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VE R MO NT ’S INDE PEN DENT VO IC E DECEMBER 02-09, 2015 VOL.21 NO.13 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Vermonters explore new ways to keep Parkinson’s disease at bay BY K E N P IC AR D | PAGE 3 2

USE OITRLOSE IT DEAD TIME BLUES

PAGE 14

VT inmates down on Michigan

‘PRO-LIFE’ KILLING

PAGE 28

Judith Levine on who’s to blame

BRADFORD’S GOT GAME

PAGE 44

Celebrating 60 years of wild dining


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW

CONCRETE BUNGLE

That’s how many Christmas trees Vermont farms harvested three years ago, according to a federal count. Conifer commerce is in full swing right now.

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SCOTT’S START

134,504

A truck overturned in the Winooski traffic circle last week, injuring the driver, spilling cement and halting traffic for about two hours. Easy does it.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) was scheduled to resume his Senate duties on Tuesday — 24 hours after the 74-yearold presidential contender had a hernia procedure. No rest?

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In his own remarks, Scott said that while Vermonters are struggling to stretch their dollars, too many elected officials want to raise taxes and spending. He pledged to “rebuild Vermont’s economic foundation.” Scott also talked of troubles that plagued Vermont’s online health exchange — something Democratic Gov. Peter Shumlin once referred to as a “nothing burger.” Scott said: “It turned out to be a big old McWhopper.” He said it was “long past time to pull the plug on Vermont Health Connect” and to use the federal exchange or partner with a state whose exchange works better. Scott faces rival Bruce Lisman, a retired Wall Street banker, in the GOP primary. Seeking the Democratic nomination are Matt Dunne, a Google employee and former state legislator, and Sue Minter, who stepped down from her post as the state transportation secretary to run. To read more about Scott’s announcement, check out Terri Hallenbeck’s Off Message blog post at sevendaysvt.com.

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epublican Lt. Gov. Phil Scott kicked off his campaign for Vermont’s top job in grand style Tuesday, speaking before hundreds of enthusiastic supporters at the Sheraton Burlington Hotel & Conference Center. His mother, Marian DuBois, introduced him in a room decorated with green and white balloons, a race car, a bike and a tractor — a nod to his pursuits, including decades of competitive stock-car racing at Thunder Road SpeedBowl. DuBois noted that she became a single mother of three young boys when Scott’s father died in 1969 of injuries he had sustained in World War II. Her son Phil “always valued independence,” she said. The room was a who’s who of Vermont GOP luminaries, including former governor Jim Douglas, who spoke on Scott’s behalf. Also on the podium was Democratic Sen. Dick Mazza of Colchester, Scott’s longtime friend and colleague, who praised the former state senator and third-term lieutenant governor. Scott, 57, co-owns DuBois Construction with a cousin.

Route 108 through Smugglers’ Notch has been closed for the season, so drivers have to take the long way around. Skiers, sledders and snowshoers — it’s all yours.

“How to Answer Your Nutty Uncle’s Questions About Bernie Sanders” by Paul Heintz and Ken Picard. Just in time for the holidays, this handy guide helps answer those inevitable questions about Vermont’s favorite socialist senator. “Nectar’s, a Burlington Landmark, at 40” by Dan Bolles. The venerable Burlington venue celebrates the big 4-0 with — what else? — live music and gravy fries. “Vermont Comedy Club Opens With a Lot of Funny People” by Sadie Williams. The first shows at Burlington’s new comedy club sold out — and there are plenty more to come. “What to Eat at Vermont Comedy Club” by Hannah Palmer Egan. The food-and-drink menu at Burlington’s new comedy club is no laughing matter. “What a Messina: Bill Sorrell’s Albuquerque Attorney” by Paul Heintz. Some question the motives behind Attorney General Bill Sorrell’s motion to add a New Mexico attorney to those representing the state in a groundwater contamination lawsuit.


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FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

CONFLICT RESOLUTION

[Re “South Burlington Residents Raise Conflict-of-Interest Concern — Again,” November 18]: There is a growing concern in South Burlington that we, and our children, will be losing our beloved neighborhood schools in order to benefit corporate development. There is clearly a conflict of interest in the city’s appointment of Art Klugo, who is director of business development at PC Construction, to the South Burlington Planning Commission and as chair of a city task force that recommended closing neighborhood schools in order to build a new, consolidated school and make way for a city center development project. It is OK for a construction professional to serve on a committee that influences city planning, but it is not OK for that individual to stand to gain “personal or financial advantage” from their work for the city. In the article, it was clearly acknowledged that PC Construction would be a potential bidder for both the proposed new elementary school and city center projects; it is unreasonable for the city to expect objective input and leadership in the planning process from a person in Klugo’s position. This is a clear conflict of interest, in my view, and the city council should recognize and correct this mistake so that we can move forward with a planning process that has transparency and community support. Otherwise, the city is supporting a merger of political and corporate power, at the

TIM NEWCOMB

expense of our children’s education and the community’s trust. Noah Hoffman

SOUTH BURLINGTON

GIVE US YOUR SYRIANS

Thank you, Gov. Peter Shumlin, for supporting Syrian refugees coming to Vermont [Off Message: “Shumlin: Vermont Will Continue to Welcome Syrian Refugees,” November 16]. As a resident of the Old North End of Burlington, where many New Americans coming to Vermont are settled, I would welcome people from Syria seeking to escape violence and build better lives for themselves. I am not the only Vermonter raised in the U.S. whose grandparents or great-grandparents came to here to escape persecution. Syrians deserve the same as our ancestors received when they came to this country! Ben Gordesky

BURLINGTON

NOT-SO-GREAT SCOTT

A week ago Republican candidate for governor Phil Scott called for a “pause” in accepting Syrian refugees [Off Message: “Matt Dunne Castigates Phil Scott over Syrian Refugee Comments,” November 19]. Now he says he’s satisfied with the process of vetting refugees [Off Message: “In Reversal, Phil Scott Backs Syrian Refugee Resettlement,” November 25]: “I think it is safe and well run and we should continue.”


Go Get It!

WEEK IN REVIEW

What changed? He says he’s learned more about the process. Oh, I see — essentially saying he didn’t know what he was talking about. So this is how he makes decisions? Is this how he would govern Vermont? Declares policy, makes pronouncements, condemns thousands of families. And then takes the time to get the facts. Cart before the horse? Perhaps he also noticed that Vermonters have reacted differently to the refugee crisis, that they have a different opinion. We welcome strangers, offer help and aid to people desperate for a home. Vermonters always have. Scott reminds me of that old “Saturday Night Live” character, Roseanne Roseannadanna, who, after a tirade caused by misunderstanding a word, says “Never mind.” Bill Kuch

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Erik Gillard

Your Cheese & Wine Place

12.02.15-12.09.15

K.C. Whiteley

In “Persistent Pipeline Protesters Are Pushing the Limits” [November 18], Terri Hallenbeck missed the mark in painting a full picture of the ongoing climate justice struggle in Vermont. Why are protesters pushing the limits? Are they just a “ragged band” of young, bristling, squirming, fidgety, cherubic-faced radicals who have lofty goals and want to annoy people? What is really at stake when it comes to climate, fracking and capitalism? The climate justice struggle is a struggle for survival. It is not just about pollution, fracking or carbon-caused global warming. Climate justice is about reestablishing ways of surviving with the Earth’s systems that aren’t dependent on exploitation and oppression. The rule of capitalism is to make profit through unfettered consumption of resources; the rule of survival is that humanity must cut back on gobbling up the planet and screwing each other over. As Naomi Kiein writes in This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate: “Only one of these sets of rules can be changed, and it’s not the laws of nature.” Rising Tide Vermont’s work to change the system is part of a long lineage of grassroots struggles whose strategies are responsible for today’s hard-won civil rights, workers’ rights, reproductive rights, etc. Martin Luther King Jr. described that strategy of civil disobedience as one that “seeks so to dramatize the issue that it can no longer be ignored.” The climate crisis can no longer be ignored, not by the state nor by the corporations the state enables. Hallenbeck could’ve scratched a little deeper.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Thanks for Terri Hallenbeck’s article on Vermont Gas’ proposed pipeline to transport fracked gas [“Persistent Pipeline Protesters Are Pushing the Limits,” November 18]. Although fracking is banned in Vermont, the Shumlin administration appears to have no qualms about importing fracked gas. The science is still evolving, but we know we need to keep about four-fifths, or 80 percent of all fossil fuels where they are, in the ground, if we hope to slow down global warming. Building an expensive fossil-fuel infrastructure is a waste of precious resources, especially if we hope to meet our goal to acquire 90 percent of our energy from renewable sources by 2050. One way to reduce dependence on fossil fuels is to tax carbon emissions. World leaders, including German Chancellor Angela Merkel and World Bank president Jim Yong Kim, have called on all countries to impose a price on carbon as the only way to effectively reduce global emissions. By levying a fee on carbon pollution, we can turn the climate crisis into economic opportunity, providing an engine for new jobs in the sustainable energy market and supporting Vermonters with a rebate to lower their energy bills. British Columbia has achieved amazing success since enacting a carbon fee and rebate policy. Since 2008, the return on this investment has given B.C. the lowest personal income-tax rate in all of Canada, and its fossil-fuel use has dropped by 16 percent. In Vermont, a carbon-pollution tax can help protect our environment and support a strong local economy.

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

DECEMBER 02-09, 2015 VOL.21 NO.13

Vermont Inmates Pine for Their Old Kentucky Prison

ARTS NEWS 22

BY MARK DAVIS

16

New Drugs Offer Vermonters Hope — for a Price

BY MARGOT HARRISON

22

BY NANCY REMSEN

18

The Y and What For: A Tale of Two Rehab Projects BY MOLLY WALSH

20

Excerpts From Off Message

The Demise of Burlington’s Ashgate Publishing Inspires Widespread Concern — and a Petition Vermont Artists Go ‘Mammoth’ at the Miami Art Fair

30

Coffee and Cinema: An Offbeat Film Series Begins in Burlington

BY SADIE WILLIAMS

32

36

Verses From the Barn

BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

38

VIDEO SERIES

Health: Dancing, boxing, miming: Vermonters explore new ways to keep Parkinson’s disease at bay

Books: The Academy of Hay, Julia Shipley

The Art of Politics

Art: Longtime Sanders supporters fondly revisit his early campaign posters BY NANCY REMSEN

41

Damascus Dreams

Books: In a new book of photographs, Vermonter Deborah Harte Felmeth depicts her other home: Syria BY ETHAN DE SEIFE

44

End Game

Food+drink: As urban game dinners come into vogue, Bradford celebrates its 60th

Underwritten by:

Stuck in Vermont: Burlington's new $1 million waterfront skatepark is an oasis for skaters and BMX riders. Maven skate shop owners Trina Zide and Brendan Foster have been organizing community support for the project since 2009.

Grup Anwar brings Arabic sounds to Burlington BY DA N BO L L ES

Music: Vermont native Caitlin Canty on touring, her guitar and her new record BY DAN BOLLES

COLUMNS + REVIEWS 12 26 28 45 71 75 80 88 97

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Calendar Classes Music Art Movies

COVER IMAGES MATTHEW THORSEN/ OLIVER PARINI COVER DESIGN BROOKE BOUSQUET

vehicles housing services homeworks buy this stuff music fsbo art legals calcoku/sudoku crossword support groups puzzle answers jobs

BY KEN PICAR D | PAGE 32

USE OITRLOSE IT DEAD TIME BLUES

‘PRO-LIFE’ KILLING

PAGE 14

VT inmates down on Michigan

PAGE 28

Judith Levine on who’s to blame

BRADFORD’S GOT GAME

HINDSIGHT two decades of Seven Days G

IN

ALL

Y PU BL

June 20

PAGE 44

Celebrating 60 years of wild dining

IS

SEVEN DAYS

2012

CONTENTS 9

READ MORE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/2020.

Vermonters explore new ways to keep Parkinson’s disease at bay

D

and the word is a fitting description of Agha’s general demeanor. He’s quietly reluctant to speak on the current political and social strife in his native Syria, but he brightens up as he muses on the unifying power of music. “I have Jewish friends, Christians, Muslims,” he says. “I love people, and I love coming together over music. So I don’t like to talk about politics. Only music.” He also beams when he talks about his adopted state. “I love the people of Vermont,” Agha enthuses. “They are always smiling. They are so welcoming.”

C-2 C-2 C-2 C-3 C-3 C-3 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-4 C-5 C-5 C-7 C-8

HE

Grup Anwar, or, more formally, Anwar Ensemble, is a new group led by Anwar Diab Agha. The 72-year-old is a master oud and violin player and a famed musician and composer in his native Syria. Before moving to the United States permanently in 2008 to be closer to his children — who had immigrated here over the previous couple of decades — Agha was a member of the Syria National Radio and Television Orchestra in Damascus. He studied under the masters of traditional Arabic music, and has traveled the world as a highly respected Arabic master himself. Anwar means luminous in Arabic,

CLASSIFIEDS

Fair Game POLITICS WTF CULTURE Poli Psy OPINION Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Art Review Movie Reviews Ask Athena SEX

SECTIONS 11 21 52 66 70 80 88

27 91 92 92 92 92 93 93 94 94 94 94 95 96

12.02.15-12.09.15

Light Show

The Young and the Reckless

straight dope movie extras children of the atom edie everette lulu eightball sticks angelica bliss jen sorensen red meat deep dark fears this modern world kaz free will astrology personals

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY HANNAH PALMER EGAN

FUN STUFF

BY SUZANNE PODHAIZER

70

Use It or Lose It

Flavors Without Borders

Food+drink: Holiday shopping for food — and food lovers — in Montréal

BY KEN PICARD

BY ETHAN DE SEIFE

BY SEVEN DAYS STAFF

Something Old, Something New

Shopping: LocalStore: Rackk & Ruin

BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES

25

48

FEATURES

I

14

48

OR

NEWS

41

V E RM ONT’S I NDE PE NDENT V OI C E DECEMBER 02-09, 2015 VOL.21 NO.13 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

38

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Happy Holidays from our family to yours!

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SATURDAY 5 & SUNDAY 6

Straight Outta Whoville He’s as cuddly as a cactus, as charming as an eel and, this weekend, Dr. Seuss’ curmudgeonly character comes face-to-face with fans young and old at Meet the Grinch! Festive families flock to all three Phoenix Books locations to snap photos with the mean, green Grinch himself. Bring a nonperishable food donation — your heart just may grow three sizes. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 59

SATURDAY 5

UNDENIABLE DIVA

Bettye LaVette released her first single, “My Man — He’s a Lovin’ Man,” in 1962 at the age of 16, kicking off a career that has spanned half a century and counting. At An Evening With Bettye LaVette, the Grammy Award-nominated songstress serves up sizzling soul, blues and R&B selections from the Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center stage. Sing it, Bettye! SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 60

SATURDAY 5

Photographic Memories Named the “land of the wild onion” by the Abenakis, Winooski boasts a long and rich history. With input from the Winooski Historical Society, Al Blondin and Anastasia Pratt have chronicled the riverside city’s past through pictures in their book Winooski (Images of America). The pair peels back the layers of the Onion City at the Eloquent Page in St. Albans. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 61

FRIDAY 4 & SATURDAY 5

Life Is a Cabaret Songs can be the best storytellers. Case in point: the Singer’s Art Concert Series cabaret Sentiments & Suitcases. Featuring vocalist Taryn Noelle, her trio the Blue Gardenias and pianist Tom Cleary, the show tells the story of a young woman searching for a sense of self, love, family and home through original music and wellknown numbers by Joni Mitchell and Andrew Lloyd Webber. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 58

Natural Wonders

SEE ART REVIEW ON PAGE 80

MONDAY 7

Grape Escape

THURSDAY 3

Music and Lyrics

SEE INTERVIEW ON PAGE 70

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 64 COURTESY OF SPRUCE PEAK PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

MAGNIFICENT SEVEN 11

Singer-songwriter Caitlin Canty commands attention with what the San Francisco Chronicle calls her “casually devastating voice and unshakable poise.” Brimming with husky vocals and notes picked on a vintage Recording King guitar, Canty’s 2015 album, Reckless Skyline, runs the gamut of American styles — think country, rock, blues and folk. Hear the Vermont native at ArtsRiot when she opens for producer Jeffrey Foucault.

SEVEN DAYS

Oenophiles combine their love for vino with the spirit of giving at Uncorked for a Cause, a Pride Center of Vermont Wine Auction. Each participant trades one bottled beverage for the chance to bid on reds, whites and Champagnes to benefit the center. Treats from Velvet Catering and tunes by Dayve Huckett round out the revelry.

12.02.15-12.09.15

From a pristine field soaked in sunshine to a gnarled tree clinging to a cliffside, artist Gabriel Tempesta’s images capture elements of the natural world with striking detail. Tempesta employs charcoal, casein and watercolor to re-create scenes captured on his camera in the exhibit “Our World, Charcoals & Casein,” captivating art hounds and nature lovers alike.

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POLITICS

Gun Shy

hen a gunman opened fire last week on a Planned Parenthood facility in Colorado Springs, he reignited two of America’s most combustible political issues: abortion and guns. Here in Vermont, some 2,000 miles away, those issues play differently than in much of the country: All four candidates seeking to succeed Gov. PETER SHUMLIN favor abortion rights — and both the Democratic and Republican gubernatorial fields are divided on new gun laws. While many national Republicans spent the summer urging the federal government and the states to defund Planned Parenthood, Vermont’s top GOP officeholder toured Planned Parenthood of Northern New England’s Burlington Health Center on St. Paul Street. “We just sat down and talked about what they do, how they help and the essential services they provide,” recalls Lt. Gov. PHIL SCOTT, who is seeking the Republican nomination for governor. “I don’t think we should be spending our time defunding Planned Parenthood. They do really good work for a lot of people in need.” Like all three of his opponents, Scott says he’s outraged by the Colorado Springs massacre, which killed three and injured nine. He refers to it as “an act of some sort of domestic terrorism committed by someone with severe mental health issues.” But Scott says it and other recent mass shootings, from South Carolina to Vermont, have not changed his views about his home state’s gun laws, which are frequently described as the most permissive in the nation. “No, I still support the Second Amendment, and I don’t believe we need to change our gun laws in Vermont,” the Berlin Republican says. “But I do think that we need to continue to identify and try to help those with severe mental health issues.” Sharing that view is a Democratic rival: former senator MATT DUNNE. “I think there is a gun-violence problem in our country and there is a violence problem in our country,” the Hartland resident says. “But if you look at some of the specific laws that have been proposed, they wouldn’t have actually prevented this particular likely act of terrorism from happening.” For that reason, Dunne says, he opposes extending mandatory criminal background checks to those who purchase firearms at gun shows or through private sales — and he opposes banning semiautomatic weapons or high-capacity ammunition. “I’m focused on things that will actually address the issues we’re confronting today,” he says.

12/1/15 1:37 PM

OPEN SEASON ON VERMONT POLITICS BY PAUL HEINTZ

To Dunne, that means “standing up for programs like Planned Parenthood” and “pushing back on people who assert that this kind of action might be OK.” Such people were among the more than 100 who commented on a Facebook post he wrote Saturday morning expressing solidarity with Planned Parenthood. Dunne says he was “quite disturbed” that some of the commenters “suggested that these shootings were justified.” Dunne’s opposition to new gun laws is in keeping with some prominent Vermont Democrats, such as Shumlin. But it diverges from the positions currently held by Sen. PATRICK LEAHY (D-Vt.), Sen. BERNIE SANDERS (I-Vt.) and Congressman PETER WELCH (DVt.) — not to mention public opinion. The Castleton Polling Institute has consistently found that Vermonters support closing the so-called gun show loophole. Last February, a poll it conducted for VTDigger.org found that 77 percent of Vermonters and a whopping 93 percent of Democrats favor universal background checks.

THE DEMOCRATIC AND REPUBLICAN GUBERNATORIAL FIELDS ARE

DIVIDED ON NEW GUN LAWS. Dunne’s Democratic rival, former transportation secretary SUE MINTER, sides with the masses. “I believe we need to address gun violence prevention, and we need to do what we can to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous felons,” the Waterbury resident says. “And, for me, that includes closing the loophole for background checks.” While Minter emphasizes that she “respect[s] the Second Amendment,” she says she was “very shaken” by the August shooting deaths of three family members in Berlin and a state social worker in Barre, all allegedly perpetrated by the same woman. Clear as she is about background checks, Minter declined three times to say whether she supports banning automatic weapons or high-capacity ammunition. Minter is joined in her support for new gun laws by an unexpected ally: retired Wall Street banker BRUCE LISMAN, who has mostly staked out positions to the right of Scott’s in his bid for the Republican gubernatorial nomination.

Lisman argues that anyone buying a gun should undergo a background check in order to keep firearms out of the hands of “those who have been adjudicated mentally unbalanced or unfit” and “those who are not allowed to fly.” The Shelburne Republican says he’d prefer the federal government take the lead on such legislation, but he would not oppose a state effort to close the loophole. “There’s nothing wrong with a healthy, informed debate about the issue, which has not taken place at the state or national level,” Lisman says. Seems like that’s about to change.

‘Must-Win’? Speaking Sunday at the New Hampshire Democratic Party’s annual JeffersonJackson dinner in Manchester, Sen. Sanders pledged to “pull off one of the greatest political upsets in the history of our country.” But can he, really? Since mid-October, when Vice President JOE BIDEN announced he wouldn’t join the presidential race and former secretary of state HILLARY CLINTON outperformed expectations at a Las Vegas debate and a high-stakes congressional hearing, Sanders’ momentum has seemed to slow. In most national polls, he’s struggled to get within 25 percentage points of Clinton. In New Hampshire, where Sanders led in August and September, Clinton has evened things out. And in Iowa, Clinton has maintained a steady lead. Meanwhile, Clinton has continued to lock up establishment endorsements — and corresponding superdelegate votes: On Sunday and Monday, she held three events in three cities to trumpet support from Boston Mayor MARTY WALSH, seven New Hampshire mayors and 13 of the 14 women serving in the U.S. Senate. (ELIZABETH WARREN, the progressive darling from Massachusetts, was the lone holdout.) After adopting several Sanders positions on trade and energy policy, Clinton appears to be pivoting back to the center with an eye to the general election. Speaking Sunday in Boston, she again criticized Sanders’ single-payer health care plan — not exactly a way to appeal to the base — saying, “I’m the only Democratic candidate in this race who will pledge to raise your incomes, not your taxes.” But lest you think the race is over, University of New Hampshire political scientist ANDREW SMITH says: Hold on! “Two months is a lifetime in a primary,” the UNH Survey Center director says. “Speaking as a pollster, polls don’t mean


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Soon thereafter, Weaver appeared to be back on message. “The truth is, campaigns are a long haul — and we’re in it for the long haul,” he said. “There is no make or break.”

Media Notes

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FAIR GAME 13

While gubernatorial candidate Minter is generating headlines, her family members are more likely to be writing them. Minter’s husband, DAVID GOODMAN, is a well-known freelance journalist whose subject matter ranges from progressive politics to backcountry skiing. Her sister-in-law, AMY GOODMAN, has hosted the nationally syndicated radio and television show “Democracy Now!” for nearly two decades. Even her 15-yearold son, JASPER GOODMAN, has served as a sports commentator on WDEV Radio since he was 10. He regularly appears on WCAX-TV and pens a column for the Barre-Montpelier Times Argus. So who’s the best source for the inside scoop on the press? “Definitely my son,” Minter says. Not that she needs it. According to her husband, “Sue really is very experienced in dealing with the media. It’s always been a really important part of her job.” David Goodman says he doesn’t have “any formal role” in Minter’s campaign, though he concedes that the topic occasionally comes up at dinner. “Our family has always enjoyed talking politics, so it isn’t any different than that,” he says. “We’re all engaged and interested.” Unlike many journalists, Goodman recieves his paycheck from an advocacy group that lobbies state lawmakers: Vermont Businesses for Social Responsibility. The left-leaning organization finances Goodman’s weekly WDEV radio show, “The Vermont Conversation,” paying the host and the station, and it rounds up other sponsorships, according to VBSR lobbyist DANIEL BARLOW. While Barlow says VBSR “occasionally suggest[s] topics,” Goodman has full editorial control over the show, which often includes state policymakers but rarely focuses on electoral politics. Goodman notes that he led a “hardhitting” conversation about last year’s FairPoint Communications strike, even though the company was underwriting the show at the time. Goodman says he doesn’t think his work conflicts with Minter’s, “since I am not involved in VBSR lobbying and the show is editorially independent from them.” But he says he would likely reevaluate the situation if his wife wins the race. Minter concurs. “If I’m elected governor, I think a lot will change in terms of the work my husband’s able to do as a journalist,” she says. m

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

much. Frankly, voters aren’t paying any attention to the race yet, and they won’t be until the last few weeks.” According to historical exit polls, 35 to 45 percent of New Hampshire voters make up their minds in the last three days of a campaign, Smith notes, while 15 to 20 percent do so on Election Day itself. That’s a good thing for Sanders, says BEN TULCHIN, the candidate’s pollster. “Hillary’s been in the public eye for 25 years,” he says. “Here’s a guy who’s trying to play catch-up, and he’s doing remarkably well.” Former New Hampshire Democratic Party chair KATHY SULLIVAN expects her state’s February 9 primary to be a close one. But the longtime Clinton supporter thinks her candidate has the edge, in part because her campaign is being run by some of the best operatives in the state. “They have a plan,” she says. “They stick to the plan and just carry it through.” But Sanders supporter BURT COHEN, a former state senator from New Castle, thinks Clinton suffers from an “enthusiasm gap.” (Smith calls her an “eatyour-vegetables candidate.”) “People trust Bernie,” Cohen says. “They know he’s for real.” A recent Quinnipiac University Poll of Iowa, which holds its caucuses February 1, shows a similar dynamic in the Hawkeye State. Asked who is “honest and trustworthy,” cares about their “needs and problems” and shares their values, more Iowa Democrats said Sanders than Clinton. But she’s leading him among likely caucus-goers, 51 to 41 percent. “I think what drives a lot of this is that Secretary Clinton is viewed as the more likely candidate to actually win the presidency than is Sen. Sanders,” explains Quinnipiac assistant director PETER BROWN. Among the biggest threats facing Sanders is one his own campaign created: public expectations it may struggle to meet. Early last month, his New Hampshire state director, JULIA BARNES, told Bloomberg that hers was a “mustwin” state for Sanders. The next week, campaign manager JEFF WEAVER reinforced the sentiment, telling Seven Days, “I think New Hampshire is pretty much a mustwin, but I think if you come very close in Iowa, I think that’s as good as a win.” A week after that, senior strategist TAD DEVINE tried to walk those comments back and better manage expectations. “Obviously we have to do very, very well, beginning in Iowa and New Hampshire,” he told Seven Days. “I don’t think we have to win any single state to win the nomination of the Democratic Party.” Devine warned that it was dangerous to buy in to such an argument, because the Clinton campaign would only “keep moving the goalposts on this down the field” — in Nevada, then South Carolina and so on.

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LOCALmatters

Vermont Inmates Pine for Their Old Kentucky Prison B Y M A R K D AV I S

“North Lake feels a lot more like ‘dead time’ than CCA,” said inmate Shaun Bryer, a former Morrisville teacher and selectboard member convicted in 2011 of sexually assaulting former students. “What you have are guys who used to occupy themselves for hours a day with nothing to do … Time seems to go slower, and little problems seem bigger.”

MICHAEL TONN

14 LOCAL MATTERS

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I

n June, the Vermont Department of Corrections ended its controversial 11-year relationship with the Corrections Corporation of America and started a new one with a rival private prison company, the GEO Group. As a result, 350 Vermont inmates were transferred from a CCA prison in Kentucky to a GEO facility in Michigan. Five months later, inmates and the officials who advocate for them say they were better off in Kentucky. They claim the transition to the North Lake Correctional Facility in Baldwin, Mich., has been rife with problems. Inmates accustomed to the open dorm-style living in Kentucky are now stuck in Michigan in windowless cells and allowed little freedom of movement. They no longer have access to many of the jobs, classes and activities that helped them pass the time — and stay out of trouble — in Kentucky. To learn about life in the GEO prison, Seven Days exchanged emails with several inmates. A new system now gives prisoners in both Michigan and Vermont an alternative to calling “collect”: digital means to communicate with the outside world — for 40 cents per email. Inmates who engaged with Seven Days described a chaotic transition during which rules were unclear and GEO seemed ill prepared to host them. North Lake, which had been mothballed for several years, received them just two months after GEO announced the two-year, $30 million contract with Vermont and began hiring new guards. In fact, the Vermonters are the only inmates in the 1,740-bed prison, which is about three hours northwest of Detroit. “The underlying theme is that we have been treated like guinea pigs,” wrote inmate Victor Hall, who was convicted of aggravated sexual assault. The GEO facility, he wrote, “wasn’t ready for us at all, and these five months later they are still patching holes in the boat. When we got to Michigan, nobody knew anything about how this place should operate, including the staff.” Some of the wrinkles have been smoothed out, inmates say. GEO hired a dentist, set commissary prices, and resolved the laundry and toilet paper delivery schedule. But inmates and their allies fear some problems may be intractable. One of the biggest complaints: There is a scarcity of jobs that could help prisoners pass the time and earn a small amount of money, around 50 cents a day, to buy personal items at the commissary.

In Kentucky, every inmate who wanted a job had one. In Michigan, even though the Vermont inmate population has plummeted to 240 — something state officials say is partly the result of prison diversion programs — there aren’t nearly enough jobs to go around. Programs have been affected, too. In Kentucky, many inmates spent several hours a day making elaborate craft projects — ranging from jewelry boxes to small pieces of furniture — using Popsicle sticks and glue. DOC officials told inmates the program would continue in Michigan. Instead, guards there deemed the materials contraband and confiscated them. The warden rejected pleas to restore the program, according to several inmates. In Kentucky, some prisoners took advantage of a canine-training program. They spent six to eight weeks teaching obedience to shelter dogs that were in danger of being euthanized as a result of behavioral problems. There’s no such program in Michigan. “We’re put in storage, and with nothing positive to fill our time, we are left with two choices: Do nothing or do wrong things,” Hall said. “There isn’t enough offered here to make good use of the massive time we have to spend here. Many, many men here do nothing. They waste and rot, largely for nothing.” It’s been more than 20 years since the Vermont DOC had enough room to accommodate its prisoner population. When the 1,600 beds in seven facilities are all occupied, the state relies on private companies to step in. Generally, inmates with longer sentences get sent out of state, where non-Vermonters are responsible for their mental health and safety. The prisoners’ primary advocate in Vermont said he is concerned that security at North Lake is weaker than it was in Kentucky, and a few fights have already broken out. “There is the potential for a lot more trouble,” said Seth Lipschutz, supervising attorney for the Vermont Prisoners’ Rights Office. “My sense is that this place is somewhat less safe than Kentucky.” Inmates live in four wings. At the center is a small hub that is usually staffed by just one guard, Lipschutz said. Other guards walk through the wings and check on the inmates infrequently. There have been instances of inmates being bullied into paying “rent” to other inmates for the privilege of living in their assigned cells, Lipschutz said. “One of the main problems that concerns me is the potential — and incidents I’ve heard about — for inmate-on-inmate violence and the strong preying on the weak.”


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LOCAL MATTERS 15

Kaseen Smith said he prefers Michigan to Kentucky. GEO staffers, he said, have treated inmates fairly. He attributed any shortcomings to the Vermont DOC, which he claimed cares little about its out-of-state inmates. “These people here at GEO make a valid effort to meet our needs,� said Smith, who was convicted of aggravated domestic assault. “They do what they can.� Though they have just begun to settle in, some inmates are now worried that they could soon be forced to relocate again and go through another uncomfortable transition. A few told Seven Days that wardens and guards have said that North Lake is in danger of closing if it doesn’t get more prisoners. GEO announced in May that up to 1,000 inmates from the State of Washington were coming to North Lake. But the Washington inmates never arrived. The Washington DOC has since said it will only use Michigan as a fallback, and it has no immediate plans to send inmates there. Lipschutz said that guards at the Michigan prison had asked him whether Vermont could send more inmates, to keep the prison economically viable. Menard said she was unaware of any possible change in GEO’s plans for North Lake, and, HAL L while the state would like to reduce its inmate population so it can cut all ties with the private prison industry, that isn’t likely to happen anytime soon. “What’s frustrating,� she said, “is that we’re doing prisoners out of state at all.� Meantime, inmates in Michigan say their time spent there does little to prepare them for life on the outside. In Kentucky, Bryer taught a basic adult education class to help inmates obtain their GEDs. His class was usually full. Over the years, he said, more than 800 Vermonters obtained their high school equivalencies through the program. Now, there are no classes to teach. Bryer spends some of his abundant free time lobbying GEO officials for more programs. He asked: “Isn’t the goal of corrections to correct?� m

SEVEN DAYS

Vermont inmates contacted by Seven Days did not, however, express any significant security concerns. Nor were they immune from violence in CCA prisons. Last year, Vermont inmates rioted in a CCA prison in Arizona, where the company used to house a small number of Vermonters who had disciplinary problems in Kentucky. In 2004, inmates rioted inside the Kentucky prison. DOC Commissioner Lisa Menard, who was appointed to her position in September, said in an interview that her agency is pleased with GEO’s work and described the switch as a “smooth transition� with normal “growing pains.� “You’re taking people who don’t have any control over where we’re moving them,� Menard said. “They didn’t choose Kentucky. But they were comfortable. They established their routine, and we moved them. Like anybody, they want their routine back.� Menard confirmed that some fights had occurred in Michigan, but nothing out of the ordinary. She said no one had been seriously injured. GEO, a publicly traded company based in Florida that owns more than 100 prisons worldwide, did not respond to a request for VICT OR comment by press time. Menard said GEO was not contractually obligated to provide inmates jobs or crafts programs but that the DOC is working with the company to create more work opportunities. GEO has discretion in the classes and activities it offers, she said. “I’ve definitely heard the same complaints, and we continue to look at them,� Menard said. “Their concerns are not falling on deaf ears.� Compounding inmates’ frustration is a grim routine. Outdoor time is limited to an hour or two a day, when it’s offered at all. In Kentucky, by contrast, inmates could roam between various wings and go outside largely unfettered, as long as they behaved. In Kentucky, the cells had windows. In Michigan, they don’t. “When your world closes in on you, little things become much more important in a way we in the public don’t understand,� Lipschutz said. Not all inmates fault GEO.

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11/17/15 6:36 PM


LOCALmatters

New Drugs Offer Vermonters Hope — for a Price S T ORY AN D PH OT OS BY N AN C Y RE M S E N

B

ridget Huguenin was 13 when she was diagnosed with cystic fibrosis. At the time, people afflicted with the disease weren’t expected to live beyond their twenties. Now 45, she looks younger than her age in a miniskirt, sweater, tights and boots. “I have my life, and cystic fibrosis is something I have to deal with,” said Huguenin, who works three and a half days a week at the St. Albans Free Library and the other two days at a dental office. Cystic fibrosis, caused by a genetic mutation, produces a buildup of thick mucus in the lungs and pancreas, making sufferers susceptible to pulmonary infections and other diseases. Although she shows no overt signs of someone with a chronic disease, Huguenin admitted that her breathing capacity has decreased in recent years, and her purse is full of prescriptions to manage her deteriorating condition. Among them is Orkambi, a breakthrough cystic fibrosis medication developed by Vertex Pharmaceuticals of Boston. The federal Food and Drug Administration approved it on July 2, and Huguenin started taking it soon thereafter in hopes of extending her life. The new drug’s price, however, is breathtaking. The cost of her daily, four-pill dosage is more than $700. The total cost for a year: $259,000. Huguenin expects to take Orkambi until something better comes along. Huguenin’s drug expenses are covered under Medicaid, the government health insurance program. “If I had to pay a copay or deductible, it would be thousands and thousands of dollars,” she said — an expense she can’t afford. Under Medicaid, she pays $3 per prescription, which covers a month’s worth of medication. Such expensive drugs are exploding the cost of Vermont’s public health programs. In a report to the legislature’s Health Reform Oversight Committee in October, the Department of Health said new specialty drugs now account for 16 percent of all pharmaceutical spending — up from 9 percent two years ago. The Medicaid program is required to cover expensive specialty drugs such as Orkambi, according to Nancy Hogue,

would improve lives and save money on hospitalizations. Twice a year, patients such as Huguenin go in for “a cleanout,” as she puts it, that involves up to two weeks of therapy to loosen the thick mucus that clogs her lungs. The cost of such hospital stays ranges from “$60,000 into the hundreds of thousands,” according to Lahiri. He said Orkambi has the potential to reduce hospital visits for the 30 to 40 percent of patients who benefit from the drug.

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HEALTH

CYSTIC FIBROSIS IS SOMETHING I HAVE TO DEAL WITH. B R I D G E T H U G U E NI N

Bridget Huguenin

pharmacy director at the Department of Vermont Health Access. “But that doesn’t mean we can’t place utilization limits,” she said. For example, the state may require doctors to get prior approval or restrict how long a drug may be used without renewed authorization. Hogue noted, “Cost comes into play when there are multiple options.” Orkambi was tested only in patients who were age 12 or older, so the FDA didn’t approve it for use in young children. Vermont Medicaid officials proposed limiting its availability further — to the sickest individuals as determined by a test that compares how forcibly a patient blows out air. A prominent doctor challenged that recommendation at a recent

meeting of Vermont’s drug utilization review board, which meets every six weeks to review new drugs and revise treatment guidelines for the hundreds of medications covered by Medicaid. In September, Orkambi came before the group of five doctors, five pharmacists and a nurse practitioner that decides whether medications should be “preferred” in Vermont. Dr. Thomas Lahiri, director of the cystic fibrosis center at the University of Vermont Medical Center, attended the meeting along with the parent of a child with cystic fibrosis to argue against restricting Orkambi to the sickest patients. “If you can act early and get things corrected before it causes damage,” Lahiri predicted, the drug

In response to Lahiri’s arguments, the board agreed to expand its eligibility criteria, making it available to an estimated 39 Vermonters. State officials predict Orkambi will cause a significant spike in Vermont’s Medicaid spending — $5 million in the current budget year and $8 million next year, when it will be available for a full 12 months. Federal funds cover about 55 percent of those costs, but the state is on the hook for $2.2 million and $3.6 million respectively, at a time when tax revenues remain flat. This isn’t the first time a new drug has bumped pharmacy expenditures for Medicaid. The program paid $5.8 million last year to provide 70 individuals with Harvoni, a recently developed drug that can cure hepatitis C. The disease infects the liver and may eventually result in scarring or cancer. Many people go years without knowing they are infected. Harvoni received FDA approval in October 2014, and it’s now the drug on which Medicaid spends the most in Vermont. Until 2011, the treatment was primarily interferon, a protein injected to retard reproduction of the hepatitis virus. Dr. Doris Strader, who runs a liver clinic at UVMMC, said it didn’t work for everyone and had nasty side effects, including nausea and depression. “Now


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Orkambi

medication is likely to treat Alzheimer’s. He said the FDA has fast-tracked the approval process of a drug that not only seems to slow the disease’s progress, but may even reverse some effects. It could be available by 2018. For a drug that promises to attack such a ravaging disease, Murphy asks, “What price are people willing to pay?”

Plenty, apparently. Drug manufacturers defend the high cost of medications, citing the expenses associated with research and clinical trials and the need to educate doctors and patients through advertising. Critics — notably Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) — charge that the big drug companies spend more on lobbying and marketing

than on research and development. The American Medical Association, which voted two weeks ago to recommend a ban on drug advertising, reported that drug manufacturers spend nearly $5 billion on marketing, up 30 percent from two years ago. In September, Sanders, a Democratic presidential candidate, introduced a bill that would allow Medicare to negotiate better prices for drugs, allow for importation of cheaper Canadian drugs and ban drug companies with a brandname medication from paying other companies to delay making a lower-cost generic version. Huguenin said she used to worry about the cost of her drugs, even though state programs have sheltered her from their enormous expense. She said her doctor had to persuade her to start using one pricey inhaled medication. She participated in the clinical trial of another. Although she takes a half dozen other meds, Huguenin views astronomically priced Orkambi as her ticket to a future. “I have been waiting, waiting, because my lung function has been going down,” she said. She wants to avoid becoming so sick that she needs an expensive lung transplant — the next course of treatment. “I don’t want to get rid of my lungs. They have worked really hard for me for a really long time.” m Contact: nancy@sevendaysvt.com

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

we have a treatment that can possibly cure it, but a majority of patients can’t afford the $85,000 cost,” she said of those who are not covered by government programs. The price of new drugs doesn’t just make the state’s Medicaid program more expensive. It drives up health care costs for private insurance companies, too. Brian Murphy, pharmacy director at Blue Cross Blue Shield of Vermont, said drugs have typically accounted for 15 percent of total health care expenses, “but because of the growth of specialty drugs, that cost has begun growing.” The high cost of newer drugs used to be offset by the savings from generic drugs, Murphy added, but now the growth in new generics has slowed. Like the state, Blue Cross establishes rules to ensure that drugs are prescribed appropriately and to influence prescribing practices when cost is a factor. In the case of hepatitis C drugs, Blue Cross has made Viekira, approved after Harvoni, the preferred drug. It costs half as much as Harvoni, according to Murphy. A patient takes five pills a day, compared to one Harvoni daily, during the same threemonth course of treatment. But in the case of Orkambi, “There really isn’t another option,” Murphy said. Blue Cross covers the cost of Orkambi for six Vermonters with cystic fibrosis. More specialty drugs are on the way. Murphy said the next breakthrough

12.02.15-12.09.15 SEVEN DAYS LOCAL MATTERS 17

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LOCALmatters

The Y and What For: A Tale of Two Rehab Projects B Y M O LLY WA LSH

SEVENDAYSVT.COM 12.02.15-12.09.15 SEVEN DAYS 18 LOCAL MATTERS

DEVELOPMENT

PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

S

trolling down the narrow hallways on the upper floors of the Greater Burlington YMCA, president and CEO Mary Burns explained that the cramped offices on either side were once used as lodging for “young men of good moral character” and later as dorms for GIs. Now they could become luxury suites in a boutique hotel, student apartments or condominiums. Those are some of the uses under consideration as prospective buyers tour the 1934 building that went up for sale in August for $3.75 million. Since then, realtor and listing agent Yves Bradley has shown the property to at least half a dozen potential buyers. “They love it,” he said. “If you look at it, it’s a fantastic spot. It’s very convenient to downtown without being right in it.” The old brick building at the corner of South Union and College is two blocks from Church Street. Both local and out-of-state developers have toured the facility, Bradley said, including prospective owners who want “a presence in Vermont and, more specifically, in the Burlington market for a boutique hotel,” he added. Although no local colleges or commercial office brokers have yet expressed interest, at least one private developer has looked at the Y with the idea of leasing directly to students. But no sale is imminent — the building is not under contract — and redevelopment is likely several years away. The timing will have to work for the Y, which is moving half a block up College Street to a site that is occupied by the former Ethan Allen Club. Soon after the Y’s purchase of the new site went through in August, Burns announced that she will leave at the end of the year to take a job at a YMCA in Pennsylvania. The Y paid $2.5 million for its new home, using funds raised to renovate its old one. Burns said a capital campaign is under way to raze the nondescript 1972 social club, most recently owned by Champlain College. The goal is to construct a new YMCA where members won’t have to negotiate the 400 steps at the current Y or run 25 laps to hit a mile on its tiny indoor track. Plans also call for a new pool, more room for childcare and preschool programs, as well as a gathering space for seniors and other community members. As ideas begin to gel for the nextgeneration Y, the future life of the current one is up in the air. A full teardown of the Greek Revival building is unlikely,

because the original portion of it is listed on the state historic register. However, parts of the mazelike structure could meet the wrecking ball: the north end of the building, which includes a 1984 addition containing the Y’s lap pool; and the east wing of the original structure running along South Union, which houses the gym and a second, smaller pool. Bradley is pitching the property with those alterations in mind. The current pools “have to go,” according to Bradley, to make room for a new addition with a parking garage below or alongside it — the current 12 spots just aren’t enough for any imaginable new use, he said. Whether it’s a hotel or apartments, Bradley said there would have to be at least 65 units to make the redevelopment cost-effective. Uncertainty about which changes would win city permits creates “lots of question marks” about the property, Bradley conceded. But he’s clear on one thing: “That building is not coming down.” He said a full-scale demolition of the edifice would never get past the city’s preservation-conscious development review board. “If anybody has asked about it, I’ve told them that would be a nonstarter. “There’s just no way. It’s listed; it’s historically very significant. No way.” His prediction: As the Burlington area grows and space downtown becomes harder to come by, creative “infill” redevelopment is going to become more common and attract developers who can handle it. Describing the Y as “a complicated site,” he said, “It’s a great opportunity, but it’s not for the fainthearted. It’s one that people really need to think through how it’s going to work before they can take a run at it.” When it was erected during the Great Depression, Burlington’s YMCA was a source of local pride. Community members managed to raise $270,000 in hard times to construct the building after its forerunner at 129 Church Street was destroyed by fire in 1928. The description of the building in the state historic register notes its bricked-in windows with marble sills, gabled wings and dormers, and Georgian massing. Inside, though, it’s a confusing labyrinth of dungeon-like workout spaces; crowded preschool classrooms; old, dented lockers; and hallways overflowing with exercise props — stationary bikes, yoga mats and blocks, and big rubber balls. Other than the black-and-white photos of the Y’s Camp Abnaki, little about the place feels “historic” in the positive sense of the term.


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The building has no elevator and, except for a back-door ramp leading to the lap pool, no handicap access. Dressed in a smart skirt and jacket, Burns seemed embarrassed as she pointed out this glaring deficiency in a facility committed to welcoming people of all abilities. “It just turns our stomach, makes us sick,” she said. It isn’t just people with disabilities who can’t navigate the full building. Burns said some older Y members have had to quit coming to the facility because they can no longer handle all the stairs, which

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technically travel over 10 different levels from the roofline to the lowest part of the basement. Why hasn’t the organization found a way to install an elevator? “Cost,” according to Doug Bishop, the Y’s director of communications, “and the board’s goal to find a new facility.” Fixing other problems would also require major investments. The roof leaks, and the heating and ventilating system needs an overhaul. Yet many of the Y’s members remain loyal, despite the fact that they may be doing crunches on a mat in the Y’s old bowling alley, dragging plastic platforms to the basketball court for step class or swimming in windowless rooms.

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When the place opens at 5 a.m., “some of them are already waiting at the door to get in,” Burns said. The Y closes on weekdays at 10 p.m. The Y has been searching for new digs since Burns started working there as an office assistant in the 1980s. The institution considered moving to the suburbs, the Burlington waterfront and neighboring Memorial Auditorium — and did establish a satellite facility in Winooski. But a new HQ never materialized. The Ethan Allen Club was long seen as a possibility. In 2008, the Y tried to buy it but lost out to the higher-bidding Champlain College. Champlain had planned to build student housing on the site, but opposition from neighbors and other factors led to the sale earlier this year. “Silent fundraising” for the new Y has started, Burns said, but it’ll be up to her successor to launch and oversee the impending capital campaign. Former South Burlington City Council chair Pam Mackenzie is taking over as interim director when Burns says goodbye to the Y’s 100 full-time employees on December 18. She earned $147,264 in wages last year, plus additional compensation valued at $15,887, according to YMCA federal tax filings. The Internal Revenue Service forms also show that the Y’s total revenues dropped from $8.8 million to $8.3 million between 2013 and 2014, with grants and contributions declining by $451,439 and program fees dropping by $24,340. The Y still finished the year in the black but with a balance of $127,706 in 2014 compared to $718,355 in 2013. Program fees produce about 85 percent of the Y’s revenue. Of those, childcare, youth development and camp programs represent the largest income stream — $5.4 million of a total $7 million in 2014. Athletic memberships are a relatively small portion of current income, and the Y fitness numbers have been stagnant for 15 years, hovering between 1,800 and 1,900 memberships. Burns said that number needs to grow to help subsidize programs for seniors and people with disabilities, as well as public health initiatives such as diabetes prevention. That’s part of what is motivating the organization to build a newer facility with better workout areas. Also: Right now there are 150 people on the wait list for the Y’s infant-toddler childcare program. The goal is to increase slots from 42 to 90 when the new facility is built, Burns said. Last Tuesday Michael Nichols sat on the hip abduction machine in the Y weight room, scissoring his legs in and out as other Y members ran on treadmills and lifted free weights. He lives in the New North End and pays for metered parking when he comes to the Y, three or four times a week.

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Champlain Parkway LAKESIDE AVENUE

FLYNN AVE.

T About 120 people turned out Monday night STAR for an update on the long-stalled and much189 maligned Champlain Parkway in Burlington’s South End. At the outset, moderator Greg Marchildon, executive director of Vermont AARP, told the crowd the event was to provide information — not a forum to protest the $30-plus million, 2.5-mile road project. The meeting at Champlain Elementary School generated no rabble-rousing. After state and local officials made presentations on the road design, a panel answered questions the audience had submitted on index cards. The format was undemocratic, said Burlington resident Barbara McGrew. “The city is very good at coming up with processes that seem like they are orderly but silence a lot of people,” she said. McGrew said she doesn’t see the point of the parkway, which would arc from Interstate 189 at the southern gateway of Burlington to Lakeside Avenue, and from there would connect

PINE STREET

City of Burlington SHELBURNE ST REET

with Pine Street to shuttle more cars downtown. A portion of the parkway was built in the 1980s but never opened to traffic because of permitting problems. The road now has a state environmental permit and is scheduled for construction in 2018, despite opposition from some artists who work in the South End. Others in the audience said they believe the project will be helpful, with redesigned intersections, a new stretch of multi-use path on the west side of Pine Street and the connection to I-189. “It represents progress for the city, progress for a progressive city,” said Steve Conant, owner of Conant Metal & Light on Pine Street. The amenities will better the experience for nondrivers on Pine Street, and on balance, he said, the road sounds like an improvement.

MOLLY WALSH

Burlington College Lowers Tuition to Attract More Students Burlington College

FILE: NATALIE WILLIAMS

Burlington College announced Monday that it’s reducing tuition, bucking a national trend of rising rates. Tuition, which doesn’t include room or board, will be $21,500 for the 2016-17 academic year — down from roughly $23,500 today. The tiny liberal arts college has kept tuition flat since the fall of 2014. That’s despite being in serious need of cash. College officials are hoping the discount will attract new students — a critical need, given that its student body has shrunk in the midst of its financial struggles. Now that the college will be getting less revenue per student, the need for new students is all the more urgent. Representatives of the regional accreditation agency, the New England

Association of Schools and Colleges, visited the campus last month. In an interview that the college posted on YouTube, NEASC officials characterized the decline in enrollment — from 186 full-time undergraduate students in the

fall of 2014 to 123 in the fall of 2015 — as a major risk. But they also praised the college for reducing its debt, stabilizing its administrative staff and streamlining its course offerings. NEASC is the same organization that put Burlington College on probation in July 2014. Coralee Holm, the college spokesperson, said lower tuition would reduce the financial pressure on students and bring the cost of Burlington College more in line with comparable institutions. She also noted that 80 percent of the student body receives financial aid. College officials are optimistic, Holm said, noting there’s been an increase in applications for the 2016-17 year.

ALICIA FREESE

Burlington Suspends Taxi Company for Violations A Burlington panel has suspended one of the city’s largest cab companies for three months and revoked its owner’s taxi license as a result of numerous complaints. The Burlington Taxi Licensing Appeals Panel issued the threemonth suspension against Blazer Transportation on October 16, citing a “pattern of disregard for the city’s regulations.” Allegations included “brazen and unapologetic overcharging of customers” and employing a driver whose license had been suspended for driving under the influence. The panel also revoked the taxi driver’s license of Blazer owner Ricky Handy and suspended the taxi driver’s license of his son, Christopher Handy, for three months. The panel determined that Blazer and the two Handys violated taxi regulations. Ricky Handy isn’t out of the taxi business, however. He said he is working as a dispatcher for another licensed taxi company, J.J. Transit. Drivers who have worked for Blazer are driving for J.J. Transit. “He’s helping me, but I’m also helping him, at the same time, learn how to run his company differently,” Ricky Handy said of J.J. Transit owner Jim Jarvis. “I have to work for Jimmy Jarvis to put food on my table.” Jarvis confirmed that he hired Ricky Handy and is considering buying Blazer Transportation from him once the suspension

is complete in January. Handy said that as long as he’s not driving a taxi in Burlington, the arrangement is perfectly legal. Handy said he continues to operate Blazer Transportation outside the city, including in Stowe, from which Blazer offers service to the Burlington International Airport. While Blazer cabs are banned from the airport, he said he warns those customers in advance that Blazer will drop them across the street. Last Wednesday, a Seven Days reporter called Blazer’s number to arrange a cab ride from downtown Burlington to the airport. A minivan marked J.J. Transit responded. The driver, who said he worked for Blazer, provided a “Blazer Transportation” receipt.

