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HIGHER POWER Meet VT’s new Episcopal bishop

V ER MON T’S INDE P ENDE NT V O IC E SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019 VOL.24 NO.50 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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From campus to politics to business, Vermonters use an internet phenom to get the word out BY MARGARET GRAYSON PAGE 2 8

WHALES TALE

PAGE 34

An illuminating Art Hop exhibit

TASTE OF SOMALIA

PAGE 38

Multicultural Kismayo Kitchen

PYROS MANIA

PAGE 58

In love with a new BTV band


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THE LAST WEEK IN REVIEW

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AUGUST 27-SEPTEMBER 4, 2019 COMPILED BY SASHA GOLDSTEIN, MATTHEW ROY & ANDREA SUOZZO

THIS LITTLE PIGGY

After his 250 pigs got loose and ran wild, an Orange County farmer lured them back with hotdog buns. Not bacon this up.

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FRESH START

F-35

Afterthoughts O

pponents of basing F-35 fighter jets at Burlington International Airport contend a newly obtained document suggests the aircraft will be far louder than the U.S. Air Force and Vermont Air National Guard have acknowledged. With next-generation fighters expected to arrive in a few weeks, critics led by Rosanne Greco, a retired Air Force colonel, are demanding the secretary of the Air Force block the basing until new sound studies can be conducted. They argue that the completed studies assumed that the jets would use their afterburners less than 5 percent of the time. New documents, however, suggest afterburner usage might be 10 times that much — or more, Greco said. “The Air Force finally had to admit to the public what they knew for a long time — that at the large Air Force bases

where the F-35 is currently flying … they are taking off in afterburner 50 to 100 percent of the time,” Greco said at a press conference last Thursday outside Sen. Patrick Leahy’s (D-Vt.) Burlington office. For evidence, she and attorney James Dumont pointed to an internal email Greco said she received last week. The message, a copy of which she provided to Seven Days, appears to have been sent from a civilian engineer in Tucson, Ariz., to Air Force officials involved in base study management. Christopher Brewster’s jargon-laden email says the Air Force “has decided to delay” a new round of environmental studies for a base in Fort Worth, Texas, citing “discrepancies and concerns” over “afterburner usage.” Instead of assuming a 5 percent afterburner rate, new studies would examine different use levels of up to 50 percent, according to the email. “It’s

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People’s United Bank is selling its downtown Burlington building to a developer who wants to put up apartments. It’s right next door to CityHole — er, CityPlace.

BREAKING AWAY

The Labor Day Classic at Thunder Road was postponed after a racecar flew over a wall and hit two track officials. Luckily, no one was killed.

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MOST POPULAR ITEMS ON SEVENDAYSVT.COM

1. “Century Armed: Vermont Importer’s Guns Used in Mass Shootings” by Paul Heintz. A Vermont arms dealer imported the AK-47-style gun used in the July garlic festival shooting in California. 2. “Family Sues DCF Over Case That ‘Shocks the Conscience’” by Derek Brouwer. A federal lawsuit says the Vermont Department for Children and Families discriminated against a family based on accusations of drug use. 3. “Vice President Mike Pence to Return to Vermont” by Sasha Goldstein. For the second year in a row, the veep spent (part of) Labor Day weekend in Vermont. 4. “Gas Leak Disrupts Church Street Dinner Service” by Courtney Lamdin. S.D. Ireland workers accidentally hit a gas line in Burlington last Friday, knocking out service to most Church Street restaurants in the middle of the dinner rush. 5. “Burlington Councilors Slam Brookfield for CityPlace ‘Non-Update Update’” by Courtney Lamdin. Councilors expressed concerns that Brookfield Asset Management could not provide a timeline for construction of the project.

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all just a big Charlie Foxtrot that could have been addressed over a year ago when we all questioned the validity of using only 5 percent afterburners,” Brewster wrote, using a military euphemism for a “clusterfuck.” He did not return messages requesting comment. Dumont argued that even a slight increase in predicted afterburner use represents a significant change in findings of the Vermont study and could open it up to new legal challenges around potential noise impacts.  Mikel Arcovitch, public affairs officer for the Vermont National Guard, said he couldn’t speak for other bases, but that “nothing has changed for Vermont.” “We will use military power 95 percent of the time and afterburner 5 percent,” Arcovitch wrote in an email.  Read reporter Kevin McCallum’s full story on sevendaysvt.com.

As part of a rebranding effort, the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf has changed its name to Feeding Chittenden. Less of a mouthful.

21

new program will allow some of Burlington’s less fortunate to see better at night and recharge. The Howard Center plans to use a $2,500 grant to buy about 50 solar lanterns for homeless folks in and around the Queen City. Funded by the Vermont Energy Investment Corporation, the powered-by-the-sun light sources will also have USB ports, said Adam Brooks, a Howard Center spokesperson. That “could be a good solution to an issue that a lot of people in the homeless population have, and that’s access to electricity,” he continued, especially for those who call the woods home. The VEIC grant focuses on the concept of energy justice, according to Brooks. While most people take for granted the power outlets in their homes and workplaces, the homeless frequently rely on open-

flame light sources or use outlets at restaurants, stores and libraries. The lanterns will grant some independence, he said. The Howard Center is still researching the best lanterns to buy, as they don’t want ones that are too bulky or heavy. Staff will hand them out this fall at Here to Help clinics, which are generally held on the third Saturday of each month at the First United Methodist Church in Burlington. Volunteers offer free hot meals, showers, haircuts, clothes and bike repairs. Brooks said the lanterns are just another way to help neighbors in need. “Our hope is that this idea will sort of catch on, and maybe other organizations or businesses will look at this as a unique solution to something that homeless people go through every day,” he said. SASHA GOLDSTEIN SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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6

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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FEEDback READER REACTION TO RECENT ARTICLES

CHERISH YOUR CO-OP

I need to call out reporter Courtney Lamdin on her cheap shots at our Onion River Co-op in her August 28 article “Union Pushes for $15-an-Hour Wages at City Market” — including dragging up the old misnomer “City Markup.” When the Burlington Free Press last did an annual market basket comparison, City Market was second behind Hannaford and before all the other supermarkets. She implies that what the Onion River Co-op gives to local nonprofits comes mostly from the generous customers. Our co-op gives them even more through the discounts for the member workers who volunteer for those nonprofits and with a 10 percent discount to all member owners who are enrolled in 3 Squares Vermont.  She writes, “City Market raked in $48 million”! There is no “raking in”; there is an enormous amount of hard and thoughtful labor day in and day out by Onion River Co-op employees, both workers and management. She downplays the complexities of the negotiations. The Onion River Co-op provides a vast array of benefits in addition to salaries. It also has to consider its large number of local stakeholders. We also need to find ways to make housing more affordable in Burlington. Our cooperative alone cannot solve all the problems facing workers. Overall, this is an informative article, but cheap shots at an important local resource are not helpful. Corporate America would love to see us do in our cooperatives, labor unions and alternative press. These valuable assets need our constructive criticism, but they also need us to cherish and protect them. Don Schramm

BURLINGTON

Schramm is a former board president of City Market, Onion River Co-op.

CORRECTION

Last week’s article, “Union Pushes for $15-an-Hour Wages at City Market” misstated why the $15 minimum wage bill never came to pass this year. It was due to a dispute between legislative leadership rather than a gubernatorial veto as was originally reported. Gov. Phil Scott did veto a $15 wage bill, but that was in 2018.


WEEK IN REVIEW

so-called developers truly begin building something in it. They might be huddled together down there for the next 10 years.

TIM NEWCOMB

Peter Giampaoli BURLINGTON

ELECTRIC AVENUE

HEAR FOR THE ANIMALS

[Re Off Message: “Citing Email About Afterburners, F-35 Critics Want New Noise Study,” August 29]: While the Leahy/ Sanders/Welch military industrial complex admits the human toll of increased noise will reach toxic levels for thousands of people in the Winooski region should F-35s begin flying out of the Burlington International Airport, the stressors on animals, dogs and cats are even more extreme. I know of a pet owner whose dog suffered such anxiety from existing airplane noise that they had to find a new home for him. It will be the worst for birds, which have the most sensitive hearing. There are 14 species of threatened and endangered birds in Vermont. It may be unlawful to subject them to toxic and abusive levels of sound. Has anyone stood up for these creatures against the F-35 invasion of the peace? Emily Peyton

PUTNEY

MILE NOT DRIVEN

[Re “Power Play? Efficiency Vermont’s Mission Could Expand — to Fossil Fuels,” August 21]: Expanding the mission of Efficiency Vermont to include transportation is the right thing to do. But it does not necessarily lead to more electrification. In electricity, Efficiency Vermont has taken a comprehensive, research-based look at how to invest funds to reduce electric use. And that’s how we need to examine transportation. If we really take a comprehensive look at how to reduce the energy used in transportation, it may lead to solutions such as adding a sidewalk or a bike lane or paying people to give up a car.

Whatever the answer, it should not start with the solution in mind. It starts with the research. That is what has been missing from the conversation about transportation. For Efficiency Vermont, the greenest and cheapest unit of electricity is the one not used. In transportation, the cheapest, greenest mile of travel is the one not driven in any vehicle — even if it is electric. Richard Watts

HINESBURG

Watts is cofounder of Sustainable Transportation Vermont.

SECOND-GUESSING CITYPLACE

Regarding [Off Message: “Developer: CityPlace Burlington Project Will Be Redesigned,” July 19] and other stories about the CityPlace fiasco, I don’t fully grasp the complexities of urban redevelopment. However, it seems asinine that members of the city council and the mayor approved an agreement that allowed the destruction of the Burlington Town Center before Don Sinex and his supposed partners could demonstrate committed funding for the entire life of the project. I am not opposed to urban redevelopment schemes. I am opposed to public servants making decisions based on unfounded promises and their fecklessness holding private developers accountable. My impression is that the city did not perform sufficient due diligence before approving the development agreement. While this drama drags itself along, Mayor Miro Weinberger and city council members who were boosters for this project should be required to pitch tents and live in the bottom of City Hole until the

The article [“Power Play? Efficiency Vermont’s Mission Could Expand — to Fossil Fuels,” August 21] deals with Vermont’s plan to develop a broader program to curb or stabilize the amount of greenhouse gas emissions at 1990 levels. There are many important issues today, but none more important than our existence! Vermont’s current programs are insufficient, and emissions, though once improving, are now increasing again. The programs administered through Efficiency Vermont, while good, are no longer sufficient to make the needed reductions by themselves. The 2019 legislature deemed that Vermont would have to do more limiting of fossil fuels, especially in heating and transportation. Petroleum industries should be encouraged to do all they can to offer their own environmental solutions, but the public will ultimately reduce the use of fossil fuel sources of energy if the industry cannot develop environmentally and economically satisfactory technologies. Life on Earth must be sustainable. Efficiency Vermont is presently prohibited from addressing the transportation and heating aspects of the gas emissions problem. However, given EV’s successful past performance in areas in which it is permitted to contribute, it is likely to be a player in or the leader of new programs. It certainly should be. It is likely that electricity will have to be a greater portion of the energy budget and supplied by renewable means of generation. Renewable means of producing more electric power will have to be expanded. Robert Ullrich

SHELBURNE

SAY SOMETHING! Seven Days wants to publish your rants and raves. Your feedback must... • be 250 words or fewer; • respond to Seven Days content; • include your full name, town and a daytime phone number.

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contents

LOOKING FORWARD

fresh

SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019 VOL.24 NO.50

12

17

NEWS & POLITICS 12

‘A Sense of Holy Scrappiness’

Shannon MacVean-Brown is the first black woman to lead Vermont’s Episcopal church BY DEREK BROUWER

12

22

38

Second Down: Buffalo Bills Hire Former Dartmouth Football Coach Callie Brownson

FEATURES 28

BY DAN BOLLES

18

Family Sues DCF Over Case That ‘Shocks the Conscience’

Hartford’s Postmaster Claimed a Man Attacked Her. A Judge Said She Lied

34

BY DEREK BROUWER

ARTS NEWS

Burlington 101

High schoolers use the city and Lake Champlain as a classroom BY COURTNEY LAMDIN

14

Fight to Save One of Winooski’s Oldest Homes Goes Another Round BY MOLLY WALSH

16

Burlington Schools’ Equity Director Takes Leave BY MOLLY WALSH

20

Art Hop Goes ‘Flynn to Flynn’ This Week The Stranger Festival Spotlights Works by Women Playwrights

36

38

A Green Mountain Gathering Performs and Celebrates Monteverdi BY AMY LILLY

Whales’ Tale

Harvey Milk to Goat Milk

Talking art: Photographer Dona Ann McAdams: art, activism and agriculture

Art: At the South End Art Hop, Kristian Brevik’s whale sculptures illuminate a crisis

BY NANCY STEARNS BERCAW

COLUMNS + REVIEWS

Pitch Imperfect

24 27 39 59 63 66 72 81

Theater review: Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins, Grange Theatre

Full Plate

Food: First Bite: At Kismayo Kitchen, Somali and American fare share the menu

Drawn & Paneled ART Hackie CULTURE Side Dishes FOOD Soundbites MUSIC Album Reviews Talking Art Movie Reviews Ask the Reverend

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Food: Martin Philip talks about his experiment in baking, conversation and humanity BY JORDAN BARRY

VIDEO SERIES

Singled Out

Music: Steven Yardley puts love and romance front and center on the Pyros’ new EP, Christian Mingle

66

BY ALEX BROWN

BY CHELSEA EDGAR

22

Culture: From campus to politics to business, Vermonters use an internet phenom to get the word out

BY PAMELA POLSTON

BY PAMELA POLSTON

21

58

Say What You Meme

BY MARGARET GRAYSON

BY DEREK BROUWER

13

58

Online Thursday

The Magnificent 7 Life Lines Food + Drink Calendar Classes Music + Nightlife Art Movies Fun Stuff Personals Classifieds + Puzzles

HIGHER POWER Meet VT’s new Episcopal bishop

VE RMONT ’S I NDE PE NDE NT VOICE SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019 VOL.24 NO.50 SEVENDAYSVT.COM

PAGE 12

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From campus to politics to business, Vermonters use an internet phenom to get the word out B Y MARGARET GRAY SON PAGE 28

WHALES TALE

PAGE 34

An illuminating Art Hop exhibit

Underwritten by:

Stuck In Vermont: Unlike most people, Anne-Marie Keppel isn’t afraid to talk about death. From her home office in Craftsbury Common, she works as a “death doula,” easing the transition and supporting families during their time of grief.

TASTE OF SOMALIA

PAGE 38

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Cultivating Knowledge Looking to stay on top of hemp industry regulations? Interested in the health benefits of cannabinoids? A full day of workshops and panel discussions at the Vermont Hemp Fest covers subjects related to the low-THC cannabis plant. Presented by Heady Vermont at the Burke Mountain Hotel & Conference Center, this third annual gathering also features exhibitors, networking opportunities and live entertainment.

MUST SEE, MUST DO THIS WEEK COMPI L E D BY K RI ST E N RAVI N

SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 48

SATURDAY 7

On a Roll When athlete Kelly Brush was a sophomore at Middlebury College in 2006, she became paralyzed in a ski racing accident. Brush’s teammates rallied around her, launching the Kelly Brush Century Ride to outfit her with adaptive athletic gear. Now called simply the Kelly Brush Ride, the annual event offers 10-, 20-, 50- and 100-mile loops for handcyclists and bikers, beginning at Middlebury College. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 49

FRIDAY 6-SUNDAY 8

Hop to It Each year, thousands of visitors descend upon Burlington’s South End Arts District for the South End Art Hop. It’s safe to say that they all have one thing in common: supporting Vermont artists. Hundreds of Green Mountain State creatives showcase their work during this colorful weekend of open studios, live music and parties. SEE STORY ON PAGE 20

ONGOING

Art Works “My teachers taught me how to make art, but Harvey Milk taught me how to use that art for social change,” photographer Dona Ann McAdams told Seven Days in a phone interview. In a career spanning four decades, the artist and activist has documented everything from the queer liberation movement to her Sandgate, Vt., goat farm. Nancy Stearns Bercaw talks with the artist, whose “Performative Arts,” a retrospective of her work, is on view at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center.

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SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 53

SEE INTERVIEW ON PAGE 66

SATURDAY 7

Carbo-Load Held at Camp Meade in Middlesex, the Great Vermont Bread Festival fêtes some of the state’s leading bread makers — think Suzanne Slomin of Green Rabbit bakery and Jeffrey Hamelman, author of Bread: A Baker’s Book of Techniques and Recipes. Foodies find wood-fired loaves and an assortment of toppings, along with themed competitions, kids’ activities, and evening music and brews. SEE CALENDAR LISTING ON PAGE 48

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This fall, all first-year students at Northern Vermont University– Johnson will read and discuss Long Way Down, Jason Reynolds’ (pictured) novel written in verse about gun violence. The book’s themes thread through campus events throughout the semester, including talks and film screenings, as well as a photography exhibit. The New York Times best-selling author kicks things off with a discussion and book signing at the school.

Released in late August, the video for Queen City trio the Pyros’ song “Coffee” is a spot-on visual representation of the band’s retro rock-and-roll sound: Hip young people with greaser hair and party dresses cut a rug to the guitar-driven tune. Jordan Adams profiles front person Steven Yardley, aka Sonic Steve, ahead of the band’s gig opening for B Boys at the Monkey House in Winooski. SEE STORY ON PAGE 58

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news

MORE INSIDE

BTV SCHOOL OFFICIAL ABSENT WITH LEAVE PAGE 16

FEMALE FOOTBALL COACH GOES TO PROS PAGE 17

JUDGE: LIES OF A POSTMASTER PAGE 18

GLENN RUSSELL

LEGAL

Family Sues DCF Over Case That ‘Shocks the Conscience’ B Y DER EK B R OU WER

RELIGION

‘A Sense of Holy Scrappiness’

Shannon MacVean-Brown is the first black woman to lead Vermont’s Episcopal church B Y D E RE K BROU W E R

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y the time she entered an Episcopal seminary in 2004, Shannon MacVean-Brown thought she knew what sort of priest she wanted to be. In her 30s and pregnant, the seminarian had already run a design business, taught elementary school art and become a preacher at her unconventional childhood church in Detroit. She saw full priesthood as a way to take her creative approach to other congregations. MacVean-Brown did not initially see her race as particularly important to her 12

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

ministry. That began to change when she entered Seabury-Western Theological Seminary in Evanston, Ill., where, as one of the few nonwhite students, she was confronted with a church that wasn’t quite living up to its ideals. During her orientation, one of the professors made disparaging comments about the church’s African American hymnal, and several classmates registered their displeasure with a required antiracism training. “I was shocked at people’s ignorance

and,” she recalled, pausing to choose her words, “racism. Pure and simple racism.” Her priestly calling took new shape. To fully embrace its values, she concluded, the church would need leaders from more diverse backgrounds, who, like her, could bring new perspectives to ministry. Fifteen years later, MacVean-Brown, 52, is about to become the first black woman to lead an Episcopal diocese in ‘HOLY SCRAPPINESS’

» P.14

A new federal lawsuit accuses Vermont’s Department for Children and Families of violating parents’ rights and discriminating against them based on their history of opioid use. Allegations against the state, put forth by an unnamed couple, appear to dovetail a 2018 report by a parent advocacy group that identified what it saw as systemic failures in Vermont’s child protection system.  One of the most egregious claims in the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court asserts that a DCF caseworker compelled one of the plaintiffs, a mother, to begin taking the opioid-weaning drug suboxone, itself an opiate, by convincing her it was necessary to regain custody of her children.  The state’s behavior “shocks the conscience,” attorneys for Shlansky Law Group of Burlington wrote on behalf of the plaintiffs. The family is seeking damages.  According to the complaint, the state got involved after one of the family’s three children told a mental health counselor that she’d seen her mother snort a pill. The counselor reported the child’s comment to DCF, which sent caseworker Christine Gadwah to meet with the family at a mental health clinic the same day.  There, the family alleges, Gadwah threatened to call the police to remove the children unless the mother arranged for them to live with a relative. The “extrajudicial removal” lasted 10 months for two of the children and nearly a year for the third.  The mother denied snorting the pill and said she hadn’t used drugs in nearly two decades, since she was a teenager.  DCF then contacted the mother’s employer and allegedly urged her ex-husbands to seek custody of the children. A month later, the mother was fired from her job as an in-home care provider due to the state’s allegation that she abused her children.  The complaint accuses DCF employees of fabricating evidence against the family and failing to conduct a fair and impartial investigation.  A DCF spokesperson said in a statement that the department disagrees with the facts as described in the complaint.  Contact: derek@sevendaysvt.com


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Burlington 101 High schoolers use the city and Lake Champlain as a classroom B Y C O UR TN EY L A MDIN

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look at problems affecting their community — and a chance to help solve them. “Instead of just reading about initiatives, we’re working with the people who are behind those initiatives,” said Dov Stucker, who doubles as a history and social studies teacher. The process opens doors to “the Burlington they’ve never seen,” he said. Students enrolled in the program essentially split their weekly class schedule between traditional courses and the City & Lake curriculum. On city days, they spend their entire day off campus, working alongside experts on transportation, energy, lake ecology, the arts and more. While their peers are poring over the periodic table, kids in the City & Lake program are dissecting smelt on a research vessel, collaborating on a community mural and consulting with city councilors. Studying practical applications of math, science and social studies, they’re less likely to pose the perennial complaint: When will I ever use this in real life? “Everything we’re doing is drawn from the real world,” project director Andy Barker said. “It’s relevant to the way the world works.” That’s exactly why Lucie Winrock, a BHS junior, signed up. She was tired of the same old lesson plans.

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wo dozen people sat in neatly arranged folding chairs at Burlington’s Old North End Community Center. One by one, they aired city-related grievances: Why are Burlington’s public transit options so limited? Why is there so much traffic? Why are some sidewalks replaced before others? Why can’t the city just fix the sewer system already? The questions weren’t coming from politically active adults at a municipal meeting. The scene last Friday was the first meeting of the Burlington City & Lake Semester, a program that uses hands-on learning to engage high school students. Every semester, four teachers take a select group of teenagers out of the classroom, plop them in the middle of their city and ask them to be curious. Only two dozen juniors and seniors are enrolled at a time, but more than that apply. It’s the only class of its kind at BHS. “We know that one-size-fits-all doesn’t work, and yet people are often wary to leave the confines of that model we’ve stuck with for so long,” said Peter McConville, an English teacher who helps lead the City & Lake program. “The conformity we fall into in schooling is something that will hold folks back.” By turning the classroom model inside out, the program gives students a first-hand

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news FILE: MOLLY WALSH

The Mansion House

DEVELOPMENT

Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

YOU CAN SAY, “WE WANT TO BE INCLUSIVE,” ALL YOU WANT,

BUT IF … IT’S ONLY WHITE MEN IN CHARGE, THAT’S NOT TRUE. S H ANNO N MAC VE AN- B R O WN

MacVean-Brown described her path from the country’s blackest city to one of its whitest states and how her experiences as a black woman can help push the church to realize its inclusive ideals. MacVean-Brown grew up on Detroit’s east side in an unusual congregation where many of the members lived in an intentional community, or what outsiders might call a commune. As a 4-year old, MacVean-Brown said, she had convinced her church-weary mother to join the Episcopal Church of the Messiah, whose daycare center she was attending. Her mother met and married the priest, and they lived in church-owned communal housing throughout her childhood in the ’70s and early ’80s. MacVean-Brown’s enthusiasm for the church waned as a teenager, and she stopped attending regularly. She explored Buddhism and taught Laotian classical dance, but she returned to Christianity while in the Kendall College of Art and

LL

Opponents of a proposal to demolish one of the oldest houses in Winooski to make way for a 75-unit apartment building at Main and Mansion streets are appealing the project’s approval to the city’s Development Review Board on September 19. The hearing is the latest in a string of attempts to stop the teardown of the early 19th century Mansion House and two adjacent homes. A four-story apartment building with ground-floor commercial space would replace them. The Mansion House is listed on the Vermont State Register of Historic Places. The project has sparked intense debate since March about the balance between preservation and the need for new housing in Winooski. It also has triggered broader discussion about form-based code, newer zoning rules meant to encourage growth along major “gateway” arteries such as Main Street. The changes have triggered the demolition of older homes, some of which were historic, to build apartment buildings. The Mansion House proposal has faced numerous challenges. The upcoming hearing will weigh an appeal that was filed by David Carter and Joseph Gamache, both of Mansion Street. They objected to the permit because it would allow developer Jeff Mongeon to combine a lot at 18 Mansion Street that is not part of the new gateway district with the properties on Main Street that are. The Development Review Board granted part of their appeal in July. The board directed city planning and zoning manager Eric Vorwald to reconsider his approval with respect to 18 Mansion Street and said this portion of the project should be reviewed not under the gateway zoning but under the city’s rules for “residential C” districts. Vorwald did so and approved it once more. Now Carter and Gamache have appealed that finding. m

Design of Ferris State University in Grand Rapids, Mich., where she studied art. She moved back to Detroit and worked as a commercial interior designer and, later, as an elementary art teacher. When her stepfather retired, fellow members of the church she had grown up in selected her as the leader of their congregation. Her creative personality became central to her leadership: When few people volunteered to decorate the church for Christmas, she incorporated the chore into a Sunday service. When the church needed money for repairs, she had members create art tiles to help raise funds. Having found her calling, GL EN MacVean-Brown decided to N R pursue full priesthood and entered the seminary. She finished her master of divinity at the Episcopal seminary in Evanston, where, she said, a series of experiences opened her eyes to the racism that still existed within the church. MacVean-Brown had encountered discrimination before. White members of the Detroit commune didn’t want their children dating the black teens. In Michigan, she recalled, someone threw a brick through the car window of the Laotian family she was living with. But realizing that institutional racism also permeated the church to which she felt called to dedicate her life was “heartbreaking,” she said. The realization formed the seed of her eventual dissertation, which focused on how black women priests could help advance the church. She felt like an outsider inside her own church, which she came to see as her biggest strength. “You can say, ‘We want to be inclusive’ all you want, but if … it’s only white men in charge, that’s not true,” she said. To effect that change, MacVean-Brown said, she decided to seek out places where she could serve the church as an “other” and not just as “one black woman priest in a black city in a diocese that has a bunch of other people who look like me and are thinking the same things.” She thought of it as a “ministry of otherness,” where she and her congregations must constantly confront what it means to create an inclusive community. Her first opportunity outside Detroit arrived in 2014, when she was assigned to Christ Church Cathedral in Indianapolis. The church was multiracial and multilingual, in a state dominated by Christianity’s more conservative strains. She became president of Indiana’s counterpart to SE

BY M O L LY WA L S H

New England. Vermont lay leaders and clergy elected her in May as the state diocese’s 11th bishop, succeeding Thomas Ely, who will retire next month after 18 years in the post. Once formally consecrated as bishop on September 28, MacVean-Brown will lead a church that is small but increasingly feisty. Slightly fewer than 6,000 Vermonters are Episcopalians, spread out among 45 congregations, the largest of which is the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Burlington. Like Vermont, the church is mostly white, and like many of the state’s traditional Christian denominations, its congregants are aging. The Episcopal Church, the American offshoot of the Church of England, has a long-held association with polite society, as a place where the wealthy practiced a restrained form of worship. It has begun to shake its stodgy reputation by embracing progressive causes and more diverse leadership. The Episcopal Diocese of New Hampshire elected the church’s first openly gay bishop in 2003, and Michael Curry became the first African American to preside over the national church in 2015. In Vermont, Ely has been a vocal advocate for marriage equality, gun safety and other social justice causes. Church members have followed. Episcopalians are some of the most active participants in the state’s Interfaith Action Network, a progressive group, according to its executive director, the Rev. Debbie Ingram, who is also a Democratic state senator representing Chittenden County. In the country’s least-religious state, Episcopal leaders see feistiness as central to the church’s future. The diocese’s baptized membership dropped 13 percent between 2011 and 2017, and average Sunday attendance declined by 15 percent, according to data from the national church’s General Convention, its governing body. Some parishes have closed or consolidated and have struggled to afford clergy. Faced with declining budgets, a search committee composed of laity and clergy considered abandoning a full-time bishop upon Ely’s retirement. Instead, they resolved to find a leader with a “sense of holy scrappiness,” as the job description read, who could bring innovative approaches to the church’s challenges and advocate for social change. “We know we need to change,” said Rev. Rick Swanson, rector at St. John’s in the Mountains in Stowe. “We’re scared, but we know we need to do it.” In MacVean-Brown, church leaders believe they’ve found an independent

thinker who can lead in partnership with church members — while also challenging them. That’s a tall order, but it’s one that aligns with MacVean-Brown’s approach to the faith. “This church thing is not about coming and singing pretty songs on Sunday and saying our perfect prayers,” she said. “It’s about: How are we changing the world? How are we living into this countercultural activity we’ve been called to?” The bishop-elect spoke to Seven Days for more than two hours in a small, sparsely furnished office at the diocese’s Rock Point headquarters, surrounded by vegetable gardens and trails that crisscross the scenic and forested 130-acre property on the shore of Lake Champlain. She has moved into the historic bishop’s residence nearby, where her husband, their teenage daughter and chihuahua, Detroit, will soon join her.

US

Fight to Save One of Winooski’s Oldest Homes Goes Another Round

‘Holy Scrappiness’ « P.12

‘HOLY SCRAPPINESS ’

» P.18


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Burlington City & Life students walking up Pearl Street with teacher Signe Daly

“School has never worked for me. I go in and sit at the same seat every day, and we learn the same thing, and it’s just the teachers talking over and over again,” Winrock said. “Hands-on is really what works for me.” Burlington isn’t the only district to incorporate experiential learning into a traditional curriculum. When the Vermont legislature passed Act 77 in 2013, it formed the Flexible Pathways Initiative, which encourages school districts to develop unique “educational experiences” for students. That broad umbrella can cover early college programs, technical education, and place-based learning like Burlington’s City & Lake. The school launched the program last fall as a partnership with Shelburne Farms, which has supported a hands-on curriculum at Burlington’s K-5 magnet school, the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes, since 2004. Each entity lends two teachers to the program, but there’s no cost to the school district. Grants and donations cover the program’s $150,000 annual budget, according to Barker. Research from Teton Science Schools, a Wyoming nonprofit that has emphasized place-based education for more than 50 years, found that such programs boost environmental stewardship, social-emotional learning and academic achievement in students. “It’s not that I didn’t care about school or learning before,” said Ruby Guth, a 17-year-old senior who enrolled in City & Lake last fall; she just didn’t connect

academics to “real issues — some that affect our lives so greatly.” For example, plastic pollution seemed far away until Guth saw it up close at Burlington’s North Beach. On a rainy day last November, she and her classmates joined Ashley Sullivan, executive director of the conservation group the Rozalia Project, to collect and sort plastic litter there. In just 30 minutes, students found more than 1,200 pieces of debris. After that class, Guth sought to curb her use of plastic drinking straws by buying a set of metal ones; she said she’s used them ever since. Guth’s mom, Sarah, noticed other changes in her daughter’s habits. For the first time, Ruby came home and talked about what she did in school that day. She went from being a B and C student to a straight-A one. “As a parent of a teen, this is exactly what you want to see,” said Sarah Guth, who is a child psychiatrist. “The interactive nature of it — I think they need that. I think sitting for hours on end and just being lectured at is something no brain is really good for.” As Famo Haji, Guth’s classmate, noted: “It was more interesting to actually see and do than just hear.” Julius Dodson, another City & Lake alumnus, said he liked meeting with experts in their fields — literally, in one case. His class visited the Intervale Community Farm as part of a broader lesson about the local food economy. The farm manager told students that he’d like BURLINGTON 101

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news COURTESY OF DOV STUCKER

EDUCATION

Burlington Schools’ Equity Director Takes Leave BY M O L LY WA L S H

Burlington city schools’ executive director of equity affairs and in-house counsel has been on medical leave for more than three months and has hired attorney John Franco to represent her in a dispute over benefits. Franco declined to specify the reasons for Nikki Fuller’s medical leave, citing privacy concerns, and Fuller declined to comment.  Burlington Superintendent of Schools Yaw Obeng said via email that Fuller stopped working under the Family and Medical Leave Act on May 20. She drew her $118,816 annual salary for the next 12 weeks. 

Fuller has since exhausted her paid leave time and is no longer drawing a salary, according to Obeng, who responded to Seven Days’ public records request about Fuller’s employment status. Franco said Fuller hired him regarding a disagreement over how much paid vacation and accrued leave time she is entitled to receive. He declined to say when Fuller might return to work and added that she has not sued the district.  Fuller was working as an assistant Burlington city attorney when the district hired her seven years ago. She has held several titles in the district, including director of human resources.  Among her duties was to help Vermont’s largest school district improve its racial climate and hire and retain more diverse faculty and administrators. But she encountered challenges. In 2015, Fuller, who is black, and two other African American administrators made a formal complaint of discrimination and harassment to the school board’s diversity and equity committee. The school board agreed to hire an outside consultant to investigate.  The investigator’s 2016 report found no specific instances of racially motivated conduct or retaliation, but it did find a culture of “pervasive racism” in the district that needed to be addressed. The board voted to adopt a plan to improve the racial climate for district employees.  Contact: molly@sevendaysvt.com

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

BURLINGTON SCHOOL DISTRICT\MOLLY WALSH

Nikki Fuller and Yaw Obeng

Students touring the McNeil plant

Burlington 101 « P.15 to pay his workers more, but that would increase the cost of his farm share, which would limit who can afford it. Dodson said themes of affordability and food equity were fitting segues into other presentations by Hunger Free Vermont and the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf, which is now known as Feeding Chittenden. “I never really thought about how they all affect each other,” he said. “I definitely see the community differently.” Another twist: On occasion, the experts in the City & Lake program have turned to the students for help. Last fall, BTVStat, a division of the city’s Department of Innovation and Technology, invited the group to consult on the city’s first-ever Equity Report, which analyzed how officials can better serve Burlington’s diverse population. Afterward, students reflected that they enjoyed learning about their local government — a subject not covered in traditional classes — and appreciated that the adults had sought their advice. “If we went to City Hall just to listen about the equity report, I wouldn’t care as much,” one student wrote in a journal

that each student keeps throughout the semester. “But because they wanted feedback from me, it made me and my peers way more engaged.” Stucker said Burlington’s size makes it well suited for such a class. It’s small enough that officials are only a phone

WHO GETS TO STUDY ABROAD? KIDS WITH MEANS.

WHAT DOES IT COST TO DO THIS? NOTHING. D O V S TUC K E R

call away but large enough to have “city problems” such as homelessness, traffic congestion and opioid abuse. He likened the City & Lake semester to a study abroad program, one that shrinks the opportunity gap between students. “Who gets to study abroad? Kids with means. What does it cost to do this? Nothing,” Stucker said. He said BCL makes a point to enroll kids who “have incredible opportunities … and those who have never left their neighborhood.”

McConville, Stucker’s co-teacher, said most students have latched onto the traditional formula for success: Take honors classes; get into a good college. But he’d argue the City & Lake program looks just as good on a college transcript as do Advanced Placement courses. After last week’s meeting at the Old North End Community Center, the students embarked on a 45-minute walking tour of their city classroom. They trekked down Pearl Street and paused at the intersection with North Winooski Avenue to jot down some observations in small, tan notebooks. Teacher Signe Daly, from Shelburne Farms, encouraged the city explorers to share their thoughts aloud, which prompted the students to ask more questions: Why is this intersection so dangerous? Why does that roof look so funny? Why are bike lanes painted green, anyway? Who hasn’t wondered such things? That, it turns out, is the whole point. After being exposed to the complexities of these systems, Daly said, “They can bring these skills with them and this kind of curiosity and thinking no matter where they end up.” m Contact: courtney@sevendaysvt.com


Callie Brownson

COURTESY OF THE BUFFALO BILLS

When too much fertilizer is applied to the landscape, rain often washes it directly into our streams, rivers and lakes.

SPORTS

Second Down: Buffalo Bills Hire Former Dartmouth Football Coach Callie Brownson BY D A N B O L L E S

Last month, the NFL’s Buffalo Bills announced the hiring of Callie Brownson as a full-time offensive coaching intern. Brownson made national headlines last year when she became the first female coach in NCAA Division 1 history as an offensive quality control coach for Dartmouth College. Brownson is the third woman in four years to join Bills head coach Sean McDermott’s staff, and she joins a growing number of female coaches around the NFL. Brownson met McDermott in February at the Women’s Careers in Football Forum, an annual convention hosted by the NFL to increase female participation at all levels of the league’s operations. She and Dartmouth head coach Buddy Teevens spoke there on a panel about coaching, after which McDermott invited Brownson to shadow his staff at the Bills’ training camp this summer. Following training camp, she was offered a position on staff, where she’ll take on quality control duties similar to those she performed at Dartmouth.  Seven Days recently chatted with Brownson by phone about her move from college to the pros, the prospects of U.S. Women’s Soccer star Carli Lloyd as an NFL kicker and some Bills-related fantasy football tips.  SEVEN DAYS: When players transition

from college, you always hear about how much faster the game moves at the pro level. What has your experience been from a coaching perspective?

CALLIE BROWNSON: That’s definitely the case. This is the cream of the crop, the

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best players in the country, and they’re pros for a reason. But it’s a different culture. In college you’re dealing with collegiate athletes, students. They’re not punching the clock, and what they do with you is not necessarily putting food on the table for their families. In the NFL, these guys are here to work. They’re professionals. Not that college kids don’t conduct themselves professionally. It’s just a different culture, a different pace. SD: Did the fact that the Bills had previously hired two female coaches make the transition easier for you? CB: Definitely. Kathryn Smith was the first years ago. Then Phoebe Schecter was with them last year, and I know both of them through the women’s football world. We’ve got a cool little network going.  I talked to Phoebe a lot before I left for the training camp internship. And she gave me tons of advice so that I could jump right in and be able to add some value. She was super helpful about who I’d be working with and the things I’d be doing. Even the little things that you don’t think about. Like, “Hey, what should I wear to breakfast for an away game?” Those are things that should maybe be assumed, but you only learn once you get into the process.  And Kathryn reached out when I was hired. And my response to both of them was appreciation. Because without the [impression] they left, I don’t know that this opportunity would have been possible for me. This women-in-football thing is so delicate that to do a bad job, or even an average job, can hinder the door staying open for somebody afterwards. And both of them had done such a phenomenal job that Sean and the rest of the staff were willing and open to doing it again. 

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START COFFEE. MAKE TOAST.

Go Public. Listen to Morning Edition weekdays 6-9am on Vermont Public Radio.

This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity. Visit sevendaysvt.com to read the entire conversation with Brownson.

107.9 | VPR.org

Contact: dan@sevendaysvt.com

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news COURTESY OF JAMES M. PATTERSON/VALLEY NEWS

FUN FOR FALL!