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12.02.15-12.09.15 SEVEN DAYS 20 LOCAL MATTERS

Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

Champlain Parkway Discussed at ‘Unexpectedly Civil’ Meeting

MAIN STREET

“It’s great; I love it,” Nichols said. The new location could potentially be good, he said, especially if it has parking. Employees mostly use the current Y’s dozen spots. Even paid parking is hard to come by since City Market/Onion River Co-op customers started using the lot between the Y and Corbin and Palmer Funeral Home. Burns promised more places for cars at the new site, but perhaps not a lot more. There are no plans to build a garage. A higher priority is to create a safer dropoff for the many tots and children who participate in Y programs, from preschool to swim lessons. Some aren’t sure a new facility is needed, including Sam Nolan. He grew up in Burlington visiting the Y and was back last Tuesday for a workout. “It’s a great community gym,” said Nolan, who now lives in Massachusetts and came home to Vermont for hunting season. The Y might be better off working on improving the current facility, he suggested, but if it does move up the street, he likes the fact that it will still be downtown. “Burlington needs a gym,” Nolan said. As a fitness center, the Y has a lot more competition than it did before the EDGE and Planet Fitness came onto the scene, with their constantly shifting deals that sometimes beat the Y’s $62-a-month adult membership rate. Outdated equipment, parking hassles and hygiene standards have driven others away. “The age of our facility and space limitations … have played a part for some as to why they decide to let a fitnessoriented membership lapse,” said Bishop, the Y’s director of communications. Every time that happens, it hurts the Y’s bottom line, as well as its ability to offer scholarships and the broad range of programming that makes it much more than a gym. Back in 2012 the Y looked seriously at a $9 or $10 million expansion of the current building and hired Freeman French Freeman architects in Burlington. The firm’s renderings called for two floors of new space over the lap pool and a new, two-story entrance addition in the alley on the west side. But the plan didn’t improve the parking situation, and the Y dropped it to pursue purchase of the Ethan Allen Club property. “Their preference really was to build a new Y,” said Jesse Beck, president of FFF. The current one is quirky, Beck admitted, but the structure has potential. “There really are a lot of possibilities for adaptive reuse of that building.” 

END

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The Y and What For « P.19

TERRI HALLENBECK


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BURLINGTON, 1949-2015

Elizabeth Anne “Lizzie” Burke-Tabor WAITSFIELD, 1956-2015

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After an all-too-brief life of selfless service to others, Elizabeth Anne “Lizzie” Burke-Tabor, 59, passed away peacefully, in the company of family and loved ones, in hospice at the Central Vermont Medical Center on Monday, November 23, 2015. Born in Dedham, Mass., to Edward J. Burke and Elizabeth Drinkwater, Lizzie studied political science at Keene State College and earned a master’s of science degree in organization management from Antioch University of New England. Lizzie met her husband of 32 years, James M. Tabor, at the Putney Federated Church in 1983. Their son, Jack Buchanan Tabor, was born in Brattleboro in 1985. Lizzie’s irreverent humor, commitment to social justice and boundless love for the earth (she was a

passionate master gardener) made her a true real Vermonter in the purest, sweetest sense. Those who knew her well thought of Lizzie as an angel on Earth, beautiful both inside and out, with good reason: Hers was a life devoted to helping those in need. Her first work, in Boston, involved enriching the lives of developmentally challenged adults. She next served as a counselor for recovering alcoholics and addicts at the Brattleboro Retreat. After moving to the Mad River Valley in 1993, she became the founding executive director of the Evergreen Place Senior Center in Waitsfield. And for the last 14 years, she worked as a resident services coordinator for the Vermont State Housing Authority. In that role, she improved the quality of life in countless ways for hundreds of Vermonters throughout the state. Lizzie is survived by her husband, James M. Tabor, of Waitsfield; her son, Jack Buchanan Tabor, and his wife, Yumi, of New York City; her stepson, Damon Michael Tabor, and his partner, Emma Pildes, of Brooklyn, N.Y.;  her sisters-in-spirit Wallis Anne Wheeler, of Richmond, Va., Sheila Bannister of Northfield, Kathie Laing of Boston, Mass., and Janet Langdon of Putney; her brother Edward Burke, sisterin-law Anna, nieces Kristin and Suzanne, and nephew Edward III of Norwood, Mass; her brother James Burke and sister-in-law Delvonne of  Beaumont, Texas; and her sister, Sandy, and brother-inlaw Ed Maguire of Cataumet, Mass.  In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to the Cancer Patient Support Foundation, PO Box 1804, Williston, VT 05495.

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James “Jim” Patrick Barrett, of Burlington and most recently of Saranac Lake, N.Y., passed away after a short illness in his home on Wednesday, November 18, 2015. He was born on May, 1, 1949, in Lawrence, Mass., and spent his childhood growing up in Andover, Mass., and in Burlington. He graduated from the University of Vermont with a degree in forestry. Jim’s love of the outdoors continued throughout his life. He was passionate about kayaking, hiking, camping and going on spontaneous road trips throughout the Northeast and Canada. He also loved listening to music and especially attending bluegrass festivals. Jim had many jobs throughout his life but was particularly proud of introducing the concept of food trucks to the Burlington area with his successful mobile Mexican restaurant, Monty’s. He had many fond memories of serving coffee and burritos to his favorite customers with his friends and family. Jim will be remembered for his compassionate nature, sense of humor and great storytelling abilities. He is survived by his son Zachary Barrett; daughter Emily Barrett-LeBel and son-in-law Graham LeBel; brother Dr. William Barrett and sister-in-law Marsha Barrett; sister Mary (Barrett) Young and brother-in-law Louis Young; aunts Phyliss Maurice and Lorraine Ludwig; and numerous

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STATEof THEarts

The Demise of Burlington’s Ashgate Publishing Inspires Widespread Concern — and a Petition B Y M A R GO T HA R R ISON

M

22 STATE OF THE ARTS

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

any Vermonters never knew it was here. But nationwide, the academic community is already feeling the loss of ASHGATE PUBLISHING, which, according to multiple sources, closed its offices at 110 Cherry Street in Burlington last week. That modest office suite opposite the Burlington Town Center served as the American arm of a company with its other office in the UK but its early roots in Vermont. According to its website, Ashgate produces about 800 books annually, “representing the best academic research from around the world” in the social sciences and humanities. Last July, The Bookseller reported that Ashgate had been acquired for £20 million by Informa, the multinational that owns trade publishing giant Taylor & Francis (owner of the popular Routledge imprint). On November 16, Julia Wright, an English professor at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, tweeted a screenshot of an email she had received as the editor of an Ashgate series. “With regret,” the message informed recipients that Ashgate’s Burlington office would close on November 25. Its employees would no longer be considered Ashgate

Soon after, a petition to “Save Ashgate Publishing” popped up at change.org, authored by Rabia Gregory, an associate professor of religious studies at the University of Missouri. It described the press as a “safe haven for scholars” and “urge[d] Taylor & Francis to reverse course immediately and restore Ashgate’s US and UK offices.” Roughly a week later, that petition was closing in on 7,000 supporters. It

BOOKS

representatives, the message continued, and recipients of the email should direct further correspondence to the UK office, whose fate was still “in discussions.”

VERMONT ARTISTS GO ‘MAMMOTH’ AT THE MIAMI ART FAIR Every year since 2002, Miami Beach and the surrounding area have swelled with artists, gallery owners, curators, celebrities (art-world ones as well as the cinematic variety) and art enthusiasts. Art Basel, the influential international art fair, has drawn crowds since its inception in Basel, Switzerland, in the 1970s. The show’s Miami iteration is relatively new, but it has quickly spawned more than 20 satellite shows. “Natural Rebellion,” sculpture by Jennifer McCandless This week, the work of eight Vermont-based artists will appear at two such events, the Fridge Art Fair sculptors LESLIE FRY and JENNIFER and the inaugural X Contemporary MCCANDLESS; and choreographer LAURA fair, where that art will be exposed GORDON, who will perform at various to fairgoers from around the world. locations within the Fridge Art Fair. Participating artists are painters The participation of Vermont SCOTT ANDRE CAMPBELL, BROOKE MONTE artists in what is loosely called and SARA KATZ; mixed-media artists Miami Art Week is in large part due ALEX COSTANTINO and CATHERINE HALL;

to the initiative of Burlington-based ONE ARTS CENTER codirector MARGARET COLEMAN and the national nonprofit arts organization she directs, Art Shape Mammoth. Composed of various nodes, ASM incorporates a national artists’ representation program and a new arts-exchange project in Shanghai. ONE Arts, which has a physical space in Burlington’s Old North End and curates local exhibits, events and classes, is one of several ASM projects. The organization’s primary goal is to “enhance contemporary arts dialogue [by] supporting the development of artists by connecting them with new communities.” Bringing artists to Miami is one example of what Coleman describes as her ongoing effort to

ART

caught the attention of Inside Higher Ed, which on November 23 published a short piece called “Concerns Over Ashgate Publishing’s Future.” The author noted that Taylor & Francis had not responded to emailed requests for confirmation of the American office’s closure. Seven Days has likewise not been able to obtain confirmation from the parent company, and a voicemail inquiry left at Ashgate’s local office went unanswered. Employees of Ashgate’s U.S. branch — who numbered 19 at last count — declined to speak about the company’s current situation. But senior editor SETH HIBBERT offered an overview of its history. Ashgate has its roots in the Brookfield Publishing Company, he said, established in that Vermont town in the early 1980s, which did distribution and marketing for international publishers. One of Brookfield’s clients purchased the company and renamed it Ashgate in 1987. In 1999, Ashgate began commissioning new titles from scholars; the following year, it moved to Burlington to take advantage of the city’s amenities. Since 2005, Ashgate’s local desk editorial team has overseen the editing and production of the company’s U.S. titles, as well

“develop a relationship with a larger contemporary arts dialogue.” She asserts, “Everybody who we’re taking absolutely has the quality of work that should be at a contemporary art fair.” Another major booster of Vermont’s

EVERYBODY WHO WE’RE TAKING ABSOLUTELY HAS THE QUALITY OF WORK

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arts profile is JILL BADOLATO, director of social responsibility at Dealer.com. To help get the Vermont work seen in Miami, the company issued what Badolato refers to as a “fuse grant.” The charitable contribution is specifically earmarked, in this case, for the costs of professionally transporting artwork


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as some UK books. “When it was fully Radical Women of Color, a seminal femistaffed,” Hibbert wrote in an email, that nist text that would give birth to the nowteam “produced approximately 130 books inescapable concept of “intersectionalannually.” ity.” It was published not by a university If the average reader doesn’t feel the press but by a small independent one loss of an independent academic pub- called Kitchen Table. lisher, scholars do. In her tweet, Wright “Every time the large corporations described the closure of Ashgate as “re- buy a small publisher,” Wright lamented, ducing diversity.” And the company seems “there are fewer acquisitions editors, to have exemplified that: A glance at its fewer book series and so fewer voices roster reveals a wide variety of academic in the discussion about what is worth studies authored by professors all over publishing.” the world. Recent prize-winning titles Wright said there is a “less-told story include The Arts of about Ashgate,” too Imprisonment (an — namely, that it was anthology exploring among a number the intersections of small publishers of aesthetics and that were known for criminology), The their commitment Islamic Villa in Early “not only to quality Medieval Iberia academic books but and Regulating also to respectful Corporate Bribery and caring workin International places.” She added, Business. “[T]hat is one of In an email to the reasons many Seven Days, Wright of us liked working called the fate of with the publisher JUL IA WRIGHT Ashgate “a huge — it was an ethical loss to academic choice as well as a publishing in the social sciences and hu- scholarly one.” manities. Scholarship relies on debate,” While a publisher may not be as visible she noted, and “independent publish- a part of the local business landscape as, ers have often been at the leading edge say, a restaurant or retail storefront, the of changing scholarly debate because loss of that choice is a loss to Vermont,8V-marilyns120215.indd they’re freer to take risks.” too. m As an example, Wright cited This Bridge Called My Back: Writings By Contact: margot@sevendaysvt.com

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Shanghai digital artists last spring.) “When you live in Vermont and you’d like to get your work in front of people who are serious about buying,” says Winooski sculptor Fry, “[Miami Art Week] is the ultimate marketplace, because there are people who come from all over the world.” If it sounds like there’s a lot going on in Miami, that’s because there is. Through the art-centric ambition and hard work of Coleman and Badolato, the Vermont artists will have the opportunity to multiply their audience, connections and inspirations in a short span of time. “The whole time we’re there,” Coleman says, “we’ll be talking about what we’re doing in Vermont.”

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to Miami — a task that can become a nightmare. Like Coleman, Badolato plans to attend the fair herself, where she will “go and see so much art, and get the lay of the land of who’s out there,” she says. For her, increasing Vermont’s presence in the art world helps to “make it a place that people want to live.” Rather than being clustered together, the Vermont artists will exhibit with other ASM-associated artists. Nine of them, including Fry and McCandless, will appear at X Contemporary as part of ASM’s “The Language of Objects” show. Campbell, Costantino, Fry, Hall, Katz and Monte will exhibit at Fridge Art Fair as part of ASM’s exchange program, alongside five Chinese artists presented by Shanghai curator Lufei (Vera) Sun. (Sun graduated earlier this year from the MFA program in emergent media at Champlain College, where she cocurated a Burlington exhibit of

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proprietor of the new Burlington café and event venue RUBRA ATRA, is a little cagey when asked to explain the name of his business. He allows Keith Wright that it means “red black” in Latin, but he won’t explain the significance of those colors. Wright doesn’t seem the type to be a Chicago Bulls fan. Either way, the translation is helpful in locating Rubra Atra. Its signage-free entrance, tucked into a redpainted back corner on the south side of the SODA PLANT, is helpfully painted with enormous, red-and-black roses. KEIT H Pulling open the black door, visitors are greeted by the welcoming aroma of roasted coffee that fills this high-ceilinged space. With its expansive white walls and funky furnishings, the interior of Rubra Atra looks like a great place to screen movies. And that’s exactly what Wright — a 37-year-old barista savant and former DJ — intends to do with it. A film series that he’s dubbed BLACK BOX MOVIE THEATER will make its début on Saturday, December 5, with a screening of Matt McCormick’s Towlines (2004), a short independent documentary about, of all things, tugboats. If that sounds arcane, that’s part of Wright’s idea. “I don’t think people want to see action movies,” he says. “They’re ready to see something new.” Wright intends to host a weekly series of foreign, art and experimental films — screened on a white wall. His enthusiastic disquisition on the subject is peppered with the names of cinematic trailblazers such as Ingmar Bergman, Andrei Tarkovsky and George Kuchar. If the series catches on, Wright envisions inviting guests to curate screenings and using the venue as a forum for works

by independent Vermont media makers. More than that, he wants to use the 40-seat Black Box as “an idea generator that gets people moving and thinking” about film and art. In between sips of coffee that he brewed by a method of his own invention, Wright passionately holds forth on the necessity of a vital local arts community. Suitably, the location he’s picked for his venture is next door to the S.P.A.C.E. GALLERY, and in a building that holds other artist studios and creative businesses. Rubra Atra doesn’t announce WRIGHT its presence very loudly. Though he’s been serving up coffee for nearly half a year, Wright set out a sandwich board on Pine Street only about a month ago. He has financed Rubra Atra in part with an inheritance from his grandfather, also named Keith Wright and the owner of Williston’s Skateland roller rink, which closed in 2000. “I don’t have to sell out, so I’m not worried about the money aspect,” the younger Wright says. “I want to build it slow and steady, by word of mouth.” Rubra Atra won’t be selling alcohol at Black Box screenings — a strategy Wright borrowed from Skateland, where he deejayed for an all-ages crowd. In fact, one of the things he loves most about film is that it’s as accessible as music. “Everyone knows how to listen to music,” he says, “and everyone knows how to watch a film.” m

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WHISKEY TANGO FOXTROT B Y E TH A N D E S E I FE

26 WTF

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few hundred feet from the shore of Burlington’s North Beach, a couple of Coast Guard buoys bob in the waves. They’re in open water, beyond the point where natural hazards such as rocks or fallen trees might lie in wait for unsuspecting sailors or swimmers. Turns out, the buoys are attached to the top of the mast of a submerged sailboat. WTF is the boat doing there? Who owns it? And who’s responsible for getting it out? A sunken ship is not unusual in Lake Champlain, which has been claiming vessels for as long as people have been plying its waters. The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum documents several modern powerboats — as well as such historic wrecks as Benedict Arnold’s Revolutionary War gunboat Spitfire — that remain on the bottom of the lake. Certified divers can even swim among the many wrecks that constitute the Lake Champlain Underwater Historic Preserve. But the situation surrounding the North Beach sailboat is unusual. According to Lt. David Bourbeau, chief of the waterways management division

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What’s Up With the Sunken Boat Off North Beach?

for the U.S. Coast Guard’s Northern New England sector, an October 1 report indicates that the boat is a 32-foot Ericson sailboat that had been anchored near North Beach all last summer. Bourbeau puzzled over one detail in the report: an uncertainty about the boat’s name. It’s either Azalea or Gracie. (Or maybe Azalea or Gracie. It wouldn’t be the first boat with a weird name.) “The boat was anchored bow and stern,” said Jesse Bridges, harbormaster for the City of Burlington, “and back in mid-September, we had a fairly significant storm event. The way that it was anchored, and the way that the wind turned, it just took her right down.” Since then, the boat has slowly slipped from view. Bourbeau, who is stationed in Portland, Maine, said the Coast Guard has concluded that the boat’s protruding mast poses no navigational hazards, and that the vessel is not leaking any pollutants. That doesn’t mean authorities intend to leave the boat in place, but nor is it likely to be raised from the depths anytime soon.

“The problem with this vessel,” said Petty Officer John Canario of the Coast Guard’s Burlington station, “is that we don’t know who the owner is.” Despite efforts to find that person, he added, no one has come forward to claim it. The boat itself hasn’t yielded any evidence. A properly registered boat has a hull identification number (HIN) — a unique 12- or 14-digit serial number, typically printed on the vessel in multiple locations, that can be checked against boat registry databases. Canario said that an underwater-camera search for identifying marks yielded no HIN on this vessel. In his three years as harbormaster, Bridges has seen several capsized and submerged boats. But this is the first case in his tenure, he said, in which a crippled vessel’s owner has been impossible to locate. That’s a problem, because the law states clearly that the owner of a submerged vessel is responsible for raising it again. If an ownerless sunken boat poses a navigational or environmental hazard, the Coast Guard will raise it. But since the

service has determined that this boat poses neither, the task — and cost — of its salvage falls to the City of Burlington. “We may still have time to get a diver in the water and get a hull ID,” said Bridges. “We’d like to get it resolved without having to spend local dollars.” If no owner is located after a reasonable search, salvagers can lay claim to the vessel and all it contains. If that sounds like a treasure opportunity straight out of The Goonies, fold up those treasure maps right now. This sunken vessel is no booty-laden pirate ship but an apparently abandoned boat that’s likely to wind up in pieces in a couple of Dumpsters. Mickey Maynard, a Coast Guardlicensed captain and owner of Plattsburghbased Lake Champlain Marine Resource and Services, described boat salvage as a chancy, costly operation. Speaking from Florida while on a “working vacation,” he said that a salvage company might charge a boat’s owner up to a “couple of hundred dollars an hour,” a sum that doesn’t include numerous miscellaneous fees. The total, Maynard said, could run “well into the thousands of dollars.” A boat is worth salvaging only if it has solid resale value. At the moment, it’s not clear whether the North Beach boat is worth the trouble. Another factor looms large in this aquatic mystery: the weather. Even if the vessel is not currently leaking fuel, it might contain fuel tanks that could rupture in the cold. “That could be a serious issue,” Maynard said. The buoys have reduced or eliminated any danger the boat might pose to other vessels. But Pierre LaRocque, owner of the Vergennes-based Champlain Divers International, said that the coming winter could make the boat a hazard of a different kind: Its protruding mast could spell trouble for snowmobilers who zip across Lake Champlain when the lake freezes over. LaRocque neatly summed up the sailboat’s current situation: “No one really knows anything about it.” And unless that changes, the City of Burlington will have to pick up the tab for salvaging a boat that’s dead in the water. m Contact: ethan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Outraged, or merely curious, about something? Send your burning question to wtf@sevendaysvt.com.


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How do mattress stores manage to stay in business? They’re all over the place, but the average adult buys a mattress once every five to 10 years. With high overhead and infrequent purchases, how are they around? (This question was inspired by a friend, Bethany.) Not Bethany

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the eyewear business, which has similarly been called oligopolistic, where the entrepreneurial upstart Warby Parker found success selling cheap glasses to hipsters. Whence the white knight of mattress sales? I found an article profiling one contender whose cofounders show the right credentials — both have Silicon Valley backgrounds; one’s got a great beard — but if I were a mattress seller, I wouldn’t be losing any sleep just yet.

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consulting firm A.T. Kearney found that despite the digital hype, overall a full 90 percent of retail transactions still take place in physical stores. And according to an investor presentation by industry giant Mattress Firm, dedicated mattress stores account for 46 percent of total mattress sales, handily beating out furniture stores (35 percent) and department stores (5 percent) for the largest share of the market. So mattress delivery by drone is still a ways off. But again, these stores aren’t just surviving, they’re flourishing — that market share has more than doubled in the last 20 years. Why open a mattress store when there’s another just down the street? Turns out the economics make perfect sense: • Running a mattress store doesn’t cost much. Since each store is essentially a showroom, with the product delivered to your home from a warehouse, sellers don’t keep a lot of inventory around. And the salespeople generally work on commission. So contrary to your assumption, overhead is actually pretty low. Plus, the uninhibited signage at these

lifestyle magazines provide great propaganda in the form of endless encomiums to getting a good night’s sleep, and the well-publicized resurgence of bedbugs certainly plays nicely with the industry’s attempts to get you to replace your mattress more often. On the principle of Chekhov’s gun, if I use a loaded term like “old economy” in the first act, we’ll be talking about “disruption” here in the third. And lo: Some not-exactly-disinterested observers say it’s high time to disrupt the mattress industry, which has been described variously as a “scam,” a “racket” and, as suggested above, an “oligopoly.” Critics are galled by a system wherein retailers charge exorbitant, and wildly variable, prices for products whose differences from one another are often (a) slight, and (b) described in nonsensical language — e.g., “ComforPedic iQ” with “Ultra Cool Memory Foam” and optional “AirCool Memory Foam with Micro GelTouch.” (Lots of product labeling is similarly nuts, of course; on the other hand, you’re not dropping $2,000 on a razor blade.) They point to

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see your query, NB, and raise you. To my mind, it’s not just about how these stores manage to stay in business: The question is, moreover, how are there so goddamn many of them — particularly right now? Where I live, in Chicago, entire blocks are all but overrun with the places, which frankly don’t do much for a street’s aesthetics. In June a Texas Monthly article described the worrisome proliferation of mattress stores in Houston, where the venerably groovy Montrose neighborhood has become known as “the Mattrose” on account of all the new sleep shops. An April headline in the Northwest Indiana Times asked, apropos of the town of Schererville, “Why the heck are so many mattress stores opening?” So, you and I aren’t the only ones wondering. What gives? One thing that jars about this state of affairs is that, in the age of Amazon, there’s something very old-economy about mattress stores, beyond their relentlessly cheesy look. No one goes to bookstores to buy books anymore, right? Well, not exactly. A 2014 report by the

places provides constant free advertising. • The industry is benefiting from post-recession catch-up. According to the trade journal Sleep Retailer, the global mattress market saw a decrease in sales in 2008 and 2009; in the years since, the rebounding economy — including increasing home ownership — has occasioned “remarkable” growth in the industry, says SR, expected to reach $25 billion globally by 2017. The U.S. is the largest retail mattress market worldwide. • The markup is stupendous. This is the big one. Mattress markups are notably higher than for other furniture items: Consumer Reports puts gross profit margins on mattresses at 30 to 40 percent, both for wholesalers and for retailers, and up to 50 percent for makers of super-luxe products. One estimate (from a boutique mattress upstart, so take this with a grain of salt) claimed that mainstream retailers can charge $3,000 for a mattress (after wholesale and retail markups, marketing costs and commissions) that actually cost only $300 to produce. What accounts for this? It’s your classic oligopoly, where the market is dominated by just a few makers — think familiar names like Serta, Sealy, et al. More on this below. Certain ancillary factors are working in the mattress-pushers’ favor too. Newspapers and


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icki Saporta, president of the National Abortion Federation, saw it coming. Harassment, threats and violence against abortion clinics had been mushrooming since the July release of the Planned Parenthood tapes — the anti-abortion Center for Medical Progress’ video hoax, edited to create the false impression that the health care provider is trafficking in fetal body parts. The tapes inspired death threats. “I’ll pay ten large to whomever kills Dr. Deborah Nucatola,” an individual with the handle “Joseywhales” posted on Fox Nation in July. Nucatola is a Planned Parenthood senior director filmed in the video. Anti-abortion terrorism is not new. From 1977 through 2014, according to NAF, abortion clinics, staff and patients have been the victims of “eight murders, 17 attempted murders, 42 bombings, 186 arsons, and thousands of incidents of criminal activities,” including acid and anthrax attacks and kidnappings. But this time Saporta was as scared as she’d ever been. “In my 20 years at NAF, I have never seen such a volume, intensity and escalation of hate speech, threats and criminal activity,” she told the Huffington Post. And then it happened: Robert Lewis Dear attacked the Planned Parenthood in Colorado Springs, killing three people — Jennifer Markovsky, 36, Ke’Arre Stewart, 29, and Officer Garrett Swasey, 44 — and wounding another nine. “No more baby parts,” Dear said during police questioning. All day and all night on Friday, as the events in Colorado dominated the news, Republican presidential candidates and Congressional leaders said nothing. Jeb Bush tweeted about football. Marco Rubio’s tweet advertised a campaignrelated Black Friday sale: “Shop now and save!” Saturday morning, Ted Cruz bestirred himself to comment, also on Twitter: “Praying for the loved ones of those killed, those injured & first responders who bravely got the situation under control in Colorado Springs.” “The situation.” Nothing to do with him — the man who kept the phony tapes in the news for weeks and threatened to shut down the government if it did not defund Planned Parenthood. The Colorado Republican Party was also praying, it said in a statement, for “the victims of this senseless tragedy.”

12/1/15 12:40 PM

President Obama delivered his usual weary speech about gun violence, treating this as just one more mass shooting. “This is not normal,” he said. “We can’t let it become normal.” Like the GOP, the president implied that the shooting had no logic, no meaning. Like the GOP, he failed to mention women — much less their reproductive rights. The Right has been on the Democrats’ case for refusing to call members of ISIS what they are: “radical Islamists” or “Islamist terrorists.” The Dems apparently don’t want to alienate potential Muslim allies. The Republicans want to alienate Americans from the Democrats. For the jingoist GOP, the term “Muslim allies” is an oxymoron anyway. On the morning after the latest Paris attacks, Cruz declared: “As long as we have

a commander-in-chief unwilling even to utter the words ‘radical Islamic terrorism,’ we will not have a concerted effort to defeat these radicals.” This euphemizing of violence is racialized. If an Arab shoots some strangers, he’s a terrorist. If a white guy shoots some strangers who just happen to work at an abortion clinic, he’s mentally ill — as if a person cannot be simultaneously crazy and a true believer in a murderous ideology. On Twitter, it’s been pointed out that had Dear been black, he surely would not have been taken into custody alive. But if Democrats won’t call the jihadists Islamists, and the Republicans call all Muslims terrorists; if the press won’t describe a white cop killer as criminal and reflexively criminalizes African Americans, there is still one species of criminal maniac


movement, sent his blessings to the Trump campaign. “God has given this man an anointing for the mantle of government in the United States and he will prosper,” Wallnau wrote. The Dominionists, who believe Satan runs America, advocate for the Christian takeover of all aspects of the country’s political, legal and cultural life. Robert Lewis Dear may not have been directly influenced by Christian beliefs — though he did display a cross of twigs in his tiny cabin. After the shootings, Operation Rescue combed its membership list and reported that his name was not on it (so that took care of that). But Dear’s acts cannot be dissociated from the bloody rhetoric disguised as Christian love for the unborn — including the slanderous tapes. The Colorado Springs Planned Parenthood has been picketed for years. The town is the Raqqa of the Moral Right, headquarters of Focus on the Family and many other conservative Christian groups. Dear may be certifiably mad, but his madness was guided by a message: “No more baby parts.” “We need to call the threats of violence and the intimidation of health care providers and patients what it is — domestic terrorism,” said Karen Middleton, executive director of NARAL Pro-Choice Colorado, after the attack. “And more public officials

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POLI PSY 29

Poli Psy is a monthly column by Judith Levine. Got a comment on this story? Contact levine@sevendaysvt.com.

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in Colorado and across the country, not just advocacy groups and the people on the front lines, need to take a stand opposing domestic terrorism and supporting women’s health.” I’d go further. We need to call that domestic terrorism what it is: radical Christian jihad. These American terrorists share with the U.S.’ declared Islamist enemies a hatred of women and a burning determination to control their sexuality by any means necessary. In Syria, extremists whip and stone women for wearing burqas that are somehow too revealing. They sell women into slavery. In the U.S., Christian fanatics bomb clinics and kill the doctors who serve and protect not just women’s health but also their freedom to selfdetermination. m

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that no one, particularly on the Right, will indict. That’s radical Christian terrorists, who are behind much, perhaps most, of the “pro-life” carnage. The Army of God launched its bloody anti-abortion crusade in 1982, perpetrating scores of terrorist acts, including fire bombings of numerous clinics and the nail bombing of a lesbian bar (they hate “fags” as much as “baby killers”). The Army’s soldiers or fellow travelers murdered abortion doctors George Tiller, David Gunn and John Britton and some of their coworkers. Even when the Army of God did not pull the trigger, it celebrates every round. Operation Rescue, which collaborated with CMP to produce the debunked Planned Parenthood videos, also has a gory history laced with lunatic Christian ideology. The group’s senior policy adviser, Cheryl Sullenger, served two years for conspiracy to firebomb the Family Planning Associates Medical Group in San Diego in 1987. She and her eight coconspirators were members of the Bible Missionary Fellowship in Santee, Calif. Operation Rescue president Troy Newman orchestrated the decades-long legal and personal torment of Wichita, Kan., abortion doctor Tiller and his family. He published the addresses of their home and church, where Tiller was ultimately shot by Scott Roeder. Roeder’s photograph is prominently featured on the Army of God homepage with the caption “American Hero.” On the eve of the execution of Paul Jennings Hill for the murder of Dr. Britton and his bodyguard, Newman and Sullenger issued a press release stating that he should be exonerated for his “justifiable defense” of the unborn. Hill, an excommunicated minister, also claimed connections with the Army of God. Newman’s apocalyptic manifesto, Their Blood Cries Out, written with Sullenger, is an exhortation to Christians to take extreme measures to prevent God’s destruction of America as punishment for legal abortion. In it, Newman calls the 9/11 terrorist attacks and AIDS signs of God’s displeasure. Later, he declared that a California drought signified God’s retribution for the state’s liberal abortion laws. Not only do the Republican candidates fail to repudiate these extremist organizations and their leaders, they embrace them. The week before the Colorado Springs attacks, Cruz announced Newman’s endorsement, proudly pointing to Operation Rescue’s role in making the debunked videos. Donald Trump has been meeting with dozens of right-wing Christians. This week, it was a coalition of African American clergy, many of them “prosperity theologists,” who preach that God loves capitalism. Recently, Lance Wallnau, a leader in the Seven Mountains Dominionism


PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

orer t S l a c o L ur neighbors, you r nd you Help yo elf — spe s r u o y d rmont! state an ars in Ve ll o d y a d holi

ries tore, a se In LocalS out the s through Days of article ven eason, Se ned holiday s locally ow features Vermont. shops in

Something Old, Something New

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LocalStore: Rackk & Ruin, 270 Pine Street, Burlington, rackkandruin.com The first piece of jewelry Molly Conant fell in love with was her mother’s silver charm bracelet. “I’d go down the line of charms and tell my mom, or whoever would listen, a story. So, if there was a boot, the boot would be incorporated into the story. I’d make up a new one every time.” Now, as the proprietress of her own jewelry and clothing company, Rackk & Ruin, Conant threads, hammers and saws reclaimed metals and miscellany into polished pieces as distinctive as those stories she told as a child. The Burlington native has come a long way since 2009, when she began crafting one-off pieces of jewelry in the spare bedroom of the Old North End house she shared with her now-husband, Eric Seitz of Pitchfork Farm. At the time, Conant was waitressing at American Flatbread Burlington Hearth. “It was such a wonderful incubator space for people that were really motivated — going to grad school or starting a small business — to be able to work in a supportive environment, make a good amount of money and still have a huge chunk of their day free to explore what they wanted to do,” Conant says. In 2013, she left Flatbread to pursue her passion for making jewelry full time. First Conant worked in a studio behind Speeder & Earl’s Coffee, but its poor ventilation nixed the idea of soldering. Then she tucked into a storage space at Conant Metal & Light. Finally the young designer opened Rackk & Ruin in a sunny, second-floor space above Vintage Inspired Lifestyle Marketplace in the Soda Plant. (Her windows overlook the building’s distinctive rhino head.) The shop, which doubles as Conant’s studio, is filled with delicate adornments wrought from repurposed metals and

Molly Conant

vintage trinkets, as well as a small but carefully curated selection of fine vintage and altered clothing. “I really love hunting for unique materials and completely changing them, turning them into something someone can possess and wear — that can represent their personality,” Conant says. She digs out a strip of embossed

brass from behind her antique wooden worktable and shows how she sawed out tiny raised ovals to make earrings. Dainty brass chains come from her favorite supply place in New York City; East African coins, from her own collection. In addition, Conant says she constantly combs flea markets, estate sales and eBay for treasures. Art and creative recycling run in the family: Her father, Steve, owns Conant Metal & Light and makes light fixtures from vintage materials; mother Maggie, also an artist, was a longtime art teacher in the Burlington School District. Though Conant earned her degree in studio art and sociology at the University of Vermont, she didn’t study metalwork in school. “I love the idea of taking a two-week intensive to learn a specific skill, more than doing a one-year program,” she says. “A lot of my knowledge has come from trial and error, YouTube, googling … just figuring it out.” Conant also picks up tricks from neighboring artists, including the metalworkers downstairs. For example, while trying to fasten a delicate chain to a tiny pendant for a bracelet, the designer hit a roadblock. “My dad came up with the idea of soldering a little tube to the back, then running the chain through the tube,” she says. Rackk & Ruin’s collection of vintage clothing also reveals some tinkering, as well as restraint. While a breezy silk tank top or perfectly weathered Levis remain untouched, Conant transformed a black leather jacket into a vest, adding a bronze beaded collar rescued from an old dress. Her philosophy has as much to do with the environment as with aesthetics. “When you’re buying vintage, you’re not contributing to the waste stream,” Conant notes. And when you buy her customized clothing, you’re guaranteed not to run into anyone else wearing the same thing. Rackk & Ruin’s products aren’t cheap, but they’re priced fairly: A black velvet vest with decorative gold piping retails for $72; vintage jeans range from $30 to $92. A cuff bracelet goes for $78 in brass and $106 in sterling silver, and Conant’s popular ZoëWolf earrings, delicate handstamped brass triangles, are $48. Most of the clothing is one of a kind, but Conant produces large batches of her jewelry — primarily septum cuffs and studs — for three wholesale accounts. Fortuitously, hippie-chic giant Free People contacted her soon after she quit her job at Flatbread. “That definitely was a big pat on the back,” Conant says, noting that the company gives her credit for her work on its website and doesn’t try to “pass it off as theirs.” Currently, Conant estimates that 70 percent of her sales are online, 20 percent are wholesale orders and the rest are in-store. Those numbers might suggest focusing on web efforts, but Conant is committed to her shop. “It’s the direct communication I get from people walking in that really helps me remember that what I’m doing is fun and different,” she says. “A lot of people talk about how they envy my little messy desk in this sunlit corner, and I believe them. I’m incredibly lucky.” S ADI E W I LLI AMS


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MATTHEW THORSEN

Sara McMahon’s Movement for Parkinson’s Class

USE ITOR

LOSE IT Dancing, boxing, miming: Vermonters explore new ways to keep Parkinson’s disease at bay BY KE N PICARD

J

im Hester knows all about inertia and Newton’s first law: A body in motion will stay in motion unless acted on by an external force. Back in the 1960s, the former aerospace engineer worked on the Apollo space missions, developing the engines that lifted the lunar module off the moon’s surface. Today, Hester, 71, applies his understanding of Newtonian physics to a more modest goal: keeping his body in motion while an internal force — Parkinson’s disease — tries to slow it down. Five years ago, the Burlington resident was diagnosed with PD, a neurodegenerative disorder that can cause tremors, stiffness, loss of balance and coordination, and other physical and cognitive difficulties. So far, Hester’s PD has progressed gradually. The disease has slowed his reaction times and impaired his balance, making rapid movements more difficult. Sometimes it also takes his mind longer to process information, he says. Shortly after his diagnosis, Hester says, he received a valuable piece of advice from someone whose Parkinson’s was far more advanced than his. “‘Focus

on what you can do, not on what you can’t do,’” he recalls being told. “The mantra is, ‘Use it or lose it.’” Hester took those words to heart — and is now among a growing number of Vermonters with PD who are finding creative and fun ways to “use it.” They’re taking up recreational activities such as dancing, juggling, boxing, circuit training and even mime to keep their bodies active and their minds engaged. Many have discovered these activities through classes developed and funded by the University of Vermont’s Binter Center for Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders. The center was founded two years ago with a $2 million gift from Nancy Ratkovitz, a former UVM Medical Center neurosurgeon, and her husband, Bela, a former neuroradiologist. They named it for Nancy’s father, Frederick Binter, who died of PD in 1996. An estimated 1 million Americans, including nearly 2,000 Vermonters, are afflicted with the still-incurable disease, according to the Binter Center. PD is now the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the United States, behind Alzheimer’s disease.


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see them as people with Parkinson’s. I see them as dancers,” McMahon explains. “I don’t say, ‘This specific dance sequence works on balance.’ All dancers need balance.” McMahon’s interest in dance as therapy isn’t solely professional. Three years ago, her husband, Gary Martin, was diagnosed with PD. Martin, who’d long been The Binter Center’s active — he was a taiko Push Back PD program drummer and played in a rock band — eventually had to give up his psychotherapy practice because his verbal skills had classes. She would go on to attend several deteriorated. His coordination has also more — and then start teaching her own class in Burlington, with support from suffered. “My big thing is my balance,” he says. the Binter Center. Since then, McMahon has expanded the program to Middlebury “I fall backwards.” Fortuitously, around the same time and Barre. She is considering adding as Martin’s diagnosis, the Mark Morris classes in St. Albans and St. Johnsbury. Forty minutes into the class, the Dance Group, an internationally renowned company based in Brooklyn, students take a break, during which came to the Flynn Center for the McMahon clears the chairs. The second Performing Arts. Back in 2001, Morris, in half of the class is devoted to improviconjunction with the Brooklyn Parkinson sation and interpretive dance, done to Group, had developed a program called musical selections ranging from African Dance for PD, which uses dance to help drumbeats to slow jazz to “The Pink those with the disease improve their Panther Theme.” In one exercise, the students silently coordination, balance, cognition and physical self-confidence. The program is choose a partner from across the room, now taught in more than 100 communi- approach each other and engage in what ties in nine countries; it’s the basis for McMahon calls a “moving conversation” McMahon’s Movement for Parkinson’s with their bodies. Without exchanging a word, the dancers perform slow-motion class. On the morning of the Mark Morris swing moves, tugs of war, high fives, show at the Flynn, McMahon attended one of the company’s Dance for PD

OLIVER PARINI

SITTING DOWN ALL DAY LONG

Gary Martin in the Push Back PD program OLIVER PARINI

sit on the edge of their chairs, backs straight and feet flat on the floor. Her goal is to get halfway through the 90minute session without a break. “OK, toes directly aligned with the center of the ankle, the center of the knee and the hip joint. Soft shoulder roll … elbow circle, arm circle and down, bringing the hands to the belly button,” she says. The warm-up exercise is set to slow-paced piano music. “Remember that starfish image I talked about? We have six limbs radiating from our belly — head and tail, arms and legs. Reach out, and stay out there. Big, big, big!” McMahon instructs. “Now take a deep breath in, let your breath out and let your body deflate, like a balloon. Good! Nice!” MOVING TO THE MUSIC Most of the students appear to be in their sixties or older; a few are younger, It’s 10 a.m. on a blustery Wednesday, and Hester is one of 18 students who including a woman in her twenties. Their have just arrived at the Flynn Center mobility and flexibility vary widely. Some Studios in Burlington for a Movement for are limber, while others are rigid, a signaParkinson’s class. Many enter the dance ture trait of the disease. One woman in her studio with slow, shuffling strides and mid-seventies can barely raise her arms careful, deliberate movements. About to shoulder level. The twentysomething woman has an aide who half rely on walking moves her arms and sticks or canes; a few legs to the music. cling to partners or aides Next, McMahon for support. After moves on to the sun hanging their coats and salutation and asks her removing their shoes, students if they need to the participants take review the sequence. seats in a circle of chairs. BEA J ORDAN One woman remarks, Leading the class is “We have Parkinson’s. veteran dance instructor Sara McMahon. For about a decade in We don’t remember!” “Yes, you do!” McMahon answers. the 1970s and ’80s, she co-owned a dance For 20 minutes, the students perform studio above Nectar’s called Main Street Dance Theatre. Later, she had her own their reaching, stretching and rollprofessional dance troupe, Ketch Dance ing moves from a seated position. As Company, which performed throughout McMahon explains later, that’s about the only modification she makes for people New England. These days, McMahon, who is also a with PD. At its heart, this class teaches psychotherapist, works with many people students the fundamentals of modern who have little or no prior dance training. dance. “When people come in, I don’t She begins by directing her students to

Parkinson’s will soon pose significant challenges to Vermont’s health care system. The U.S. Census Bureau predicts that, by 2030, nearly one-third of the state’s residents will be 60 or older, the prime age bracket for developing Parkinson’s. This small state has limited community resources for addressing the therapeutic needs of those with the disease, but that’s where the Binter Center comes in. It operates on the principle that keeping older people active and engaged can have major payoffs — not only by reducing long-term health care costs, but also by helping Vermonters live longer and happier lives.


MATTHEW THORSEN

MATTHEW THORSEN

Sara McMahon

Sara McMahon’s Movement for Parkinson’s class Pete Adams

OLIVER PARINI

Bea Jordan, 74, attends the class with her husband. She’s part of a Parkinson’s “cluster” in her family that includes her father, a brother, several uncles and an aunt. When asked if she feels different after the class, she answers without hesitation. “I can move. I can really move,” she says with a smile. “Sitting down all day long is not good. I ache. If I move, I don’t ache.” Susan Leister was diagnosed with Parkinson’s 15 years ago, when she was just 36. Working as a neurosurgical nurse at Fletcher Allen Health Care (now UVM Medical Center), she diagnosed herself with PD before her doctor did. Ultimately, the disease ended her nursing career. But the headstrong Leister is not taking her PD lying down. She maintains a high level of physical activity — since her diagnosis, she’s trekked to Peru’s Machu Picchu and gone white-water rafting and zip-lining. She takes McMahon’s dance class to help slow the progression of her symptoms. “Sara really understands the parts of our bodies that aren’t working, and she knows how to pinpoint what you need,” Leister says. The benefits of dance for people with Parkinson’s aren’t just anecdotal. A study published in April in the Journal of Neural Transmission measured the effects of Dance for PD on class participants. The researchers found measurable improvements in the students’ physical,

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Use It or Lose It « P.33 bows, hat tips and hugs before separating and returning to their respective places. “You’re creating your own mini moving sculptures,” McMahon tells the class. “So let’s see you use other body parts besides hands and arms. You have legs, hips, backs…” One married couple meets and kisses. “Get a room!” someone shouts jokingly. In another exercise, McMahon instructs her students to approach the center of the studio and, one by one, to build an interconnecting sculpture with their bodies in poses of their own choosing. She doesn’t leave them frozen in place for long — Parkinson’s does that enough. Soon the dancers release and separate. McMahon ends the class with a clapping and improv exercise set to Kool & the Gang’s “Celebration.” Afterward, about half of the students linger to chat. For many, it’s their only outing of the day. McMahon points out that the class’ social component is a major reason why attendance is so high. It’s an opportunity for people with Parkinson’s to commiserate with others facing similar challenges.

mental and emotional well-being, which they attributed to the skills that dance requires: motor planning and memory, visual focus, rhythm, posture and balance control. Those improvements included a 10 percent increase in students’ overall mobility, a 27 percent improvement in their walking and gait, and a 19 percent reduction in tremors. Equally important, the study quoted dance participants as describing their movements, and themselves, in terms not typically used by those with Parkinson’s, including “graceful,” “focused,” “confident,” “optimistic” and “fluid.” The dancers also characterized themselves as “exhilarated,” “much happier” and even “symptom free.” As McMahon’s students leave the Flynn Studio, it’s evident even to an untrained eye that they’re more fluid and confident in their movements. As McMahon explains, the mere act of focusing their attention on how they move their bodies can reduce the “flatness or two-dimensional quality” of the disease. In short, she says, they’re no longer just people with Parkinson’s, but dancers.

MIME ON HIS SIDE Rob Mermin needs no instruction in bodily self-awareness. The 65-year-old professional mime and founder of Circus Smirkus has spent most of his adult life studying the minutiae of his own movements through space. Now he’s applying that training to help people with Parkinson’s — including himself — stave off the disease’s debilitating effects. “Pretty much all my adult life has involved movement — doing acrobatics, doing mime, working in the circus,” Mermin says during a recent interview in

his Montpelier apartment. “So this is very ironic, for me to suddenly be diagnosed with a movement disorder.” Mermin was 19 when he literally ran away with the circus and traveled around Europe as a mime clown. He trained with world-renowned French mime artist Marcel Marceau, as well as with Marceau’s own teacher, Étienne Decroux. Mermin remembers coming home each day from mime class and meticulously analyzing his daily activities. As he washed his face, for example, he’d observe whether he brought his hands to his face or his face to his hands — then memorize those sequences and transpose them to the stage. The mime first realized something was wrong with his body last year while he was shampooing his hair: His left hand wasn’t moving as rhythmically as his right. When Mermin tried to juggle, he discovered his left hand couldn’t throw or catch as gracefully, either. When he walked, his right arm swung normally, but his left arm hung limply at his side. Mermin was finally diagnosed with Parkinson’s. His doctor told him he was actually “ahead of the game” compared with most patients, thanks to his circus training. “When you do mime onstage, you’re aware of every gesture you’re making,” Mermin says. Every movement is planned, like a choreographed dance. But Mermin — who also attends McMahon’s Movement for Parkinson’s class in Barre — notes that mime differs from dance in that it re-creates everyday physical activities. Furthermore, while dance is meant to look graceful and effortless, mime creates the illusion of an invisible world by making the effort visible. Today, Mermin no longer performs publicly — “My movements aren’t up to my own standards anymore,” he says. But he still creates a convincing illusion: An observer wouldn’t guess he has a movement disorder. He remains meticulous about keeping those mental notes: where his weight is centered, where his arm rests, how he crosses his legs and which hand he uses to gesture. Mermin notices and compensates for his asymmetric symptoms: If he gestures with his right hand but not with his left on one occasion, he’ll purposely use his left hand the next time. “If I think about it, I do it,” he says. “Parkinson’s, for me, is like doing mime all day long.” And Mermin isn’t keeping those skills to himself. Teaching comes naturally


IS LIKE DOING MIME ALL DAY LONG.

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Contact: ken@sevendaysvt.com

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INFO For more about Movement for Parkinson’s, contact the Binter Center at 800-358-1144. To learn more about Rob Mermin’s juggling classes for PD, visit robmermin.com.

FEATURE 35

Pete Adams stands in front of a mirrored wall with both fists up, like a boxer. Beside him stand six other men and one woman, their arms and fists also in standard pugilist pose. As the music begins — the theme music from Rocky, naturally — UVM physical therapist Parm Padgett calls the shots from the front of the exercise room. “OK, let’s begin with the right hand. We’re going to do jab, jab, cross, then come back to center,” she says. “Jab, jab, cross! Come back. Jab, jab, cross! Now a little faster.” This is Push Back PD. The weekly circuit-training class, launched three years ago and funded by the Binter Center, was designed for people with Parkinson’s.

PARKINSON’S, FOR ME,

by health insurance plans. The Binter Center foots the bill — but, owing to limited space and resources, cannot offer the class to everyone who might benefit from it. “It’s not accessible to most people, unfortunately,” Padgett adds. “If we could replicate this class, we could probably do two classes a day, every day.” Moving on to the leg station, Adams balances on one foot for more than a minute. Though he wavers from side to side, it’s not for lack of balance. Actually, he’s moving to the rhythm of the Greek dance music playing in the background. “Pete’s balance is legendary in this class,” notes Rilke Greenmun, another PT student who’s helping him. “Can you tell these guys are sadists?” Adams mutters jokingly. Ironically, he reports later, one of the major symptoms of his Parkinson’s has been a loss of balance. Holt, the PT who coaches the Monday Push Back PD class, says it’s crucial that Vermont invest in more programs like this in the coming years, as the state’s population continues to age. It doesn’t matter whether it’s circuit training, boxing, dance or some other exercise, she says. What matters is keeping Vermonters in motion. “The more we use our physical bodies all through our lives, the better we’ll meet the demands of aging,” Holt continues. “If you see someone who has Parkinson’s, or you think they do, do everything you can to keep them at the gym. To walk away is the worst thing they can do.” m

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PUSHING BACK

Classes are held twice weekly on UVM’s Fanny Allen Campus in Colchester. Push Back doesn’t refer to participants as “patients” or “clients.” They’re “players.” Their physical therapists, and the 10 graduate students from UVM’s physical therapy and exercise sciences programs who assist them, are “coaches.” Such semantic distinctions underline the philosophy that, while the program is physically demanding, it’s also got to be fun to keep people coming back. Adams is one of three players in Professional mime Rob Mermin this room who also take McMahon’s Movement for Parkinson’s classes; Leister, the retired nurse; and Martin, the dance instructor’s husband, are the other two. For 15 years, Adams worked in tethered to a handrail to assist him if he the hospital’s central sterile reprocessing stumbles or falls. Overseeing Martin is department. There he prepared medical Emily Day, a second-year PT student at instruments for surgery — that is, until his UVM. When Martin walks, he occasionally Parkinson’s made it impossible for him to scuffs his feet, Day observes. However, differentiate their shapes and sizes. “I just couldn’t handle the mental part when he runs on the treadmill, his gait and stride are normal. Why? One theory, anymore,” he says. “I got too damn slow.” You wouldn’t guess that from watch- she explains, is that Martin is tapping into ing Adams box. He jabs swiftly and with a “motor plan” imprinted in his brain long surprising agility for a 74-year-old who’s ago, like muscle memory. “Your brain takes over and says, ‘Oh, been sparring with Parkinson’s for 12 I know how to do this!’” she says. “It’s years. In early November, Adams and sev- really good for us [students] to have an eral other Push Back players saw a CBS application for the things we’ve learned News report by Lesley Stahl about Rock in the classroom.” As Martin runs, Day gently reminds Steady Boxing. The program uses boxing him to swing techniques to his left arm help people with more. As she Parkinson’s — points out, including Stahl’s Parkinson’s is a husband, Aaron disorder of the Latham — fight R O B ME R MIN brain, not the the disease’s debilitating effects. Padgett’s class asked if muscles, though muscles will atrophy if she could add boxing techniques to their they’re not used. The goal of this class is usual stretching and warm-up exercises, to prevent that from happening. Padgett, who’s taught this group for and today’s jabbing session is one result. Padgett’s colleague, physical therapist three years, says she’s seen noticeable Maggie Holt, is now looking to get cer- improvements in the players’ strength, tified herself as a Rock Steady boxing mobility and flexibility. At the beginning, many couldn’t plank for more than five instructor. After the warm-up, Padgett divides seconds. Now they do it for more than a the class into small groups, assigning minute. One man, who started the class two coaches to each. The players rotate last spring, initially had trouble keeping through four workout stations: cardio, up with the others. Then he started walklegs, core and wall. One group lies on the ing regularly. “He came back this semester, and he’s floor and does planks; a second stands against a wall and works on flexibility like a whole new man,” Padgett says. Why aren’t more Vermonters engaged and posture; a third does leg and balance training; a fourth hits the cardio in these forms of PD therapy? One major challenge the program faces, Padgett machines. In that fourth group, Martin begins notes, is finding the resources to offer alternately walking and running on a classes like this one to all the people who treadmill. Like all the players, he wears a need them. Unlike one-on-one physical blue “gait belt” around his waist, which is therapy sessions, Push Back isn’t covered

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

to someone who has spent much of his career instructing students in circus skills, both in Circus Smirkus and in college lecture series. In coming months, Mermin plans to offer a class in the Montpelier area to teach people with Parkinson’s how to juggle. Rather than using balls, pins or beanbags, he’ll start with less intimidating objects: plastic bags from the supermarket produce section. Inflated, the bags float lightly to the ground, which simplifies the juggling process. Mermin has dubbed the activity “baggling.” He notes that the throwing, bending and reaching involved in juggling are precisely the kinds of exercises that physical therapists recommend to PD sufferers to promote better balance, concentration and the use of both sides of their bodies. Recently, Mermin worked one-on-one with a man with Parkinson’s who had difficulties with his balance and frequent falls. For 10 minutes, Mermin’s student kept three plastic bags aloft simultaneously. When they finished, Mermin observed that the student hadn’t fallen once. As he focused on keeping the bags aloft, he also kept his PD symptoms at bay. As a young man, Mermin says, he learned a valuable lesson from his mentor: Marceau saw mime as a metaphor for life. When a mime drinks from an invisible glass of water, it’s not just a silly pantomime but a drink from the water of life. When a mime stands up from a chair, he’s not just one man standing, but all humanity rising to its feet. These days, Mermin applies Marceau’s metaphorical worldview to his Parkinson’s. “You have to keep moving in life,” he says, “no matter what.”


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Book review: The Academy of Hay, Julia Shipley B Y RACH E L E L IZABE TH J O NE S

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he first poem in Vermont writer Julia Shipley’s new collection, The Academy of Hay, is “Narcissus Cleaning the Bulk Tank.” The title is an apt one to lead the work that follows. The collection gradually teases out the relationship of self to a rural landscape populated by family, weather, the often peculiar infrastructure of agriculture, and so-called “ordinary” beasts: cows, goats, sheep, chickens. Shipley is the founder of Chickadee Chaps & Broads, a poetry and letterpress enterprise; and an occasional Seven Days contributor. Her previous work, Adam’s Mark: Writing From the Ox-House, was selected as a Boston Globe Best New England Book of 2014. In Craftsbury, Shipley has run Chickadee Farm and its writers’ retreat since 2004. She describes herself as “married to one man and six acres.” Described on its back cover as “a feminist response to our world straight from earth,” Academy was awarded the Melissa Lanitis Gregory Poetry Prize in 2014. These poems at times tread a line of familiar — particularly in Vermont — nature-fueled navel gazing. But they are riddled with delightfully idiosyncratic insights and gracefully shuttle between the raw elements of the farm and the raw elements of human experience. The collection is divided into five sections: “Herd,” “Barn Storms,” “The Academy of Hay,” “Husbandries” and “Herd of the World.” After reading all 55 entries, one might wonder how poetry could be written without a farm. Shipley is nonchalant and yet deliberate in her conflation of the language of the farm with the language of life. In “An Exegesis,” loading hay into the barn is described as “charging the barn’s imagination with soil’s offspring.” In “Ghost,” a phantom “shucked off his

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36 FEATURE

Verses From the Barn

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BOOKS shoes.” The transformation of barn into sentient, creative being, however, is not the central image of the former poem, nor is that of a ghost’s corn-ridden feet the centerpiece of the latter. These descriptors do not feel smug or sufficient in themselves; they are means to an end. In “Ghost,” that end is a searing image of a “talcum track” of white footprints on a floor “painted the color of dried blood.” Lighthearted wordplay is a fixture of the book, from a poem titled “Heartacre” to “The Present,” in which Shipley describes the barn looking like a freshly unwrapped gift as she cleans manure from the floor, recollecting a specific moment — a different kind of “present.” In “Bird Count,” Shipley describes the strangeness of English itself. “Porter, a toddler, hands me a turkey feather, Here. / He gives me a thing, but uses the language of location.” The Academy of Hay contains a great deal of violence, as well. “Ballistics”

meditates on the discovery of a hunter’s ammunition, mixing metaphors of guns and sex on the way to its ultimate assertion that while a bullet can travel two miles, “Any poem can travel further, though its wound / is inconclusive.” Shipley addresses the violence of time with lines like “as gradually as summer spears through winter” (“Horn”). In “Sufficiency: September 11, 2006,” “dawn cruises into noon,” an allusion to the trajectory of the planes flown into the World Trade Center. In “Persuasion,” Shipley writes, “The saw persuades the tree to forfeit an upright position […] The hammer persuades the washer to lie flat in the hole / the drill has persuaded the wood to open.” For the most part, these poems encapsulate feelings of simple wonder at the day-to-day mechanisms of subsistence, love and reproduction. However, at the end of the segment “Barn Storms,” Shipley bursts forth with an anomalous explosion titled “On the Road.” Longer


This Vermont endangered species is dying in traps

than most of the other poems, it’s a sort of songlike rant about driving and crashing, about harvests and payloads lost during transport. While the phrase “feminist response” in the book’s cover copy could be taken as referring to Shipley’s eco-minded lifestyle, it could also describe the anger she expresses in lines such as this one: “At worst I’d strew soot over every / rube/sob/stooge/pawn/dude who ever asked, / How are you?” By contrast with this generalized rage, most of the gendered pain that Shipley expresses in these poems relates to the kind of hurt inflicted within

AFTER READING ALL 55 ENTRIES, ONE MIGHT WONDER HOW POETRY COULD BE WRITTEN an intimate relationship. In “Winter as a Profit and Loss Statement,” for instance, she writes, “She’s felt a man go away without moving a muscle. She’s

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WITHOUT A FARM.

seen a man / veer away from a woman and he didn’t move at all.” Against the backdrop of this dominant tone of calm observation, “On the Road” appears like a sincere, startling outburst, and it’s significant that it takes place in transit, in a sphere outside the homestead. Religion and spirituality run through this collection, as well, with both themes coming to a climax in the book’s final segments, “Husbandries” and “Herd of the World.” “Mappa Mundi” directly addresses the task of defining God. Shipley confesses, “I don’t think: oh, holy soil,” and adds humorously: “Dirt — it doesn’t even have eyes for chrissake.” The book’s penultimate poem, “wAn Exegesis,” playfully likens the ascension of Jesus to heaven to the arrival of a bale on the hay elevator. Shipley writes, “on the third day / he rose from the dead and ascended into heaven … where she / grips him by the twine, hoists high, heaves him over.” With her nuanced, accessible visions of agrarian Vermont subject matter, Julia Shipley carries forward the state’s literary legacy. The Academy of Hay shows us that the land really is a gift that keeps on giving.  Contact: rachel@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The Academy of Hay by Julia Shipley, Bona Fide Books, 75 pages. $15.

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FEATURE 37

tense as when you watch a wine glass set on the table edge beside a guest telling dramatic stories with his hands... The morning the horn grazed eyeshine, at the brink of his blindness, the farmer showed up, hacksaw in hand. She keeps this stub to remind her.

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Imagine growing something from your head that could blind you: She once knew a ram whose horn grew askew, toward his eye. Slowy, though, as slow as hair grows, as gradually as summer spears through winter; as long as it takes something newly known to be said out loud—

12.02.15-12.09.15

FROM THE ACADEMY OF HAY: “HORN”

11/30/15 3:56 PM


The Art of Politics Longtime Sanders supporters fondly revisit his early campaign posters B Y NANCY R EMSEN

ALL OF THESE CAME

Frank Hewitt

on the poster project. It was 1981, and Sanders was making his first bid for mayor. “The big issue that election was a real-estate mogul’s plan to develop Burlington’s waterfront, then pretty much a weedy landscape of abandoned industrial buildings, junked railroad cars and big, rusty petroleum tanks,” Patterson wrote in a 2009 blog post about Hewitt’s first Bernie poster. His concept for the poster was a map of Burlington labeled “Burlington is not for sale,” plus an inset image

38 FEATURE

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12.02.15-12.09.15

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OUT OF FRANK’S HEAD.

COURTESY OF KAREN HEWITT

I

f Burlington artist Frank Hewitt were alive today, the artist and the politician, that were auctioned to he would surely have designed a collectible raise money for Sanders’ campaigns. poster to illustrate key themes of Bernie Sanders’ Hewitt died long before his friend would run for presidential campaign — perhaps pairing the Senate, much less president of the United States. But the artist’s family and friends have saved downtrodden middle class or greedy big banks those posters and remember the process with Sanders’ distinctive visage. behind them. The Rutland-born painter was an associate professor of art at the University of Vermont Karen Hewitt, Frank’s widow, still has some of the pillowcase-size posters from 1970 until his death in 1992. Even before stacked flat in wide drawers in the bright Sanders appeared on the scene, Hewitt was attic workroom where she designs wooden no stranger to controversy: He made his first toys. She told Seven Days she would give national splash in 1965, when the radical the artworks to Sanders’ presidential Anonima Group, which he had cofounded in campaign “if there was any way to make Cleveland, had a collaborative show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art. these helpful. I would do anything to help Bernie.” During his time at UVM, Hewitt ventured Burlington graphic artist Michael into political art to assist the electoral MIC H AE L Patterson collaborated with Hewitt on ambitions of his friend and fellow progressive, PAT TE R S O N the posters, although he stressed, “All Bernie Sanders. Their sons were friends, too: of these came out of Frank’s head.” Levi Sanders and Corin Hewitt spent a lot of Inspired by Sanders’ high national time shooting hoops at the Hewitts’ Henry visibility, the longtime owner of Patterson Ads Street house in Burlington. Hewitt made silk-screened posters for each of recently pulled out his own collection of the Sanders’ mayoral races, 1981 through 1987, and for his posters to revisit them. Patterson said he was “a printmaking student” at run for the U.S. Congress in 1990. These weren’t lawn signs but frame-worthy populist artworks, signed by UVM when Hewitt approached him looking for help

‘Burlington is not for sale’ Artist Frank Hewitt created this poster for Bernie Sanders’ first campaign for mayor in 1981, when one of the big issues was how to redevelop the waterfront. Sanders favored creation of public space over selling the entire area to a private developer, so Hewitt chose that theme for his poster. Sanders squeaked to victory by 10 votes, defeating the Democratic incumbent.

Bernie buttons In this 1983 poster, Hewitt used the images of two big campaign buttons to convey the message that Bernie was good for Burlington, so Burlington voters ought to rally for him on Election Day. They did. He won 52 percent of the vote in a three-way race with a Democrat and a Republican.


Grand slam For Sanders’ fourth and final term as mayor, Hewitt chose a different theme for his poster: baseball. The poster suggested that the mayor could hit a “grand slam” of accomplishments if voters returned him to office. It also reminded voters that Sanders’ dogged pursuit of a professional minorleague baseball team paid off. The Double-A team, initially dubbed Vermont Reds, began playing in the city in 1984. Sanders garnered 55 percent of the vote against a Democratic challenger.

Bernie = Burlington When Sanders ran a third time for Burlington’s top job, Hewitt’s poster featured a classic image of the mayor with a mic, hand raised to make a point. Sanders won reelection with 56 percent of the vote, again in a threeway contest.

ART

A new audience

FEATURE 39

Hewitt kept it simple when he created the 1990 poster for Sanders’ second attempt to win the state’s sole seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. Just the candidate’s name appeared — first, of course — followed by a map of Vermont and a declaration of his independence. After six unsuccessful runs for various statewide offices, Sanders secured the Congressional seat in a four-way race, with 56 percent of the vote.

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Kraft, who also owns several of the ’80s Bernie posters, described them as bold political statements done by an artist in a playful, creative style. The second and third mayoral posters reminded voters of Sanders’ commitment to the city with the slogan “Bernie for Burlington.” As Sanders sought a fourth term, Hewitt’s poster celebrated his accomplishments with a baseball analogy: “a grand slam for Burlington.” The poster also reminded Burlington voters that Sanders had brought a Double-A minor-league baseball team to the city. Hewitt created a fifth poster in 1990, when Sanders made his second run for Vermont’s sole seat in the U.S. House of Representatives. His win launched a 25-year (and counting) career in Washington, D.C., that Sanders is now hoping to top with a move to the White House. Art is part of that effort, too. Artists such as Richard J Oliver and dug Nap have already contributed pieces to Sanders’ presidential campaign that will be printed as limited editions. “We have a policy that explains what we can accept from artists,” said Michael Briggs, campaign communications director. The prints by Oliver, Nap and other artists will be displayed in shows around the country and then auctioned, he added. The maximum price for an artwork will be $2,700, the limit on an individual campaign donation. Back in Burlington, the possessors of Sanders’ early political posters cherish them all the more now that he is on the national stage, Kraft said. “There are people who would like to collect these things right now,” she noted, “because Bernie is very cool and Frank’s work has currency.” 

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of a smiling Sanders and the instruction to “Vote Sanders for Mayor.” Patterson had a screen-printing setup in the basement of his home in Winooski, he recalled. So Hewitt came over with a stack of positive films. “We Scotch-taped them together into the composition,” Patterson explained. “We exposed a stencil film with a sun lamp shining through our taped-up master and pulled a few dozen prints. “Then Frank worked into the still-soft ink on most of the prints with thinner and a brush, creating the soft, washy effects,” he added. That made each print unique. Sanders, of course, won that historic 1981 race — and he was reelected three times. For his subsequent campaign posters, Patterson said he helped Hewitt put together the film images for the masters, but they were printed commercially. Doreen Kraft, executive director of Burlington City Arts, said Hewitt saw art as a communication tool and a way to build community. “Bernie’s election, to him, was very significant,” she said. One of Sanders’ first moves as mayor was to set up a volunteer arts task force, and Hewitt was one of the original members. The group, which became known as the Mayor’s Arts Council, “turned the lobby of city hall into a gallery,” Kraft remembered. It also established a Thursday-night summer concert series in Battery Park, for which Hewitt created an image depicting a vivid pink sunset over Lake Champlain. (In 1983, the Burlington City Council voted to fund the arts group and hired Kraft as a part-time coordinator; seven years later, it would evolve into Burlington City Arts.)


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BOOKS

The Minaret of Jesus at the Umayyad Mosque in Damascus

Damascus Dreams

In a new book of photographs, Vermonter Deborah Harte Felmeth depicts her other home: Syria B Y E TH AN D E SEIFE

T

I TOOK THE PHOTOGRAPHS BECAUSE I WAS IN

“This is the second-oldest stone mosque in the world. Inside it is a mausoleum holding the head of John the Baptist. Before it was a mosque, it was a cathedral; underneath the cathedral is a Roman temple of Jupiter; underneath the Roman temple is a pagan temple for the god Hadad, the god of thunder. “Alongside the mausoleum, the first time I was in Damascus, I remember seeing a line of men hunched over, sitting on the ground. They didn’t look well. I wondered, What is this about? Then I realized they were all blind. [A friend explained that]

when they were young, they were sent for religious education, and they memorized the Quran. A child who has no sight has limited opportunities for work, and [many Muslims believe that the blind] have more insight because they don’t see the outer world — literal insight. Therefore, these men would wait for anybody who needed to talk. People would walk up and go, I’m gonna talk to that guy, and they would sit. Then the men would straighten up, they would listen, they would counsel. Then the people would put a little money down.”

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Archway in the Old City of Damascus

» P.43

FEATURE 41

DAMASCUS DREAMS

SEVEN DAYS

“The man on the left is peddling his wares through the Old City: oranges from the Mediterranean coast. One of the wonderful things about living in the Old City of Damascus is hearing the cries of the street sellers. I would be sitting downstairs, and I would hear [clinks spoon repeatedly on mug], and I would know that the gas-bottle seller was there. You might hear someone going through the street saying, ‘Tender, tender, tender as babies’ fingers’ — selling little tiny cucumbers. Each seller has his own melody.”

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EXTRAORDINARY SITUATIONS AND FELT THAT I WAS ALMOST CONTINUOUSLY BEING GIVEN TREASURE.

PHOTOS: DEBORAH HARTE FELMETH

he nation the years, she of Syria came to know it so commands well that she and more headher Syrian native lines today than it husband led tours has at any other time of the country. in modern history. Syria’s civil war, Since 2011, the counwhich began in try’s very name has 2011 and continconjured up images of ues to rage today, revolution, civil war eventually forced and an increasingly the couple to bring dire refugee crisis. their tour operations For American to a halt. Felmeth’s politicians, Syria has voice was tinged become another buzzwith regret when word they use to polarshe talked with Seven ize supporters and detractors. Days about the imposMany state governors sibility of returning are currently conto Syria now; she testing the Obama regards the country administration’s as a second home. policy of accepting Over coffee, refugees fleeing that Felmeth quickly country. Gov. Peter noted that she’s Shumlin’s recent not a professional decision to welcome photographer — in Syrian refugees has Vermont, her bio sparked both protests states, she works as and plaudits. a piano, voice and But for Waltham yoga teacher. “If I resident Deborah had known, back Harte Felmeth, who in 1991, that I was has lived in Syria taking photographs DEB ORAH HARTE FE LMETH intermittently for for a book, I would the past 20 years, have changed my the country has less contentious asso- camera!” she said with a laugh. ciations. It’s a land of welcoming people, Still, Felmeth has captured strikbeautiful traditions and arresting coun- ing images unlike those we see in the tryside. Her view of the place — both lit- news these days. The photos in Syria: eral and figurative — is the subject of her Remember Me, taken between 1991 and book of photographs Syria: Remember 2011, show landscapes, market vendors, Me, recently published by Bard Owl worshippers, whirling dervishes — a Books, an imprint of Wind Ridge Books country’s everyday life. of Vermont. “I took the photographs because I Felmeth first visited Syria in 1991, was in extraordinary situations and felt when she was 37, to take a job teach- that I was almost continuously being ing music at the Damascus Community given treasure,” Felmeth said. School in the nation’s ancient capital. She selected several images from Her growing fascination with Syria led Syria: Remember Me and shared the to further travel within its borders. Over stories behind them. 


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“This is the very edge of a prepottery archaeological site — I think that’s the third millennium [BC], but I’m not positive. [The houses at left are] the ‘modern village’: mud brick. They make and bake the mud bricks, which are coated with wattle and daub. Very, very beautiful houses with poplar roof beams. At this site, a team of archaeologists from the University of Chicago discovered the first evidence of the change from round to square in dwellings, so this turned out to be an extremely important site. “This was [taken] in 1994, and the Syrian government was, during this period, designing and building the second hydroelectric dam on the Prayer-bead seller, Damascus Euphrates in this region. So it was known that this was going to be flooded. The archaeologists were working in great haste. It was known that the water was going to rise and was going to cover that village. “Speaking to this man, I said, “This man, with all these prayer beads ‘What are you going to do?’ And he said, under his arm, had such a beautiful ‘Wait.’ ‘What do you mean, “wait”?’ I said. voice. I would hear him from two or three ‘When the river moves, we’ll move. The blocks away, and I would try to find him. government has given us concrete blocks [Sings in Arabic.] That means ‘To whom and rebar, but we don’t really want the can we complain? You are forever, you concrete blocks and rebar, because they are forever.’ And, of course, he was selling don’t build a house as good as this. So prayer beads. My husband would always we are making mud bricks. But we’re not laugh at me: ‘You bought more prayer going to move until the river moves.’” beads from that guy?’ I would say, ‘No, I

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FEATURE 43

INFO


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End Game

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en wearing plaid and camouflage gather in the church parking lot. Some trade stories of the day’s hunt; others turn sausages over hissing grills. Savory scents fill the air as floodlights bolster the day’s fading sun. From a stained-glass window in the church, Mother Mary gazes downward with an eternal not-quite-smile. A man rushes toward the grill, empty sheet pan in hand. “They need lots of rabbit,” he says urgently. The grill man loads skewers onto the pan. “That’s rabbit?” the waiter asks. “Yeah,” the griller replies. The server dashes back toward the dining room, which is also the function hall at the Bradford Congregational United Church of Christ, known locally as the “Congregational” or just “Congo” church. Near the front door, a plywood sign announces the evening’s event in black-stenciled letters: “WILD GAME SUPPER, NOV 21.” This year’s feast was the town’s 60th. More than 800 guests showed up, according to longtime reservationist Janice Larabee. Most of them registered via printed forms, folded and posted with a $30 check and SASE. Not so long ago the meal fed nearly twice that, Larabee says. In recent years organizers cut the 6:30 p.m. seating — sourcing, prepping and serving more than a thousand portions of moose, bear, beaver and boar was just too much to handle. Many on the all-volunteer crew didn’t finish their shifts until well after midnight. Still, in sleepy Bradford, the meal is a highlight on the town’s annual calendar and has garnered press from the New York Times, NPR and other national outlets. Throughout the afternoon, cars stream off the highway and pull in to

Bradford’s Wild Game Supper

That’s because roasting area bed-and-breakfasts beaver smells like eau du and motels, then head to pond, all stagnant organics the village for the first and dark, impenetrable seating at 2 p.m. By 4 muck. p.m., cars with out-ofBut some people love state plates line Route 5. the stuff. Says Larabee, “I Behind the church, J UL IE P O R TE R think [beaver is] disgusting, a steep embankment but if you don’t have it, rises to Pleasant Street, where my grandmother spent many a people want it!” For a taste of this and fall evening roasting beaver in the yard of other critters, guests must ascend the her big white house. No one remembers wide granite steps into the church how Barbara Palmer ended up on beaver sanctuary. When my husband and I arrive, detail, but everyone in the family recalls the house-filling stench that caused her Dwayne Benjamin is at the altar strumming bluegrass-y ballads. To his to move the operation outside.

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left, Larabee sits at a table with two other ladies, handing cards to guests as they check in. “Egan,” I say, approaching the table. “For two.” “Egan, Egan,” she hums, thumbing through her box. She pulls out two tickets: 394 and 395. We take seats in the pews along with at least 200 other number-holding guests and listen to Benjamin croon. One of the check-in ladies stands up. “Anyone with numbers 400 and below!” she calls. END GAME

» P.46

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FOOD 45

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and will host special cocktail nights, workshops and other boozy events in hopes of tapping into the Queen City’s increasing interest in craft food and spirits. “It’ll give us a chance to talk to people about how we make these cocktails and give people a better sense of what craft distilling is all about,” Buttenheim says. Egan notes that the company decided early on to distill every spirit by hand and from scratch, using as

(5615 Route 14) reopened for regular business before Thanksgiving. A well-loved watering hole since the early 1800s, the tavern stood empty for almost 10 years until chef JED COHAN moved his DELICATA CATERING business into the space in summer 2014. He opened the tavern last January with a well-crafted locavore menu of arancini, empanadas, pizzas and dinner plates such as grilled ribs, roast chicken, and baked polenta with wilted greens and red sauce. Though he insists the reopening isn’t “a big thing,” Cohan has installed additional plush seating and tweaked the menu. He plans to debut brunch service soon and has reintroduced the popular hand-ground burger, which he shelved this past summer after continued issues with the ventilation hood. “We’re always revising the menu and trying to get it

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will follow the company’s Waitsfield outlet (open on weekends) as its second retail location. Along with its own bottles, the shop will carry spirits from other Vermont distilleries, plus mixers, glassware, bar tools and gift packs, such as a three-flask holiday sampler of MRD rye, bourbon and maple rum. Though Buttenheim emphasizes that the new space will not be a bar, the tasting room will have a bar

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For decades, the airy corner storefront at 137 St. Paul Street in Burlington was home to the Hempest, the clothing retailer known for its spirited, eco-friendly duds. Shortly after the Boston-based boutique closed earlier this month, MAD RIVER DISTILLERS moved in. Now the craft distillery is hard at work transforming the space into a tasting room and retail shop. If all goes well, the cofounders of the Warren distillery — JOHN EGAN, MAURA CONNOLLY and BRETT LITTLE — will be offering samples of their whiskeys, rums and Malvados apple brandy later this month — at least on a pop-up basis. The opening date remains fuzzy pending permits, says distillery president MIMI BUTTENHEIM, who joined the company last spring after four years heading VERMONT SPIRITS. When it opens for regular hours in January, the Burlington tasting room

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End Game « P.44 We check our numbers and turn toward the door, filing past more ladies selling knit caps and crab-apple jelly from a table at the back. Down the wood staircase and into the dining room, ushers collect our tickets and guide us into a buffet line. A boy hands me a plate, then sends me to the meat gauntlet, where I exchange greetings with 20-odd volunteers, many of whom I know. They ask after my parents and offer portions of roast and steak and sausage, each tagged with a colored toothpick. Depending on the day, this room serves as food pantry and community meeting space. It’s also the Sundayschool classroom, where village children study picture-book stories of plagues and miracles, pharaohs and famines. Here, too, they dress for the Christmas pageant, donning robes and wings to retell the story of a baby born to a virgin in a faraway manger. But tonight we’re here to eat. Waiters dart through the room, carrying plastic pitchers of cider and brown gravy and trays of potatoes. White name tags identify them by first name only. All told, the volunteers are in the hundreds, says 2015 supper cochair Julie Porter, who adds that, with a shrinking church population, finding help is the meal’s biggest challenge. Upstairs, 20 musicians cycle through pro bono sets in the sanctuary. Prior to the big day, cooks prepare the meats, working in shifts in the church and high school kitchens. Fourteen women bake rabbit pies in their home ovens, Porter says.

Dozens more prepare roasts and sausages of buffalo, bear, moose and game birds, many following recipes volunteers have used for 60 years. So when my dad tells me the pheasant and rice is not to be missed, he’s talking about the exact pudding he sampled decades ago. “[The recipes are] all on an original note card tucked away until the time of the dinner,” Porter says, adding that each dish is scaled to feed 500 people

A STRIP OF BOAR BACON IS LEANER THAN A DOMESTICATED CURE,

AND NUTTY, AS IF THE WILD PORKER HAD GORGED ON FALLEN ACORNS BEFORE ITS DEMISE. or more — down to the whipped cream spooned over the spiced gingerbread cake at meal’s end. Seated at a long table next to strangers, I stare down at the two-bite nibbles of bear and venison steak, wild boar bacon, rabbit pot pie, roast beaver, and sausages made with any or all of the above. I plunge my spoon into a plastic ramekin of bear-and-venison chili, then contemplate the tomato-tinged red beans and ground game. It’s a little ... gamey, but mostly tastes like chili. A strip of boar bacon is leaner than a domesticated cure, and nutty, as if the


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relatives. “I was 10 when I was put into the cider room with the very important job of emptying gallons of cider into pitchers,” she recalls. “It’s been a family tradition forever.” Porter has also worked the buffet line, prepared specialty meat, and carried coffee, cider and gravy to thousands of guests. This year, her 2-year-old son helped her father sort the squash. Her mother, Anita Perry, made the pheasant-and-rice pudding, while her cousin and uncle worked the buffet line. In 2014, Porter and cochair David McLam announced that this year’s supper would be their last. In addition to working full time overseeing

the baker’s hotline at King Arthur Flour in Norwich, Porter is mother to two young children and busy in the community. Coordinating the supper kicks into high gear in August, and Porter says she spends most of her spare time on it until mid-November. McLam says he started sourcing meat for this year’s dinner more than a year ago. Finding volunteers is the hardest part. “The church population is getting on in age,” Porter says. “So it’s hard to keep this thing alive with only 30 or so [active members]. Of those, only a few are young enough to help. There’s a group of people that has been doing it for so long, they’re just plain tired of working on it.” But many hundreds of guests have made the meal a tradition — one troupe of boy scouts has been coming from Connecticut for 40 years, and they’re not the only large group making the annual pilgrimage. The supper is also the church’s major fundraiser, netting an average of $10,000 per year. “It keeps the lights on, that’s for sure,” Porter says. Behind the game-supper sign, another one reports that the community has raised $60,000 of the $200,000 needed to repair the 140-year-old church. This summer, workers fixed the steeple and clock embedded in its spire, which had been losing time for as long as many residents can remember. When Porter and McLam resigned, and announced the last supper, longtime volunteers Dan and Tracy Smith stepped in. With promised support from several community members, the couple committed to coordinating the 2016 feast. “We just don’t want it to stop,” says Tracy Smith. She has worked the supper since childhood, and she took on more responsibility as her parents phased out. While everyone says that keeping the dinner tradition alive is trying, that’s nothing new, according to Janice Larabee. “[This] started out with Helen and Cliff McLam way back when. Then Aris Eastman got involved. Then the Tomlinsons, and then Julie and Dave. Nobody wants to give it up, so someone has to take it over.” Tracy Smith seems hopeful for next year. “You feel like you’ve accomplished something once you do it,” she says. “You feel good about everything. The people who come are always so thankful and appreciative.” m

AMER I

wild porker had gorged on fallen acorns before its demise. In past years, hunters donated much of the meat. But with a shrinking church population and fewer members trolling the woods, supper organizers rely on Vermont’s Department of Fish & Wildlife for illegal deer taken by hunters. And, Porter adds, “I hate to say it, but some of it’s roadkill.” The volunteers supplement with farmraised animals purchased from co-ops and game preserves throughout the region. This year, Pierson Farm donated 778 pounds of Hubbard squash, while the church paid for thousands of pounds of potatoes and cabbage, Porter says. Porter is a Bradford native, raised in the church along with many of her


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f holidays had personalities, Thanksgiving would be the tried-and-true friend — the same No need to travel to Montréal, Boston or starchy meal every year, the same even Europe... we’re just minutes away! tryptophan naps. Christmas has a more exotic quality, flavored with the crunch of fresh snow, cinnamon and 12v-cafemeditarano111914.indd 1 11/13/14 12:58 PM pine needles. There’s the sweet agony of waiting to see what’s under the tree, and the thrill of ripping off paper to be shocked (happily or otherwise) by the findings. Then comes the feast. This year, after a fall seasoned by change and heartbreak, I found the thought of Thanksgiving’s routines QUALITY MEATS & DELI more melancholy than cozy. So instead since 1992 of churning out pumpkin pie, I headed ORDER YOUR OFFICE to Montréal, holding the promise of Christmas in my thoughts. For 12 hours, I wandered the markets and the streets, seeking out fine flavors to grace my holiday table and gifts to FIVE-FOOT SANDWICHES give the gourmands in my life. I barely SANDWICH PLATTERS thought about turkey. LARGE SALADS MAC & CHEESE AND LASAGNA I’m always confounded by shopping PLUS MORE! guides that range all over a city, so I limited my wanderings to the vicinity 16 Main St . Essex Junction 878-8163 of Jean-Talon Market, at 7070 avenue www.martonesmarket.com Henri-Julien, plus a brisk stroll down Boulevard Laurent and a couple of pop12v-martones111815.indd 1 11/16/15 3:30 PMins on the streets nearby. Tu-Th 11-8 • F & S 11-9 • Closed Sun & Mon Full menu www.cafemediterano.com

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48 FOOD

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197 North Winooski Avenue 863-8278 BarrioBakeryVt.com

Tips for Shopping Abroad Unless you’re at the front of a long line, ask the person who’s helping you to recommend their favorite products; they know more about them than you do. I typically fill in the blanks in this Mad Lib: “I’m hoping to take home some of [place]’s finest [type of food]. I like ones that are [adjective] and [adjective], and taste a little like [other food item], but I’m willing to try anything you think is essential.” Buy things you can’t get at home. Buy things produced in the place you’re visiting. Make plans, but be willing to surrender them as your journey unfolds. My accidental discovery of Boucherie Lawrence led to a surprise lunch at

11/23/15 1:58 PM

PHOTOS: SUZANNE PODHAIZER

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HOLIDAY PLATTERS

MY ACCIDENTAL DISCOVERY OF BOUCHERIE LAWRENCE LED TO MY FIRST TASTE OF WHELK, CRISPY AND CHEWY, WITH CHICKPEAS, CUCUMBER AND DASHES OF PARSLEY.

Lawrence restaurant — my first taste of whelk, crispy and chewy, with chickpeas, cucumber and dashes of parsley — and to a new friend, co-owner Sefi Amir, who is a passionate advocate for principled agriculture.

Specialty Food Shops The best food shops fall into two distinct categories. There are establishments focused on particular items — say, things made with and from olives. These typically have impassioned staffs and small but well-curated selections. Bonus points if most goods are made on-site. Then there are shops that aggregate the best of the best, offering handcrafted items in plenty of culinary categories. For instance, Le Marché des Saveurs du Québec features 7,000 items produced in the province. Between those two extremes, you’ll find hundreds of run-of-the-mill tourist traps, selling whatever attracts the eye.


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Jean-Talon Market, 450-588-5125 — wildcrafted goods from Québec

The owners of this market stall also operate a retail store in Saint-Roch-del’Achigan, 45 minutes from Montréal, and a much-touted restaurant in the same town. Prix-fixe and open only on Saturdays, it serves dishes such as oysters Rockefeller made with sea spinach, and pork with corn and cattail-pollen polenta. At the market, try: Labrador tea syrup, dried wild sarsaparilla berry, black trumpet mushrooms, milkweed flower, day-lily pistils (poor person’s saffron), wild herb salt, Québec long pepper.

34 Park Street, Essex Junction

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Épices de Cru C-11, Jean-Talon Market, 514-273-1118 — spices and tea, tea ware

Pâtisserie le Ryad

Try: Vanilla beans from a variety of countries and exotic spices such as ajwain, amchoor and mastic gum.

Jean-Talon Market, 514-777-2189 — Middle Eastern and Mediterranean sweets

Pastificio Sacchetto

Specialty Food Shops: Outside Jean-Talon Market

Jean-Talon Market, 514-274-4443 — 70 varieties of fresh pasta and the sauces to go with them

Try: Extruded noodles, such as penne and fusilli, that few people make at home.

Boucherie Lawrence 5237 boulevard St-Laurent, 514277-8880 — a rotating selection of

FLAVORS WITHOUT BORDERS

» P.50

have originated in Canada — make sure you have proof. CHEESE: The only items listed as prohibited are ricotta and cottage cheese, or anything that “pours like cream.” Cultured products such as yogurt are allowed, as are semi-soft and hard cheeses.

plants, as well as fruit and vegetable seeds. Otherwise, fruits, herbs, spice blends, cooked and husked nuts, and dry mixes for baking are admissible. Rice from certain countries is prohibited because of an invasive beetle so it’s best not to have rice.

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PRODUCE: If it was grown in Canada, you’re crossing in May through October and it’s not a western Canadian potato, it’s probably fine. Have proof of origin.

Reserve your Jamaican Blue Mountain!

SEAFOOD: No listed restrictions on

“personal amounts.” DRIED FOODS: Avoid any parts of citrus

PREPARED FOODS: Meat-free baked goods, bottled condiments, candies and chocolates are A-OK. Don’t try to bring restaurant leftovers.

2:36 PM

412 PINE ST, BURLINGTON 658-6016 8v-speeders112614.indd 1

FOOD 49

MEAT: Nothing made with goat or sheep. Meat can be fresh, frozen, cooked or cured but must be sealed in its package, include an English ingredient list and

WATCH LIVE Even from outside, I could tell these @5:25 people are serious about deliciousness. I WEEKNIGHTS ON wasn’t wrong. TV AND ONLINE Try: Everything. And then go to GET MORE INFO OR WATCH ONLINE AT the companion restaurant, also called VERMONT CAM.ORG • RETN.ORG CH17.TV Lawrence, which is just a couple of doors down (5201 boulevard St-Laurent, 514-503-1070). Eat something you’ve 16t-retnWEEKLY.indd 1 11/30/15 never eaten before.

SEVEN DAYS

generally known, we’d be eating a lot more Canadian cheese. For gourmands who are jumping for joy at the thought of better access to Canadian products, my advice is this: Buy a portable vacuum sealer and tote it around with you at the market. I chose not to buy some of the most delicious things I tasted at Jean-Talon because the vendors couldn’t package them in a way that I thought would pass muster. After all the care I took to study the rules, ask for special packaging and organize my receipts, guess what happened when I arrived at the border. The guard asked, “What did you buy while you were in Canada?” “Cooking magazines, cookbooks and food,” I replied, ready to elaborate and offer documentation. He waved me on with no further questions. I passed the border with ease, but you never know when you’ll be grilled. To help you be fully prepared, here’s a rundown of what I learned:

SATURDAY > 8:00 AM

12.02.15-12.09.15

During my day in Montréal, I kept repeating two phrases. One was “Pardonnez-moi, mais je parle anglais.” The second was “Can you vacuum seal that?” Before leaving the United States, I’d thoroughly studied a document called “Travelers bringing food into the U.S. for personal use” on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection website. Frankly, what surprised me the most was the dearth of restrictions on food we can cart back from our northern neighbor. If I’m reading that document correctly, dry-aged steaks, Brie, raw shrimp, Canadian-grown berries, honeycomb, clean wild mushrooms and dried pork sausages are all allowed. Heck, you can even drag a bison carcass across the border, provided that it’s headless and gutless, and that you can whip out your hunting license. Yet, to my surprise, none of the shopkeepers seemed to realize this. Most suggested that meat is probably prohibited and that dairy is dicey. I suspect that if the rules were more

Try: Turkish delight in a variety of flavors, including my fave — rose.

VT STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION

charcuterie made with meat from small producers, plus a few dairy products, eggs and pickled things

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

FOOD AND THE BORDER PATROL

11/18/15 11:22 AM

11/25/14 1:22 PM


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11/20/15 4:12 PM

ASIAN STREET NOODLE BOWLS

Le Marché des Saveurs du Québec 280 Place du Marché du Nord, 514-2713811 — fine foods from Québec in every category you can think of

Try: Cheese, and lots of it. Staff will help you pick the best ones. Then shop for preserved spruce tips, day-lily-and-apple jelly, chocolate bars, ice cider and ice wine, and all things cranberry and érable (unless you’re a Vermonter who regards it a grave sin to buy Canadian maple).

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Lunch $10.95 • Dinner $13.95 • Your choice of noodle: Rice, Egg or Ramen Grilled Honey Pork and Fried Egg Hunan Country Chicken* Vietnamese Beef Pho — sautéed steak w/ organic spinach, basil & carmelized onions Malaysian Curry Chicken or Beef* Vegetable Hunan*— mixed seasonal vegetables w/ spicy sauce Chicken Teriyaki — with caramelized onions & organic spinach Hong Kong Style Shrimp or Pork Dim Sum Beef and Kim Chee*— sautéed steak with kim chee, tofu with sriracha chili SAUTÉED NOODLES Singapore Street Curry Noodle*— chicken, pork & shrimp w/ curry & pineapple Chef Pan Fried Noodle — shrimp, pork, chicken w/ mix veg in savory light soy over crispy noodles Chef Pad Thai* — Thai style roce noodle w/ tomato, basil & a splash of fish sauce Sauteed Udon w/Vegetables*— Japanese (sweet aged soy)

*Hot & spicy: can be adjusted according to your taste

1216 Williston Rd., So. Burlington • silverpalaceofvt.com Behind Dunkin Donuts • 802-864-0125

50 FOOD

6862 Boulevard St.-Laurent, 514-2738558 — Italian groceries

For those who like lower prices and less froufrou, this store sells frozen microwave pizza … and veal brains. The noodle aisle is like a shrine to pasta; I’ve never seen so many varieties in one place. Also look for local wagyu beef, organic porchetta, really big jars of Nutella, gooey nougat — the works. Try: Getting an Airbnb room so you can buy sweetbreads here, cook them and serve them over saffron tagliatelle.

Cookbooks Librairie Gourmande Jean-Talon Market, 514-279-1742 — a thoughtful selection of cookbooks in French and English

STEAM BUNS $ 7.95 Honey Pork Slider— honey pork w/ caramelized onion, basil & hoisin sauce Popcorn Shrimp*— crispy shrimp w/ pepper, onion basil & splash Thai chili sauce Thai Beef or Chicken* — sautéed w/ basil, cilantro & fresh tomato Savory Pork Belly — slow cooked pork belly in sweet soy bean paste

3v-silverpalace120215-2.indd 1

Milano Fruiterie

11/30/15 4:09 PM

Try: Francophone food magazines, such as Caribou, Saveurs (not to be confused with the American Saveur) and Dinette. Also, snap up some quintessential northof-the-border cookbooks. I got Market Chronicles: Stories and Recipes From Montréal’s Marché Jean-Talon, by Susan Semenak, which offers easy-to-make

recipes inspired by the market’s producers. Particularly intriguing are spruce-beer granita, spicy corn fritters with bacon, and wild mushroom and venison tartare. More adventurous cooks may want to try Montréal Cooks: A Tasting Menu From the City’s Leading Chefs, by Jonathan Cheung and Tays Spencer, featuring recipes for Pig’s Trotter Savoury Cake with tomato jam, and Szechuan-style poached white fish.

Cooking Classes and More La Guilde Culinaire 6381 boulevard St-Laurent, 514-7506050 — a boutique selling specialized cookware and a small number of edibles, with an in-house cooking school that offers classes nightly

Try: All the strange chemicals chefs use for molecular gastronomy experiments, along with pipettes and other gadgets that will make you feel like you’re in high school chem lab. Frequent visitors to the city may appreciate gift certificates that can be used toward goods or classes.

Les Touilleurs 152 avenue Laurier Ouest, 514-2780008 — upscale cookware and regularly scheduled demos by local chefs

Try: Fine cookware in elegant neutral colors, pepper mills made of “naturally fallen” branches, heavy-duty aprons, cotton dish towels with antique-style prints. m

More food after the classifieds section. PAGE 51


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UNDERHILL Lg. 3-BR, 2-BA. W/D, parking, snow removal, heat incl. $1,350/mo. NS/pets. Avail. now. 373-8496. Lease, refs., 1-mo. sec. dep. Great country setting. WINOOSKI Newly renovated townhouse. $1,500/mo. + utils. 4-BR, 1.5-BA. Sec. dep. Avail. now. 598-9328, etran1015@ gmail.com.

HOUSEMATES MILTON Room to rent, 12 x 12 ft. w/ closet. Heat & electricity incl. Kitchen privileges. W/D. $125/ week. 488-4839. MILTON Finished room to rent in private lakefront 2-BR ranch. Private BA. Heat & electricity incl. $125/ week. 488-4839.

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EQUAL sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 HOUSING 16t-robbiehh102115.indd 5:02 PM 1 Our readers are hereby informed 10/19/15 12:52 PM law. OPPORTUNITY that all dwellings, advertised in this All real estate advertising in this newsnewspaper are available on an equal paper is subject to the Federal Fair opportunity basis. Any home seeker Housing Act of 1968 and similar Verwho feels her or she has encountered mont statutes which make it illegal to discrimination should contact: advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, HUD Office of Fair Housing religion, sex, national origin, sexual 10 Causeway St., orientation, age, marital status, Boston, MA 02222-1092 handicap, presence of minor children (617) 565-5309 in the family or receipt of public as— OR — sistance, or an intention to make any Vermont Human Rights Commission such preference, limitation or a dis135 State St., Drawer 33 crimination. The newspaper will not Montpelier, VT 05633-6301 knowingly accept any advertising for 800-416-2010 real estate, which is in violation of the Fax: 802-828-2480 C-2 CLASSIFIEDS

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11:26 AM

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1,000 a week mailing brochures from home. No experience required. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine opportunity. Start immed. theincomehub. com. (AAN CAN)

COMPUTER DISH TV Starting at $19.99/ mo. (for 12 mos.). Save! Regular price $34.99. Ask about free same-day installation! 888-992-1957.

SOMETHING SEW RIGHT Professional clothing alterations since 1986. Creative, quality work from formal wear to leather repairs. New location: 248 Elm St., 2nd floor, Montpelier. 229-2400, pmorse52@ live.com.

FINANCIAL/LEGAL ARE YOU IN BIG TROUBLE WITH THE IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns & payroll issues, & resolve tax debt fast. 844-7531317. (AAN CAN)

HEALTH/ WELLNESS ELIMINATE CELLULITE & inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. For men or women. Free month supply on select packages. 844-2447149 (Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m.-9 p.m.) (AAN CAN)

local decisions First Time Homebuyer Programs VHFA | FHA |VA|RD|NHHFA

800-753-4343 UBLOCAL.com Untitled-5 1

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk w/ caring agency specializing in matching birthmothers w/ families nationwide. Living expense paid. Call 24-7: Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions, 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana. (AAN CAN)

CLOTHING ALTERATIONS

STAY LOCAL. GO FAR.

FOR RENT

802-472-5100

RICHMOND Share a home w/ a senior woman who enjoys card games, “Jeopardy” & “Wheel of Fortune.” Provide light housekeeping, occasional meal prep & help w/ errands in exchange for reduced rent of $200/mo., all incl. No pets. 863-5625 or homesharevermont.org for application. Interview, refs., background checks required. EHO.

MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s waterfront has affordable office & retail space. Dynamic environment w/ progressive & forwardthinking businesses. mainstreetlanding.com, click on space avail. UB_mortgage.ad.7Ds.NOV.pdf 1 10/19/15

HOUSING

Route 15, Hardwick

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

11/6/15 11:15 AM

PSYCHIC COUNSELING & channeling w/ Bernice Kelman of Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes & more. Info: 899-3542, kelman.b@ juno.com.


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x37.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses ExcEptional Burlington triplEx!

ExcEptional pricE - MotivatEd SEllErS!

Burlington | 70-74 AdAms street | #4441124

Jericho | 16 BrAdley Bow roAd | #4448010

HarBor HEigHtS townHoME

south Burlington | 33 hArBorview roAd, #1201 | #4460363

PRice ReDUceD! Well located premier brick Burlington Triplex. Spacious and nicely renovated Townhouse style apartments with parking and onsite laundry. Only three blocks to Main St. and one block to Smalley Park. Rare opportunity to acquire exceptional Burlington property! $849,000

VOLUNTEERS FOR FOOD STUDY Ages 18-40, not on prescription medication & whose diet incl. dairy products. Investigating the role of milk fat in a balanced diet. All food provided (8 weeks) & $1,000 upon completion. foodstudy@uvm. edu.

846.9575 LipVT.com

Bobbe Maynes 846.9550 BobbeMaynes.com

HOME/GARDEN

FURNITURE

MISCELLANEOUS

HONEY-DO HOME MAINTENANCE All jobs lg. or small, home or office, 24-hr. service. A division of Sasso Construction. Call Scott today! Local, reliable, honest. All calls returned. 310-6926.

CHERRY CANOPY BED FRAME $650. Full size. 860-331-0026.

CHRISTMAS ROCKING HORSE Santa & rocking horse decorations. $15 each. 860-331-0026.

Say you saw it in ...



buy this stuff

ELECTRONICS SONY HIGHDEFINITION TV Must sell. 51 in. Does need color adjustment but works perfectly. Paid $3,000. $200/ OBO. Jackie, 861-2375.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES CAMERA & EQUIPMENT SWAP Do you have photographic equipment just gathering dust, or are you looking for something? Sun., Dec. 5, noon-4 p.m., at Darkroom Gallery, 12 Main St., Essex Jct. tinyurl.com/nmzhpck.

SNOW TIRES 8 studded Nokian Hakkapelita tires. Used 1 winter; low miles. 20565R16. Bought new last year. $450. 363-3343. VIAGRA! 52 pills for only $99. Your No. 1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured & guaranteed delivery. 877-621-7013.

VIAGRA! 52 pills for only $99. Your No. 1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured & guaranteed delivery. 888-403-9028

PETS FERRET CAGE & BIRD CAGE Lg. ferret cage. Shelving & tunnels create 3 levels. On wheels. 4.5 x 3.5 ft. $75/OBO. Bird cage. $20/OBO. Jackie, 861-2375. HAND-RAISED BABY PARAKEETS Only 2 left. Handled since birth. Solid yellow babies w/ green undertone. $20. Jackie, 861-2375.

FOR SALE APPLE IPHONE 6S e.soulnic@gmail.com. Skype ID: e.soulnic. THE STRADIVARIUS TENOR SAX Selmer MK VI. Awesome condition; newly refurbished. Original case avail. 492-3785.

MUSIC » To schedule a tour, please call 802-373-5893

Fitness center Outdoor terrace Private washer/dryers Heat included Private balconies Covered Parking

4

56 APARTMENTS AVAILABLE!

802-863-2311 110 WINOOSKI FALLS WAY, WINOOSKI, VT 802.373.5893 | RIVERRUNWINOOSKI.COM | INFO@RIVERRUNWINOOSKI.COM

11/16/15 1:03 PM

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CLASSIFIEDS C-3

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WWW.ICVVT.COM

ANTIQUES WANTED Trusted 3rd-generation Vt. antique dealer specializing in jewelry, watches, silver, art, military, antique collectibles, etc. bittnerantiques.com. Brian, 272-7527. Consulting/ appraisal services avail. House calls made free of charge.

music

Waterfront location

40 Main Street • Burlington INFO@ICVVT.COM

ANTIQUES Furniture, postcards, pottery, cameras, toys, medical tools, lab glass, photographs, slide rules, license plates & silver. Anything unusual or unique. Cash paid. Dave, 859-8966.

MUSIC

SEVEN DAYS

• Class A Office Space 5,700—17,000 Square Feet Available • Incredible Lake Views • Dedicated Parking Garage • Low Operating Costs • Custom Fit-ups

846.9575 LipVT.com

WANT TO BUY

NOW LEASING

NOW LEASING

Steve Lipkin

12.02.15-12.09.15

Gateway Square

Steve Lipkin

Well maintained end unit with extra windows for maximum natural light, beautiful maple flooring, updated kitchen with stainless appliances, two oversized bedrooms each with dual closets, basement storage, garage plus association pool. Pet friendly! Quick trip to shopping and i-89. $237,000

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

WHAT IS THRIVE? An 8-week experience designed to help individuals reach peak physical & mental levels. Want to know more? amccluskey. le-vel.com. Le-Vel Independent Brand Promoter. LV-336589.

Nestled among the trees just off the River Road and three minutes to exit 11 on interstate 89, this Sterling-built energy efficient cape is filled with light. Three bedrooms, 3 1/2 baths, finished walkout basement and lovely eatin kitchen. Bluestone patio and wonderful screened porch. A must see! $435,000


fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

NORTHEAST KINGDOM CASTLE A breathtakingly beautiful Bavarianstyle castle. Approx. 3000 sq.ft. Authentic design. Features 20 acres,moat, pond, aircraft hangar, runway. Superb business opportunities. Appointment by pre-qualified buyers only please! $450,000. 802-272-3717

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music [CONTINUED]

INSTRUCTION

pasbell@paulasbell. com. 11/2/15 10:30 AM

BEGINNER GUITAR LESSONS Great for kids. Plenty of experience in the area. Great refs. 646-685-3760.

HOW TO RECORD YOUR MUSIC Engineering, audio production, music technology lessons. Learn to set up your microphone & guitar or keyboard & lay down tracks. 646-685-3760.

GUITAR LESSONS W/ GREGG All levels/ages. Acoustic, electric, classical. Patient, supportive, experienced, highly qualified instructor. Relax, have fun & allow your musical potential to unfold. Gregg Jordan, gregg@ gjmusic.com, 318-0889.

LEADING PRIVATE INSTRUCTOR ZOT Zin Music, LLC, is a leading private guitar instruction & music school located in Los Angeles since 2002. zotzinguitarlessons. com.

ANDY’S MOUNTAIN MUSIC Affordable, accessible instruction in guitar, GUITAR INSTRUCTION mandolin, banjo, more. All styles/levels. All ages/skill levels/ Emphasis on developing interests welcome! strong technique, Supportive, professionthorough musicianship, al teacher offering refs., personal style. Paul results, convenience. Andy Greene, 658-2462, Asbell (Unknown Blues Band, Kilimanjaro, UVM guitboy75@hotmail. & Middlebury College com, andys Using the enclosedfaculty). math233-7731, operations mountainmusic,com.