JOIN OUR COMMUNITY! Everyone belongs at the Y. Here’s what’s up this fall:

Rosi O’Connell in the former West Hartford Post Office in 2011

Aquatics

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More info at gbymca.org GET EXCITED! Your new Y opens in early 2020 18 Untitled-41 1

Hartford’s Postmaster Claimed a Man Attacked Her. A Judge Said She Lied BY DE REK B ROUW ER

Hartford’s postmaster fabricated an allegation that a letter carrier brutally assaulted her, a federal judge wrote last month in a blistering decision that suggested she could be prosecuted. Rosi O’Connell’s lies, which included testimony the judge characterized as “perjury,” cost the former postal worker the best job he ever had, put him through a publicized criminal trial, and will cost the U.S. government at least $72,000 in damages. But they have not cost O’Connell her job. Senior Judge Loren A. Smith published his opinion last month in the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which handles federal contract disputes, concluding that the U.S. Postal Service wrongfully fired contract driver Brian Bowles. The judge forwarded his findings to federal prosecutors in Washington, D.C., for potential criminal perjury charges against O’Connell. The outcome is the result of a sevenyear effort by Bowles, 47, to clear his name and recoup costs from accusations that, he said, “shook the foundation of my life.” In April 2012, a postal customer discovered O’Connell crying for help on the post office floor. O’Connell told police that Bowles struck her over the head with a five-pound mail scanner. “I was afraid he would kill me,” she wrote in a statement to police. O’Connell appeared “extremely confused,” wrote a Hartford police officer, who noticed a lump under O’Connell’s hair but no other signs of injury. The state charged Bowles with misdemeanor assault, and the USPS terminated him on technical grounds. While the assault charge was pending, O’Connell reported a second attack, this time outside her North Pomfret home. She claimed that a masked man confronted her on her front porch. He struck her head and face with a blunt object, she told Vermont State Police, knocking her unconscious. She claimed to have awoken on the porch the following morning. O’Connell told state troopers she believed Bowles was the masked assailant, court records show. State police searched Bowles’ house for evidence, he told Seven Days. 

O’Connell had visible bruising. No one was ever charged. A little more than a year later, jurors acquitted Bowles of the post office assault after hearing testimony from both him and O’Connell. Jurors deliberated for less than half an hour, according to a Valley News report.  The verdict was vindicating, but the charges had already taken their toll, Bowles said. His postal route had paid more than his previous jobs. Bowles went on to work for a temp agency, but once the agency got wind of O’Connell’s claims, the job calls dried up. Bowles, through his attorney, David Bond of Burlington, sued O’Connell in U.S. District Court and filed a separate federal claim against the USPS. O’Connell settled earlier this year for $107,000 — an amount Bond said was covered by the postmaster’s personal homeowner’s insurance.  In the USPS case, the government owes $72,000 in damages for lost wages and potentially more in attorney’s fees.  A USPS spokesperson declined to comment on the litigation but said O’Connell remains Hartford’s postmaster. O’Connell, reached by phone at her home on Monday, declined to comment.  Bowles moved to South Burlington last year and currently works part-time in the restaurant industry.  Bowles said he’s astonished that it took seven years for a public official to call out O’Connell’s “fairy tale.” Authorities pursued the case against him despite what he considered red flags: How could a series of blows with a five-pound, metal-reinforced scanner not leave any physical trace? The doctor who examined O’Connell at the hospital, according to the court record, noted that she seemed to be exaggerating her injury for “secondary gain.” “They actually ought to be ashamed of themselves,” Bowles said.  To read the judge’s full decision, go to sevendaysvt.com.

‘Holy Scrappiness’ « P.14 Vermont Interfaith Action, called Faith in Indiana, lobbying for social justice causes. She also witnessed another church milestone. In 2016, her colleague Jennifer Baskerville-Burrows became the first black woman elected as an Episcopal diocesan bishop; the consecration was held at MacVean-Brown’s church. The Vermont diocese’s unusual job ad, with its pitch for “holy scrappiness,” prompted the priest to apply last year, she said. Episcopal bishops are elected by a majority vote of clergy and lay representatives in the diocese. The church appointed a group last year to develop the job posting and select a group of finalists, said committee chair Maggie Thompson of Calais. Six of the top seven candidates, and the three finalists, were women. “This is a generalization, but for the most part, the women were more energetic and willing to try new things,” Thompson said. MacVean-Brown was elected in May on the first vote — a rare occurrence that reflected enthusiasm for her perspective, local church leaders said. Swanson, the Stowe rector, who is gay, said MacVean-Brown is positioned to help the mostly white church confront racial justice issues, much as it began addressing LGBTQ equality in earlier years. “She is here to take them to the next space of real uncomfortable conversation on race,” he said, referring to the church’s congregants. MacVean-Brown said she hadn’t put race at the “top of the list” of her priorities as incoming bishop, though since moving to Vermont over the summer, she’s learned more about its fraught history here. In one of her sermons, the bishop-elect said, she talks about Episcopalians’ ability to stay united during hard times. But there was one time when the church should have fractured, she preaches — during the abolitionist movement, when the church failed to take a stand against slavery. It was only after moving to Vermont, MacVean-Brown said, that she learned of the work of the reverend John Henry Hopkins, who in 1861 authored a pamphlet that defended slavery on biblical grounds. Hopkins was Vermont’s first Episcopal bishop, writing more than 80 years after the state outlawed slavery. He went on to preside over the national General Convention in 1865 that reunified the church’s northern and southern factions. Hopkins’ story, she said, reminded her that issues of race may, indeed, have an important place in her work as she takes on the ministry he once held. 

Contact: derek@sevendaysvt.com

Contact: derek@sevendaysvt.com

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019 8/27/19 12:37 PM


READ, POST, SHARE + COMMENT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LIFELINES

lifelines

OBITUARIES, VOWS, CELEBRATIONS

OBITUARIES

Eugene Shaver 1936-2019 BURLINGTON, VT.

Eugene (Gene) H. Shaver, our beloved husband, father and grandfather, left for his heavenly home on Thursday, August 1, 2019. An intelligent, humble, dog-loving gentleman and friend to all has left us. He leaves his one and only love of 59 years, Mary (Jackson) Shaver; his son, Eric, and his wife, Gail Gaetani; his daughter, Sonja Fuller, and her husband, Andy; his sisters, Gale Shaver and Elaine Brooks; four grandchildren: Sophia and Sedona Shaver and Amy and

Adam Fuller; and many other relatives and close friends. He was predeceased by his brother Allen. He was born on August 2, 1936, in Andes, N.Y., to Allen J. Shaver and Lillian Misner. He started a lifelong passion for sports, particularly baseball, at an early age that carried throughout his lifetime.  After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Army with his best friend, Fred Wilson, and was assigned to the signal corp. He became an instructor in cathode ray tube theory at Fort Monmouth, N.J. After his discharge, he returned home and became reacquainted with a now-grown-up girl he used to tease as a child, Mary Jackson. Mary and Gene were married in July 1960.  He started the family in San Jose, Calif., with Sonja and Eric and moved the family of four to Burlington, Vt., in 1967. Burlington has been home since and the starting place for so much of what he was proud to provide for his family. His time on the Burlington City Council was a source of pride for him, knowing he could give back and help the community

he loved. He loved to spend time on the lake and attend or coach absolutely any sport he could, and he taught himself to ski. He became a hockey player at 40. You could find him skiing, skating, playing basketball, softball, baseball, tennis, water-skiing … you name it. Later in life, he took joy in his grandchildren and taking every opportunity to teach, coach, play and tease another generation of Shavers. He enjoyed getting to know his step-grandchildren and considered them family, as well. He had a reputation for being a constant joker and loved to tease you. His hope was always that you would tease right back. Gene loved talking to friends and strangers alike and could find fun in everyone he met and everywhere he went. He found these friends at IBM, at the church, at the beach, playing sports, in the neighborhood, at the Elks Club and in his extended family everywhere. He loved to swing dance with his wife, Mary, and their dance club became a rich source for many friendships. He is missed dearly by all who knew him.

Kari Bierbaum 1967-2018 BURLINGTON, VT.

The family of Kari (Stolpestad) Bierbaum recently gathered in Islesboro, Maine, to remember her. Kari died by suicide on December 2, 2018, in Burlington, Vt. Our Kari was born on February 11, 1967, in Bryn Mawr, Pa., to Bonnie and Arthur Stolpestad (of Brunswick, Maine, and Lynn, Mass., respectively). Standing together in love and courage were her beloved husband, Bruce, and son, Gunnar “My Boy” Bierbaum (Burlington, Vt); her mother, Bonnie Stolpestad (the late Arthur Stolpestad), now of Crossroad’s Village, Portage, Mich.; brother Lars Stolpestad (Kari) and their children, Annika and Bjorn (Kalamazoo,

Mich.); sister Rev. Kerrie Harthan (Gloria Korsman) of Cambridge, Mass.; aunt Candy Dorscheid and her Donofrio family (Madison, Conn.); godmother Gunta Hirsch (the late Bruno Hirsch) of Canton, Mass.; and cousins Ginny Drew and Earl and Bonnie MacKenzie of Islesboro, Maine. Hailing from Brunswick, Maine, Kari graduated from Brunswick High School in 1985. She met Bruce at the University of Maine, Orono, graduating in 1989. They set up home in Burlington, Vt. Kari loved working in the University of Vermont’s Research Protection Office and coming home to tend to son Gunnar and his friends, as well as her vibrant garden. She was an athletic outdoorswoman and certified as a diving instructor and master gardener, perfectly reflecting her spiritual connection to nature. She was happiest when camping on Warren Island, swimming and kayaking off Leadbetter Island (both in Penobscot Bay), snowshoeing and skiing in Stowe, hiking the Green Mountains, and sailing on Lake Champlain with family, friends and Ebb, her chocolate lab, who still looks for her. Kari was an engaging woman whose sidesplitting antics grew out of compassion, mischief and wry humor.

Whether flamboyantly dancing to ABBA on a schooner bowsprit or pouring red wine on your white kitchen floor and tossing all your clothes around your house as her way of saying “Thanks for your hospitality,” she endeared herself to you. You knew that she cared. Blessed with empathy and appreciation for the shenanigans of youth, she relished opening her home to her cherished neighborhood family, especially the young people now in college. She wanted you to feel at home, understood, content. Kari was kind. If desired, a tribute to Kari can be made to the Vermont Suicide Prevention Center. She struggled with depression and anxiety, intensely, these last two years. Our family is committed to bringing heartfelt awareness, research and effective public health policy to bear on this widespread, treatable disease. We thank the St. Lawrence University football team, staff and faculty for their superb, loving support of Gunnar. We thank the Cremation Society of Chittenden County, a division of Ready Funeral Services in Burlington, Vt., for its compassionate aid, including a perpetual web portal through which you can reach us and VSPC: cremationsocietycc.com.

Want to memorialize a loved one? We’re here to help. Our obituary and in memoriam services are affordable, accessible and handled with personal care. Share your loved one’s story with the local community in Lifelines.

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Post your obituary or in memoriam online and in print at sevendaysvt.com/lifelines. Or contact us at lifelines@sevendaysvt.com or 865-1020 ext. 10. SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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FILE PHOTOS: LUKE AWTRY

ART HOP GOES ‘FLYNN TO FLYNN’ THIS WEEK This has been a watershed year for Burlington’s SOUTH END ARTS AND BUSINESS ASSOCIATION. In late 2018, executive director ADAM BROOKS stepped down after about seven years at the helm; assistant director and curator SARAH DREXLER soon followed. Around the same time, the organization lost its lease — and its highly visible headquarters — at 404 Pine Street, accommodating an expansion of ARTSRIOT. It downsized to a tiny space at GENERATOR on Sears Lane. In May, SEABA hired CHRISTY MITCHELL, proprietor of the S.P.A.C.E. GALLERY, to succeed Brooks as ED.

ART

By that point, board members were already thinking about their flagship event, the South End Art Hop. Would they be able to pull it off? They would and have: The 27th annual Hop takes place this Friday through Sunday, September 6 to 8, with no visible abatement in neighborhood excitement, artist participation or site registrations. There will, however, be some changes from previous years. One of them is organizational. Mitchell has created color-coded zones for sections of the South End — which might make more sense when Hoppers refer to the 72-page program. “These are four distinct zones that will encourage people to keep hopping,” she says. The signs at each site will

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correspond to the color of their zone. Perhaps more motivational is a bingo-style game that is printed on the back of the program as well as separately, Mitchell says. Hoppers can get it stamped at each venue they visit and be entered into a raffle for South End-specific prizes. This year’s juried art show, a centerpiece of the Hop, is installed at the AMY E. TARRANT GALLERY in the FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS. The juror is Brent Beamon, director of the Flowers Gallery in New York City. Parallel South End nomenclature inspired a “Flynn to Flynn” motif — and a hashtag — suggesting Hop attendees should think about traversing the entire district, from the Main Street gallery to the venues on Flynn Avenue. Two free shuttle buses will ease that distance: the “bunny bus” (disclosure: it’s sponsored by Seven Days) on the north end and a school bus from DEALER.COM at Howard and Pine streets south to Flynn Ave. As in previous years, Pine Street will be closed to traffic between Kilburn and Howard streets. One significant change is that Strut!, the Saturday-night fashion show, will take place not under a ginormous tent behind the MALTEX BUILDING but in a much more intimate venue: the exhibition space at Generator. The move was clearly based on cost: Mitchell says the quote for the tent was about the same as projected revenue from the show. Strut! has always been the only ticketed event at the Hop, but if expense equals income, the fundraising potential is defeated.

It remains to be seen whether heretofore enthusiastic audiences for the fashion show can adapt to more constrained quarters. The teen designers, who have come to dominate the event in recent years, are very excited for the showcase, according to Mitchell. “It’s a good jumping-off point for a lot of them,” she observes. Mitchell notes that Art Hop headquarters will be located in the VAULTS, the brand-new Howard Street building which itself is filled with artist studios. Friday night parties, officially registered or otherwise, have long been a staple of Art Hop. Mitchell says some are still popping up. Among those she cited are swing dancers performing at Kilburn and Pine; a concert featuring ROUGH FRANCIS at SPEAKING VOLUMES; and live mural painting plus music at Tomgirl Juice in the Soda Plant, at the Dealer.com parking lot on Howard, and behind North Country Kettlebells at 696 Pine (near Eco Bean Café). And then there are the dozens of open studios. The event, after all, is a big shout-out to art. As always, there’s a lot to Hop about. PAME L A P O LS T O N

Contact: pamela@sevendaysvt.com

INFO South End Art Hop, Friday through Sunday, September 6 to 8, various locations in Burlington’s South End Arts District. seaba.com


GOT AN ARTS TIP? ARTNEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

The Stranger Festival Spotlights Works by Women Playwrights

SOUTH END

ART 2019

STEPHEN MEASE

ENJOY BURLINGTON'S SOUTH END ARTS DISTRICT

B Y C HELSEA ED GA R

A

s the bell-voiced Vermonter Neko Case once crooned, “The most tender place in my heart is for strangers.” These words could be a mission statement for the women playwrights behind the Stranger Festival, a showcase of new works that debuts later this month at OFF

CENTER FOR THE DRAMATIC

THE PLAYS’ CHARACTERS GRAPPLE WITH

THE FUNDAMENTAL UNKNOWABILITY OF OTHER HUMAN BEINGS.

in Burlington and the GRANGE HALL CULTURAL CENTER in Waterbury. Each of the festival’s four short plays, which range in length from 12 to 25 minutes, explore the subtle shades of what it means to be “strangers,” said Vermont playwright and festival cocreator JEANNE BECKWITH. “Could two people who have been friends all their lives and then both experience Alzheimer’s suddenly become strangers?” she mused. “How well can you really get to ARTS

know someone you see at a coffee shop all the time?” The plays’ characters grapple with the fundamental unknowability of other human beings — and what that means for the state of interpersonal relationships. The official teaser for one of the works, Chagrin Valley by Boston playwright Hortense Gerardo, offers a glimpse of the existential territory in which the festival takes place: “Joris and Eloi meet-cute, until Gabriel comes along, and then it’s not so cute. But then again, define cute. Define anything.” The playwrights presenting works in the Stranger Festival — Gerardo; Beckwith, who lives in Roxbury; Elizabeth Flanagan, from San Francisco; and Alex STRANGER FESTIVAL

» P.22

COURTESY OF F. BRETT COX

THEATER

SEPTEMBER 6-8 Friday, 5pm-10pm Saturday, 10am-10pm Sunday, 11am-4pm SATURDAY ACTIVITIES FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY:

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JOEL BARBER & THE MODERN DECOY

8/27/19 4:55 PM

9.14.2O19– 1.12.2O2O

Decoys, drawings, historical photographs, and watercolors celebrate the life and artwork of the author, illustrator, and pioneering decoy collector.

Sarah Venooker and Clarke Jordan in Jeanne Beckwith’s play William Hazlitt and the Natural Correction

INFO The Stranger Festival, Thursday through Saturday, September 19 through 21, 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, September 22, 2 p.m., at Off Center for the Dramatic Arts in Burlington; Friday and Saturday, September 27 and 28, 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, September 29, 2 p.m., at the Grange Hall Cultural Center in Waterbury Center. $20. sevendaystickets.com, offcentervt.com, grangehallcc.com

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Joel Barber & the Modern Decoy is sponsored in part by The Donna and Marvin Schwartz Foundation, Guyette & Deeter, Inc., Copley Fine Art Auctions, and in honor of Ellin N. London. SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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studio sessions

SEPTEMBER 13 | 7:00 PM

A Green Mountain Gathering Performs and Celebrates Monteverdi

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Award-Winning & Critically-Acclaimed Prince Edward Island Folk Acoustic Singer-Songwriter, Catherine MacLellan is a perennial fixture at the top of Canada’s Roots Music Charts. She has won accolades from international media including The Boston Globe and BBC Radio.

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t’s September, so it must be time for a concert by the GREEN MOUNTAIN MONTEVERDI ENSEMBLE OF VERMONT . Once a year, founder and bass singer STEPHEN FALBEL gathers a handful of singers and instrumentalists for an early-music concert featuring his favorite composer, Claudio Monteverdi. Fittingly, the Italian composer’s last name means “green mountains.” So, yes, GMMEV is a triply redundant name. “I always joke that we’re looking for a rich person named Greenberg to fund the group so we can name it for that person, as well,” says Falbel. (Berg is German for “mountain.”) “We try not to take ourselves too seriously.” Falbel, a rather serious Harvard University graduate and public-transportation planning consultant, lives in Montpelier with his wife, LINDSEY WARREN, a soprano and pianist who teaches from her home studio. Falbel studied philosophy and German at Harvard — “of course, the natural lead-in to transportation and music,” he jokes — but he also sang in the Harvard Glee Club, which focused on Renaissance music. “I fell in love with it then,” Falbel notes. “I’ve always loved that period, up to and including baroque music and [Johann Sebastian] Bach.” While living in Boston, Falbel sang in the Tanglewood Festival Chorus and an early-music ensemble. He also met Burlington native Scott Metcalfe — founding director of Blue Heron — and other key figures in that city’s rich early-music scene. After moving to Vermont, Falbel met Warren when both were hired to sing solo

Stranger Festival « P.21 Karolyi, from Toronto — might have remained strangers themselves had they not met last summer at a master class in Concord, N.H. As Beckwith recalls, all the men in the workshop wrote dramas revolving around families, friends, lovers and other people with intimate knowledge of each other. The women’s plays, by pure coincidence, all pivoted on relationships in which the characters had no history. 22

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CLASSICAL MUSIC

Green Mountain Monteverdi Ensemble of Vermont, from left: Carolyn Dickinson, Adam Hall, Lindsey Warren, Stephen Falbel, Erik Nielsen and Molly Clark

parts with the ONION RIVER CHORUS, a Montpelier-based community choir. He founded GMMEV in 2012 with its first program already in mind. Falbel credits Metcalfe’s friend Dana Maiben, a baroque violinist on the music faculty at the Longy School of Music of Bard College, with the name. GMMEV’s concerts this weekend, on Friday and Saturday, September 6 and 7, in Burlington and Montpelier, respectively, are titled “Music of Love and War: Monteverdi and Schütz.” The program includes a selection of Monteverdi’s madrigals from his eighth book and works

Spurred by this synergistic connection, the four women decided to organize a theater festival around the stranger theme. Due to the relatively high cost of doing absolutely anything in Toronto, Boston or San Francisco, Vermont emerged as the locale of choice. But probing the various permutations of strangerhood isn’t the festival’s sole raison d’être, said Beckwith; creating a space for women to tell stories from their own perspectives was equally critical.


GOT AN ARTS TIP? ARTNEWS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

from Heinrich Schütz’s Symphoniae Sacrae II. Monteverdi (1567-1643), who is credited with inventing opera, revolutionized the vocal harmonies of Renaissance polyphony, practically defining the baroque. He wrote his eighth of nine books of madrigals late in life while serving as maestro di cappella at St. Mark’s Basilica in Venice. Schütz (1585-1672), perhaps the most important German composer before Bach, was his student there. Generally, the ensemble performs with only one voice to a part to better elucidate the music’s textual meaning and expressiveness. (“So if I have music with six voice parts, I have to find six

Nielsen is also a tenor. Before he moved to Vermont in the late 1980s to focus on composing, he sang in professional choirs and was a paid section leader in several church choirs, he says. “I’ve always loved pre-1700s music,” Nielsen comments. “Monteverdi and [Thomas] Tallis in particular have influenced me a good deal in my writing — which is not unusual among composers.” Nielsen recalls listening to his parents’ recording of Monteverdi’s Vespers of 1610. “This was long before the earlymusic craze, and I just fell in love with it. The music is transcendent. He uses these long lines of plainsong as an organizing unit and sets other lines against them.

IT’S CAPTIVATING TO THE EAR

BECAUSE IT’S SUCH GORGEOUS HARMONY. LIN DSE Y WARRE N

singers,” Falbel says.) Some voice parts are doubled in this weekend’s concerts, which feature sopranos Warren and MOLLY CLARK, contralto CAROLYN DICKINSON, tenors ADAM HALL and ERIK NIELSEN, and bass Falbel. Accompanying the singers are violinists Jesse Irons and Emily Dahl Irons, a couple who play in the acclaimed Boston early-music ensemble A Far Cry. (Jesse is from Berlin, Vt.) They are joined by Douglas Freundlich on theorbo — an instrument resembling an oversize lute with a towering neck — and Alice Robbins on baroque cello. Warren, who studied early music at McGill University, also plays harpsichord and sings in the trio Atlantis Baroque. She occasionally helps Falbel program GMMEV’s music. Of this program, she says, “It’s captivating to the ear because it’s such gorgeous harmony, and both composers have a lot of contrast in their music — a variety of textures.” Some classical fans may be surprised to learn that Brookfield composer

“Monteverdi is a towering composer,” Nielsen continues. “He almost singlehandedly brought the Western world from the late Renaissance into the baroque. He synthesized the old contrapuntal music with harmony. Also, he uses really large ranges for each singing part. It’s very expressive and dramatic. “Schütz is not up at the top of my list,” he adds, “but it’s all personal taste, right?” Whatever audiences’ tastes, Warren promises “a big mix of pieces for soloists, duets and full ensemble. And we’ve got a great band.” 

“Women still don’t get produced,” she said. According to American Theatre’s 2018 gender-parity survey, femaleauthored works accounted for 30 percent of all productions. A 2017 report by the Actors’ Equity Association found that white men continued to occupy the majority of high-level jobs. In the interest of disrupting this longstanding hegemony, the Stranger Festival has assembled a predominantly female and Vermont-based crew, including directors TESS HOLBROOK, MONICA CALLAN, KIM

WARD and SARAH VENOOKER. There are male

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roles in the plays, but, in this universe, the female artists get to be their puppeteers. Beckwith and her fellow playwrights can’t say whether the festival will continue in years to come — though she’s adamant that they’ll try to keep it going, perhaps in one of those aforementioned expensive cities. But she’s certain of one thing: “Our friendship is going to be permanent.” 

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This comic is an excerpt from This Is What Democracy Looks Like: A Graphic Guide to Governance, a 32-page comic that illustrates the layers of U.S. democracy from the executive branch down to local government. The comic is set to be distributed to schools and comic book stores around the country for free this fall. These pages were drawn by The Center for Cartoon Studies (CCS) graduate Dan Nott ‘18 and CCS cofounder James Sturm, with title text by Kevin Czap (CCS Fellow). You can download a free PDF of the comic, as well as a lesson plan, at cartoonstudies.org/democracy.

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HACKIE

A VERMONT CABBIE’S REAR VIEW BY JERNIGAN PONTIAC

The Scent of Marinara

J

ernigan, do you remember Sharon?” It was Greg on the line. In my Stable of Loyal Customers, he was a member in good standing. Greg’s a hardworking guy employed by one of the many local breweries that have sprung up over the last few years. Apparently, sales of suds rise dramatically in the summer, so he’s been regularly putting in 50- or even 60-hour weeks. “Is she your friend who lives on Barlow?” I asked. “The real short girl?” “Yup, that’s the one. Could you pick her up and drive her to my place? She’s in front of the Burlington food shelf. I’ll pay for the ride.” Greg lives in one of Winooski’s many public housing projects, a multistory building set aside for vets. Though we’ve never discussed it, I’ve assumed Greg was a vet because of: 1. his address, and 2. his occasional drinking at the VFW. “Sure, I can do that. Is she ready now?” “Yeah, she’ll be waiting for you. Also, on the way over, could ya stop at Papa Frank’s to pick up a to-go order? It’s all paid for.” “Roger Wilco. I’ll give you a jingle when we leave Papa Frank’s so you can meet me by the door.” Sharon, all five feet of her, was standing at the curb when I pulled up to the corner of North Union and North Winooski. “How ya doing, Sharon?” I asked as she settled into the shotgun seat. “I been better,” she replied. “Haven’t we all?” I sympathized. “We’re stopping at Papa Frank’s for an order on the way over, so that’s good news, right?”

“That is good. I could use a hearty meal.” From the times I’ve driven her, I’ve surmised that this woman has had a rocky life. I don’t know the details; one can only imagine. But she’s still standing, and that counts for something in this callous world. As we eased to a red-light stop at the eastern end of Riverside Avenue, to our right a homeless man stood at the curb holding a sign. This is evidently a lucrative panhandling spot because,

I’LL GIVE YOU THREE GUESSES WHAT RESTAURANT I WOULD HIT UP LATER THAT EVENING.

rain or shine, it seems someone is always stationed there. I’m torn about giving money to people begging on the street. Mostly I won’t, but if my intuition speaks to me otherwise, I will. I noticed Sharon gazing at the guy, as well. She said, “I picked up about $75 downtown earlier today.” At first, I was unclear what she meant, but then realized she was talking about panhandling. This took me aback and, in that moment, a bit of self-knowledge pinched me. I saw that homeless folks, in my mind, were a separate breed: the redheaded stepchildren of the human family, the unwanted and neglected misfits. Seeing them this way, rather than as individual souls — in truth, my down-and-out brothers and sisters — allowed me to walk past them on the street with a closed mind and benumbed heart. Sharon telling me about her panhan-

RAINTREE

weeks. So, a girl’s gotta do what a girl’s gotta do.” We swung around the Winooski circle and I pulled in across from Papa Frank’s. “Could you go in to get the food?” I asked. “I better remain in the car ’cause this ain’t a legal spot.” Awaiting Sharon’s return, the aroma emanating from the eatery was getting me high. I’m a big fan of Papa Frank’s, a genuine community institution that’s been open at this location since the early ’80s. I mean, what’s better than good, cheap Italian food? My idea of heaven is a Barcalounger; a continuous loop of The Godfather, parts I and II, on a ginormous flat screen; and a red-sauce IV at the ready. (I would add Rosanna Arquette as my private nurse, but I don’t want to be greedy.) Sharon returned with the big bag of takeout, and I rang up Greg to let him know we’d be over in a jiffy. When we

pulled up to the rear entrance, he wasn’t down yet. Sharon got out to wait on a bench by the door. After five minutes and still no Greg, I asked her to give him a buzz and see what was what. “It’s going to voicemail,” she reported. “That fucking guy — I bet he’s been drinking and nodded out. I’m not paying for this ride, you know!” “Relax, Sharon. I wouldn’t dream of asking you. Greg’s good for it — he’ll pay me either now or later.” After five more minutes of crickets, I bid goodbye to Sharon and took off. Ten minutes after that, I heard from Greg. “I found Sharon sitting in the back,” he said, his voice rising in annoyance. “Where were you, man? I was waiting for you in the front. I got your money.” “Greg, my man — I always drop you in the back. You’ve told me that works better for you.” “Yeah, but for pick ups, it’s the front.” How the heck was I supposed to know that? I thought, chuckling to myself. He said it like it was self-evident. “Drop off back, pick up front — got it. Don’t worry about the fare, Greg. I’ll get it from you next time.” I’ll give you three guesses what restaurant I would hit up later that evening. When the red sauce calls to me, I’m a goner. m All these stories are true, though names and locations may be altered to protect privacy.

INFO Hackie is a twice-monthly column that can also be read on sevendaysvt.com. To reach Jernigan, email hackie@sevendaysvt.com.

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dling awakened me to this dead zone in my consciousness. It was impossible for me to retroactively relegate her to the nameless, faceless category of “insignificant others.” She was already a fully embodied individual to me, a person I knew and respected. “Sharon, don’t you have a job?” I asked. “I was laid off a few months back, and I have to make rent,” she explained. “I took a cleaning job at the Motel 6, but I won’t get my first check for another two

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From campus to politics to business, Vermonters use an internet phenom to get the word out BY MAR GAR E T GR AYS O N

K

atie Corrigan really just wanted a place to kvetch. It was the spring of 2017, and Middlebury College was all over the national news. On March 2 of that year, social scientist Charles Murray, who had written “widely discredited racebased theories of intelligence,” as the New York Times put it, visited campus for a speech. Student protestors derailed the speech and surrounded Murray as he left the building afterward. A Middlebury professor was diagnosed with a concussion after a protestor pulled her hair. The condemnations came like a tidal wave. The Atlantic published an op-ed titled “A Violent Attack on

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Free Speech at Middlebury.” The New York Times editorial board called the protestors “thoughtless agitators.” Under this outside scrutiny, the college disciplined 67 students for participating in the protests. Administrators and professors faced a public relations nightmare and a tense campus climate. Some students felt the administration had dismissed their concerns, kowtowed to Murray and punished them unfairly for protesting. Corrigan, who was at the time a sophomore studying sociology and anthropology, stood firmly with the protestors. “Honestly, nowhere I’ve ever been in my life produces controversy as quickly as a liberal arts campus,” she said.

Corrigan had recently visited a friend at the University of Pennsylvania. In Penn’s meme group on Facebook, established in 2016 and called the Official Unofficial Penn Squirrel Catching Club, she saw students using memes to joke about the inadequacy of the school’s mental health services. Corrigan envied the Penn students’ platform for satire and venting — then realized she could make her own. She founded the group Middlebury Memes for Crunchy Teens on March 26 with 24 original members, mostly her friends and people from her firstyear dorm. The first meme she posted was a simple combination of two screenshots that expressed anger over what she regarded as a Middlebury

professor’s disparagement of her students and colleagues. To people who grew up in an analog world, online memes probably seem like an odd — and unfamiliar — vehicle for student political protest. So what is a meme, exactly? Pronounced “meem,” it’s a bitesize package of meaning that often carries enough invisible baggage to fill a dump truck. It’s a way to distill a complicated thought or debate down to a shareable, visual form. Patrick Wallace, Middlebury’s digital projects and archives librarian, defined a meme as “an image, often from some type of pop media, that is combined with original text in order to convey an original notion.”


(The result is often called an “image macro.”) Then he clarified: The meme is not the image or the text alone but “the idea expressed through that combination.” A meme is also something that any online-literate person can create. The Vermonters who create memes include students like Corrigan, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) supporters, people selling sandwiches and people who just think memes are funny. But they all have in co mmon a commitment to pithy, easily transmissible grassroots expression. A place to share their feelings about the entire college experience was what Corrigan and her fellow students wanted. “We need a platform to talk about the BS that happens here,” Corrigan said. Starting the meme page, she said, “had a tremendous amount to do with how I believed that the administration was handling Charles Murray coming to campus poorly.” The meme group blew up. Today, Middlebury Memes has nearly 2,600 members. Middlebury College’s total enrollment, according to U.S. News & World Report, is 2,500. While the group includes some alumni, it’s safe to assume a sizable portion of current students participate, because the group is closed to curious outsiders. Before new students are allowed to join the group, moderators crosscheck their names with the student directory. In early 2019, TORRE Corrigan got an email from Wallace, the librarian, and Nellie Pierce, a library fellow. They wanted to start archiving the memes in the library’s special collections. “I just, like, laughed,” Corrigan said. “I just think it’s funny, you know. But also flattering.”

as “a renunciation of reason and celebration of ignorance” and said she was “troubled” when some of her fellow professors joined in the objections and protests. Corrigan combined this image with a screenshot of the title bar of a YouTube video called “Top 10 Anime Betrayals,” so that the op-ed headline now appears to be the YouTube still image. By associating the editorial with a “betrayal,” Corrigan expressed her belief that Stanger was unfairly distancing herself from Middlebury College and its students to her own benefit. The meme format Corrigan chose turns her opinion into a shareable image that plays on a confluence of potentially humorous topics — YouTube, listicles, anime and more. The “Top 10 Anime Betrayals” caption comes from WatchMojo, a YouTube channel with more than 21 million subscribers that deals in pop culturerelated video listicles. (A few others include “Top 10 Most Dangerous Cults in Gaming” and “Top 20 Hilarious Impressions Done by Celebrities.”) The format of Corrigan’s meme is common enough that the social media platform Reddit has given it a name: a “smooby,” defined as “a screenshot of a video in which the title of the video or still image shown has been edited to make the screenshot as a whole humorous.” The thing about a meme, though — as the previous analysis illustrates — is that, DAVY if you have to explain it, it’s probably not going to be funny. A good meme is just a template, the knock-knock joke of the online era. A knock-knock joke wouldn’t be funny if you’d never heard one before; you have to know the script and play along, anticipating a punny punchline. Some memes aren’t funny unless you can decode their complicated cultural references. But it’s not always that deep; others are just pictures of cats. And the term itself originated long before most people were online — in 1976, in a book called The Selfish Gene by evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins. Dawkins chose the word “meme” because it sounded similar to “gene.” He used it to refer to any unit of

IT REMAINS, TO ME … A VERY UNIQUE FORUM FOR MIDDLEBURY STUDENTS.

The Knock-Knock Joke of the Online Era

How does a meme work? Corrigan’s first meme in the group started with a screenshot of a New York Times op-ed by Allison Stanger, the professor who got a concussion during the Murray protests. In the piece, titled “Understanding the Angry Mob at Middlebury,” Stanger lamented the events at Middlebury

culture, such as an idea, style or joke, that passed from person to person. “Just as biological evolution is driven by the survival of the fittest genes in the gene pool, cultural evolution may be driven by the most successful memes,” Dawkins wrote. He theorized that memes, like genes, mutate and evolve in response to outside pressure. The first use of the word to describe an internet trend is attributed to Mike Godwin. Writing for Wired in 1994, he described a troubling tendency of all online arguments to devolve into comparisons of one’s opponents to Nazis. The “countermeme” he invented to try to stem the trend became widely known as “Godwin’s law.” In today’s online culture, the term “meme” can refer to a catchphrase, a video, a dance move or even just a manner of speaking or typing. Rickrolling — or the practice of tricking people into clicking on a link that leads them to the music video for Rick Astley’s “Never Gonna Give You Up” — is a meme. The Harlem Shake was a meme, as was planking. Some memes are phrases that embed themselves in the internet’s collective consciousness and bounce around until they shed all semblance of meaning and are replaced by newer, even more bizarre obsessions. In the fall of 2018, there was a brief period when it seemed like everyone on the internet was saying, “They did surgery on a grape.” The phrase had no discernible meaning beyond its original use to caption an Instagram

video of surgical equipment being used to peel a grape. If you try to research its origin, you’ll find only joke articles from online news outlets and a confused and sad piece in Forbes that begins with trying to understand the origins of the meme and ends by explaining the grape-peeling technology and calling it a day. That’s a meme. To confuse things even more, internet memes don’t always stay on the internet. This summer, a Seven Days reporter at Sterling Pond on a Saturday afternoon observed several kids, roughly between the ages of 9 and 13, threatening to “yeet” each other into the water. For this generation, the verb “yeet” is all but interchangeable with “throw.” Why? The secret lies in a viral video posted in 2014 on the app Vine, in which a young woman hands her friend a soda can. Realizing it’s empty, the friend hurls it down a school hallway, yelling, “Yeet!” Meme culture lives all over the web. Many memes originate on Twitter, but screenshots of them reach vast audiences on Instagram. Reddit remains a consistent home for memes, and teens are turning to the video platform TikTok in massive numbers. The website Know Your Meme, the closest thing that exists to a library of memes, traces various meme formats or online trends back to their original sources and explores their evolution. A more localized form of meme evolution is what Wallace hopes to

SAY WHAT YOU MEME

Katie Corrigan’s first meme in the Middlebury Memes for Crunchy Teens group, equating professor Allison Stanger’s New York Times op-ed to an anime betrayal

» P.30

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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Big Meme on Campus

College meme pages like the one at Middlebury have sprung up across the country since 2011. Many of them have names that riff on a Facebook group created in 2015 called Dank Memes for Edgy Teens, according to Know Your Meme. Some of them grew rapidly. The group Harvard Memes for Elitist 1% Tweens has almost 57,000 members. UCLA Memes for Sick AF Tweens has more than 64,000. But the winner, by far, is UC Berkeley Memes for Edgy Teens, which is home to more than 193,000 members. In the fall of 2018, the University of California, Berkeley had slightly more than 42,500 students. The creator of the UC Berkeley meme group, Chris Tril, wrote in the Daily Californian that “memes were a mistake.” He compared himself to the inventor of the 30

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

COURTESY OF LEXI KRAVITZ

IF YOU HAVE TO EXPLAIN IT, IT’S PROBABLY NOT GOING TO BE FUNNY.

Corrigan to embargo the archived memes for five years before making them visible to the public. The goal is to protect students from potential fallout while they’re still on campus. The library also only sweeps the page once or twice per semester, giving students plenty of time to remove posts they might regret. At the University of Vermont, senior William Wuttke founded the group Make UV Groovy Again in April 2017. MUGA, as it’s called, lacks many of the restrictions of the Middlebury group. Everyone is welcome, not just UVM students, and many of the memes are reposts from other pages or unrelated to the college experience. The group gained 2,000 followers within a week. Now it has about 5,800. The meme page can be a place to debate campus issues, Wuttke said. For instance, in the fall of 2017, a student Make UV Groovy Again meme using the popular “Who Would Win?” posted in the group format to criticize UVM for spending money on free sweatshirts for first-year students instead of on trashcans. that UVM was littered with cigarette butts, When Middlebury special collections even though it was ostensibly a “smokestarted archiving the page, the library free campus.” Commenters were quick made an agreement with Davy and to attribute the problem to a lack of

COURTESY OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF MEMES

chronicle by archiving Corrigan’s Middlebury Memes page. Corrigan has seen the remnants of Middlebury student life that are preserved in the college’s archives, such as scrapbooks from the 1930s and ’40s. “It’s all just postcards and cocktail pamphlets and corsages,” she said. To her mind, such collections don’t evoke how it felt to be a Middlebury student back then. That’s exactly the problem that Wallace hopes to correct. He’s responsible both for digitizing Middlebury’s current archives and for archiving new cultural artifacts that exist only online. The latter range from emails sent and received by senior Middlebury administrators, to Facebook pages for student groups, to a Tumblr dedicated entirely to pictures of broccoli from a Middlebury dining hall. Wallace, 37, has been online since before the internet as we know it existed. He sees digital archiving as a way to create a more holistic view of life on campus and open up the archives to a broader range of voices. “The web archive really came from the idea that most student socialization happens online,” Wallace said. “Preserving voices that are critical, or that are dissenting or that maybe don’t show their experience in the best light, is very important.” Both Wallace and Corrigan said they like the idea of Middlebury students 100 years from now seeing the archived Middlebury meme page and understanding their peers from this age a little better.