Calcoku

as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

10+ 3÷

FRIDAY POP CAFÉ STUDIO Located in downtown Burlington, Friday Pop Café is a creative, cosy-vibey recording studio that welcomes solo acts, bands & multimedia projects! Call/ text Kat, 310-383-8619.

Say you saw it in ...



108x

16x

AUDITION FOR BRUNDIBAR! Adult & child actors/ singers wanted for community-driven production. Auditions: Dec. 5, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. & Dec. 6, 2-6 p.m., Contois Auditorium, Burlington. theatrekavanah. org, facebook.com/ brundibarbtv.

As ordered by the Court set forth below and in connection with a certain mortgage given by Stacy L. Soule to JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., dated July 11, 2008 and recorded in Book 138 Page 158 of the land records of the Town of Alburgh, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder. In accordance the Judgusing with the

Sudoku

3 2

3

5+

8 9 7

1 Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

1 2 3 9

7 1 2 6 1 7 4 3 5 8

24x

2-

2 8

1

2

6+

CALCOKU

AUDITIONS/ CASTING

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. SEC 4952 ET SEQ.

Complete the following puzzle by numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

4

3-

7+ 2÷

art

5

1-

12.02.15-12.09.15 SEVEN DAYS

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL

11+

16+

C-4 CLASSIFIEDS

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Ashley, 864-5684, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

No. 404

SUDOKU

Difficulty: Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row acrosss, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

2

5

3

6

4

1

3

6

4

1

2

5

1 8 5 4 7 3 9 6 2 4 3 7 6 2 9 1 5 8 ANSWERS ON P. C-7 ★ = MODERATE 7 BOY! 6 2 ★9★ = CHALLENGING 1 8 5 ★4★★3= HOO, 2 5 3 9 4 8 6 7 1

ment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered August 1, 2014 in the action entitled JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. v Stacy Soule., by the Grand Isle Unit, Civil Division, Vermont Superior Court, Docket No. 29-5-11 Gicv for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 13 North Main Street, Alburg, Vermont on December 16, 2015 at 1:00 pm all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Timothy Soule and Stacey L. Soule by Warranty Deed of Michael Soule and Toni-Lynee Soule of even date and to be recorded prior to the recording of this instrument in the Town of Alburgh Land Records. Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Michael T. Soule and Toni Lynne Soule by Warranty Deed of Nellie F. Lockerby dated May 1, 1987 and recorded in Volume 56, Page 25 of the Town of Alburgh Land Records. Being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to Roland H. Blair and Nellie F. (Blair) Lockerby dated July 14, 1967 and recorded in Book 39, Page 92 of the Town of Alburgh Land Records. Being two (2) adjoining parcels of land with the buildings thereon, located on the westerly side of Main Street, in the Town and Village of Alburg, and being more particularly described as follows: Parcel No. 1: Being a lot of land situated on the westerly side of Main Street and being adjacent to and northerly of Parcel No. 1 above; said lot having a frontage on Main Street of 12 feet.

Reference is made to the aforementioned deed, and to the record thereof, and to the deeds and records therein referred to in further aid of this description. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid in cash, certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within thirty (30) days after the date of sale.     The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : November 16, 2015 By: /s/: Valerie A. Finney, Esq. Valerie A. Finney, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 (860) 606-1021 MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. SEC 4952 ET SEQ. As ordered by the Court set forth below and in connection with a certain mortgage given by Walter C. Safford


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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS

C-17 12.02.15-12.09.15

CENTRAL VERMONT ADULT BASIC EDUCATION, Inc. ~~~ Local Partnerships in Learning ~~~ Serving Washington, Lamoille and Orange counties cvabe.org

TEACHER/COMMUNITY COORDINATOR Full-time position

Teacher/Community Coordinator based in Morrisville responsible for service to Lamoille-area residents. Candidates must have ability to work as a strong collaborative partner in an instructional team; be able to develop education plans and provide personalized instruction for adults and teens; and have spirit and capacity for ongoing outreach and skill in organizing community involvement to support student success. Experience with volunteer management, program enrichment and familiarity with the service community are essential elements of the job. CVABE, a community-based, nonprofit organization, has served the residents of Lamoille County for 50 years. Hundreds of central Vermonters enroll annually at CVABE for help improving basic literacy skills, pursuing alternative pathways to high school completion, learning English as another language, and preparing for work and college. If interested, please submit cover letter, résumé and three references by December 4 to:

LEGAL SECRETARY

WANTED

Licensed Nursing Assistants Full-Time Nights Wake Robin seeks a dedicated nursing assistant with a strong desire to work within a community of seniors. Wake Robin seeks LNAs licensed in Vermont to provide high-quality care in a fast-paced residential and long-term care environment, while maintaining a strong sense of “home.” We offer higher than average pay including shift differentials, great benefits, a pristine working environment, and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting.

We continue to offer generous shift differential for evenings, nights and weekends! Interested candidates, please email hr@wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to HR, 264-5146.

Executive Director Central Vermont Adult Basic Education, Inc. 46 Washington Street, Suite 100 Barre, VT 05641

Wake Robin is an equal opportunity employer.

info@cvabe.org

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The Burlington Housing Authority’s Rental Assistance Office (Section 8) is seeking a full-time, qualified individual for its fast-paced office. S/he will be responsible for answering all BHA incoming calls, provide primary coverage for the front desk, prepare packets for landlords and tenants and assist staff with various duties. The successful candidate must have computer and strong interpersonal skills and be able to work as a team member. Minimum qualifications: Associate’s degree in business, public administration, or other related field. Formal education may be substituted by extensive previous administrative experience. BHA offers a competitive salary and excellent benefit package. No inquires in person or by phone. Please send resume and cover letter to: Claudia Donovan Director of Rental Assistance Programs Burlington Housing Authority 65 Main Street Burlington, VT 05401

Legal Services Law Line of Vermont is looking for a full-time staff attorney. We are an innovative, nonprofit civil legal services law firm specializing in counsel, advice, pro se assistance and community education in a high-volume, telephone-based practice. Working closely with Vermont Legal Aid, we help lowincome Vermonters help themselves, applying a broad range of legal services including information, advice, review of pleadings, coaching and representation. Strong legal, writing, and communication skills, a demonstrated commitment to public-interest law, and the ability to work as part of a team are a must. Applicants must be members of the Vermont bar or committed to becoming members of the bar at the first available opportunity. Support for professional growth provided by a dynamic group of attorneys. Salary is $37,779 plus, depending on experience, with excellent fringe benefits.

APPLICATION INSTRUCTIONS: Your application should include a cover letter and resume, sent as a single PDF. Send your application by email to bwells@lawlinevt.org with the subject line “Hiring Opportunity.”

The Burlington Housing Authority is an equal opportunity employer.

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APPLICATION DEADLINE: December 11, 2015.

Or by email to cdonovan@burlingtonhousing.org.

Email resume and cover letter by Friday, 12/4, to mary.deaett@vermont.gov

STAFF ATTORNEY

11/20/15 5v-WakeRobinWaitstaff120215.indd 3:25 PM 1

Receptionist/ Administrative Assistant

Prisoners’ Rights Office, Montpelier. Secretarial experience and professional demeanor required; prior legal secretarial experience in the criminal field strongly preferred. Must be highly organized, detail-oriented and comfortable answering phones with a sometimes challenging clientele. Must be able to prioritize workload and work both independently and as part of a legal team. Full-time, State PG17 position with benefits. EOE.

Funded by the Legal Services Corporation.

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11/13/15 4:32 PM

DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS LENDING The Vermont Community Loan Fund, a nonprofit financial institution, seeks a lending professional to help us provide economic opportunities to lowand moderate-income Vermonters. This full-time position is a key member of senior management and is involved in both strategic and tactical decision making. Primary job responsibilities include analyzing and underwriting commercial business loans, managing our business loan portfolio, and providing technical assistance to borrowers. Find job description at vclf.org. Send cover

letter, resume and salary requirements to hr@vclf.org. VCLF IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.

11/23/15 3v-VT 12:01Comm PM Loan Fund-112515.indd 1

11/23/15 12:53 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-18

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

12.02.15-12.09.15

Academic Operations Manager

Do you exude positive energy? Are you looking for a challenge? Like to play? Want to work with children/youth?

The Division of Communication and Creative Media at Champlain College invites applications for the position of Academic Operations Manager to start January 2016. The Operations Manager provides day-to-day front-office management, overall coordination and proactive, high-level administrative support to the CCM Division dean, faculty and students.

If so, we currently have multiple BEHAVIOR INTERVENTIONIST positions available. Work with children and youth while implementing an individualized behavior plan in school, day treatment and/or community settings with support from a fun, dynamic and creative team. Training, advancement opportunity and excellent benefits await you.

The successful candidate will have a strong working knowledge of budget and fiscal management, reporting and forecasting, as well as experience with personnel contract processing, scheduling and enrollment management, special events management, advanced technical skills specific to Microsoft Office applications, and excellent communication skills. Our new colleague must be highly organized with strong attention to detail and follow-through, and possess outstanding interpersonal communication skills. A four-year degree and a minimum of three to five years of relevant experience is required. An equivalent combination of experience and education will be considered.

To learn more or to read our complete job descriptions, visit our website, wcmhs.org. Apply online or send your resume to personnel@wcmhs.org or Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.

Review of submitted applications will begin December 1, 2015, and continue until the position is filled. The successful completion of a criminal background check is required as a condition of employment.

Equal Opportunity Employer.

4t-WCMHS-120215.indd 1

For more information on Champlain College, and to apply, please submit a cover letter, resume, and name and contact information for three references to our website:

CENTRAL VERMONT ABUSE SERVICES Central VermontSUBSTANCE Substance Abuse Services is a nonprofit organization located in Berlin, VT, providing providing substance is a nonprofi t organization located in Berlin, substance abuse services to central Vermont residents. The range of services abuse services to central Vermont residents. The range of services provided includes outpatient, intensive outpatient intervention, provided includes outpatient, intensive outpatient intervention, education, prevention, intervention, and treatment services. education, prevention, andavailable: treatment services. We have theintervention, following positions

champlain.edu/peoplecenter.

Champlain College values, supports and encourages diversity of backgrounds, cultures and perspectives among students, faculty and staff. We are an equal opportunity employer. 7t-ChamplainCollege-120215.indd 1

11/25/15 12:47 PM

Access Coordinator/ Access Coordinator / Hub and Adult Clinicians Hub & Adult Clinicians Access Coordinator: This position will serve in a key role focusing

on access care and–providing a will bridge to the Accessto Coordinator This position serve from in a keyreferral role focusing on various access to care and providingavailable a bridge from to the various treatment service options atreferral CVSAS. Work willtreatment involve service options available CVSAS. Work will involve assessments, group & assessments, group andatindividual therapy as well as coordination individual therapy as well as coordination with representatives from the withDepartment representatives fromand theother Department of Corrections, and of Corrections, referral sources. Previous experience withsources. people inPrevious recovery from substance abuse is preferable. This in otherworking referral experience working with people position offerssubstance some flexibility of scheduling with at least one evening of work recovery from abuse is preferable. This position off ers required. MA Required. LADC required. some flexibility of scheduling with at least one evening of work Hub Clinician: Master’sLADC level clinician position working with adults as a part required. MA required. required.

Washington County Mental Health Services is currently seeking the following clinician positions in our Center for Counseling and Psychology Services:

of our Hub & Spoke medication assisted therapy (MAT) program. This

Community Support Clinician for Trauma Programs A full-time office- and community-based position with benefits, designed to serve adults, children and families whose lives have been impacted by trauma. The Community Support Clinician provides assessment and treatment resource coordination to help clients develop stabilization skills and establish emotional and psychological safety in the broader context of their lives. Trauma treatment services are team-oriented and collaborative with clients and other providers; they may include individual and group modalities integrated with appropriate resources available within the agency and/or wider community. Must be willing to work some evening hours. Master’s-level clinician with knowledge of the effects of trauma and experience working with populations impacted by trauma required. Experience working in home-based settings helpful.  

To learn more or to read our complete job descriptions, visit our website, wcmhs.org. Apply online or send your resume to personnel@wcmhs.org or Personnel, PO Box 647, Montpelier, VT 05601.

Hubposition Clinician: Master’s-level clinician position working with will focus on access to care and providing a bridge from the MAT program to referrals the & treatment options. Work will therapy involve adults as a part of ourtoHub Spoke service medication-assisted assessments, group & individual therapy, case management as well as (MAT) program.with Thistheposition willoffocus on access to care and coordination Department Corrections. Previous experience providing bridge the MAT referrals AtoLADC the is working awith peoplefrom in recovery fromprogram addictions to is preferable. preferred. Workingoptions. hours roughly 6:00will a.m.involve to 2:00 p.m. treatment service Work assessments, group & individual case management as well asclinical coordination Substancetherapy, Abuse Treatment Clinician: Master's level positions with(LADC the Department of Corrections. Previous experience working preferred) providing outpatient counseling to adults, adolescents and dealing with substance related issues. TreatmentAmodalities withfamilies people in recovery fromabuse addictions is preferable. LADC is may be provided using group, individual and / or couples counseling and may preferred. Working hours roughly 6 a.m.Treatment to 2 p.m.program. include some work in our Intensive Out-Patient Substance Treatment clinical IndividualsAbuse who are interested inClinician: being part Master’s-level of a dynamic team are positions (LADC providing outpatient encouraged to preferred) apply. Flexibility, dependability, strong counseling communication,to organizational skills, and the ability to be a team player are essential. We adults, adolescents and families dealing with substance abuseoffer a flexible benefit package which can be taken as a cash benefit. 403b related issues. Treatment modalities may be provided using retirement match and generous time off policy. If interested, please send group, individual / orto:couples counseling and may include resume and letter and of interest some work in our Intensive Out-Patient Treatment program. Rachel Yeager, HR Coordinator, or to: ryeager@claramartin.org Individuals who are interested in being part of a dynamic team Clara Martin dependability, Center are encouraged to apply. Flexibility, strong P.O. Box communication, organizational skills,Gand the ability to be a team player are essential. We offer a flexible benefit package which Randolph, VT 05060 can be taken as a cash benefit. 403(b) retirement matchEOE and generous time-off policy. If interested, please send resume and letter of interest to: Rachel Yeager, HR Coordinator, or to: ryeager@claramartin.org. Clara Martin Center, P.O. Box G, Randolph, VT 05060 EOE

Equal opportunity employer. 7-WCMHS-clinicians-111115.indd 1

11/30/15 3:44 PM

11/9/15 9:56 AM 6-ClaraMartinCenter-112515.indd 1

11/23/15 12:15 PM


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C-19 12.02.15-12.09.15

earn some extra holiday money!

HIRING EVENT Thursday & Friday Dec. 3 & 4 • 4-7 pm Saturday & Sunday Dec. 5 & 6 • 1-5pm

555 Shelburne Rd. Burlington or STP.me/Apply ABOUT US

ADDITIONAL

250 HIRING BONUS

$

* Bonus distributed after 90 days of employment.

30% EMPLOYEE SHOPPING DISCOUNT

Untitled-2 1

Founded in 1986, Sierra Trading Post is dedicated to offering great deals from top name brands and providing our customers outstanding customer service. Our range of products includes outdoor gear, footwear, active and casual apparel.

RETAIL ASSOCIATES

Sierra Trading Post is seeking cheerful, outgoing Retail Associates with good communication skills for our Burlington Store. Associates are responsible for merchandising and organizing their department, as well as providing product knowledge in a range of categories. Previous customer service experience helpful. Sierra Trading Post is committed to diversity and is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 11/30/15 3:28 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

C-20

POST YOUR JOBS AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/JOBS FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

12.02.15-12.09.15

Driver GUEST SERVICES COORDINATOR Boundless Journeys, an active travel, international luxury tour operator based in Stowe, is seeking a full-time Guest Services Coordinator with exceptional organizational skills to join our team. This entry level position is responsible for a wide variety of essential, complex duties in providing support to our travelers and operations team. Send a resume and cover letter to: info@boundlessjourneys.com or

Boundless Journeys 998 South Main, Ste 2 Stowe, VT 05672 Please visit boundlessjourneys.com/employment for additional information. NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE.

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For more information on our hospital, visit our website at bevsvt.com. Please forward a cover letter and resume to jobs@bevsvt.com.

Wake Robin, Vermont’s premier continuing care retirement community, seeks a part-time driver to provide on- and off-campus transportation services to residents. Duties include driving, assisting residents into and out of vehicles, escorting residents to destination if necessary, and general maintenance/cleaning of vehicles. This position requires timely adherence to transportation schedules and safety protocol, and excellent customer service. Applicants must possess a valid Vermont driver’s license (CDL not required) and a stellar driving record.

DELIVER happiness . We know what you want in a job.

Interested candidates, please email hr@wakerobin.com or fax your resume with cover letter to HR, 264-5146.

Kelly Services® is now hiring seasonal delivery drivers for ® assignments with FedEx Ground . Don’t miss out! Details:

• 21 years or older • Business-related driving experience required • Weekly pay • Safety bonus plan

Inquire in Person

Wake Robin is an equal opportunity employer.

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DIRECTOR of PROGRAMS

kellyservices.us

11/30/15 3:23 PM

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SPECIALIST: Responsible for regular processing and payment of invoices; responding to inquiries from staff and vendors; processing staff mileage reimbursements; maintaining filing; and 1099 processing. Associate’s degree in accounting or related field, plus one to three years’ experience, or a combination of education and experience. This is a full-time, benefit-eligible position. EMR APPLICATION, TRAINING AND SUPPORT SPECIALIST: Responsible for electronic medical record system support, testing and troubleshooting. Prepare documentation and provide end user training and EMR help desk assistance. Assist with testing for upgrades, patches and other system enhancements. Minimum requirements: associate’s degree or experience consummate with education. This is a full-time, benefit-eligible position. EMR/BILLING ASSOCIATE: Maintain client information, submit claims, apply payments, and scan and release client records. Associate’s degree plus one year of relevant experience or a combination of education and experience required. Attention to detail a must. This is a full-time, benefit-eligible position.

Submit cover letter and resume to apply@csac-vt.org. To explore more opportunities, please visit csac-vt.org or contact Rachael at 388-6751.

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11/30/15 4:16 PM

Mon-Fri 9am 5pm 322 Leroy Road Williston, VT

FedEx Ground is a registered trademark of the Federal Express Corporation An Equal Opportunity Employer © 2015 Kelly Services, Inc. Z0758D

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Looking for a job in the health care field but working with animals instead of people? (We don’t blame you!) Burlington Emergency & Veterinary Specialists (BEVS) is Vermont’s only multispecialty and 24-7 emergency veterinary hospital. We are a group of individuals truly dedicated to the health and comfort of our patients. We have a variety of positions available and are willing to train the right people! Competitive pay and pets benefits are available for both full and part-time positions.

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Part Time

CERF+, a national nonprofit that provides a safety net to artists through readiness, education and relief programs. Through more than 30 years of programming, CERF+ has become a pioneer and leader in the emerging field of arts emergency management. We are seeking a dynamic director of programs who has the experience and skills to strengthen the impact of CERF+’s work as an “artist responder” and artist advocate and to expand the visibility of its services, thereby increasing the population of artists served. The position involves directing teams of CERF+ staff, board and consultants, and collaborative work with other artist-focused organizations, arts agencies and relief providers, both in nonemergency and emergency periods. The ideal candidate will be a creative individual with 10 years or more of experience providing support services to professional artists, with at least five years at the executive/program manager level. Strong skills as a communicator, presenter, editor and educator are essential. Other critical skills include proven ability to lead/coordinate in periods of crisis and familiarity with current trends and issues in sustaining a career in visual arts. Experience in the craft field a plus, but not required. The deadline for applications is December 18, 2015. To seek a detailed job description and to apply, go to our website craftemergency.org/who_we_are/job_openings.

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11/30/15 5:33 PM


More food before the classifieds section.

PAGE 50

SIDEdishes

Give a Tasteful Gift...

food+drink

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ENGLAND CULINARY INSTITUTE

grad and SHELBURNE FARMS alum reopened with an expanded, ingredientdriven menu. Think braised pork belly with smoked cheddar grits, deep-fried beets dipped in honey mustard, and more than a dozen beers on tap, mostly craft brews. m

SEVEN DAYS

CONNECT Follow us on Twitter for the latest food gossip! Hannah Palmer Egan: @findthathannah

FOOD 51

Now, with winter approaching and catering season dying down, Cohan says he’s excited to focus on the tavern — and to serve a trailblazing crowd once the snow flies. The tavern is located on a Vermont Association of Snow Travelers trail, and the chef is working with South Royalton’s Ridge Climbers Snowmobile Club to ensure ample sled parking, along with signage that will welcome riders inside to warm up over a snack or beverage. “There’s this perception that the

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12.02.15-12.09.15

to what the people here want,” says the chef, who took charge in the kitchen following the departure of opening chef TED ASK. Cohan says he reformulated his vision for the restaurant after realizing that locals had their own ideas about what the historic venue was and should be. “People have a real sense of ownership about this place,” he says. “We have an obligation to what it is. It’s a tavern and a meeting place, and people want quality food and caring.”

(108 Rainbow Street) earlier this summer — and promptly closed to give the place a face-lift. In late October, the NEW

Give the Gift of All-Clad Reg. $225 Reg. $155 or

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

restaurant is fancier and more expensive than it is,” Cohan says, noting that beers are priced at about $6 per pint and most entrées ring in at less than $20. The Fox Stand isn’t the only longtime local hub to have reopened recently after a monthslong closure. A few miles south, chef BENNETT ZAPLETAL took the reins at South Royalton’s

11/24/14 1:37 PM


DEC.4-6 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS

calendar D E C E M B E R

activism

BUILDING EMPATHY & ADDRESSING RACIAL OPPRESSION: A WORKSHOP IN THREE PARTS: Weekly sessions touch on topics such as white fragility, subconscious bias and supporting an anti-oppressive society. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $30-60; free for people age 25 and under; preregister; limited space. Info, 863-2345, ext. 6. ECONOMIC CLIMATE EQUALITY SPEAKOUT: Environmental activists, poets, musicians and raconteurs rally to raise money for 350 Vermont. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5 p.m. Donations. Info, 540-0406.

agriculture

DAIRY DAY: Agricultural experts deliver a moo-ving discussion on the manufacturing of milk products. William H. Miner Agricultural Research Institute, Chazy, N.Y., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 518-846-7121, ext. 117.

community

OPEN HOUSE: Those seeking memory care, help managing illness or disability, and other forms of support meet Visiting Nurse Association of Chittenden and Grand Isle Counties Adult Day Program staff and tour the facility. VNA Adult Day Program, Essex Junction, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4407.

crafts

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BLOCK PRINT CRAFT: Crafters transfer images onto paper using 4-by-6-inch blocks and paint. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 878-4918. KNITTERS & NEEDLEWORKERS: Crafters convene for creative fun. Colchester Meeting House, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

dance

AFROLATIN PARTY: Dancers ages 18 and up get down to the kizomba, kuduro and kompa with DsantosVT. Zen Lounge, Burlington, lesson, 7-8 p.m.; party, 8-10 p.m. $6-12; free for party. Info, 227-2572. DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: Beginners are welcome at a groove session inspired by infectious beats. Swan Dojo, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $13. Info, 540-8300.

education

HOMESCHOOLING PARENTS NIGHT: Moms and dads raise questions during a facilitated

2 0 1 5

conversation. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

etc.

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Folks develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon-1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

SEVEN DAYS

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

TURNON BURLINGTON: Communication games encourage participants to push past comfort zones and experience deep connections. OneTaste Burlington, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $10. Info, cj@onetasteburlington.us.

Friday, December 4, 5-8 p.m., Saturday, December 5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday, December 6, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction. $7-20; free for kids under 6. Info, 863-6713. vermontinternationalfestival.com

film

CLASSIC FILM SERIES: Movie lovers view cinematic masterpieces. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. ‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: Stunning aerial shots and narration by Harrison Ford propel this 2D and 3D salute to the marvels of modern air travel. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11:45 a.m. & 1:45 & 3:45 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $10.50-13.50; free for kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. WARREN MILLER’S ‘CHASING SHADOWS’: The biggest names in skiing and snowboarding tackle daunting peaks in this adrenaline-pumping tribute to 66 years of mountain culture and extreme filmmaking. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 8 p.m. $15-18. Info, 382-9222.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: Strategic players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722.

health & fitness

DANCE-BASED CONDITIONING: Melissa Ham-Ellis guides students through a series of stretching and strengthening movements. No dance experience is required. Fusion 802 Dance, South Burlington, 7:158:15 p.m. $15. Info, 444-0100. FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Participants improve strength, agility, endurance and cardiovascular fitness with interval training. Middlebury Municipal Gym, 7-8 a.m. $10. Info, 343-7160. INSIGHT MEDITATION: Attendees deepen their understanding of Buddhist principles and practices. Wellspring Mental Health and Wellness Center, Hardwick, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 472-6694. MINDFUL WORKWEEKS: WEDNESDAY NIGHT MEDITATION: Give your brain a break at a midweek “om” session followed by tea and conversation. WED.2

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List your upcoming event here for free! SUBMISSION DEADLINES: ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. YOU CAN ALSO EMAIL US AT CALENDAR@SEVENDAYSVT.COM. TO BE LISTED, YOU MUST INCLUDE THE NAME OF EVENT, A BRIEF DESCRIPTION, SPECIFIC LOCATION, DATE, TIME, COST AND CONTACT PHONE NUMBER.

52 CALENDAR

Locals can tour the world in a weekend without leaving Chittenden County at the 23rd annual Vermont International Festival. Billed as a “celebration of cultures that make up our community,” the fest is a vibrant melting pot of sights, smells, tastes and sounds from across the continents. Revelers can admire handcrafted goods from 40 countries — perhaps picking up a few holiday gifts along the way. There are plenty of opportunities to bask in the beat of world music and dance or expand sartorial sensibilities at an international fashion show, as well as sample global gourmet eats. New on the menu this year are mouthwatering Venezuelan arepas, Indian street food and Tibetan moma. Bon voyage and bon appétit!

CALENDAR EVENTS IN SEVEN DAYS: LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

COURTESY OF VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL

WED.2

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Globe Trotting

Bluegrass Christmas While there’s something nice about hearing the same old reliable Christmas songs every year, there’s nothing wrong with putting a twist on tradition. Inspired by his 1995 album Glory Shone Around: A Christmas Collection, venerable banjo player Tony Trischka and friends hit the stage, adding a healthy dose of twang to the sounds of the season. The program “Glory Shone Around” is a one-of-a-kind tour through holiday compositions by way of banjo-driven bluegrass and Americana styles channeled through an ensemble of shape-note singers and multiinstrumentalists. Listeners can expect a festive sampling ranging from old-time fiddle tunes to classically influenced carols.

TONY TRISCHKA’S ‘GLORY SHONE AROUND’ Saturday, December 5, 8 p.m., at Haybarn Theatre, Goddard College, in Plainfield. $20-25. Info, 434-4563. valleystage.net


COURTESY OF CHANDLER CENTER FOR THE ARTS

DEC.5 | MUSIC

DEC.5 | HOLIDAYS

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She has tickled the ivories on stages around the world, but pianist Simone Dinnerstein calls Randolph’s Chandler Music Hall “exactly the perfect atmosphere for making music.” Since selfreleasing an album of Bach’s Goldberg Variations in 2007, Brooklyn-based Dinnerstein has topped the Billboard classical chart and has been lauded as “a poet at the piano” and “a blessing for music” by friend and composer Philip Lasser. The award-winning instrumentalist returns to the Chandler this Saturday, paying homage to classical giants Schumann, Bach and Schubert, SIMONE DINNERSTEIN Saturday, December 5, 7:30 p.m., at Chandler Music Hall while looking toward the future of the in Randolph. $10-40. Info, 728-6464. chandler-arts.org genre with a new work by Lasser.

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COURTESY OF VALLEY STAGE PRODUCTIONS

SEVEN DAYS

FESTIVAL OF WREATHS Saturday, December 5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., at Town Hall Theater in Middlebury. Donations. Info, 388-2853. mjccvt.org

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is the season to deck the halls with twinkling lights, lush garlands and fragrant coniferous foliage, and holiday home decorators are in heaven at the Festival of Wreaths, presented by the Mary Johnson Children’s Center. Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater plays host to a display of more than 100 festooned wreaths from Addison County merchants, businesses and MJCC supporters. After browsing rows of boldly embellished boughs, friends and neighbors can bid on their favorite front-door adornments in a silent auction benefiting local youngsters in need. With past themes ranging from Vermont flora and fauna to Frozen, this year’s selection is sure to be a festive feast for the eyes.

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Decoration

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calendar WED.2

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Library, Williston, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 878-4918.

Milarepa Center, Barnet, 7-8 p.m. Donations. Info, 633-4136. MINDFULNESS CLASS: Dogma-free meditative techniques lead to peace, joy and freedom. Exquisite Mind Studio, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. $5-20. Info, 735-2265. NIA WITH LINDA: World music and movements drawn from martial, dance and healing arts inspire folks to find their own paths to fitness. South End Studio, Burlington, 8:30 a.m. $14. Info, 372-1721. POSTNATAL REHAB: Babies are welcome at a class aimed at strengthening the areas most compromised during pregnancy. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. PRENATAL BALLET BARRE: Expectant mothers in all trimesters stay strong and fit. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. PRENATAL YOGA CLASS: Moms-to-be prepare their bodies for labor and delivery. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 12:15-1:15 p.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. PUSH-UPS IN THE PARK: Fitness fanatics get a sweat on at a fast and furious workout that benefits local charities. Oakledge Park, Burlington, 6-7 a.m. $5-15. Info, 658-0949. R.I.P.P.E.D.: Resistance, intervals, power, plyometrics, endurance and diet define this high-intensity physical-fitness program. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: A stretching session for all ability levels builds physical and mental strength to support healing. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 861-3150. VINYASA FLOW YOGA: Breathe in, breathe out! Students explore a breath-centered practice. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. $10. Info, 540-0186. ZUMBA: Lively Latin rhythms fuel this dancefitness phenomenon for all experience levels. Vergennes Opera House, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 349-0026.

SEVEN DAYS

READ TO A DOG: Book hounds ages 5 through 10 curl up with a good story and a furry friend. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. ‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: A dolichorhynchops braves history’s most dangerous oceans in a National Geographic Studios 2D and 3D movie. Northfield Savings Bank Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:45 a.m. & 12:45 & 2:45 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $10.5013.50; free for kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Engrossing plots unfold into projects for kids up to age 6 and their grown-ups. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 1011:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. STORY TIME FOR 3- TO 5-YEAR-OLDS: Preschoolers stretch their reading skills through activities involving puppets and books. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. TODDLER TIME: Puzzles, puppets, art supplies and books entertain tots ages 4 and under. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Students build a foundation in reading, speaking and writing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-3403. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

music

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‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A LIVE RADIO PLAY’: A guardian angel saves a hopeless man from despair as Frank Capra’s 1946 Christmas classic comes to life before Lost Nation Theater’s live studio audience. Montpelier City Hall Auditorium, 7 p.m. $10. Info, 229-0492.

BRANDI CARLILE: The singer-songwriter serves up selections from The Firewatcher’s Daughter as part of her Winter Acoustic Tour. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 8 p.m. $42.75-82.75. Info, 775-0903.

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GUITAR ENSEMBLE CONCERT: SUNY E OR AT T DS Plattsburgh students pick NS |M SO AJO R JA O HN and strum their six-stringed CKSON | COURTESY OF J ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: instruments. Krinovitz Recital Hall, Stories, movies, live entertainment and Hawkins Hall, SUNY Plattsburgh,, N.Y., more set the holiday season in motion. See fes7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-3095. tivaloftreesvt.com for details. Various St. Albans JAZZ VOCAL ENSEMBLE & JAZZ COMBO CONCERT: locations. Prices vary. Info, 309-4487. Choral arrangements and jazz classics get heads WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: Revelers bask in the glow bopping. UVM Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. of illuminated snowflakes, trees and delicately Free. Info, 656-2295. hanging decorations. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake SONG CIRCLE: Music lovers congregate for an Champlain, Burlington, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $10.50acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick 13.50; free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. 864-1848. Info, 775-1182. U.

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KIDS’ OPEN GYM: Physical fitness is disguised as fun for little ones ages 6 to 10. Church of the Nazarene, Williston, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-8591.

HOLIDAY ARTISANS MARKET: Locals fill their totes with a wide variety of fine gifts. Chandler Gallery, Randolph, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 728-9878.

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

holidays

DOROTHY CANFIELD FISHER BOOK DISCUSSION: Readers ages 8 through 11 weigh in on The Meaning of Maggie by Megan Jean Sovern. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

BOOK DISCUSSIONS FOR HOMESCHOOLED STUDENTS: Youngsters, grouped by age, chat about celebrated titles. Call for details. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. BUILD IT!: Students in grades 3 through 5 tackle engineering challenges. Dorothy Alling Memorial

sports

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: Drive to the hoop! Ladies dribble up and down the court during an evening of friendly competition. See meetup. com for details. Lyman C. Hunt Middle School, Burlington, 8-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

talks

STORYCRAFT: THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF CREATIVE WRITING: Wordsmiths put pen to paper in this eightweek workshop with Vermont author Keith Morrill. Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 877-2211, ext. 208.

DARRA GOLDSTEIN: Cuisine reflects culture in the First Wednesdays lecture “Russia, the Land and Its Food.” KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

JOHNSON WEDNESDAY STATE CREATIVE COLLEGE WRITING FREE WORKSHOP: SPEAKER Lit lovers anaSERIES: Ryan lyze works-inJoy delivers progress penned a double dose by Burlington of data in Writers Workshop “Investigations members. 22 Church to Characterize St., Burlington, 6:30 T T the DCBLD Receptor HU p.m. Free; preregister ON M .3 Family” and “In Vivo ER |K at meetup.com; limited IDS NV O | FA and Biochemical Analysis.” UB LLspace. Info, 383-8104. AUD IN G Y OF INTO W Bentley Hall, Johnson State INTER | COURTES WEDNESDAY EVENING BOOK CLUB: College, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, Avid readers exchange ideas and opinions 635-1327. about Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman. Burnham JOSEPH ELLIS: History comes alive in the Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:45-7:45 p.m. Free. First Wednesdays presentation “The Quartet: Info, 264-5660. Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789.” Norwich Congregational Church, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. KIRSTEN HOVING: As part of First Wednesdays, the Middlebury College professor presents a portrait of the 19th-century art movement in “The Impressionists: Painters of Modern Life.” Rutland Free Library, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. PETER TRAVIS: Geoffrey Chaucer’s comic wisdom and enduring humanity shine through the First Wednesdays discussion “The Literary Achievement of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.” St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

THU.3 activism

SURVEILLANCE DRONES PRESENTATION: Concerned citizens can ask questions after a presentation on the past, present and future of surveillance in the United States. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345.

agriculture

RAY VEGA: As part of First Wednesdays, the worldrenowned composer examines the contributions of Latin American musicians in “Roots of Latin Jazz.” Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

AWESOME TREE CONTEST AWARD CEREMONY & ANNUAL MEETING: Community members celebrate Burlington’s finest foliage over pizza and homemade desserts. Burlington Municipal Building, 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 656-5440.

RESEARCH CENTER SEMINAR SERIES: Singersongwriter Neil Young’s boycott of Starbucks over Vermont’s GMO labeling law is food for thought. Farrell Room, St. Edmund’s Hall, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 12:15-1:15 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

art

ROBERTA STEWART: The Dartmouth College professor examines ways in which The Odyssey speaks to those coming home from war in “Reading Homer With Veterans: Narratives of Return and Rage” as part of First Wednesdays. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

bazaars

theater

‘MARY POPPINS’: A drab family gets a visit from a magical nanny in this beloved musical presented by Northern Stage. Barrette Center for the Arts, White River Junction, 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m. $15-65. Info, 296-7000. ‘RINGING DOWN THE CURTAIN’: SUNY Plattsburgh, theater and dance students pool their talents in a joint performance. Hartman Theatre, Myers Fine Arts Building, SUNY Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Free. Info, 518-564-2000.

ART PLAY TIME: Participants express their artistry through loosely themed projects in a fun, social class. Expressive Arts Burlington, 10-11:45 a.m. $20. Info, 862-5302.

JEWELRY & SCARF SALE: Shoppers browse Baked Beads baubles. Holiday Inn, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2440.

community

COHOUSING PRESENTATION: From energy efficiency to shared garden space to regular potlucks, folks learn the perks of living in a new village neighborhood in Bristol. Howden Hall Community Center, Bristol, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 734-0798. SUICIDE PREVENTION AWARENESS: Community members join graduate students to create a visual representation of how suicide has affected their lives. Davis Center, UVM, Burlington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 656-8800.

‘TRIBES’: Billy was born deaf to a family that hears but doesn’t listen in this Segal Centre for Performing Arts production. Segal Centre for Performing Arts, Montréal, 8 p.m. $24.50-59. Info, 514-739-7944.

VERMONT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION FALL CONFERENCE: Speakers dig into the theme “Workforce Housing: Springboard to Economic Vitality.” Hilton Garden Inn Burlington Downtown, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m. $50; preregister. Info, 229-9111.

words

dance

BOOK DISCUSSION: ‘INFLUENTIAL FIRST LADIES’: Phyllis Lee Levin’s Edith and Woodrow: The Wilson White House inspires lively discussion among nonfiction fans. South Burlington Community Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7076.

MONICA BILL BARNES & CO.: Shaken or stirred? The choreographer and her dance partner Anna Bass team up for the cocktail party-inspired dance show “Happy Hour.” FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7 & 9 p.m. $26-30. Info, 863-5966.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

education

‘HOW TO SPARK THE LOVE OF LEARNING’: A showing of a TED talk by international education adviser Ken Robinson gives way to an in-depth discussion between parents and teachers. Pacem School, Montpelier, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-1010.

environment

GREEN MOUNTAIN GLOBAL FORUM: Global Health Media Project’s Deb Van Dyke and Peter Cardellichio shed light on their work making educational videos for families and health workers in low-resource settings. Big Picture Theater and Café, Waitsfield, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 496-3872.

etc.

holidays

‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: Choreographer Jennifer Henderson puts a new spin on the classic ballet, with a reinterpreted Sugar Plum Fairy and more. Preperformance tea at the Lebanon Ballet School is optional for some shows. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 7:30 p.m. $7.50-30; $22-37 includes tea. Info, 603-448-0400.

FEAST & FIELD HOLIDAY MARKET & CONCERT: Beverages, baked goods, warm meals and tunes by Off the Rails are on the menu at this pastoral party. Barnard Town Hall, 5-7:30 p.m. Donations. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com.

kids

‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2. ‘PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF KATRINA GILBERT’: A panel discussion tops off a screening of this 2014 film documenting a year in the life of a struggling single mother. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 5-7:30 p.m. $5 or a nonperishable food item; preregister. Info, 864-7541. ‘RIFFTRAX LIVE: SANTA AND THE ICE CREAM BUNNY’: Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett offer wisecracking commentary on the B-movie sensation. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 8 p.m. $12.50. Info, 660-9300. WARREN MILLER’S ‘CHASING SHADOWS’: See WED.2.

health & fitness

FELDENKRAIS AWARENESS THROUGH MOVEMENT: Whether you consider it relaxing exercise or active meditation, this experience can reduce pain and increase mobility. Living Room: Center of Positivity, Essex Junction, 6-7 p.m. $10. Info, 655-0950. FITNESS BOOT CAMP: See WED.12, Cornwall Town Hall, 10-11 a.m. $10.

GAGA MOVEMENT CLASS: A training method for folks ages 16 and up offers end-of-semester stress relief. Lounge, Virtue Field House, Middlebury College, 8-9 a.m. Free. Info, 443-3168.

MORNING FLOW YOGA: Start your day with a grounding and energizing class for all levels. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. $10. Info, 540-0186.

FALL-ING INTO WINTER: Animal lovers ages 3 through five and their adult companions find out how different creatures adapt to the cold-weather months. Brrrr! Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9-10:30 a.m. $8-10 per adult-child pair; $4 per additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068. FOOD FOR THOUGHT LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS: Pizza fuels a teen discussion of books and library projects. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

MIDDLEBURY TOWN HALL THEATER

WEDNESDAY | DEC. 2 | 8:00 PM THURSDAY | DEC. 3 | 8:00 PM

BURLINGTON FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

FRIDAY | DEC. 4 | 6:30 & 9:30 PM

HARDWICK STORY TIME: Kids up to age 6 sit tight for engaging narratives. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 472-5948. PJ STORY HOUR: Little ones dress for bed and wind down with tales and treats. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. PLAINFIELD PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Tykes ages 2 through 5 discover the magic of literature. Cutler Memorial Library, Plainfield, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 454-8504. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Young’uns have fun with song and dance. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. READ TO ARCHIE THE THERAPY DOG: Bookworms join a friendly canine for entertaining tails — er, tales. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. ‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2. THURSDAY PLAY TIME: Kiddos and their caregivers convene for casual fun. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

language

MANDARIN CHINESE CLASS: Language lovers practice the dialect spoken throughout northern and southwestern China. Agape Community Church, South Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 503-2037.

FREE LIFT TICKET TO SUGARBUSH & SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH SKI AND RIDE FOR FREE AT STEAMBOAT $25 OFF A PURCHASE OF $100 OR MORE AT ALPINE SHOP

music

JEFFREY FOUCAULT: The singer-songwriter celebrates the release of his album With Salt As Wolves. Caitlin Canty opens. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8 p.m. $15. Info, 540-0406. LATIN JAZZ ENSEMBLE & GUITAR ENSEMBLE CONCERT: Student musicians interpret tunes by George Cables, Benny Carter, Yoko Kanno, Tito Puente and Mitch Frohman. UVM Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-2295.

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* BURLINGTON ONLY

F O R C O M P L E T E O F F E R D E TA I L S G O T O

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CALENDAR 55

PRENATAL YOGA CLASS: See WED.2, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

THE ART OF HAROUN: Salman Rushdie’s Haroun and the Sea of Stories inspires a painting session for artists in grades 5 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

THIS WEEK!

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SEVEN DAYS

INPOWER YOGA: Ambitious yogis take on a challenging sequence in a heated studio. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $10. Info, 540-0186.

WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2.

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FORZA: THE SAMURAI SWORD WORKOUT: Students sculpt lean muscles and gain mental focus when using wooden replicas of the weapon. North End Studio A, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 578-9243.

ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.2.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice led by Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161.

Or call my plow guy.

HOLIDAY SPECTACULAR: The Twilight Players present an evening of seasonal music, dance and sketches. Alexander Twilight Theatre, Lyndon State College, 7:30 p.m. Donations of nonperishable food items or new unwrapped toys. Info, 626-3663. ‘IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE: A LIVE RADIO PLAY’: See WED.2.

film

I’ll‘ send my kids over.

HOLIDAY ARTISANS MARKET: See WED.2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

BURLINGTON GARDEN CLUB HOLIDAY LUNCHEON: An afternoon affair benefiting the club comes complete with a plant sale, a bake sale and a silent auction. Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 12:30-3 p.m. $10. Info, 489-5485.

GEAR SWAP: Outdoor adventurers stock up on skis, boards, boots and more. Stearns Performance Space, Johnson State College, noon-7 p.m. Free. Info, 978-979-5701.

Help! I need snow shoveled.


Let Us Be Your Helper for the Holidays!

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OPEN MIC: Musicians, poets and storytellers test their talents onstage. Jericho Town Library, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Donations; BYOB; preregister. Info, joshua3larose@gmail.com.

Book Your Holiday Party Today!

SHELBURNE VINEYARD FIRST THURSDAYS CONCERT: Cricket Blue dole out evocative folk ballads for an evening complete with food, beer and wine. Partial proceeds benefit Vermont Cares. Shelburne Vineyard, 6 p.m. Free; cost of food and drink. Info, 985-8222.

seminars

NAMI VERMONT FAMILY-TO-FAMILY CLASS: The National Alliance on Mental Illness builds understanding between individuals struggling with psychological health and their loved ones. Call for details. Various locations statewide, 6-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 800-639-6480, ext. 102.

• Appetizer Platters • Office Parties • Delivery or Full Service

sports

FREE AIKIDO CLASS: An introduction to the Japanese martial art focuses on centering and finding freedom while under attack. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, 951-8900.

talks

RABBI NOAM MARANS: “Celebrating Fifty Years of Transformed Catholic-Jewish Relations: A Journey of Reconciliation” unites listeners. Event Room, Dion Family Student Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 654-2000.

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‘CLICKSHARE’: Employees at a news website find their lives at stake when they break a big story in this drama staged by the Middlebury College Theatre Program. Seeler Studio Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 7:30 p.m. $6-12. Info, 443-6433. KICK-OFF MEETING FOR LYRIC THEATRE COMPANY’S ‘MARY POPPINS’: Thespians meet the artistic team and learn about the casting needs for this beloved play about a magical nanny. Lyric Theatre Company Office/Warehouse, South Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 658-1484. ‘LOST IN YONKERS’: Neil Simon’s comedy, staged by the Fair Haven Drama Club, chronicles nine months in the lives of two boys left in the care of their grandmother and aunt. Fair Haven Union High School, 6:30 p.m. $8-10. Info, 265-4966, ext. 232. ‘MARY POPPINS’: See WED.2, ‘RINGING DOWN THE CURTAIN’: See WED.2. ‘TRIBES’: See WED.2.

words

GEEK MOUNTAIN STATE BOOK CLUB: Bookworms chat about Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5124.

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Their Playlists:

theater

MAJOR JACKSON: The University of Vermont professor shares passages from his latest collection of poetry, Roll Deep. Stearns Cinema, Johnson State College, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1340.

SEVEN DAYS

STEPHEN CRAMER: The Burlington bard serves up rhymes and treats at the launch for his lyrical cookbook A Little Thyme & a Pinch of Rhyme. Phoenix Books Burlington, 7 p.m. $3; limited space. Info, 448-3350. YOUNG ADULT WORKSHOP: Readers swap ideas and opinions about YA stories written by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 22 Church St., Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

FRI.4 art

PRINTS & PINTS: Aspiring artists engage in an easy, playful process resulting in original gelatin prints while sipping Vermont brews. ONE Arts Center, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $24 includes two drinks, $40 for a pair. Info, 518-649-6464.

bazaars

JEWELRY & SCARF SALE: See THU.3.

community

FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: Senior citizens and their guests catch up over a shared meal. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, noon-1 p.m. $7-9; preregister. Info, 262-6288. FOOD DRIVE: Folks lend a hand to their neighbors in need with donations of canned goods and nonperishable food items. Fireside Lounge, Champlain College, Burlington, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 845-492-7086. VERMONT HEALTH CONNECT ENROLLMENT: Qualified navigators guide attendees through the steps of signing up for health insurance. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

crafts

MAGGIE’S ADULT FIBER FRIDAY: Veteran knitter Maggie Loftus facilitates an informal gathering of crafters. Main Reading Room, Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 6maggie2@myfairpoint.net.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: VIENNESE WALTZ: Samir Elabd leads choreographed steps for singles and couples. No partner or experience required. Jazzercize Studio, Williston, introductory lesson, 7-8 p.m.; dance, 8-9:30 p.m. $6-14. Info, 862-2269. DANCE SHOW: Students light up the stage with infectious rhythm. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7-10 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1476. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: A movement session with the Green Mountain Druid Order inspires joy, transformation and divine connections. Christ Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 505-8010. FALL DANCE CONCERT: Middlebury College dance students show the fruits of their labor. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 p.m. $6-12. Info, 443-6433. OPEN-LEVEL IMPROVISATION: Structured prompts, imagery and partnering forge adaptive problem-solving skills in movement. North End Studio B, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. $12. Info, 363-5544.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL: A showcase of arts, crafts, food, dance and musical performances celebrates cultures from around the world. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, 5-8 p.m. $7-20; free for kids under 6. Info, 863-6713.

film

‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2. WARREN MILLER’S ‘CHASING SHADOWS’: See WED.2, Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 6:30 & 9:30 p.m. $19.27. Info, 863-5966.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.2, 9:15 a.m.

health & fitness

56 CALENDAR

COMMUNITY HATHA YOGA: Students move at their own pace in a gentle, reflective workout. South End Studio, Burlington, 5:15-6:15 p.m. $6. Info, 683-4918. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.2.

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FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS

SOUL PARTY YOGA SERIES: Emina Kelestura welcomes students of all levels for a seven-week course focused on finding freedom through vinyasa flow. Sangha Studio, Burlington, 7-8:15 p.m. $5-10. Info, 448-4262.

holidays

BARRE HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Wares from local producers make for unique gifts. Old Labor Hall, Barre, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, 476-0567.

MAGIC: THE GATHERING: Players in grades 6 and up engage in epic duels in this card-based roleplaying game. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. MUSIC WITH ROBERT: Sing-alongs with Robert Resnik hit all the right notes. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Free; groups must preregister. Info, 865-7216. MUSICAL STORY TIME: Melody makers of all ages read and rock out with books, songs and instruments. Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. ‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2.

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SONGS & STORIES WITH MATTHEW: Matthew Witten helps children start the day with tunes and tales of adventure. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Kick-off / Information Meeting | December 3, 7:00 PM Children’s Auditions | December 5, 8:30 AM-Noon Adult Auditions | December 6, 1:00-6:30 PM & December 7 – 9, 5:45-10:00 PM All events at 7 Green Tree Drive, South Burlington Info: www.lyrictheatrevt.org

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BLUEBIRD FAIRIES HOLIDAY SHOP: Fairy card readings with artist Emily Anderson offer folks insight to shoppers who browse her fairy decks, greeting cards and T-shirts. E1 Studio Collective, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 238-4540.

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TS & SY TEEN ADVISORY BOARD: Teens in SUIT CAS ES’ | C OU RTE A CAPE BRETON HOLIDAY grades 9 through 12 gather for live-action CONCERT WITH CÒIG: An all-star group role playing with Tempest Cameron. Yes, there will of fiddlers, singers and multi-instrumentalists be snacks! Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 bands together for a showcase of Celtic sounds. p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. UVM Recital Hall, Burlington, preperformance talk, 6:30 p.m.; show, 7:30 p.m. $10-35. Info, 656-4455.

CHRISTMAS MUSIC: Friends and neighbors come together for festive songs, readings and refreshments. United Reformed Church, New Haven, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 388-1345. ‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: See THU.3. COLCHESTER COMMUNITY CHORUS: Singers hit all the right notes in the program “Holiday Memories.” Colchester High School, 7:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 862-3910. HOLIDAY ARTISANS MARKET: See WED.2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: An evening of music history and seasonal libations culminates in an EP release party for the Pilgrims. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 356-2776.

‘THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE’: Tchaikovsky’s famous music sets the stage for the Middlebury Community Players’ family-oriented adaptation of The Nutcracker. Auditorium, Middlebury Union High School, 7 p.m. $6. Info, 382-9222.

‘SLEIGH RIDE’ CHRISTMAS MARKETPLACE: Attic treasures, handmade gifts, baked goods and raffles tempt shoppers. Bristol St. Ambrose Parish, 1-5 p.m. Free. Info, 453-2488. ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.2. WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2.

ACORN CLUB STORY TIME: Little ones up to age 4 gather for read-aloud tales. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. CLARA IN CONTEXT: Dancers from City Center Ballet take young fans behind the scenes of The Nutcracker. Lebanon Opera House, N.H., 10 a.m. $4-10. Info, 603-448-0400.

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CASTLETON UNIVERSITY CHORALE & CHAMBER SINGERS: Led by Sherrill Blodget, vocalists belt out songs by Joan Szymko, Paul Basler, James McCray and others. Casella Theater, Castleton University, 7 p.m. $5-10. Info, 468-1119. DR. RICK & THE WOOLENS: Squimley and the Woolens and Doctor Rick form a supergroup to provide the soundtrack for an ugly sweater-themed holiday party. Cosmosis Jones open. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 9 p.m. $5. Info, 540-0406. NORTHSONG WINTER CONCERT: The Newportbased chamber choir performs a variety of choral selections by Bach, Puccini, Laridsen, Chilcott and Stroope. Barton United Church, 7:30-9 p.m. $5. Info, 895-4942. PATRICK ROSS & HOT FLANNEL WINTER KICKOFF: The Vermont-born fiddler teams up with Green Mountain State musicians for three themed concerts. See hotflannel.com for details. West Newbury Hall, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $20; free for kids under 13 on December 6. Info, 866-3324.

seminars

KNOW THYSELF: PATHWORK GROUP: Participants in this six-week series explore the many layers of the self through guided meditation, journaling and the Pathwork teaching. Union Station, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 279-9144.

talks

EDUCATION ENRICHMENT FOR EVERYONE: FALL SERIES: Professor William Hart schools listeners with “On His Own Resources: The Indomitable Will of Alexander Twilight, Middlebury College, Class of 1823.” Faith United Methodist Church, South Burlington, 1-2 p.m. $5. Info, 864-3516.

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EARLY-BIRD MATH: Books, songs and games put a creative twist on mathematics. Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

APPALACHIAN MUSIC & JAM: A country and gospel concert by Vicki Moore and Joe Godwin gives way to a back-porch-style picking session. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

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SEVEN DAYS

kids

music

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POP-UP HOLIDAY MARKET: Champlain Valley makers and artisans set up shop for an evening of browsing and socializing. Tandem, Bristol, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 734-4236.

FIRST FRIDAY: SANTA’S NAUGHTY OR NICE PAJAMA PARTY: Hosts Miss Crime Scene, Mhisty Nights and Edda Belle are in the holiday spirit at this monthly queer dance party. Higher Ground Showcase Lounge, South Burlington, 8:30 p.m. $510. Info, 877-987-6487.

FREE CHOCOLATE SNOWFLAKE with a purchase of $25 or more

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HOLIDAY TRACTOR PARADE: A festive procession of farm machinery leads to a party at the St. Albans Cooperative Creamery complete with hot chocolate, a photo booth, visits with Santa and a tractor display. Downtown St. Albans, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-2444.

lgbtq

Candy Cane Delight $13.25!

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The Graduate Program in Community Mental Health & Mental Health Counseling has a new name! We are now the

FRI.4

Graduate Program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling

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LISA ROCHELLE: Those interested in downsizing hear the ins and outs and ups and downs of living tiny from the speaker who calls a 20-by-8-foot house home. Community Room, Hunger Mountain Co-op, Montpelier, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 223-8000, ext. 202.

Classes meet one weekend a month in Burlington, Vermont. Preparation for licensure as a clinical mental health counselor and certification as a substance abuse counselor. Accepting applications for both January 2016.

theater

‘CLICKSHARE’: See THU.3. ‘CRANKIES!’: A dynamic collection of artists tell stories through scrolling illustrations in celebration of the historic storytelling medium. Sandglass Theater, Putney, 7:30-9 p.m. $13-16. Info, 387-4051. ‘MARY POPPINS’: See WED.2. ‘SENTIMENTS & SUITCASES’: Singer Taryn Noelle and the Blue Gardenias use songs by Andrew Lloyd Webber, Joni Mitchell and others to tell the story of a young woman’s sojourn in this heartfelt cabaret. Spotlight Vermont, South Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $20; limited space. Info, 865-7626.

Specializations offered in Integrated Mental Health and Addictions Treatment for Children, Youth and Families or Adults

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words

FRIDAY MORNING WORKSHOP: Lit lovers analyze creative works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 22 Church St., Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup. com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. WRITING SALON: Wordsmiths employ neuroscientific research to kick out the inner critic who can curb creativity. Vermont Center for Emerging Technologies, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $20-25. Info, 865-4209.

SAT.5

activism

RIGHTS & DEMOCRACY SUMMIT: BUILDING AN ECONOMY FOR PEOPLE & THE PLANET: Skillbuilding workshops and guest speakers prepare community members to take an active role in guiding government policy. Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Free; preregister.

art

POTTERY SALE: A fundraiser for the school features works by students and local artists. Middlebury Studio School, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 247-3702.

bazaars

INTERNATIONAL BOUTIQUE: Goods from India to Nepal to Zimbabwe make for unique holiday gifts. Masonic Lodge, Waitsfield Village, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. Info, 801-793-2205.

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58 CALENDAR

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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JEWELRY & SCARF SALE: See THU.3, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

community

HOME SHARE NOW INFORMATION SESSION: Locals get up-to-date details on home-sharing opportunities in Vermont. Montpelier Pharmacy, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 479-8544. RIVER OF LIGHT LANTERN PARADE: Sambatucada and Brass Balagan keep the beat during a themed lantern-lit procession through town. Various Waterbury locations, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, mmonley@wwsu.org.

dance

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BURLINGTON WESTIE FIRST SATURDAY DANCE: Hoofers hit the dance floor for a themed evening of blues and west coast swing. North End Studio A, Burlington, introductory lesson, 6:30 p.m.; workshop, 7 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $7-10. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com. CONTRA DANCE: A traditional social dance comes complete with music by the Stringrays and calling by Will Mentor. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 8-11 p.m. $5-9. Info, 744-2851.

DANCE! FACULTY/STUDENT WORKS-INPROGRESS: Professional dancers and advanced students share current projects in an intimate setting. Contemporary Dance & Fitness Studio, Montpelier, 7-8:15 p.m. $5-10. Info, 229-4676. DANCE SHOW: See FRI.4. FALL DANCE CONCERT: See FRI.4.

etc.

AN EVENING AT THE LIBRARY: Patrons of the library fête cartoonist Ed Koren at a soirée complete with food, drink and live music. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. $60. Info, 223-3338. INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY MEETING PLACE: Brainstorming leads to forming activity groups for hobbies such as flying stunt kites and playing music. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. MARBLE MANSION TOUR: History buffs explore the 1867 home build by Ira C. Allen. Call for details. Marble Mansion Inn, Fair Haven, noon-4 p.m. Info, 265-3340. STORY BARN HOLY COW!: Folks from all walks of life share true tales, live music and a potluck meal. The Story Barn, Johnson, potluck, 2 p.m.; live band, 8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, mark@vecotourism. org.

fairs & festivals

GINGERBREAD FESTIVAL: More than 80 edible houses are on display at this fun-filled event featuring handmade gifts and kids’ activities. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $5-10. Info, 649-3268. VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL: See FRI.4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

film

‘CITIZENFOUR’: This 2014 documentary follows Edward Snowden as he shares classified documents. Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center, Middlebury College, 3 & 8 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433. ‘THE GOLDEN AGE OF COMEDY’: Silent cinema’s comedic greats come together in this award-winning compilation shown on 16mm film. Newman Center, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 7 p.m. Donations. Info, serious_61@yahoo.com. ‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2.

food & drink

BURLINGTON WINTER FARMERS MARKET: A bustling indoor marketplace offers fresh and prepared foods alongside crafts, live music, lunch seating and face painting. Burlington Memorial Auditorium, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 310-5172. CAPITAL CITY WINTER FARMERS MARKET: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at an off-season celebration of locally grown food. Montpelier City Hall, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2958. COSMIC WINES: Cheers! National and international winemakers and importers uncork bottles at an epic wine tasting. Zero Gravity Craft Brewery, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $40. Info, 865-2368. FIVE CORNERS INDOOR FARMERS MARKET: From prepared foods and local produce to handmade gifts, vendors share the fruits of their labor. Maple Street Park, Essex, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 999-3249. MAKE YOUR OWN CHOCOLATE BARS: First-time confectioners tie on their aprons to temper, mold and wrap full-size take-home treats. South End Kitchen at Lake Champlain Chocolates, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. $25. Info, 864-0505.

health & fitness

BEYOND THE MAT YOGA RETREAT INFORMATIONAL CLASS: Sarah Diedrick and Caitlin Pascucci lead a Vin Yin session where they outline the details of their upcoming retreat in Costa Rica for interested yogis. Sangha Studio, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. FITNESS BOOT CAMP: See WED.2, 8-9 a.m.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT LOW BACK LOVE WORKSHOP: A slow-paced vinyasa flow promotes mobility in the lower body. Sangha Studio, Burlington, 2-4 p.m. $25. Info, 448-4262.

HOLIDAY BOOK SALE: Bibliophiles add gently used titles to their bookshelves, or find gifts for fellow readers. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

MORNING FLOW YOGA: See THU.3.

HOLIDAY CONCERT: Audience members are welcome to sing along to favorite carols during a recital by the Green Mountain College Choirs, GMC Festival Brass and guest musicians. Ackley Hall, Green Mountain College, Poultney, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 800-776-6675.

PRENATAL YOGA CLASS: See WED.2, 10:30-11:30 a.m. R.I.P.P.E.D.: 9-10 a.m.

holidays

BLUEBIRD FAIRIES HOLIDAY SHOP: See FRI.4, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. BREAKFAST WITH SANTA: Kiddos start their day off with St. Nick, then take advantage of themed crafts and activities. South Burlington St. John Vianney Parish Hall, 8:30-10 a.m. & 10:30 a.m.noon. $15; free for kids age 1 and under. Info, 951-4290.

HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR: Neighbors catch up at this seasonal fête featuring locally made art and crafts. Maple Corner Community Center, Calais, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4702.

CHRISTMAS BAZAAR: Shoppers, fueled by a hearty lunch, stock up on handmade gifts. Shelburne United Methodist Church, bazaar, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; lunch, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 985-3981. CHRISTMAS TREE SALE: Eye-catching evergreens make for a festive fundraiser for Lund Family Center and All Breed Rescue. All Breed Rescue, Williston, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Cost of trees. Info, 658-0809. ‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: See THU.3, 1 & 4 p.m.

COUNTRY CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE & HOLIDAY PAINT-IN: From bazaars and bonfires to sweet treats and sled dogs, a seasonal extravaganza celebrates the arts with a wide range of familyfriendly activities. Various Mad River Valley locations. Free. Info, 496-6682.

DELIGHTS OF DECEMBER: Christmas carols ring out from the Phonograph Museum as revelers browse for gifts and gaze at art. Compass Music and Arts Center, Brandon, noon-5 p.m. Free. Info, 247-4295.

FESTIVAL OF WREATHS: Food, music and more than 100 decorated boughs welcome winter in all its glory. Proceeds benefit local children’s services. See calandar spotlight. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Donations. Info, 388-2853. HOLIDAY ARTISANS MARKET: See WED.2, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.

HOLIDAY HOP: An alternative to crowds treats shoppers to craft fairs, gift boutiques and local fare. Call for details. Various Champlain Islands locations, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 999-5862. HOLIDAY MASQUERADE PARTY FOR TEENS: Costumes are encouraged at an evening complete with a photo booth, a lip syncing contest, karaoke and games. Twiggs — An American Gastropub, St. Albans, 6-9 p.m. $3. Info, 309-4487.

FITNESS

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Carols played on an 1831 piano set a festive mood for crafts, art viewing, an electric train and other activities. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, Middlebury, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Donations. Info, 388-2117. HOOKED ON THE HOLIDAYS: Rod-and-reel fanatics and their families decorate trout cookies, tie decorative clown flies and warm up with cocoa and s’mores. American Museum of Fly Fishing, Manchester Center, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 362-3300 Phoenix Books Essex, 11 a.m. Free; donations of nonperishable food items accepted. Info, 872-7111. MEET THE GRINCH!: Kiddos and their parents get acquainted with Dr. Seuss’ meanest, greenest character. Phoenix Books, Essex, 11 a.m. Free; donations of nonperishable food items accepted. Info, 872-7111. Phoenix Books Burlington, 2 p.m. Free; donations of nonperishable food items accepted. Info, 448-3350. ‘THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE’: See FRI.4, 7 p.m. OLD-FASHIONED NEW ENGLAND HOLIDAY FAIR: Revelers shop a huge selection of handcrafted goods, enjoy live music and dig into a hearty lunch. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-7861.

with a

FAMILY MEMBERSHIP

25% OFF

YEARLY MEMBERSHIP! Plus Kids Under 18 FREE Short term individual & family packages are also available

PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Four-legged friends who arrive on leashes or in carriers are photographed with Saint Nick to benefit the Humane Society of Chittenden County. Burlington Emergency & Veterinary Specialists, Williston, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $5. Info, 863-2387.

HURRY

RICHMOND HOLIDAY MARKET: Santa makes an appearance as folks take horse-drawn wagon rides through town and check out specialty items from more than 70 vendors. Various Richmond locations, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 434-4483.

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HOLIDAY BAZAAR: For the 83rd year, three floors of fun feature baked goods, a silent auction, tasty eats, handicrafts, gift making and more. First Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5630.

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period dress is encouraged. Plattsburgh, Elks Lodge, N.Y., 6-9:30 p.m. $85. Info, 518-324-0125.

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SEVEN DAYS

FESTIVAL OF TREES: As bids rise, so do holiday spirits at this annual auction led by Bob Prozzo, who presents vacation getaways, gift certificates, home furnishings and more. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 6 p.m. $10; cash bar. Info, 775-0903.

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DECK THE HALLS: Families tap into the holiday spirit with decorated trees, musical performances, themed crafts and more. Shelburne Museum, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $5-10; free for members and kids under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Holiday shopping package starts at $249. Goods & gift cards on sale now. hotelvt.com

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COOLIDGE HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: Stepping back in time to the 1870s, folks explore the birthplace of of America’s 30th president. Crafts, sleigh rides, kids activities and a hat fashion show round out the festivities. President Calvin Coolidge State Historic Site, Plymouth, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 672-3773.

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HOLIDAY CRAFT WORKSHOP: Little ones ages 8 and up use paper, beans and aluminum foil to create ornate ornaSA ments for the tree. MAC T.5 AL CHRISTMAS AT THE |M HE Center for the Arts Gallery, US ITY N I C| FARM: Families celebrate the Newport, 9:30 a.m. Free; MU E LI OM W ES holidays 19th-century-style with ON C T | CO U preregister. Info, 673-8808. RTESY OF RIPT ornament making and baked treats. A HOLIDAY GALA INSPIRED BY Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-4 ‘DOWNTON ABBEY’: Mountain Lake PBS celebrates p.m. $4-14; free for members and kids 2 and under. the hit drama with an advance screening of the Info, 457-2355. first episode of the final season at a soirée where

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calendar SANTA ARRIVES & NECI COOKIE DECORATING: New England Culinary Institute staff and students help youngsters create tasty treats as they await a visit from Santa Claus himself. City Center, Montpelier, 12:30-4 p.m. Free. Info, 223-9604. ‘SLEIGH RIDE’ CHRISTMAS MARKETPLACE: See FRI.4, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.2.

for every

ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: Spirits soar at a variety of Christmas-themed attractions, including Santa’s Workshop, an art show and a tree showcase. Downtown St. Albans, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 309-4487.

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Turn to the Classifieds section (center pull-out) or go to sevendaysvt.com/legals for a list of legal notices including: • Act 250 Permit applications • Foreclosures • Notices to creditors • Storage auctions • Planning and zoning changes

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‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2.

Call Ashley for a quote: 865-1020 x37

SKIPPYJON JONES IN ‘SNOW WHAT’: The beloved Siamese cat from Judy Schachner’s children’s book series travels from the page to the stage in this Theaterworks USA production. A milk-and-cookies reception follows. Moore Theater, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 3 p.m. $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422.

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ELI WEST: Multiinstrumentalist Mark Winship accompanies the singer-songwriter as part of the Ripton Community Coffee House Series. Ripton Community House, 7:30 p.m. $3-15. Info, 388-9782.

AN AN EVENING WITH BETTYE FR DO ‘A WINNIE-THE-POOH LP YO LAVETTE: The soulful singer HS ES CHRISTMAS TAIL’: Live actors RT IN G U CO E RS serves up blues and R&B selections W INT ER C O NC ER T | and puppets breathe new life from her 50-year career. Spruce Peak into Pooh, Eeyore, Piglet, Tigger and Performing Arts Center, Stowe, 7:30 p.m. $20Christopher Robin. Off Center for the Dramatic 54. Info, 760-4634. Arts, Burlington, 10 a.m. & 2 & 6 p.m. $10-15. Info, MONTPELIER COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHOIR: 863-5966. Vocalists celebrate 20 years of song in an uplifting program of soul, jazz, and original and tradikids tional gospel, led by John Harrison. First Church ‘THE ANIMALS IN WINTER’: George Dennison’s Universalist of Barre, 7 p.m. $10; $25 per family. children’s poem inspired this play about a group of Info, 778-0881. children who offer shelter to a parade of animals. PATRICK ROSS & HOT FLANNEL WINTER KICKOFF: Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 4 See FRI.4, 7:30 p.m. p.m. Free; limited space. Info, moderntimestheater@gmail.com. SIMONE DINNERSTEIN: Works by Schumann, Schubert and Philip Lasser ring out courtesy of CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Players make stratethe acclaimed pianist. See calendar spotlight. gic moves and vie for the opposing king. Adult Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 7:30 p.m. $10-40. supervision required for kids 8 and under. Brownell Info, 728-6464. Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. ‘SONGS OF PEACE & JOY’: South Burlington Community Chorus’ renditions of songs by Pete FAMILY GINGERBREAD DECORATING: Tykes and Seeger, Cat Stevens, Gustav Holst and John their parents craft colorful and delicious creations. Lennon, along with some holiday favorites, uplift Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m. Free; prereglisteners. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s ister. Info, 849-2420. College, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $10-12; free for kids FAMILY WORKSHOP: PAPER MARBLING: Parents under 18. Info, 846-4108. and kids age 10 and up employ the creative techTHE SOUND INVESTMENT JAZZ ENSEMBLE: nique dating to the 1200s. Catamount Outback Middlebury College’s big band swings into the seaArtspace, St. Johnsbury, 10 a.m.-noon. $12; $10 per son with a toe-tapping performance. Robison Hall, family member; preregister. Info, 748-2600. Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 8 GINGERBREAD HOUSES: Confectionary architects p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433. build edible dwellings. Kids ages 8 and under VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA WINTER CONCERT: must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling A bow-and-string extravaganza benefits the Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free; preSecond Congregational Church. Hyde Park Opera register. Info, 878-4918. House, 7 p.m. $5-10; free for preschoolers. Info, HANDS-ON GLASSBLOWING PROJECTS & 229-4191. CLASSES: SUNCATCHER: Aspiring artisans ages VSO MASTERWORKS: The Vermont Symphony 7 and up choose natural and nautical designs to Orchestra & Chorus charm classical connoisseurs create colorful window hangings. Orwell Glass with compositions by Schubert, Sibelius and workshop, Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Dvořák. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 8 p.m. $9-61. Vergennes, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $15-20; preregister for a Info, 863-5966. time slot. Info, 475-2022. |R

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BELLA VOCE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Local vocalists interpret seasonal tunes in “Feast of Carols.” First Baptist Church of Burlington, 8 p.m. $15-18. Info, 863-5966.

MU

WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2.

ANIMA: The all-female a cappella ensemble travels to the Renaissance era in “The Soul of Winter.” Green Mountain Monastery, Greensboro, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 373-7597.

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music

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‘THE TOYS TAKE OVER CHRISTMAS’: A rag doll named Sunny and her lifelike friends melt the Master Toymaker’s hardened heart in a UVM Department of Theatre production. Royall Tyler Theatre, UVM, Burlington, 10 a.m. & 2 & 6 p.m. $815. Info, 656-0094.

WINTER HOLIDAYS PARTY: Kiddos get creative with gingerbread while adults help decorate the library. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

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WEEKEND ARTWORKS: Potential Picassos explore different artists and creative techniques with themed activities. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland, 1-3 p.m. $10; free for members. Info, 775-0356.

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TONY TRISCHKA’S ‘GLORY SHONE AROUND’: A banjo-driven musical celebration highlights a range of seasonal selections. See calendar spotlight. Haybarn Theatre, Goddard College, Plainfield, 8 p.m. $20-25. Info, 434-4563.

TRAIN SHOW: Locomotive lovers feast their eyes on model displays, books, videos and more at this fundraiser for Winooski Dollars for Scholars. Winooski High School, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $1-5; free for kids under 6 with an adult. Info, winooskidfs@ gmail.com.

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outdoors

GLOBAL FATBIKE DAY: Cyclists get the skinny on the winter riding option at a day of competitions, demonstrations and exploration. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $20-25. Info, 879-6001.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

MOUNT HUNGER AND WHITE ROCK HIKE: Adventurers tackle a difficult 6.5-mile hike gaining 2,500 feet in elevation. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 899-9982.

seminars

50 WAYS TO PROVE HE’S DEAD: Family tree fanatics pick up tips on locating death dates. Vermont Genealogy Library, Fort Ethan Allen, Colchester, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $5. Info, 310-9285. BATH SALTS: GIFTING FOR PARENTS AND FAMILIES: Attendees put love into homemade, aromatic tub-time gifts. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $5-10; preregister; limited space. Info, 861-9757. INTERMEDIATE MICROSOFT WORD: Students get familiar with the word processor’s advanced features and customization options. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. WINTER RIDING WORKSHOP: Those who wish to commute by bike year-round learn the ins and outs of staying safe, warm and comfortable on two wheels. Bike Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 264-9687.

talks

SHANE CLAIBORNE: Spiritual seekers hear stories of compassion and reconciliation in the talk “Tearing Down Walls.” South Hero Congregational Church, 5:30-8 p.m. Donations; preregister for dinner. Info, 372-4962.

theater

Give the Gift

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ART CHURCH: Experienced artists and newbies alike deepen their reverence for the creativity within through meditation and a silent work session. Arrive 10 minutes before the start time. Expressive Arts Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. $20. Info, 862-5302.

bazaars

INTERNATIONAL BOUTIQUE: See SAT.5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

community

COHOUSING PRESENTATION: See WED.2, Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 734-0798. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS WITH THE CENTER FOR MINDFUL LEARNING: Peaceful people gather for guided meditation and interactive discussions. Burlington Friends Meeting House, 5-7 p.m. $10. Info, 540-0820. OK: Like-minded individuals plan for the future, contemplate the past and connect with the present. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4:45-6 p.m. Free. Info, 989-9684.

dance

FAMILY DANCE: Hoofers of all ages boogie and sing along to live music by Kenric Kite and friends. Liz Benjamin calls circle and line dances. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, lizbenjamin64@gmail.com.

‘BRUNDIBÁR’ AUDITIONS: Adults and kids age 7 and up strut their stuff for singing roles in this parable of hope and justice produced by Theatre Kavanah and In Tandem Arts. Burlington City Hall Auditorium, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, info@ intandemarts.com.

‘THE LADY OF THE CAMELLIAS’: The Bolshoi Ballet interprets the story of a bourgeois who falls in love with a courtesan in a broadcast production of John Neumeier’s tragic masterpiece. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 12:55 p.m. $6-18. Info, 748-2600.

CHILDREN’S AUDITIONS FOR LYRIC THEATRE COMPANY’S ‘MARY POPPINS’: Performers with stage ages of 9 to 11 years give it their all for starring and supporting parts. Lyric Theatre Company Office/Warehouse, South Burlington, 8:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 658-1484.

etc.

‘CLICKSHARE’: See THU.3, 2 & 7:30 p.m. ‘CRANKIES!’: See FRI.4, 7:30-9 p.m. ‘LOST IN YONKERS’: See THU.3, 2 & 6:30 p.m.

‘SENTIMENTS & SUITCASES’: See FRI.4. ‘TRIBES’: See WED.2, 8 p.m.

words

BOOKS ON THE BALCONY: Readers browse page turners at this benefit for library programs. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

MEGAN PRICE: The author signs copies of the humorous and harrowing tale Vermont Wild: Adventures of Fish & Game Wardens, Volume 4. The Eloquent Page, St. Albans, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 527-7243.

The

arts

are for

P E R F O R M I N G

EVERYONE!

15-16 highlights Broadway National Tour: Ragtime Broadway National Tour: Once TWIN INFINITY: An Intergalactic Nemesis Live-Action Graphic Novel Paula Poundstone Companhia Urbana de Dança Peking Acrobats Maria Schneider Orchestra Alonzo King LINES Ballet: Biophony

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JANE AUSTEN IN VERMONT: Fans of the famed writer dress their best for the annual Jane Austen Birthday Tea and Regency Ball with the Burlington Country Dancers and music by Impropriety. The Essex Culinary Resort & Spa, 1-5 p.m. $10-40; preregister. Info, 343-2294.

fairs & festivals

VERMONT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL: See FRI.4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

film

‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2.

food & drink

ETHIOPIAN NIGHT: Mulu Tewelde and Alganesh Michael serve up traditional African dishes. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 4:30-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink; preregister; limited space. Info, 540-0406, ext. 4. WINE AUDITION & CHEDDAR CHALLENGE: Foodies taste test fromage and vino to be served at the theater. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $20-25. Info, 382-9222.

games

SHRINERS SUPER BINGO: Players with five in a row win big at this monthly meet-up. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $15-30. Info, 434-2055.

SEVEN DAYS

IT HAPPENED ONE DECEMBER: STORIES BY THE FIRE, A HOTEL VERMONT AND BURLINGTON WRITERS WORKSHOP STORYTELLING SERIES: Winter-inspired stories told aloud entertain listeners who sip from mugs of hot chocolate. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 855-650-0080.

Whether you give tickets to a performance, a Flynn membership, or a FlynnArts class, create a memorable experience for a loved one while supporting the Flynn. Or give a gift certificate and your recipient can choose any of the above.

12.02.15-12.09.15

BOOK LAUNCH: Al Blondin and Anastasia Pratt peel back the layers of the Onion City in their book Winooski: Images of America. The Eloquent Page, St. Albans, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 527-7243.

This holiday, give an experience they’ll always remember!

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HD LIVE: Soprano Marlis Petersen soars as the eponymous femme fatale in a broadcast production of Berg’s opera Lulu. Loew Auditorium, Hopkins Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., 1 p.m. $29. Info, 603-646-2422.

PERFORMING ARTS!

health & fitness

HERBAL TONICS & ELIXIRS FOR WINTER WELLNESS: Students prepare for the cold season with healthful recipes and immune-boosting tips. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. $15. Info, 540-0186.

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KUNDALINI YOGA: Asana, pranayam, mantra and meditation accelerate the path to awakening. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 10 a.m.-11:30 p.m. $12. Info, 540-0186.

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MIXED-LEVEL FLOW YOGA: Students may modify postures to meet their individual needs during a sequence of feel-good poses. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 4:30-5:45 p.m. $10. Info, 540-0186. NIA WITH SUZY: Drawing from martial, dance and healing arts, sensory-based movements push participants to their full potentials. South End Studio, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. $14. Info, 522-3691. WOMEN’S WELLNESS SERIES: YOGA FOR FERTILITY: Women working toward becoming pregnant hit the mat for a relaxing practice. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 3:30-5 p.m. $20. Info, 829-0211.

holidays

CHRISTMAS AT THE FARM: See SAT.5. CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING & CAROLING: ‘Tis the season for crafts, carols, cocoa, cookies and boughs ablaze with tiny lights. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. CHRISTMAS TREE SALE: See SAT.5. Untitled-14 1

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‘CLARA’S DREAM: A NUTCRACKER STORY’: See THU.3, 3 p.m. COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS CONCERT: Seasonal strains ring out when the Enosburg Community Chorus and the Enosburg Town Band take the stage. Enosburg Opera House, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 933-6171. COUNTRY CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE & HOLIDAY PAINT-IN: See SAT.5. DECK THE HALLS: See SAT.5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. GERMAN HOLIDAY BAKING: OLD TRADITIONS & NEW VARIATIONS: Heike Meyer of brotbakery shares traditional recipes from her native country. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $5-10; preregister; limited space. Info, 861-9757.

Artisan soaps, shaving, and body care sundries handcrafted here in our Studio. Treat yourself or someone you love this holiday!

HOLIDAY ARTISANS MARKET: See WED.2, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. HOLIDAY BOOK SALE: See SAT.5, noon-6 p.m. HOLIDAY CONCERT: The Milton Community Band and the Colchester Community Chrous perform a spirited show of seasonal songs. 2-3:15 p.m. Free. Info, miltonband01@hotmail.com. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE & LUNCHEON: A festive afternoon comes complete with lunch, treats, vintage toys and kids’ activities. Milton Historical Museum, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2598.

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HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE: See SAT.5, noon-4 p.m.

“A heartwarming family favorite!”

SEVEN DAYS

—St. Louis Post-Dispatch

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HOLIDAY PIE CONCERT: The Champlain Echoes join the Green Mountain Chorus to belt out seasonal tunes, then serve up slices of tasty pastries. McCarthy Arts Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 2:30 p.m. $10-20 includes unlimited pie samples. Info, 555-9595. JUDY COLLINS: ‘HOLIDAYS & HITS’: Fans file in to hear the folk legend sing seasonal favorites plus hits such as “Send In the Clowns.” Bellows Falls Opera House, 7 p.m. $29.50-69.50. Info, 748-2600.

Nebraska Theater Caravan

“A Christmas Carol”

LIGHT THE NIGHT: The spirit of Chanukah shines at a grand menorah lighting complete with latkes, sufganiyot and kids’ souvenirs. University Green, UVM, Burlington, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 658-5770.

Friday, December 11 at 7 pm, MainStage

MEET THE GRINCH!: Phoenix Books Rutland, noon. Free; donations of nonperishable food items accepted. Info, 855-8078. ‘THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE’: See FRI.4, 2 p.m. PLAINFIELD HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET & TRUNK SALE: Support local herbalists, crafters and farmers at this emporium of handmade crafts, foods and gifts. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, gardens7gables@gmail. com.

Sponsor

Season Sponsor

Media

62 CALENDAR

ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See WED.2. ST. ALBANS FESTIVAL OF TREES: See SAT.5. ‘THE TOYS TAKE OVER CHRISTMAS’: See SAT.5.

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WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2. ‘A WINNIE-THE-POOH CHRISTMAS TAIL’: See SAT.5, 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.

kids

HANDS-ON GLASSBLOWING PROJECTS & CLASSES: SUNCATCHER: See SAT.5. ‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2.

language

DIMANCHES FRENCH CONVERSATION: Parlez-vous français? Speakers practice the tongue at a casual drop-in chat. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431.

lgbtq

THE SKY WRITING GROUP: Creative storytelling supports health and community cohesion in a critique-free environment. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, liz@pridecentervt.org.

music

ANIMA: United Church of Cabot, 6:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 373-7597. BELLA VOCE HOLIDAY CONCERT: See SAT.5, 3 p.m. FRANCESCA BLANCHARD AND WHEEZER & SQUEEZER: Both acoustic songs in French and English and traditional instrumental dance music captivate listeners. New City Galerie, Burlington, 7-8:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 735-2542. HANDEL’S ‘MESSIAH’ IN BARRE: Lisa Jablow conducts a classical ensemble in this joyful work from the Baroque period. Barre Opera House, 2 p.m. $5-15. Info, 476-8188. HANDEL’S ‘MESSIAH’ IN RUTLAND: Jennifer Carpenter conducts a classical ensemble in this Baroque masterpiece. Grace Congregational Church, Rutland, 3:30 & 7 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-4301. JEFF SALISBURY BAND: Audience members bob their heads to the sounds of vintage blues and R&B. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4962. ‘MESSIAH’ SING: Vermont Symphony Orchestra and Burlington Chamber Orchestra musicians join vocalists for a rousing rendition of this seasonal favorite by Handel. Charlotte Congregational Church, 4 p.m. $12; $40 per group of four. Info, 425-3176. MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY WIND ENSEMBLE: Forty musicians celebrate the 150th anniversary of the birth of Jean Sibelius with a performance of his masterwork “Finlandia.” Holley Hall, Bristol, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 453-5885. MONTPELIER COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHOIR: See SAT.5. A reception and silent auction follow. Bethany Church of Montpelier, 4 p.m. $10; $25 per family. Info, 778-0881. NATASHA KOVAL PADEN: The Middlebury College affiliate artist presents a repertoire of major works by Chopin. Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. NORTHSONG WINTER CONCERT: The Newportbased chamber choir performs a variety of choral selections by Bach, Puccini, Laridsen, Chilcott and Stroope. United Church of Newport, 4-5:30 p.m. $5. Info, 895-4942. PATRICK ROSS & HOT FLANNEL WINTER KICKOFF: See FRI.4, 4 p.m. PURE COUNTRY BAND: Music lovers start with food, then dance the afternoon away to toe-tapping tunes. VFW Post 309, Peru, N.Y., meal, noon; band, 1-4 p.m. Donations. Info, 518-643-2309. RANDOLPH SINGERS WINTER CONCERT: Lindsey Warren directs vocalists in Rachmaninoff’s “Vespers,” Op. 37. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 4 p.m. Donations. Info, randolphsingers@gmail.com. UNIVERSITY CONCERT CHOIR & CATAMOUNT SINGERS: Vocalists lift their voices in “Winter’s Warm Music: A Celebration of Yuletide.” Marble Court, University of Vermont Fleming Museum of Art, Burlington, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 656-2295. THE VERMONT CHORAL UNION: A cappella harmonies propel the program “O Radiant Dawn.” The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, 3 p.m. $12-17. Info, info@cathedralart.org.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT PREGNANCY STUDY

VERMONT FIDDLE ORCHESTRA WINTER CONCERT: A bow-and-string extravaganza gives way to a silent auction and refreshments. Unitarian Church of Montpelier, 4 p.m. $12-15; free for kids 12 and under; preregister. Info, 229-4191.

PUBLIC HEARING: Citizens weigh in on the New England Theological Seminary’s request for changes in zoning and development regulations. Meeting Room, Williston Town Hall, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6704.

outdoors

dance

STIMSON MOUNTAIN HIKE: Outdoor enthusiasts maintain a moderate pace on a Long Trail trek. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 355-7181.

sports

WOMEN’S PICKUP SOCCER: Quick-footed ladies of varying skill levels break a sweat while connecting passes and making runs for the goal. For ages 18 and up. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. $3. Info, carmengeorgevt@gmail.com.

talks

DAVE MELNICK: Northeastern Family Institute of Vermont’s director of outpatient services presents the public forum “The Enigma of Adolescence” to help parents and professionals better understand the teenage brain. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 6:308:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-1104.

theater

ADULT AND TEEN AUDITIONS FOR LYRIC THEATRE COMPANY’S ‘MARY POPPINS’: Performers ages 18 and up throw their hats in the ring for roles in the spring production. Lyric Theatre Company Office/ Warehouse, South Burlington, 1-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 658-1484. ‘BRUNDIBÁR’ AUDITIONS: See SAT.5, 2-6 p.m. ‘CRANKIES!’: See FRI.4, 3-4 p.m. & 7:30-9 p.m. ‘MARY POPPINS’: See WED.2, 2 p.m. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HD LIVE: See SAT.5, 1 p.m. ‘TRIBES’: See WED.2, 2 & 7 p.m.

words

BOOK LAUNCH: Nonfiction fans flock to the release of Richard Allen’s Ambition & Grit: The Life of Truman Naramore, Civil War Veteran and Entrepreneur. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

BURLINGTON WOMEN’S POETRY GROUP: Female writers seek feedback from fellow rhyme-andmeter mavens. Call for details. Private residence, Burlington, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 828-545-2950.

MON.7 art

bazaars

INTERNATIONAL BOUTIQUE: See SAT.5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

community

PUBLIC FORUM: Locals raise questions and provide feedback on a possible retail sales tax increase in Berlin. Berlin Elementary School, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4405, ext. 305.

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: Jigs, reels and strathspeys for all ability levels exercise the body and the mind. Bring water and soft-soled shoes. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $5-9. Info, 355-5901.

Compensation $700 2 Free Ultrasounds If interested, please visit our website to complete the recruitment questionnaire: http://j.mp/1yLwkLO

etc.

BECOMING A FATHER: Dads-to-be share hopes and fears about starting a family. Good Beginnings of Central Vermont, Montpelier, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 595-7953.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 802-656-1906

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.2.

film

‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2.

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food & drink

MASTERING THE ART OF THE STIR-FRY: Home cooks infuse fresh veggies with Asian flavoring at a culinary class led by food writer Andrea Chesman. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $5-10; preregister; limited space. Info, 861-9757.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.2, 7 p.m. TRIVIA NIGHT: Teams of quick thinkers gather for a meeting of the minds. Lobby, Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 651-5012.

DEC .

health & fitness

4-6

DYNAMIC QIGONG: Breathing, stretching and meditative movements enhance health and well-being. 2 Wolves Holistic Center, Vergennes, 6:30-7:45 p.m. $14. Info, 238-2637. HERBAL CONSULTATIONS: Betzy Bancroft, Larken Bunce, Guido Masé and students from the Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism evaluate individual constitutions and health conditions. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 4-8 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, info@ vtherbcenter.org.

52B Church St., Burlington DesignersCircleVT.com 802-864-4238

Follow Us!

OPEN EVERYDAY THROUGH THE HOLIDAYS!

MORNING FLOW YOGA: See THU.3. NIA WITH SUZY: See SUN.6, 7 p.m. POSTNATAL REHAB: See WED.2.

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PRENATAL BALLET BARRE: See WED.2. PRENATAL YOGA CLASS: See WED.2. R.I.P.P.E.D.: See WED.2. RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.2. SLOW FLOW YOGA: Breath guides a series of seated and standing postures aimed at improving balance. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 6-7:15 p.m. $10. Info, 540-0186. ZUMBA: See WED.2.

holidays

JUDY COLLINS: ‘HOLIDAYS & HITS’: See SUN.6, Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $49.50. Info, 457-3981. WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2.

kids

‘THE ANIMALS IN WINTER’: Greensboro Free Library, 4 p.m. Free; limited space. Info, moderntimestheater@gmail.com. CRUISERS’ & CRAWLERS’ PLAY & STAY STORY TIME: Babies and toddlers up to age 2 engage in books, songs and social time with blocks, bubbles and parachute play. Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. MON.7

CALENDAR 63

HOME SHARE NOW INFORMATION SESSION: See SAT.5, Johnson’s Sterling Market, noon-3 p.m. Free. Info, 479-8544.

Flexible scheduling, including weekend and evening appointments

SEVEN DAYS

OPEN STUDIOS: Creatives meet new friends and make art in a community setting. Expressive Arts Burlington, noon-2 p.m. $15. Info, 862-5302.

9 short appointments (approximately 20 minutes each)

12.02.15-12.09.15

THE BEST OF BURLINGTON WRITERS WORKSHOP TOUR: Danielle Thierry and Nina Gaby host a showcase of top-notch work from local wordsmiths. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 383-8104.

SALSA MONDAYS: Dancers learn the techniques and patterns of the salsa, merengue, bachata and cha-cha. North End Studio A, Burlington, fundamentals, 7 p.m.; intermediate, 8 p.m. $12. Info, 227-2572.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BOOKAPALOOZA: Bibliophiles can eat, drink and be merry as booksellers provide inspired recommendations for the gift-giving season. Phoenix Books Burlington, 6 p.m. Free; preregister; limited space. Info, 448-3350.

Researchers at the Vermont Center on Behavior and Health are looking for women who are currently pregnant to participate in a study on health behaviors and infant birth outcomes. This study involves:

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Contact us at 847-8248 or menopauseandbrain@uvm.edu.

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DROP-IN STORY TIME: Reading, rhyming and crafting entertain creative kiddos. Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. FAMILY DANCE: Kids and their caregivers romp, shake, stretch and wiggle at an all-ages sock hop hosted by Dance Tribe Vermont. Shelburne Town Hall, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $2-5. Info, jerihelen@gmail. com.

theater

HANDS-ON GLASSBLOWING PROJECTS & CLASSES: SUNCATCHER: See SAT.5.

‘HAIRSPRAY’ AUDITIONS: Actors, singers and movers age 12 and up vie for roles in Lost Nation Theater’s 2016 season opener. See lostnationtheater.org for details. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier, 5-9 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0492.

PAJAMA STORY TIME: Kids in PJs bring their favorite stuffed animals for stories, a craft and a bedtime snack. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: See THU.3, 11 a.m. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP: Naturalistled activities through fields and forests captivate little ones up to age 5 and their parents. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 229-6206.

Clinical Neuroscience Research Unit

‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2.

STORIES WITH MEGAN: Budding bookworms ages 2 through 5 open their ears for exciting tales. S O U T H B U 1R L I N G T O10/30/15 N 12v-uvmclinicalresearch110415.indd 1:13 PMFletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free; groups must preregister. Info, 865-7216.

10th Annual HOLIdAy INN

1068 WILLISTON ROAD

12.02.15-12.09.15 SEVEN DAYS

Cash • Check • VISA • MasterCard

Free Parking & Admission

bakedbeads.com

64 CALENDAR

BAKED BEADS by David & Robin

A Vermont company since 1991

TUE.8 art

lgbtq

OPEN ART STUDIO: Seasoned creatives and first-timers alike convene to paint, knit and craft in a friendly environment. Bring a table covering for messy projects. Swanton Public Library, 4-8 p.m. Free. Info, swantonartscouncil@ gmail.com.

UNCORKED FOR A CAUSE: PRIDE CENTER OF VERMONT WINE AUCTION: Red or white? Revelers take their pick at a benefit for the center featuring tasty fare, live music and merriment. Burlington City Arts, 6-9 p.m. $20 or a bottle of wine. Info, 860-7812.

music

AMARYLLIS: VERMONT’S EARLY VOICE: Susanne OPEN STUDIOS: See Peck directs the local MON.7. ensemble in a program of W IN Renaissance choral music in ROCK YOUR ART OUT: OW EA FT UD “Jubilate Deo!” Middlebury St. Free-form creative expresYO ITI S ON TE R & OU CH ED Stephen’s on the Green Episcopal sion eliminates the stress DAR C HAL LEN GE | C Church, 7:30 p.m. $13. Info, 453-3513. and tension of the day. Expressive Arts Burlington, 6:15-8:15 p.m. $20. Info, CHAMBER ENSEMBLES CONCERT: University of 862-5302. Vermont music students perform classical chamber music for trios, quartets and quintets. UVM Recital bazaars Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-2295. INTERNATIONAL BOUTIQUE: See SAT.5, 10 a.m.-6 MAD RIVER CHORALE OPEN REHEARSAL: The p.m. community chorus welcomes newcomers in preparation for its upcoming concert. Chorus Room, community Harwood Union High School, South Duxbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2048. COMMUNITY SERVICE WITH THE SALVATION ARMY: Locals help set up the dining room, serve SAMBATUCADA! OPEN REHEARSAL: Newbies dinner and clean up after a community meal. The are invited to help keep the beat as Burlington’s Salvation Army, Burlington, 4-6:30 p.m. Free; presamba street-percussion band sharpens its tunes. register. Info, 878-4918. Experience and instruments are not required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. FEAST TOGETHER OR FEAST TO GO: See FRI.4. Free. Info, 862-5017. TUESDAY VOLUNTEER NIGHTS: Helping hands pitch in around the shop by organizing parts, seminars moving bikes and tackling other projects. Children WINTER BIRDS: Avian enthusiasts pick up tips for under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Bike attracting feathered fliers to their yards. Richmond Recycle Vermont, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, Free Library, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. 264-9687. |

Expandable Charm Bracelets Jewelry Gift Sets Pashminas & Scarves 3 for $25 Gifts & Stocking Stuffers for ALL!

SHAPE & SHARE LIFE STORIES: Prompts from Recille Hamrell trigger recollections of specific experiences, which participants craft into narratives. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

D

ALL JEWELRY $5

MONDAY CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP: Lit lovers analyze works-in-progress penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 22 Church St., Burlington, 7 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup. com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

OO

& Lots New!

talks

VERMONT ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY: Stargazers meet to discuss celestial subjects. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

INTERMEDIATE & ADVANCED WEST COAST SWING: Experienced dancers learn smooth transitions and smart stylings. North End Studio A, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. $9-14. Info, burlingtonwestie@gmail.com.

etc.

words

|F

Less Than ReTaiL

BEGINNER WEST COAST SWING & BLUES FUSION DANCING: Students get schooled in the fundamentals of partner dance. North End Studio B, Burlington, 8-9 p.m. $9-14. Info, burlingtonwestie@ gmail.com.

‘TRIBES’: See WED.2, 7 p.m.

N.6

75%

dance

.SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different styles, including the lindy hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

SU

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

december 3 - 5 Thursday & Friday • 10am–7pm Saturday • 10am–5pm

YOUNG ADULT ADVISORY BOARD: Middle and high school students help make the library a destination for their peers. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

OPEN CRAFT NIGHT: Creative sparks fly in a studio space filled with snacking, sewing, socializing and sharing. Nido Fabric & Yarn, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 881-0068.

THEATER COMMUNITY PLAY READING GROUP: Actors and directors explore existing plays and experiment with nontraditional casting for established works. Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 652-4537.

EA TE R

** New Location!**

WRITE NOW!: Emerging wordsmiths in grades 6 through 12 hone their skills in a supportive environment. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

ADULT AND TEEN AUDITIONS FOR LYRIC THEATRE COMPANY’S ‘MARY POPPINS’: See SUN.6, 5:45-10 p.m.

TH

jewelry & scarf sale

VT POLITICS SPEAKER SERIES: BRANDON RIKER: Gubernatorial candidate Brandon Riker addresses students and the public. Library and Learning Center, Johnson State College, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1349.

LL

Participants will receive $50.00 compensation.

MON.7

HA

Healthy postmenopausal women (50-60 years old) needed for a 1 visit UVM study that includes a brain MRI.

calendar

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Healthy Women Needed for a Study on Menopause and the Brain

crafts

NEEDLE FELTING: Crafters ages 18 and up use supplies provided to produce holiday creations. Burnham Room, Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 2-3:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

READING, TALK, MUSIC: A performance of Shostakovich’s String Quartet No. 8 complements author M.T. Anderson’s discussion of the composer and of the writer’s book Symphony for the City of the Dead. College Hall, Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 7-8:30 p.m. $20. Info, 229-0774.

film

‘CONSUMED’: A mother’s exploration into the cause of her son’s illness leads to genetically modified foods in this 2015 documentary. Merrill’s Roxy Cinemas, Burlington, 7 p.m. $10. Info, 864-4742. KNIGHTS OF THE MYSTIC MOVIE CLUB: Cinema hounds view campy flicks at this ode to offbeat productions. Main Street Museum, White River Junction, 8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 356-2776. ‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.2, 7 p.m. GAMING FOR TEENS & ADULTS: Tabletop games entertain players of all skill levels. Kids 13 and under require a legal guardian or parental permission to attend. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. SOUTH END TRIVIA NIGHT: IF YOU DON’T KNOW, NOW YOU KNOW: Teams of quick thinkers gather for a meeting of the minds. A DJ set and prizes sweeten the deal. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406.

health & fitness

BRANDON FITNESS BOOT CAMP: Hop to it! Folks get fit with strength, endurance, agility and coordination exercises. Otter Valley North Campus Gym, Brandon, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $12. Info, 343-7160. BUTI YOGA: A fusion of power yoga, tribal dance and deep abdominal toning boosts the flow of energy throughout the body. The Wellness Collective, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. $10. Info, 540-0186. COMMUNITY YOGA: Breathe deep, feel good and have fun at a class accessible to all levels. Yoga Roots, Shelburne, 7:30-8:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 985-0090. GENTLE DROP-IN YOGA: Yogis hit the mat for a Hatha class led by Betty Molnar. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. KICKBOXING CLASS: Music propels this highoctane practice focused on maintaining form and achieving power through movement. North End Studio B, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $15. Info, 646-577-7985. MINDFULNESS CLASS: See WED.2, 12:15-1 p.m. PRENATAL YOGA CLASS: See WED.2, 6-7 p.m. and 4:30-5:30 p.m. WINTER WELLNESS: Herbs and foods serve as immune-strengthening remedies for the cold-and-flu season. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $5-10; preregister; limited space. Info, 861-9757.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

holidays

‘MESSIAH’ SING-ALONG: Community members are welcome to join the Burlington Choral Society in singing the Christmas choruses of Handel’s composition. The Cathedral Church of St. Paul, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, bcssingerz@gmail.com. WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2.

kids

CHILDREN’S UNDERGROUND FILM SOCIETY: Monthly movie screenings encourage viewers of all ages to think critically about artful cinema. Big Picture Theater and Café, Waitsfield, 5:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 496-8994. CREATIVE TUESDAYS: Artists exercise their imaginations with recycled crafts. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. GINGERBREAD HOUSES: See SAT.5, 3-3:30 p.m. HANDS-ON GLASSBLOWING PROJECTS & CLASSES: SUNCATCHER: See SAT.5. MONTPELIER MUSIC & MOVEMENT: Energetic children up to age 6 engage in songs and silliness with Laurie and Rachel of Active Brain, Active Body. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PRESCHOOL MUSIC: Melody makers ages 3 through 5 sing and dance the morning away. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 264-5660. PRESCHOOL STORY HOUR: Imaginations blossom when kids up to age 6 engage in themed tales and activities. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Books and creative projects help tykes gain early literacy skills. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. READ TO DAISY THE THERAPY DOG: Budding bookworms join a friendly canine for ear-catching narratives. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. ‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2. STORY TIME FOR 3- TO 5-YEAR-OLDS: See WED.2. STORY TIME FOR BABIES & TODDLERS: Picture books, songs, rhymes and puppets arrest the attention of children under 3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: Language learners sharpen communication skills. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1311. ‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195.

music

DIRK POWELL & RILEY BAUGUS: Two respected old-time musicians treat listeners to an intimate acoustic concert. Burlington Violin Shop, 6 p.m. $20; preregister. Info, mark.sustic@gmail.com.

RAILYARD ENTERPRISE PROJECT PUBLIC MEETING: Community members weigh in on alternative transportation methods. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406.

PAJAMA STORY TIME: Youngsters cuddle up in PJs for captivating narratives, cookies and milk. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

VERMONT LIBERTARIAN PARTY TOWN CAUCUS FOR UNDERHILL: Underhill voters who have not yet participated in a caucus this year elect officers and discuss local issues. Private residence, Underhill, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 735-2149.

crafts

‘SEA MONSTERS: A PREHISTORIC ADVENTURE’: See WED.2.

seminars

AFROLATIN PARTY: See WED.2.

politics

MEDICARE & YOU: AN INTRODUCTION TO MEDICARE: Members of the Central Vermont Council on Aging clear up confusion about the application process and plan options. Central Vermont Council on Aging, Barre, 3-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-0531. PODCASTING FOR BEGINNERS: Budding radio personalities learn the basics of building a podcast on Garageband and posting it online for listeners. VCAM Studio, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $25; preregister; limited space. Info, 651-9692. WINTER RIDING WORKSHOP: See SAT.5, Old Spokes Home, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 863-4475.

talks

ERIC HANSON: Ornithology enthusiasts engage in “The Natural (and Unnatural) History of the Common Loon” Richmond Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

theater

ADULT AND TEEN AUDITIONS FOR LYRIC THEATRE COMPANY’S ‘MARY POPPINS’: See SUN.6, 5:45-10 p.m. ‘HAIRSPRAY’ AUDITIONS: See MON.7. ‘JANE EYRE’ THEATER INDUSTRY MIXER: Folks in the performance field rub elbows between screenings of National Theatre Live. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 5:45 p.m. Free. Info, 863-5966. ‘MARY POPPINS’: See WED.2, 7:30 p.m. NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE: Charlotte Brontë’s spirited heroine tackles poverty, injustice and betrayal in a broadcast production of Jane Eyre. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 2 & 7 p.m. $18. Info, 863-5966.

KNITTERS & NEEDLEWORKERS: See WED.2.

STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: See WED.2.

dance

STORY TIME FOR 3- TO 5-YEAR-OLDS: See WED.2.

DROP-IN HIP-HOP DANCE: See WED.2. ‘TAKING FLIGHT’: Dancers interpret experimental works by emerging Middlebury College choreographers. Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College, 4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 443-6433.

etc.

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.2. TURNON BURLINGTON: See WED.2.

film

‘LIVING IN THE AGE OF AIRPLANES’: See WED.2.

games

ADULT DUNGEONS & DRAGONS NIGHT: Quick thinkers 14 and up rely on invented personas to face challenges and defeat enemies. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 5:30-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, jmuse@colchestervt.gov. BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.2. PATHFINDER SOCIETY: Players ages 16 and up give it their all in a fantasy role-playing game similar to Dungeons & Dragons. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-11 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

health & fitness

DANCE-BASED CONDITIONING: See WED.2. FITNESS BOOT CAMP: See WED.2. INSIGHT MEDITATION: See WED.2. MINDFUL WORKWEEKS: WEDNESDAY NIGHT MEDITATION: See WED.2. MINDFULNESS CLASS: See WED.2. MORNING FLOW YOGA: See THU.3. NIA WITH LINDA: See WED.2.

‘TRIBES’: See WED.2.