Meme about law enforcement in Vermont taking maple syrup very seriously COURTESY OF VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF MEMES

Keurig K-Cup, who has publicly lamented the waste brought on by the disposable pod coffee revolution he sparked. Corrigan doesn’t regret her creation to that extent. But she’s quick to say that the Middlebury Memes page has become something she never expected or planned. “This is my private Facebook group that I made three years ago that kind of got out of hand,” Corrigan said. “I, like, unleashed a monster in a way I totally didn’t realize I was going to. Not that anything serious or bad has happened,” she added. And “serious or bad” things can happen. In 2017, the Harvard Crimson reported that at least 10 students admitted to the Harvard University class of 2021 had had their admission revoked after they posted racist memes and memes about sexual assault and child abuse in a group chat that was titled, at one point, “Harvard memes for horny bourgeois teens.” Corrigan and Torre Davy, who took over the Middlebury page when Corrigan graduated, haven’t had to deal with anything of that nature. The posts they take down, Davy said, are usually reposts or memes unrelated to the college. Davy said he takes down fewer than one in 10 posts. He noted that, though the meme page was created for students to respond satirically to the Charles Murray situation and air other grievances, many of the memes are lighthearted. “It remains, to me … a very unique forum for Middlebury students,” Davy said. “It’s not quite like anything else.”

Say What You Meme « P.29

trashcans on campus. One pointed to a petition for more cigarette butt receptacles, created the year before. A 2018 Vermont Cynic article confirmed that UVM’s waste supervisor had deliberately removed trashcans from campus, both for aesthetic reasons and to encourage students to be more “responsible” with their waste. Not everyone in the meme group agreed about the trashcans, but the topic spawned a few popular memes. And in February 2019, the Student Government Association passed a resolution supporting more campus receptacles for cigarette butts. Wuttke pointed to this outcome as an example of how the meme page exists in synergy with off-screen discussions of campus issues. He said another topic that has sparked debate on the meme page is the process of choosing the new UVM president, Suresh Garimella. But not all campus memes are serious, and any minor gripe can be turned into a meme. “Dining hall memes do very well,” Wuttke said. “Suddenly it’s exciting to get a bad meal at a dining hall.”


Meme commenting on the state of Vermont roads

similar joke had popped up on another Vermont-themed Facebook page, he said. Now Power and Naccarato watermark their original memes. Common themes include maple syrup, unpredictable weather and hating Rutland. They’re currently gunning for 10,000 likes.

Memes Fought the Law, and So Far Nobody Won

Maple Syrup, Unpredictable Weather and Hating Rutland

Students aren’t the only Vermonters passing memes back and forth. The Vermont Department of Memes Facebook page has more than 9,700 likes. The page’s logo is fashioned to resemble a state seal with a trio of images in the center: a jug of maple syrup, a turning maple tree and Bernie Sanders. The page is run by Matt Power and Alex Naccarato, a pair of 20-year-olds from Springfield who now live in Burlington. “As teenagers, our generation is always on the internet and always reading the news,” Power said. “I’m looking at memes, like, all day and sharing them with my friends.” The Vermont Department of Memes page launched with an image of Burlington’s Church Street overlaid with the text “Vermont: A mountainous region of small villages in which hippies and rednecks coexist more or less peacefully.” Combining an irreverent statement about Vermont’s quirkiness with a bland shot of one of the state’s most iconic tourist destinations, the meme was a Facebook gold mine. It was shared more than 3,200 times and got 57 comments. “I think we stole that one,” Naccarato said with a laugh. The two aren’t really concerned about where their memes come from. Their most popular meme to date is a pair of screenshots from the TV show “Family Guy” with labels that transform them into a joke about the superiority of Vermont, Maine and New Hampshire to Massachusetts. Power said a friend sent it to him. The meme has 3,700 shares, 1,000 reactions and 422 comments. (It’s an example of a common meme format, referred to as “You Guys Always Act Like You’re Better Than Me” on Know Your Meme, which is actually based on a misquote of a “Family Guy” scene.) While Naccarato and Power admit to having appropriated others’ memes, most of their content is now original, and they don’t like having their own ideas replicated. Once, just hours after posting a joke to the page, Naccarato noticed a

Just as memes live at the intersection of many different strains of humor, they’re also affected by many different aspects of the law. Memes routinely use copyrighted images, from stock photos to paparazzi images of celebrities to screenshots from movies and TV. And, of course, memes copy other memes. To what extent does the First Amendment protect their creators? “Copyright law is an anti-free-speech law, in a sense,” said Oliver Goodenough, who’s a Vermont Law School professor specializing in intellectual property law and a special counsel at Gravel & Shea PC in Burlington. Goodenough has studied how the law works in terms of digital technology and, in his words, “the mismatch of technology and the regulatory structures around technology.” Anyone who takes a photo owns that photo, just as songwriters own their lyrics and melodies and NBC owns screenshots of scenes from “The Office.” Those owners have the right to demand payment for use of their work, whether in print or online. If, however, someone has significantly transformed the work, whether in appearance or in meaning, then they can argue “fair use” of the copyrighted image, a legal defense. Do memes count as transformation under the “fair use” doctrine? Using an image to comment on something else isn’t the same as transforming its meaning, Goodenough said. Memes are sometimes called parody, which was established as fair use in famous cases such as that of the Gone With the Wind parody The Wind Done Gone. While a parody specifically mocks the work it appropriates, however, memes typically use that work to mock something else. In the example from Vermont Department of Memes, for instance, the shots from “Family Guy” are used to mock not the show itself but the denizens of Massachusetts. Goodenough said he expects that Congress will need to re-examine fair use laws in the digital age. Copyright law, he noted, was formulated back when copying was a relatively difficult and expensive process, requiring resources such as a printing press or audio equipment. SAY WHAT YOU MEME

» P.32

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Say What You Meme « P.31 Today, anyone can copy nearly anything at the touch of a button. A person who makes a meme from a copyrighted image, Goodenough said, is “at least opening the door to a fair bit of legal risk. And the question is, does the risk come through the door and bite them?” It would be neither practical nor particularly lucrative for copyright owners to go after every teen who shares their image in a meme. But publications and businesses, which have deeper pockets, are more vulnerable. The owners of Grumpy Cat, for instance, successfully sued a coffee company for more than $700,000 for selling unauthorized Grumpy Cat-themed T-shirts. Wondering why this story doesn’t feature direct reproductions of many online memes? You’ve got your answer.

“People seem to be very into it,” Yost said. “I’m very surprised more businesses don’t do it, considering it’s just not challenging.” Kountry Kart has received little negative feedback, the pair said, beyond the occasional customer asking for an explanation of what a meme is. Once, LicholsNeach posted a meme using the ubiquitous “distracted boyfriend” stock photo of a man walking with one woman while looking over his shoulder at another. (You know, the one on our cover.) She labeled the girlfriend “oatmeal” and the distracting woman “Shiner.” Someone commented that the meme was “kind of sexist.” “How is this sexist? It’s about breakfast,” Lichols-Neach said. Regardless, she messaged the commenter to clarify the post’s intentions and smooth things over.

Eat Sandwiches, Not Tide Pods

Copyright issues haven’t stopped businesses from getting in on the meme game. Sometimes they become memes themselves: Arby’s, Slim Jim and MoonPie are a few national brands whose online presences are deeply embedded in meme discourse. In Burlington, Kountry Kart Deli has been posting memes on Instagram since January 2018. It all started with a simple image that capitalized on online trends to sell the deli’s signature breakfast sandwich, the Shiner. The meme read “Tide Pod: Bad. Shiner: Good.” Two longtime employees, Adrea Lichols-Neach and Carlton Yost, are behind the deli’s meme renaissance. Before them, the Kountry Kart Instagram page was mostly populated with photos of the deli’s sandwiches. “It’s hard to get good pictures of sandwiches,” Lichols-Neach noted. Originally, the point of the memes was to boost morale among the mostly young staff, Yost and Lichols-Neach said. The posts weren’t based on any kind of marketing strategy — but the owner, Mike Williams, liked them. When the pair took over the Instagram account, it had about 200 followers. Today, it has more than 1,600. Recent memes have featured Keanu Reeves, White Claw Hard Seltzer and Area 51. Yost and Lichols-Neach even held a meme contest and received more than 70 entries. Williams encourages them with bets, like challenging them to get mentioned in 40 Instagram stories over a weekend. Yost and Lichols-Neach pulled it off, and Williams had to wear a wig while working the register. This spectacle, of course, was also ’grammed. 32

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

“Most people probably think that we’re one young dude,” Yost said. He’s 29, and Lichols-Neach is 37. “Whenever we get messages, it’s like, ‘Hey, bro.’ And it makes me laugh really, really hard,” Lichols-Neach added.

Bernie Sanders and the Memes of Production

The power of memes has been displayed on stages much larger than Vermont. In 2016, the Washington Post declared none other than Bernie Sanders, then in the midst of his first presidential run, “the lord of ‘dank memes.’” This was thanks to a Facebook group called Bernie Sanders’ Dank Meme Stash, founded in 2015. The Post wrote that the group had 300,000 followers in 2016. Today, it’s closing in on 400,000. “You’ve heard that many voters chose George W. Bush in 2004 because they thought he’d make the best drinking buddy; 12 years later, as we approach the mostmemed election in U.S. history, it may very well matter which candidate makes the best

image macro or remixed Pepe,” wrote Post week of the announcement, membership reporter Caitlin Dewey. (Pepe the Frog is ballooned to 60,000. The page was home a cartoon character created by Matt Furie to calls to action, fundraising efforts, donathat the alt-right has used in memes to tion requests, discussions of news articles repurpose into a mascot.) and, of course, plenty of Sanders memes. Sanders’ campaign King and Fredrick were wasn’t the first to deal later named to Wired’s in memes, and he wasn’t list of “20 Tech Insidthe first candidate to ers Defining the 2016 be meme-ified. In 2012, Campaign.” Barack Obama’s reelec“[Sanders] obviously tion campaign shared had a message that was a Mean Girls GIF to resonating online,” promote a presidential said Georgia Parke, senior social media debate, and a comicstyle drawing of Obama strategist for Sanders’ known as the “‘Not Bad’ 2020 campaign. “He Face” dates to 2011, was speaking the same according to Know Your language.” Meme. But the massive Parke, originally online grassroots from Stowe, is part of community that a team of Sanders staffC A R LT O N YO S T formed around ers who constantly seek Sanders — often out new corners of the independently of his campaign — internet in which to spread the campaign’s was a testament to the rising power message. The campaign is now on Twitch, of social media in politics. a video game live-streaming site. Parke’s In December 2013, Aidan King next project is a Bernie Sanders TikTok cofounded a subreddit called /r/ account. To the campaign staffers, SandSandersforPresident. This was long ers’ success on platforms such as Reddit before Sanders actually announced is a sign of his ability to reach people who his candidacy. King, originally from might not otherwise engage in politics. “We want to reach people where they are,” said Josh Miller-Lewis, Sanders’ digital communications director. “Bernie’s mission is to bring more and more people into the political process.” For King, running /r/SandersforPresident eventually translated into a real job as one of two members of the 2016 campaign’s digital team. Creating shareable graphic images was what they did every day. Some memes, King said, suggest an evolution of the political cartoon. Take, for example, the viral video of Sanders running down an escalator to catch a train, with his suit jacket flapping and his signature shock of white hair. In the hands of meme makers, that imagery becomes a vehicle for a message such as Kountry Kart Deli memes “Bernie will sprint down an escalator and out the door if he heard that some Wall Montpelier, and David Fredrick of San Street CEO was about to get off easy in a Jose, Calif., had bonded over their disdain court case,” King said. for Wall Street bankers and their shared Do memes actually translate into admiration for the Vermont senator. They increased civic engagement? King thinks so. almost named the subreddit something “It’s a really easy way to kind of share like /r/BernieSanders, King said, but political ideas with people, and to share decided “it should be more idealistic than political commentary or political observathat.” tions. It’s formatted in a way that’s kind of Before Sanders announced his candi- designed to reach a lot of people,” he said. dacy in April 2015, the subreddit had about “Once you have someone following your 10,000 members, King said. That meant page because they liked a meme … that’s Sanders already had a decent-size online when you can follow up with your more base ready and waiting for him. Within a explicit asks.”

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culture. He doesn’t feel like he has concrete answers, and there’s relatively little academic study on the subject. Are memes just regurgitating consumerist pop culture? Or are they reclaiming it? Are they critical of their source material? Memes were born of the internet because they’re the perfect vehicle for information online — concise, visually appealing and able to make viewers feel like they’re on the inside of the joke. But they can have offline consequences, both for those who create them and for the world at large. And once a meme is out there, it’s not always easy to take back. If there’s anything Wallace rues about the way the internet has evolved, he said, it’s the end of anonymity. He’s uncomfortable with the idea that a Facebook page can stand in for his actual personhood and that everything he does online is somehow associated with his real identity. Some meme makers seem to be recognizing the value of privacy and anonymity. Young Instagrammers often create “finstas” (shorthand VARIATIONS ON A MEME: This 2016 meme format pitted for “fake Insta”) where they Sanders against Hillary Clinton on various pop-culture post more off-color or offtopics. Critics said the memes were sexist. brand content for friends’ King doesn’t think this online momen- eyes only. Memes are shared more and tum is limited to Sanders. (He doesn’t more frequently through private direct work for the Sanders campaign anymore messages and message groups. — he’s with Middle Seat, a consulting One UVM student, who declined to be firm that’s running online advertising named for this story, anonymously started and fundraising for Beto O’Rourke’s 2020 the Instagram account @uvmwoes to campaign.) While King acknowledges criticize the UVM administration and that a lot of “incredibly talented and poke fun at campus life. The account has borderline weird” supporters — this is a gained more than 1,000 followers since compliment — flocked to Sanders in 2016, February, but the student said it isn’t he called such people the engine behind something she wants to be known for in any successful campaign. real life. “I would hope that 2016 was kind of Anonymity on the internet allows a eye-opening in terms of how important young person to try on different identiand how valuable the internet was as a ties, Wallace pointed out. tool for building awareness and generat“That’s my old-man-yelling-at-cloud ing support for a candidate,” King said. “It moment,” Wallace said with a laugh, of certainly did wonders for getting people his doubts about online culture. “Old man involved who otherwise would kind of yelling at cloud,” by the way, refers to a tune out the election process, or kind of popular screenshot from “The Simpsons,” watch it go by from the sidelines.” often shared online to indicate someone is fighting a losing battle of minor Living in a Meme World consequence. Wallace, the Middlebury digital archives In other words, it’s a meme. m librarian, spends a lot of time thinking about the impact of digital memes on Contact: margaret@sevendaysvt.com

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GLENN RUSSELL

Kristian Brevik

Whales’ Tale

At the South End Art Hop, Kristian Brevik’s whale sculptures illuminate a crisis B Y PA M EL A P O L S T O N

K

ristian Brevik says he started making art “as far back as I can remember.” Recently, at his family’s home in Port Townsend, Wash., he unearthed a drawing of a plesiosaur he’d made as a preschooler. No one knew at the time that the drawing — or his childhood obsession with prehistoric creatures — was a harbinger of things to come. This weekend at Burlington’s South End Art Hop, Brevik, 31, will display his latest creation: a 14-foot whale suspended from the ceiling of a gallery in the Generator maker space. Brevik is quick to give other Generator members credit for helping to build the creature, and he notes the financial backing the nonprofit gave him to cover the materials. “We challenged Kristian to make a big one,” says Generator executive director Chris Thompson. “Generator has a fund to help projects come to life.” This whale’s life began at the facility’s laser cutter, where Brevik created a cardboard mold. He covered it with cotton muslin and resin, creating “modified papier-mâché,” as he puts it. LED lights 34

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illuminate the whale from within, silhouetting its skeletal structure. So, yes, the whale is also a whopper of a lamp. Creating glowing critters is not new for Brevik. Last year’s Art Hop introduced attendees to his smaller-scale whale lamps, roughly two to three feet in length. A pod of them seemed to swim above Hoppers’ heads in front of the Lamp Shop on Pine Street. Their appeal was instant and has had staying power; Brevik continues to make the lamps and sell them in local shops, including Frog Hollow Vermont Craft Gallery and Thirty-odd, as well as on Etsy. Whether hanging or affixed to a base, each lamp is modeled after a whale of the orca, blue, gray, right, sperm or humpback variety. A member of the local Illumination Collective — a group of artists who work with light and shadow — Brevik contributed his lamps to a “magical forest” at last year’s Champlain Mini Maker Faire. He

also created “glowing surprises” for an installation at the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain for the inaugural Highlight, a New Year’s Eve celebration. Though Brevik says he’d like his lamp making to become a viable business, his interest in whales is not trifling, nor are his intentions solely artistic. He is also a scientist and a champion of biodiversity. In 2014, Brevik moved to Burlington to enter a graduate program in the Department of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Vermont. Generally, he’s interested in the impact of humans on the planet’s nonhumans. Specifically, as he explains on his website, his studies have a twopronged goal: “to find a way we can understand how to make a world for our kin of all species”; and to explore the evolution of the Colorado potato beetle as a result of transposable elements and epigenetics. Wait, potato beetle? That seems like a far cry from whales. Clearly Brevik’s interest extends to creatures large and small.

SCIENCE AND ART WILL MEET IN A MARINE-THEMED INSTALLATION AT GENERATOR.

Regardless of size, he notes, all species can fall prey to their environments, whether they’re sprayed with pesticides or they choke on plastic waste in the ocean. The tiny potato beetle has become resistant to more than 50 pesticides to date, Brevik notes. Accordingly, it gives scientists a chance to observe evolution practically in real time: the rapid adaptation of an insect trying to outpace constant chemical attacks. “Our relationship with this beetle is that they’re a pest,” Brevik says. It’s easy to see why — the bug can destroy thousands of acres of potatoes. “How to cultivate empathy even for a species we dislike is a tough one,” Brevik concedes. But heightening our empathy may be necessary for our own survival. In a paper posted on his website, Brevik argues that Earth’s ecological crisis is directly related to humans’ attitude of superiority to other species. We may consider unwelcome plants or animals “invasive,” yet “Which species is causing the most damage on the Earth?” Brevik asks. In a statement on his site, Brevik connects those ecological concerns with


his artistic practice. “Coming to terms with the grief caused by the endangerment and extinctions of plants and animals which we humans are responsible for is a monumental challenge,” he writes. “I work to find ways that art can help to foster a sense of deep connectedness with the nonhuman kin with whom we share the world.” Hence the whale lamps — not to mention the other creatures Brevik has constructed, which include wasps, centipedes, grasshoppers, trilobites and fireflies. While science alone hasn’t persuaded us to change our thinking about human-to-nonhuman connections, art can bring the issue “down to an individual scale,” Brevik suggests. Last November he put that principle in practice when he presented a large installation called “Entangled: Ghost Whales” at a meeting of the North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium in the New Bedford Whaling Museum. Large “ghost whale” lanterns were suspended overhead and caught up in fishing lines. As photos of the installation show, the sight was gut wrenching. Brevik’s ambitions include finishing his PhD and “doing larger installations and partnering with organizations.” One idea is to create an installation of lanterns equal in number to the surviving members of a particular endangered species — for example, 73 lanterns to represent the 73 southern resident killer whales thought to remain in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. Ecological crises happen in Vermont, too, Brevik notes, and his next project is locally relevant. Funded with a recent grant from the Vermont Arts Council, it will address the state’s endangered bird species. Overall, Vermont lists 52 animals as endangered or threatened, as well as 163 plants. Meantime, at this weekend’s Art Hop, science and art will meet in a marinethemed installation at Generator. Creatures crafted by other Illumination Collective members will join Brevik’s whale, Thompson says. Perhaps empathy will show up, too. m

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Theater review: Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins, Grange Theatre BY ALE X BR O W N COURTESY OF EMMY WALDEN FOX

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he story of a tone-deaf socialite who gives singing recitals could be a one-note joke, but the Grange Theatre’s production is a funny and sweetly moving duet for two engaging characters. Souvenir: A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins is Stephen Temperley’s dramatization of the real-life vocalist’s tragically bad performing career, as told through the eyes of her accompanist, Cosme McMoon. It’s a 9/3/19 10:45 AM comedy that cleverly swings between high and low humor, and the performances are as polished as the gleaming baby grand piano onstage. Audiences were drawn to witness the folly of the talentless Jenkins in the 1930s and ’40s. Viewers of Souvenir get the same train wreck of awful opera, but with a comedic look at what it means to believe sevendaysvt.com in oneself a little too much.

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Josh D. Smith and Georga Osborne

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Jenkins couldn’t hit a note except by accident, but she performed to ballroom crowds, sold a record she called “a lovely souvenir” of her voice and made it all the way to Carnegie Hall. She abides on

IN A POWERFUL SCENE, COSME FEELS HE MUST

MAKE FLORENCE SEE HER LIMITATIONS. YouTube still, and her story has been told in several plays and films. Her society friends stuffed handkerchiefs in their mouths to keep from guffawing, but Jenkins mistook this for rapture

at her efforts at soprano coloratura. Her extravagant performance costumes were shake-your-head-in-disbelief kitsch. Souvenir is framed as pianist Cosme’s remembrances, but his narration soon gives way to enacted events. He sets the tone by puzzling at his dozen years accompanying a dreadful singer. “People used to say to me, ‘Why does she do it?’ I always thought the better question was ‘Why did I?’” When they first meet, Florence tells young Cosme of her musical passion and artistic repertoire, then offers him a job as her accompanist. She’s rich, he’s poor, and this seems like the big break he’s been looking for. Then he hears her sing. Summoning deep reserves of courtesy, he notes that she “may not yet be entirely secure in the notes.” But she can no more hear the criticism than she can the


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cringe-inducing tone that she believes to be a glorious F above high C. Does self-worth come from within or without? Florence seems to have an ample supply, but it still requires validation by her audiences and Cosme, and all of them are deceiving her. She came from a wealthy family, and money is one neat insulator against criticism. Her society friends feigned delight at her singing and encouraged her to give recitals. She was so bad that she developed an audience willing to marvel at her ability to stand on a stage and fail. Being sure of oneself is either a superpower or a kind of blindness. Florence shows exactly the attitude any artist needs, but she can’t complement it with talent. Cosme wonders if she’s deluded or just spectacularly selfassured. As he doubts his own ability to advance his career as a composer, he starts to admire her confidence. The play is the story of her effect on him, for good or ill. ArtisTree’s Music Theatre Festival artistic director Josh D. Smith plays Cosme, grounding him in a gentle demeanor. Too kind to crush Florence’s dreams, he gives her what she wants. He winces when she sings, then masters his expression and supports her fantasy. It’s generous, but Cosme has a delusion of his own, believing that his financial dependence on Florence is a fair exchange for a good life, even if he isn’t making a name for himself as a composer. Cosme often does his narration at the keyboard, recollecting as he plays. He’s partial to the 1928 tune “Crazy Rhythm,” and Smith sings and plays a few bars to summon his memories. With variations in tempo and tone, he uses the same song to evoke hot jazz, earnest longing, misty reverie or a fierce call to action. Smith’s fine piano proficiency is easy to overlook, but his playing quietly anchors the musicality of the show. Georga Osborne, who has played the role of Florence at several regional theaters, has just the combination of acting and singing skills to capture

THEATER

all of Florence’s inner and outer life. She is comfortable in the mannerisms of high culture in the prewar years, moving with the fussy deliberation of an aesthete meticulously stalking beauty. With her hair permed into 1930s coils and an expression of near-constant delight, Osborne gives Florence a serene sense of worth. Behind Buster Keaton’s clumsiest rubber-legged pratfalls was the grace of a dancer. Florence’s woeful singing also needs real talent to produce. Osborne is a fine singer with a genius for getting Florence off rhythm and out of tune, setting her notes scraping in the air. When she tosses a maraca from one hand to another, she’s so far behind the beat that she’s in an alternate universe. Director Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill elicits tender performances, and we can see Cosme’s sweet blend of affection and exasperation and the little chinks in Florence’s self-confidence. David Rigler’s fine set, Alex Stevens’ precise lighting and Rider Q. Stanton’s effective sound create a beautifully realized production. Costume designer Amanda Lee supplies a parade of impressive garments worthy of a diva. In a powerful scene, Cosme feels he must make Florence see her limitations. He challenges her to hit a note correctly and explodes with frustration when she can’t. He finally pushes her too far, and the two characters balance for a moment in the no man’s land of shattered illusion. Has he rescued her or hurt her? It’s great theater and rich comedy. Florence is both fool and inspiration, oblivious that she’s been the punchline all along. For a moment, the laughter in the audience dims, then rises again. m

9/3/19 10:40 AM

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Join us for our upcoming ‘Salu-salo’ as we celebrate diversity, community, and our 2nd year anniversary! Experience carefully curated meals especially prepared for this special event! Enjoy a multi-course spread, served familystyle. Learn about the Philippines, its history, and our journey to being the best Filipino restaurant in the Northeast Kingdom and in the state of Vermont!* Sunday, September 22 from 11:30 to 1:30pm, 40 pp** This is a limited-capacity event, so reservations are highly recommended. For more information or reservations, visit www.pica-pica.us

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food+drink

A classic Somali dish of goat and rice at Kismayo Kitchen

GLENN RUSSELL

Full Plate

At Kismayo Kitchen, Somali and American fare share the menu B Y S A LLY POL L AK

T

he jasmine rice at Kismayo Kitchen is long grain and speckled with color: glints of orange, yellow and green light up the dish. The grain is cooked with herbs and seasonings used in Somali cuisine, including cumin, cardamom, basil and pepper. The extra color is derived from bits of dried vegetable, but the chef-owner of the restaurant in Burlington’s Old North End declines to reveal particulars. “It’s a secret,” said Ahmed Omar, who is known familiarly as Omar, his surname. Omar opened Kismayo Kitchen in June in the small building on Riverside Avenue that previously housed Sugarsnap and the Little Red Kitchen. The restaurant is named for the city in which Omar was born 32 years ago.

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

The five-table eatery with counter service serves lunch and dinner daily. The menu at Kismayo Kitchen is multicultural, to use Omar’s term, and offers traditional Somali dishes, as well as Italian American and American fare. One Somali dish presents a choice of protein — beef, chicken or goat — grilled with red onion and peppers and served with rice or pasta ($11.99). Another is a rich and creamy coconut chicken stew ($7.49), studded with vegetables and prepared with a base of coconut milk and tomato. Vegan or meat samosas ($1.99) are spiced with cumin

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and hot pepper; their abundant filling falls from the shell with the first bite. A Philadelphia cheesesteak ($7.49) topped with American cheese is served on a squishy grinder roll that’s spread with Somali-spiced mayo; the bread soaks up the meat’s juice in true Philly style. Omar said he wants to make a top-notch cheesesteak and offer food that will appeal to many diners — wraps, potato salad, kale salad, pasta and sauce. But his desire to serve dishes from Somalia propelled him to open his restaurant.

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HE VOWED TO PREPARE “CLEAN, HEALTHY” FOOD FOR DINERS

WITH DIETARY RESTRICTIONS AND PREFERENCES. Chef Ahmed Omar with a classic Somali dish of rice and chicken

PHOTOS: GLENN RUSSELL

A Philadelphia cheese steak at Kismayo Kitchen

Full Plate « P.38 Omar has catered events for the local Somali community for several years, and last winter he taught a Somali cooking class as part of City Market, Onion River Co-op’s Mosaic of Flavors culinary series. With his restaurant, Omar can offer Somali food to a greater number of people, he said. Kismayo Kitchen adds to the global restaurant offerings available in the Old North End, including a stretch of North Winooski Avenue where diners can find Moroccan, Vietnamese, Mexican and Thai food. But Omar thinks Kismayo Kitchen is the only Somali restaurant in Vermont. “I want to bring the [Somali] culture to the community,” he said. “They can walk in my restaurant and have a lunch, eating Somali food.” Diners are likely to be greeted by Omar himself, wearing athletic clothing and a bright smile. Customers order at the counter and take a seat; food is delivered to the 40

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

table. A pot of tea in the dining room is self-serve. If it’s a hot day, Omar will probably bring you a bottle of cold water. (The restaurant doesn’t serve alcohol, and customers can’t bring their own.) Omar is in the restaurant 12 or more hours a day, arriving around 8 a.m. to prepare for the 11 a.m. opening and staying until after the dinner service. Omar works in the kitchen with his wife, Anisa Mohamed, with whom he lives in the New North End with their daughters, ages 4 years and 1.5 months. Omar’s new emphasis is on vegan and vegetarian cuisine, and he plans to add Impossible Burger, a plantbased meat substitute, to the menu in the fall. He’ll serve the vegan product with pasta and in samosas. “I want everybody to walk in this restaurant and feel like they can get whatever they want,” he said, “something they like.” The youngest of 14 children, Omar grew up in Kismayo until age 12, when he moved with his family to Kenya.

They were war refugees who lived in a camp for five years before relocating to Vermont. He attended Burlington High School and YouthBuild, a construction-trades job training program, for his senior year, graduating from BHS in 2006. In addition to running Kismayo Kitchen, Omar is a competitive body builder who adheres to a diet of protein and vegetables, eating primarily fish, eggs, beef, asparagus, spinach and sweet potatoes. He vowed to prepare “clean, healthy” food for diners with dietary restrictions and preferences, and he makes a point of paying attention to their requests. “Feedback is going to take me to the next level,” Omar said. “I’m a man who loves to learn. If the feedback is working, I will take it. If not, I walk away.”  Contact: sally@sevendaysvt.com

INFO Learn more at Kismayo Kitchen’s Facebook page.


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Side Dishes « P.39 kitchen equipment and dining room furnishings, the 1820 farmhouse and attached bar that house the 82-seat restaurant, and 4.2 acres of land. The asking price is $1.4 million, Laura said. The building has housed a restaurant for about 40 years; Villa Tragara preceded Michael’s there. The Kloetis put their restaurant on the market knowing it could take time to sell; they’re committed to running it in the meantime. “If it takes a year, it takes a year,” Laura said. “We still love what we do. We love our staff; we love our clients; we’re still booking events.” Will the restaurant keep the name Michael’s? Laura confided that it almost wasn’t called that at all. Back when the Kloetis opened the restaurant, Michael wanted to name it Laura’s. “I wouldn’t let him,” Laura said. “I told him I couldn’t handle the pressure.” Sally Pollak

Buck Up NEW PUB OPENS IN HINESBURG BUCKY’S PUB is now open

daily and serving drinks and pub fare at 104 Ballards Corner Road in Hinesburg. RUCHEL ST. HILAIRE, who owns the pub, said her husband, Tony, purchased the building on May 10. Bucky’s opened quietly on July 27 after a complete renovation to the space, which was formerly Travia’s Bar & Grill. “It’s been good not to push it out there too much so that we could work out the kinks,” St. Hilaire said. The space has a hunting lodge feel, with the eponymous deer head hanging on pine-board walls. “That’s Bucky,” St. Hilaire said. “He’s a local Hinesburg guy.” The theme is appropriate, becausee the pub also

serves as an official big game reporting station. A large horseshoeshaped bar is the pub’s centerpiece; it also has five TVs and a deck for outdoor seating. “We’re aiming to be an easygoing place for locals to unwind,” St. Hilaire said. Bucky’s has a full bar and six taps for draft beer — three of which feature rotating microbrews, including Hinesburg’s FROST BEER WORKS. The menu offers a variety of pub food, ranging from munchies such as potato skins ($7) and chicken wings ($1 each) to pub classics served with fries ($8-13) and a 12-ounce New York strip steak ($21). The cook is Hinesburg local PHIL CROMER, who is back in the building after cooking there more than 20 years ago when it was an Italian restaurant, according to St. Hilaire.

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Biscuits for Strangers Martin Philip talks about his experiment in baking, conversation and humanity Arkansas drawl might endear him to the locals, however, his self-described “blue state Bernie bubble” politics put him at odds with the people where he grew up. Using baking as a conduit for conversation, Philip recorded the interactions from his trip to the Ozarks in essay form; excerpts are forthcoming in the Kenyon Review. “It has elements of baking, and certainly it’s in the orbit of food, because food was the first community,” he said of his project. “But this is a writing project more than anything.” Philip plans future stops in four communities along the Arkansas River: the headwaters in Leadville, Colo.; the seat of the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Okla.; a Somali Muslim community in Garden City, Kan., that was the site of a thwarted bombing by white supremacists; and the confluence of the Arkansas and Mississippi Poster for the "Baker rivers. “If I’m going to sell [this project] Maker Roadshow"

as a book, it’s got to be more than just postcards from the Ozarks,” Philip said. No matter where he is, the premise is simple. “I knock on the door and say, ‘My name’s Martin Philip, and I’m riding around on my bike talking to people about food and making biscuits. Can I make you some biscuits?’” Philip explained. Seven Days chatted with Philip over the phone about the random door knock, how to carry a banjo and a basket of biscuit ingredients on a bicycle, and why biscuits are the perfect thing to bake for strangers.

COURTESY OF MA

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ould you let a stranger into your house if he offered to make you biscuits? Martin Philip, baker and author of Breaking Bread: A Baker’s Journey in 75 Recipes, is banking on people answering yes. Philip’s newest project, which he alternately calls the Baker Maker Roadshow and Biscuits for Strangers, has him biking door-to-door with his banjo and a basket full of biscuit ingredients. His aim: to collect stories and connect with people who might not share his worldview. Philip, 49, is the head baker at King Arthur Flour in Norwich and won the 2018 Vermont Book Award for Breaking Bread. He started his adventure in the fall of that year far from his home in the Upper Valley, biking along the Pig Trail Scenic Byway in Arkansas’ Ozark Mountains. It was a return to his roots. While his

RTIN PHILIP

B Y J O R D AN BAR RY

Martin Philip

PHOTO BY MIKE PHILIP COURTESY OF MARTIN PHILIP

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SEVEN DAYS: We’re conditioned not to talk to strangers from the time we’re little. What made you decide not only to talk to them but to go into their homes and bake for them? MARTIN PHILIP: This project is all about context for me. Everything tastes better with context, right? When I started thinking about it, it was 2016. It was still in the lead-up to the election — it wasn’t even November. What sparked it was the divide between so many groups in society. When you turn on the news, or however you take your daily dose, you see that there are a lot of disconnects. Maybe some of that is played up because it gathers eyeballs, but I felt it between myself and the people where I grew up. We are a divided nation in many ways, and I wanted to go see if it was true or not. So I started thinking, How do I do that? How do I get to a place where the tools I have — blunt or sharp — could be used to foster conversations and maybe even get me into people’s homes? I knew I wanted to be out in the environment. I didn’t want to walk, because walking felt like an imposition. If you walk up to someone’s house in the country, they might think they have to give you a ride. [Laughs] If you pull up in a car, that’s not good because it’s aggressive. But I thought, Maybe a bicycle. It couldn’t be a fancy bike, because I didn’t want people to peg me, like, “Oh, look at the boy on the fancy bike.” So I got this 1930-something Elgin cruiser. It’s cosmetically rough, but it rides OK. Then I started putting together this look, for lack of a better word. I didn’t want to self-identify. I didn’t want to wear an Act Up T-shirt or a Bocephus [Hank Williams


food+drink Jr.] T-shirt. I tried to be of another era, and I think that worked. Then, of course, there had to be some baking component. It’s a good activity, because if you’re baking with someone, you’re standing side by side. It deflects in a way, but at the same time it fosters conversations because food is so key to experience. SD: Were people willing to let you in? MP: It was very hard to get into houses. It sounded like a pretty good idea when I was up here in Vermont [laughs], but I spent two days trying to get in. I’d knock on the door, and dogs would go apeshit. I’d see a curtain flick, or I’d see a shadow move behind the house — and nothing. I was so frustrated that I actually forgot I had a plan B. I went to this place called Turner Bend, which is a big outfitter along the river where everybody cruises through. I went down there and started playing the banjo, and all this crazy stuff started happening. Within two hours, I was booked for the rest of the week. After that, I didn’t really care about the random door knock. The point wasn’t the gesture, the point was the conversation.

in it when we moved from Kentucky to Arkansas.” I thought that was too sentimental, so she gave me another old one from my grandmother. I put just enough flour and butter in the basket for a single visit, maybe two. And then my mother made this repurposed gun sack that I could fit my banjo in. She was funny. She said, “I put a pocket on the outside for your gun.” [Laughs] She’s a social worker and spends a lot of time out in these rural communities, and she was like, “You’re gonna wanna have a gun.” I think I said, “My banjo is my gun.” SD: Your banjo and your biscuits. What about the biscuit makes it right for an adventure like this? MP: For me, it’s the thing I resonate with. Everybody has those foods that take them to a different place, or even a time. But also, biscuits have universal appeal, and they can be eaten warm. If I were at a visit, and it was like, Uh, I need to get out of here, biscuits are out of the oven in 20 minutes. If we were making bread, it needs two hours of bulk fermentation and an hour rise, and it’s like, Oh, shit, we’re here all day. SD: What’s your ideal biscuit? MP: The biscuit I like is the classic Appalachian type. I like a biscuit that’s buttery, flaky, not too tender and not too sweet. Cut with a two-inch cutter, brown on the edges, PHILIP maybe some layers when you break it apart if the butter goes in well. In terms of making a good biscuit, what’s important — especially if you don’t have a lot of experience with it — is to maintain ratios well. And I hate to say it, but the best way to maintain ratios in a baking environment is by measuring ingredients with a scale. Because one person packs their cup of flour, one person sprinkles and scoops. There are a lot of ways to get flour into a cup measure, few of which are accurate. That being said, I sure as hell wasn’t out there on the Pig Trail with a digital scale. [Laughs] That really would have blown my cover. m

I’M RIDING AROUND ON MY BIKE TALKING TO PEOPLE ABOUT FOOD AND MAKING BISCUITS.

SD: Did you do any trial runs in Vermont to see if you’d get the same results? MP: I thought about it. I even had people say, “Oh, you’ve gotta go test it.” And I could never bring MARTIN myself to do it. I felt some need to just let it unfold and let it be hard. If you go in there and everybody’s holding your hand, or you’re too familiar, the story’s different than if you get thrown out on your butt.

CAN I MAKE YOU SOME BISCUITS?

SD: What were the interactions like, once you got in the door? Were they hard? MP: They were powerful, and I heard stories that not in a thousand years could I have made up. I think I expected that. I expected that everybody I might talk to would have some story, or there would be something that, as a writer, I could chew on. Some visits definitely didn’t work as well as others, but by and large, I could have written about each one. SD: How do you carry all that stuff on a bicycle? MP: There’s a rack on the back of the bike, and a wicker basket. When I initially told my mother I’d need a basket, she said, “I’ve got just the basket. You rode

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INFO Learn more at breadwright.com. Untitled-55 1

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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calendar S E P T E M B E R

WED.4 crafts

FIBER RIOT!: Creative types get hooked on knitting, crocheting, spinning and more at an informal weekly gathering. Mad River Fiber Arts & Mill, Waitsfield, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 496-7746. GREEN MOUNTAIN CHAPTER OF THE EMBROIDERERS’ GUILD OF AMERICA MEETING: Needle-and-thread enthusiasts fine-tune their techniques. Bring a bag lunch. Ascension Lutheran Church, South Burlington, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free for first-timers. Info, gmc.vt.ega@gmail.com. KNITTER’S GROUP: Needles in tow, crafters share their latest projects and get help with challenging patterns. All skill levels are welcome. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

etc.