POSTNATAL REHAB: See WED.2.

words

PRENATAL BALLET BARRE: See WED.2.

BOOK DISCUSSION: Avid readers swap ideas about Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson. Local History Room, Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. BOOK LAUNCH: Leanne Ponder shares her gift for verse with selections from Tonight Not Even My Skin. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. CREATIVE NONFICTION WORKSHOP: Readers give feedback on essays, poetry and journalism written by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 22 Church St., Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104.

PRENATAL YOGA CLASS: See WED.2.

TODDLER TIME: See WED.2. YOUNG ADULT BOOK GROUP: Readers engage in a lively discussion of Evil Librarian by Michelle Knudsen. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-4665.

language

BEGINNER ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASS: See WED.2.

music

BRASS ENSEMBLE CONCERT: The student-run group breaks out the horns for “A Night of Brass.” UVM Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-2295. CASTLETON WIND ENSEMBLE: Student musicians present the eastern-influenced program “An Asian Celebration” featuring works by the likes of Yagisawa, Boo and Chance. Casella Theater, Castleton University, 7:30 p.m. $3-5. Info, 468-1119. JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE ENSEMBLES: Toes tap to the sounds of jazz and funk. Dibden Center for the Arts, Johnson State College, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1476.

politics

VERMONT LIBERTARIAN PARTY TOWN CAUCUS FOR FAIRFAX: Fairfax voters who have not yet participated in a caucus this year elect officers and discuss local issues. Private residence, Fairfax, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 735-2149.

seminars

COMMUNITY OF VERMONT ELDERS GOVERNMENT WORKSHOP: An interactive presentation empowers community members to engage in advocacy by covering topics such as the three branches of government and communicating with legislators. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 223-2518.

sports

PUSH-UPS IN THE PARK: See WED.2.

WOMEN’S PICKUP BASKETBALL: See WED.2.

R.I.P.P.E.D.: See WED.2.

talks

RECOVERY COMMUNITY YOGA: See WED.2. VINYASA FLOW YOGA: See WED.2. ZUMBA: See WED.2.

holidays

CRAFTY SOAPS FOR THE HOLIDAYS: Participants prepare sudsy, olive-oil based presents with guidance from Joann Darling of Green Sylk Soap Company. City Market/Onion River Co-op, Burlington, 5:30-8 p.m. $5-10; preregister; limited space. Info, 861-9700.

ENVIRONMENTAL & HEALTH SCIENCE SPEAKER SERIES: University of Vermont’s Sean Flynn covers extensive ground in “The Road Less Traveled: From the Frontiers of Epilepsy Research to the Lecture Halls of Higher Education.” Bentley Hall, Johnson State College, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1327.

theater

ADULT AND TEEN AUDITIONS FOR LYRIC THEATRE COMPANY’S ‘MARY POPPINS’: See SUN.6, 5:45-10 p.m.

WED.9

HOLIDAY ARTISANS MARKET: See WED.2.

‘MARY POPPINS’: See WED.2, 11 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.

WILD LIGHTS FESTIVAL: See WED.2.

‘TRIBES’: See WED.2, 1 p.m. & 8 p.m.

BUILDING EMPATHY & ADDRESSING RACIAL OPPRESSION: A WORKSHOP IN THREE PARTS: See WED.2.

kids

KIDS’ DUNGEONS & DRAGONS NIGHT: Experienced and novice players ages 9 through 13 take on challenges to defeat enemies in this pen-and-paper role-playing game. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, jmuse@colchestervt.gov.

‘WINTER TALES’: Folk singer Patti Casey joins Vermont Stage Company actors in this seasonal celebration of stories and songs. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $28.80-37.50; $55 for Sunday night gala. Info, 863-5966.

activism

bazaars

UVM CATAMOUNT SINGERS: Student vocalists lift their voices in a concert of seasonal works. Burlington St. Paul’s Cathedral, 12:15 p.m. Free. Info, info@cathedralarts.org.

community

INTERNATIONAL BOUTIQUE: See SAT.5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

MEN’S GROUP: A supportive environment encourages socializing and involvement in senior center activities. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 1011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-2518.

KIDS’ OPEN GYM: See WED.2. LEGO CLUB: Youngsters ages 6 and up snap together snazzy structures. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

words

STORYCRAFT: THE BUILDING BLOCKS OF CREATIVE WRITING: See WED.2. THE WEDNESDAY WORKSHOP: CHAPTER FOCUS: Folks give feedback on selections of up to 40 pages penned by Burlington Writers Workshop members. 22 Church St., Burlington, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister at meetup.com; limited space. Info, 383-8104. m

CALENDAR 65

OPEN MIC: Musicians, storytellers and poets entertain a live audience at a monthly showcase of local talent. Wallingford Town Hall, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 446-2872.

SEVEN DAYS

NONET & POST-BOP CONCERT: Music lovers get their fix with a varied program of works from Charles Mingus, Don Cherry, Chick Corea and others. UVM Recital Hall, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 656-2295.

‘MUCH WORK WITH LITTLE EFFORT’: Physics meets slapstick comedy in this scientific assembly with Dr. Quintin Quark. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury Academy, 10:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. $4. Info, 748-2600.

12.02.15-12.09.15

PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage folks engage in dialogue en français. Sherpa Kitchen, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2431.

PUBLIC FORUM: Locals voice their opinions on how the Athenaeum can better serve the community. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

language

VYO CHORUS & CONCERT CHORALE: Exploring the theme “We are such things as dreams are made on,” vocalists deliver numbers by Handel, Vaughan Williams and others. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 7 p.m. $7-12. Info, 863-5966.


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

art PAINTING & DRAWING FOUNDATIONS: Painting & Drawing Foundations is supportive, hands-on and no pressure! Most materials included! Explore basics in our beautiful working studio. Led by fantastic teacher and professional artist Maggie Standley, this is a great fit for those brand-new to making art as well as those who would like a refresher. Tue., Dec. 8-Feb. 2, 9 a.m.-noon. Cost: $220/7-week session of 3-hour weekly classes. Location: Wingspan Studio, 4A Howard St., Burlington. Info: Maggie Standley, 233-7676, maggiestandley@yahoo.com, wingspanpaintingstudio.com.

66 CLASSES

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

burlington city arts

Call 865-7166 for info or register online at burlingtoncityarts.org. Teacher bios are also available online. EARRINGS: Come check out the jewelry and fine metals studio by making your own silver earrings. Open to all skill levels. Class includes copper and brass, silver ear wire and all basic tools. Silver can be purchased separately. Thu., Dec. 10, 6:30-9 p.m. Cost: $35/person; $31.50/BCA members. Location: Generator, 250 Main St., Burlington. PAINTING SEMINAR: COMPOSITION: What one thing do all great paintings have in common? Strong composition! No matter what artistic style, color, palette or subject matter, composition is the essential glue that pulls it all together. You will be guided through exercises designed to stimulate awareness of dynamic shape, rhythm and movement. Beginners welcome! Sat., Dec. 5, 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Cost: $90/person; $81/BCA members. Location: BCA Center, 135 Church St., Burlington. PHOTOGRAPHING YOUR ARTWORK: Professional photographer Dan Lovell will demonstrate lighting techniques for photographing 2D and 3D

art. Whether you’re applying to art school, submitting for an exhibition or putting together a website, you’ll leave this workshop with techniques that will improve your images and enhance your presentations. Basic understanding of your camera required. Mon., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $35/person; $31.50/BCA members. Location: BCA Center, 135 Church St., Burlington.

craft HOLIDAY MAKE ‘N’ TAKES W/ BONNIE ROWELL: Learn how to stamp, heat emboss, color and create quick and impressive backgrounds for gift tags, wine bottle tags and more! There will be two types of gift tags running simultaneously, every hour. Each takes approximately 30 min. while supplies last. First come, first served. Santa will be arriving at 1 to 4 p.m. Stamp with your child while waiting for Santa! Dec. 12, 1-4 p.m. Cost: $6/person. Location: Vintage Inspired Lifestyle Marketplace, 180 Flynn Ave., Burlington. Info: Mary, 488-5766, vintageinspired. net.

dance DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes, nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walk-in classes, Wednesdays, 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in any time and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington.Info: Victoria, 5981077, info@salsalina.com. DSANTOS VT SALSA: Experience the fun and excitement of Burlington’s eclectic dance community by learning salsa. Trained by world famous dancer Manuel Dos Santos, we teach you how to dance to the music and how to have a great time on the dance floor! There is no better time to start than now! Mon. evenings: beginner class, 7-8 p.m.; intermediate, 8:15-9:15 p.m. Cost: $12/1-hour class. Location: North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: Tyler Crandall, 598-9204, crandalltyler@hotmail.com, dsantosvt.com. LEARN TO DANCE W/ A PARTNER!: Come alone or come with friends, but come out and learn to dance! Beginning classes repeat each month,

but intermediate classes vary from month to month. As with all of our programs, everyone is encouraged to attend, and no partner is necessary. Private lessons also available. Cost: $50/4-week class. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington.Info: First Step Dance, 598-6757, kevin@firststepdance. com, firststepdance.com.

drumming DJEMBE IN BURLINGTON AND MONTPELIER!: Learn drumming technique and music on West African drums! Drums provided! Burlington Beginners Djembe class: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m., starting Dec. 9. $36/3 weeks or $15/drop-in. Montpelier Beginners Djembe class: Thu., 7-8:20 p.m., starting Dec. 10. $54/3 weeks or $22/walk-in. Please register online or come directly to the first class! Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3-G, Burlington, & Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin.Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org. TAIKO DRUMMING IN BURLINGTON!: Study with Stuart Paton of Burlington Taiko! Beginner/Recreational Class: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m. $72/6 weeks. Accelerated Taiko Program for Beginners: Mon. & Wed., 6:30-8:30 p.m. $144/3 weeks. Kids and Parents’ Class:

Mon. & Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. $60/child; $105/parent-child duo. Five-person minimum required to run most classes; invite friends! Register online or come directly to the first class! Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3-G, Burlington.Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org. TAIKO IN MONTPELIER: Kids and Parents’ Taiko: Thu., 4:30-5:20 p.m. $60/person; $114/pair. 5-week class. Montpelier Taiko: Thu., 5:30-6:50 p.m. $90/5 weeks; $22/walk-in. Register online or come directly to the first class. Location: Capital City Grange, 6612 Rte. 12, Berlin.Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

empowerment TRANSITIONS: WISDOM JOURNEY: Change happens. Wonderful or awful, we grieve what is gone to fully embrace the new. Honoring and moving through these transitions we find Joy. In keeping with shamanic and mystical traditions let’s creatively express ourselves through our journey, loss/grief/ joy, by using our dreams, art making, movement, music and written word. Weekly on Thu., Dec. 10-Feb. 11 (no class Dec. 24 & 31 & Jan. 28), 6:30-8:45 p.m. Cost: $195/person; all materials incl. No previous art experience necessary. Preregistration is required. Location: Expressive Arts

Burlington, 200 Main St. Suite #9, Burlington.Info: Topaz Weis, 343-8172, topazweis@gmx.net, expressiveartsburlington.com.

flynn arts

EXPLORING CONNECTIONS: This workshop uses movement and metaphor to explore the expressive body, incorporating movement fundamentals as well as drawing and writing to explore the relationship between movement and personal expression. Our goal will be to facilitate a lively interplay between inner connectivity and outer expressivity to enrich your movement potential, change ineffective neuromuscular movement patterns, and encourage new ways of moving and embodying your inner self. Instructor: Sara McMahon. Fri., Dec. 4, 5:45-7:45 p.m. Cost: $25/person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4548, flynnarts.org. IMPROVISATION LABORATORY: SKILLS FOR DANCING, CREATING, PERFORMING & LIVING: The art of improvisation will be the focus with longtime dance artist and teacher Hannah Dennison. Learn and polish skills that are the foundation for world-renowned performers! These seven workshop laboratories are set up as a cumulative series to pay close attention to the sense and understanding of movement with self, others, space and time. Beginners welcome. Please avoid perfume or added scents as they can

interfere with concentration. Sun., Dec. 13, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost: $25/person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: 652-4548, flynnarts.org. LOOKING DEEPER CONTEMPORARY DANCE INTENSIVE: Led by a different guest artist each month from the teaching staff at Bennington and Middlebury Colleges, these intensives are designed to support and strengthen the skills and community of practicing contemporary dancers and dance makers in our region. Each intensive will focus on different aspects of the skills at the core of strong and compelling performers and performances. Instructor: Tzveta Kassabova. Sun., Dec. 13, 1-4 p.m. Cost: $30/ person. Location: Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, 153 Main St., Burlington.Info: 652-4548, flynnarts.org.

gardening MASTER GARDENER 2016 COURSE OFFERED ONLINE: Learn the keys to a healthy and sustainable home landscape from your home computer as University of Vermont faculty and experts provide live, interactive webinars on gardening in Vermont. This 13 week noncredit course covers a wide variety of horticultural topics: fruit and vegetable production, flower gardening, botany basics, plant pests, soil fertility, disease management, healthy lawns, invasive plant control, introduction to home landscaping, and more! Registrations will be accepted by credit card online at uvm.edu/mastergardener or by phone through the UVM Extension Master Gardener GARDENING

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $13.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

GARDENING

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Program office. A downloadable registration form also is available on the website if paying by check. Weekly on Tue., Feb. 2-Apr. 26, 6:15-9 p.m. Cost: $395/ person; incl. online Sustainable Gardening book. Printed copy can be ordered for an additional $55. Noncredit course. Location: Live webinar, online course statewide.Info: 656-9562, master.gardener@uvm.edu, uvm.edu/mastergardener. STONE WALL WORKSHOP: Our introductory stone wall workshops for homeowners and tradespeople promote the beauty and integrity of stone. The one-day, hands-on workshop focuses on the basic techniques for creating dry-laid walls with a special emphasis on stone native to Vermont. Workshops are held inside warm greenhouses in Hinesburg. Space limited. Jan.-Mar. Cost: $100/each 1-day workshop. Location: Red Wagon Plants, 2408 Shelburne Falls Rd., Hinesburg.Info: Queen City Soil & Stone, Charley MacMartin, 318-2411, macmartin@igc.org, queencitysoilandstone.com.

helen day

COMICS AND MANGA WORKSHOP FOR TEENS: We’ll cover the basics of making a comic, including character design, writing, penciling, inking and production. Sat., Dec. 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost: $55/person; $45/members. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe.Info: 253-8358, education@helenday.com, helenday.com. FAMILY DAY: Shake off the snow and warm yourself during an afternoon of seasonal art activities and sweet treats including gingerbread house building. Sat., Dec. 12, 1-4 p.m. Location: Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe.Info: 253-8358, education@helenday.com, helenday.com.

language ANNOUNCING SPANISH CLASSES: Join us for adult Spanish classes this winter. Our 10th year. Learn from a native speaker via small classes, individual instruction or student tutoring. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers. Also lessons for young children; they love it! See our website or contact us for details. Beginning week of Jan. 4; 10 weeks. Cost: $225/10 classes of 90+ min. each. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center.Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com. FRENCH: OH LA LA! TEEN/ ADULT: Fabulous French classes for you chez Wingspan Studio! Inspiring, small-group environment; experienced instructor Madame Maggie will have you speaking in no time! Join fun, interactive, encouraging class in Burlington’s South End Arts District. Private lessons available to fit your schedule and specific needs. Allons-y! Oui! Oui! Weeeee! Weekly on Tue. starting Dec. 8, Intermediate French: 5-6:30 p.m.; Adv. Beg. French: 6:45-8:15 p.m. Cost: $160/7week session of 1.5-hour classes. Location: Wingspan Studio, 4A Howard St., 3rd floor, Burlington. Info: Maggie Standley, 233-7676, maggiestandley@gmail.com, wingspanpaintingstudio.com/ classes.html.

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

martial arts

68 CLASSES

in Vinyasa, Kripalu, Core, Gentle, Vigorous, Philosophy, Yoga Wall, Therapeutics and Alignment. Become part of our yoga community. You are welcome here. Cost: $15/class; $130/10-class card; $5-10/community classes. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington.Info: 8649642, evolutionvt.com.

VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIUJITSU: Classes for men, women and children. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu enhances strength, flexibility, balance, coordination and cardio-respiratory fitness. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu training builds and helps to instill courage and selfconfidence. We offer a legitimate Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu martial arts program in a friendly, safe and positive environment. Accept no imitations. Learn from one of the world’s best, Julio “Foca” Fernandez, CBJJ and IBJJF certified 6th Degree Black Belt, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr., teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil! A 5-time Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu National Featherweight Champion and 3-time Rio de Janeiro State Champion, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Mon.-Fri., 6-9 p.m., & Sat., 10 a.m. 1st class is free. Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston.Info: 660-4072, julio@bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Through the practice of sitting still and following your breath as it goes out and dissolves, you are connecting with your heart. By simply letting yourself be, as you are, you develop genuine sympathy toward yourself. The Burlington Shambhala Center offers meditation as a path to discovering gentleness and wisdom. Shambhala Café (meditation and discussions) meets the first Saturday of each month, 9 a.m.-noon. An open house (intro to the center, short dharma talk and socializing) is held on the third Sunday of each month, noon-2 p.m. Instruction: Sun. mornings, 9 a.m.-noon, or by appt. Sessions: Tue. & Thu., noon-1 p.m., & Mon.-Thu., 6-7 p.m. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington.Info: 658-6795, burlingtonshambha lactr.org.

performing arts THE ACTOR’S LAB & WORKSHOPS: Skills can be shared and taught. Talent can only be encouraged and nurtured. —Georgette Garbes Putzel. The Actor’s Lab and preproduction workshops. For beginners, intermediates and curious others. Offered in English and in French. Artistic discipline and creativity using a mosaic of approaches to the art of being onstage. TBA. Cost: $12/person. Location: Theatre Mosaic Mond Studio, TBA, Jericho & Burlington.Info: Theatre Mosaic Mond, Georgette Garbes-Putzel, 735-7912, mosaicmond@gmail.com, theatremosaicmond.net.

pregnancy/ childbirth PRENATAL METHOD STUDIO: Prenatal and postnatal yoga and barre classes. Yoga for Fertility Class Series. Childbirth Education Series and weekend intensives. Yoga Alliance Registered Prenatal Yoga Teacher Training Program. Empathy circles, infant massage and new mothers’ groups. Supporting women and their partners in the management and journey of pregnancy and childbirth. Every day: lunchtimes, evenings & weekends. Cost: $15/1-hour prenatal or postnatal yoga class. Location: Prenatal Method Studio, 1 Mill St., suite 236, at the Chace Mill, Burlington.Info: 829-0211, beth@ prenatalmethod.com, prenatalmethod.com.

tai chi SNAKE-STYLE TAI CHI CHUAN: The Yang Snake Style is a dynamic tai chi method that mobilizes the spine while stretching and strengthening the core body muscles. Practicing this ancient martial art increases strength, flexibility, vitality, peace of mind and martial skill. Beginner classes Sat. mornings & Wed. evenings. Call to view a class. Location: Bao Tak Fai Tai Chi Institute, 100 Church St., Burlington.Info: 864-7902, ipfamilytaichi.org.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Evolution Yoga and Physical Therapy offers yoga classes for beginners, experts, athletes, desk jockeys, teachers, fitness enthusiasts, people with who think they are inflexible.. Choose from a wide variety of classes and workshops

HONEST YOGA, THE ONLY DEDICATED HOT YOGA FLOW CENTER: Honest Yoga offers practice for all levels. Brand new beginners’ courses include two specialty classes per week for four weeks plus unlimited access to all classes. We have daily classes in Essentials, Flow and Core Flow with alignment constancy. We hold teacher trainings at the 200- and 500-hour levels. Daily classes & workshops. $25/new student 1st week unlimited; $15/class or $130/10-class card; $12/ class for student or senior or $100/10-class punch card. Location: Honest Yoga Center, 150 Dorset St., Blue Mall, next to Sport Shoe Center, S. Burlington. Info: 497-0136, honestyoga studio@gmail.com, honestyoga center.com. HOT YOGA BURLINGTON: Feeling stuck, overwhelmed, stressed, restless or just bored? Come try something different! Yes, it’s yoga, you know, stretching and stuff. But we make it different. How? Come and see. Hot Yoga Burlington is Vermont’s first Far Infrared heated hot yoga studio, experience it! Get hot: 2-for-1 offer. $15. Location: North End Studio B, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington.Info: 999-9963, hotyogaburlingtonvt.com. YOGA ROOTS: Yoga Roots strives to provide community experiences that promote healing on all levels with a daily schedule of yoga classes for all ages and abilities. We aim to clarify your mind, strengthen your body and ignite your joyful spirit through classes such as Anusurainspired, Restorative, Heated Vinyasa Flow, Gentle, Prenatal, Teen and Energy Medicine Yoga! Check out our special offerings: Holiday Meditations w/ Charlie Nardozzi: Dec. 1 & 8, 4:45-5:45 p.m.; Feldenkrais: Freeing up the Shoulders w/ Uwe Mester: Dec. 3, 8:30-10 a.m.; New! Flow & Glow w/ Katie Bohlin & Heidi Bock: Dec. 5, noon-1:30 p.m.; Vespers: Journey to Light w/ Melinda Kinzie & Dorothy Stone begins Dec. 6, 3-4 p.m.; Kundalini w/ Jane Michaud: Dec. 13, 9:4511:15 a.m. & Dec. 19, 4-5:30 p.m. Location: Yoga Roots, 120 Graham Way, Shelburne Green Business Park behind Folino’s. Info: 985-0090, yogarootsvt. com.


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It’s amazing who you meet at a real Vermont Cider Mill. He’ll be at After they visit Santa, kids under ten eat FREE with purchase of one adult entrée at our Apple Core Luncheonette.

SEVEN DAYS

Cold Hollow Cider Mill DEC 12, 11:00 - 2:00 DEC 13, 11:00 - 2:00

While you’re here, try a FREE sample of our own new Barn Dance Hard Cider.

Plenty of sleigh parking! CH–XMAS AD.indd Untitled-3 1 1

For full events calendar visit

12/1/15 12:27 PM

Produced, Distilled and Bottled in Ireland by West Cork Distillers, LLC. Imported by M.S. Walker, Inc. Somerville, MA. 40% Alc/Vol. WESTCORKIRISH.COM

PLEASE ENJOY RESPONSIBLY. Untitled-2 1 westcork_Blended_7Nights_2015fall.indd 1

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gostowe.com/events

11/30/15 11/8/15 11:13 9:00 AM AM


COURTESY OF MICAH ALBER

music

The Young and the Reckless

Vermont native Caitlin Canty on touring, her guitar and her new record

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

BY D AN BO L L E S

C

aitlin Canty’s latest album, Reckless Skyline, is at times a dark and brooding affair. A twanginflected mix of heartbreaking ballads, murky blues and sparsely arranged folk, it is also the smoky-voiced Vermont native’s most critically heralded record to date. The Telegraph tabbed it as one of the Best Country Music Albums of 2015. NPR Music praised its grit and emotional punch. And the San Francisco Chronicle opined that the album should make Canty “the next great Americana star.” Canty, who now lives in Nashville after many years in New York City, recorded the album with songwriter Jeffrey Foucault. The two share a band, which includes members of Morphine, Ray LaMontagne’s Pariah Dogs, Booker T and Rusty Belle. Touring in support of Foucault’s new record, the equally stark and beautiful Salt as Wolves, Canty and Foucault will perform at ArtsRiot in Burlington this Thursday, December 3. In advance of that show, Seven Days spoke with Canty by phone from Nashville. SEVEN DAYS: You grew up in Proctor. Was your family musical? CAITLIN CANTY: I grew up in a family of athletes. My dad is a marathon runner. And my brother and I grew up playing a lot of sports. I did band and chorus in school. But I didn’t get a guitar until I was a senior

in high school. So the songwriting stuff didn’t happen until later. Growing up, it was more playing soccer and basketball. SD: Being a late bloomer, what ultimately led you to music? CC: I did sing all the time growing up. So the guitar was a vehicle for singing. Once I started writing songs, I got the bug. And I haven’t been able to stop since. Music is now the center of my life. SD: Speaking of guitars, I hear you’ve got a pretty cool one. CC: I do! It’s a Recording King from the 1930s. The exact vintage is uncertain, but it’s from the late 1930s. I bought it in Boston on a tip from a friend who said I should check it out. I wasn’t really looking for an old guitar. But I just couldn’t leave this one behind. I’d never had the experience before where I was singing and the guitar complemented my voice so perfectly. I had never spent that much money on anything before. And it’s not even that expensive of a guitar. I’d just never spent that much money before. Not even on my car. And my car is a shitbox. But it sounded so dark and beautiful. And when I opened the case, it smelled like cigar smoke. It smells like a library. It’s got so many chips and dings in it. It’s

been the biggest thing that’s changed my singing and songwriting. It’s almost like having a cowriter, or a partner, where before my guitar was just a vehicle to get a song across. SD: I don’t know if I’ve ever heard anyone say that a specific instrument fundamentally changed their approach to their music. CC: Different instruments like different things. My guitar sings better when it’s in drop-D tuning. It’s more dark and deep. So that made me write more drone-y blues kinds of songs. And it’s how I like to sing, too. SD: So this guitar really helped shape and inform Reckless Skyline? CC: Yes. I wrote most, if not all, of the songs for Reckless Skyline on it. And everything kind of came together around the same time, too. Jeffrey Foucault signed on to produce it right after that, and the band came in then. So I had all this excitement and a purpose. I was overjoyed working so hard on all those songs, and it didn’t feel like work at all. It was a beautiful time. SD: What was it like working with Jeffrey? CC: I had never worked with a producer before. And it was spectacular. He says a producer’s job is to do THE YOUNG AND THE RECKLESS

» P.72


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No O? Oh No!

B Y DA N B OLL E S

FRI 12.4

FRI 12.4

104.7 The Point welcomes

Leftover Salmon

104.7 The Point welcomes

Eric Hutchinson (Solo Acoustic) Anya Marina

First Friday: Santa’s Naughty or Nice Pajama Party

SAT 12.5

WIZN welcomes

SUN 12.6

Parquet Courts

WED 12.9

Burlington Battle of the Bands

THU 12.10

Chris Webby

THU 12.10

All Star Superjam

FRI 12.11

Comedy: Gad Elmaleh

Lotus Land: A Tribute to Rush

Pill, Joey Pizza Slice

Spose, Justina Valentine, Mase Well

Featuring members of Trey Anastasio Band, Lettuce, Turkuaz, and more!

JUST ANNOUNCED —

Congrats to the STARLINE RHYTHM BOYS! The long-running local rockabilly band was nominated for a 2016 Ameripolitan Music Award in the Honky Tonk Group SOUNDBITES

1/20 Vaud & The Villians 1/29 Dead Sessions 2/13 Winter Is A Drag Ball 2/21 Aaron Carter

SEVEN DAYS

BiteTorrent

THU 12.3

12.02.15-12.09.15

debate around which there are some passionate opinions: Nectar? Or Nector? If you’ve been around Burlington long enough, there’s a good chance you’ve seen NECTAR RORRIS’ name spelled both ways. On their 1992 record, A Picture of Nectar, which bears Rorris’ visage on the cover, PHISH (obviously) spelled it with an A. However, in the Wikipedia entry for that album, Rorris is referred to as Nector. I know, I know. Consider the source, right? Well, on the history page of the website for the bar that (maybe?) bears his name, he’s also referred to as Nector. He’s been referred to as Nector in numerous articles over the years, locally and nationally, from VPR to jambands.com. Prior to writing the article I was advised by CHRIS WALSH, who purchased the club from “Nectar” in 2002, that Nector is how Rorris himself prefers it. And Walsh was adamant, citing years of documents with the latter spelling. Since that story ran, I’ve heard from numerous people on both sides of the debate. ANNE ROTHWELL, the original owner of Club Metronome, was just as adamant that it was spelled with an A, citing her own lease agreements with Rorris. So which is it? Earlier this week,

I called Rorris to find out once and for all. “It’s short for Nectarios,” he said. “So it’s spelled with an A.” Well that’s that, right? Not quite. As it turns out, Nectar’s was, in fact, originally named Nector’s. When the club opened in 1975, it was spelled Nector’s Restaurant. That’s according to the building’s listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Rorris sold the business in 1983, and the establishment became a restaurant called McHats. But Rorris bought back the restaurant and reopened it as Nectar’s in 1984, which is when the current spinning neon sign went in. The picture at left shows the original sign, with the 1975 spelling. So why did Rorris open a business with a name close to, but slightly different than, his own? On that, Rorris is less forthcoming than how he prefers his name to be spelled. He vaguely referred to legal issues at the time of the transactions in the 1980s. Rothwell, who worked at Nectar’s in the 1980s, recalls a noncompete clause when he sold. But Rorris declined to speak on that subject, fearing any inadvertent legal entanglements that might be lingering 30-plus years later. He probably doesn’t need to worry about that, since the name Nectar’s is federally trademarked. But you can’t blame the guy for being cautious. While the reason Rorris originally opened his joint as Nector’s instead of Nectar’s might remain unanswered, what is no longer a mystery is how the man’s name is really spelled. So let the record show: It’s Nectar. Not Nector. My apologies for the mistake, which could have been avoided had I simply asked Rorris from the outset. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to have several beers at Finnigan’s Pub and ask why it’s not spelled Finnegan’s.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

» P.73 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington

For up-to-the-minute news abut the local music scene, follow @DanBolles on Twitter or read the Live Culture blog: sevendaysvt.com/liveculture.

802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic

MUSIC 71

Before we dig into this week’s music news and views, I need set the record straight on a few things regarding last week’s cover story on 40 years of Nectar’s. Perhaps inevitably, given the scope and size of the piece, and the fact that I was working with sources who were calling on quite old and possibly drunken recollections, there were a few gaffes. The first is that I referred to BLUES FOR BREAKFAST bandleader CHARLIE FRAZIER as a “beast of a guitarist.” Well, Mr. Charlie is indeed a beast, but on harmonica, not guitar. The second is that I got my Bradens mixed up. I quoted BRADEN LALANCETTE of SQUIMLEY & THE WOOLENS, who just wrapped up a residency at the club. The problem was, I referred to him as BRADEN WINSLOW, who is in BINGER, not Squimley. On the plus side, Winslow actually did sit in with Squimley during the residency. So that counts for something, right? On second thought, no. No, it doesn’t. Another error was that DAMON BRINK sold his share in Nectar’s in 2009, not 2007, as stated in the piece. Those errors are regrettable, but they are the kinds of slips that sometimes happen even after careful revisions, read-throughs, edits and nitpicky fact-checking. However, it seems my story ignited a decades-old Burlington

GOT MUSIC NEWS? DAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM


is the Suitcase Junket. So it was a really cool first gathering of this crew. Now we’ve been touring together in different formations for almost two and a half years. SD: You recently moved to Nashville. What do you think of Music City? CC: I was [coming] here a lot to do writing sessions and sing on people’s records. So I’ve spent a good deal of short-term time here. So it feels like home already. Also, I chose this place. Which is the first place I’ve really chosen. I was born in Vermont and moved to New York because of a job and then just couldn’t leave. But Nashville is so comfortable for me. And for a musician, it’s just an easier life. You can tour in and out; it’s a lower cost of living. If you need to find a banjo player for something, you could throw a stone and hit one. But to be honest, I haven’t been here much since I moved here. I’ve been running around behind Reckless Skyline, which came out only in January. I’ve been touring like crazy and kind of leaving my guitars in Nashville.

ONCE I STARTED WRITING SONGS, I GOT THE BUG. AND I HAVEN’T BEEN ABLE TO STOP SINCE. Untitled-3 1

CAITLIN CANTY

12/1/15 10:24 AM

PRESENTS

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SEVENDAYSVT.COM

COURTESY OF JAY SANSONE

The Young and the Reckless « P.70

SISTER SPARROW & THE DIRTY BIRDS Saturday, December 12

Doors: 8:00/Show: 8:30 pm Showcase Lounge “Fiery brass- and gospel-infused funk” LA Times

WIN TIX! 4t-Hotticket-112515.indd 1

via questions.

and answer 2 tri Go to sevendaysvt.com

Or, come by Eyes of the World (168 Battery, Burlington). Deadline: 12/8, at

noon. Winners no tified

by 5 p.m. 11/23/15 3:17 PM

all their work before and after. A lot of people think what a producer does happens in the session, like, “Let’s hear another take of that.” But really what helped me was the preparation before: sending him songs and talking about approaches we might take. And then after the sessions … usually, the post-session decisions multiply under your fingertips and you can get lost in the weeds there. But one of Jeffrey’s approaches is to choose a take in the moment and then the rest of the takes are dead to us. And I really think that helped move things along. And it wasn’t like anyone was just following directions. Those guys have all played in different incarnations of Jeff’s band. And I brought along another Vermonter, Matt Lorenz, who

SD: You do tour a lot. Do you have any tips or tricks for staying sane on the road? CC: Well, that assumes I stay sane. [Laughs] SD: Touché. CC: I do run when I can. It helps. I also try to eat well. Not so much super healthy, but just sitting down for a meal. That makes a big difference when you’re hustling. Our workday starts around four o’clock and ends at midnight. So my only trick is to ask for an early load-in, just to get that shit done and eat before the show. Otherwise, it’s the 11 o’clock gas-station dealie. Nobody likes that. SD: What’s the best record you’ve heard recently? CC: Would it be pandering to say Salt as Wolves? [Laughs] Actually, what I can’t stop spinning right now is an old record, Charley Pride in Person [Live at Panther Hall]. Every time I’m making dinner at home in Nashville, I throw that one on and sing along to every old country song on it. m

INFO Jeffrey Foucault and Caitlin Canty perform at ArtsRiot in Burlington this Thursday, December 3, 7:30 p.m. $15. AA.


S

UNDbites

GOT MUSIC NEWS? DAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM Fantasy is a necessary ingredient in living, it’s a way of looking at life through the wrong end of a telescope. — Dr. Seuss

ONLINE@ZENLOUNGEVT

CO NT I NU E D F RO M PAG E 7 1

player JOHNNIE DAY DURAND. Nice to have you back, guys and gals.

W.12.2 Th.12.3 F.12.4

KIZOMBA with DSANTOS VT 7PM, 18+ DELTA UPSILON HOLIDAY PARTY with DJM 10PM, 18+

BRETT HUGHES 7PM, 18+

It’s also nice to have an open mic at with JAH RED 9PM, 21+ Radio Bean again. Or at least something like it. For years, the Monday Bean open 11 P.M. 21+ mic was one of Burlington’s most active Sa.12.5 ANDRIANA CHOBOT & JIMMY RUIN 8PM, 21+ musical petri dishes. But eventually, it 11 P.M. 21+ became kind of “a thing” and grew to a Su.12.6 NEXUS PRESENTS HOLIDAY VIBEZ point where it no longer really served it original purpose: fostering a spirit featuring of collaboration, experimentation and 9 P.M. 21+ encouragement. Raise your hand if you 165 CHURCH ST, BTV • 802-399-2645 ever signed up for a slot, then left the coffee shop until it was time for your eight minutes … Oh, right. Like it was 12v-zenloungeWEEKLY2015.indd 1 11/30/15 2:32 PM just me? Psshh. Anyway, this Sunday, CRICKET BLUE’s LAURA HEABERLIN will host the second edition of Songwriter Sessions at the Bean. The idea is similar to an open mic, in that performers sign up to play and test-drive new stuff. It differs in that six chairs will be onstage, one for the performer and five for the next people 1 large, 1-topping pizza, on deck to play. That means, if you’re 2 liter Coke product gonna play, you have to stick around and support everyone else. Think of it as a songwriters-in-the-round for those 2 large, 1-topping pizzas & 2-liter Coke product looking to get their feet wet.

SALSA NIGHT DJS DAVE VILLA & RON STOPPABLE

DJ CRAIG MITCHELL

MARTIN, MITCHELL, JUSTIN REM & CHIA

Starline Rhythm Boys

Island Music label mates and Vermont expats JP HARRIS AND THE TOUGH CHOICES. Visit ameripolitan.com to cast your vote. Happy trails to HOT NEON MAGIC! After eight years and more than 200 shows, the 1980s-loving New Wave party band is calling it quits. They’ll play their final show on Saturday, December 5, at Positive Pie in Montpelier. Welcome back, the WEE FOLKESTRA! After parting ways a few years back, the local all-star indie-folk collective is reuniting for a gig at the Skinny Pancake in Burlington on Friday, December 4. If you’re unfamiliar, the WF are a nine-piece ensemble featuring a slew of talented local songwriters and players. These include JOE ADLER, SAMARA LARRK, AYA INOUE and her husband, ERIK SEGALSTAD, MATT HARPSTER, MATT DELUCA, ERIC DANIELS, GREG ALEXANDER and saw

HOLIDAY SPECIAL

$19.99 $24.99

Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 12/31/15. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day.

Last but not least, ’tis the season for local holiday spectaculars! Longtime Text “3bros” to 30321 to join our VIP Loyalty Program for exclusive giveaways & deals! readers know I love me a good holiday rock show. And this year the slate kicks 973 Roosevelt Highway off with the fifth annual Jingle Jam at Colchester • 655-5550 Moog’s Place in Morrisville on Saturday, www.threebrotherspizzavt.com December 5. The show is a benefit for the United Way of Lamoille County and 11/18/15 12:24 PM will feature appearances by — as always,12v-ThreeBros112515.indd 1 read this next bit in your best DON PARDO voice — DEAD SESSIONS, JOHN LACKARD, TIM BRICK, BLUE FOX, SETH YACOVONE, SMOKIN’ JS, COQUETTE, BEN SLOTNICK, GARY WADE, GUANO Find, fix and feather with LOCO and many, many more!  SEVENDAYSVT.COM

category. Ameripolitan is a relatively new organization based in Austin, Texas, dedicated to promoting and preserving “real” country music. The 2016 awards will be the third year these AMAs have been handed down. Ameripolitan is also the name of a new hybrid genre, seemingly of the organization’s own creation, crossing Americana with countrypolitan. On the website it’s described as “a new music genre with prominent roots influence. It is broken into four related subcategories: Honky Tonk, Western Swing, Rockabilly and Outlaw… Musical and lyrical creativity is critical, but to be considered Ameripolitan music, it must retain some of these traditional elements as well.” Creative and traditional sure sounds like SRB to me. But they’ll need your help to win against some strong competition — including their Cow

obsessed?

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MUSIC 73

Sign up today at sevendaysvt.com/enews.

SEVEN DAYS

Wee Folkestra

A peek at what was on my iPod, turntable, eight-track player, etc., this week. PROTOMARTYR, The Agent Intellect SLEATER-KINNEY, No Cities to Love DOLDRUMS, The Air Conditioned Nightmare METZ, II ROSE WINDOWS, Rose Windows

12.02.15-12.09.15

Listening In

Nest Notes — an e-newsletter filled with home design, Vermont real estate tips and DIY decorating inspirations.

11/19/15 11:03 AM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.2

burlington

THE DAILY PLANET: Lowell Thompson (alt-country), 8 p.m., free. THE GRYPHON: Al Tedosio and Tom Frink (jazz), 7 p.m., free. HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Jock Jams with Craig Mitchell (1990s dance), 10 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Pub Quiz with Dave, 7 p.m., free. Karaoke with Melody, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Jake Whitesell Quartet (jazz), 8 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions, 8 p.m., free. Film Night: Indie, Abstract, Avant Garde, 10 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with Rough Francis & Disco Phantom, 6 p.m., free. Karavan (soul, rock), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Ensemble V (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Marcie Hernandez (singer-songwriter), 9 p.m., free. The Littlest Giant (ska), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Tim Brick Band (country), 8 p.m., free. DJ Pat (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free. SIGNAL KITCHEN: Anaïs MItchell, Bridget Kearney, Benjamin Lazar Davis (folk), 8 p.m., $18/20. AA. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Josh Panda’s Acoustic Soul Night, 8 p.m., $5-10 donation. ZEN LOUNGE: Kizomba with Dsantos VT, 7 p.m., free. Zensday College Night, 10 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Dinosaur Jr., Dredd Foole & Sunburned Hand of the Man (rock), 8:30 p.m., $22/25. AA.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Mark Instinct Twofold (bass music), 8:30 p.m., $10/12. AA. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Chad Hollister (rock), 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier BAGITOS BAGEL & BURRITO CAFÉ: McKew Devitt (acoustic rock), 6 p.m., donation.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): Cajun Jam with Jay Ekis, Lee Blackwell, Alec Ellsworth & Katie Trautz, 6 p.m., $5-10 donation. SWEET MELISSA’S: Wine Down with D. Davis (acoustic), 5 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

74 MUSIC

RUSTY NAIL: Open Mic, 9:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Celtic Jam, 8 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. THE STAGE: Open Mic, 6 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic, 10 p.m., free. NAKED TURTLE: Jay Lesage (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: So You Want to Be a DJ?, 10 p.m., free.

THU.3

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Jeffrey Foucault, Caitlin Canty (Americana), 7:30 p.m., $15. AA. CHURCH & MAIN: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 8 p.m., free. THE DAILY PLANET: Brett Hughes (country), 8 p.m., free. DRINK: BLiNDoG Records Acoustic Sessions, 5 p.m., free. FINNIGAN’S PUB: Craig Mitchell (funk), 10 p.m., free. FRANNY O’S: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. THE GRYPHON: Gravel (jazz), 7 p.m., free. HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Half & Half Comedy (standup comedy), 8 p.m., free. Harder They Come (house), 10:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Trivia Mania, 7 p.m., free. Bluegrass Thursday, 9 p.m., $2/5. 18+. RADIO BEAN: Jazz Sessions with Julian Chobot, 6:30 p.m., free. Jacob Green (blues), 7 p.m., free. Rob Morse Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. Jazz Sessions with the Ray Vega Quartet, 10:30 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: Dirthouse (rock), 6 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8, 10 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ Kermit (top 40), 10 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Life of the Party (short-form improv), 7 p.m., $5. The Daily Grind (long-form improv comedy), 9 p.m., $5. ZEN LOUNGE: UVM Fundraiser with DJ Atak (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Leftover Salmon (progressive bluegrass), 8:30 p.m., $20/22. AA. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Joywave, Dreamers (indie), 7:30 p.m., $0.99. AA. Sold out. MONKEY HOUSE: Coquette, Hamjob (rock), 8:30 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

MON.7 // MOBILE DEATHCAMP [METAL]

Bang Your Head Todd Evans formed

MOBILE DEATHCAMP

after a five-year run performing as Beefcake

the Mighty with iconic alien metal band Gwar. MD don’t boast quite the same theatrical bent as the Scumdogs of the Universe, or enslave audience members. But the Toledo-based band does share an affinity for pulverizing thrash metal that leaves audiences battered, bloodied and bruised — sonically speaking, of course. MD headline Metal Monday at Nectar’s in Burlington on Monday, December 7, with support from CARNIVORA and FOAMING AT THE MOUTH.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Nobby Reed Project (blues), 7 p.m., free. PENALTY BOX: Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL & BURRITO CAFÉ: Colin McCaffrey & Friends (Americana), 6 p.m., donation.

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Gabe Jarrett (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: Supersounds DJ (top 40), 10 p.m., free.

CLUB METRONOME: ’90s Night with DJ Fattie B, 10 p.m., free/$5.

RUBEN JAMES: DJ Cre8 (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

FINNIGAN’S PUB: Seamus the Great (rock), 10 p.m., free.

SIGNAL KITCHEN: Session Americana (Americana), 8:30 p.m., $10. AA.

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Bonjour Hi (house), 10 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: BYOV Thursdays, 3 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Francesca Blanchard (folk), 9 p.m., free.

WHAMMY BAR: Kris Gruen, Katie Trautz, Brian Clark (indie folk), 7 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: The DuPont Brothers (indie folk), 8 p.m., free. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

MAGLIANERO CAFÉ: Teen Poetry Slam & All-Ages Open Mic, 6 p.m., free.

middlebury area

NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. Tom Hamilton’s American Babies, Canopy (rock), 9 p.m., $5.

northeast kingdom

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Bad Accent (world folk rock), 6:30 p.m., free. The Lsdies (folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Old Man Joe (rock), 10 p.m., free. Sundown (instrumental), 11:30 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS: Throttle Thursdays with DJ Gold, 9 p.m., free.

PARKER PIE CO.: Parker Pie Music Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

FRI.4

burlington

ARTSRIOT: Dr. Rick, the Woolens, Cosmosis Jones (rock), 9 p.m., $5. AA.

RED SQUARE: Kraggle Rock (rock), 4 p.m., free. Renegade Groove (funk), 8 p.m., $5. DJ Craig Mitchell (house), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: D Jay Baron (EDM), 9 p.m., $5.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): The Wee Folkestra, Dan Blakeslee (folk rock), 8 p.m., NA.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Loose Assisication (acoustic rock), 5 p.m., free. Phil Abair Band (rock), 9 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: The Full Cleveland (yacht rock), 9:30 p.m., $5.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL & BURRITO CAFÉ: Art Herttua & Ray Carroll (jazz), 6 p.m., donation.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Daniel Koren (musical comedy), 7 & 9 p.m., $15. The Darker Side of Comedy (standup comedy), 11 p.m., donation.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Abby Jenne & Doug Perkins (folk rock), 6 p.m., free. Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 8:30 p.m., free.

ZEN LOUNGE: Brett Hughes (country), 7 p.m., $5. Salsa Night with Jah Red (Latin), 9 p.m., $5.

ESPRESSO BUENO: Extempo (storytelling), 8 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

BACKSTAGE PUB: Acoustic Happy Hour, 5 p.m., free. Karaoke with Jenny Red, 9 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Eric Hutchinson, Anya Marina (solo acoustic), 8 p.m., $20/25. AA. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: First Friday: Santa’s Naughty or Nice Pajama Party (dance party), 8:30 p.m., $5/10. 18+. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Coon Hill John (folk), 7 p.m., free.

POSITIVE PIE (MONTPELIER): Barika (ethereal dubscape), 10 p.m., $5. SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5 p.m., free. WHAMMY BAR: Chad Hollister (folk rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area MOOGS PLACE: Abby Sherman (folk), 6:30 p.m., free. Seth Yacovone Band (blues), 9 p.m., free. RIMROCK’S MOUNTAIN TAVERN: DJ Rekkon #FridayNightFrequencies (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Radio Flyer (rock), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+. FRI.4

» P.76


LEARN

GOT MUSIC NEWS? DAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

LAUGH

REVIEW this The Pilgrims, Shred Savage (WHAT DOTH LIFE, CD, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD)

Sooner or later, we all get old. Though the ravages of age are inevitable, getting older doesn’t necessarily mean one has to grow up. That’s a dichotomy with which the members of the Pilgrims are currently grappling. The band formed five years ago in Windsor. Under the aegis of Upper Valley sorta-label What Doth Life, the Pilgrims have released five albums, including their latest, Shred Savage. They have grown from a quartet to a quintet. And, as bassist Brendan Dangelo writes in a recent email, the band is presently “tripping over the thirties threshold and trying to be adult about it.” From someone who has face-planted on the thirties threshold and is now nervously eyeing 40 just over the horizon, here’s the thing about being an adult: There are a lot of ways to go about it. Judging by Shred Savage, it seems the Pilgrims (rightly) believe one can be a

grown-up and still cling to the nostalgic folly of youth. That’s most overtly evidenced by the record’s title — for those under 30, it’s a nod to Fred Savage, the star of the classic late-1980s coming-of-age TV series “The Wonder Years.” It’s also teased by the cover art, which recalls Garbage Pail Kids stickers. But the theme emerges in other, more subtle ways, too. On album opener “Weird,” vocalist Chris Rosenquest recommends letting one’s freak flag fly. “You can have my heart, you can shave my head / You can keep your beard, this is what she said,” he sings in his typically ragged growl. Then comes the hook on repeat: “You should just be weird.” Becoming comfortable in your own skin is one of the overlooked advantages of age and experience. That notion is a central tenet of the Pilgrim’s latest, both thematically and sonically. The band

has always existed in a stylistic limbo in which late-1970s rock, 1980s alt-rock and 1990s punk overlap. But here they blur those lines even further. “Cool. Dad” is something like a Big Star tune if covered by Squeeze but with Camper Van Beethoven’s David Lowery fronting the band. Speaking of CVB, the calypsotinged “The Man’s Best Friend” could be an outtake from Telephone Free Landslide Victory. “Smokes Too Much” takes Rivers Cuomo’s middle-aged teenage angst and packages it in early 1980s power pop, à la Rick Springfield or the Cars. “Attitude City” is slackadaisical punk with a TexMex kick. The album closes on “Wallet,” which, amid a flurry of punchy riffs, suggests that the best way to combat financial woes is with “a big glass of wine.” If that ain’t grown-up, I don’t know what is. The Pilgrims play a release party for Shred Savage at the Main Street Museum in White River Junction on Friday, December 4. Shred Savage is available at pilgrimsvt.bandcamp.com.

DAN BOLLES

LOUNGE

WED OPEN MIC 2 & Improv Jam THU IMPROV 3 Life of the Party / Daily Grind

FRI 4SAT5

DANIEL

KOREN 18+ show

SUN STANDUP 6 Comedy Double Header UPCOMING SHOWS

DEREK GAINES....DEC 11/12 VT COMEDY DIVAS...DEC 18 MIKE FINOIA.............DEC 19

ORDER YOUR TICKETS TODAY! (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM 101 main street, BurlingtoN

Hollar General, Shameless Light

GIVETHEGIFTOF GROOVETHIS

(SELF-RELEASED, DIGITAL DOWNLOAD, VINYL)

SEASON

NORTHERN LIGHTS

Northern Lights

DAN BOLLES

Mon-Thur 10-9 Fri-Sat 10-10 Sun 10-8

IF YOU’RE AN INDEPENDENT ARTIST OR BAND MAKING MUSIC IN VT, SEND YOUR CD TO US! DAN BOLLES C/O SEVEN DAYS, 255 S. CHAMPLAIN ST., SUITE 5, BURLINGTON, VT 05401

8v-northernlights111115.indd 1

@ N or th er n Li g h tsVT

MUSIC 75

w w w .nor t her nlight s pipes .c om Must be 18 to purchase tobacco products, ID required

GET YOUR MUSIC REVIEWED:

SEVEN DAYS

THE SMOKESHOP WITH THE HIPPIE FLAVOR

12.02.15-12.09.15

vehicle for Chorney’s indie-folk-oriented songwriting pursuits. But just as his avant-garde instrumental compositions exist on an ethereal plane, Chorney’s comparatively more conventional writings with Hollar are similarly opaque and veiled. He deploys the talents of Zack DuPont, Peg Tassey, Jane Boxall, Alec Spiegelman, Caleb Elder, Nelson Caldwell and Miriam Bernardo with the skill and furtiveness of a master illusionist. Album opener “Moline” unfolds gently with a serene guitar progression that ripples and splashes like a tiny waterfall. In the eddy below, Carr’s brushed snare and cymbals lightly skim the surface, above which backing vocals entwine with Chorney’s plaintive melody. The slyly funky “Soldiers Field” evokes some woozy, boozy session between Joe Henry, Tom Waits and Andrew Bird. On “Solid State,” Chorney uses the buzz of tape hiss as an instrument on par with guitars and drums. That almost subconscious hum lends the tender love

12:47 PM

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

In recent years, local composer Michael Chorney has probably been best known to Vermont audiences for helping to make other artists’ music mysterious, beautiful and strange. His work with Anaïs Mitchell, both on her early solo records and as the sonic architect behind her acclaimed folk-rock opera Hadestown, is the highest-profile example. But his contributions to Maryse Smith’s 2015 record, The Way It Is, were just as transformative. Chorney is also an accomplished bandleader, having helmed the great 1990s “antacid” jazz band viperHouse and a number of smaller local combos that haunt the shadowy margins of contemporary American music. By all accounts, Chorney is a selfless musician, having aided in the artistic development of countless local players, singers and songwriters. It is fitting, then, that so many of them returned the favor on his latest project with Hollar General, Shameless Light. Flanked by bassist Rob Morse, pedal steel player Brett Lanier and drummer Geza Carr, Hollar General is essentially a

song an air of nostalgia that transports and Untitled-18 1 11/30/15 soothes. “Luminous” is deceptively complex. A subtly dynamic rhythmic cadence churns beneath a dovetailing whirl of crystalline pedal steel and guitar tones. This all contrasts with Chorney’s plainspoken vocal delivery, which carries his most direct lyrical turn. “Fix” is a swooning, eight-minute suite of instrumental chamber folk. Chorney’s incomparable talents as an instrumental composer are on display in the high, arcing tones of Elder’s fiddle and the bowing weight of Caldwell’s cello. The NOW WITH THE pastoral grace of “West, West, West,” AREAS WIDEST another instrumental, is given voice in SELECTION OF Spiegelman’s bass clarinet, which dances VAPORIZERS with pirouetting strings and twisting guitars. Shameless Light closes on “A Perfect Time for Thieves,” which is almost a microcosm of the entire record. In the span of nine minutes, Chorney guides Hollar General through a shifting landscape of styles and sounds, from orchestral indie folk to mountain music to avant-garde jazz, melding together brilliantly and beautifully. Shameless Light by Hollar General is 75 Main St., Burlington, VT 864.6555 available at michaelchorney.com.

11/6/15 2:24 PM


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Untitled-20 1

11/30/15 12:54 PM

FRI.4 // SESSION AMERICANA [AMERICANA]

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

AT

Circus Act Pack Up the Circus, the latest record from Boston’s

AMERICANA,

SESSION

is the most vivid reflection of the band’s collaborative nature to date.

Produced by Vermont’s Anaïs Mitchell, the album captures the freewheeling spirit around which the band was formed during informal Sunday-night sessions at a tiny Cambridge bar eight years ago. It also reflects fine attention to detail and appreciation of songcraft. These tales of love and life, with all the beauty and madness of both, are

12.02.15-12.09.15

equally tender and energetic. Catch Session Americana at Signal Kitchen in Burlington on Friday, December 4. FRI.4

« P.74

mad river valley/waterbury THE CIDER HOUSE BBQ AND PUB: Tim Kane (piano), 6 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS

middlebury area

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Eight 02 (jazz), 8 p.m., free. CITY LIMITS: Let it Rock Ent. (total requests), 9 p.m., free. City Limits Dance Party with Top Hat Entertainment (Top 40), 9:30 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Cooper & Lavoie (blues), 6 p.m., free. Undun (rock), 9 p.m., $3.

76 MUSIC

northeast kingdom

THE STAGE: Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

Untitled-17 1 Untitled-1 1

11/30/15 12:45 PM 11/29/15 2:34 PM

outside vermont

MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. PALMER STREET COFFEEHOUSE: Michele Fay Band (folk rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

SAT.5

burlington

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Tiffany Pfeiffer (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Retronome With DJ Fattie B (’80s dance party), 9 p.m., free/$5. FRANNY O’S: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. THE GRYPHON: Zack DuPont (indie folk), 8 p.m., free.


The Great Gift Giveaway is underway...

It's 4 weeks of great gifts for you and your family, from our family of sponsors and all of us at The Point! Each gift is worth at least $350! Get all the information at PointFM.com, or just listen!

JP’S PUB: Karaoke with Megan, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Erik Urch (folk), 9 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Woven (folk), 8 p.m., free. Taka (vinyl DJ), 11 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Revibe, Broccoli Samurai (rock, funk), 9 p.m., $5.

RED SQUARE: Andriana Chobot Trio (jazz, pop), 4 p.m., free. Grupo Sabor (Latin jazz), 8 p.m., $5. Mashtodon (hip-hop), 11 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul, 6 p.m., $5. DJ Reign One (EDM), 11 p.m., $5. RUBEN JAMES: Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free.

ZEN LOUNGE: Andriana Chobot & Jimmy Ruin (singer-songwriters), 8 p.m., $5.

chittenden county

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Lotus Land: A Tribute to Rush, 8 p.m., $18/20. AA. JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Milo White Band (rock), 7 p.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL & BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation. O’hAnleigh (Celtic), 6 p.m., donation. ESPRESSO BUENO: Espresso Brain-O (trivia), 7 p.m., $5.

Ski & RThe with t Poin 2016!

POSITIVE PIE (MONTPELIER): Hot Neon Magic (’80s New Wave), 10 p.m., $5. WHAMMY BAR: Mad Mountain Scramblers (bluegrass), 7:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area

MOOGS PLACE: Jingle Jam, 9 p.m., $10.

mad river valley/waterbury THE CIDER HOUSE BBQ AND PUB: Dan Boomhower (piano), 6 p.m., free.

THE RESERVOIR RESTAURANT & TAP ROOM: Jason Lowe (rock), 10 p.m., free.

middlebury area

104.7 & 93.3 BURLINGTON

SEVEN DAYS

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Daniel Koren (musical comedy), 7 & 9 p.m., $15.

barre/montpelier

Cominn!g Soo ide

12.02.15-12.09.15

RADIO BEAN: Paige & Elysia (acoustic covers), 7 p.m., free. Mass Inc. (Eurodance), 8:30 p.m., free. Wild Branch (bluegrass), 10 p.m., free. Metal Night with Amadis, Leper Messiah, 11:30 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Shane’s Apothecary (acoustic rock), 5 p.m., free. Dirthouse (rock), 9 p.m., free.

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Space Echo with Jahson Deejay & Guests (house), 10 p.m., free.

93.7 MIDDLEBURY

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE: Small Change (Tom Waits tribute), 8 p.m., free.

104.7 & 100.3 MONTPELIER

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Gumbo YaYa (soul, funk), 6 p.m., $3.

95.7 THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM 103.1 & 107.7 THE UPPER VALLEY

SUN.6

MUSIC 77

MONKEY HOUSE: Brad Farberman Group, Entrance to Trains (jazz), 9 p.m., $3/8. 18+.

» P.78 2v-the-point111115.indd 1

11/30/15 5:59 PM


music

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

Oh, Brother Earlier this year, NYC’s

PARQUET COURTS

released a mostly instrumental, wildly experimental EP, Monastic Living. Something of a screed against

the digital era, the recording was a distinct departure from their earlier work and drew sharp criticism from reviewers — the harshest of whom, interestingly, publish solely online. But the clatter and clank of unconventional noise was meant as a jarring wake-up call, a rejection of screen-centric society that suggests there’s more to life than scrolling through your phone. Like, for example, experiencing challenging, provocative art live and in the flesh. Do just that when Parquet Courts play the Higher Ground Showcase Lounge in South Burlington on Sunday, December 6, with PILL and Burlington’s JOEY PIZZA SLICE.

SUN.6 // PARQUET COURTS [INDIE]

SAT.5

« P.77

SUN.6

burlington

FRANNY O’S: Kyle Stevens’ Happiest Hour of Music (singersongwriter), 7 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., $3.

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THE OLDE NORTHENDER PUB: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. RADIO BEAN: Rebecca Padula (folk), 11 a.m., free. Pete Sutherland & Tim Stickle’s Old Time Session, 1 p.m., free. Songwriter Sessions with Laura Heaberlin, 4 p.m., free. Jen Taylor, Amanda Kulos and Anna May (ukulele trio), 7 p.m., free. Mt. Philo (folk rock), 8:30 p.m., free. Mobile Steam Unit (garage soul), 10:30 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch Scramble, noon, $5-10 donation.

chittenden county BACKSTAGE PUB: Karaoke/ Open Mic, 8 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Parquet Courts, Pill, Joey Pizza Slice (indie), 8:30 p.m., $15/17. AA. PENALTY BOX: Trivia With a Twist, 4 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Rock & Roll Karaoke, 8 p.m., free.

78 MUSIC

stowe/smuggs area MOOGS PLACE: Comedy Night, 8 p.m., donation.

northeast kingdom THE STAGE: Open Mic, 5 p.m., free.

MON.7

burlington

FRANNY O’S: Standup Comedy Cage Match, 8 p.m., free. Comedy Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free. HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Family Night (rock), 10:30 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Dance Video Request Night with Melody, 10 p.m., free. JUNIPER: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 8 p.m., free.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Kelly Ravin (country), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area MOOGS PLACE: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PHAT KATS TAVERN: Jay Natola (solo guitar), 9 p.m., free.

brattleboro area

THE PIZZA STONE: This Time Stars Fall, Destructive Nature, Hadrons Collide, Nemus of Nex, Faux in Love (hardcore), 5:30 p.m., $5.

outside vermont

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Dana Barry, 9 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free.

TUE.8

NECTAR’S: Metal Monday: Mobile Deathcamp, Carnivora, Foaming at the Mouth, 9 p.m., $5/7. 18+.

ARTSRIOT: If You Don’t Know Now You Know (trivia), 7:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Amelia Schumacher (folk), 7 p.m., free. Latin Sessions with Mal Maiz (cumbia), 10:30 p.m., free. RED SQUARE: Mashtodon (hip-hop), 8 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Kidz Music with Raphael, 11:30 a.m., $3 donation.

chittenden county

MONKEY HOUSE: Open Mic, 7:30 p.m., free/$3. 18+.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Open Mic Comedy Café, 8 p.m., free.

burlington

CLUB METRONOME: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., free/$5. DRINK: Drink Comedy Open Mic, 9 p.m., free. FRANNY O’S: Shawny Cash & Captain Hook (rock), 8 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Open Mic with Kyle, 9 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lotango (tango), 8 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Great Blue, Close Encounter (rock, funk), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

RADIO BEAN: Stephen Callahan Trio (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. Zack DuPont (indie folk), 9 p.m., free. Honky Tonk Tuesday with Eric George & Friends, 10 p.m., $3.

JP’S PUB: Pub Quiz with Dave, 7 p.m., free. Karaoke with Melody, 10 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: DJ KermiTT (hiphop), 8 p.m., free. Craig Mitchell (house), 10 p.m., free.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Mike Martin (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Ray Vega Quartet (jazz), 8 p.m., free.

chittenden county

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions, 8 p.m., free. Film Night: Indie, Abstract, Avant Garde, 10 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Cooie Sings (blues), 8 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia, 7:30 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

NECTAR’S: Vinyl Night with Waylon Speed, Disco Phantom, 6 p.m., free. Karavan (soul, rock), 9 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

BAGITOS BAGEL & BURRITO CAFÉ: Nick Clemens (folk), 6 p.m., donation.

RADIO BEAN: Sophie Patenaude (folk), 7 p.m., free. Fab Rangoon (rock), 10:30 p.m., free.

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Wylie & Riley (folk), 8 p.m., free. DJ Pat (hip-hop), 11 p.m., free.

SOUTH SIDE TAVERN: Open Mic with John Lackard, 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Josh Panda’s Acoustic Soul Night, 8 p.m., $5-10 donation.

middlebury area

ZEN LOUNGE: Kizomba with Dsantos VT, 7 p.m., free. Zensday College Night, 10 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

MOOGS PLACE: Jason Wedlock (rock), 7:30 p.m., free.

TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Karaoke with Roots Entertainment, 9 p.m., free.

WED.9

chittenden county HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Burlington Battle of the Bands (rock), 7:30 p.m., $5. AA.

THE DAILY PLANET: Seth Yacovone (blues), 8 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Winooski Wednesdays: Quiz for a Cause (trivia), 5:30 p.m., free. Jacob Green (folk), 9:30 p.m., free/$3. 18+.

THE GRYPHON: Al Teodosio & Tom Frink (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Pine Street Jazz, 7 p.m., free.

burlington

HALFLOUNGE SPEAKEASY: Wildlife DJs (house), 10 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier BAGITOS BAGEL & BURRITO CAFÉ: Daniel Rahilly & Ty Cicia (acoustic blues), 6 p.m., donation.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): Cajun Jam with Jay Ekis, Lee Blackwell, Alec Ellsworth & Katie Trautz, 6 p.m., $5-10 donation. SWEET MELISSA’S: Wine Down with D. Davis (acoustic), 5 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs area MOOGS PLACE: Fred Brauer (blues), 8 p.m., free.

PIECASSO PIZZERIA & LOUNGE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. RUSTY NAIL: Open Mic, 9:30 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS: Karaoke, 9 p.m., free. TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. THE STAGE: Open Mic, 6 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic, 10 p.m., free. NAKED TURTLE: Jay Lesage (acoustic), 5:30 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: So You Want to Be a DJ?, 10 p.m., free. 


VENUES.411 BURLINGTON

STOWE/SMUGGS AREA

CLAIRE’S RESTAURANT & BAR, 41 Main St., Hardwick, 472-7053 MATTERHORN, 4969 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-8198 MOOG’S PLACE, Portland St., Morrisville, 851-8225 PIECASSO, 899 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4411 RIMROCKS MOUNTAIN TAVERN, 394 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-9593 THE RUSTY NAIL, 1190 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-6245 SUSHI YOSHI, 1128 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4135 SWEET CRUNCH BAKESHOP, 246 Main St., Hyde Park, 888-4887

Some restrictions may apply Valid through 12/25/2015

75 Maple Street, Burlington VT | 802.863.8652 Mon-Fri 10-6 | Sat 10-5 | Sun 12-5

BUY ONE ENTREE FOR LUNCH GET THE SECOND 1/2 OFF!

MIDDLEBURY AREA

51 MAIN AT THE BRIDGE, 51 Main St., Middlebury, 388-8209 BAR ANTIDOTE, 35C Green St., Vergennes, 877-2555 CITY LIMITS, 14 Greene St., Vergennes, 877-6919 TOURTERELLE, 3629 Ethan Allen Hwy., New Haven, 453-6309 TWO BROTHERS TAVERN LOUNGE & STAGE, 86 Main St., Middlebury, 388-0002

RUTLAND AREA

HOP’N MOOSE BREWERY CO., 41 Center St., Rutland 775-7063 PICKLE BARREL NIGHTCLUB, Killington Rd., Killington, 422-3035

Expires 12/31/15

authentic mexican cuisine 802-540-3095 • 169 Church St. • Burlington • 802-662-4334 • 4 Park St. • Essex Junction (Lincoln Inn) www.ElGatoCantina.com • info@elgatocantina.com 8h-ElGatoCantina120215.indd 1

11/30/15 3:33 PM

CHAMPLAIN ISLANDS/ NORTHWEST

CHOW! BELLA, 28 N. Main St., St. Albans, 524-1405 CLUB KARIB, 50 Kingman St., St. Albans, 527-9992 SNOW SHOE LODGE & PUB, 13 Main St., Montgomery Center, 326-4456

deadlines DECEMBER 23 & 30 ISSUES*

UPPER VALLEY

BREAKING GROUNDS, 245 Main St., Bethel, 392-4222

• Calendar Events

NORTHEAST KINGDOM

Thursday, 12/17, at noon (for events scheduled 12/23 – 1/13)

JASPER’S TAVERN, 71 Seymour Ln., Newport, 334-2224 MUSIC BOX, 147 Creek Rd., Craftsbury, 586-7533 PARKER PIE CO., 161 County Rd., West Glover, 525-3366 PHAT KATS TAVERN, 101 Depot St., Lyndonville, 626-3064 THE PUB OUTBACK, 482 Vt. 114, East Burke, 626-1188 THE STAGE, 45 Broad St., Lyndonville, 427-3344 TAMARACK GRILL, 223 Shelburne Lodge Rd., East Burke, 626-7390

• Art Shows & Club Dates

Friday, 12/18, at noon (for exhibits and shows happening before 1/13)

» sevendaysvt.com/postevent • Classifieds & Classes Monday, 12/21, at noon

• Jobs

OUTSIDE VERMONT

SEVEN DAYS

There will not be a paper published on Wednesday, January 6, 2016.

Monday, 12/21, at noon

» sevendaysvt.com/classifieds • Retail advertising Friday, 12/18, at noon

MUSIC 79

MONOPOLE, 7 Protection Ave., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-563-2222 NAKED TURTLE, 1 Dock St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-566-6200. OLIVE RIDLEY’S, 37 Court St., Plattsburgh, N.Y., 518-324-2200 PALMER ST. COFFEE HOUSE, 4 Palmer St., Plattsburgh, N.Y. 518-561-6920

SEVEN DAYS

BACKSTAGE PUB, 60 Pearl St., Essex Jct., 878-5494 GOOD TIMES CAFÉ, Rt. 116, Hinesburg, 482-4444 HIGHER GROUND, 1214 Williston Rd., S. Burlington, 652-0777

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12/1/15 2:55 PM


art

A Closer View

Art review: Gabriel Tempesta, West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park B Y PA MEL A PO LSTON

W

hen stick season, aka November, arrives in Vermont, some people get depressed. But Wolcott artist Gabriel Tempesta seems to relish nature at its most somber. In his current exhibit, “Our World, Charcoal & Casein,” at Stowe’s West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park, the 11 works are executed in black and shades of gray on paper or board. A couple of sepia-toned pieces, and another with a small patch of brushwork in midnight blue, are the only departures here. Most of these paintings are studies of trees, but a rocky seashore, a lily pond and several creatures appear, as well. Paradoxically, the works are both stark and luxuriously detailed. Tempesta notes his choice of materials in the very title of the show — though he could also have listed watercolor; it’s used in more than half of the paintings. Like it, casein paint is a fast-drying, water-soluble medium, derived from milk protein (his is made by the Massachusetts-based Old Fashioned Milk Paint Co., Tempesta notes). Given that two of his mediums are runny and the third can turn to dust, the precision of his artworks is utterly stunning. In fact, from a short distance they could be — and have been — mistaken for photographs. Tempesta does take pictures of his chosen subject matter and works from the photographic images in the studio, he acknowledges. Still, photorealism does not seem to be the goal in these paintings. A close observation of them indisputably reveals the work of the artist’s hand. Tempesta got his formal training at Montserrat College of Art, but he credits his “formative years in the Vermont landscape” with influencing his painting. “I am moved by the visual poetry in the trees and fields that surround me and look to capture and celebrate that with my artwork,” he writes in an email to Seven Days. Rather than offering wide views, his take on landscape gives special potency to the idea of getting “close” to nature. Tempesta looks at the trees

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REVIEW

“Old Birch on Elmore Mountain”

rather than the forest, as it were. In fact, not even whole trees; many of his paintings focus on bark. Only a microscope could offer a more intimate view. In the casein-on-board piece “Old Birch on Elmore Mountain,” Tempesta’s perspective is reverential and the opposite of vertiginous. The point of view is from the ground looking up

at the ancient tree, its bark rough and minutely delineated. All of the branches are bare, and some of them have been broken. This birch has been through a lot. Overhead, the sky is overcast, a featureless pale gray. Just 32 inches square, the painting can make a viewer feel small. The 20-by-18-inch “Nebraska Valley Stowe Afternoon II,” using charcoal

and watercolor on board, zooms in on a higher point in another tree. The picture plane is condensed, the POV that of a bird or a squirrel. The sky is stormy, yet the sun pierces through enough to illuminate every tiny twig. Collectively, they take on the appearance of a neural network, fluorescent white against dramatically dark heavens. The contrast is riveting.


ART SHOWS

“Wolcott Pond in Bloom”

PARADOXICALLY, THE WORKS

ARE BOTH STARK AND LUXURIOUSLY DETAILED.

f ‘BLUE-PLATE SPECIAL’: Color reproductions of midcentury food signs, which originally hung in the Burlington Woolworth’s on Church Street. Reception: Friday, December 4, 6-9 p.m. December 4-31. Red Square, Burlington. Info, 318-2438. f MATTHEW THORSEN: Works from the acclaimed Vermont photographer, including family photos, Vermont notables, and selections from his “Sound Proof” collection of rock performances and artists. Reception: Friday, December 4, 5:30-8 p.m. December 4-February 27. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Flynn Center, in Burlington. f SAGE TUCKER-KETCHAM: “Spacescapes,” new abstract paintings by the local artist, inspired by the natural world, chemistry, science and alchemy. Reception: Friday, December 4, 6-8.p.m. December 4-January 31. Info, 861-3155. Karma Bird House Gallery in Burlington. f ST. CHRISTOPHER: “Trajectories,” bold graphic paintings by the self-taught artist. Reception: Friday, December 4, 7-10 p.m. December 4-January 4. Info, 865-6223. Battery Street Jeans in Burlington.

barre/montpelier

f HEIDI CHAMBERLAIN AND NANCY GADUE: Cross-stitch and multimedia and upcycled Christmas stockings from the local artists, respectively. Reception: Friday, December 4, 4-8 p.m. December 4-January 15. Info, 223-1981. The Cheshire Cat in Montpelier.

One of thousands of Vermont crafted gifts available in the gallery.

f ‘IN MINIATURE’ HOLIDAY EXHIBIT & SALE: Work from Newbury artists including paintings, prints, mixed media, fine art photographs, wood turning and wood carvings. Reception: Saturday, December 5, 3-5 p.m. December 5-January 5. Info, 866-5366. Tenney Memorial Library in Newbury.

stowe/smuggs area

WWW.FROGHOLLOW.ORG 85 Church St. Burlington, VT 802-863-6458

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f MEMBERS’ ART SHOW & SALE: Exhibition of work submitted by members of the Helen Day Art Center. Reception: Friday, December 4, 5 p.m. December 4-January 3. Info, 253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe.

middlebury area

Happy Holidays!

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f GINGERBREAD HOUSE EXHIBITION: The 17th annual exhibition of gingerbread houses made by community members addresses the theme “’Digital Folklore’: Emoji, Rainbow Unicorns and Lolcats.” Reception: Friday, December 4, 4-6 p.m. December 4-22. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. SILKSCREEN PRINTS: Students in Hedya Klein’s printmaking class exhibit their new work as a culmination of in-depth studio practice. December 2-10. Info, 443-5258. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College.

HAND MADE PLATINUM EDWARDIAN DIAMOND DROP NECKLACE

rutland area

f ‘STORYBOOK LOVE’ GINGERBREAD EXHIBIT: An annual community gingerbread-house competition and exhibition. Reception and awards: Friday, December 18, 4-6 p.m. December 4-18. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

brattleboro area

f COLLIN LEECH: Recent paintings by the Vermont artist, showcasing her mixed use of collage, drawing, painting and encaustic work. Reception: Thursday, December 3, 5:30-7 p.m. December 3-28. Info, 869-2960. Main Street Arts in Saxtons River.

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“Gabriel Tempesta: Our World, Charcoals & Casein,” through December 31 at West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park. westbranchgallery.com

SEVEN DAYS

Contact: pamela@sevendaysvt.com

burlington

12.02.15-12.09.15

“Acadian Mist”

NEW THIS WEEK

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“Creator #1”

Giant shelf fungi dominate the foreground in “Relic,” which at 48 by 24 inches is one of the largest paintings here. The mushrooms appear on the trunk of yet another gnarly tree like toeholds on a climbing wall. Again, Tempesta directs the eye upward — except for a hole low in the tree that introduces an inky spot. It’s hard not to gaze into that darkness and wonder what might lurk within. Mysticism takes a front seat in Tempesta’s bumblebee paintings, two of which are included here. Though he paints the insects with characteristic exactitude, the artist allows himself to fudge the details where the “mysterious creative forces of the universe,” as he puts it, are concerned. In “Pollinator #2,” a bee is busily at work on a bee balm flower, and the indistinct petals seem a-flurry in reciprocation of this vital exchange. “Creator #1” is downright dreamy. The bee is seen from behind, its black-andwhite markings lucid, its fairy wings in motion. The insect is departing something dark and womb-like. A hive? It would surpass the skills of a casual photographer to capture such an image, so Tempesta clearly imagined it — and puts the viewer inside the hive. What lies ahead of the creature is “nebulous deep space,” the artist writes. And that’s as good a description as any for the ambiguous blobs and spatters with which Tempesta represents the bee’s universe. We don’t know exactly where it’s going, but its life-affirming mission is unmistakable. Tempesta’s cat is on another kind of mission. Though in a way the most prosaic painting in the exhibit, “Hunter in the Field” captures the feral killing instinct that has survived centuries of domestication. Stalking through grasses, this kitty is on alert, its eyes focused. Perhaps it has already spotted its prey. The image is tightly cropped, just a 24-by-28.75-inch rectangle of grass and cat. The light source — presumably the sun — is strong, and because this work is black and white, the light fur of the feline’s face fairly glows. Each blade of grass is distinctly rendered. In charcoal and watercolor, Tempesta again delivers the stuff of life without a speck of color. m

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f ‘SORO FIBER CRAFTERS’: Group show of quilts, hooked rugs, crewel embroidery, knitted items and other fiber art by local makers. Reception: Sunday, December 13, 2-4 p.m. December 8-February 13. Info, 763-7094. Royalton Memorial Library in South Royalton.

ART EVENTS SOUTH END HOLIDAY SHOP: A monthlong art-sales opportunity in support of the local creative economy, hosted by the South End Arts and Business Association. South End Arts District, Burlington, Through December 24. Info, 859-9222. ‘THE ART OF HAROUN’: A painting session inspired by excerpts of the 2015 Vermont Reads book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories. For fifth grade and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, Thursday, December 3, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6955. PAINTING SOCIAL: A local artist provides step-bystep instruction on the painting of the night while guests enjoy a beverage in a social atmosphere. Materials included. The Traveled Cup, St. Albans, Thursday, December 3, 6-8:30 p.m. $40. Info, bookings@paintingsocial.net. ARTIST TALK: MARY LACY: Vermont muralist Mary Lacy discusses her public work, including animals at the Moran Plant and abstract silos at the Dealer. com headquarters in Burlington. T. W. Wood Gallery, Montpelier, Friday, December 4, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 262-6035. CHEAP ART HOLIDAY SHOW AND SALE: Works from more than 20 artists, all under $100, most $25 or less. Christ Church, Montpelier, Friday, December 4, 4-7 p.m. Info, 225-6628. COTTON MILL OPEN STUDIOS & HOLIDAY SALE: The 17th annual event features work by local artists and artisans, performances including music, dance and circus acts, food and wine tastings, a raffle, and more. Cotton Mill Main Studio, Brattleboro, Friday, December 4, 4-7 p.m. Info, floopenstudio@gmail. com.

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FIRST FRIDAY ART: Dozens of galleries and other venues around the city open their doors to pedestrian art viewers in this monthly event. See Art Map Burlington at participating locations. Friday, December 4, 5-8 p.m. Info, 264-4839. HOLIDAY STUDENT ART SALE: Comic books, original art, prints, handmade crafts and other unique gifts all made by CCS students. Center for Cartoon Studies, White River Junction, Friday, December 4, 5-7 p.m. Info, emilyparrish.artist@ gmail.com. MONTPELIER ART WALK: Enjoy local art and Vermont-made baked goods with a self-guided tour through local shops in downtown. Various Montpelier locations, Friday, December 4, 4-8 p.m. Info, 223-9604. ARTIST DEMONSTRATION: ERIC NELSON: The glassmaker provides insight into his process with a barrette/ornament-making workshop. Frog Hollow Vermont State Craft Center, Burlington, Saturday, December 5, noon-4 p.m. Info, 863-6458. AVA OPEN HOUSE: Visitors are invited to watch artist demonstrations, learn about AVA’s green building, meet with faculty members and peek into working artists’ studios. AVA Gallery and Art Center, Lebanon, N.H., Saturday, December 5, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 603-448-3117. ‘DELIGHTS OF DECEMBER’: A holiday celebration featuring Christmas music favorites in the Phonograph Museum, the center’s holiday art show and gift shopping, including new and used books, classical music and treats from the local farmers market. Compass Music and Arts Center, Brandon, Saturday, December 5, noon-5 p.m. Info, 247-4295.

Mareva Millarc Painter Mareva Millarc’s abstractions are riddled with curves, expansive color palettes and layers

of shapes in a range of scales. For her current exhibit at the BCA Center’s Vermont Metro Gallery, Millarc cites as influences Richard Diebenkorn and Arshile Gorky, two prominent artists associated with the abstract-expressionist movement. She also cites her own father, painter William Millarc. In her artist’s statement, Millarc situates her work in the space between “the nothingness of abstract”

and “the slight realm of possibility” and says her task is “to capture the infinite.” The architecture suggested in some of Millarc’s paintings is like that of the Rio de Janeiro slum, or favela, which is perpetually in flux but takes distinct shape organically over time. It also contains a tremendous amount of life in a very small space. Through January 16. Pictured: “The Other Side of the Moon.”

‘IT’S ALL ABOUT THE LAKE’: Work by student artists on view in support of the Friends of Northern Lake Champlain. 10 S. Main St., St. Albans, Saturday, December 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 527-7243. JENNIE KRISTEL ART SALE: The artist offers framed and unframed original monoprints, journals, note cards, lamps and shades, and more. Ten percent of all proceeds to benefit the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf. Jennie Kristel Studio, Burlington, Saturday, December 5, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 373-5030. OPEN STUDIO: JANET FREDERICKS: Semiannual studio sale featuring prints, drawings, sketches and paintings at reduced prices. Janet Fredericks Studio, S. Lincoln, Saturday, December 5, noon-4 p.m. Info, 453-5425. SWEET SIPS AND HOLIDAY MARKET: Mingle, support local artists and makers, and enjoy hot drinks in handcrafted mugs made by ceramic artist Tamara Cameron. Ticket includes two specialty cocktails and use of artist’s mug. ONE Arts Center, Burlington, Saturday, December 5, 7-9 p.m. $10; free for ONE Arts members. Info, 518-649-6464.

ART UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF CATHY STEVENS PRATT: The local artist leads this group painting event in which participants create their own semiabstract “Village Snow Dance” masterpiece to take home. Ticket price includes materials and one drink. Hotel Vermont, Burlington, Tuesday, December 8, 6-8 p.m. $36.87. Info, 859-9222. PAINTING SOCIAL: ‘WINTER BIRD’: A local artist provides step-by-step instruction on the painting of the night, “Winter Bird,” while guests paint and enjoy a beverage in a social atmosphere. Materials included. Shooters Saloon, St. Albans, Wednesday, December 9, 6-8:30 p.m. $40. Info, bookings@ paintingsocial.net. FIRST FRIDAY HOLIDAY BAZAAR & COFFEE TASTING: Seasonal market filled with handpicked, handcrafted items and artwork by a bevy of local talents. This event is also the closing reception for the November exhibition “Go For Broke,” featuring work by Christy Mitchell and Benjamin Peberdy. S.P.A.C.E. Gallery, Burlington. Friday, December 4, 5-9 p.m. Info, 578-2512.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

f ‘MADE’: Work from 21 South End artists highlighting the wide variety of arts and making in the Enterprise Zone. Reception: Friday, December 4, 5-8 p.m. f ‘THE ARTS UNKNOWN’: SEABA-curated group exhibition with work including photography, painting, stained glass and drawing by local artists. Reception: Friday, December 4, 5-8 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 859-9222. SEABA Center in Burlington. CHRIS ALLEY: “The Science of Flaws and Miracles,” works by the Burlington College professor. Through December 31. Info, 860-4972. Vermont Art Supply and Black Horse S.P.G. in Burlington. ‘HOLGA SHOTS’: Jordan Douglas presents a variety of square black-and-white darkroom prints, all produced with a $25 plastic camera. Through December 31. Info, 651-8834. Penny Cluse Café in Burlington.


ART SHOWS

CALL TO ARTISTS 2016 SCHOLASTIC ART & WRITING AWARDS: Vermont students in grades 7 to 12 are invited to submit art and writing entries in dozens of categories, including ceramics, digital art, painting, photography, poetry, humor, science fiction, personal essay/memoir and more. Visit brattleboromuseum.org for more info. Deadline: December 16. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. Info, 257-0124.

‘MOTION’: Artists are invited to submit 2D works addressing the theme of motion for this group exhibition. Deadline: December 15. Jericho Town Hall. Info, 878-8887. ‘SALVAGE’: Chandler Gallery seeks submissions of work made from found and repurposed materials, asking, “How does the reimagining of salvaged parts come together in your work?” Deadline: December 9. Chandler Gallery, Randolph. Info, salvage. chandler@gmail.com. SOLIDARITY CRAFT FAIR: Seeking artists and

‘IN GRAIN: CONTEMPORARY WORK IN WOOD’: Contemporary wood sculpture with examples of hand- and machine-carved figurative, abstract and geometric works and laser-cut biomorphic forms by 10 artists. Through December 18. ‘SEX OBJECTS: PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER AND SEXUALITY’: An exhibition of everyday and ceremonial art and artifacts curated by 40 anthropology and art history students. Through May 22. ‘WORLD LEADERS & GLOBAL CITIZENS: PHOTOGRAPHS BY PATRICK LEAHY, U.S. SENATOR’: An exhibit organized on the 40th anniversary of Sen. Patrick Leahy’s first term, featuring his view of historical events over the the past few decades. Through December 18. Info, 656-0750. University of Vermont Fleming Museum of Art in Burlington.

craftspeople to sell their wares at Planting Hope’s 22nd annual event in Montpelier on December 12. Deadline: December 5. Bethany Church of Montpelier. $20-40 per space. Info, 778-0344. ‘WINTER AS PRISM OR PRISON’: How do you view winter: as a beautiful prism of light or a prison of epic proportions? That’s the theme of an upcoming juried exhibit. More info at cmacvt. org. Deadline: December 4. Compass Music and Arts Center, Brandon. Info, 247-4295.

f WORKS FROM BELLCATE SCHOOL: Students of Josh Linz’s art class present work influenced by diverse art movements. Reception: Friday, December 4, 5-8 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 651-9692. VCAM Studio in Burlington.

MAX FEHR: “Poemography,” original photographs paired with the artist’s poetry. Through December 31. Info, 865-7211. Fletcher Free Library in Burlington.

DICK BRUNELLE: Exhibition of new abstract paintings and watercolors by the Vermont artist. Through December 31. Info, 316-4265. Firebird Café in Essex Junction.

‘NIGHTMARE APOLLO: ADVENTURES IN ASIA’: New photographs from southern Japan and other destinations in Asia by Robin Katrick. Through December 31. Info, 660-9005. Dostie Bros. Frame Shop in Burlington.

HARALD AKSDAL: “Art of Words,” an exhibition of original watercolor and ink illustrations for three books, as well as new landscapes and framed prints. Through December 27. Info, 899-3211. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery in Jericho.

‘PROJECTING WEST’: Mike Ackerman and Craig Winslow share work from their Portland-toPortland road trip, in which they created daily light-based installations. Through December 4. Info, 207-671-1016. Center for Communication and Creative Media in Burlington.

f LINDA DI SANTE: “The Nature of Things,” works in watercolor, graphite, and pen and ink by the Vermont artist. Reception: Sunday, December 6, 2-4 p.m. Through February 28. Info, 985-8222. Shelburne Vineyard.

VERMONT PHOTO GROUP: Eight photographers exhibit images of landscapes, nature and animals on media including aluminum and cotton rag paper. Through December 28. Info, 434-5503. New Moon Café in Burlington. ‘VISUALIZATIONS IN THE SCIENCES’: Images of scientific information in a variety of formats created by UVM faculty and students. Through December 17. Info, 656-4636. Davis Center, UVM, in Burlington.

• • • •

Receptions and events Weekly picks for exhibits “Movies You Missed” by Margot Harrison News, profiles and reviews

sevendaysvt.com/RevIeW

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Jaime Laredo Music Director

Anthony Princiotti, conductor

vso.org

MILTON ARTISTS GUILD: Twenty artists share photographs that represent meaningful passageways in life. Through February 5. Info, lstech@comcast.net. Milton Municipal Building. ‘PASSAGES’: A group exhibition featuring work by Bonnie Acker, Miriam Adams, Elizabeth Allen, Annelein Beukenkamp, Kevin Fahey, Byron Geigel, Kate Longmaid, David Maille, Janet McKenzie, Virginia McNeice, Gail Salzman, Dianne Shullenberger, David Smith, Adelaide Murphy Tyrol, Shaio-Ping Wang and Jon Young. Through January 30. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne.

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‘SHADES OF RED’: Works by more than 30 Vermont artists, including photography, painting, stained glass and collage. Through December 31. Jericho Town Hall.

Concert Sponsors

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Flynn Center for the Performing Arts Burlington

SCHUBERT Mass No. 2 in G Major

‘VISIONS OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN AND BEYOND’: Local landscape paintings by Carolyn Walton, Helen Nagel and Gail Bessette; pastels by Athenia Schinto and Betty Ball; and jewelry by Tineke Russell. Through December 30. Info, 985-8223. Luxton-Jones Gallery in Shelburne.

BARRE/MONTPELIER SHOWS

Saturday

SEVEN DAYS

TRINE WILSON: “Sand Wash Basin Wild Horses,” photographs taken in northwestern Colorado. Through January 31. Info, 355-4834. The Swingin’ Pinwheel Café & Bakery in Burlington.

Plan your visual art adventures with the Seven Days Friday email bulletin including:

12.02.15-12.09.15

TOM CULLINS: “A Creative Life,” retrospective of the work and legacy of the Burlington architect and fourth-generation Vermonter. Through January 16. Info, 865-7166. Burlington City Arts.

VERMONT

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

KAREN DAWSON: The winter 2015 featured artist presents new work. Through February 28. Info, 264-8191. Community Health Center of Burlington.

‘TIME & SPACE’: Work from 13 art educators presenting under the banner Art Educators Unite. Through December 11. Info, 656-4200. Living/ Learning Center, UVM in Burlington.

art

chittenden county

‘BIRDS OF A FEATHER’: An exhibition exploring the illusory and deadly beauty of American wildfowl decoys, featuring models of 13 different bird species. Through May 1. ‘EYES ON THE LAND’: Installations, sculpture, paintings and photographs by 13 artists who were matched with 15 farms and forests conserved by the Vermont Land Trust over one year’s time. Artists include painters Mark Nielsen, Cameron Davis, Bonnie Acker, Charlie Hunter, Susan Abbott and Neil Riley; sculptors and multimedia artists Brian D. Collier, Dan Snow, Karolina Kawiaka and Gowri Savoor; and photographers Tyler Wilkinson-Ray, John Willis and Caleb Kenna. Through January 3. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum.

f JEAN CHEROUNY: “Fresh Daily,” new works from the Ripton painter. Reception: Friday, December 4, 5-8 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 658-6016. Speeder & Earl’s Coffee (Pine Street) in Burlington.

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art CHITTENDEN COUNTY SHOWS

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barre/montpelier

f ALMUTH PALINKAS AND JEANNE CARIATI: “Interface,” alabaster sculptures and works in fiber and watercolor. Art Walk Reception: Friday, December 4, 4-7 p.m. Photo ID required for entry. Through December 31. Info, 828-0749. Governor’s Gallery in Montpelier. ‘ANIMAL’ PHOTO RETROSPECTIVE: Photographs from the dance-based interdisciplinary project directed by Montpelier dancer/choreographer Hanna Satterlee. Through December 23. Info, 223-4712. Contemporary Dance and Fitness Studio in Montpelier.

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‘CELEBRATE!’: A 15-year anniversary celebration of local arts featuring a wide variety of fine art and crafts by SPA member artists. Through December 31. Info, 479-7069. Studio Place Arts in Barre. CHARLES FISH: “Blue Ribbons & Burlesque,” photographs taken at Vermont country fairs. Through July 1. Info, 479-8519. Vermont History Museum in Montpelier.

f JONATHAN VANTASSEL: “Wemosphere,” new abstract oil paintings by the Vermont artist. Art Walk Reception: Friday, December 4, 4-7 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 828-5657. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier. MEMBER ART SHOW: First annual MSAC member art show, featuring work including photographs, pastels and watercolors from more than a dozen artists. Through December 31. Info, 262-6284. Montpelier Senior Activity Center.

NORTHFIELD ARTISTS HOLIDAY ART SHOW & SALE: Nine area artists offering paintings, fiber art, wood carvings, reed work, ceramics, photography 12/1/15 10:15 AMand other creative gift ideas. Through December 12. Info, 485-8387. Gray Building in Northfield.

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f ART RESOURCE ASSOCIATION MEMBERS SHOW: The artist group celebrates its 40th year. Reception: Friday, December 4, 4-8 p.m. Through January 2. Info, aggiesmee@tds.net. City Center in Montpelier.

Powersport Donation Days December 5, 3 – 5 pm December 6, 10 am – 2 pm 298 James Brown Dr., Williston Snowmobiles • Jet Skis Motorcycles & Mopeds ATVs & UTVs • Boats (with trailers) Golf Carts • Scooters (And of course, you can donate your car, truck or van!)

877.GIVE.AUTO

‘Time and Space’ A show title with the words “time” and “space” might suggest that the artwork plumbs the never-fail subject matter of the universe’s

vastness. Maybe it’s trippy, or experimental. In this case, though, the topic is much more down-to-earth. Thirteen female art educators have come together under the banner Art Educators Unite to share in the struggle of finding time and space to make their own art. Exhibiting as a group seems to be working: AEU, whose numbers fluctuate, has shown at the SEABA Center, VCAM, Flynndog and Fletcher Free Library since it began in 2012, and it shows no sign of slowing down. “Time and Space” is on view at the University of Vermont’s Living/Learning Center through December 11. Pictured: detail of “Letter

f ‘OUTSIDER ART INSIDE’: Works from nine

Game Diptych,” a mixed-media work by Dodi Gomez.

PHYLLIS CHASE: “Life in Vermont,” oil paintings and framed limited-edition prints by the Montpelierbased artist. Through December 15. Info, 223-7800. The Green Bean Art Gallery at Capitol Grounds in Montpelier.

KATHARENA RENTUMIS: “Starting Lines,” paintings and works on paper from the VSC staff artist-inresidence. Through December 4. Info, 635-2727, ext. 223. Vermont Studio Center in Johnson.

self-taught artists associated with Grass Roots Art and Community Effort. Reception: Friday, December 4, 4-7 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier.

‘WOMEN OF NORWICH: TRAILBLAZERS AND TORCHBEARERS’: Photographs, documents, uniforms and objects celebrating the women who were “first,” from the first ladies of university presidents to the first women in the Corps of Cadets and so-called nontraditional fields. Through December 31. Info, 485-2183. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University, in Northfield.

stowe/smuggs area

‘2015 LEGACY COLLECTION’: Landscapes painted by 25 living and 13 now-deceased artists that reflect the legacy of museum namesakes and artists Alden and Mary Bryan. ‘GEMS’: An exhibition of 135 small-format works by gallery members. Through December 30. Info, 644-5100. Bryan Memorial Gallery in Jeffersonville. GABRIEL TEMPESTA: “Our World, Charcoals & Casein,” highly detailed paintings rendered from photos of the natural world. Through December 31. Info, 253-8943. Upstairs at West Branch Gallery in Stowe.

KATHRYN LIEN: “This Is Where We Live Now,” drawings and sculptures from the VSC staff artist’s experiment in constructing a temporary space. Through December 4. Info, 635-2727, ext. 223. Vermont Studio Center Gallery II in Johnson. RIVER ARTS PHOTO CO-OP: Images from 18 dedicated participants of the monthly photographers’ meetup. Through January 4. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville. TOD GUNTER AVIATION ART: Illustrations currently include the F4U Corsair, a WWII fighter and the F-4 Phantom II, a fighter-bomber active in Vietnam. More drawings and renderings are continually added. Through December 31. Info, 734-9971. Plane Profiles Gallery in Stowe.

mad river valley/waterbury

f HOLIDAY GROUP EXHIBITION: Vermont artists Jason Boyd, Hope Burgoyne, Kate Cahill-Vansuch, Marilyn Gillis, Gloria Lynn, Shannon Morrison, Gerald Stoner and Sarah-Lee Terrat exhibit works in a variety of mediums. Reception: Friday, December 4, 6-8 p.m. Through January 16. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frameshop in Waterbury.

middlebury area

‘CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS’: Artworks and crafts by more than 45 artists working in wood, fiber, ceramics and glass; hundreds of items priced under $50. Through December 31. Info, 877-3850. Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes. ‘FROM FARM TO FEAST’: Art, craft and photography by 22 local artists celebrating Vermont agriculture. Through December 31. Info, 388-1436. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, in Middlebury.

f GREG BERNHARDT AND HANNAH SESSIONS: “Our Song,” landscape and farm-life paintings by the married artists. Reception: Saturday, December 5, 4-6 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 458-0098. Edgewater Gallery, Mill Street, in Middlebury. MODEL TRAINS: Annual three-level model train diorama, running against a backdrop of the Green Mountains, painted by local artist Gail Braiysted. Through January 9. WARREN KIMBLE: “AllAmerican Artist: An Eclectic Retrospective,” works by the internationally known Brandon artist, along with works from his own folk art collection. Through December 31. Info, 388-2117. Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History in Middlebury.

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84 ART

VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

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ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY RACHEL ELIZABETH JONES AND PAMELA POLSTON. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

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ART SHOWS

‘NAKED TRUTH: THE BODY IN EARLY 20THCENTURY GERMAN AND AUSTRIAN ART’: Prints, drawings and watercolors by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, Otto Dix, George Grosz, Max Beckmann, Käthe Kollwitz and others whose work addressed the relationship of the nude body and contemporary morality. Through December 13. Info, 443-3168. Middlebury College Museum of Art. ‘PORTRAIT OF A FOREST: MEN AND MACHINE’: Contemporary images from Weybridge photojournalist George Bellerose presented alongside archival material from the logging industry. Through January 9. Info, 388-4964. Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury.

rutland area

f ‘THE ART OF GIVING -:- THE GIVING OF ART’: Art enthusiasts can shop from a selection of handcrafted, one-of-a-kind artwork, jewelry and other gifts. Reception: Saturday, December 5, noon-5 p.m. Through January 9. Info, 247-4295. Compass Music and Arts Center in Brandon. ‘FINE ART GIFTS FOR HOLIDAY GIVING’: Exhibition and sale of affordable artwork by guild members. Through December 29. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild. HOLIDAY BOUTIQUE: Annual event offering visitors a variety of unique handmade gifts. Through December 19. Info, 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center in Rutland.

champlain islands/northwest

f DECEMBER FEATURED ARTISTS: Work by photographers Cassy and Frank McDonough and painters Natalie LaRocque-Bouchard, Pat Murphy and Martha Ohliger. Reception: Sunday, December 6, 1-3 p.m. Through December 31. Info, 933-6403. Artist in Residence Cooperative Gallery in Enosburg Falls.

upper valley

COLLECTIVE FALL SHOW: Hooked rugs by Janet Avery, jewelry by metalsmith Susan Riach, ornaments and whistles by Mary Stone and hand-molded beeswax candles by Vermont Honey Lights. Through December 31. Info, 457-1298. Collective — the Art of Craft in Woodstock.

REBECCA LEVI: “Queering the Lines,” embroidery works from the Brooklyn artist that subvert traditional assumptions of handicraft and gender normativity. Through December 2. Info, 356-2776. Main Street Museum in White River Junction. ‘SMALL WORKS’: An exhibit of small works presented for sale during the holiday season. Through December 19. Info, 457-3500. ArtisTree Gallery in South Pomfret.

TOM SCHULTEN: Vivid works by the renowned Dutch painter of consensusism. Through December 31. Info, 457-7199. Artemis Global Art in Woodstock.

LISA ESHLEMAN FOSTER: “Ancestors: Going Way Back,” a one-woman show. Through January 23. Info, 334-1966. MAC Center for the Arts Gallery in Newport.

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OTTO: Prints of recent work from “The Book of Wales” by Newport artist Brian McCurley (aka OTTO). Through December 15. Info, 323-7759. The 99 Gallery and Center in Newport. VICTORIA PATRICK ZOLNOSKI: “Altared,” new altarpieces and digital and altered method photographs. Through December 26. Info, 472-9933. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick.

randolph/royalton

‘THE BOWL, A CELEBRATION’: A collection of special and treasured bowls from the Tunbridge community and beyond, each accompanied by a story about its meaning to the owner. Organized by art teacher and potter Stephanie Loeffler, the show marks the establishment of a bowl lending library with pieces from local artists available for checkout. Through December 31. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village.

manchester/bennington

‘CELEBRATING 65 YEARS ‘ON THE HILL’’: The arts center celebrates its 65th year at the Webster Estate with work from its permanent collection, as well as pieces from artist members. Through January 3. Info, 367-1303. Yester House Galleries, Southern Vermont Arts Center, in Manchester.

randolph/royalton

‘HOT HOUSES, WARM CURVES’: Paintings by Anda Dubinskis, photography by Peter Moriarty and painted shoes by Rick Skogsberg. Through December 12. Info, 767-9670. Big Town Gallery in Rochester. MONIQUE VAN DE VEN: “Gleaned Near South Royalton,” ceramics inspired by and incorporating objects found in nature. Through December 5. Info, 763-7094. Royalton Memorial Library in South Royalton.

WINTER’S WARM MUSIC

manchester/bennington

A Celebration of Yuletide

TOM LEYTHAM: “The Other Working Landscape,” watercolors by the artist and architect depicting the remnants of Vermont’s 19th- and 20th-century industrial structures. Through December 31. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 6 AT 2:00PM

outside vermont

CAMILLE HENROT: “Grosse Fatigue,” 13-minute video installation inspired by the concept of the encyclopedia, produced during a residency at the Smithsonian Institute. DANA SCHUTZ: An exhibition highlighting recent works by the influential painter. PATRICK BERNATCHEZ: “Les Temps Inachevés,” collected interdisciplinary works by the Québec artist, including drawings, photographs, film, sound pieces and installation, that together form a singular rumination on time. Through January 10. Info, 514-847-6226. Montréal Museum of Contemporary Art.

OUTSIDE VERMONT SHOWS

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UNIVERSITY CONCERT CHOIR AND CATAMOUNT SINGERS

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ART 85

‘BOXCARS: RAILROAD IMAGERY IN CONTEMPORARY REALISM’: Realist paintings with trains as subject, curated by Charlie Hunter. Through March 12. f ‘DRAWING ON, IN, OUT’: Drawings by Christina de Gennaro, Terry Hauptman, Monique Luchetti, Craig Stockwell, Jane Sutherland and Scott Tulay. Exhibition tour: Sunday, December 6, 2 p.m. Through February 8. ‘SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE WORKING FOREST’: A multidisciplinary examination and celebration of the working forest featuring paintings by Kathleen Kolb, poetry by Verandah Porche and exhibition design by Mark O’Maley. Through January 3. EVAN

GERRY TREVITS: New paintings of the Northeast Kingdom. Through December 7. Info, 525-3366. Parker Pie Co. in West Glover.

SEVEN DAYS

brattleboro area

‘DINOSAUR DISCOVERIES: ANCIENT FOSSILS, NEW IDEAS’: Fossils and models reveal how current thoughts on dinosaur biology have changed since the 1990s. Organized by the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Through December 15. Info, 748-2372. Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium in St. Johnsbury.

12.02.15-12.09.15

‘SPECULATIVE BIOLOGY’: Imaginative works featuring invented animals, with drawings by Luke Eastman and the sci-fi 2314 Cookbook by Adam Blue. Through December 3. Info, 295-0808. Scavenger Gallery in White River Junction.

northeast kingdom

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‘FEATHER & FUR: PORTRAITS OF FIELD, FOREST & FARM’: Portraits celebrating the beauty, intelligence and grace of animals by nine artists. Through April 30. Info, 885-3061. The Great Hall in Springfield.

CORONIS: “Penumbra,” hexagonal forms made with unrefined industrial glass. Through March 12. LINN BRUCE: “Stories in Color,” vibrantly colorful paintings. Through January 3. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center.


ART SHOWS

art OUTSIDE VERMONT SHOWS

‘ANIMAL’ Photo Retrospective

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‘COLLECTING AND SHARING: TREVOR FAIRBROTHER, JOHN T. KIRK AND THE HOOD MUSEUM OF ART’: Almost 140 paintings, drawings, photographs, sculptures and early American furniture from the Fairbrother-Kirk collection and the museum, featuring works by Andy Warhol, Marsden Hartley, Carl Andre, John O’Reilly, John Singer Sargent and others. CANALETTO’S VEDUTE PRINTS: An exhibition honoring collector and donor Adolph Weil, Jr. features etchings from the early 1740s of Venetian scenes by Antonio Canaletto. Through December 6. Info, 603-646-2808. Hood Museum, Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H.

This

debuted

her

April,

Hanna

Satterlee

two-years-in-the-making

interdisciplinary dance project “ANIMAL” at Stowe’s Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center. In February 2014, Seven Days described a “draft” of the performance as playing with “flight instinct, pack behavior,

CHRISTIAN WOLFF: “Beginning anew at every ending,” an exhibition highlighting key aspects of the composer’s work — indeterminacy, politics and collaboration — and celebrating his long association with Dartmouth College as a professor. Through December 10. Info, 603-646-2422. BakerBerry Library, Dartmouth College, in Hanover, N.H.

power dynamics and intuitive physical reactions to external stimuli.” Now, viewers can see the choreographic exploration captured in still images, in a photographic

‘GEORGE S. ZIMBEL: A HUMANIST PHOTOGRAPHER’: Images from the collection of the documentary photographer covering 1953 to 1955, which includes his shots of Marilyn Monroe standing over the subway grate during the filming of The Seven Year Itch by director Billy Wilder. Through January 3. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts.