CHITTENDEN COUNTY STAMP CLUB MEETING: First-class collectibles provide a glimpse into the postal past at this monthly gathering. Williston Fire Station, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 660-4817.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: A new IMAX film unravels the mystery of the creature we love to fear. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50;

admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: Some of the Pacific Ocean’s most beautiful islands and marine national monuments grace the screen. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, noon, 2 & 4 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: Advanced filming techniques expose the planet’s top hunters on land, under the sea and in the air. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848. ‘THE MARTIAN’: Matt Damon embodies an astronaut stranded on the red planet. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 533-2000. ‘THE MATRIX’: “My name is Neo!” Keanu Reeves stars as a computer hacker who enters an underworld where he learns perception-altering truths about his reality. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: Actor Kate Winslet narrates a virtual odyssey into the largest and least-explored habitat on Earth. Northfield Savings Bank 3D Theater: A National Geographic Experience, ECHO Leahy

LIST YOUR UPCOMING EVENT HERE FOR FREE! ALL SUBMISSIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY THURSDAY AT NOON FOR CONSIDERATION IN THE FOLLOWING WEDNESDAY’S NEWSPAPER. FIND OUR CONVENIENT SUBMISSION FORM AND GUIDELINES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT. LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY KRISTEN RAVIN AND DAN BOLLES. SEVEN DAYS EDITS FOR SPACE AND STYLE. DEPENDING ON COST AND OTHER FACTORS, CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS MAY BE LISTED IN EITHER THE CALENDAR OR THE CLASSES SECTION. WHEN APPROPRIATE, CLASS ORGANIZERS MAY BE ASKED TO PURCHASE A CLASS LISTING.

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Running It

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Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 11:30 a.m., 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. $3-5 plus regular admission, $11.50-14.50; admission free for members and kids 2 and under. Info, 864-1848.

food & drink

COOKBOOK CLUB: Home cooks bring and discuss dishes prepared from Ruffage: A Practical Guide to Vegetables by Abra Berens. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 846-4140. COMMUNITY DINNER: Friends, neighbors and staff members strengthen relationships over a complimentary supper. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free. Info, clara@ pathwaysvermont.org.

games

BEGINNERS’ BRIDGE: Those looking to get in on the card game learn the basics from longtime player Grace Sweet. Waterbury Public Library, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036. BRIDGE CLUB: Players have fun with the popular card game. Burlington Bridge Club, Williston, 9:15 a.m. & 1:30 p.m. $6. Info, 872-5722. MAH JONGG IN BARRE: Fun, friendship and conversation flow as players manipulate tiles. Barre Area Senior Center, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

RESILIENCE FLOW: Individuals affected by traumatic brain injuries engage in a gentle yoga practice. Sangha Studio WED.4

What better way to get pumped for Sunday’s Pride Vermont Parade & Festival in downtown Burlington than with an invigorating 3.1-mile jaunt along the shores of Lake Champlain? Runners, walkers and those on wheels kick off the weekend with Stride for Pride, a 5K sunset excursion benefiting the Pride Center of Vermont. Back after a oneyear break, the outing is open to all allies and members of the LGBTQ community, no matter their ability, sexual orientation, or gender identity or expression. As the saying goes: Work hard, play hard!

STRIDE FOR PRIDE Friday, September 6, check-in, 5 p.m.; race, 6 p.m., at Pride Center for Vermont in Burlington. $25-30. Info, 860-7812, pridevt.org.

Birds of a Feather Taking on a new hobby can be daunting. For those considering spreading their wings in the world of birding, the North Branch Nature Center’s BirdFest! offers a gateway into the outdoor endeavor. This all-ages summer nature festival begins with guided bird walks led by expert birders doling out identification tips. Folks become familiar with feathered friends during bird-banding demos and live raptor encounters. Themed kids’ crafts and educational lectures, including the keynote talk “Saving the Bird in the Bush” by Bird Diva Bridget Butler, round out this ornithology extravaganza.

BIRDFEST! Saturday, September 7, 7 a.m.-2 p.m., at North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier. Donations. Info, 229-6206, northbranchnaturecenter.org.

» P.46

FIND MORE LOCAL EVENTS IN THIS ISSUE AND ONLINE: art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + nightlife Find club dates at local venues in the music + nightlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com.

SEP.6 | LGBTQ

SEP.7 | FAIRS & FESTIVALS


THE RIGHT MOVES The September 16 season premiere of ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” is right around the corner, and dance fever is in the air. Local celebrities get in on the action by competing in Dancing With the Stars of Burlington, a fun-spirited fundraiser for the Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. The contest pairs Vermont movers and shakers with dance professionals. After weeks of practice, teams cut a rug on stage, vying for the title of Burlington Dance Stars 2019. Local star power includes Community Health Centers of Burlington director of development and communications Kim Anderson, who finds her footing with Rick Kinsman of Colchester’s Up North Dance Studio (both pictured).

Musical Mother In 2002, storyteller and concert pianist Mona Golabek published The Children of Willesden Lane: Beyond the Kindertransport: A Memoir of Music, Love, and Survival. Cowritten with Lee Cohen, the book tells the story of Golabek’s mother, a musical prodigy who escaped Nazicontrolled Austria as a young teen via Kindertransport, the children’s train that carried European kids to safety in England. Golabek brings the memoir to life in The Pianist of Willesden Lane, a Hershey Felder Presents production in which the Grammy Award-nominated instrumentalist performs works by composers such as Claude Debussy and Ludwig van Beethoven while sharing her mother’s tale of perseverance.

DANCING WITH THE STARS OF BURLINGTON Sunday, September 8, 7 p.m., at Flynn MainStage in Burlington. $28.75. Info, 863-5966, flynntix.org.

SEP.8 | DANCE

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’ Sunday, September 8, 1:30 p.m., and Monday, September 9, through Wednesday, September 11, 8 p.m., at Sylvan Adams Theatre, Segal Centre for Performing Arts, in Montréal. See website for additional dates. $30-67. Info, 514-739-7944, segalcentre.org.

COURTESY OF HERSHEY FELDER PRESENTS

SEP.8-11 | MONTRÉAL

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— Pine, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262. YOGA4CANCER: Meant for anyone affected by the illness, this class aims to help participants manage treatment side effects and recovery. Sangha Studio — North, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

language

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: Learners take communication to the next level. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. GERMAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Community members practice conversing auf Deutsch. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: ¡Hola! Language lovers perfect their fluency. KelloggHubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338.

music

OLD NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD BAND TEEN MUSIC JAM: Be they accomplished or beginner musicians, young players find harmony in the traditional music of Burlington’s past and present immigrant groups. Boys & Girls Club, Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 881-8500. ROOCHIE TOOCHIE & THE RAGTIME SHEPHERD KINGS: This old-time novelty jazz and pop quintet breathes new life into zany and obscure songs from the early 20th century. Caledonia Grange, East Hardwick, 7 p.m. $10. Info, 472-8987. SONG CIRCLE: Singers and musicians congregate for an acoustic session of popular folk tunes. Godnick Adult Center, Rutland, 7:15-9:15 p.m. Donations. Info, 775-1182.

seminars

REAL ESTATE INVESTING WORKSHOPS: Local professionals provide resources and up-to-date information when sharing their experiences with investment properties. Preferred Properties, Williston, 6-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, 862-9106.

talks

CARRIE BLACK: The National Science Foundation astronomer kicks off the 25th annual Current Topics in Science Speaker Series with a lecture on her career and Vermont roots. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, les.kanat@northern vermont.edu.

CURRENT EVENTS CONVERSATION: Newsworthy subjects take the spotlight in this informal discussion. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

musical backdrop. Terrace, Hotel Vermont, Burlington, 5-9 p.m. Free. Info, 855-650-0080.

THU.5 | THEATER | 'Shakespeare's Will'

VERGENNES FARMERS MARKET: Local food and crafts, live music, and hot eats add flavor to summer evenings. Vergennes City Park, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-9180.

ELIZABETH FENTON: What does religion have to do with the study of American literature, anyway? The professor addresses this and other questions in the lecture “Is American Literature Secular? (Nope.)” Memorial Lounge, Waterman Building, University of Vermont, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 656-1297. JOEL TILLEY: “Fall Warblers: Why Do They All Look the Same?” helps ornithology enthusiasts sharpen their bird identification skills. Poultney Public Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 287-5556.

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: Electronics novices develop skill sets applicable to smartphones, tablets and other gadgets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, noon & 1 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6955.

theater

‘THE ADDAMS FAMILY’ AUDITIONS: Actors ages 16 and up vie for roles in Lyric Theatre’s upcoming production of this kooky, spooky musical based on the classic TV show. Lyric Theatre Company Creative Space, South Burlington, 5:45-10:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 324-3651. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: Take a chance on this Stowe Theater Guild production of Catherine Johnson’s acclaimed jukebox musical based on the songs of ABBA, with music composed by former band members Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus. Stowe Town Hall Theatre, 7:30 p.m. $14-20. Info, tickets@stowetheatre.com. PLAY SCRIPT-READING CLUB: Storytelling enthusiasts unleash their inner thespians during a monthly reading of preselected scripts. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. ‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: This ArtisTree’s Music Theatre Festival production offers a funny and touching look at a real-life — and tone deaf — New York socialite who fancied herself an opera singer. The Grange Theatre, South Pomfret, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $28-35. Info, 457-3500.

words

CHARLES J. LAROCCA: Recognized nationally for his knowledge of the Cilil War, the historian offers an enlightening look at a popular war novel in The Red Badge of Courage: Stephen Crane’s Novel of the Civil War: An Historically Annotated Edition. Milton Historical Society, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 893-1604.

CLAUDIA KEMFERT: Speaking as part of the Vermont Council on World Affairs Speaker Series, the energy expert elucidates the economic cost of climate change. ECHO Leahy Center for WRITING CIRCLE: Words pour Lake Champlain, Burlington, out when participants explore lecture, 6-7:30 p.m.; reception, 46 SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

creative expression in a lowpressure environment. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 303.

THU.5

environment

CELEBRATING BIODIVERSITY IN THE MAD RIVER VALLEY: Conservationists describe actions Vermonters can take in their yards, gardens, forests and farms to benefit the environment. Attendees dig into a flatbread dinner. Lareau Farm Inn, Waitsfield, 5:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, curt2225@ gmail.com.

etc.

FEAST & FIELD MARKET: Prepared foods and the traditional French and Celtic stylings of Triton are on the menu at a pastoral party. Feast and Field, Barnard, 5-9 p.m. $5-10. Info, feastandfield@gmail.com. LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING: Nursing mothers share breastfeeding tips and resources. Essex Free Library, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, lllessexvt@gmail.com. PROJECT: RAIN BARREL: A lively bidding war for rain barrels painted by area artists supports Friends of Northern Lake Champlain. Mad River Brewing BBQ & Smokehouse, St. Albans, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 582-4182. QUEEN CITY BICYCLE CLUB MONTHLY RIDE: Folks who identify as women, trans, femme and nonbinary empower one another on a group excursion complete with glitter and a giant boom box.

A drink ticket awaits each rider at Zero Gravity Craft Brewery. Old Spokes Home, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, christine.tyler@ gmail.com. QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK GHOSTS & LEGENDS OF LAKE CHAMPLAIN TOUR: Brave souls learn about the darker side of Burlington on a guided walk with author and historian Thea Lewis. Arrive 10 minutes early. Battery Park Fountain, Burlington, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 351-1313.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.4. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4. ‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.4.

food & drink

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: Foodies sample local eats on a scrumptious stroll dedicated to the Queen City’s culinary past. Awning behind ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 1 p.m. $55. Info, elise andgail@burlingtonediblehistory. com.

Bradford Public Library, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 222-4536. PLAUDERSTUNDE: Conversationalists with basic knowledge of the German language put their skills to use over lunch. Zen Gardens, South Burlington, noon. Cost of food. Info, 862-1677.

WATERBURY FARMERS MARKET: Cultivators and their customers swap veggie tales and edible inspirations at a weekly outdoor emporium complete with live music and yoga demos. Rusty Parker Memorial Park, Waterbury, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, waterbury market@gmail.com.

music

WORCESTER COMMUNITY MARKET: Fresh organic produce, live bands and kids’ activities bring neighbors together. 66 Elmore Rd., Worcester, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, thelandingvt@gmail.com.

HUNGER MOUNTAIN CO-OP BROWN BAG SUMMER CONCERT SERIES: This weekly series continues with West African drumming by Araba-Lon. City Hall Plaza, Montpelier, noon. Free. Info, 223-9604.

games

COURTESY OF JOHN SNELL

Find club dates in the music section.

7:30-8:30 p.m. $10-25 includes one drink voucher. Info, patricia @vermont.org.

CHITTENDEN COUNTY CHESS CLUB: Checkmate! Strategic thinkers make calculated moves as they vie for their opponents’ kings. Shaw’s, Shelburne Rd., South Burlington, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 863-5403. CRIBBAGE: Friends connect over a fun-spirited card game. Barre Area Senior Center, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION EXERCISE PROGRAM: Seniors rise and shine with an exercise program meant to increase bone density and muscle strength. Barre Area Senior Center, 8:309:45 a.m. Free. Info, 479-9512. CHAIR YOGA: Comfortable clothing is recommended for this class focused on balance, breath, flexibility and meditation. Barre Area Senior Center, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512. CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Champlain Senior Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS: A 20-minute guided practice with Andrea O’Connor alleviates stress and tension. Tea and a discussion follow. Winooski Senior Center, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 233-1161. FALLS PREVENTION TAI CHI I & II: Students improve their ability to stay steady on their feet. Barre Area Senior Center, 3:45-4:45 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512. YANG 24 TAI CHI: Slow, graceful, expansive movements promote wide-ranging health and fitness benefits. Shelburne Farms, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 735-5467.

COMMUNITY LUNCH: Gardengrown fare makes for a delicious and nutritious midday meal. The Pathways Vermont Community Center, Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 888-492-8218, ext. 309.

YOGA: A Sangha Studio instructor guides students who are in recovery toward achieving inner tranquility. Turning Point Center, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 448-4262.

FOOD — FIRE — FOAM: Wood-fired pizza and other palate-pleasing provisions fill bellies as John Abair & His Good Pals provide the

language

FRENCH CONVERSATION: Speakers improve their linguistic dexterity in the Romantic tongue.

Find club dates in the music section. BROADWAY SING-ALONG: Musical theater mavens lift their voices in popular show tunes. The Dutch Deli, Winooski, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 655-5003.

outdoors

SLOW & EASY HIKING: Walkers enjoy the sights, sounds and smells of the forest while moving at a gentle pace. Ilene Elliott leads this public Barre Area Senior Center outing. Barre Town Forest, Websterville, 10:10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

talks

JANET BENNION: In her talk, “An Analysis of Polyamory Networks in France,” the anthropology and sociology professor examines what motivates some Parisians to engage in multiple consensual intimate relationships. Stearns Performance Space, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 635-1219.

tech

TECH SUPPORT: Need an email account? Want to enjoy ebooks? Bring your phone, tablet or laptop to a weekly help session. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5-7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-8291.

theater

‘THE ADDAMS FAMILY’ AUDITIONS: See WED.4. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.4. NADEEN MANUEL: Comedic storytelling meets hypnosis in a show by the hypnotherapist and speaker. Alexander Twilight Theatre, Northern Vermont University-Lyndon, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 626-6413. NIGHTMARE VERMONT OPEN AUDITIONS: Brave souls ages 16 through 55 vie for the chance to embody creepy characters in the state’s longest-running haunted house. Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, 6:309:30 p.m. Free. Info, 355-3107. ‘SENT HIM MENTAL: THE HUMANITY AND INSANITY OF G. RICHARD AMES’: From a 2000 hostage incident in Winooski to interactions with Shirley PhelpsRoper of the Westboro Baptist Church, details of the Vermont writer’s life propel two one-act plays. QuarryWorks Theater, Adamant, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6978.


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: The Bard’s wife gets the last word in a humorous solo show inspired by the few historical facts known about Anne Hathaway. Presented by Lost Nation Theater. Lost Nation Theater, Montpelier City Hall, 7:30-9 p.m. $10-30. Info, 229-0492. ‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.4.

words

GREAT DECISIONS: Hardhitting issues come to the fore in a group discussion of Richard B. Andres’ article “Cyber Conflict and Geopolitics.” South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140. JEREMY HOLT: The Vergennes author chats with Seven Days associate editor Margot Harrison about his latest graphic novel, Before Houdini. Sparkling wine is available for purchase. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3350. PECHAKUCHA NIGHT BURLINGTON: Local artists share inspiring tales through an unusual storytelling format that features 20 images, each shown for 20 seconds. FlynnSpace, Burlington, 7 p.m. $7. Info, 863-5966.

FRI.6

activism

WEEKEND AT BERNIE’S: Activists gather outside Sen. Bernie Sanders’ office to protest his support of bringing F-35 fighter jets to Burlington International Airport. Please bring signs. Senator Bernie Sanders’ Office — Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Free. Info, 786-423-1403.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nighlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

bazaars

BOOK & BAKE SALE: Homemade treats sustain bookworms as they browse bargain-priced titles. Grace United Methodist Church, Essex Junction, 9 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 879-7943.

business

STEPS TO START A BUSINESS: Entrepreneurs learn what it takes to get a new enterprise off the ground. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 9:3011:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

community

LOCAL HISTORY ENGAGEMENT SESSIONS: Folks chat about the role of local historical societies and museums, the obstacles they face, and how Vermonters can work together to build a stronger history community. Saint Albans Museum, 10 a.m.noon. Free; preregister. Info, 479-8500.

dance

BALLROOM & LATIN DANCING: Singles, couples and beginners are welcome to join in a dance social featuring waltz, tango and more. Williston Jazzercise Fitness Center, 8-9:30 p.m. $10. Info, 862-2269. ECSTATIC DANCE VERMONT: Inspired by the 5Rhythms dance practice, attendees move, groove, release and open their hearts to life in a safe and sacred space. Christ Episcopal Church, Montpelier, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, fearnessence@gmail.com.

etc.

ARTSRIOT 6TH BIRTHDAY PARTY: It’s time to get down: The venue parties in style with performances by DJ Cre8, the Wormdogs, Bill Mullins and Scantron, as well as visual art and food truck eats. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406. CIRCUS ARTS TRAINING JAM: Daring individuals perfect skills ranging from juggling to tight-rope walking with CAMP Burlington members. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6:30-9 p.m. Donations. Info, burlingtoncamp@gmail.com. FIRST FRIDAY EVE — CELEBRATING THE FARM FAMILIES WHO OWN CABOT: The entire museum campus is open and free to all during an evening of live music, picnicking, lawn games, food trucks and special programs. Shelburne Museum, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 985-0881. LOUNGE 91: Green Mountain Railroad passengers delight in live music, cocktails and hors d’oeuvres as picturesque scenery rolls by. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $60. Info, 800-707-3530. QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK DARKNESS FALLS TOUR: Local historian Thea Lewis treats pedestrians to tales of madmen, smugglers, pub spirits and, of course, ghosts. Arrive 10 minutes early. Democracy sculpture, 199

Main St., Burlington, 7 p.m. $20. Info, 324-5467.

fairs & festivals

SOUTH END ART HOP: Vermont’s largest event of its kind takes over Burlington’s South End Arts District with works by hundreds of artists, open studios, live music, installations, fashion shows and parties. See seaba.com for details. Various Burlington locations, 5-10 p.m. Free. Info, 859-9222.

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film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

Plus tax. Pick-up or delivery only. Expires 9/30/19. Limit: 1 offer per customer per day.

‘GREAT WHITE SHARK 3D’: See WED.4.

Order online! We Cater • Gift Certificates Available

‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4. HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL: Myriad body sizes, shapes, ages, genders and fetishes appear on the silver screen in short pornographic films show two nights in a row. Merrill’s Roxy Cinema, Burlington, 7 & 9:30 p.m. $20-25; for ages 18 and up. Info, info@humptour.com. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4.

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‘OCEANS: OUR BLUE PLANET 3D’: See WED.4.

food & drink

presents

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: Passengers feast on a three-course meal while riding the Green Mountain Railroad from Burlington to Middlebury and back. Union Station, Burlington, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $89. Info, 800-707-3530.

AT BURLINGTON September THU 5 JEREMY HOLT: 7PM BEFORE HOUDINI

PUBLIC CUPPING: Coffee connoisseurs and beginners alike explore the flavor notes and aromas of the roaster’s current offerings and new releases. Brio Coffeeworks, Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 777-6641.

In conversation with Margot Harrison.

TUE 10 HARRY GOLDHAGEN: 7PM GREEN MOUNTAIN SAPSUCKERS & SAPNET Free.

THU 12 CADWELL TURNBULL: 7PM THE LESSON

RICHMOND FARMERS MARKET: An open-air marketplace featuring live music connects cultivators and fresh-food browsers. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, info@richmond farmersmarketvt.org.

“Turnbull is a rising star in the science fiction and fantasy world.” -The Verge

SPINNING PLATES: The alleyway next to the theater is transformed into an outdoor dining room with food truck fare and a beer and wine garden. See town halltheater.org for restaurant information. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 5-10 p.m. Cost of food and drink. Info, 388-1436. SUN TO CHEESE TOUR: Fromage fans go behind the scenes and follow award-winning farmstead cheddar from raw milk to finished product. Shelburne Farms, 1:45-3:45 p.m. $20 includes a block of cheddar; preregister. Info, registration@shelburne farms.org.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.4, 9:15 a.m.

An oral history of 9/11.

Get a FREE gift just for stopping by! Mention this ad to our licensed insurance agents Clark and John! On the green at Maple Tree Place 28 Walnut Street Suite 160 • Williston Call us: 802-878-8233

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA: Students with limited mobility limber up with modified poses. Sangha Studio FRI.6

TUE 17 GARRETT M. GRAFF: 7PM THE ONLY PLANE IN THE SKY

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THU 19 MICIAH BAY GAULT, ANN 7PM DÁVILA CARDINAL & MARTIN PHILIP

An evening of fiction and cookies.

THU 26 GLYNNIS FAWKES 6PM & JASON LUTES

Graphic novelists tell the stories of Charlotte Bronte and Harry Houdini. Free.

Phoenix Books Burlington events are ticketed unless otherwise indicated. Your $3 ticket comes with a coupon for $5 off the featured book. Proceeds go to Vermont Foodbank.

AT ESSEX September SAT 14 MEET LLAMA LLAMA! 11AM WED 18 NANCY & JOHN HAYDEN: 7PM FARMING ON THE WILD SIDE Book launch!

Phoenix Books Essex events are free and open to all. 191 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington • 802.448.3350 2 Carmichael Street, Essex • 802.872.7111 www.phoenixbooks.biz SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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calendar FRI.6

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— North, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262. GONG MEDITATION: Sonic vibrations lead to healing and deep relaxation. Yoga Roots, Williston, 7:30-8:30 p.m. $18. Info, 318-6050.

lgbtq

STRIDE FOR PRIDE: Runners, walkers and those on wheels kick off Pride weekend on a 5K course along the shores of Lake Champlain. Proceeds benefit the Pride Center of Vermont. See calendar spotlight. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, check-in, 5 p.m.; race, 6 p.m. $25-30. Info, 860-7812.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BEN PALEY: On tour from England, the master fiddler is equally adept at Swedish, Irish, klezmer and old-time styles of playing. Landmark Schoolhouse, Lower Cabot, 7-9 p.m. $16-20. Info, 793-3016. CAPITAL CITY CONCERTS: JENNIFER HOULT: Listeners relax and reflect during a 30-minute meditation concert by the harpist. Cedar Creek Room, Vermont Statehouse, Montpelier, noon. Free. Info, info@capitalcity concerts.org. DWEEZIL ZAPPA: Frank Zappa’s son honors his legendary father with his Hot Rats and Other Hot Stuff world tour. Stateside Amphitheater, Jay Peak Resort, 6:30-11:45 p.m. $15-35. Info, 800-451-4449. EVERYONE ORCHESTRA: Matt Butler directs a revolving roster of players in danceable improvisational music as part of the Live From Dibden music series. South Lawn. Rain location: Dibden Center for the Arts. Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1476. EXPERIENCE JANIS: CC Coletti channels the spirit of 1960s blues and rock singer Janis Joplin, belting out hits such as “Me and Bobby McGee” in a heartfelt tribute performance. Strand Center Theatre, Plattsburgh, N.Y., 8 p.m. $20-44. Info, 518-563-1604, ext. 105. GREEN MOUNTAIN MONTEVERDI ENSEMBLE OF VERMONT: “Music of Love and War” is devoted to the two masters of early baroque vocal music: Claudio Monteverdi and Heinrich Schütz. First United Methodist Church, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $10-20. Info, 223-0687. PIANOS ON THE POINT: Faculty members from a new program for serious adult piano students at Point CounterPoint music camp tickle the ivories. Pianists include Diana Fanning, Arielle Levioff and Michael C. Haigler. Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Middlebury, 7:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 388-8080.

outdoors

fliers search for fall migratory songbirds. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 7:30-9 a.m. $10; free for members. Info, 229-6206.

SAT.7 | MUSIC | Beg, Steal or Borrow

seminars

SOUTH END ART HOP: See FRI.6, 10 a.m.-10 p.m.

GENEALOGY: Using their memories, the internet and a library card, folks work with Carl Williams to record their own family history. Barre Area Senior Center, noon1:30 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

VALLEY DAY: A fun-filled community celebration is complete with a barbecue, corn hole tournament, kids’ games, a flea market and yard sales along Route 14. Route 14, East Randolph, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 363-2598.

sports

film

DIVAS OF DIRT GROUP RIDES: Women mountain bikers of all ability levels share their passion for the sport at biweekly group rides and happy hours. Killington Resort, 3-5 p.m. Free with bike park ticket or pass, $22. Info, 422-6232.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4. HUMP! FILM FESTIVAL: See FRI.6. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4.

theater

food & drink

‘A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN’: Vermont actress Elizabeth Wilcox portrays Virginia Woolf in this solo performance based on an extended essay by the 20th-century English writer. QuarryWorks Theater, Adamant, 7:30-9:15 p.m. Free. Info, 229-6978.

BURLINGTON FARMERS MARKET: More than 90 stands overflow with seasonal produce, flowers, artisan wares and prepared foods. 345 Pine St., Burlington, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, burlington farmersmarket.org@gmail.com.

BURLINGTON EDIBLE HISTORY TOUR: See THU.5.

‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.4.

‘THE SECRET GARDEN’ AUDITIONS: Actors give it their all for parts in an adaptation of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s children’s novel, staged by Shelburne Players. Shelburne Town Center, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, suemartin455@yahoo.com. ‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: See THU.5. ‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.4.

words

WRITER’S BLOCK: Scribes bring essays, short stories, one-act plays and poems to be critiqued by a supportive audience. Barre Area Senior Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

SAT.7

agriculture

SUMMER WEEKEND GARDENING PROJECT: Helping hands give back to the community by beautifying four plots. Bring gloves and small tools. Vermont Garden Park, South Burlington, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, djvanmullen@gmail.com.

bazaars

BOOK & BAKE SALE: See FRI.6.

business

LANDLORD WORKSHOP: HOW TO PURCHASE & MANAGE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES: Property owners gather information on the leases, evictions, health and safety issues, and more. United Community Church North Building, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 748-3926, ext. 5.

FRIDAY MORNING FALL BIRD WALKS: Fans of feathered

48

HARVEST FAIR: Families make merry at a 31st-annual frolic featuring food, crafts, live tunes and kids’ activities. Rochester Park, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Donations. Info, 767-9025.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

cannabis

VERMONT HEMP FEST: Exhibitors, panels, workshops and live music attract investors and others interested in agricultural hemp to this third-annual gathering. Burke Mountain Hotel & Conference Center, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. $20. Info, info@headyvermont.com.

community

HARVEST FOR HOUSING: An annual meeting gives way to a community pizza dinner set to live bluegrass music by the Dale & Darcy Trio. Proceeds benefit the nonprofit’s efforts to provide affordable housing for those in need. Legion Field, Johnson, meeting, 4-5 p.m.; dinner, 5-7 p.m. Free for meeting; $12-25 for dinner. Info, 888 5714.

dance

BURLINGTON WESTIE FIRST SATURDAY DANCE: New dancers are encouraged to take part in an introductory lesson before hitting the floor for a themed evening of West Coast swing and fusion. North End Studio A, Burlington, free introductory lesson, 7:30 p.m.; dance, 8-11 p.m. $8-12; free for first-timers. Info, burlington westie@gmail.com.

etc.

ALL BREED RESCUE CALCUTTA: Animal lovers share dinner for two, then vie for prizes to support rescue pups. Raffles and a silent auction round out the fun. Milton Eagles Club, 6-9 p.m. $70. Info, 489-5889. E-BIKE & BREW TOUR: Electric bicycles transport suds lovers to three local beer producers via scenic routes. Lamoille Valley Bike Tours, Johnson, noon-4:30 p.m. $75 includes an appetizer and two souvenir pint glasses. Info, 730-0161. HISTORIC TOUR OF UVM: A walking tour of New England’s fifth oldest university brings

its illustrious history to life. Ira Allen Statue, University Green, University of Vermont, Burlington, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 656-8673. LEGAL CLINIC: Attorneys offer complimentary consultations on a first-come, first-served basis. 274 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 383-2118. LOUNGE 91: See FRI.6. QUEEN CITY GHOSTWALK DARKNESS FALLS TOUR: See FRI.6. SHRED FEST: Those looking to avoid identity theft destroy and dispose of personal documents in a secure environment. New England Federal Credit Union, Williston, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 879-8790. STRUT: AN ART HOP FASHION SHOW: Creative threads from nearly 20 local designers hit the runway. Switchback Brewing bar service satiates sartorially savvy spectators. Generator, Burlington, 6:30 & 8:30 p.m. $20. Info, 859-9222. STUNT KITE FLIERS & ARCHERY HOBBYISTS MEETING: Open to beginning and experienced hobbyists alike, a weekly gathering allows folks to share information and suggestions for equipment, sporting locations and more. Presto Music Store, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 658-0030. TOURS OF THE HISTORIC BARN HOUSE & EXHIBITS: Attendees view authentic African art, impressive architecture and antique fixtures during a stroll through historic buildings. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, 10-11:30 a.m. $10. Info, clemmonsfamily farm@gmail.com.

fairs & festivals

BIRDFEST!: Birders bond over nature walks, banding demos, live raptors and kids’ activities. See calendar spotlight. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 7 a.m.2 p.m. Donations. Info, 229-6206.

GLORY DAYS FESTIVAL: Families fête transportation modes of the past, present and future with train rides, vendors, kids’ activities and live entertainment. Sunday offers train excursions only. Downtown White River Junction, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 295-5036, ext. 230. GREAT VERMONT BREAD FESTIVAL: Mouths water at a celebration of the state’s great bread makers, as well as Red Hen Baking’s 20th anniversary. Beer, live music, a French toast breakfast and, of course, fresh-baked bread are on the menu. Camp Meade, Middlesex, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2108.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nighlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

CAPITAL CITY FARMERS MARKET: Meats and cheeses join farm-fresh produce, baked goods, locally made arts and crafts, and live music. 60 State Street, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, manager@montpelier farmersmarket.com. CHAMPLAIN VALLEY DINNER TRAIN: See FRI.6. CHOCOLATE TASTING: Candy fanatics get an education on a variety of sweets made on-site. Nutty Steph’s Granola & Chocolate Factory, Middlesex, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 229-2090. LATTE ART THROWDOWN: Badass baristas pour eye-catching designs. Brio Coffeeworks, Burlington, 6-10 p.m. $5 to compete; free for spectators. Info, 777-6641. SHELBURNE FARMERS MARKET: Harvested fruits and greens, artisan cheeses, and local novelties grace outdoor tables. Shelburne Parade Ground, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 482-4279.

health & fitness

CARVE YOGA CURIOUS?: Yoga, aerobic exercise and resistance strength training come together in a stress-relieving total-body workout. Hot Yoga Burlington, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 999-9963. COMMUNITY YOGA: Active bodies get their stretch on with Carolyn Hannan and Marger Maldonado, increasing balance and flexibility. Namaste! Old Stone House Museum, Brownington, 10-11 a.m. Donations. Info, 754-2022. INTRO TO STUDIO CYCLING: Beginners hop in the saddle for a 20- to 30-minute ride with an instructor demonstrating each position. Alpenglow Fitness, Montpelier, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 279-0077. MARTIAL ART WORKSHOPS: Attendees discover the


FIND FUTURE DATES + UPDATES AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/EVENTS sugarbush.com

dynamic Japanese art of aikido. Participants receive free onemonth memberships. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, youth class for ages 7-12, 10-11 a.m.; teen and adult class, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free. Info, 951-8900.

language

BIBLIO CAFÉ: A conversation group helps Francophones maintain their language skills. North Hero Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 372-5458.

lgbtq

MATTHEW RIEMER & LEIGHTON BROWN: A talk and signing introduce audience members to We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power and Pride in the History of Queer Liberation, a photographic history featuring more than 300 images. Presented in conjunction with the exhibit “Dona Ann McAdams: Performative Acts.” Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 257-0124. PRIDE HIKES: SHELBURNE BAY PARK: Clad in weather-appropriate clothing, LGBTQA+ hikers carpool to their destination for 2.8-mile out-and-back trek. Shaw’s, Shelburne Rd., South Burlington, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, gcauser@audubon.org. PRIDE YOGA: LGBTQ individuals and allies hit the mat for a stretching session suited to all levels. Sangha Studio — Pine, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. Donations. Info, 448-4262.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BANJO DAN’S BLUEGRASS REVUE: An evening of stellar picking and singing highlights the talents of Bob Amos & Catamount Crossing and the Sky Blue Boys & Cookie. Haskell Free Library & Opera House, Derby Line, 7:30 p.m. $20. Info, 888-757-5559. BEG, STEAL OR BORROW: Veteran Vermont and New Hampshire musicians pick and strum their way through a bluegrass concert. Ripton Community House, 7:30 p.m. $10-15. Info, 388-9782. GREEN MOUNTAIN MONTEVERDI ENSEMBLE OF VERMONT: See FRI.6, Unitarian Church of Montpelier. PAUL ASBELL: The lifelong guitar player who has worked with the likes of Muddy Waters and John Lee Hooker tunes into his own blend of jazz, roots and blues styles. Meeting House on the Green, East Fairfield, 7-9 p.m. $10. Info, 827-6626. PUNK IN THE PARK 14: Fans get riled up for a day of raucous rock by Lobotomobile, Middle Son, Trash Bae and others in a drugand-alcohol-free setting. Kids’ activities round out the event. Main Street Park, Rutland, noon. Free. Info, spankysdivebar@ gmail.com. STEVE HARTMANN: A selftaught guitarist and classically

trained pianist, the Jericho singer-songwriter entertains onlookers with engaging original numbers. Brandon Music, 7:30 p.m. $20; $45 includes dinner; preregister; BYOB. Info, 247-4295. VERMONT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CHORUS OPEN REHEARSAL: Music lovers listen in as singers practice Mozart’s Requiem and a new work by Matthew Evan Taylor in a casual and interactive format. Elley-Long Music Center, Saint Michael’s College, Colchester, 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, rsvp@vso.org. WDEV RADIO RANGERS: Serving up originals and old-time classics, the Vermont band blends country, bluegrass and western swing styles. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7:30 p.m. $10. Info, 533-2000.

outdoors

CELEBRATING SACRED WATERS — CANOE PADDLE & TRAIL WALK: Lovers of Lake Champlain fête the body of water by engaging in educational and spiritual activities. Shelburne Bay Park, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $5; free for kids under 12; preregister; limited space. Info, 922-1990. FALL WARBLER WALK: Joel Tilley of the Rutland County Audubon Society leads a birding walk along the Howe Hill trail. Bring water, bug spray and binoculars. East Poultney Green, 7:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, jptilley50@gmail.com. MOONLIGHT STARLIGHT ASTRONOMY NIGHT: Curious minds uncover the mysteries of the universe in a stargazing session with the Green Mountain Astronomers. Call to confirm. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 7:30-11 p.m. $3. Info, 273-2282. MYSTERY HIKE: Outdoor adventurers join members of the Green Mountain Club Burlington section for a moderate trek. Contact trip leader for details. Free; preregister. Info, wesvolk@ gmail.com. WILDWAY TRAIL OPENING & HIKES: A ribbon-cutting opens a 5.5-mile section of a new trail connecting Burlington’s wild places. One- and three-mile guided hikes begin a 1 p.m. Ethan Allen Homestead, Burlington, noon-3 p.m. Free. Info, 310-1980.

seminars

FAVORITE LOCAL HIKES: Outdoor adventurers get an overview of area parks, preserves and other hidden gems for year-round excursions. L.L. Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 888-615-9973. INTRODUCTION TO FOREST BATHING: Certified nature and forest therapy guide Duncan Murdoch delves into the history of this guided practice in which participants take in nature through the senses. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140.

800.53.SUGAR

sports

KELLY BRUSH RIDE: Handcyclists and bikers spin their wheels on scenic 10-, 20-, 50- or 100-mile loops through the Champlain Valley to raise funds for the Kelly Brush Foundation. Middlebury College, registration, 7-11 a.m.; events start, 7:30 a.m.; post-ride barbecue, noon-5 p.m. $75-125; free for handcyclists; plus minimum $100 in funds raised. Info, 846-5298.

talks

MARGARET FOWLE: “Bird Conservation in Vermont: How Can Landowners Make a Difference?” includes information on the status of critical bird species and how humans can help them thrive. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 11 a.m.-noon. Donations. Info, 434-3068. RICHARD BACKER: Northwest Vermont Solid Waste Management District’s environmental, health and safety manager discusses manufactured goods stewardship as part of the Sustainability Speaker Series. American Precision Museum, Windsor, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 674-5781.

theater

‘THE ADDAMS FAMILY’ YOUTH AUDITIONS: Young performers ages 8 and up throw their hats into the ring for the roles of Puglsey and two ancestor children in Lyric Theatre’s upcoming production of this kooky, spooky musical based on the classic TV show. Lyric Theatre Company Creative Space, South Burlington, 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 324-3651. ‘MAMMA MIA!’: See WED.4. ‘A ROOM OF ONE’S OWN’: See FRI.6. ‘THE SECRET GARDEN’ AUDITIONS: See FRI.6, 10 a.m.-noon. ‘SENT HIM MENTAL: THE HUMANITY AND INSANITY OF G. RICHARD AMES’: See THU.5, 2-3:30 p.m.

2019/20 Season Passes PREMIUM PASS

$1,049 Adult (40-64) $599 For30s (30-39) $399 For20s (19-29) $399 Youth (7-18)

Value Pass

$599 Adult (40-79) $279 Youth (7-18)

boomer Pass

$139 (65-89)

‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: See THU.5, 2 & 7:30-9 p.m. ‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.4. ‘SURVIVING TWIN’: Loudon Wainwright III’s one-person theatrical show focuses on fatherhood, combining the “Dead Skunk (in the Middle of the Road)” hit maker’s original music with the writings of his late dad. Town Hall Theater, Middlebury, 7:30-10 p.m. $59. Info, 382-9222.

words

BOOK & MEDIA SALE: Lovers of the written word bag bargain titles. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 388-4095.

SAT.7

BUY EARLY & SAVE.

Prices increase after Sep. 11, 2019.

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HOW A BOUT A BURGER WITH A SIDE OF HISTORY ?