“retrospective” that creates a dialogue between two extremely varied forms of artistic expression: one that is about making motion, and another about arresting it. The

HOLIDAY SALE AND EXHIBITION: Work by artists in a variety of mediums and prices. Through December 24. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H.

images are on view in the Foyer Gallery at the Contemporary Dance and Fitness Studio in Montpelier through December

f ‘STUDENT ASSOCIATION COLLECTS: 20002015’: An exhibition of objects purchased by a group of students under the guidance of faculty. Reception: Thursday, December 3, 4-6 p.m. Through January 24. Info, 518-564-2474. Plattsburgh State Art Museum, N.Y. m

23. Pictured: dancers Isadora Snapp and Chelsea Palin performing in “ANIMAL,” photographed by Jeff Herwood.

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PRESENTS

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Kids ages 5-13 wow the crowd with two-minute acts showcasing their talents. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow for ticket information.

Saturday, December 12 at 12 p.m.

SEVEN DAYS

Higher Ground Ballroom. Kids 6 & under free, $7 in advance, $10 at the door.

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12/1/15 4:39 PM


movies Trumbo ★★★

T

he chief internal enemies of any state are those public officials who betray the trust imposed upon them by the people.” The novelist and screenwriter Dalton Trumbo put millions of words to paper in his highly prolific lifetime, but perhaps none come closer to encapsulating his worldview than those. Certainly none in Jay Roach’s well-intentioned but ill-conceived biopic. “Biopic” is a stretch. What Roach and scripter John McNamara concocted might better be described as a factually iffy chronicle of Trumbo’s life during the roughly 10year period when he was considered an enemy of the state. He was, of course, one of the “Hollywood 10,” blacklisted in 1947 by gossip columnist Hedda Hopper. Seriously. The filmmakers have given history a rewrite. Played as an anti-Semitic hybrid of Liz Smith and a velociraptor by Helen Mirren, the Tinseltown insider is reimagined as a one-woman anti-commie crusade from whom the House Un-American Activities Committee obediently took cues. It’s a reworking of the record that’s not merely inaccurate but misogynistic.

Bryan Cranston continues his effort to leverage the success of “Breaking Bad” into a career on the big screen, a transition that has yielded mixed results. For every hit such as Argo (2012), the actor has missed with a Godzilla (2014). Trumbo features his first run at a leading role in a film. While Cranston brings style and brio to the part, his character rarely achieves threedimensionality. I wish he’d been better served by his writer and director. McNamara and Roach were hardly obvious choices to introduce a new generation to this historical figure, the politically controversial winner of a National Book Award and multiple Oscars. The former has never written a film before. Roach honed his skills on the Meet the Parents franchise. It’s sort of like Michael Bay making a legitimacy grab by adapting Uncle Vanya. The film focuses on the period following Trumbo’s refusal to testify before HUAC. He’s shown doing time, then organizing a secret screenplay factory in his home, keeping himself and his blacklisted pals from the poorhouse by writing cut-rate scripts under pseudonyms for B-movie magnates the

PEN NAME Following his release from prison, the blacklisted writer was forced to use a combination of fronts and pseudonyms to sell his scripts, two of which earned Oscars that he could not accept.

King brothers. Luckily, John Goodman plays Frank King. He’s occasionally able to inject a little life and levity into what is otherwise an overacted sequence of speeches and underground meetings. How meh is this stilted, sanctimonious movie? It actually manages to make Louis CK look dull. The comic shows up as a writer who’s had a lung removed. His sense of humor would appear to have been extracted as well. It’s not quite the fulfillment of the promise he showed in 2013’s American Hustle. Did I mention that the real Trumbo moved his family to Mexico after he got out of jail? And that Diane Lane is squandered in the role of his wife, Cleo? To say she channels June Cleaver in this thankless role would be to overstate its depth and nuance. This is the

88 MOVIES

SEVEN DAYS

12.02.15-12.09.15

SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Brooklyn ★★★★

FAR AND AWAY Ronan tries to decide whether to look back to Ireland or forward to a new life in Crowley’s immigrant story.

low-key courtship of Tony (Emory Cohen), a young plumber who makes Eilis feel special without crowding her, pulls her out of her funk. Crowley offers beautifully composed shots that keep our focus on his lead’s sensitive face. While Ronan is best known for playing prickly, headstrong young girls such as Briony in Atonement, she loses the overt spunkiness here without losing our interest. Eilis is quiet but not passive, each small triumph or embarrassment registering on her

RI C K KI S O N AK

REVIEWS

T

he trailer for Brooklyn leads us to expect a sentimental ride through a golden vision of midcentury New York, laced with gentle humor and benignly familiar ethnic stereotypes — the sweet Irish lass, the earthy Italian love interest. While this adaptation of Colm Toíbín’s 2009 novel is, indeed, the kind of film that justifies the use of adjectives such as “lovely,” it has more grit than its marketing suggests. To start with, the bittersweet melancholy that permeates the narrative isn’t the filmmakers’ nostalgia for a never-really-existed past. Rather, those conflicted emotions belong, as they should, to our protagonist, Eilis (Saoirse Ronan), a young immigrant missing her homeland. Working from a script by novelist Nick Hornby, director John Crowley (Intermission, Boy A) has made a movie you can take Grandma to — and one that might induce Grandma to reminisce about the dark passages and tough choices of her youth. While Eilis’ lilting accent evokes wistful notions of the old country, the world she inhabits is believable, specific and not always kind. A shy young woman who’s largely supported by her working sister (Fiona Glascott) in a dead-end town, Eilis goes to America for one reason: economic opportunity. She finds it in a Brooklyn department store, but she’s still painfully homesick, and her glamorous boss’ (Jessica Paré) insistence that she be sparkling and sociable doesn’t help. Only the

sort of movie that explains its subject’s politics to the audience by having him explain them to his young daughter — a device that dumbs things down, to put it mildly. The picture succeeds in reminding us of a shameful chapter in American history but fails to re-create it with any degree of credibility. Virtually all the principals come off as caricatures, the acting is regrettably broad and Roach’s lack of experience with drama is apparent in the film’s tone, which is all over the place. The bottom line: The man who gave us Roman Holiday, Spartacus, The Brave One, Johnny Got His Gun, Exodus, Papillon and dozens of other well-remembered films deserves considerably better cinematic treatment than he receives here.

face; by the end, it’s impossible for us not to root for her. All the performances have a similar livedin feeling. Even characters who come off as insufferable in the trailer, such as Tony’s loud-mouthed, precocious kid brother, turn out to be more nuanced in the film. Jim Broadbent offers uncloying goodness as the priest who sponsored Eilis’ immigration, and even the sassy New York roommates, who mock and frighten Eilis as a group, gradually develop their own personalities, too.

Brooklyn is essentially a study in what home means, and what it takes to detach us from one place and attach us to another. To that end, a third-act twist brings Eilis back to Ireland, where she must make a wrenching decision about where her heart lies. The dilemma is the stuff of thousands of movies, most of them overwrought and tissuedemanding. But the greatest tribute one can pay to Brooklyn is that it doesn’t make the heroine’s choice obvious or the ending predictable. Indeed, the screenplay hints that, with a few small changes in circumstances, Eilis’ fate might have changed, too. This is a film that doesn’t stack the deck or take sides. Crowley’s camera captures both the oceanic hugeness of grief and the trivial, inadequate smallness of wilting flowers scattered on a grave. He finds beauty in the teeming crowds of Coney Island and in the lonely, unspoiled span of Curracloe Beach, where Eilis shows off her new American one-piece to her Irish friends. If Brooklyn is a sentimental journey for some viewers, that’s not because it makes them long for a simpler era, but because it reminds them that there’s never been anything simple about the struggle to find one’s true home in a world as large and cold as the ocean. MARGO T HARRI S O N


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Spectre

NEW IN THEATERS KRAMPUS: Tired of saccharine Santa-themed movies? Already saying, “Bah, humbug”? Then you may be the target audience of this scare comedy, in which a kid accidentally summons a Christmas demon for ho-ho-horror. With Adam Scott, Toni Collette and David Koechner. Michael Dougherty (Trick ’r Treat) directed. (98 min, PG-13. Essex, Majestic, Palace) THE LETTERS: Based on a series of letters written by Mother Teresa (Juliet Stevenson), this biopic explores her faith, her doubts and the case for her sainthood. With Rutger Hauer and Max von Sydow. William Riead wrote and directed. (114 min, PG. Roxy)

NOW PLAYING BRIDGE OF SPIESHHHHH An ordinary American lawyer (Tom Hanks) finds himself playing a key role in a prisoner exchange between the CIA and KGB in this Cold War drama directed by Steven Spielberg and coscripted by Ethan and Joel Coen. With Mark Rylance and Alan Alda. (142 min, PG-13) BROOKLYNHHHH In the 1950s, a shy Irish immigrant to the U.S. (Saoirse Ronan) finds herself choosing between two paths, in this drama from director John Crowley (Intermission), from a script by Nick Hornby. With Emory Cohen, Domhnall Gleeson and Jim Broadbent. (111 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 12/2)

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY — PART 2HHH1/2 The dystopian saga concludes, as Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence) and the rebels prepare to bring down the tyrannical Capitol. With Josh Hutcherson, Julianne Moore and Natalie Dormer. Francis Lawrence again directed. (137 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 11/25)

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets

12/1/15 1:39 PM

THE NIGHT BEFOREHHH Riffing on influences as opposite as a popular Christmas poem and The Hangover, this yuletide ride follows three childhood friends (Seth Rogen, Joseph GordonLevitt and Anthony Mackie) on a wild search for an epic X-mas party. With Lizzy Caplan, Ilana Glazer and Miley Cyrus, and directed by Jonathan Levine (50/50). (101 min, R) THE PEANUTS MOVIEHHH1/2 Charles M. Schulz’s beloved comic-strip characters have been updated with computer animation and Top 40 pop by Steve Martino, the director of Ice Age: Continental Drift — not that the target audience of kids is likely to mind. With the voices of Noah Schnapp, Bill Melendez and Hadley Belle Miller. (93 min, G) ROOMHHHH1/2 Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay are generating Oscar buzz for their respective roles as a mother and child who have been held captive in a garden shed for the son’s entire life. Written by Emma Donoghue, based on her award-winning 2010 novel. Lenny Abrahamson (Frank) directed. (118 min, R) SECRET IN THEIR EYESHH1/2 Julia Roberts, Nicole Kidman and Chiwetel Ejiofor star in a Hollywoodized remake of a 2009 Argentinian murder thriller. In it, an FBI agent hopes to bring closure to his team 13 years after the unspeakable death of a teenage girl tears it apart. Screenwriter Billy Ray (Captain Phillips) also directed. (111 min, PG-13) SPECTREHHHH Daniel Craig returns as James Bond, now on the trail of the sinister organization of the title, which has resurfaced from his past. Ralph Fiennes takes over as M, still beleaguered; Sam Mendes again directs. With Christoph Waltz, Ben Whishaw, Monica Bellucci and Léa Seydoux. (148 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 11/11) SPOTLIGHTHHHHH Michael Keaton, Mark Ruffalo, Rachel McAdams and Stanley Tucci are among the all-star cast of this gripping drama about the Boston Globe’s Pulitzer Prize-winning investigation into the Catholic sex-abuse scandals uncovered in the early aughts. Tom McCarthy (The Visitor) directed and cowrote. (128 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 11/25) SUFFRAGETTEHHH Carey Mulligan plays a working-class wife who finds herself becoming involved in the fight to give Englishwomen the vote in this historical drama directed by Sarah Gavron (Brick Lane). With Anne-Marie Duff, Helena Bonham Carter and Meryl Streep. (106 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 11/11) NOW PLAYING

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MOVIES 89

RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

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THE MARTIANHHHH Stranded on Mars, the last member of a manned mission (Matt Damon) must survive, contact NASA and help engineer his own rescue in this sci-fi adventure directed by Ridley Scott and based on the science-savvy novel by Andy Weir. With Jessica Chastain, Kristen Wiig and Jeff Daniels. (141 min, PG-13)

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THE GOOD DINOSAURHHH1/2 The latest family animation from Pixar imagines an alternate Earth where dinosaurs survived into the era of people — and one especially cute ’saurus makes a young human friend. With the voices of Jeffrey Wright, Frances McDormand and Marcus Scribner. Peter Sohn cowrote and directed. (100 min, PG)

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CREEDHHHH The Rocky franchise gets a new lease on life in this boxing drama in which an aging Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone) trains the son of his one-time arch-rival, Apollo Creed (Michael B. Jordan). Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station) directed. (132 min, PG-13)

LOVE THE COOPERSH1/2 In this rather early holiday comedy, four generations of one family hash out their issues on Christmas Eve. With Olivia Wilde, Amanda Seyfried, Marisa Tomei and Diane Keaton. Jessie Nelson (I Am Sam) directed. (118 min, PG-13)


movies

LOCALtheaters

(*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

MARQUIS THEATRE Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 The Good Dinosaur The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 friday 4 — thursday 10 Schedule not available at press time

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMA

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 Brooklyn The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 Spectre Spotlight Suffragette Trumbo friday 4 — thursday 10 Brooklyn The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 *The Letters Spectre Spotlight Suffragette Trumbo

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12.02.15-12.09.15

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 8645610, palace9.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3

BIG PICTURE THEATER

48 Carroll Rd. (off Rte. 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

wednesday 2 — thursday 10 Schedule not available at press time.

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4 Rte. 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 10 Creed The Good Dinosaur The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 The Night Before The Peanuts Movie (Sat & Sun only)

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE 90 MOVIES

PALACE 9 CINEMAS

93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 Creed The Hunger Games:

Mockingjay — Part 2 The Night Before The Peanuts Movie (2D & 3D) Spectre Victor Frankenstein friday 4 — thursday 10 Creed The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 The Peanuts Movie (2D & 3D) Secret in Their Eyes Spectre Victor Frankenstein (Fri & Sat only)

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

21 Essex Way, #300, Essex, 879-6543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 Creed The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 Love the Coopers The Night Before The Peanuts Movie

Secret in Their Eyes Spectre Victor Frankenstein friday 4 — thursday 10 Creed The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 *Krampus Love the Coopers The Night Before The Peanuts Movie Secret in Their Eyes Spectre Victor Frankenstein

MAJESTIC 10

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 Creed The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 Love the Coopers The Martian

The Night Before The Peanuts Movie Secret in Their Eyes Spectre Victor Frankenstein friday 4 — thursday 10 Creed The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 *Krampus Love the Coopers The Martian The Night Before The Peanuts Movie Spectre Victor Frankenstein

Bridge of Spies Creed The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 **Met Opera Live: Lulu (Thu only) The Night Before The Peanuts Movie **Rifftrax Live: Santa and the Ice Cream Bunny (Thu only) Secret in Their Eyes Spectre Victor Frankenstein friday 4 — thursday 10 **Bolshoi Ballet: The Lady of the Camellias (Sun only) Bridge of Spies Creed The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) **Home Alone 25th Anniversary (Wed only) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 *Krampus

**National Theatre Live: Jane Eyre (Tue only) The Night Before The Peanuts Movie Spectre Victor Frankenstein

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

241 North Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 10 The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0509, savoytheater.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 Room Suffragette friday 4 — thursday 10 Spotlight Trumbo

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678. stowecinema.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 3 The Good Dinosaur (2D & 3D) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 Spectre friday 4 — thursday 10 Schedule not available at press time

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 8621800. sunsetdrivein.com

Closed for the season.

WELDEN THEATRE

104 No. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

wednesday 2 — thursday 10 Creed The Good Dinosaur The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 2 The Peanuts Movie (Sat & Sun only)

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NOW ON VIDEO

TRUMBOHH1/2 Bryan Cranston plays Dalton Trumbo, the Hollywood screenwriter who became a prominent victim of blacklisting in the McCarthy era. With Diane Lane and Helen Mirren. Director Jay Roach, known for comedies like Meet the Fockers, takes a more dramatic turn. (124 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 12/2) VICTOR FRANKENSTEINHH In yet another film taking advantage of a classic’s public domain status to “reimagine” it, the titular scientist (James McAvoy) and his noncanonical assistant, Igor (Daniel Radcliffe), attempt to create life from spare parts. Paul McGuigan (Lucky Number Slevin) directed. (109 min, PG-13)

90 MINUTES IN HEAVENH1/2 Hayden Christensen plays a car-crash survivor who claims to have seen heaven during his near-death experience in this drama based on Don Piper’s memoir. With Kate Bosworth and Dwight Yoakam. Michael Polish (The Astronaut Farmer) directed. (121 min, PG-13)

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AMYHHHHH Asif Kapadia’s acclaimed documentary uses both personal and public footage to chronicle the tragically short life of singer Amy Winehouse. (128 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 7/29)

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SKIERS, SNOWBOARDERS & BACKCOUNTRY ENTHUSIASTS

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Film series, events and festivals at venues other than cinemas can be found in the calendar section.

OFFBEAT FLICK OF THE WEEK

Support ret in Downtow Waterbury 46 South Main Street • Waterbury, VT • 882-8595 • Open 7 days • waterburysportsvt.com

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Goodnight Mommy

Offbeat Flick of the Week: We pick an indie, foreign, cultish or just plain odd movie that hits local theaters, DVD or video on demand this week. If you want an alternative to the blockbusters, try this!

WHAT I’M WATCHING This week I'm watching: The Seventh Victim

(And yes, it’s still free.)

SEVEN DAYS

Though directed by Mark Robson, the 1943 thriller The Seventh Victim is better known as the work of its producer, Val Lewton. It turns out that it may well have been Robson's lack of a strong directorial style that ensured him a decades-long career as a Hollywood director.

Flip through your favorite local newspaper on your favorite mobile device.

12.02.15-12.09.15

B Y ETHAN D E SEI FE

Refresh your reading ritual.

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Now on video, this Austrian thriller about a mother, her young sons and some very creepy plastic surgery is "nerveshredding," according to the A.V. Club. (The original title is somehow even creepier: It translates as "I see, I see.") If you're a horror fan who missed this at the Vermont International Film Festival, check it out now.

11/30/15 11:47 AM

One career ago, I was a professor of film studies. I gave that up to move to Vermont and write for Seven Days, but movies will always be my first love. In this feature, published every Saturday on Live Culture, I write about the films I'm currently watching and connect them to film history and art.

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Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

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REAL FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY DECEMBER 3-9

resurrection fantasies come true. Here are some of the possibilities. 1. If you’re brave enough to change your mind and shed some pride, you could retrieve an expired dream from limbo. 2. By stirring up a bit more chutzpah than you usually have at your disposal, you might be able to revive and even restore a forsaken promise. 3. Through an act of grace, it’s possible you will reanimate an ideal that was damaged or abandoned.

Sagittarius (NOV. 22-DEC. 21)

“Like all explorers, we are drawn to discover what’s out there without knowing yet if we have the courage to face it.” Buddhist teacher Pema Chödrön said that, and now I’m telling you. According to my divinations, a new frontier is calling to you. An unprecedented question has awakened. The urge to leave your familiar circle is increasingly tempting. I don’t know if you should surrender to this brewing fascination. I don’t know if you will be able to gather the resources you would require to carry out your quest. What do you think? Will you be able to summon the necessary audacity? Maybe the better inquiry is this: Do you vow to use all your soulful ingenuity to summon the necessary audacity?

TAURUS

(April 20-May 20): I suspect that in the coming days you will have an uncanny power to make at least one of your

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In September

of 1715, a band of Jacobite rebels gathered for a guerrilla attack on Edinburgh Castle in Scotland. Their plan was to scale the walls with rope ladders, aided by a double agent who was disguised as a castle sentry. But the scheme failed before it began. The rope ladders turned out to be too short to serve their intended purpose. The rebels retreated in disarray. Please make sure you’re not like them in the coming weeks, Cancerian. If you want to engage in a strenuous action, an innovative experiment or a bold stroke, be meticulous in your preparations. Don’t scrimp on your props, accoutrements and resources.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you give children

the option of choosing between food that’s mushy and food that’s crunchy, a majority will choose the crunchy stuff. It’s more exciting to their mouths, a more lively texture for their teeth and tongues to play with. This has nothing to do with nutritional value, of course. Soggy oatmeal may foster a kid’s well-being

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your mascot is a

famous white oak in Athens, Ga. It’s called the Tree That Owns Itself. According to legend, it belongs to no person or institution but only to itself. The earth in which it’s planted and the land around it are also its sole possession. With this icon as your inspiration, I invite you to enhance and celebrate your sovereignty during the next seven months. What actions will enable you to own yourself more thoroughly? How can you boost your autonomy and become, more than ever before, the boss of you? It’s prime time to expedite this effort.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Police in Los Angeles conducted an experiment on a 10-mile span of freeway. Drivers in three unmarked cars raced along as fast as they could while remaining in the same lane. The driver of the fourth car not only moved at top speed, but also changed lanes and jockeyed for position. Can you guess the results? The car that weaved in and out of the traffic flow arrived just slightly ahead of the other three. Apply this lesson to your activities in the coming week, please. There will be virtually no advantage to indulging in frenetic, erratic, breakneck exertion. Be steady and smooth and straightforward. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You will gener-

ate lucky anomalies and helpful flukes if you use shortcuts, flee from boredom and work smarter rather than harder. On the other hand, you’ll drum up wearisome weirdness and fruitless flukes if you meander all over the place, lose yourself in far-off fantasies and act as if you have all the time in the world. Be brisk and concise, Scorpio. Avoid loafing and vacillating. Associate with bubbly activators who make you laugh and loosen your iron grip. It’s a favorable time to polish off a lot of practical details with a light touch.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Once I witnessed a windstorm so severe that two 100-year-old trees were uprooted on the spot,” Mary Ruefle wrote in her book Madness, Rack and Honey. “The next day, walking among the wreckage, I found the friable nests of birds, completely intact and unharmed on the ground.” I think that’s a paradox you’d be wise to keep in mind, Capricorn. In the coming weeks, what’s most delicate and vulnerable about you will have more staying power than what’s massive and fixed. Trust your grace and tenderness more than your fierceness and forcefulness. They will make you as smart as you need to be. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aztec king

Montezuma II quenched his daily thirst with one specific beverage. He rarely drank anything else. It was ground cocoa beans mixed with chili peppers, water, vanilla and annatto. Spiced chocolate? You could call it that. The frothy brew was often served to him in golden goblets, each of which he used once and then hurled from his royal balcony into the lake below. He regarded this elixir as an aphrodisiac and liked to quaff a few flagons before heading off to his harem. I bring this up, Aquarius, because the coming weeks will be one of those exceptional times when you have a poetic license to be almost Montezumalike. What’s your personal equivalent of his primal chocolate, golden goblets and harem?

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Unfortunately,

I’m pretty lucky,” my friend Rico said to me recently. He meant that his relentless good fortune constantly threatens to undermine his ambition. How can he be motivated to try harder and grow smarter and get stronger if life is always showering him with blessings? He almost wishes he could suffer more so that he would have more angst to push against. I hope you won’t fall under the spell of that twisted logic in the coming weeks, Pisces. This is a phase of your cycle when you’re likely to be the beneficiary of an extra-strong flow of help and serendipity. Please say this affirmation as often as necessary: “Fortunately, I’m pretty lucky.”

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Charm is a way of getting the answer ‘yes’ without having asked any clear question,” wrote French author Albert Camus. I have rarely seen you better poised than you are now to embody and capitalize on this definition of “charm,” Aries. That’s good news, right? Well, mostly. But there are two caveats. First, wield your mojo as responsibly as you can. Infuse your bewitching allure with integrity. Second, be precise about what it is you want to achieve — even if you don’t come right out and tell everyone what it is. Resist the temptation to throw your charm around haphazardly.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): To the other 11 signs of the zodiac, the Way of the Gemini sometimes seems rife with paradox and contradiction. Many non-Geminis would feel paralyzed if they had to live in the midst of so much hubbub. But when you are at your best, you thrive in the web of riddles. In fact, your willingness to abide there is often what generates your special magic. Your breakthroughs are made possible by your high tolerance for uncertainty. How many times have I seen a Gemini who has been lost in indecision but then suddenly erupts with a burst of crackling insights? This is the kind of subtle miracle I expect to happen soon.

better than crispy potato chips. Let’s apply this lesson to the way you feed your inner child in the coming weeks. Metaphorically speaking, I suggest you serve that precious part of you the kind of sustenance that’s both crunchy and healthy. In other words, make sure that what’s wholesome is also fun, and vice versa.

CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES: REALASTROLOGY.COM OR 1-877-873-4888

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PREFER A COUNTRY ROAD I am 5’4 with long silver hair and curves in all the right places. I love the woods, my deck, a glass of wine, roaring fires, sci-fi and horror movies from the ‘50s, out-of-the-way places. Someone who has time to do things. I am affectionate and loving. Once in a while I may even surprise you. autumn10, 61, l COUNTRY FARM GAL Honest, sincere woman. Looking to find that in a man. I enjoy crafting, cooking, refinishing antiques. Looking for passionate, caring, honest man. glad2bhome, 58 SEDUCTIVE WOMAN LOOKING FOR FWB Well, hi. This is very new to me. Um, would describe myself as positive, funny, smart, very caring. Also love to explore sexually, given the right person. I love gardening, reading and horses, as well as cooking and baking. Guess that’s it. bellrosa775, 46, l SUTTONELSE Adventurous: like to travel and explore anywhere. Music lover: R&B, R&R, country, funk, dancing. Creative: like to work with my hands and mind. Looking for an easygoing, smart, creative comrade who can communicate with a good sense of humor. suttonelse, 64, l CREATIVE, FUN ALPACA MAMA I am a kind, creative, sensitive, loving woman who is intelligent and compassionate. I have many passions in life, but one of my greatest is my love of animals (particularly my own!). Spending time in nature is paramount for me, as is my connection with the divine. I would love to find a partner who is kind, spiritual and creative. alpacamomma, 65, l NATIVE VERMONTER WHO LOVES LIFE I am comfortable in my own skin yet always seeking to improve. I can be serious and compassionate but love to laugh and have fun. I think I have a good sense of humor. I have many friends and keep active. I enjoy traveling, whether it be a cruise, a road trip or a trip to a foreign country. Gram1938, 77, l

CARPE DIEM! LET’S DO SOMETHING. Retired. Comfy in my skin. Adventurous. Prefer to ski; also kayak, hike, bike, dance. Perfect evening: dinner with my special lady, sitting in front of the fire, a glass of wine, good music, cuddle and then... Summer: campfires, night kayaking, night swims, friends and family. Looking for that special lady to share the autumn of my life with. Retired, few extra pounds, bald, goatee. oneoldtimer, 65, l FRIENDLY I consider myself an honest and kind person. I love to travel and explore new places. Exercise is important to me, as well as eating and cooking great food. Humor and laughter feed my soul. Win158, 67, l NO, STOP, DON’T Bearded, dirty tree-man seeking unromantic ground and pound. 30-plus MILF preferred. HardwoodSoftheart, 28 CHAMPLAIN SEEKING HIS BELLE Well-traveled, interesting guy — somewhat intelligent, multilingual, romantic, open-minded, sense of humor, respectful, honest and good listener, who detests arguments. Some interests are hiking, bicycling, writing, crosscountry skiing, snowshoeing, antiques, travel, theater, comedy clubs, museums and the arts in general. Looking for his in-shape Cinderella to enjoy sun-filled days and to be there for the rainstorm days. —G. HOLlande126D, 62 LAID-BACK, CHILL TRAVELER I am looking for someone with passion, a great smile and a positive attitude who doesn’t take life or themselves too seriously. bski, 34 SIMPLE MAN FOR SOMETHING FUNCTIONAL Looking for somebody who I want to be around. Somebody sarcastic, witty, sweet, caring and, of course, goodlooking. I’m a country guy. I live a pretty simple life. I’m a pretty big guy with a big beard and a big heart. I’m as single as they get and looking for somebody to change that. jalden64, 28, l TRANSMASCULINE SUB LOOKING FOR DOM/ME Young, curvy transmasculine sub looking for the right circumstances to find themselves in the hands of a smart, consent-aware dom/me. I want to learn from your hard or soft hand and be your transmasc pup. ;) Under the right circumstances, this pup will do lots for you. Young, amateur but eager and willing to learn. transsub, 19 LISTEN TO THE MUSIC A night in or a night on the town both work for me. I’m looking forward to traveling locally and globally. The Vermont seasons keep me here, and both coasts call to me, too. I love to cook, preferably good local food. I love music, and I play guitar in a couple of bands. Life is good! biff, 59, l FAUTE DE MIEUX Seeking Clio, Thalia, Terpsichore, Erato. Am familiar with, “Great minds think alike,” “Idiots seldom differ,” “Brevity is the soul of lingerie.” Order, family, genus, species. And finally, the idea that some circumstantial evidence is very strong, as when you find a trout in the milk. Bikerider, 60

I GOT SPIED I sing music at the bar. I play guitar and sing the I-Spys to the people. ispysinger, 25 LOOKING FOR GAL WITH STRONG INTEREST OR EXPERTISE Because this generally guarantees straightforwardness and stability in a person, and some autonomy. As for me, have high leisure budget but am disinterested in possessions. Sports: snowboarding, skiing, snorkeling, diving, climbing, hiking, meditation (but no group affiliation), music, art. Longest relationships were with geeky women, but your interest area could be anything, as long as it is strong — i.e., not a casual interest. activeintellectual, 50 TODAY IS A NEW DAY I am looking for someone to grow and learn with. I am outgoing, strong, grounded with a good job. Love meeting new people, and my family always comes first. summerrider, 29 SOLID, STRONG VERMONT MAN Widower, good-looking. Peace and love, nature and quiet. Gardener, craftsman/artist type, skating, quality food, live performance, my girl dogs, UVM hockey supporter, good snuggler. Have tools and skills. Know how to take care of a woman and treat her right. You’re smart, trim, maintained and similar. Probably drive a Subaru and likely have a dog. 14thstate, 60 JUST AN ORDINARY, AVERAGE GUY Quoting Joe Walsh, “I’m just an ordinary, average guy.” OK, not entirely true, but I’m not egocentric to think I’m extraordinary. I have a professional work background, own my own business, enjoy playing ice hockey (a lot), love international travel, own my own home, love my kids and family, love my pets, and enjoy being outside/active, emotionally intelligent, secure and goofy. babooski, 48, l PROFESSIONAL MINGLER I’m here to find an exceptional woman with a positive attitude and a passion for adventure. sailon, 48 ACTIVE REDHEAD I work at a local mental health agency. When I’m not working, I enjoy all the stereotypical Vermont things, like hiking, running, skiing and generally being outside. I like to be pretty active and play soccer during the week and am currently on a broomball team (which is super fun). SkiVT85, 30, l THAT’S LIFE A brief perspective of myself would include professional, respectful, caring, intelligent, attractive, unique background, easygoing, sense of humor, love to have fun. Let’s begin with a cup of coffee and take it from there. Like to know your dreams, ambitions and what you have done so far in life. Let’s share. Hightreesandhightides, 64 HEADY, LOYAL, CHIC Where to begin, without revealing too much so there’s room for getting to know one another? I just moved to northern Vermont from northeastern Connecticut. I do work. I’m definitely an outdoors guy. I go camping and to a lot of music concerts and festivals. I’m a deadhead and a tour kid. I love traveling. Hit me up, ladies. ShoesMagoo, 37, l


For groups, BDSM, and kink:

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HOO RAW I seek friendship that can be coupled with some NSA hot sex. I love hiking, art, poetry, cats and beer. I am very laid-back and easy to hang with. I have piercings, tattoos and long legs. I do not wear makeup or shave, so if you’re not into a raw woman, I am not for you. CuriousFarmer, 23, l THUNDER CLAP Ass(cheeks) like flounders. Sexrinkle545, 43, l I YEARN TO PLAY Adventurous, beautiful, blue-eyed woman. fitfoodie34, 34, l THREE FOR ME, PLEASE! I am an outgoing girl who loves sex — but safe sex! I work hard but love to play harder. ;) I love to dress up in my tight pants and boots and dance and flirt. ;) If you think you’d like to play with me, send me a message and a good picture of what makes me love men so much! toriperri69, 45, l SEEKING SMILES I am educated and employed with a dynamic life at baseline. Looking for exciting, pleasurable, safe and discreet fun. Let’s do something we can giggle about later. Seitanherself, 40, l NONMONOGAMOUS MASOCHIST PRINCESS SEEKING PLAYMATES Bisexual, masochist, non-monogamous bottom with a curious appetite. I’m really into impact play, rope/bondage and the D/s dynamic. I’m looking for friends, FWB for regular meet-ups, or maybe something a little deeper if it feels right. If any of this piques your curiosity, get at me. AliensVsUnicorns, 24, l

waNt to coNNect with you

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69

¢Min 18+

YOUNG, CLEAN AND SEXY ;) Hey, ladies. I’m a good-looking, in-shape college student looking for some fun. Looking for girls around my age, but not opposed to trying stuff with older ladies. Let’s get together and have some fun. ;) csnowboarder202, 22, l

OTHER seeking?

LOOKING FOR FUN AND ADVENTURE We are an attractive, well-established couple in our forties looking to add some fun to our already great sex life. Let’s just say we like to mix it up and have a good time. Male is 6’ and muscular with black hair and blue eyes. Devadventure, 47, l

PROFESSIONAL MALE WITH DEVILISH WAYS Nice, quiet, professional male with devilish way to touch women mentally and physically, making them trust and long for more. Sincerely looking for woman with whom we can truly fulfill her erotic and submissive side. An insatiable appetite is a benefit! No drama in my life. She would be comfortable with me on her arm, if it were to get to that point. MtnAdventures, 52

SEEKING KINKY, TRANS-FRIENDLY CUDDLE-BUDDY/PLAY PARTNER Non-op, non-binary trans femme looking for weekend play partners or cuddle buddies. Open to meet-ups with bisexual women, trans folks or crossdressers for play and, potentially, non-PIV sex. I am a Princess Domme who takes pleasure in inflicting pain while dressed head-to-toe in pink and frills. Clean. Sub-free not required. No alcoholics, men, cheaters or bigots. radfae_lilpup, 24, l

PASSION, ENERGY, FUN :) Well, hi. I am looking for people to have honest, drama-free, physical playtime with. To me, sex and intimacy are an amazing outlet and exchange of energy, and I am looking for likeminded people to share that with. I am DD-free and in excellent physical shape. You too? Let’s meet and see what happens! Passionis, 48, l

COUPLE FOR WOMAN Couple (both 35) looking for a lady to join us. This will be a first for us. Looking for a woman age 21 to 38 with a slender body type. Please be DD-free, as we are. Would like to get to know the right gal first, then see where it leads. elle2728, 35

THICK WOMEN LOVER. WHO’S READY? I am a stocky, muscular black male into all kinds of raunch and different types of women, especially thick women with huge breasts and ass. Looking for discreet, NSA hookups and, optionally, multiple hookups. If you’re down, let’s have some fun! BlackRhinoxxx, 35, l ADVENTURIST I am very sexual. I am willing to try new things. Trying to expand my horizons. Apparently I’m seeing there’s a lot I’ve never done. So hit me up, and we could chat about it. 2loud4u, 38 DIPPING TOES IN BONDAGE WATERS 50-y/o straight professional male with bondage fantasies. I would like to be tied up and also do the tying. I also have a strap-on fantasy. I am new to this and hope to take it somewhat slow. 5’9”, fit and attractive. Who wants to teach me? DuckME65, 50

AMAZING HOOKUP OPPORTUNITY I’m a healthy, passionate, horny man willing to please my mate. I’m clean, in shape, handsome and caring. I’m open to almost anything to excite, please and turn you on. :) RealJamesTower, 47, l LOVE LICKING PUSSY We are looking for the right lady to join us. Between the ages of 25 and 45. We are both very attractive and clean; DD-free. We are real; no games. If you are attractive and take care of yourself, please contact us. Please send a pic with your response. We will send you pics in return. No pics, no response. twofor1, 46, l CONCUPISCENT COUPLE We won’t bite! No, really. :) We are a young, professional couple who would like to mix it up with another lady. You can expect a relaxing, sensual evening with us. We’re newbies but open to learning new things. Let’s meet over drinks and get to know each other. We can host. We are both DD-free and require the same. breadchuckle, 24, l

I want to break up with my boyfriend. We’ve been going out for more than a year, and he’s really great, but not in bed. I just think we can’t make that part happen at all. It’s never been all that good, but I liked him a lot so I tried to deal with it. But I’m so bored, and I think we should just end it. How do I dump him and still be nice about it? I don’t want to hurt him, and I don’t want him to be too mad at me. Help me, please.

Signed,

How to End It Nicely

Dear How to End It Nicely,

I get it. Breaking up is hard to do. But you want it to end, so … end it. It’s not going to be easy or enjoyable, but it’s gotta happen. And dragging it out will just make it harder. It’s time to clock in, get the job done and get outta there. A straightforward, simple approach is best for a drama-free breakup. Call him, invite him over to talk and explain how you feel. Be direct. Don’t beat around the bush. Explain that your feelings or situation have changed and that you need to move on. It’s kind of you to care about how he will feel. And I appreciate that you want to be a standup person and let him down easy, but you can’t worry too much about this. You’re not happy, period. Staying with him just to be nice would cause more damage in the long run. Very often the person being dumped will want to know what went wrong. And can you blame them? They thought things were peachy, and all of a sudden things are not. Your guy might be sad or angry, but he might also be confused and vulnerable. So tread lightly. You can be honest about your feelings without telling him you think he’s crap in bed. No need to rub his face in it. A simple “I’m not feeling this relationship anymore” will suffice. If he presses for more details, answer as honestly and carefully as you can and bring the conversation to a close. There’s not much else to talk about, right? There is a possibility that he’s having similar thoughts and you’re just beating him to the punch. That would be ideal, really. It’s much better to leave the relationship amicably, with both parties ready to say goodbye. But don’t make any assumptions here, and don’t over-apologize. It is what it is. I hope he’s understanding and that you can both move on peacefully.

Good luck,

SEVEN DAYS

ME, YOU AND MY BOYFRIEND Adventurous, silly, clean, loving couple (blue-eyed and bearded 6’5 boy and sexy brunette girl) seeks other girl for flirting, playing, maybe more. I would like to connect with you first before you meet him. Let’s explore and do something you won’t want to stop thinking about tomorrow. diamond_soles, 26, l

Dear Athena,

12.02.15-12.09.15

Athena

Need advice?

You can send your own question to her at askathena@sevendaysvt.com.

PERSONALS 97

NEWBIE LOOKING FOR NEW NEED CLOSET LOVER CONNECTIONS I am married with a frigid partner. Would 1x1c-mediaimpact050813.indd 1 5/3/13 4:40 PM Testing the waters and looking for like to find a single, NSA FWB. Someone new experiences and possibly a FWB to laugh and screw with. Body type is situation. Professional, active, DD-free not important, but attitude is. hops, 40 but open to 420 if you are. Looking for someone close to my age, HWP, TOTALLY QUEER AROUND HERE discreet and willing to take things slow I do not have a car and can never have a unless we really hit it off. LZ3, 31, l license. My eyes are so damaged that no glasses, contacts or surgery could ever COOKING SOMETHING UP correct my acuity to the legal minimum I’m an open book. Just ask. adksub29, 25 (20/40) for driving. I am a lower-leg amputee on the left side. I am now SUMMER OF LOVE learning to walk again using a prosthetic. I’ve been told that in the “real” world I’m Can you dig it? 1stepAtaTime, 35, l pretty and powerful. In the bedroom I’m looking for a handsome man who BI MALE SEEKS BI FEMALE is willing to slowly take all of my power Hi. Seeking a LTR with a bi female for away so that all I want to do is submit adding some fun in life. Very sexual but and worship him. I am a professional very discreet. I’m orally bi but willing and very well-educated. I am clean and to experiment. adventurous_bi, 59 expect the same. meme99, 34, l

SEXY YOUNG FUN Young, adventurous couple seeking young lady to join in NSA play with her for his watching enjoyment. Him: tall, handsome, 7.5” cut, white. Her: petite, 34D, Asian, bisexual. We’re happily married but would like to add some heat. :) Vtcouple3, 27

ASK ATHENA

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MEN seeking?

Your wise counselor in love, lust and life


RADIO BEAN GOOD VIBE GIRL You were sitting by the front door enjoying conversation and great music. Your smile intrigued me, and our glances connected a few times. You had short blond hair. Me: the tall guy who said bye to the guitar player on my way out. Would you like to see some more live music with me and get to know each other? When: Saturday, November 28, 2015. Where: Radio Bean. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913268 SPENCER WITH BLUE HAIR: THANKS! I was yelling on the street around 4:30 p.m. My white SUV died. Wanted to say thank you. I was losing it, and having someone calm stop to help me was grounding. In this current world, folks are not so quick to stop, and I just wanted you to know that your action was appreciated. Happy Thanksgiving! When: Saturday, November 7, 2015. Where: Main St., Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #913267 COWBOYS FAN AT BWW You came and sat at my table for a bit looking at a Cowboys flag. We talked while you were there, and I asked if you were good to get home. You shook my hand, saying you were all set. I didn’t get your name. What was it? Glad I could help you get your flag. When: Sunday, November 22, 2015. Where: Buffalo Wild Wings. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913266 AMERICAN FLATBREAD WAITSFIELD EAVESDROPPER I was with my parents and a friend. You were the youngest (and prettiest) in a group of three or four. Our tables were next to each other in a corner of the restaurant. I noticed you tuning in to our conversation. We shared a few glances, which left me feeling excited to meet you. A hike and/or a beverage sometime? When: Saturday, November 21, 2015. Where: American Flatbread, Waitsfield. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913265 REDHEAD AT HANNAFORD You were a cute redhead wearing green. I didn’t see any ring on your finger. Any chance you are single? When: Saturday, November 21, 2015. Where: Hannaford, St. Albans. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913264

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BACK TO BLACK AT WATERWORKS There I was, zero expectations, when out of nowhere, BAM! You, a super-tall, sugar-faced, stunning beauty in a red dress, smiled at me. I was so in awe of your gorgeousity that I failed to get your number. I might’ve fallen in love with you a little bit. That’s a bit dramatic; still, I’d really like to take you out. When: Friday, November 13, 2015. Where: Winooski. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913261

98 PERSONALS

SEVEN DAYS

SHY SMILE AND A LIP RING You: lip ring, striking eyes, arm tattoos, tall and handsome. Me: pouring you coffee, “even though it was already 11 a.m.,” you said. I enjoyed laughing with you. And your eyes knock me off my feet. I’d love to go on a date. Want to see if there’s anything there? Come say hi again; it would make my day. :) When: Monday, November 16, 2015. Where: that coffee shop. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913262

12.02.15-12.09.15

MONTPELIER MAIN STREET BAR & GRILL 11/18 Loraine and Lisa spied. Nice conversation with you lovely ladies. Felt a little spark with Loraine. Please do respond if you are single and if you felt a spark, too. Enjoyed meeting and having a nice conversation. —Steve. When: Wednesday, November 18, 2015. Where: Main Street Bar and Grill. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913263

TRAINING BARTENDER AT THE GUILD I’m pretty sure that it was your first night working. You referred to me and my friend as gentlemen; we corrected you. You have a beautiful smile and quite the personality, perfectly suited for your job behind the bar. Single? If you are, I’d love to have the chance to get to know you! Dinner sometime? When: Monday, November 16, 2015. Where: the Guild. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913260

i SPY

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CREEPIN’ You are beautiful, smart and funny. Everything about you is amazing. I could listen to you laugh and watch you dance all day. When: Sunday, November 1, 2015. Where: everywhere. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913258 REDHEAD AT THREE PENNY Saw you the past two Friday nights wearing a Sugarbush jacket and a Bruins hat. I noticed you and believe you noticed me, as well. Maybe this Friday will be different, and there will be more than just noticing each other. When: Friday, November 6, 2015. Where: Three Penny Taproom. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913257 SATURDAY EVENING IN CITY MARKET You are stunning. I’ve seen you around before, and I would love a chance to meet you. You wore a turquoise puff, a black-and-white striped skirt, and boots. You put your groceries into a reusable bag and carried out a six-pack of stouts. I wanted to ask you out, but then you were gone. When: Saturday, November 14, 2015. Where: City Market. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913256 IS THAT A FRENCH BRAID? We had just parked our cars by the Ethan Allen Club. You stopped on the steps to wait for someone. You have a great smile. Your hair had some kind of cool braid-wrap thing that was a real jaw-dropper. When I came back later, I left a note on what I think was your car. It said, “You are beautiful.” When: Tuesday, November 10, 2015. Where: College Street. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913255 ZAG OWNER I’ll join the chorus of heartfelt birthday wishes to an unsurpassed, kind soul. Even in your absence, I revere your constant presence. What I would do for a hand-delivered strawberry bread, though. When: Wednesday, July 7, 2010. Where: in a dream. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913254 GIANTS 64 You have been spied more than once. I have flirted with you on another site and can’t seem to get your attention. We both like the Giants, pool, Harley rides and tequila. What more could we both need? We do seem to have a lot in common. When: Thursday, November 12, 2015. Where: Seven Days, here and there. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913253 TO SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 Don’t think too much. Do something. Take action. When: Monday, November 9, 2015. Where: everywhere. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913252 RASPBERRY TWISTED TEA We were both in the Cambridge Village Store today. You were buying a six-pack of Twisted Tea. I’ve seen your picture before on an online dating site. Your picture doesn’t do you justice! I’d love to chat. When: Thursday, November 12, 2015. Where: Cambridge. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913251 BOBCAYGEON You once left me a napkin on New Year’s Eve Wheat Kings and... When: Thursday, November 12, 2015. Where: everywhere. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913250

NURSE “A,” YES, DEFINITELY YOU I didn’t write the last one, but this one is absolutely for you. I enjoyed talking with you tonight, and I think you’re cute. I’d love to get a beer (or a coffee) sometime. I am sure there are easier ways to ask you out, but this seemed more fun. :) Baird RNs, help this find the right girl. When: Wednesday, November 11, 2015. Where: You were trying a new activity where I “sort of” work. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913249 SILVER FOX AT VERMONT FEDERAL It was Monday, maybe Tuesday. Saw you in line at the bank. You have gray hair and hoop earrings. I was the brunette waiting for my friend on the couch, probably wearing black pants and a green jacket. I noticed you. I think you noticed me, too. You’re definitely older than me, but age ain’t nothin’ but a number, right? When: Tuesday, November 3, 2015. Where: Vermont Federal Credit Union. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913248 SCHLITZ HAT I first saw you playing a show this summer. When I saw you again at my work, we exchanged a few words. I have had a ridiculous crush on you since then. Several months later, and I still haven’t worked up the courage to approach you again. When: Sunday, November 8, 2015. Where: Lake Street. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913247 HAPPY TRADER JOE’S EMPLOYEE You twirled around in front of me to grab a shopping basket while I was in the checkout line. Outside you said, “Have a good night, miss,” flashing a killer smile. Drove away wishing I had given you my digits. Collecting shopping carts is secretly my dream job. Thanks for not calling me ma’am. When: Sunday, November 8, 2015. Where: Trader Joe’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913246 BLACK TRUCK SHELBURNE RD. MONDAY Hey handsome, you made my day by smiling and waving while I was chatting with the crossing guard! Have a great week, and if you pass that way again, my regular bus stop is the next street on the left. Do I know you? When: Monday, November 9, 2015. Where: green jacket from Kinney Drug Shelburne Rd.. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913245 SLOANE, RADIO BEAN’S 15TH Your friend’s already-broken zipper was stuck in a bar stool, and I somehow only made it worse. I was too drunk to be properly charming, and relying on random chance isn’t my style (nor is this, but who doesn’t want to be I-Spied?). Let’s get coffee. That voice... When: Saturday, November 7, 2015. Where: Radio Bean. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913244 CAN I BE MORE OBVIOUS? Eight months have passed since we first met. We have a beautiful and meaningful friendship. So I’m kind of nervous to try for something more. But I think it could be really great if we did! I hope I make you feel half as wonderful as you make me feel. P.S. Please don’t call me “dude” anymore. When: Thursday, November 5, 2015. Where: my house, your house, the school, Moog’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913243 B&N CUTIE IN GRAY SWEATER Saw you on Tuesday afternoon. You were wearing a shapely gray sweater and black stockings. I was in a black fleece vest. You caught my eye, and I was hoping we could chat. You were in the used book area. I couldn’t keep my eyes off of you. Maybe we have something in common? Let’s see. When: Wednesday, November 4, 2015. Where: Barnes & Noble. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913242

DAILY PLANET BURGER CHATTER I was glad you asked about my burger. We talked cooking, baking and wind! I wanted to chat more but was pulled away. I really hope to hear from you. :) When: Monday, November 2, 2015. Where: Daily Planet. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913241 ERIN & CO ESSEX JCT. You: tall, dark hair, Under Armour hat and sunglasses, drinking a coffee while waiting for a haircut. Me: pink shirt, gray sweater, blond hair with three children waiting for my son’s haircut. Were you smiling at me? Or my outgoing little girl in her pretty dress? When: Wednesday, November 4, 2015. Where: Erin & Co. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913240 SAMBUCA HOTTIE You sit at the end of the bar every day. “Vodka and sambuca,” you say. When tomorrow comes and you take your seat, I’ll be waiting. Next one’s on me! When: Wednesday, November 4, 2015. Where: tavern. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913239 A SHOT IN THE DARK You were singing in the front row of the Green Mountain Chorus, blue shirt, no ring. Your joy in your skill and your beauty mesmerized me. I couldn’t keep my eyes off of you, but when you came to speak to me after the performance I choked completely and flunked at flirting. Could I have a second chance? When: Sunday, October 4, 2015. Where: Gateway Center, Newport. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913238 COAT TO COVER YOUR BUTT I saw you looking at the men’s down jackets. You were looking for one that covered your butt, and I thought you were really funny and nice! You zipped up the coat I hung on the hanger, and we laughed when I said, “Do you work here?” Looking to find you again. When: Sunday, November 1, 2015. Where: Outdoor Gear Exchange used clothing. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913237 LAST TIME IN MONTRÉAL... Last time we saw each other was in Montréal. We had such a nice time together! But I had to do my thing and go on my own adventure; you know how I am. Just wanted to let you know life is great and I miss you dearly, and I am thinking of you on your birthday, my wonderful bandit weasel friend. When: Monday, June 29, 2015. Where: Montréal. You: Man. Me: Woman. #913236 BEAUTIFUL NATIVE NINJA HIPPIE The last time I saw you in Vermont, I was waiting to meet you on a beautiful day. You walked through the door wrapped in goose down, with a smile that could melt all the snow in Hyde Park. I’ve held onto that goodbye kiss in hopes that our paths would cross again. When: Monday, February 4, 2013. Where: Muddy Waters. You: Woman. Me: Man. #913235

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OFFER EXPIRES 12/16/15

THE NORTH FACE STORE AT KL SPORT 210 College Street Burlington 860-4600

SEVEN DAYS

NOMINATIONS END WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, AT 5.P.M. VOTING ENDS DECEMBER 16, AT 5 P.M.

11/17/15 4:42 PM


2015/2016 S EAS ON

GOLD SPONSORS:

SEASON SPONSORS:

Dec

Dec

Jan

2

20

18

8:00 PM

2 PM/6 PM

7:00 PM

SATURDAY i rand Nutcracker NIGHT BCARLILE r e v Fe The

Albany Berkshire Ballet

WINTER ACOUSTIC TOUR

Jan

Jan

Jan

22

26

29

8:00 PM

7:00 PM

8:00 PM

b o B MARLEY The Comedian

s i v a M 17 SAMURAI STAPLES

2015/16 Season available at: Untitled-32 1

paramountlive.org

30 CENTER ST, RUTLAND, VT 802.775.0903 11/30/15 1:50 PM

Profile for Seven Days

Seven Days, December 2, 2015  

Moving to Keep Parkinson’s at Bay; Vermont Inmates Unhappy With ‘Dead Time’; Holiday Food Shopping in Montréal

Seven Days, December 2, 2015  

Moving to Keep Parkinson’s at Bay; Vermont Inmates Unhappy With ‘Dead Time’; Holiday Food Shopping in Montréal

Profile for 7days