Starting 9/8, join us at The Red Mill for some delicious new comfort food specials, in a space filled with tradition. 802.475.2317 BasinHarbor.com/dining

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POETRY EXPERIENCE: Writers share original work and learn from others in a supportive environment open to all ages and experience levels. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

SUN.8 bazaars

BTV FLEA: Marketgoers browse a multifarious mix of local artwork and vintage household goods. Vintage Inspired Lifestyle Marketplace, Burlington, noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, 488-5766.

community

COMMUNITY MINDFULNESS PRACTICE: Sessions in the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh include sitting and walking meditation, a short reading, and open sharing. Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga, Burlington, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, newleafsangha@ gmail.com.

dance

BALKAN FOLK DANCING: Louise Brill and friends organize participants into lines and circles set to complex rhythms. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 3:30-6:30 p.m. $6; free for firsttimers; bring snacks to share. Info, 540-1020. DANCING WITH THE STARS OF BURLINGTON: Pro dancers and local celebs pair up to cut a rug — and hopefully a big check — for the Vermont Association for the Blind and Visually Impaired. See calendar spotlight. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 7 p.m. $28.75. Info, 863-5966.

education

FIRST LEGO ROOKIE COACHES TRAINING: Adults interested in starting a First Lego League team build their skills in a four-hour educational session. Current coaches looking to learn more are also welcome. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 1-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 649-2200.

etc.

Unsworth Properties is proud to offer BRAND NEW space in the heart of the South End. Small studios available! Don’t miss this opportunity to be a part of of the thriving South End Artist District. Prime Art Hop location!

Contact vaults@Unsworthproperties.com or (802) 879-4504 50

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ROV SHIPWRECK TOURS: Explorers do a deep dive into Lake Champlain and its maritime wreckage by way of a remotely operated vehicle. Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, Vergennes, 1 p.m. $20-40. Info, 475-2022.

fairs & festivals

GLORY DAYS FESTIVAL: See SAT.7, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. SOUTH END ART HOP: See FRI.6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4.

‘INTELLIGENT LIVES’: A 2018 documentary shown as part of the Sunday Best series focuses on individuals with intellectual disabilities. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 4 p.m. $5. Info, 260-2600.

inspired by her own mother’s story of survival during World War II in this Hershey Felder Presents production. See calendar spotlight. Sylvan Adams Theatre, Segal Centre for Performing Arts, Montréal, 1:30 p.m. $30-67. Info, 514-739-7944.

‘ONE TOWN AT A TIME’: This documentary film trains the lens on the 251 Club of Vermont — a group dedicated to visiting each of the state’s 251 towns and cities. A filmmaker Q&A follows. Old Labor Hall, Barre, 7 p.m. Donations. Info, onetown atatimevt251@gmail.com.

PIKNIC ÉLECTRONIK MONTRÉAL: DJ sets and beat-driven music propel a dance party of epic proportions. See piknicelectronik. com for details. Plaine des jeux, Montréal, 2-9:30 p.m. $16-119. Info, 514-904-1247.

food & drink

Find club dates in the music section.

CHOCOLATE TASTING: See SAT.7.

BARIKA & DABY TOURÉ: A double bill of Levitt AMP St. Johnsbury Music Series performances features a six-piece funky West African-flavored band from Burlington and a Montréalbased singer songwriter. Dog Mountain, St. Johnsbury, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

EAT UP! AT THE GREEN: Locals skip cooking dinner in favor of food and drink from area purveyors served amid art, live music and good company. Camp Meade, Middlesex, 4-9 p.m. Free. Info, 496-2108.

JOANNA MARSDEN & KATELYN CLARK: Taking to flute and piano, the instrumentalists breathe life into works by Beethoven, Reicha and Ries. First Congregational Church, St. Albans, 3-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 524-4555.

STOWE FARMERS MARKET: An appetizing assortment of fresh veggies, meats, milk, berries, herbs, beverages and crafts tempts shoppers. Red Barn Shops Field, Stowe, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, stowefarmers market@gmail.com.

UKULELE MÊLÉE: Fingers fly at a group lesson on the fourstringed Hawaiian instrument. BYO uke. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4-6 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

WINOOSKI FARMERS MARKET: Families shop for fresh produce, honey, meats, baked goods and prepared foods from vendors at an outdoor marketplace. Champlain Mill, Winooski, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, farmers market@downtownwinooski.org.

WONDERTEE GOLF OUTING: Kids and adults on teams of up to five play nine holes to support the Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum. A barbecue at the Palms at Prospect Bay follows. Bomoseen Golf Club, Castleton, tee off, 1 p.m.; barbecue, 4 p.m. $65-405; $15 for barbecue only. Info, 282-2678.

CHICKEN BARBECUE & SALAD SUPPER: Slow-roasted poultry, baked beans, rolls, pie and beverages make for a hearty dine-in or take-out meal. Brewster Pierce Memorial School, Huntington, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $6.50-12. Info, 434-4583.

health & fitness

TECH-ASSISTED MEDITATION MEETUP: Mobile devices and headphones in tow, participants explore digital tools and techniques for achieving deep focus. Satori Float & Mind Spa, Shelburne, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 498-5555.

lgbtq

LGBTQ FIBER ARTS GROUP: A knitting, crocheting and weaving session welcomes all ages, gender identities, sexual orientations and skill levels. Pride Center of Vermont, Burlington, noon-2 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812. PRIDE VERMONT PARADE & FESTIVAL: Performers, marchers and an array of floats color the town with rainbows on a procession from the bottom of Church Street to Battery Park, where vendors, games, eats and entertainment await. Various Burlington locations, parade, 12:30 p.m.; festival, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 860-7812.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: Grammy Award-winning pianist Mona Golabek performs a stirring classical music concert

music

sports

talks

ELISE GUYETTE: History buffs lend their ears to the Discovering Black Vermont: African American Farmers in Hinesburgh, 17901890 author for the illustrated talk “When the Church and Republicans Were Radical: Reconstruction, 1862–1895.” Rokeby Museum, Ferrisburgh, 3 p.m. $5. Info, 877-3406. IRIN CARMON: The co-author of the 2015 biography Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg chats with University of Vermont Wellness Environment director James Hudziak. Ira Allen Chapel, University of Vermont, Burlington, 1:30-3 p.m. Free. Info, 656-9819.

theater

‘AFTER THE REVOLUTION’: Dedicated to her family’s Marxist tradition, Emma Joseph faces questions of honesty and allegiance when a shocking truth about her blacklisted grandfather comes to light. Presented as part of the Middlebury Actors Workshop’s Cutting Edge OffBroadway Play Reading Series. Vermont Coffee Company


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

Playhouse, Middlebury, 4 p.m. $10. Info, 233-5255. ‘THE ESSENTIAL FURTHERMORE’: Employing papier-mâché puppets, Bread and Puppet Theater shares a new play in three parts: comprehensive wake-up services for the sleeping dead, an extinction rebellion and denormalization of the unthinkable. Paper-Mâché Cathedral, Bread and Puppet Theater, Glover, 3 p.m. $10-20. Info, 525-3031. ‘SENT HIM MENTAL: THE HUMANITY AND INSANITY OF G. RICHARD AMES’: See THU.5, 2-3:30 p.m. ‘SHAKESPEARE’S WILL’: See THU.5, 2 p.m.

MON.9 crafts

HANDWORK CIRCLE: Friends and neighbors make progress on works of knitting, crocheting, cross-stitch and other creative endeavors. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

etc.

AMERICAN VETERANS VERMONT POST 1: Those who have served or are currently serving the country, including members of the National Guard and reservists, are welcome to join AMVETS for monthly meetings. American Legion, Post 91, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 796-3098. VERMONT ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY: INFORMAL SHOW & TELL & Q&A SESSION: Stargazers meet to discuss celestial subjects. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

FOMO? Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

film See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nighlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4. ‘STAR WARS: EPISODE IV — A NEW HOPE’: Luke Skywalker battles to save the galaxy — and rescue Princess Leia from the villainous Darth Vader. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

food & drink

BTV POLY COCKTAILS: Those who are polyamorous, in an open relationship or just curious connect over drinks. Deli 126, Burlington, 7 p.m.-midnight. Free. Info, 253-310-8315.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.4, 6:30 p.m. MAGIC: THE GATHERING — MONDAY NIGHT MODERN: Tarmogoyf-slinging madness ensues when competitors battle for prizes in a weekly game. Brap’s Magic, Burlington, 7-11 p.m. $8. Info, 540-0498. PITCH: Players compete in a trick-taking card game. Barre Area Senior Center, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 479-9512.

health & fitness

CHAIR YOGA WITH SANGHA STUDIO: Supported poses promote health and wellbeing. Heineberg Senior Center, Burlington, 10:45-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 448-4262. COMMUNITY HERBAL CLINIC: Supervised clinical interns offer guidance and support to those looking to care for themselves using natural remedies. By appointment only. Vermont Center for Integrative Herbalism, Montpelier, and Railyard Apothecary in Burlington, 4-8 p.m. $10-30; additional cost for herbs; preregister. Info, 224-7100. GUIDED GROUP MEDITATION: In keeping with the tradition of Thich Nhat Hanh, folks practice mindfulness through sitting, walking, reading and discussion. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 7:158 p.m. Free. Info, 505-1688.

language

ENGLISH CONVERSATION CIRCLE: Language learners make strides — and new friends — in an ongoing discussion group. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, noon-1:30 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4140. PLATTSBURGH CONVERSATION GROUP: French speakers maintain their conversational skills in a weekly meetup. Plattsburgh Public Library, N.Y., 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, ajobin-picard@ cefls.org.

lgbtq

PANORAMA: Joined by a facilitator, parents, caregivers and adult family members of LGBTQ youth ask questions and share their experiences. Outright Vermont,

Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-9677.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See SUN.8, 8 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. SAMBATUCADA OPEN REHEARSAL: Burlington’s own samba street percussion band welcomes new members. No experience or instruments required. 8 Space Studio Collective, Burlington, 6-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-5017.

sports

NOW AVAI LABLE AT KI NNEY DRUGS!

LOOKOUT FOR EACH OTHER GOLF TOURNAMENT: Players aim for a hole in one while supporting local charities and community projects. Killington Resort, noon. $100; preregister; limited space. Info, 422-5665.

talks

DEBORAH LEE LUSKIN: The novelist takes listeners on a journey in “Getting From Here to There: A History of Roads and Settlement in Vermont.” Pratt Hall, Montgomery, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 326-3113.

Dual-Ingredient Hemp Supplements Have Arrived

tech

TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.4.

words

MUST-READ MONDAYS: Lit lovers cover Educated by Tara Westover. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

TUE.10

Each Uleva formulation has been thoughtfully blended to generate maximum benefits. Herbal and nutritive ingredients such as turmeric, ginger, melatonin, and green tea work in harmony to support an overall feeling of wellness.*

activism

Visit uleva.com/kinneydrugs for a location near you.

TOXIC WHITENESS DISCUSSION GROUP: Peace & Justice Center representatives facilitate a conversation on the harmful effects of white supremacy on communities and individuals. Peace & Justice Center, Burlington, noon1 p.m. Free. Info, 863-2345.

agriculture

ROCK GARDENS: In a Hanover Garden Club presentation, Marianne Kuchel explains how to utilize the Upper Valley’s abundant ledge and stone in eye-catching plots and troughs. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 1-2:30 p.m. Regular admission, $3-18; free for members and kids under 2. Info, 649-2200.

business

INSURE YOUR BUSINESS WITH CONFIDENCE: Enterprisers learn to effectively protect their assets by choosing appropriate and cost-effective insurance policies. Center for Women & Enterprise, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870. SPEED MENTORING: QUICK Q&A FOR SMALL BUSINESS: SCORE TUE.10

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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Vermont mentors elucidate business-related topics during rapid-fire meetings with aspiring entrepreneurs. South Burlington Community Library, University Mall, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 846-4140.

OLD NORTH END FARMERS MARKET: Locavores score breads, juices, ethnic foods and more from neighborhood vendors. Dewey Park, Burlington, 3-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, oldnorth endfarmersmarket@gmail.com.

community

TUESDAY LUNCH: An in-house chef whips up a well-balanced hot meal with dessert. See barreseniors.org for menu. Barre Area Senior Center, noon. $6; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

COMMUNITY DROP-IN CENTER HOURS: Wi-Fi, games and art materials are on hand at an open meeting space where folks forge social connections. GRACE, Hardwick, 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 472-6857.

crafts

COMMUNITY CRAFT NIGHT: Makers stitch, spin, knit and crochet their way through projects while enjoying each other’s company. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7211.

dance

LAKE CHAMPLAIN SQUARES FALL SEASON NEW DANCER CLASS: Neophytes find their footing in an introductory square dance lesson. Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School, South Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 985-2012.

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FALL 2019 Tuesday, September 10

6:00-7:30 PM

SOLVING THE MYSTERY OF SLEEP: PATTERNS, HABITS, AND TOOLS

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section.

‘STAR WARS: EPISODE V — THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK’: Luke Skywalker begins his Jedi training in this classic flick from 1980. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

food & drink

BENEFIT BAKE: Pizza lovers dine on slices in support of the Vermont Dance Alliance. Partial proceeds from each flatbread sold are donated. American Flatbread Burlington Hearth, 5-11:30 p.m. Cost of food and

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

WOOD-FIRED PIZZA & MEDICINAL HERB GARDEN TOUR: As they nosh on slices made from garden herbs and wild edibles, participants explore regional medicinal and culinary herbs. Rock Point School, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $1025. Info, 861-9700.

‘NIGHT ON EARTH’: The temporary bond between taxi driver and passenger propels five vignettes in this 1991 comedic drama featuring Winona Ryder and Gena Rowlands. Film House, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 540-3018.

Learn more about Community Medical School at www.UVMHealth.org/MedCenterCMS or call (802)847-2886

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etc.

‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4.

Sullivan Classroom, Medical Education Pavilion Larner College of Medicine, University of Vermont

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SWING DANCING: Quick-footed participants experiment with different forms, including the Lindy Hop, Charleston and balboa. Beginners are welcome. Champlain Club, Burlington, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $5. Info, 448-2930.

‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4.

PAMELA SWIFT, PH.D. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHIATRY

9/2/19 2:52 PM

drink. Info, info@vermontdance. org.

games

BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.4, 7 p.m.

health & fitness

ARTHRITIS FOUNDATION EXERCISE PROGRAM: See THU.5. BEGINNER/INTERMEDIATE TAI CHI: Whether they’re new to Sun-style practice or wish to review core moves, students join Elizabeth Wirls for some gentle exercise. Homestead Gardens, Wheeler House, South Burlington, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. COMMUNITY HERBAL CLINIC: See MON.9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED TAI CHI: Time for individual questions and mentoring augments an hour of instruction. Homestead Gardens, Wheeler House, South Burlington, 10:3011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 735-5467. REIKI CLINIC: Thirty-minute treatments foster physical, emotional and spiritual wellness. JourneyWorks, Burlington, 3-5:30 p.m. $10-30; preregister. Info, 860-6203. TUESDAY GUIDED MEDITATION: Participants learn to relax and let go. Stillpoint Center, Burlington, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 318-8605.

FOMO?

language

ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: Parla Italiano? Language learners practice pronunciation and more in an informal gathering. Hartland Public Library, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 436-2473. ‘LA CAUSERIE’ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Native speakers and learners are welcome to pipe up at an unstructured conversational practice. El Gato Cantina, Burlington, 4:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0195. LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: ITALIAN: Speakers hone their skills in the Romance language over a bag lunch. Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. PAUSE-CAFÉ FRENCH CONVERSATION: Frenchlanguage fanatics meet pour parler la belle langue. Burlington Bay Market & Café, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 430-4652.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See SUN.8, 8 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. BURLINGTON SONGWRITERS OPEN MIC: Area songsters make their music heard. O.N.E. Community Center, Burlington, 7-9:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-1139. NORTHERN VERMONT SONGWRITERS: Melody makers meet to share ideas and maximize their creativity. Call for details. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 6:45 p.m. Free. Info, 467-9859. OPEN MIC: Singers, players, storytellers and poets entertain a live audience at a monthly showcase of local talent. Wallingford Town Hall, 7-9 p.m. Free. Info, 446-2872.

outdoors

Find visual art exhibits and events in the art section and at sevendaysvt.com/art.

BIRDING WALK: Joel Tilley of the Rutland County Audubon Society leads ornithology enthusiasts on a search for fall warblers and other migrating birds. Bring Water, bug spray and binoculars. Fairgrounds Trails, Poultney, 7:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, jptilley50@gmail.com.

film

SLOW & EASY HIKING: See THU.5.

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section and at sevendayst.com/movies.

seminars

Find even more local events in this newspaper and online:

art

music + comedy Find club dates at local venues in the music + nighlife section and at sevendaysvt.com/music. All family-oriented events are now published in Kids VT, our free parenting monthly. Look for it on newsstands and check out the online calendar at kidsvt.com. Learn more about highlighted listings in the Magnificent 7 on page 11.

CITIZEN SCIENCE PROJECTS: Curious minds find out how they can get involved in data collection, analysis or reporting of a wide range of topics, such as ecology, wildlife or botany. No scientific background required. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036. FLY TYING THE GOLD-RIBBED HARE’S EAR: Step by step, anglers learn to craft a fly known for its ability to mimic a variety of insects. L.L. Bean, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free;


LIST YOUR EVENT FOR FREE AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT

E’S DAN SAVAG preregister; limited space. Info, 888-615-9973.

sports

WED.11

agriculture

FREE AIKIDO CLASS: A one-time complimentary introduction to the Japanese martial art focuses on centering and finding freedom while under attack. Open to prospective students. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, 6:15-7:15 p.m. Free. Info, 951-8900.

EXTENDING THE GROWING SEASON: Green thumbs get the dirt on seed saving, composting and cover cropping from author and teacher Ron Krupp. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 745-1393.

talks

BUSINESS PLANNING COURSE: In a 10-week class presented by the Center for Women & Enterprise, aspiring entrepreneurs gain the confidence and knowledge to launch a small business. Rutland Economic Development Corp., 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 391-4870.

ANDREA GRAYSON: The links between a common sweetener and chronic disease come to light in “Does Sugar Have a Spell on You?,” a lecture by the University of Vermont professor. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 238-4433. CURRENT EVENTS DISCUSSION GROUP: Informed individuals reflect on the news and its context and ramifications. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6955.

words

BARNES & NOBLE BOOK CLUB: Bibliophiles read into Inland by Téa Obreht. Barnes & Noble, South Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. BURLINGTON FREE WRITE: Aspiring writers respond to prompts in a welcoming atmosphere. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 999-1664. CARLETON YOUNG: In the talk “Voices in the Attic: The Williamstown Boys in the Civil War,” the local author reveals how a bundle of letters written during the Civil War inspired his book Voices From the Attic. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. HARRY GOLDHAGEN: Lit lovers help the local author mark the launch of novellas Green Mountain Sapsuckers and SapNet. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. JASON REYNOLDS: The New York Times bestselling author talks about his award-winning novel Long Way Down, which deals with gun violence through verse. Dibden Center for the Arts, Northern Vermont UniversityJohnson, 8 p.m. Free. Info, 635-1408. THE MOTH: LESSONS: Wordsmiths have five minutes to tell true tales inspired by a shared theme. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 540-0406. SYDNEY LEA: The former Vermont poet laureate reads from his latest collection, Here, in which he addresses the deep connection between human life and the natural world. A Q&A, book signing and refreshments round out the evening. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 229-0774.

business

community

COFFEE TALK: Friends, neighbors and AARP Vermont volunteers catch up on upcoming activities and issues facing older Vermonters. Nomad Coffee — South End Station, Burlington, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, vt@aarp.org.

crafts

FIBER RIOT!: See WED.4. KNITTER’S GROUP: See WED.4.

dance

SQUARE DANCING: Swing your partner! Dancers foster friendships while exercising their minds and bodies. Barre Area Senior Center, 1-3 p.m. Donations; preregister. Info, 479-9512.

film

See what’s playing at local theaters in the movies section. ‘THE FULL MONTY: Viewers are in stitches over this 1997 comedy about six unemployed factory workers who develop a male striptease act. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, 7-9 p.m. $5. Info, 533-2000. ‘HIDDEN PACIFIC 3D’: See WED.4. ‘INCREDIBLE PREDATORS 3D’: See WED.4. ‘STAR WARS: EPISODE VI — RETURN OF THE JEDI’: Luke Skywalker attempts to retrieve Darth Vader from the dark side — without falling into the evil Emperor’s trap. Catamount Arts Center, St. Johnsbury, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 748-2600.

food & drink

COOK THE BOOK: Foodies bring a dish from Whiskey in a Teacup: What Growing Up in the South Taught Me About Life, Love and Baking Biscuits by Reese Witherspoon to a palate-pleasing potluck. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

games

BEGINNERS’ BRIDGE: See WED.4. BRIDGE CLUB: See WED.4. MAH JONGG IN BARRE: See WED.4.

MAH JONGG IN WILLISTON: Participants of all levels enjoy friendly bouts of this tile-based game. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

health & fitness

RESILIENCE FLOW: See WED.4.

IVAL FILM FEST

YOGA4CANCER: See WED.4.

holidays

DAY OF REMEMBRANCE: Contemplative amblers get free admission to the historic site for Patriot Day. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Info, 273-2282.

Sept 6 & 7 ROXY CINEMA, BURLINGTON

language

BEGINNER & INTERMEDIATE/ ADVANCED ENGLISH LANGUAGE CLASSES: See WED.4.

T I C K E T S AT H U M P F I L M F E S T.C O M

LUNCH IN A FOREIGN LANGUAGE: SPANISH: See WED.4.

montréal

‘THE PIANIST OF WILLESDEN LANE’: See SUN.8, 8 p.m.

music

Find club dates in the music section. OLD NORTH END NEIGHBORHOOD BAND TEEN MUSIC JAM: See WED.4.

talks

ERIN MAILE O’KEEFE: The Tiny House Fest Vermont cofounder shares her expertise in “Live Large, Build Tiny,” presented as part of the Yestermorrow Speaker Series. Yestermorrow Design/Build School, Waitsfield, 7-8 p.m. Free. Info, 496-5545. NICHOLAS GOTELLI: The 25th annual Current Topics in Science Speaker Series continues with “Forecasting Nature: Ecological Experiments in a Time of Planetary Change,” presented by the University of Vermont biology professor. Room 207, Bentley Hall, Northern Vermont University-Johnson, 4-5:15 p.m. Free. Info, les.kanat@northern vermont.edu.

tech

SENDING PROFESSIONAL EMAILS: Job seekers get familiar with using Google tools to stay organized, search for open positions and correspond effectively. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 865-7217. TECH HELP WITH CLIF: See WED.4.

theater

‘SOUVENIR: A FANTASIA ON THE LIFE OF FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS’: See WED.4.

DON’T STOP Untitled-91 1

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the presses!

words

BOOK SALE: A genre-spanning selection of page-turners pleases bookworms of all ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, fletcherfriends@ gmail.com.

Keep this newspaper free for all. Join the Seven Days Super Readers at sevendaysvt.com/super-readers or call us at 802-864-5684.

WRITING CIRCLE: See WED.4. m 4t-dontstop-SR18.indd 1

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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classes THE FOLLOWING CLASS LISTINGS ARE PAID ADVERTISEMENTS. ANNOUNCE YOUR CLASS FOR AS LITTLE AS $16.75/WEEK (INCLUDES SIX PHOTOS AND UNLIMITED DESCRIPTION ONLINE). SUBMIT YOUR CLASS AD AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTCLASS.

ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center

Call 864-8426 x12004 for info or register, find more info, and more courses at btc.bsdvt.org/index. php/ace-academy/ AUTO TECHNOLOGY BASICS: Do you want to learn how to fix your own vehicle and save yourself money on repairs? This is an introductory course and great for that. Students will study the engine, ignition system, fuel and cooling systems, brakes, tires, steering, and general electrical service. Wed., 6-9 p.m., nine weeks, Sep. 25-Nov. 20. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. BAKING FUNDAMENTALS: BREAD AND DESSERT: Ingredients are included, and you will take home your freshly baked creation after every class. Breads: We will cover quick breads, a braided loaf, homemade rolls and even cinnamon rolls from scratch. Desserts: We will cover cookies, cupcakes, pies and more. Wed., 6-9 p.m., two five-week sessions: Sep. 18-Oct. 16 and Oct. 23-Nov. 20 Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. ELECTRICITY BASICS: CONSUMER ELECTRONICS: This class will review the basic theories and applications of electricity and specifically its use in consumer electronics. Book fees are not included. Wed., 6-9 p.m., eight weeks, Sep. 23-Nov. 13. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. EXPLORATIONS IN COOKING: Create delicious food in your home kitchen! One- or two-night courses covering a variety of topics, from gluten-free baking to time-saving techniques for making homemade meals for busy folks. All skill levels and special diets welcome! Ingredients provided; take home meals prepared! Sign up for one or all courses. Thu., 6-9 p.m., 1-2 evening sessions starting Sep. 26. Location: ACE Academy

54

at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. FRENCH I, BASIC CONVERSATIONAL: This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of the French language and covers basic grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. It includes simple conversation and reading and writing exercises, and it provides an introduction to the arts and cultures of France and Canada and of French-speaking peoples. Thu., 6-8:30 p.m., nine weeks, Sep. 26-Nov. 21. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. JAPANESE, BASIC CONVERSATIONAL: This course offers an introduction to speaking, listening, reading and writing Japanese. Emphasis is on the conversational patterns used in everyday life, when meeting people, getting around, etc. Discussions of life in Japan, customs and culture are interwoven throughout the language lessons. Book fees are not included. Thu., 6-9 p.m., nine weeks, Sep. 26-Nov. 21. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc. bsdvt.org/index.php/ace-academy. JEWELRY BASICS: METALSMITHING: Designed for the beginning student. Jewelry making techniques such as filing, sawing and soldering silver will be taught. Tools are furnished; lab fee included in tuition. Students are expected to pay for materials used. Option of an Open Studio for experienced students. Students will design and execute their own projects. Thu., 6-9 p.m., nine weeks, Sep. 26-Nov. 21. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc. bsdvt.org/index.php/ace-academy. MIXED-MEDIA PAINTING AND DRAWING: This class aims to explore what “mixed media” means through a range of materials. This class includes some fundamentals of drawing, painting and color theory for a beginning artist. The goal of this class is to encourage your unique creative style while learning various techniques and compositional tools. Mon., 6-9 p.m., 10 weeks, Sep. 19-Nov. 23. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@ bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/index.php/ ace-academy.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

MOTORCYCLE MAINTENANCE: Learn theory and practical knowledge of two-stroke and four-stroke motorcycle engines, electrics, brakes, fuel systems, basic maintenance. Other topics could include: chassis design, steering geometries, racing, restorations. Course will follow the direction and pace students desire. Students are encouraged to bring their motorcycles to course. No prior mechanical experience necessary. Mon., 6-9 p.m., five weeks, Sep. 30-Oct. 28. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. PLUMBING BASICS: Students will learn the basics of plumbing systems with an emphasis on simple plumbing maintenance and repairs to household plumbing and related appliances such as sinks, garbage disposals, toilets, HVAC units, etc. Mon., 6-9 p.m., nine weeks, Sep. 23-Nov. 18. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. SPANISH I, BASIC CONVERSATIONAL: The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with everyday common expressions, including nouns, adjectives and use of special verbs. This class will be a simple conversational approach to the practical application of the language. Book fees are not included. Mon., 6-9 p.m., 10 weeks, Sep. 18-Nov. 18. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. UNDERSTANDING OPIATE ADDICTION: Learn and share about the opiate crisis, signs of opioid addiction, the effect of opioid addiction on people and their families, and what you can do to help. This three-class workshop is recommended for anyone who wants to learn more about how to make a difference in their community or family. The workshop is participatory in nature. Dinner is provided. Thu., 6-8:15 p.m., Oct. 3-17. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy. WELDING BASICS: Fundamentals of making welded joints with oxyacetylene and electric arc processes are taught, along with MIG and TIG welding. In addition, the fundamentals of metal fabrication. 6-9 p.m., nine weeks, Sep. 25-Nov. 20. Location: ACE Academy at Burlington Technical Center, 52 Institute Rd., Burlington. Info: Marni Leikin, 864-8426 x12004, mleikin@bsdvt.org, btc.bsdvt.org/ index.php/ace-academy.

art COLLAGE ART CLASS FOR AGES 16+: Expand your knowledge of collage making and let your

imagination soar in a supportive and friendly environment. Young or old, we all have a story to tell, so bring your scissors and tell it through collage. We will utilize paint, paper, fabric and transfers to create amazing, intriguing and beautifully layered art. Thu., starts Sept. 12, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $65/ six-week class. Location: Williston Central School, 195 Central School Dr., Williston. Info: Todd Goodwin, 876-1160, recreation@willistonvt. org, willistonrec.org. HAITIAN PAINT AND CHILL CLASS: Chill, paint, learn about Haitian culture and help build our multicultural community with Artist Julio Desmont. Novices and seasoned painters alike are welcome to spend time together in a beautiful and meaningful place. BYOB: Bring your own bottle (empty), paint and materials — or we’ll supply them for you. Sun., starting Aug. 25, 3-5 p.m. Cost: $35/person; additional $20 for material & supplies, or bring your own. Location: Clemmons Family Farm Authentica Art Gallery, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: 765-560-5445, clemmons familyfarm@gmail.com, clemmons familyfarm.org. HAITIAN PAINTING & CULTURE: Chill with Julio Desmont, the Clemmons Family Farm’s artist-inresidence. Paint to your heart’s content, learn about Haitian culture and pick up a few words of patois at his “Art That Binds” communitybuilding painting classes. Learn more at bit.ly/CFFArtBinds. Sun., 3 p.m., multiple dates. Cost: $35/2 hours. Location: Clemmons Family Farm Authentica Art Gallery, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: , Clemmons Family Farm, 765-5605445, clemmonsfamilyfarm@gmail. com, clemmonsfamilyfarm.org. JAMAICAN MUSIC & STORYTELLING: Authentic Jamaican music, culture and storytelling with Vermont Artist Michael Dyke for children 6 to 9 years old. Children will enjoy a musically immersive experience, mindfulness and fun connections with the artist and with others. Class includes songs, demonstrations of a variety of musical instruments, and learning rhythms. Sat., starting Aug. 24, 10-11:30 a.m. Cost: $10/90-minute class. Location: Clemmons Family Farm Authentica Art Gallery, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: 765560-5445, clemmonsfamilyfarm@ gmail.com, clemmonsfamilyfarm. org.

BCA Studios

Burlington City Arts Fall Class Registration is now open! Find these classes and many more at burlingtoncityarts.org. ACRYLIC PAINTING: This class introduces students to the tools and techniques artists use to create successful works of art in one of the most versatile mediums available: acrylic paint. Learn the

basics of mixing colors, blending and a variety of acrylic painting techniques. No experience necessary. Price includes all basic materials, as well as open studio access during the weeks of your class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Tue., Oct. 1-Nov. 5, 6-8:30 p.m. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. ARTIST BOOKS + ZINES: Ages 18 & up. Prerequisite: Basic digital editing skills. Have you wanted to make a book or zine but don’t know where to start? Bring your project ideas and create unique artist books and zines from start to finish in this eight-week hands-on class. Sequencing choices, layout in Adobe InDesign, digital printing and hand-binding techniques will be covered. Class price includes darkroom and digital lab access during open lab hours. Find more information and register at burlington cityarts.org. Thu., Oct. 17-Dec. 12, 6-8 p.m. (no class Nov. 28). Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DARKROOM CRASH COURSE: Ages 18 & up. No experience necessary. Explore the traditional, analog, black-and-white darkroom! Learn how to properly expose blackand-white film, process film into negatives, and make silver gelatin prints. Students will leave with the skills and confidence to join the darkroom as a member. All 35mm film, paper and darkroom supplies included. Bring your manual 35mm or medium format film camera to the first class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncity arts.org. Mon., Nov. 18-Dec. 9, 6-9 p.m. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@ burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY: Learn the basics of making a great photograph from initial exposure to editing and printing in this comprehensive class. Organizing and editing files in Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop will also be covered, and students will leave with a selection of high-quality prints made on our archival Epson printer. A DSLR or digital Mirrorless Rangefinder and a Mac-compatible portable hard drive or flash drive required. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Mon., Sep. 16-Oct. 28, 6-9 p.m. Cost: $240/ person; $216 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlington cityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECTS : Ages 18 & up. Prerequisite: Basic proficiency with manual camera settings and Adobe Lightroom. Do you shoot digital images or scan color film and have a project idea to explore? This eight-week class will challenge you to edit and refine your photographs to create the portfolio of work you envision. Organizing and editing techniques in Adobe Lightroom, printing on our Epson large format

printers and more will be covered, tailored to individual student interests. Class price includes darkroom and digital lab access during open lab hours. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts. org. Mon., Nov. 4-Dec. 16, 6-9 p.m. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlington cityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. DRAWING: Ages 18 & up. Learn a variety of drawing techniques, including basic perspective, compositional layout, and use of dramatic light and shadow. Students will work mostly from observation and will be encouraged to work with a variety of media, including pencil, pen and ink, ink wash, and charcoal in this small, group setting. Price includes all basic drawing materials, as well as open studio access during the weeks of your class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Mon., Sep. 30-Nov. 18 (no class Oct. 14 or Nov. 11), 6-8:30 p.m. Cost: $255/ person; $229.50 for BCA members Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlington cityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. FRIDAY ADULT WHEEL: Ages 18 & up. Curious about the pottery wheel? Spend a Friday night with our pottery instructors at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket includes a wheel-throwing demonstration at the beginning of class, access to a wheel, and time to try making a bowl or cup. There is a $5 additional fee per clay piece to be fired and glazed by the studio. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Find more information and register at burlingtoncity arts.org. Fri., 7:30-9 p.m., starting Sep. 20. Cost: $10/person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. FRIDAY FAMILY CLAY: Spend a Friday night with your family at the BCA Clay Studio. A ticket provides a wheel demonstration at the beginning of class, wheel access (for ages 6+), hand building for any age, unlimited clay, and time to create. Youth must be accompanied by an adult. Adults may assist their child(ren) free of charge. Additional tickets are required for adults who would like to join the fun and either hand build or use a wheel of their own. If you’d like your work to be fired and glazed by the studio, there is a $5 fee per piece. Finished pottery will be available for pickup three weeks after visit. Class ticket purchases are nonrefundable. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Fri., 5-7 p.m., starting Sep. 20. Cost: $10/person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. JEWELRY: Ages 18 & up. Learn the basics of creating metal jewelry. Techniques covered will include sawing, piercing, filing, annealing, soldering, texturing, cold connections, basic hollow construction, ring sizing and more, so that students can create at least two


CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

completed pieces. The class includes copper and brass and use of all basic tools, as well as studio access during the weeks of your class. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Tue., Sep. 24-Oct. 29, 5:30-8 p.m. Cost: $255/ person; $229.50 for BCA members Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlington cityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. LIFE DRAWING: Ages 18 & up. Spend the evening with other local artists drawing from one of our experienced models. Please bring your drawing materials and paper. Purchase a ticket to hold your spot; drop-ins are welcome if space is available. Ticket purchases for this class are nonrefundable. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Fri., 7:30-9 p.m., starting Sep. 20. Cost: $10/ person; $9 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlington cityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. PORTRAIT WORKSHOP: Ages 18 & up. Prerequisite: previous painting experience recommended. Explore the unique structure of the head and facial features with local painter Gail Salzman. Capture the individual likeness of the model using simplified shapes and tones. Students will work with effects of light on facial forms, experimenting with variety and

contrast in realistic and inventive color. Individual coaching and group feedback will be provided. Class price includes paint as well as the use of BCA’s palettes, easels and painting trays. Students are responsible for some materials; see materials list online under class description. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts. org. Sat., Sep. 28, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Cost: $240/person; $216 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157, kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org. PRINTMAKING: Ages 18 & up. This class will show you a whole range of printing techniques that can be used on their own or in combination to create unique artwork. Through demonstrations and hands-on learning, you’ll be introduced to the studio’s equipment and materials. Students will also be encouraged to explore these techniques and have fun experimenting. Class price includes basic supplies and open studio access during the weeks of your class. No previous experience needed. Find more information and register at burlingtoncityarts.org. Tue., Sep. 24-Oct. 22, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cost: $212.50/nonmembers; $191.25 for BCA members. Location: BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Kiersten Williams, 865-7157,

kwilliams@burlingtoncityarts.org, burlingtoncityarts.org.

craft ARTS & CRAFT WORKSHOPS: North Country Studio Workshops offers a five-day intensive workshop for advanced- to professionallevel artisans January 29 to February 2, 2020. NCSW fosters an atmosphere of discovery, energy, collaboration and inspiration. Workshops include basketry, book arts, brushes, clay/hand-building, clay/wheel, encaustic/cold wax, fiber 2D and 3D, metal jewelry, painting/drawing, photography, printmaking and sculpture. The campus of Bennington College provides workshop facilities, accommodations and an inspirational setting. Explore, expand and create in a community of fine craft and fine art professionals. Jan. 29Feb. 2, 2020. Cost: $1,350/person for full resident schedule; $1,150 for commuter. Location: North Country Studio Workshops at Bennington College, 1 College Dr., Bennington. Info: Jeanne Haskell, 603-3804520, registrar@ncsw.org.ncsw. org/workshops.

dance ARGENTINE TANGO CLASSES: Tango is playful, elegant and affectionate. Beginners: Step into the basics. Interm/adv-beg: Polish your technique and learn something

new. No partner required. LGBTQ+ friendly. Stay for the milonga (social tango dance) 7:45-10:30 p.m. Bring clean, smooth-soled shoes. Instructor Elizabeth Seyler PhD makes learning a breeze. Classes may continue into Nov. Sat., Sep. 7 & Oct. 5, and Fri., Sep. 20 & Oct. 18; interm/adv beg: 7-7:45 p.m.; beg: 7:45-8:30 p.m. Cost: $10/person, incl. free admission to milonga; $35 for all four (paid at first class); $65 for all four (paid at first class) for you & a friend. Location: Champlain Club, 20 Crowley St., Burlington. Info: Queen City Tango, Eloise Beil, 999-1798, qct@queencitytango.org, queencitytango.org. DANCE STUDIO SALSALINA: Salsa classes: nightclub-style, group and private, four levels. Beginner walkin classes, Wed., 6 p.m. $15/person for one-hour class. No dance experience, partner or preregistration required, just the desire to have fun! Drop in anytime and prepare for an enjoyable workout. Location: 266 Pine St., Burlington. Info: Victoria, 598-1077, info@ salsalina.com.

drumming TAIKO AND DJEMBE CLASSES IN BURLINGTON!: Sessions begin monthly for adults, kids, parents! Parade and conga classes, too. Intermediate Taiko: Mon., 6-8:20 p.m. Taiko, adults: Tue., 5:30-6:20 p.m., and Wed., 6:30-7:50 p.m.

Djembe, adults: Wed., 5:30-6:20 p.m. Taiko, kids and parents: Tue., 4:30-5:20 p.m. World Drumming, kids and parents: Wed., 4:30-5:20 p.m. Drums provided. Schedule/ register online. Location: Taiko Space, 208 Flynn Ave., Suite 3G, Burlington. Info: 999-4255, burlingtontaiko.org.

Flynn Arts

ACTING FOR BASHFUL BEGINNERS: Instructor: Susan Palmer. Thu., Sep. 12-Oct. 17, 7-8:30 p.m. Cost: $150/person for six weeks. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. AFRO-FUSION JAM CLASS: For all ages. Instructor: Bonisiwe Green. Sun., Oct. 27-Dec. 8 (no class Nov. 24), 10:30 a.m.-noon. Cost: $160/ six weeks; $22.50 to drop in. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org. BALLET LEVELS I & II: For teens & adults. Instructor: Elizabeth Brody. Level I: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Level II:

6:35-7:35 p.m. Mon., Sep. 9-Dec. 2 (no class Nov. 25). Cost: $170/12 weeks; $15 to drop in. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. BURLESQUE TECHNIQUE LEVEL I & II, AND BURLESQUE ACT DEVELOPMENT: Ages 18+. Instructor: Doctor Vu. Level I: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Level II: 6:35-7:35 p.m. Act Development: 7:40-8:40 p.m. Mon., Sep. 9-Dec. 2 (no class Nov. 25). Cost: $170/12 weeks. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org. CONTEMPORARY DANCE: For teens & adults. Instructor: Rose Bedard. Thu., Sep. 12-Dec. 5 (no class Nov. 28), 6:30-7:30 p.m. Cost: $170/12 weeks; $15 to drop in. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org. DANCE FLOOR MOVES: FRIDAY NIGHT SOCIAL: For ages 55+. Instructor: Sara McMahon, Rose Bedard & special guest instructor Jena Necrason. Fri., Sep. 27-Dec. 6 (no class Nov. 29), 7:35-8:35 p.m. Cost: $150/10 weeks. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, CLASSES

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OPEN HOUSES SIGN UP TODAY! NorthernVermont.edu/Visit Johnson Campus: Friday, September 13 Lyndon Campus: Friday, September 20

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8/30/19 4:06 PM

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CLASS PHOTOS + MORE INFO ONLINE SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSES

classes CLASSES

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scaliendo@flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. FLYNN SHOW CHOIRS!: Auditions will be held Sep. 7 for grades 4-12. Rehearsals: Sat., Sep. 14-Dec.14 (no class Nov. 23). Performances: Dec. 20, 21 & 22. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. HEY MASTER DJ!: For adults & teens 16+. Instructor: DJ cRAIG mITCHELL. This course is a prere quisite for small group, hands-on DJ instruction with cRAIG offered in the Spring. Tue., Oct. 22-Dec. 3 (no class Nov. 26), 5:30-7 p.m. Cost: $150/six weeks. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. HIP-HOP: For teens & adults. Instructor: Rose Bedard. Thu., Sep.12-Dec. 5 (no class Nov. 28), 5:25-6:25 p.m. Cost: $170/12 weeks; $15 to drop in. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. HIP-HOP FOR KIDS: For ages 8-12. Instructor: Rose Bedard. Thu., Oct. 10-Dec. 5 (no class Nov. 28), 4:205:20 p.m. Cost: $130/eight weeks Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org. JAZZ FUSION: For teens & adults. Instructor: Rose Bedard. Thu., Sep. 12-Dec. 5 (no class Nov. 28), 7:358:35 p.m. Cost: $170/12 weeks; $15 to drop in. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. MOTH-STYLE STORYTELLING: Price of class includes ticket to Arts Riot Moth Story Slam! Instructor: Susanne Schmidt. Tue., Sep. 17-Oct. 22, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost: $165/ six weeks. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. MUSIC TOGETHER: For caregivers and children, ages 3 months to 5 years. Instructor: Alison Mott. Mon., 10-10:45 a.m., Sep. 16-Nov. 18 Cost: $155/10 weeks, incl. materials. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org. RHYTHM KIDS: Ages 5-8. Instructor: Alison Mott. Sun., 3-3:45 p.m., Sep. 8-Nov. 17 (no class Sep. 29). Cost: $155/10 weeks, incl. materials. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org.flynncenter.org. TAP LEVELS I, II & III: For teens & adults. Instructor: Elisa Van Duyne. Level I: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Level II: 6:35-7:35 p.m. Level III: 7:40-8:40 p.m. Wed., Sep. 11-Dec. 11 (no class Sep. 18 or Nov. 27). Cost: $170/12 weeks. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@ flynncenter.org.flynncenter.org.

p.m. Cost: $130/eight weeks Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org. YOUTH JAZZ COMBOS: Grades 7-12. Audition for new members: Sep. 3 (contact FlynnArts manager to sign up at flynnarts@flynncenter .org). Final performance on Dec. 5. Instructor Shane Hardiman combo: 5:20-6:50 p.m. Instructor Tom Cleary combo: 7:15-8:45 p.m. Tue., Sep. 10-Dec. 3 (no class Nov. 26). Cost: $250/12 weeks Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter.org, flynncenter.org. YOUTH THEATER: Placement session for new students: Sep. 4, 5-6 p.m. All-Stars, grades 5-8, Tue., Sep. 10-Dec. 3 (no class Nov. 26), 3:30-5 p.m., instructor Annalisa Ledson, Hoehl Studio. Juniors, grades 2-6, Thu., Sep. 12-Dec. 5 (no class Nov. 28), 3:45-5 p.m., instructor Jamie Watkins, Hoehl Studio. Sprouts, age 4-grade 2, Wed., Sep. 11-Dec. 4 (no class Nov. 27), 4-5 p.m., instructor Tracy Martin, Chase Studio. Location: FlynnArts, 153 Main St., Burlington. Info: Sarah Caliendo, 652-4537, scaliendo@flynncenter. org, flynncenter.org.

gardening ALL ABOUT HYDRANGEAS: This class will focus on the four species of hydrangeas, how and when to prune them, and proper fertilization for max blooms. Register at gardenerssupplystore.com. Sep. 14, 2-3:30 p.m. Cost: $15/ person. Location: Gardener’s Supply-Williston, 472 Marshall Ave., Williston. Info: Meredith White, 660-3505, meredithw@gardeners. com, gardenerssupplystore.com. LANDSCAPE DESIGN: Are you an avid gardener looking for new inspiration? Want a better understanding of selecting and placing plants? This four-part series by landscape designer Silvia Jope is the answer. Wed., Sep. 25-Oct. 16, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $180/ person; register at gardenerssupplystore.com. Location: Gardener’s Supply Company, 128 Intervale Rd., Burlington. Info: Meredith White, 660-3505, meredithw@gardeners. com, gardenerssupplystore.com.

healing arts SOMATIC MOVEMENT WORKSHOP: Amber Arnold is a sound healer of a somatic movement practice that calms the nervous system and helps to release patterns of stress, stagnant energy and imbalance in the body. Participants finish with a vibrational sound bath to realign and bring vibrational balance back into the body. Sat., Sep. 28, 1-2:30 p.m. Cost: $25/person. Location: Clemmons Family Farm , 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765-560-5445, clemmons familyfarm@gmail.com, clemmons familyfarm.org.

SOUND BATH & MEDICINE MAKING: Join sound healer Amber Arnold of Sacred Vibrations for an YOUTH DANCES: For ages 5-7. afternoon of herbal medicine makInstructor: Rose Bedard. Fri., Oct. 11ing, somatic alignment and sound Dec. 6 (no class Nov. 29), 4:20-5:20 healing. Participants will journey 56 SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

into plant spirit medicine, engage in a nourishing somatic practice to release stagnant energy, make healing tinctures and elixirs, and end with a healing sound bath. Sun., Sep. 29, 1-4 p.m. Cost: $40/ person. Location: Clemmons Family Farm , 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765-560-5445, clemmons familyfarm@gmail.com, clemmons familyfarm.org. THE ART OF REIKI 1: In this class, you will acquire the ability to access Reiki healing energy that you will retain for the rest of your life. You’ll expand your healing abilities as you explore how Reiki can reduce stress, relieve pain, balance emotions, and facilitate personal healing and spiritual growth. Sat., Sep. 21, 1-5 p.m. Cost: $125/four-hour training. Location: Railyard Apothecary, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 540-0595, emma@railyardapothecary.com, railyardapothecary.com.

kids JAMAICAN MUSICAL STORYTELLING : Authentic Jamaican music, culture and storytelling with Vermont Artist Michael Dyke for children 6 to 9 years old. Your young citizens of the world will enjoy a musically immersive experience, mindfulness and fun connections with the artist and with others. Songs, demonstrating a variety of musical instruments, and learning rhythms are part of the class. Sat., 10-11:30 a.m, multiple dates. Cost: $10/90-minute class. Location: Clemmons Family Farm Authentica Art Gallery, 2190 Greenbush Rd., Charlotte. Info: Clemmons Family Farm, 765560-5445, clemmonsfamilyfarm@ gmail.com, clemmonsfamilyfarm. org.

language ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE: FALL SESSION: Our fall session starts on September 16. Morning, afternoon and evening classes are available in Burlington, and there are evening classes in Colchester and Montpelier. We serve the entire range of students from the true beginners to those already comfortable conversing in French. Begins Sep. 16. Location: Alliance Française of the Lake Champlain Region, Burlington, Colchester and Montpelier. Info: Micheline Tremblay, 881-8826, education@ aflcr.org, aflcr.org. ANNOUNCING SPANISH CLASSES : Spanish classes start in September. Learn from a native speaker via small classes or personal instruction. You’ll always be participating and speaking. Lesson packages for travelers, lessons for young children; they love it! English as Second Language instruction online. Our 13th year. See our website or contact us for details. Start week of Sep. 16. Cost: $235/10 weekly classes, 90+ min. each. Location: Spanish in Waterbury Center, Waterbury Center. Info: 585-1025, spanishparavos@gmail.com, spanishwaterburycenter.com.

martial arts AIKIDO CLASSES: Discover the dynamic, flowing martial art of aikido. Learn how to relax under pressure and how aikido cultivates core power, fitness and flexibility. Aikido emphasizes throws and pinning techniques rather than strikes.The philosophy and movements cultivate the harmonious resolution of conflict. Classes for adults, families and youth. Visitors are always welcome! Free workshops Sat., Sep. 7: Youth (ages 7-12), 10 a.m.; Adult, 11 a.m. Adult classes begin Oct. 1, 6:15 p.m.; youth classes ongoing. Membership rates incl. unlimited classes. Contact us for info about membership rates for adults, youth & families. Location: Aikido of Champlain Valley, 257 PIne St., Burlington. Info: Benjamin Pincus, 951-8900, bpincus@burlington aikido.org, burlingtonaikido.org. VERMONT BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: Brazilian jiujitsu is a martial arts combat style based entirely on leverage and technique. Brazilian jiujitsu self-defense curriculum is taught to Navy SEALs, CIA, FBI, military police and special forces. No training experience required. Easyto-learn techniques that could save your life! Classes for men, women and children. Students will learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense life skills to avoid becoming victims and help them feel safe and secure. Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them realistic martial arts training practices they can carry with them throughout life. IBJJF and CBJJ certified black belt sixth-degree instructor under Carlson Gracie Sr.: teaching in Vermont, born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A five-time Brazilian National Champion; International World Masters Champion and IBJJF World Masters Champion. Accept no Iimitations! Location: Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, 55 Leroy Rd., Williston. Info: 598-2839, julio@ bjjusa.com, vermontbjj.com.

Media Factory

ART HOP OPENING & VR DEMOS: Come to the Media Factory to see one of the largest curated visual art exhibits at Art Hop, and check out our new VR gear. Watch the first cut of our 360-degree video of Hannah Dennison’s “The Quarry Project.” No preregistration necessary. Fri., Sep. 6, 5:30-10 p.m. Location: Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave, Suite 2G, Burlington. Info: Gin Ferrara, 651-9692, ginf@retn.org. bit.ly/ btvmediafactory. EDITING WITH ADOBE PREMIERE: This workshop provides an overview of the most-used features of Adobe Premiere. Learn how to configure the work space, import and organize media, make edits, and fine-tune them to create a finished program. Also learn how to add music and adjust audio levels, add titles and export your finished

project. Tue., Sep. 10, 6-8 p.m. Cost: $25/person suggested donation. Location: Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave, Suite 2G, Burlington. Info: Gin Ferrara, 651-9692, ginf@retn.org. bit.ly/btvmediafactory. MEDIA FACTORY ORIENTATION & VR DEMOS: A special Art Hop edition of our orientation. Learn about community media and join the Media Factory, gaining access to our gear and facilities. Afterward, check out our new VR gear and watch the first cut of our 360-degree video of Hannah Dennison’s “The Quarry Project.” Register: bit. ly/btvmediafactory, or 651-9692. Sat., Sep. 7, 11 a.m. Location: Media Factory, 208 Flynn Ave, Suite 2G, Burlington. Info: Gin Ferrara, 651-9692, ginf@retn.org. bit.ly/ btvmediafactory.

meditation LEARN TO MEDITATE: Taught by qualified meditation instructors at the Burlington Shambhala Meditation Center: Wed., 6-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Free and open to anyone. Free public meditation: weeknights, 6-7 p.m.; Tue. and Thu., noon-1 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-noon. Classes and retreats also offered. See our website at burlington. shambhala.org. Location: Burlington Shambhala Center, 187 S. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 658-6795.

performing arts PARALLEL NARRATIVES: In this six-week creative workshop, we will use magic realism and metaphor to transform our life stories. Thu., Sep. 12-Oct. 10, 6-8 p.m., w/ story circle on Sun., Oct. 13, 5-7 p.m. Cost: $150/six-week course. Location: Railyard Apothecary, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 540-0595, emma@railyardapothecary.com. railyardapothecary.com.

well-being 200-HOUR AYURVEDA INTEGRATION PROGRAM: Join us in learning and immerse yourself in the oldest surviving preventative health care system. This program is ideal for yoga teachers, counselors, therapists, bodyworkers, nurses, doctors, wellness coaches, herbalists, etc. VSAC approved and payment plans available. Can transfer hours to Kripalu’s Ayurveda Health Counselor program. More information at ayurvedavermont.com/ classes. 2020 schedule: Feb. 8-9, Mar. 7-8, Apr. 4-5, May 2-3, Jun. 6-7, Jul. 11-12, Aug. 15-16, Sep. 12-13, Oct. 17-18, Nov. 14-15. Cost: $2,795/ person. Location: The Ayurvedic Center of Vermont, 34 Oak Hill Rd., Williston. Info: Allison Morse, 8728898, ayurvedavt@comcast.net. BREATHWORK FOR TRANSFORMATION: Come join a like-minded community to recharge your batteries, feel some feels, release what you don’t need and discover that you already have everything that you need inside of you! Sun., Sep. 15, 5-7:30 p.m. Cost: $35/2.5-hour class. Location: Railyard Apothecary, 270 Battery St., Burlington. Info: 540-0595, emma@railyardapothecary.com, railyardapothecary.com.

writing WRITING MEMOIR: Get support and encouragement in writing about your life in this class that can help you give some order and focus to memories you want to preserve. This small-group format is limited to 10 students, and no previous experience is necessary. Led by Ann Turkle, MFA, Ph.D. Registration required. Mon., Sep. 9, 16, 23, 30 & Oct. 7, 7-9 p.m. Cost: $75/person. Location: Jungian Center for the Spiritual Sciences, 55 Clover Ln., Waterbury. Info: Sue Mehrtens, 244-7909, info@jungiancenter.org, jungiancenter.org.

yoga EVOLUTION YOGA: Practice yoga in a down-to-earth atmosphere with some of the most experienced teachers and therapeutic professionals in Burlington. All are welcome. New this Fall: Heated Flow, Pilates Flow, Community Y12SR and more! Daily drop-in classes including $10 community classes, Yoga Wall and Yoga Therapeutics classes led by physical therapists. Dive deeper into your practice or register for our Yoga Teacher Training for Healthcare Providers. $10-$15/class; $140/10-class card; $10/community class. New students $100/10-class card. New! Student Monthly Unlimited just $55/mo. Location: Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: 864-9642, evolutionvt.com. LAUGHING RIVER YOGA: Located in a beautiful setting overlooking the Winooski River. We offer highquality classes, workshops and trainings taught by experienced teachers who honor the beauty and wisdom of the yogic tradition. Check our website to learn more about our life-changing 200-hour teacher training and upcoming We Rise training. All bodies and abilities are welcome. Daily classes, workshops, 200- and 300-hour yoga teacher training. Cost: $65/ first month of unlimited classes; workshop & training prices vary. Location: Laughing River Yoga, Chace Mill, Suite 126, Burlington. Info: 343-8119,laughingriveryoga. com. SANGHA STUDIO |: NONPROFIT, DONATION-BASED YOGA: Sangha Studio builds an empowered community through the shared practice of yoga. Free yoga service initiatives and outreach programs are offered at 17 local organizations working with all ages. Join Sangha in both downtown Burlington and the Old North End for one of their roughly 60 weekly classes and workshops. Become a Sustaining Member for $60/month and practice as often as you like! Daily classes. Location: Sangha Studio, 120 Pine St. & 237 North Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info: 448-4262, info@sanghastudio.org, sanghastudio.org.


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COURTESY OF THE PYROS

music+nightlife

Ivamae (left) and Steven Yardley in “Coffee”

Singled Out

Steven Yardley puts love and romance front and center on the Pyros’ new EP, Christian Mingle B Y J O RD A N AD A M S

D

epending on how you look at it, being single rules, or it sucks. Most uncoupled people would likely agree that singlehood is a balancing act between perks and pitfalls. Steven Yardley might tell you that, single or partnered, it’s all about the journey. The Burlington sound engineer and front person for garage-rock band the Pyros says his band’s new EP, Christian Mingle — and its accompanying music videos — is all about “the reckless pursuit of love.” Through three highly stylized, tonguein-cheek clips, Yardley gives the world a proper introduction to the band and establishes himself as a precocious talent in the Queen City. While most of his contributions to the Vermont scene have been as a sound engineer, the singer-songwriter takes center stage with Christian Mingle, which drops Tuesday, September 10. That night, the Pyros open for B Boys at the Monkey House in Winooski. The 25-year-old Farmington, Maine, native migrated to Burlington after 58

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

graduating from St. Lawrence Univer- it a “Kurt Cobain meets Austin Powers” sity in 2016. During his college years, he vibe, Yardley describes. frequented Vermont, making connec“The coolest part about the Jammbutions that would later serve him well. lance is being able to help people to have Since his move, the a really good-sounding blonde, mullet-haired show and unite the musician has been seen community,” he says. behind the board at Though his journey clubs including Higher with the Jammbulance Ground, Foam Brewers has been fairly clear cut, S TE VE N YAR D L E Y Yardley has struggled a and SideBar. (Yardley is bit with how to propalso a member of Seven Days’ circulation team.) But as a sound erly roll out the Pyros. The first songs to be tech, his greatest accomplishment is the released were a pair of 2018 demos called Jammbulance, basically a rock show on “Zombie” and “Swamp Monster.” Also wheels. released as videos, they featured remixed Yardley envisioned a mobile concert footage of Disney’s “The Skeleton Dance” venue that could be dispatched to outdoor animated short and Wes Craven’s Swamp events, with speakers, stage, power and Thing, respectively. other essentials all included. After picking He’s also had a bit of trouble holding up a vintage, decommissioned ambulance down a bassist. After cycling through in Pennsylvania in 2017, he gutted it from several in the past couple of years, Yardfloor to ceiling and completely rewired the ley finally landed Liz Stafford, who plays electrical system. Finishing touches, such with indie rockers Paper Castles and, until as a shag carpet and a fab paint job from recently, Julia Caesar. Plastique Mammals’ local street artists Anthill Collective, give and Community Garden’s Evan Raine

YOU FEEL HUMILIATED

BY YOUR MISTAKES.

holds down drums, while Yardley plays guitar and sings. Yardley began work on Christian Mingle in 2018 as a concept album about the existential crisis of being alone when you’d rather not be. “I’ve always admired concept albums and how they flowed,” he says. The EP — particularly as seen through its visuals — loosely tells a story about a young lover (played by Yardley) holding on for dear life through a number of romantically charged situations. Though he used a few videographers — Jesse Rosenfield, Kayhl Cooper and Tyler Struss — Yardley was the project’s de facto director. In “Coffee,” a retro-rock tune that evokes Chuck Berry, he plays opposite Burlington acoustic soul maven Ivamae. “I wanted to start off with classic tropes of love,” Yardley explains, referring to the standard coffee date. In the video, the pair sits awkwardly at the Parkway Diner, exchanging longing SINGLED OUT

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GOT MUSIC NEWS? JORDAN@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

S UNDbites

SAT 9.7

News and views on the local music + nightlife scene B Y JORDAN ADAMS

Pining Away

COURTESY OF CAROLINE THOMPKINS

One of the oddest revelations during the 2017 peak of the #MeToo movement was that of EVAN STEPHENS HALL, front person of PINEGROVE. The New Jerseybased band took some time off after Hall’s bizarre online confession of “sexual coercion.” The group returns to Vermont for the first time in two years on Friday, September 6, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. I’d like to point out that I did request an interview with Hall but was denied. However, there’s no reason why I can’t share with you some of the questions I would have asked him and the direction I would have steered the conversation. If you have no idea what I’m talking about, I’ll back up a bit. Pinegrove were one of the buzziest indie-rock bands until their abrupt hiatus starting in November 2017, about two months after the HARVEY WEINSTEIN scandal broke. I suppose they’re still buzz-worthy in 2019, since here I am writing about them. Hall posted on Facebook that he had

“been accused of sexual coercion” from someone he was “involved with for a short but intense period of time.” He vaguely described their relationship. TLDR: It sounded complicated but not necessarily abusive. Again, no accuser came forward, so the only version of events the public heard was Hall’s. Furthermore, he wrote, “I should have more actively acknowledged my position of power as a public figure … I see now more clearly that the inherent privilege of my gender and the accumulated privilege of being a recognized performer most certainly impacted this interaction … I have been flirtatious with fans and on a few occasions been intimate with people that I’ve met on tour. I’ve reached the conclusion now that that’s not ever appropriate — even if they initiate it. There will always be an unfair power dynamic at play in these situations.” About a year later, a Pitchfork writer, JENN PELLY, wrote a detailed profile of Pinegrove as they were just before the reckoning. It also explored the underlying causes of how and why

Hall was moved to spill his guts and de facto cancel himself. Again, TLDR: Pelly alleges that an outside actor working for Punk Talks, an organization that helps musicians gain access to counseling services, was a divisive agent in the situation and may have violated a number of ethical boundaries in a misguided quest to cancel Hall and the band on behalf of unnamed persons. (You really should read all of the coverage across multiple media outlets, because I don’t have enough space here to fully and completely recap the whole shebang.) Addressing his last point, about it never being appropriate to be intimate with people he’s met on tour: Do you still believe that? Aside from being an overly ascetic point of view, to claim that it’s never appropriate to hook up with someone you meet on tour because you’re automatically the star of that dynamic is rather self-aggrandizing. It sounds like Hall is the one unable to detach himself from his onstage

Pride Ball ’19

FRI 9.6

Pinegrove

FRI 9.6

Mother: A Myra Flynn Show

Stephen Steinbrink, Common Holly

Monique Citro

SUN 9.8

104.7 The Point welcomes

SUN 9.8

104.7 The Point welcomes

WED 9.11

Robert Randolph & The Family Band

Davy Knowles WOKO welcomes

Granger Smith feat. Earl Dibbles Jr. Joseph Gallant

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THU 9.12

Parallels & Nina

Pinegrove, Evan Stephens Hall on far right

WED 9.13

104.7 The Point welcomes

SAT 9.14

A Tribe Called Red

MON 9.16

Illiterate Light

SOUNDBITES

TUE 9.17

Night Protocol

Enter The Haggis, Adam Ezra Group

Kali Stoddard-Imari

99.9 The Buzz welcomes

The Struts Des Rocs

10.5 Lee DeWyze 10.31 Madaila Wakes Up 11.20 + 11.21 The Disco Biscuits 11.23 + 11.24 Lotus 1214 Williston Road, South Burlington 802-652-0777 @higherground @highergroundmusic SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019 4V-HG090419.indd 1

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music+nightlife

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.4

THU.5

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

DELI 126: Deli Edits (open format), 9 p.m., free.

burlington

JUNIPER: Bird Code (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Paul Asbell Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Giovanina Bucci (singersongwriter), 9 p.m., free.

burlington

DRINK: Downstairs Comedy Open Mic, 8 p.m., free. FINNIGAN’S PUB: DJ Disco Phantom (open format), 10 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: The Peterman Quartet (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9:30 p.m., free.

HALF LOUNGE: DJ SVPPLY & Bankz (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

NECTAR’S: Bey Day: Beyoncé’s 38th Birthday hosted by Moochie, 8 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Queen City Hot Club (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: John Fealy (folk), 5:30 p.m., free. Ensemble V (jazz), 7 p.m., free. Mosaic featuring members of Kat Wright and the Welterweights (jam), 10 p.m., $5. RED SQUARE: GrooveSum (jam), 7 p.m., free. DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free. RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: RambleTree with Special Guests (Irish, folk), 7-10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Godfather Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Indie Rumble (improv), 7 p.m., $5. Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free. THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Kathyrn Blume and Julie Winn (singer-songwriter), 6:30 p.m., free. HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: EOTO, Malachi (EDM), 8:30 p.m., $15/18. THE OLD POST: Karaoke with D Jay Baron, 8 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: John Lackard Blues Jam, 6 p.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Ivan Goldstein and John Smyth (singersongwriter), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free. Jim Charanko (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke with DJ Amanda Rock, 9 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Adirondack Jazz Orchestra 10-Year Celebration, 7:30 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

sensitive topics often go unchecked, a wave of conscious joke writers and comics

are exploring taboo subjects with greater care. In 2018, LGBTQ comedian CAMERON ESPOSITO rocked the entertainment world with her hourlong standup special “Rape

Jokes,” an unblemished challenge to one of comedy’s most problematic areas. Calling on her own experience as a survivor of sexual assault, the performer artfully and sometimes painfully pulled the issue out of the shadows and onto the stage. Celebrate Pride Week with Esposito Thursday through Saturday, September 5 through 7, at the Vermont Comedy Club in Burlington.

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Mother: A Myra Flynn Show, Monique Citro (neo-soul), 8 p.m., $15/20.

OLDE NORTHENDER PUB: The Red Newts (EP release), PonyHustle (country, blues), 9 p.m., free.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Red Hot Juba (country, jazz), 7 p.m., free.

ORLANDO’S BAR & LOUNGE: Leather Neck (jam), 8 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: The Willoughbys (Americana), 5 p.m., free. Re[volt] featuring Vetica, Tyrant, Torex, Dagon (industrial, IBM), 10 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: William and the Wildflowers (folk), 7 p.m., free. Woody & Sunshine (funk, jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. Be Squad (rock), 10:30 p.m., free.

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Parks & Vachon (acoustic), 5 p.m., free. Sticks & Stones (rock), 9 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: The Brevity Thing (folk-rock), 6 p.m., free. D Jay Baron (house), 11 p.m., free.

WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Antara (folk), 9:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

GUSTO’S: Chris Powers (rock covers), 5 p.m., free. The Rowdy (rock covers), 9 p.m., $5.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Cameron Esposito (standup), 7 p.m., $20. The Mainstage Show (improv), 9 p.m., $5.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Irish Session, 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Escape from the Zoo, Time Out Timmy, Tetsuo, DownBoy (punk), 9:30 p.m., $10/15. THE OLD POST: Salsa Night with DJ JP, 7 p.m., free. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: The Jeff Salisbury Band (blues), 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Colin McCaffrey and Friends (folk), 6 p.m., free. GUSTO’S: Open Mic, 8 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): D. Davis and Django Soulo (folk-rock), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

EDSON HILL DINING ROOM & SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Pixie and the Partygrass Boys (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Pinegrove, Stephen Steinbrink, Common Holly (indie), 8 p.m., $20/25.

NECTAR’S: Trivia Mania, 7 p.m., free. Mi Yard Reggae Night with DJs Big Dog and Jahson, 9:30 p.m., free/$5. 18+.

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Zach Nugent’s Acoustic Dead (Grateful Dead tribute), 6:30 p.m., free. Jam Nation (open jam), 7:30 p.m., free.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ A-RA$ (open format), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Pilaf (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

chittenden county

RED SQUARE: Woody & the Rebel Alliance (jam), 7 p.m., $5. DJ Craig Mitchell (open format), 11 p.m., $5.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Cameron Esposito (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $25/32.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Shane Hardiman Trio (jazz), 8:30 p.m., $5. Light Club Jazz Sessions and Showcase, 10:30 p.m., free.

WHAMMY BAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free.

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Truth Be Told In a world where ill-conceived wisecracks about

RADIO BEAN: Friday Morning Sing-Along with Linda Bassick & Friends (kids’ music), 11 a.m., free. Spintuition (folk), 7 p.m., free. Grant Bloom (singer-songwriter), 8:30 p.m., free. Super Stash Bros. (funk-rock), 10 p.m., $5. Hamjob (rock), 11:30 p.m., $5.

SWEET MELISSA’S: Honky Tonk Happy Hour with Mark LeGrand, 5:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

THU.5-SAT.7 // CAMERON ESPOSITO [STANDUP]

EL TORO: Chris Lyon (folk, country), 7 p.m., free. TAVERN: Blackwolf (blues, roots), 6:30 p.m., free. MOOGS PLACE: Open Mic Night, 8:30 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

LOCALFOLK SMOKEHOUSE: Open Mic with Alex Budney, 8:30 p.m., free. ZENBARN: Jacob Jolliff plays David Grisman (Americana), 9 p.m., $15-25.

middlebury area

HATCH 31: Karaoke, first Thursday of every month, 7 p.m., free.

champlain islands/ northwest THE OLD FOUNDRY AT ONE FEDERAL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE: Nobby Reed Project (blues), 7 p.m., free.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Bob Gagnon (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom THE EAST SIDE RESTAURANT & PUB: VSO Symphony Sampler (classical), 6 p.m., $20-35.

HARDWICK STREET CAFÉ AT THE HIGHLAND CENTER FOR THE ARTS: Fishhead (eclectic), 6 p.m., free.

BURLINGTON ST. JOHN’S CLUB: Karaoke, 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: Retronome (retro dance hits), 10 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Duke Aeroplane & the Ampersand Band (blues, rock), 9 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

HIGHLAND LODGE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Lowell Thompson, 8:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Tough Old Bird (folk), 7:30 p.m., free. La Rebelión del Tango (world), 9 p.m., $5. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5.

OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Karaoke with DJ Jon Berry & DJ Coco, 9 p.m., free.

FRI.6

burlington

ARTSRIOT: ArtsRiot 5th Birthday Party featuring Scantron, Bill Mullins, the Wormdogs, DJ Cre8 (eclectic), 8 p.m., free. BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Paul Asbell (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: DJ Dakota (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Seth Yacovone (solo acoustic blues), 7 p.m., free. The Edd, Teddy Midnight (psych-rock), 9 p.m., $7. ORLANDO’S BAR & LOUNGE: Lee Ross (funk, reggae), 9:30 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Eames Brothers Band (blues), 9 p.m., free. TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Edward Pérez and Festejation (jazz), 9 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

ZENBARN: Jacob Jolliff with the Mad Mountain Scramblers (Americana), 9 p.m., $15-25.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Twist of Fate (rock), 9:30 p.m., free.

champlain islands/ northwest

NORTH HERO HOUSE INN & RESTAURANT: Lesley Grant and Ralph Eames (country), 5:30 p.m., free. THE OLD FOUNDRY AT ONE FEDERAL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE: Cooie Sings (Americana, jazz), 6:30 p.m., free.

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S

UNDbites

Join one of the 3 great rides!

C O NT I NU E D F RO M PA G E 5 9

persona; we have no idea if his hookups have that problem. Hall said it’s not OK “even if they initiate it.” That sentiment smacks of the patriarchy. It’s as if he’s saying, “I know better than you, horny person who’s all up on me. You don’t realize that you’re just under my rock-star spell. So it’s up to me to be the responsible one here and make sure no one like you has any sex with me, because that would be wrong.” Newsflash: Lots of people want to have sex with rock stars, and there’s really nothing you can do about it. He acknowledged that he once said that he “could sense who from the crowd would be interested in sleeping with me based on how they watched me perform.” Um, no doy. That’s not a “sin” original to you. Many musician friends of mine have told me that they’ve done the same thing. And there’s nothing wrong with that! Who hasn’t stared up at a stage fantasizing about getting it on with your fave rock star? Rock stars and fans have been doing the nasty since the invention of rock stars. I’ve personally never had the balls to go after it, but, for those who are confident enough to go out and get it, I say more power to you. Another super-odd point Hall makes in his post: “I’m led further to consider my demeanor in most relationships I’ve been in. I can be very talkative and excitable, talking about wild plans, dreams, wanting to share everything. And I’m realizing part of that confidence stems from my privilege as a man.” Does it, though? Because it kind of sounds like you’re simply what some people refer to as a “romantic.” Other kinds of people who are not men can and do feel this way, too. I disagree that power and privilege are at play in that context. The oddest thing about the whole debacle is that Hall called himself out. Nearly all other #MeToo incidents have resulted from a survivor accusing someone else. Since no one publicly came forward in this case, I see two possible scenarios. The first is that Hall did what he did

ARTS NEWS + VIEWS

to get out in front of a public accusation that he thought was coming in order to cover his own ass. Better to control the narrative than have it control you, right? The other is far weirder: Hall truly felt it was somehow his duty to come clean, as he presents it in his confession. But if that’s true, it’s beyond problematic, because he decided it was his job to tell his survivor’s story. That’s assuming there is, indeed, a survivor in the contextual definition of that word. Is it possible that Hall and the other person simply got mired in a messy affair that neither was prepared to take on? Dysfunction doesn’t equal exploitation. Since there was no one to speak to the other side of the relationship, we’re left to speculate. Lingering questions: Was it necessary for Hall to bring all of this into the public arena? Could the problems he had with the unnamed person he believes he coerced have been worked out privately, with proper professional guidance? Some people would annoyingly call that a “call-in.” I just call it talking to someone. Maybe it’s a good thing that I wasn’t able to get on the phone with Hall. He probably would’ve hung up on me. 

Old Spokes Home's Annual Fundraiser Ride

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8/19/19 2:53 PM

Listening In If I were a superhero, my superpower would be the ability to get songs stuck in other people’s heads. Here are five songs that have been stuck in my head this week. May they also get stuck in yours. Follow sevendaysvt on Spotify for weekly playlists with tunes by artists featured in the music section. ELVIS COSTELLO, “Watching the

Detectives” JOE JACKSON, “Happy Loving

Couples” TOM TOM CLUB, “The Man With the

4-Way Hips” CHARLI XCX, “Miss U” TAYLA PARX, “Homiesexual”

For up-to-the-minute news about the local music scene, follow read the Live Culture blog: sevendaysvt.com/liveculture. Untitled-70 1

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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music+nightlife FRI.6

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TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Tim Howard (rock, blues), 7 p.m., free.

randolph/royalton BABES BAR: Strangled Darlings (indie folk), 8 p.m., $8.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Comrade Nixon (punk), 10 p.m., free. MONOPOLE DOWNSTAIRS: Happy Hour Tunes & Trivia with Gary Peacock, 5 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Justin Friello (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free.

SAT.7

burlington

BLEU NORTHEAST SEAFOOD: Bob Gagnon (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free. CLUB METRONOME: The Throne: A Night of Hip-Hop’s Best, 10 p.m., free. DELI 126: Sputoola (jazz, funk), 8 p.m., free. FOAM BREWERS: Barbacoa (surf), 9 p.m., free. JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Madelline and the Millions (trip-hop, pop), 9 p.m., $5. DJ Taka (eclectic vinyl), 11 p.m., $5. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Blanchface (open format), 10 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Javier Santiago (jazz, hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. Christone ‘Kingfish’ Ingram, Collin Craig’s Fuego Fandango (blues, R&B), 9 p.m., $10. ORLANDO’S BAR & LOUNGE: Sorry If You Don’t (Disco Biscuits tribute), 9:30 p.m., $5.

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

JERICHO CAFÉ & TAVERN: Nina’s Brew (blues, roots), 7 p.m., free. MONKEY HOUSE: Andy Kershaw (techno, house), 10 p.m., free.

SMITTY’S PUB: The Rough Suspects (rock), 8 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Cameron Esposito (standup), 7 & 9:30 p.m., $25/32.

chittenden county

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Blue Fox (blues), 7:30 p.m., free.

62

HALF LOUNGE: Jack Bandit and Friends (EDM), 10 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Lamp Shop Lit Club (open reading), 7 p.m., free. Open Circuit: Puppets, Crankies and Pantomime, 9 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free.

STONE CORRAL BREWERY: The Brevity Thing (folk-rock), 8:30 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Chris Powers (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Seth Brand (Americana), 8:30 p.m., free. Duke Aeroplane & the Ampersand Band (blues, rock), 10 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Irish Session, 2 p.m., donation.

RED SQUARE: Four-D (hip-hop), 7 p.m., free. DJ KermiTT (open format), 10 p.m., free.

ESPRESSO BUENO: Moose Jams (rock, blues), 7:30 p.m., free. FEMCOM (standup), 8:30 p.m., free.

SIDEBAR: Open Mic, 7 p.m., free. Family Night (open jam), 9 p.m., free.

GUSTO’S: Ricky Golden (rock covers), 6 p.m., free. DJ LaFountaine (EDM), 9:30 p.m., $3.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Comedy & Crêpes (standup), 8 p.m., free.

THE QUARRY KITCHEN + SPIRITS: Cooie Sings (Americana, jazz), 6:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

THE DEN AT HARRY’S HARDWARE: Tough Old Bird (folk), 7 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Erin CasselsBrown (indie folk), 6 p.m., free. Motown Mondays (Motown DJs), 8 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

EL TORO: Sergio Torres (Americana, Latin), 7 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Lloyd Tyler Band (folk), 9 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Blue Fox (blues), 7 p.m., free.

TRES AMIGOS & RUSTY NAIL STAGE: Edward Pérez and Festejation (jazz), 9 p.m., free.

mad river valley/ waterbury

middlebury area

LAWSON’S FINEST LIQUIDS: The Starline Rhythm Boys (rockabilly), 5 p.m., free.

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: DJ Earl (hits), 9 p.m., free.

THE OLD FOUNDRY AT ONE FEDERAL RESTAURANT & LOUNGE: Dan and Dave Jarvis (rock, Americana), 7 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Gua Gua (psychotropical jazz), 8 p.m., free.

THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL: Rowan (Celtic, folk), 6 p.m., free.

PARK PLACE TAVERN: Karaoke, 9:30 p.m., free.

RED SQUARE: Women’s Tea Dance with DJ Scott Carlson (retro dance hits), 2 p.m., free. Dave Mitchell’s Blues Revue (open jam), 3 p.m., free. Everyone’s Invited (rock), 7 p.m., $5. DJ A-RA$ (open format), 11 p.m., $5.

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: DJ C-Low (hip-hop), 10 p.m., free.

ARTSRIOT: Trivia Night, 7:30 p.m., free.

SAT.7 // MADELLINE AND THE MILLIONS [TRIP-HOP, POP]

ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Bethany Conner (singer-songwriter), 5 p.m., free. Rushmore (rock), 9 p.m., free.

HATCH 31: The Medicine Tribe (rock, funk), 8 p.m., free.

REVELRY THEATER: Unrehearsed with Matt Fleury (improv), 8 p.m., $7.

burlington

THE OLD POST: Saturday Night Mega Mix featuring DJ Colby Stiltz (open format), 9 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: Waves of Adrenaline (folk), 7 p.m., free. Belle-Skinner (indie folk), 8:30 p.m., free. Daby Touré Band (jazz, world), 10 p.m., $10.

RED SQUARE BLUE ROOM: DJ Raul (Latin), 6 p.m., free. DJ ATAK (house), 11 p.m., $5.

MON.9

HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Pride Ball ’19 (drag, dance hits), 8 p.m., $12/15.

champlain islands/ northwest

champlain islands/ northwest

Wandering Star Montréal-based singer-songwriter

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Open Mic with Chris Parker, 7 p.m., free. MADELLINE

is an up-

and-comer with mood to spare. The 22-year-old Connecticut native’s chilled-out tunes are

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Buck Hollers (bluegrass), 7 p.m., free.

reminiscent of the glassy trip-hop of turn-of-the-century artists such as Hooverphonic,

upper valley

Madelline cherrypicks musical elements from jazz and soul traditions and melds them

THE ENGINE ROOM: Back to the ’80s featuring DJ Davis, 9 p.m., $5.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Ausable Branch (folk), 10 p.m., free. OLIVE RIDLEY’S: Glass Onion 25th Anniversary (The Tragically Hip tribute), 9:30 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Christine Malcolm Trio (folk), 7 p.m., free.

SUN.8

burlington

THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL: Sarah King (singer-songwriter), 6 p.m., free.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

Portishead and early Goldfrapp. As many of the genre’s flagship artists did in their day, with hip-hop beats and dreamy production. Catch Madelline and her five-piece backing band, the MILLIONS, on Saturday, September 7, at the Light Club Lamp Shop in Burlington. HALF LOUNGE: Open Decks, 10 p.m., free.

VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Sunday Singalong! (piano bar), 6 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Emo Night, 8 p.m., free.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Taylor Roges and Corey Laitman (indie folk), 7:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

barre/montpelier

RADIO BEAN: Maple Street Six (jazz), 1 p.m., free. Old Sky and Friends (Americana), 6 p.m., free. Clark (singer-songwriter), 8:30 p.m., free. Over the Bridge (reggae, rock), 10:30 p.m., free. RUBEN JAMES: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Bluegrass Brunch, noon, free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Hollis Brown (funk, soul), 8 p.m., $25/28. HIGHER GROUND SHOWCASE LOUNGE: Davy Knowles (bluesrock), 8:30 p.m., $17/20. MISERY LOVES CO.: Disco Brunch with DJ Craig Mitchell, 11 a.m., free.

BAGITOS BAGEL AND BURRITO CAFÉ: Southern Old Time Music Jam, 10 a.m., free. THE SKINNY PANCAKE (MONTPELIER): Bluegrass Brunch, every other Sunday, 11 a.m., free. SWEET MELISSA’S: Live Band Karaoke, 8 p.m., donation.

TUE.10

burlington

ARTSRIOT: The Moth: Lessons (storytelling), 7:30 p.m., $15. THE FARMHOUSE TAP & GRILL: Anthony Santor Trio (jazz), 6:30 p.m., free. LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Mike Martin and Geoff Kim (jazz), 7 p.m., free. LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Pullin’ Yo Chain Comedy Showcase, 7:30 p.m., free. John Smyth and Ivan Goldstein, 9:30 p.m., free. LINCOLNS: Laugh Shack with Joel Klein, 8:30 p.m., free. MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Erin Cassels-Brown (indie folk), 9:30 p.m., free. NECTAR’S: Dead Set (Grateful Dead tribute), 9 p.m., $5/8. 18+.

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REVIEW this Jenna Rice, Bottle Collection (SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL, VINYL)

Southern Vermont songwriter Jenna Rice’s debut LP, Bottle Collection, speaks (and sings) to the bravery of seeing through a labor of love — by itself, a praiseworthy accomplishment. However, for all of the good ideas and clever aesthetic choices Rice makes on her inaugural effort, she struggles at times to land the punch. The record opens with “Get Up and Dance,” a jaunty, folk-tinged, carpe diem sort of anthem. “So don’t let anyone stand in your way / If you’ve got a card, just go ahead and play,” she sings. Then, “Live your wildest dream while you have your chance / And while the music plays, get up and dance.” Rice’s detached delivery runs counter to the advice she’s giving. That casual feel permeates her songwriting, a kind of musical

The Red Newts, This Lonesome Town (SELF-RELEASED, CD, DIGITAL)

The Red Newts are a Burlington outfit with an interesting sound that’s equal parts straightforward Americana and bluesy bar rock. Their debut studio EP, This Lonesome Town, is a humble affair. But it’s also a strong introduction to a tight group that has been honing its sound for quite some time. In a nod to the band’s vintage inspirations — and perhaps out of economic necessity — the five tracks here were laid down as single takes at Robot Dog Studio in Williston. As a result, everything sounds like a live gig — though not quite as much as their 2016 live album. Fortunately, this band comprises tasteful, thoughtful musicians, so the aesthetic never wears thin. Perhaps I’m underselling things. The music is humble, but the Red Newts can really shred, especially lead guitarist

Participants Needed for a Research Study on the Brain

shrug that can at times be cool but often falls limp. It’s hard to encourage bravery when the source material isn’t displaying much in the first place. Rice writes tasteful progressions, a testament to her ability as a guitarist who can properly transcribe emotion through style. She has a deft right hand, is skilled in folk idioms, and manages to move her compositions along with the odd clever chord here and there. Her lyrical playing fills spaces with lovely texture. That’s especially true on “Someone to Need Me,” which features guest Ivan Goldstein’s yearning dobro melody. “You’re only here ’cause you have nobody,” Rice sings on the chorus. “And I just need someone to need me.” That melancholy fatalism appears throughout Bottle Collection, and it’s easy to appreciate Rice’s ability to distill emotionally complex themes. The title track, for instance, laments the loss of a lover to war, a soldier gone to fight in Afghanistan who came home alive but not as

the man he was. He withdrew into drinking until all he had left was his bottle collection. Rice leans heavily into balladry and mostly adheres to genre traditions. Healthy, non-smoking participants A meandering quality permeates her (18-30 years old) needed for a 4 visit melodies, which, depending on the song, UVM study on a chemical system in the can be an asset or a hindrance. On “Little healthy brain. Participants will receive Did I Know,” her delivery adds a narrative $400 for completion of the study. style that twines so perfectly with the harmonica that it nearly transitions into Contact us at 847-8248 or bluegrass. brainage@uvm.edu. That same energy fails her on “Staring CLINICAL NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH UNIT Back,” another number focused on a broken man succumbing to the bottle. It could be a haunting song, but the lack of movement in the melody kneecaps the emotion so that Rice never fully brings the listener into her story. She does achieve 12v-uvmdeptpsych-Brainstudy062718.indd 1 6/28/18 11:38 AM that feat in places on Bottle Collection, however. And those moments suggest real promise amid an uneven debut. Rice is also a visual artist and plays her own art opening on Friday, September 6, at the Long River Gallery in White River THU 5 | FRI 6 | SAT 7 Junction. You can also catch her on Saturday, September 7, at Trout River Brewing in Springfield. Bottle Collection is available at jennaricemusic.com.

David Titus. Sarah Cutler has a fine, clear set of pipes, perfectly suited to the mix of melancholy and whimsy. Band founder Nick Losito handles vocal duties on “Winter Blues,” delivering a sparse, impressionistic song with conviction and heart. Album opener “This Ain’t No Love Song” is an ideal first track, a catchy rock workout that’s heavy on reverb and leans on the band’s capable rhythm section. Glen Wallace (drums) and Luke Hausermann (bass) are in spooky sync, which drives every track here. This is a well-practiced unit, but more than that, you can tell they’re trying to disappear into the song every single time. Next is “Back on Track,” a cheerful song about shitty relationships that’s pure John Prine. The upbeat, thumping shuffle would definitely kill a dance floor, too. While the tasty musicianship sells these songs, what really makes an impression is the quality of the songwriting. Both Cutler and Losito have a real gift for turning a phrase. They’re

also self-effacing and witty without being cute about it — the clear sign of an old soul. The band credits outsider folk legend Michael Hurley, who was a wandering resident of Vermont for quite some time, as an influence on their sound. That’s mostly SUN, SEPT 8TH sonics and aesthetics — until the fourth track, “Don’t Tell Me to Smile,” a smartly written, storytelling song that is both sweet and venomous. “Don’t tell me to smile, yeah, I’ll be happy in a while,” Cutler sings, LIV “when you’re 500 miles away.” EB RO Things draw to a close on the title track, SECOND SUNDAY AD WA YK an outstanding ballad and absolute highlight. AR SING-ALONG! AO KE Over a low-key, almost mournful pocket that’s reminiscent of prime Cowboy Junkies, the band takes an already excellent song to the next level with a great arrangement and another soaring, lyrical solo from Titus. As a teaser, the Red Newts couldn’t have (802) 859-0100 | WWW.VTCOMEDY.COM done much better. While I’d like to hear 101 main street, BurlingtoN them take more time in the studio, This Lonesome Town is a solid, promising project, and I’ll keep an ear out for future releases. Untitled-2 1 9/2/19 10:45 AM This Lonesome Town is available at therednewts.bandcamp.com. The Red Newts celebrate their album release with Ponyhustle on Thursday, September 5, at the Olde Northender Pub in Burlington.

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Say you saw it in...

sevendaysvt.com SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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music+nightlife TUE.10

« P.62

RADIO BEAN: Twisty Tie (honky tonk), 8:30 p.m., free. Honky-Tonk Tuesdays with Pony Hustle, 10 p.m., $5.

CLUB DATES NA: NOT AVAILABLE. AA: ALL AGES.

WED.11

THE DOUBLE E LOUNGE AT ESSEX EXPERIENCE: Michael Hahn and Sid Gulick (singer-songwriter), 6:30 p.m., free.

FOAM BREWERS: Familiar Faces (jam, eclectic), 6:30 p.m., free.

HIGHER GROUND BALLROOM: Granger Smith featuring Earl Dibbles Jr., Joseph Gallant (country), 8 p.m., $25/28.

burlington

RED SQUARE: CRWD CTRL (house, techno), 7 p.m., free. DJ Two Sev (open format), 10 p.m., free.

JP’S PUB: Karaoke, 10 p.m., free.

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (BURLINGTON): Ukulele Kids with Joe Beaird, 9:30 a.m., free.

LEUNIG’S BISTRO & CAFÉ: Cody Sargent Trio (jazz), 7 p.m., free.

MONKEY HOUSE: Grivo, Father Figuer, Community Garden, ouzkxqlzn (indie), 8 p.m., $7/10.

LIGHT CLUB LAMP SHOP: Irish Sessions (traditional), 7 p.m., free. Giovanina Bucci (singersongwriter), 9 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

chittenden county

MONKEY HOUSE: B. Boys, the Pyros, the Wet Ones (rock), 8:15 p.m., $8/10. ON TAP BAR & GRILL: Trivia with Top Hat Entertainment, 7 p.m., free. WATERWORKS FOOD + DRINK: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

barre/montpelier

CHARLIE-O’S WORLD FAMOUS: Karaoke with DJ Molotov, 9:30 p.m., free.

stowe/smuggs

MOOGS PLACE: Chris Lyon (Americana), 7:30 p.m., free.

outside vermont

THE SKINNY PANCAKE (HANOVER): Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

JUNIPER: Bella and the Notables (jazz), 8:30 p.m., free.

THE OLD POST: Karaoke with D Jay Baron, 8 p.m., free.

MANHATTAN PIZZA & PUB: Open Mic with Andy Lugo, 9:30 p.m., free.

MOOGS PLACE: Trivia Night, 6:30 p.m., free. Jim Charanko (Americana), 8 p.m., free.

RADIO BEAN: John Kitonis (singer-songwriter), 7 p.m., free. Mosaic featuring members of Kat Wright and the Welterweights (jam), 10 p.m., $5.

middlebury area

CITY LIMITS NIGHT CLUB: Karaoke with DJ Amanda Rock, 9 p.m., free.

SUN.8 // ROBERT RANDOLPH & THE FAMILY BAND [FUNK, SOUL]

RED SQUARE: DJ Cre8 (open format), 11 p.m., free.

champlain islands/ northwest

House of Worship Recalling the glory days of Memphis, Tenn., label

RÍ RÁ IRISH PUB & WHISKEY ROOM: RambleTree with Special Guests (Irish, folk), 7-10 p.m., free. SIDEBAR: Godfather Karaoke, 10 p.m., free. VERMONT COMEDY CLUB: Indie Rumble (improv), 7 p.m., $5. Open Mic, 8:30 p.m., free.

chittenden county

CITY SPORTS GRILLE: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

TWIGGS — AN AMERICAN GASTROPUB: Blues Jam, 7 p.m., free.

northeast kingdom PARKER PIE CO.: Trivia Night, 7 p.m., free.

outside vermont

MONOPOLE: Open Mic with Lucid, 10 p.m., free. 

Stax Records,

ROBERT RANDOLPH & THE FAMILY BAND

music. Anchored in Southern gospel and blues traditions, the band’s fervent tunes stem from the front person’s experience growing up in church. Full choirs and emphatic congregations inspired the New Jersey-born bandleader, and he calls on his spiritual roots to create legendary performances. Wallflowers, beware: Expect plenty of audience participation. Check out Robert Randolph & the Family Band on Sunday, September 8, at the Higher Ground Ballroom in South Burlington. HOLLIS BROWN add support.

Singled Out « P.58

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

A still from “Christian Mingle”

COURTESY OF THE PYROS

glances and sipping java. Before long, they escape into a fantasy sock hop full of young revelers performing lightly choreographed dance moves. It plays with the idea of trying to suss out someone’s intentions: Where is this all going, and can it be here? “I was really wanting a partner, that kind of life,” Yardley says of his state of mind while writing the song. “In 2018, all I wanted was to make music, [and to have] a partner and a sick ride.” Kicking things up a notch, the second track and video, “Christian Mingle,” seems celebratory at first. But the video belies some of the song’s darker lyrics. Yardley climbs into a 1970s woodpaneled station wagon, with tin cans trailing as if he’s just gotten married. However, a sign in the back windshield reads, “Just single.” Throughout the video, he and his cronies drive around and appear in pizza parlors, Laundromats and auto garages. Its climax is another fantasy. After an unpleasant run-in with Nico Suave front person Nicole D’Elisa, Yardley imagines the two in a coital position on a mattress strapped atop his rust bucket. They canoodle and carouse as the car drives

them through city streets. (Kids, don’t try this.) “I thought I was in love / But Jenny broke my heart … An IPA will do for now,” he idly sings in the modern rock tune, downplaying the hurt and ordering drink after drink. In real life, Yardley has made an effort to cut back on his alcohol intake. His relationship to booze and how he’s used it to quell dissatisfaction with his romantic life are driving forces on “Christian Mingle.” “You feel depressed, you overdrink,” he

make uproarious classic funk and soul

says. “It’s not good for your soul. You feel humiliated by your mistakes.” The concluding track and video, “Casanova,” is perhaps the wackiest installment in the trilogy. Yardley plays a pool boy who can’t keep it in his pants as he’s seduced by a poolside siren played by Frances Desrochers. An outraged Raine shows up to defend his lady love’s honor, and the men brawl with better stage fighting than two amateurs ought to be able to pull off. (Ironically, Stafford, who doesn’t appear in the video, holds a black belt in karate.)

The exploration of unchecked lust ends comically with the woman of interest rebuking Raine, the fight’s victor. She kicks his ass and considers robbing him blind but ultimately decides he’s not worth it. Taken as a whole, the three tracks show various shades of the single life: hopeful times, depression and unbridled passion. Though he shot them in 2018, Yardley took the better part of a year to edit the videos and decide on a roll-out strategy. “This was the first [release] that was very cohesive,” he says. “I saved up money to sponsor my [social media] posts [and] bought mastering software.” Yardley also tried some unconventional guerrilla marketing techniques. Namely, he set up profiles for the band on dating apps and websites, such as Tinder, Bumble and, of course, Christian Mingle. He hasn’t gotten any noteworthy responses or matches. That’s the single life for you.  Contact: jordan@sevendaysvt.com

INFO The Pyros perform on Tuesday, September 10, 8:15 p.m., at the Monkey House in Winooski. 18+. $8/10. facebook.com/monkeyhousevt. Christian Mingle is available on Spotify.


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October 19 th 12-6p / Stateside Base Lodge Live music and lawn games Tickets*: $20 / Day of: $25 21+ to purchase tickets

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FOR FUL L L IS T OF DE TA IL S V ISI T: JAY PE A K RE SORT.C OM / E V EN T S SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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art

"Mamie"

"Christine Hallquist Pride Parade, Burlington, Vermont"

"Turkey Point Nuclear Power Plant, Miami, Florida"

Photographer Dona Ann McAdams: art, activism and agriculture B Y NA NCY STEA R N S BERC AW

W

hat do goats, Pride paraders and porn stars have in common? The answer is photographer Dona Ann McAdams, who always has her subjects’ backs while capturing their fronts — and sometimes affronts. McAdams’ remarkable career of agitprop and empathy takes center stage in “Performative Acts,” an exhibition curated by Vermont State Rep. John Killacky (D-South Burlington), the former executive director of the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts in Burlington. Currently on view at the Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, the retrospective features dozens of McAdams’ black-and-white photos spanning four decades of her work. Killacky first met McAdams in the late 1980s at P.S.122, the seminal venue for avant-garde performance in New York 66

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

City. McAdams was working as the house photographer; Killacky, an artist and curator, writes in an introduction to the “Performative Acts” exhibit that he “found inspiration, talent and a community of intense purpose” at P.S.122. When Killacky moved to Vermont decades later, he reconnected with McAdams. She was by then a living legend with work in the Museum of Modern Art in NYC, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and she was raising goats on a farm in Sandgate, Vt. McAdams was still using her Leica to focus on invisible and marginalized communities. In his tenure at the Flynn, from 2010 to 2018, Killacky hosted selections of McAdams’ photography several times,

but a full-scale retrospective of her work evolved from conversations last year with Danny Lichtenfeld, director of the Brattleboro Museum. Thanks to their shared desire to highlight McAdams in Vermont, “Performative Acts” opened at the museum on June 22. McAdams’ 40-plus years of working at the intersection of art and activism was perfect for “our museum, our audience and this moment in time,” Lichtenfeld says. “The work is incisive, uncompromising and forthright, just like the artist herself.” As for Killacky, he was “thrilled to work with McAdams again, to visit her farm and studio and select a sampling of her resplendent black-and-white images.” Collectively, they invite “the viewer into the particularity of place and the innate humanity of her subjects,” he writes.

TALKING ART

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF BMAC

Harvey Milk to Goat Milk

"The Sisters of St. Mary's Convent Northern Spy Farm, Vermont"

Seven Days caught up with McAdams by phone at her goat farm. SEVEN DAYS: In 1975, you happened to walk into Harvey Milk’s camera shop on Castro Street in San Francisco to get a roll of film. How did your work — and your world — change from that auspicious meeting? DONA ANN MCADAMS: I was 21, and sitting in on classes in the evening at the San Francisco Art Institute because I couldn’t afford to enroll. I was taking black-and-white pictures of landscapes and traditional San Francisco topography, as well as street scenes. I was a fledgling activist then. I was eager to get abortion legal. I protested America in Vietnam. My teachers taught me how to make art, but Harvey Milk taught me how to use that art for social change. I took


ART SHOWS

photographs before. Then, I started to make photographs. Since then, the artistic and the political have been inseparable for me. SD: You’re originally from Queens. When did you come back east? DAM: When Harvey was assassinated in 1978, I had to leave San Francisco. I moved to Brooklyn. I started taking pictures of the gentrification on the Lower East Side, of Pride parades and of women. Always of women, lots and lots of women! Life was too fragile and unfair not to fight for what I believed in. I used the tools I had — a camera and the remaining Tri-X film from Harvey’s shop.

Have you seen or heard the ads asking ‘Can your pharmacy do ________?’

photos on a matte-surface paper to hold their color better. The resulting work of colored photos went on the center’s bulletin board and went home with the artists themselves. SD: Tell me about the photos of three women juggling in front of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant. You’re the one in the middle? DAM: Yes. A year after the accident happened, I took a cross-country road trip with friends, and I photographed several nuclear power plants. “They’re Juggling Our Genes” is the text I put on a poster with the photograph and also used on the cover of my artist book, The Nuclear Survival Kit. It refers to human error, like dropping a ball. There is no survival from nuclear waste or weapons. It’s meant to be funny, but it’s not funny. It’s dark humor.

SD: What do you want us to see in your photographs of racetrack workers, asylum seekers, the mentally ill, the homeless, AIDS activism, the SD: When did you move queer liberation movement and even nuns to Vermont and how did with goats? you get into the craft DAM: See them! Look of making goat-milk at people who are often cheese? invisible. Get a sense of who DA M : My h u s b a n d , they are and how righteous DONA ANN MCADAMS novelist Brad Kessler, and they are. Feel compassion, I were ready to get out of awareness and love. Maybe you want to New York City after living there for a do something as a result. long time. We spent two years searching five states for the right place. In 1998, we SD: You invite your subjects to take moved to Vermont. I knew the lore of photographs for and of themselves. the goats, but I didn’t know much about Why? caring for them. Goats are anarchists. DAM: Unless you give them the camera Goats are underdogs. to take their own pictures, you are We started with a simple raw-milk objectifying them. In 2004, I became cheese. Now, our Northern Spy Goat a licensed hot walker at the Saratoga Song Tomme is sold at Clear Brook race track in order to better understand Farm in Shaftsbury and at the Brattlethe race horses and the people who boro co-op. Brad’s [book] Goat Song [A care for them. I ended up running Seasonal Life, a Short History of Herda photography workshop on the ing, and the Art of Making Cheese] was backstretch for grooms, exercise riders, published in 2009. m maintenance people and kitchen staff. I wanted them to have representation of This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity. their work and lives. In 2011, the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame celebrated the INFO photographs the workers had created “Dona Ann McAdams: Performative Acts” with an exhibition and catalog. is on view through September 23 at the

LIFE WAS TOO FRAGILE AND UNFAIR NOT TO

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Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. In conjunction with the exhibition, Matthew Riemer and Leighton Brown discuss their book We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power, and Pride in the History of Queer Liberation, Saturday, September 7, 5 p.m., at the museum. Free. brattleboromuseum.org. “Performative Acts” will travel to Castleton University Bank Gallery in Rutland, Catamount Arts in St. Johnsbury, Helen Day Art Center in Stowe, and Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, in Burlington. donaannmcadams.com

Springfield Pharmacy 262 River St., 802-885-6400

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FIGHT FOR WHAT I BELIEVED IN.

SD: Some of your black-and-white photos are also hand-colored. How did that come about? DAM: I spent every Friday morning in Coney Island, for 14 years, running a workshop program that catered to people who were living with mental illness. I took pictures of everyone, and they liked looking at the pictures. One day, a person named Jane Smith picked up a crayon and went to town on one of the photos. Others joined in. Then, I started printing my

River St. Pharmacy Springfield Health Center, 100 River St., 802-885-6800

Cover more ground during the South End Art Hop with the SEVEN DAYS BUNNY BUS — bringing art lovers from Main Street to Howard Street and back on Friday night! Look for our shuttle stops at Dealer.com, the Soda Plant and the Flynn Center. SOUTH END ART HOP

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Friday, September 6, 5-10 p.m. Free.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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art NEW THIS WEEK

Hunter Potter, Yeshua Hill, Lillian Ansel, Jess Vos and Alex Kovacs; food trucks; music from DJ Crystal Jonez, the Dirty Pennies and Birdgangs; and Bryce Dance Company. ArtsRiot, Burlington, Saturday, September 7, noon-11 p.m. Free. Info, 540-0406.

burlington

ART HOP INSTALLATIONS: On view all weekend are installations by Kristian Brevik, Lydia Kern, Al Larsen, Jake Blend, Eli Rosenblum-Stephens, Misha Korch, Alex Dupuis, Barbara Sauer-Davis and Jesse Sunquiet. In addition, there are daily tours of the makerspace and demonstrations by resident artists. See generatorvt.com for info and schedules. September 6-8. Info, 540-0761. Generator in Burlington. ART HOP JURIED SHOW: A group exhibition of works selected by a guest juror, with first, second and third prize winners, as well as people’s choice. Open during the three-day festival and then during Flynn performances or by appointment. September 6-November 30. Info, 652-4500. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery in Burlington. JOHN BRICKELS: New sculptures in red clay in combination with his signature mocha-colored clay, influenced by old mill buildings in his new hood of Lowell Mass. September 6-October 1. Info, 338-7441. Thirty-odd in Burlington.

f SCOTT ANDRÉ CAMPBELL: “Distribution,” mixed-

media geometric abstractions that create order from chaos. Reception: Thursday, September 5, 6-8 p.m. September 5-October 31. Info, 324-0014. Soapbox Arts in Burlington.

chittenden county

f VALERIE HIRD: “We’re Not in Kansas Anymore,”

new paintings by the Burlington artist that explore cultural mythologies and the roles they play in our perceptions of each other. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5:30-7:30 p.m. September 6-October 15. Info, 985-3848. Furchgott Sourdiffe Gallery in Shelburne.

f ‘WE ARE ART & DESIGN: AN EXHIBITION OF FACULTY WORK’: Works in a variety of mediums by Mallory Breiner, Brian Collier, Jordan Douglas, Gordon Glover, Valerie Hird, Deborah Kehoe and Will Mentor. Reception: Thursday, September 5, 5:30-7 p.m. September 5-27. Info, 654-2851. McCarthy Art Gallery, Saint Michael’s College in Colchester.

barre/montpelier

f CECELIA KANE: “A Year of Forgetting,” paintings about aging that visually and playfully record a year of the artist’s daily mental lapses. Reception: Friday, September 6, 4-7 p.m. Fri. September 6, 4-7 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, 738-3667. The Garage Cultural Center in Montpelier. f ‘CONDUITS’: Painters Liz Hawkes deNiord and

Richard Heller and collodion print photographer Rachel Portesi explore underlying realities in their artworks. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5-7 p.m. September 6-October 31. Info, 828-3291. Spotlight Gallery in Montpelier. GUILD OF VERMONT FURNITURE MAKERS: Fine furniture by master craftsmen George Ainley, James Becker, Chris Ericson, Bob Gasperetti, Dale Helms, Dave Hurwitz, David Lewis, Matthew Ogelby and George Sawyer. September 4-October 8. Info, 279-5558. Vermont Statehouse in Montpelier.

f JANE EDWARDS & LINDA HOGAN: Ceramic works

and photographs, respectively, by the local artists. Reception: Friday, September 6, 4-8 p.m. September 6-30. Info, 223-1981. The Cheshire Cat in Montpelier. NITYA BRIGHENTI: “Why Painting?” watercolors and oils, cityscapes and portraits. September 4-30. Info, 808-358-8185. Capitol Grounds Café in Montpelier.

f ‘REVISION’: A group exhibition of more than 20 artists who cut, edit, stitch, forge, sculpt and assemble alternate views of the world through a variety of materials and styles, stretching the limits of ordinary perception. Reception: Saturday, September 7, 3-5 p.m. September 7-October 6. Info, 223-6613. The Kent Museum in Calais.

rutland/killington

f SCULPTFEST2019: Site-specific sculptures

by nearly a dozen artists, guest-curated by Bill

68

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

ELEVATION CELEBRATION: A celebration of the installation of an elevator, making CAL accessible. Festivities start with a ribbon-cutting, outdoor activities for all ages, including the SunCommon Bounce House, face painting and food; artist receptions for Chris Jeffrey and Laura Gans in the CAL galleries. At 7 p.m., New Music Uncaged present a concert and dance performance produced by Abundant Silence. Center for Arts and Learning, Montpelier, Friday, September 6, 3-8 p.m. Free. Info, 595-5252.

AO Glass and WhistlePig Rye Whiskey South

End glassmakers Rich Arentzen and Tove Ohlander always throw open their doors for the

Art Hop, providing demonstrations of their high-temp art form and displaying their fragile, sophisticated wares. They’ll do it again this year — the Hop is Friday through Sunday, September 6 to 8 — but the company has something different to show off: a handcrafted glass bottle stopper. Specifically, a stopper for bottles of WhistlePig’s newly released, 18year double malt rye. For the collaboration, Arentzen and Ohlander, well, pulled out all the stops. Wanting to create a unique product, they sourced a 19th-century glass press at a historic factory in West Virginia and brought it back to Burlington. Called “101,” the press is now in daily operation as glassmakers turn out the stoppers one at a time — appropriately elegant “lids” for a very high-end beverage. Art Hoppers can see the making happen this weekend; expect WhistlePig tastings on Saturday. Pictured: a finished bottle stopper; photo by Brian McDonald. Wolff. Reception: Saturday, September 7, 5-8 p.m. September 7-October 20. Info, 438-2097. The Carving Studio & Sculpture Center in West Rutland.

champlain islands/northwest

f BARBARA WATERS & TUYEN MY NGUYEN: “Where Do You Draw the Line?” an exhibition of paintings and installation that explores how borders affect habitat. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. September 6-October 6. Info, greentaraspace@ gmail.com. GreenTARA Space in North Hero.

upper valley

f RACHEL GROSS: “Through the Curve,” new prints.

Reception: Friday, September 6, 5-7 p.m. September 6-October 28. Info, 295-5901. Two Rivers Printmaking Studio in White River Junction.

f SAMUEL NEUSTADT: “Faces and Places,”

digital paintings of local people and architecture by the longtime Pomfret artist. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5:30-7:30 p.m. September 6-28. Info, 457-3500. ArtisTree Community Arts Center & Gallery in South Pomfret.

brattleboro/okemo valley

f ‘ALCHEMY: METAL, MYSTERY AND MAGIC’: A group show featuring sculptures and paintings by Jeanne Carbonetti, Sabrina Fadial, Alexandra Heller, Peter Heller, Pat Musick, Dan O’Donnell, Gerald Stoner and Johny Swing. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5:30 p.m. September 6-February 29. Info, 258-3992. The Great Hall in Springfield. f NATALJA KENT: ‘Movement Artifact,” large-scale, camera-less “photographs” created with direct application of light to paper in the darkroom. Reception during Art Walk: Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. September 6-November 1. Info, 251-5130. Epsilon Spires in Brattleboro. VISUAL ART IN SEVEN DAYS:

outside vermont

f BILL CROSBY: “Land, Water & Sky,” abstracted, gestural paintings of the natural landscape by the longtime North Country artist. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5:30-7:30 p.m. September 6-27. Info, 518-563-1604. Strand Center for the Arts in Plattsburgh, N.Y. f MARY ADMASIAN: “Marked,” mixed-media sculptural works that symbolize the tension between outer and inner lives. f PAMELA TARBELL: “What Is on Your Balcony?” oil paintings inspired by Spanish architecture. f ROB HITZIG: “Rough/Polished,” paintings and painted sculpture that use contrasting textures to express emotions, feelings and experiences that are beyond words. f ROSEMARY CONROY: “Love at First Sight,” colorful paintings that celebrate the natural world and wildlife. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5-7 p.m. September 6-October 2. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H.

ART EVENTS AUTHOR TALK & BOOK SIGNING: ‘WE ARE EVERYWHERE’: Matthew Riemer and Leighton Brown, creators of queerhistory.com and Instagram’s @lgbt_history, discuss their book, We Are Everywhere: Protest, Power, and Pride in the History of Queer Liberation. In conjunction with retrospective exhibition of photographer Dona Ann McAdams. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center, Saturday, September 7, 5 p.m. Free. Info, 257-0124. BCA SUMMER ARTIST MARKET: A contemporary outdoor market that offers unique handmade items by Vermont artists including ceramics, woodworking, jewelry, games, clothing, accessories and more. Burlington City Hall, Saturdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free to browse. Info, 865-7166. ‘BODIES’: A South End Art Hop extravaganza with artwork by Haley Fenn, Mary Lacy, Corrine Yonce,

ART LISTINGS AND SPOTLIGHTS ARE WRITTEN BY PAMELA POLSTON. LISTINGS ARE RESTRICTED TO ART SHOWS IN TRULY PUBLIC PLACES.

ESSEX ART LEAGUE MEETING: The arts group’s monthly meeting includes social and business time and a guest speaker or presentation. First Congregational Church Essex, Essex Junction, Thursday, September 5, 9-11 a.m. ‘FALLING INTO LANGUAGE, A TRAVELOGUE: ARTIST CO-CREATION RESIDENCY’: Visual artist Kaylynn Sullivan TwoTrees and composer/musician Mikahely Rakoko Razafy collaborate on a video/installation/ performance; visitors are welcome to join the artists during their open studio hours and learn more about this work-in-progress. Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, Sunday, September 8, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 765-560-5445. FIRST FRIDAY ART: Dozens of galleries and other venues around the city open their doors to pedestrian art viewers in this monthly event. Various Burlington locations, Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. Info, 264-4839. FIRST THURSDAYS: The monthly event features four AIR Artists in multiple media. AIR Gallery, St. Albans, Thursday, September 5, 4:30-7 p.m. Info, 528-5222. FREE FIRST FRIDAYS: Once a month, visitors are welcome to view the exhibitions without a guide and at their own pace. Wood-fired pizza available from La Pizza Lupo. Guests bringing or consuming alcohol on the grounds must be of legal age. Hall Art Foundation, Reading, Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. Free. Info, 952-1056. GLASS AND WHISKEY: The glass artisans and WhistlePig Rye Whiskey have partnered to offer the Vermont distillery’s newly released, 18-year double malt rye with a stopper made with a salvaged and restored glass press. The result debuts during Art Hop; glass blowing and pressing demonstrations Saturday, with whiskey tastings. AO Glass, Burlington, Friday, September 6, 5-10 p.m. and Saturday, September 7, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 488-4455. MONTPELIER ART WALK: Nearly 30 venues invite the public to stop in, look and enjoy the city’s visual art offerings. Various Montpelier locations, Friday, September 6, 4-8 p.m. Info, 223-9604. OPEN ART STUDIO: Seasoned makers and first-timers alike convene to paint, knit and craft in a friendly environment. Bring a table covering for messy projects. Swanton Public Library, Tuesday, September 10, 4-8 p.m. Free. Info, swantonarts council@gmail.com. PATRICK DUNFEY OPEN HOUSE: The artist and head of exhibitions at the Hood Museum of Art opens his studio doors to the public for First Friday art walk. Studio/225 Gallery, White River Junction, Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. Info, patrick.dunfey@ dartmouth.edu. PECHAKUCHA NIGHT BURLINGTON: A simple, fast-paced presentation format in which creatives present 20 slides, 20 seconds each. Presenters are Misoo Bang, Jen Berger Rik Carlson, Neil Cleary, Jenna Emerson, Marcie Hernandez, Marcus Keely, Rolf Kielman, Brian O’Neill, Erika Senft Miller, Gyllian Rae Svensson and Julia Mara Wayne. FlynnSpace, Burlington, Thursday, September 5, 7 p.m. $7. RACHEL MORTON: The Burlington artist shows her figurative work in clay for Art Hop weekend. Dedalus Wine Shop, Market & Wine Bar, Burlington, Friday,

GET YOUR ART SHOW LISTED HERE!

IF YOU’RE PROMOTING AN ART EXHIBIT, LET US KNOW BY POSTING INFO AND IMAGES BY THURSDAYS AT NOON ON OUR FORM AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTEVENT OR GALLERIES@SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


2V-punchline-Dan St. Germain.pdf

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ART SHOWS

September 6, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday, September 7, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., and Sunday, September 8, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Info, rachel@rachelmorton.com. SCOTT GORDON: The Vermont artist talks about his sculpture and wall-mounted works from reclaimed metal. Local 64, Montpelier, Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. Info, 595-0605. SOUTH END ARTIST MARKET: Local artists offer clothing, jewelry, herbal remedies and trinkets. Cash only. Flynndog Station, Burlington, Saturday, September 7, 2-8 p.m. Info, asm.exhibitions@gmail.com. SWANTON ARTS SPECTACULAR: A celebration with arts and crafts, food, and hands-on activities, plus live music, a pet parade, a pancake-eating contest and more. Fireworks at night conclude the festivities. Swanton Village Park, Saturday, September 7, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Free. Info, SAS@swantonartscouncil.org. TALK: ‘QUEER BAUHAUS’: Dr. Elizabeth Ott, executive director of the Humanities Institute and associate professor of modern and contemporary art history and visual studies at the University at Buffalo, shares her research on the roles that queer identities and gender fluidity played in the development of modernism’s legendary art school. Mahaney Arts Center, Middlebury College, Wednesday, September 11, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 443-3168. TOURS OF THE HISTORIC BARN HOUSE: The Barn House consists of a granary and a cow barn, built around the turn of the 19th century and now conjoined. The tour features a special exhibit: “Travels of the Intrepid Couple: Stories, Art and Adventures of Lydia and Jack Clemmons.” Clemmons Family Farm, Charlotte, Saturdays, 10-11:30 a.m. $10. Info, 765-560-5445. ‘UNDER STEAM’: West Newbury photographer Ian Clark has traveled the world in search of working steam engines. He presents a slide show with more than 120 different engines to the membership of the Bradford Historical Society Bradford Academy, Sunday, September 8, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 222-9621. VERMONT ARTS & CULTURE DISASTER AND RESILIENCE NETWORK: The Vermont Arts Council and the Vermont State Archives and Records Administration hosts a day of trainings and resources on risk assessment, emergency planning, funding for recovery, and more. Designed for visual and performing arts organizations and presenters, historical societies, libraries, creative businesses, and municipalities, as well as artists. Preregistration required, see vermontartscouncil. org. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, Tue., September 10, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $10 includes lunch. Info, 828-5422. VERMONT ARTS & CULTURE DISASTER AND RESILIENCE NETWORK LAUNCH MEETING: The purpose of the network is to help the arts and culture sector mitigate the impact of disasters, help communities recover quickly and grow more resilient. Representatives of arts organizations, theaters, galleries, museums, historical societies, libraries, creative businesses and municipalities, as well as performing arts presenters and artists, are invited to attend. Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph, Tuesday, September 10, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $10. Info, 828-3291.

ONGOING SHOWS burlington

lmes, Michelle Wolf

ALISA DWORSKY & BILL FEREHAWK: “Job Site,” a room-size installation that explores the drawing and choreography inherent in architecture and incorporates paper, graphite, wood and video projection. SARAH AMOS: “Unique Multiples,” innovative prints employing multiple techniques by the Australian artist, who spends part of her time in northern Vermont. Through October 6. Info, 865-7166. BCA Center in Burlington. BEN BALCOM: A short film, “The Sequence of Years,” that investigates the relationship between cinematic artifice and experiences of everyday life. KARA TORRES: “Myopia,” artwork in variety of materials, including cloth, paint and PVC, that plays with visual perception, hidden imagery, subversive ideologies and metaphorical and literal myopia.

Through September 30. Info, 391-4083. The Gallery at Main Street Landing in Burlington. GARRETT MORIN: “Crowd Sorcery,” new works in pastel by the New York-based artist inspired by Neolithic monuments to the dead. Through November 16. Info, 233-2943. Safe and Sound Gallery in Burlington. JOSH KERMAN: “Disc Jockeys in Vermont,” nearly 100 photographs of DJs by the founder of Church Street DJs, aka KermiTT. Through September 30. Info, info@churchstreetdjs.com. Half Lounge in Burlington. LINDA E. JONES: “Traces,” a retrospective of selected mixed-media paintings including new work inspired by personal archaeological exploration. Through September 13. Info, 865-8980. Champlain College Art Gallery in Burlington.

f MERCHE BAUTISTA: “Of Joy and Other Acts of Resistance,” mixed-media installations that represent female identity by the Spanish-Mexican artist. Reception: Friday, September 6, 5-8 p.m. Through October 30. Flynndog Gallery in Burlington. MICHAEL METZ: “What Do You See?,” recent color photographs of people looking at art. Through October 1. Info, michaelmetz100@gmail.com. Mirabelles Café & Bakery in Burlington.

chittenden county

‘CITY OF HOPE’: Twenty posters, videos and audio collections that document the 1968 Poor People’s Campaign, a grassroots, multiracial movement that drew thousands of people to Washington, D.C., for 43 days. Part of the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service poster series. Advance registration required. Sundays, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Donations. Info, 765-560-5445. Authentica Art Gallery in Charlotte. ‘IN THEIR ELEMENT’: An installation of sculptures on the museum grounds by contemporary artists Rodrigo Nava, Jonathan D. Ebinger and Dan Snow. Curated by Carolyn Bauer. Through October 31. Info, 985-3346. Shelburne Museum. ‘IT’S ABOUT TIME’: Original watercolor paintings by Shelburne artist Katra Kindar. Through September 30. Info, 985-8922. Village Wine and Coffee in Shelburne. ‘WILLIAM WEGMAN: OUTSIDE IN’: More than 60 works from the renowned artist’s collection, including Polaroid photos of his Weimeraners, pages from his handmade book Field Guide to North America and to Other Regions, drawings, and postcard paintings. Through October 20. $15 general admission; $12 museum members and seniors; $5 students. Info, 985-3346. Pizzagalli Center for Art and Education, Shelburne Museum.

barre/montpelier

‘200 YEARS—200 OBJECTS’: In the final celebratory year of the university’s bicentennial, the museum exhibits a curated selection of artifacts, documents and images from the school’s collections. Through December 21. Info, 485-2886. Sullivan Museum & History Center, Norwich University in Northfield. AMY DAVENPORT: “Visual Splendor: Travels in Northern India,” photographs of architecture, street life, the Taj Mahal and women. Through October 20. Info, moetown52@comcast.net. Central Vermont Medical Center in Berlin. ELEANOR OTT: “Spirit Beings,” fantastical works by the local artist. Through September 29. Info, 595-4866. The Hive in Middlesex.

Dan St. Germain GREAT IF YOU ENJOY...Jack Black, Kyle Kinane, Dave Attell

f GALEN CHENEY & TESSA O’BRIEN: Mixed-media paintings. Through November 1. f VERMONT PASTEL SOCIETY: A selection of works by members of the statewide arts organization. Reception: Friday, September 6, 3-8 p.m., in conjunction with Elevation Celebration Through September 27. Info, 262-6035. T.W. Wood Gallery in Montpelier. LINDA MANEY: “Plane Geometry,” paintings that explore, and sometimes complicate, common geometric shapes. Through September 28. Info, 479-7069. Morse Block Deli & Taps in Barre.

BARRE/MONTPELIER

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THU. SEPT 19, 7 P.M. FRI. SEPT 20, 7 & 9:30 P.M. SAT. SEPT 21, 7 & 9:30 P.M. 101 M A I N ST. BUR LI NGTON V TC OM E DY. C OM SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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635-1469. Julian Scott Memorial Gallery, Northern Vermont University in Johnson.

f LOIS EBY: “Studies in Rhythmic Vitality,” abstract paintings by the Vermont artist. Montpelier Art Walk: Friday, September 6, 4-7 p.m. Through September 27. Info, leby@loiseby.com. Vermont Supreme Court Gallery in Montpelier.

mad river valley/waterbury

‘HUMAN NATURE/NATURE HUMAN’: Paintings by Deborah Brown that focus on a lone female character; and paintings by Mark Barry that provide poignant recognition of the humor, warmth and universality of everyday experience. Weekends only. Through October 13. Info, 583-5832. Bundy Modern in Waitsfield.

MICHAEL T. JERMYN: Framed images from the Montpelier photographer’s trip to Italy and Spain. Through September 4. Info, 223-4300. Salaam Boutique in Montpelier.

‘THE VERMONT WE CANNOT SEE’: Infrared photographs by Lisa Dimondstein, Julie Parker and Sandra Shenk. Through September 14. Info, 244-7801. Axel’s Gallery & Frame Shop in Waterbury.

‘MONKEYS, MISSILES AND MUSHROOMS’: Paintings and drawings by Marina Epstein that reflect the artist’s life in Vermont and exotic tropical influences from living in the Yucatan. Through October 30. Info, 229-6297. Capitol Region Visitors Center in Montpelier.

middlebury area

f SHOW 34: An exhibition of the latest work by gallery members. Reception: Friday, September 6, 4-7 p.m. Through September 29. Info, 552-0877. The Front in Montpelier.

‘THREADS’: Tapestries and fiber art by local weavers Lorilla Banbury, Barbara Bendix, Julie Singer George, Andrea Gould, Toby Goldsmith and Connie Koeller. Through September 5. Info, 426-3581. Jaquith Public Library in Marshfield.

‘AMASSED AND UP-ENDED: DECODING THE LEGACY OF STUFF’: Objects, photographs and documents representing four generations of the Robinson family and exploring how what we save over a lifetime helps to tell our stories. ‘STRUCTURES’: An exhibition repurposing the museum’s historic spaces as settings for contemporary art features work by Meg Walker, Axel Stohlberg, Dennis Versweyveld, Judith Rey, Steve Hadeka, Rob Hitzig and Yoko Ono. An international exhibition of mail art is in the Tourist Cabin. Through October 27. Info, 877-3406. Rokeby Museum in Ferrisburgh.

‘THE WAR OF IDEAS’: Propaganda posters from the collections, spanning the Civil War to World War II and illustrating everything from recruitment to support on the homefront. Through October 25. Info, 479-8500. Vermont History Center in Barre.

‘BEFORE HOUDINI: THE MAKING OF A GRAPHIC NOVEL’: Images that show the stages of development of the book by author Jeremy Holt and illustrator John Lucas. Through September 22. Info, 382-9222. Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater in Middlebury.

SUSAN SAWYER: Botanical artworks. Through September 30. Info, 229-6206. North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier.

stowe/smuggs

f CECIL GERRY: “Organized Chaos,” acrylic paintings, prints and sculpture by the NVU graduate. Reception: Wednesday, September 4, 3-5 p.m. Through September 15. Info, 626-6459. Dibden Center for the Arts, Northern Vermont University-Johnson. CLAIRE KELLY: “New Work,” glass sculptures that create miniature landscapes populated with animals, many of which have a perilous existence. Through September 8. DUNCAN JOHNSON: “Horizons,” a new body of work using reclaimed wood, assembled into abstract, 2D compositions. Through October 13. JUSTIN HOEKSTRA: “New Work,” abstract acrylic paintings. Through September 8. Info, 253-8943. West Branch Gallery & Sculpture Park in Stowe. ‘EXPOSED!’: The 28th annual outdoor sculpture exhibition, featuring works on the gallery lawn and around downtown Stowe. Through October 19. Info,

Galen Cheney and Tessa O’Brien

exploration she began during a 2015 residency in China, Cheney works accumulated papers — ticket stubs, receipts, fragments of old paintings — into multilayered constructions. In this way are her new works built from the past. Memories also inform O’Brien’s abstracted representational works as she refers to photographs she’s taken to document places, times and moods. The two open their shared exhibition at the T.W. Wood Gallery with a reception this Friday, September 6, in conjunction with the Montpelier Art Walk. Through November 1. Pictured: “Signal Inward” by Cheney.

253-8358. Helen Day Art Center in Stowe. ‘MORRISVILLE MOSAICS’: Multiple artistic interpretations of a sense of place, in a variety of mediums, originating from a community photographic project. ‘UNDERCOVER’: Artwork in a variety of mediums created by members of the Open Studio Figure Drawing group. Through September 15. Info, 888-1261. River Arts in Morrisville.

CALL TO ARTISTS 2020 ONE & ONLY SERIES: MOXIE Productions and the Grange Hall invite submissions for solo performance shows of all kinds for its 2020 season, January to April. Submitted proposals may represent storytelling, improv, dance, musical, puppetry, multimedia, variety, spoken word, cabaret, burlesque, standup, magic, tragedy, comedy or other forms. Pieces must be 45-90 minutes total running time. Guidelines at grangehallcc.com. Deadline: September 15. Grange Hall Cultural Center, Waterbury Center. Free. Info, grangehallcc@gmail.com. 58TH ANNUAL ART IN THE PARK FESTIVALS: Vermont artists and artisans are invited to participate in one or both festivals at Main Street Park in Rutland, August 10 and 11 and October 12 and 13. Deadline just before each show. For info, email artinthepark@chaffeeartcenter.org or call 775-0356. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland. ANEW CALL TO ARTISTS: Inclusive Arts Vermont invites established and emerging artists to participate in a showcase of work by artists with disabilities, which will tour the state in 2020. Submit work interpreting the theme beginnings, openings, doorways and new starts. Download application at inclusiveartsvermont.org. Deadline: September 30. Amy E. Tarrant Gallery, Burlington. Info, 871-5002. ‘BRING YOUR BEST’: Artists are invited to apply to this open-themed juried show with abstract or representational works. Download guidelines and application at strandcenter.org. Drop-off between September 14 and 21. Strand Center for the Arts, Plattsburgh N.Y., Through September 21. $25 and up. Info, 518-563-1604. CALL FOR EXHIBITORS: Artists and crafters are invited to apply to participate in the Fall Foliage Art in the Park Festival, October 12 and 13,

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‘PEAK TO PEAK: 10TH MOUNTAIN DIVISION THEN AND NOW’: An exhibition of photographs and artifacts to highlight the evolution of the division’s equipment and training since its beginning in 1943. Through October 31. Info, 253-9911. Vermont Ski and Snowboard Museum in Stowe. PHILIP HAGOPIAN: “Sequel,” multimedia paintings by the Vermont artist. Through September 20. Info,

held at the Main Street Park in Rutland. For info and application, call 7750356, email artinthepark@chaffeeartcenter.org or visit chaffeeartcenter. org. Chaffee Art Center, Rutland. Through October 11. Info, 775-0356. CALL FOR MURALISTS: If you’re an artist looking to display your work in a public location, Arts So Wonderful has locations. No funding, but supplies provided. Email artssowonderful2@gmail.com if interested or for more information. Various Burlington locations. Through September 25. Info, artssowonderful2@gmail.com. CALL TO ARTISTS: BOTANICAL BLITZ: During the coldest months of winter, the gallery will turn into a botanical refuge with paintings and drawings, sculptural works and installations that depict the plant, insect and animal worlds. We are looking for new work, in traditional and nontraditional media, for an exhibition January 21 to March 7, 2020. Deadline: November 15. For details, visit studioplacearts.com. Studio Place Arts, Barre. $10; free for SPA members. Info, 479-7069. ECOSYSTEM SERVICES THROUGH AN ARTIST’S EYE: The Orleans County Natural Resources Conservation District and the Memphremagog Arts Collective are looking for artists of all types to submit work around the theme of ecosystem services and agriculture. The juried exhibition will open on April 3, 2020, at the MAC Center for the Arts in downtown Newport. More info at vacd.org/conservation-districts/orleans-county or emily.irwin@vt.nacdnet.net. Memphremagog Arts Collaborative, Newport. Through December 31. Free. Info, 624-7022. JURIED SHOW AT THE AIR GALLERY: The artist-run gallery has monthly jury sessions in July, August and September. Contact artistinresidence.coop@gmail.com or visit website for more information. Artist in Residence Gallery, St. Albans. Free. Info, artistinresidence.coop@gmail.com.

‘BEING HUMAN’: Photographs from around the globe that document the exploration of human emotions, gestures and endeavors. Through September 7. Info, 233-6610. PhotoPlace Gallery in Middlebury. MUSEUMLAB: A diverse array of pieces from the museum’s collection selected by professors from a variety of disciplines; visitors are invited to observe the reactions sparked when this “teaching laboratory” displays art supporting various college courses. Through December 8. Info, 443-5258. Middlebury College Museum of Art. ‘THESE LAST WARM DAYS’: Works by Joe Bolger, Woody Jackson and Kay Flierl that express nostalgia for the waning days of summer. Through September 30. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery at Middlebury Falls. ‘THESE LAST WARM DAYS’: Works by William Hoyt, Molly Doe Wensberg and Lori Mehta that express nostalgia for the waning days of summer. Through September 30. Info, 989-7419. Edgewater Gallery on the Green in Middlebury.

LAKE PLACID CENTER FOR THE ARTS OPEN JURIED SHOW: For a showcase exhibition of the art of the region and beyond, artists are welcome to submit work in any style, genre or subject matter. For more info and forms visit lakeplacidarts.org/gallery/artistopportunities. Lake Placid Center for the Arts, N.Y. $25 entry fee for up to two works; four work limit. Info, anya@lakeplacidarts.org. MURAL OPPORTUNITY IN DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON: Burlington City Arts and the Community and Economic Development Office seek mural artists to paint 8-by-10-foot panels that are part of the construction barriers surrounding the CityPlace Burlington site. $1,000 stipend. Must be able to paint on October 4 (rain date October 5). For more info or to submit application, login or create an account at burlingtoncityarts.awardsplatform.com and select the Public Art Submission category. BCA Center, Burlington. Through September 17. Info, skatz@burlingtoncityarts.org. VALLEY ARTS PHOTO SHOW: This non-juried show, open to amateur and professional photographers, is September 13 to October 6. Rules for submission: The work must be the sole creation of the artist; work is presented uninsured; participants can submit up to three photos; presenter reserves the right to restrict works for any reason; work must remain on display for the entire exhibition. See valleyartsvt.com for details and registration form. Deadline: September 8. Big Red Barn Gallery at Lareau Farm, Waitsfield. $35. Info, 496-6682. WILMINGTON PUBLIC ART PROJECT: Seeking artist or artist team to create a site-specific mural on a downtown retaining wall 137 feet long. Info and application at BeaverStreetArt.com. Deadline: September 30. Wilmington Works. Info, wilmingtonworks@gmail.com.


ART SHOWS

rutland/killington

‘ART OF FIRE’: An all-media exhibit by members. Through November 5. Info, 247-4956. Brandon Artists Guild.

champlain islands/northwest ‘WOMEN’S WORK IS NEVER DONE’: A unique show featuring works in a variety of mediums by female artists ages 5 to 80 from Vermont, New York and Québec. Through September 7. Info, 326-6003. Montgomery Center for the Arts.

upper valley

33RD ANNUAL QUILT EXHIBITION: Quilts made by Windsor County quilters, featuring activities and demonstrations. Through September 15. Free with museum admission. Info, 457-2355. Billings Farm & Museum in Woodstock.

northeast kingdom

f CAROLYN MECKLOSKY: “Dream Portraits,” expressionist paintings celebrating the former Dream Café community in Johnson. Closing reception: Friday, October 4, 5-7 p.m. Through October 5. Info, carolynmecklosky@gmail.com. 3rd Floor Gallery in Hardwick. f ELIZABETH ROBBINS: “We Will Always Be One,” works in stained glass. Reception: Friday, September 6, 4-6 p.m. Through October 5. Info, 7480158. Northeast Kingdom Artisans Guild Backroom Gallery in St. Johnsbury. ‘FROM GRANITE TO GOLD’: An exhibit examining the life of Burdean Sebert (1900-95), the daughter of a local stonecutter who became a performer in a touring company, an Emmy winner for a TV show in Ohio, and then an instructor of drama and public speaking in Montpelier. Through October 17. Info, 472-8555. Hardwick Historical Society.

KATHLEEN KOLB: “Night & Day/Now & Then,” new paintings and drawings by the Vermont artist. Through September 8. Info, 533-9075. Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro. ‘THE PIVOT AND THE BLADE: AN INTIMATE GLANCE AT SCISSORS’: A collection of objects that convey the long human relationship to scissors, their design and explore myriad professional, creative, superstitious, violent and domestic uses. Through December 31. Info, 626-4409. The Museum of Everyday Life in Glover. ‘ROOTS’: A group show of Vermont artists that celebrates democracy, community and “the digging down of it all.” Through September 16. Info, 533-2045. Miller’s Thumb Gallery in Greensboro.

brattleboro/okemo valley

DONA ANN MCADAMS: “Performative Arts,” a major retrospective of four decades of work by the photographer and activist, who now lives in Sandgate, Vt. Curated by John Killacky. Through September 23. Info, 257-0124. Brattleboro Museum & Art Center. ‘MADE IN VERMONT’: A group exhibition of new and recently completed work by Vermont artists, including paintings, works on paper and sculpture by Arista Alanis, Steve Budington, Clark Derbes, Jason Galligan-Baldwin and Sarah Letteney. MALCOLM MORLEY: Approximately 40 paintings, sculptures and works on paper created between 1964 and 2016 by the British-born American artist and founder of super-realism. RICHARD ARTSCHWAGER: Some 40 paintings, sculptures and works on paper that reference everyday objects, symbols, people and places, often made from unconventional and industrial materials. The American painter, sculptor and draftsman died in 2011. Open for tours 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Through December 1. Info, 952-1056. Hall Art Foundation in Reading.

Family owned & operated for over 37 years

manchester/bennington

22ND ANNUAL NORTH BENNINGTON OUTDOOR SCULPTURE SHOW: Outdoor sculptures and gallery exhibits featuring 41 artists throughout the historic village. Through November 3. Info, 4309715. Various locations around North Bennington. ‘COLOR / GESTURE: EARLY WORKS BY EMILY MASON: Small paintings on paper with explosive color created by the abstractionist in the 1950s and ’60s. Through September 8. JANE STICKLE QUILT: The annual exhibition of the fragile 1893 sampler quilt created by the 19th-century Vermont stitcher. Through October 14. Info, 447-1571. Bennington Museum. ‘CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN REGIONALISM: VERMONT PERSPECTIVES’: Using works from the center’s permanent collection, the exhibition invites viewers to consider the framework of regionalism and the role art plays in society; guest-curated by Ric Kasini Kadour. Through October 20. Info, 362-1405. MAGDA LOVE: “Home Sweet Home,” a monthlong artist residency including a solo show of colorful, Argentinean-inspired paintings and an outdoor sculpture project with community involvement. Through September 8. Info, 362-1405. RON ROSENSTOCK: “Sacred Places,” photographs of locations around the world where people have gathered to pray or be inspired. Through October 20. Info, 362-1405. STEPHANIE KOSSMANN: “The 3:30 Project,” a solo exhibition of 30 abstract portraits developed from an appreciative inquiry with trauma survivors. More info at stephaniekossman. art. Through October 6. Info, 782-9426. Southern Vermont Arts Center in Manchester.

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randolph/royalton

ATHENA PETRA TASIOPOULOS: Mixed-media collage work by the Barre artist. Through September 14. Info, 685-4699. North Common Arts in Chelsea.

f DEBORAH SACKS: “Cats, Landscapes & Figures,”

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‘EAST TO WEST: A CERAMIC DIALOGUE’: Idiosyncratic works in clay by Mark Pharis, Liz Quackenbush and Cappy Thompson. Through September 28. Info, 767-9670. BigTown Gallery in Rochester. ‘HOOKIN’ IN VERMONT’: Textile art by local rug hookers Ina Anderson, Theresa Clark, Jennifer Davey, Bonnie Dore, Susie Gray, Betty LaWhite, Theresa Manning and Fern Strong. Through September 15. Info, 728-8912. White River Craft Center in Randolph. LEGACY QUILT: Ceramic tiles created by four generations of Vermonters, presented by the Arts Bus. Through September 7. Info, 728-2380. Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. RAE NEWELL: “The Tunbridge Fair,” a solo show of paintings by the Bridgewater Corners artist. Through September 5. Info, 889-9404. Tunbridge Public Library in Tunbridge Village. ‘SCATTERED GEOMETRY’: Ceramics by Jenny Swanson and Holly Walker. Through September 6. Info, 498-8438. White River Gallery in South Royalton.

outside vermont

‘THE 99 FACES PROJECT’: A nationally traveling exhibit designed, by Boston-based visual artist Lynda Michaud Cutrell, to reduce the stigma of mental illness. Photographs, videos, paintings and sculptures present true-to-life images to challenge assumptions about what living with mental illness looks like. Through September 30. Info, 603-4942179. Dartmouth-Hitchcock in Lebanon, N.H. ‘THIERRY MUGLER COUTURISSIME’: A retrospective of the French creator’s prêt-à-porter and haute couture creations, 1973-2001. Through September 8. Info, 514-285-2000. Montréal Museum of Fine Arts. ‘TRAVIS PAIGE: THE LEICA PROJECT: Eight local photographers were given a 1937 Leica Illa screwmount camera and given two weeks to master it; this exhibition displays the resulting images. Through September 16. Info, 603-448-3117. AVA Gallery and Art Center in Lebanon, N.H. m

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mixed-media prints by the local artist. Reception: Friday, October 25, 6 p.m. Through October 31. Info, 685-2188. Chelsea Public Library.

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movies Luce ★★★

Y

ou know what’s not helping with global warming? Director Julius Onah’s latest. It’s so overloaded with hot-button topics that it threatens arctic ice, tropical rainforests and the viewing pleasure of anyone who thinks message movies should be clear about what they mean to say. Luce is played by Kelvin Harrison Jr. He’s a valedictorian, track team captain and champion debater at an Arlington, Va., high school. This is a far cry from who he was 10 years earlier. Before Amy (Naomi Watts) and Peter (Tim Roth) Edgar adopted him, Luce was a child soldier in Eritrea. Years of intensive treatment have transformed him into a model student. Or have they? One person who has doubts is his history teacher, Harriet Wilson (Octavia Spencer). She gets it into her head that Luce isn’t the picture of perfection he projects and decides to snoop around in his locker. What she finds is the sort of plot device that will (a) turn Luce’s world upside down; (b) change his life forever; or (c) raise questions about who he really is behind all the friendly, solicitous smiles. The answer, unfortunately, turns out to be

REVIEWS

all three and then some. Wilson’s concerns stem from an essay Luce has written espousing the controversial views of philosopher Frantz Fanon, infamous for his advocacy of political violence. The thing is, Wilson tasked Luce’s class with writing an essay in the voice of a controversial historical figure. So her concerns stem from his having successfully completed the assignment. Not exactly probable cause. The teacher searches anyway and stumbles on a bag of fireworks. Citing heightened concerns for student safety “in the current climate,” she does the only sensible thing for an educator to do. She turns the evidence over to Luce’s mother for safekeeping. The Edgars might as well walk around in T-shirts with “Liberal Guilt” printed on the front. Amy is a doctor and super-protective of her son. Peter’s occupations appear to be day drinking and regretting they didn’t keep life simple by having a kid of their own. When Luce explains that he and his teammates share lockers, Mom believes the fireworks belong to someone else. Dad’s not so sure, so he starts drinking even earlier. Onah and cowriter J.C. Lee apparently want viewers to examine their assumptions about Luce. Is he what he claims, or is that

STUDENT DEBT Onah borrows from a long line of films about teens living salacious secret lives.

an act? To what extent are audience perceptions based on racial stereotypes or prejudice? Certainly, there are filmmakers capable of doing something fascinating with this concept. I wish they’d been invited to. As it is, we find ourselves repeatedly led in one direction only to be spun around and pointed in another. The script piles subplot on questionable subplot. A young woman suggests Luce may have sexually assaulted her with his jock buds, but the two seem on friendly terms. A bag of fireworks sets Wilson’s classroom ablaze, but Luce conveniently produces a video of him at a party that night. The teacher has a

sister with mental health issues. One day she shows up at school and does a striptease. All of which left me examining assumptions, though none about Luce. The stripping incident was gratuitous and didn’t involve him even tangentially. Other narrative threads dangled just as amateurishly. My attention was directed to a personal prejudice: the conviction that a director whose previous credit is an industry punchline like The Cloverfield Paradox is ill advised to issue a serious statement on race relations. The neophyte filmmaker’s presumption proves this picture’s most telling paradox. RI C K KI S O N AK

American Factory ★★★★★

I

n 2014, China’s Fuyao Glass opened a branch near Dayton, Ohio, in a former General Motors factory. The gigantic plant, where as many as 10,000 were once employed, had stood empty since the 2008 recession. While politicians blustered about Chinese investment in the U.S., Fuyao quietly got under way. Chinese supervisors received tutorials in American culture. (Americans are chatty and not prone to abstract thinking, they were told.) Local workers expressed their gratitude for jobs, even as some noted they were making less than half their GM wages. Five years later, is Fuyao a story of globalization’s triumphs, or of its discontents? That depends on whom you ask, and for their absorbing documentary American Factory, just released on Netflix, directors Steven Bognar and Julia Reichert asked a wealth of people, from Fuyao’s CEO down to the workers on the floor. As a result, American Factory doesn’t feel partisan, despite the backing of Barack and Michelle Obama’s new production company. It’s a deep dive into the differences between two cultures and how they manifest on the terrain of work, with no easy answers on offer. Dayton locals Bognar and Reichert attained a degree of access that makes viewers feel like flies on the wall. We watch CEO Cho Tak Wong finesse his strategy for pre72 SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

SIDE BY SIDE Chinese and American heartland workers work through their differences in Bognar and Reichert’s must-see documentary.

senting the plant to the public; we visit management meetings; we attend a fiery union organizing session. We tag along on a visit to the main Fuyao plant in China, where workers do military-style drills and promote the company in slick musical numbers. We even listen in on a mandatory meeting where high-paid consultants try to persuade the Ohio workers not to unionize. On the factory floor, the difference between Chinese and American workers ap-

pears stark: energy and tireless efficiency on the one hand, disorganization and dissent on the other. Americans insist on eight-hour shifts and weekends, the Chinese managers note with exasperation. Their “fat fingers” make them slower. But the personal stories make it hard to see anyone as a national stereotype. We meet an engineer who misses his family in China and rhapsodizes over the de-stressing effects of his evening cigarette. We meet a super-

visor who takes inspiration from the bootcamp drills at the Fujian plant and starts lining up his workers at home. We see crosscultural friendships forming, people becoming less foreign to one another. And, inevitably, by the end of the film, we see people being replaced by machines. When an Ohio worker evokes the American dream, the narrative turns elegiac. Older workers who remember their GM wages fear prosperity is gone for good. Younger ones who voted against the union simply fear losing their jobs. The Chinese have their own version of such regrets: Both the engineer and the CEO speak nostalgically of growing up in a poorer but less frantic world. A recent Bloomberg story observes that American Factory has journalists and bloggers “buzzing” in China, though the film can’t be legally streamed there. While state media have spun the doc as a paean to Chinese investment abroad, others haven’t ignored its darker currents. Bloomberg quotes a viewer named Zhang Ming who says the film evoked both admiration for Chinese efficiency and “empathy” for American workers: “The feeling is very complicated.” Indeed it is, and that’s why Americans should also be buzzing about American Factory. To see it is to ask ourselves tough questions about what we expect from work and life, and about where the quest for “efficiency” ends. MARGO T HARRI S O N


MOVIE CLIPS

NEW IN THEATERS IT: CHAPTER TWO: Pennywise the demonic clown (Bill Skårsgard) returns to his old tricks as the adaptation of Stephen King’s door-stop horror novel wraps up with this sequel set 27 years later. Jessica Chastain, James McAvoy, Bill Hader and Isaiah Mustafa play adult members of the Losers Club. Andy Muschietti returns as director. (169 min, R. Bijou, Capitol, Essex, Majestic, Marquis, Palace, Paramount, Playhouse, Roxy, Sunset, Welden)

NOW PLAYING ANGEL HAS FALLENHH1/2 Gerard Butler returns as a heroic Secret Service agent, now being framed for the attempted assassination of President Morgan Freeman, in the third installment of the action franchise, directed by Ric Roman Waugh (Snitch). With Piper Perabo. (120 min, R) THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2HHH In this second animated adventure based on the mobile game, “The flightless birds and scheming green pigs take their feud to the next level.” With the voices of Jason Sudeikis, Josh Gad and Leslie Jones. Thurop Van Orman directed. (96 min, PG) ANNABELLE COMES HOMEHH1/2 Imprisoning the demonic doll in a glass case only makes her more resourceful in the third installment of the campy horror franchise. (106 min, R) THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAINHH Kevin Costner voices a golden retriever who bonds with a race-car driver (Milo Ventimiglia) in this dog-centric drama from director Simon Curtis (Woman in Gold). (109 min, PG) BLINDED BY THE LIGHTHHH1/2 Bruce Springsteen’s anthems inspire a working-class teenager (Viveik Kalra) in this coming-of-age tale set in Margaret Thatcher’s England. Gurinder Chadha (Viceroy’s House) directed. (117 min, PG-13) BRIAN BANKSHHH A wrongful conviction derails the career of a high school football star (Aldis Hodge) in this fact-based drama also starring Greg Kinnear. Tom Shadyac (Bruce Almighty) directed. (99 min, PG-13) DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLDHHH Nickelodeon’s “Dora the Explorer” comes to life in this family adventure about a teen explorer (Isabela Moner) seeking her parents. (102 min, PG) THE FAREWELLHHHH Awkwafina plays a young woman who goes to China to say goodbye to her grandmother, whom the family is keeping in the dark about her diagnosis, in this drama written and directed by Lulu Wang (Posthumous). Tzi Ma and Diana Lin also star. (100 min, PG; reviewed by M.H. 8/7) FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAWHHH Two former antagonists from the Fast & Furious franchise (Dwayne Johnson and Jason Statham) team up to defeat a “cyber-genetically enhanced” Idris Elba in this over-the-top action flick from director David Leitch (Atomic Blonde). With Helen Mirren and Vanessa Kirby. (135 min, PG-13) GOOD BOYSHH Seth Rogen produced this pintsize version of Superbad about three sixth graders having a very eventful, R-rated day. With Jacob Tremblay and Keith L. Williams. Gene Stupnitsky makes his directorial debut. (89 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/21)

ratings

H = refund, please HH = could’ve been worse, but not a lot HHH = has its moments; so-so HHHH = smarter than the average bear HHHHH = as good as it gets RATINGS ASSIGNED TO MOVIES NOT REVIEWED BY RICK KISONAK OR MARGOT HARRISON ARE COURTESY OF METACRITIC.COM, WHICH AVERAGES SCORES GIVEN BY THE COUNTRY’S MOST WIDELY READ MOVIE REVIEWERS.

HONEYLANDHHHH1/2 A Macedonian bee hunter struggles to keep her colony alive in this documentary from directors Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov, which has been described as a parable of climate crisis. (87 min, NR)

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ITH1/2 Half of Stephen King’s horror novel, about a gang of misfit kids fighting a monster that takes on the likeness of a creepy clown, comes to the big screen. Jaeden Lieberher, Jeremy Ray Taylor and Bill Skarsgård star. Andy Muschietti (Mama) directed. (135 min, R)

Queen City Ghostwalk Ghosts and Legends of Lake Champlain Tour

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THE LION KINGHHH Stylized animated singing lions are replaced by photorealistic animated singing lions in this remake of the Disney cartoon classic about the heir to an embattled African kingdom, with the voices of Donald Glover, Beyoncé, Seth Rogen and James Earl Jones. Jon Favreau directed. (118 min, PG)

Burlington Edible History Tour

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Pasture Management & Annuals for Summer Grazing

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Queen City Ghostwalk Darkness Falls Tour

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THU., SEP. 5 BATTERY PARK FOUNTAIN, BURLINGTON

THU., SEP. 5; SAT., SEP. 7; THU., SEP. 12; SAT., SEP. 14; SAT., SEP. 21 TOURS START AT THE ECHO CENTER AWNING

LUCEHH1/2 Naomi Watts and Tim Roth play a couple grappling with disturbing discoveries about their seemingly well-adjusted adopted son (Kelvin Harrison Jr.). With Octavia Spencer. Julius Onah (The Cloverfield Paradox) directed. (109 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 9/4)

THU., SEP. 5 SEVERY FARM, CORNWALL

MAIDENHHHH Alex Holmes (Stop at Nothing: The Lance Armstrong Story) directed this documentary about Tracy Edwards, the young skipper of the first all-female crew in the 1989 Whitbread Round the World Race (now the Ocean Race). (97 min, PG)

FRI., SEP. 6; SAT., SEP. 7; FRI., SEP. 13; SAT., SEP. 14; FRI., SEP. 20 COURTHOUSE PLAZA, BURLINGTON

ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOODHHHHH The Manson murders of 1969 are the background for this story of a TV star (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his stunt double (Brad Pitt) in the latest from writer-director Quentin Tarantino. (161 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 7/31)

SAT., SEP. 7 GENERATOR MAKERSPACE, BURLINGTON

Burleseque 101

OVERCOMERHH A high school coach faces challenges and finds new inspiration when he’s forced to change gears in this faith-based film from director Alex Kendrick (Fireproof), starring Kendrick and Shari Rigby. (119 min, PG)

WED., SEP. 11; WED., SEP. 18; WED., SEP. 25; WED., OCT. 2 GRANGE HALL CULTURAL CENTER, WATERBURY CENTER

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCONHHH A young man with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen) flees an institution and teams up with a small-time crook (Shia LaBeouf) in the feature debut of writer-directors Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz. (93 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 8/28)

Insect Investigations: UnSchool

THU., SEP. 12 THE GREEN MOUNTAIN AUDUBON CENTER, HUNTINGTON

READY OR NOTHH1/2 A bride (Samara Weaving) finds herself in a wedding nightmare in this horror flick from directors Matt Bettinelli-Olpin and Tyler Gillett. With Adam Brody, Mark O’Brien and Andie MacDowell. (95 min, R; reviewed by R.K. 8/28)

Farm Table Dinner Series FRI., SEP. 13 THE LODGE AT SPRUCE PEAK, STOWE

SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARKHHH1/2 Alvin Schwartz’s creepy kids’ book series becomes a scare flick about a group of teens facing their greatest fears, directed by André Øvredal (Trollhunter). With Zoe Margaret Colletti and Michael Garza. (111 min, PG-13; reviewed by M.H. 8/14)

Autumn Mushroom Hunting + Tasting SAT., SEP. 14 THE GREEN MOUNTAIN AUDUBON CENTER, HUNTINGTON

Exploring Practices & Policies for Improving Soil Health Series

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOMEHHH1/2 In his second solo outing with this franchise, Peter Parker (Tom Holland) copes with the post-Avengers: Endgame world. With Zendaya, Angourie Rice and Jake Gyllenhaal. Jon Watts (Spider-Man: Homecoming) directed. (129 min, PG-13) TOY STORY 4HHHH The arrival of a new toy named “Forky” leads the toys on a road trip of discovery in the latest installment of Pixar’s animated series. Josh Cooley makes his feature directorial debut. (100 min, G; reviewed by M.H. 6/26) YESTERDAY 1/2H A young musician (Himesh Patel) wakes up in an alternate timeline where the Beatles never existed and only he remembers them in this comedy from director Danny Boyle (Slumdog Millionaire). With Lily James and Sophia Di Martino. (116 min, PG-13; reviewed by R.K. 7/3)

TUE., SEP. 17 REBOP FARM, BRATTLEBORO

The Stranger Play Festival

THU., SEP. 19-21; SUN., SEP. 22 OFF CENTER FOR THE DRAMATIC ARTS, BURLINGTON

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movies

LOCALtheaters (*) = NEW THIS WEEK IN VERMONT. (**) = SPECIAL EVENTS. FOR UP-TO-DATE TIMES VISIT SEVENDAYSVT.COM/MOVIES.

BETHEL DRIVE-IN 36 Bethel Drive, Bethel, betheldrivein.com

Closed for the season.

BIG PICTURE THEATER 48 Carroll Rd. (off Route 100), Waitsfield, 496-8994, bigpicturetheater.info

friday 6 — wednesday 11 Angel Has Fallen *It: Chapter Two The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood

ESSEX CINEMAS & T-REX THEATER

21 Essex Way, Suite 300, Essex, 8796543, essexcinemas.com

wednesday 4 — thursday 5

wednesday 4 — thursday 5

Brian Banks Dora and the Lost City of Gold

Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 Blinded by the Light Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw Good Boys *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Overcomer Ready or Not Spider-Man: Far From Home (extended edition) **TCM Big Screen Classics Presents: Lawrence of Arabia (Wed only) Toy Story 4

friday 6 — thursday 12 Schedule not available at press time. Closed on Mondays

BIJOU CINEPLEX 4

Route 100, Morrisville, 888-3293, bijou4.com

wednesday 4 The Angry Birds Movie 2 The Art of Racing in the Rain The Lion King Ready or Not

friday 6 — wednesday 11

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw Good Boys *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Spider-Man: Far From Home (extended edition) Toy Story 4

friday 6 — wednesday 11

friday 6 — wednesday 11

10 Fayette Dr., South Burlington, 864-5610, palace9.com

Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 Dora and the Lost City of Gold Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw Good Boys *It: Chapter Two The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Toy Story 4

MARQUIS THEATRE

65 Main St., Middlebury, 388-4841, middleburymarquis.com

wednesday 4 Closed. thursday 5 — thursday 12

Rest of schedule not available at press time.

Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 Good Boys *It: Chapter Two The Lion King Overcomer Spider-Man: Far From Home (extended edition)

CAPITOL SHOWPLACE

MAJESTIC 10

wednesday 4 — thursday 5

thursday 5 The Art of Racing in the Rain *It: Chapter Two The Lion King Ready or Not

93 State St., Montpelier, 229-0343, fgbtheaters.com

wednesday 4 — thursday 5 Angel Has Fallen Blinded by the Light *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood (Wed only) Where’d You Go, Bernadette

190 Boxwood St. (Maple Tree Place, Taft Corners), Williston, 878-2010, majestic10.com

wednesday 4 — thursday 5 47 Meters Down: Uncaged Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 The Art of Racing in the Rain Dora and the Lost City of Gold

The Farewell *It: Chapter Two

MERRILL’S ROXY CINEMAS

222 College St., Burlington, 864-3456, merrilltheatres.net

Blinded by the Light The Farewell *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) Luce Maiden Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood The Peanut Butter Falcon Where’d You Go, Bernadette

Eva Sollberger’s

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Blinded by the Light *It: Chapter Two Luce Maiden Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood The Peanut Butter Falcon

PALACE 9 CINEMAS wednesday 4 — thursday 5 Angel Has Fallen The Angry Birds Movie 2 The Art of Racing in the Rain Dora and the Lost City of Gold Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw Good Boys *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) The Lion King Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood Ready or Not Spider-Man: Far From Home Yesterday friday 6 — wednesday 11 Angel Has Fallen The Art of Racing in the Rain Good Boys *It: Chapter Two The Lion King **Margaret Atwood: Live in Cinemas (Tue only) Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood **Placido Domingo Gala (Sat only) Ready or Not Yesterday **You Are Here: A Come From Away Story (Wed only)

PARAMOUNT TWIN CINEMA

STOWE CINEMA 3 PLEX

wednesday 4 — thursday 5

wednesday 4 — thursday 5

Good Boys *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) Spider-Man: Far From Home (Wed only)

Angel Has Fallen Good Boys Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood

241 N. Main St., Barre, 479-9621, fgbtheaters.com

friday 6 — wednesday 11 Good Boys *It: Chapter Two

THE PLAYHOUSE CO-OP THEATRE

11 S. Main St., Randolph, 728-4012, playhouseflicks.com

wednesday 4 — thursday 5 The Farewell friday 6 — thursday 12 *It: Chapter Two Closed on Mondays and Tuesdays.

THE SAVOY THEATER 26 Main St., Montpelier, 229-0598, savoytheater.com

454 Mountain Rd., Stowe, 253-4678, stowecinema.com

friday 6 — thursday 12 Schedule not available at press time.

SUNSET DRIVE-IN

155 Porters Point Rd., Colchester, 8621800, sunsetdrivein.com

thursday 5 — thursday 12 *It: Chapter Two & Annabelle Comes Home It & *It: Chapter Two The Lion King & Toy Story 4 Good Boys & Angel Has Fallen

WELDEN THEATRE 104 N. Main St., St. Albans, 527-7888, weldentheatre.com

Honeyland Luce Maiden

wednesday 4 — thursday 5 Good Boys *It: Chapter Two (Thu only) Ready or Not (Wed only) Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

friday 6 — thursday 12

friday 6 — wednesday 11

Honeyland (except Fri) Luce **Lynch: A History (Fri only) The Peanut Butter Falcon

Good Boys *It: Chapter Two Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (except Wed) Toy Story 4 (Sat & Sun only)

wednesday 4 — thursday 5

Open-caption screenings upstairs on Mondays.

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fun stuff

FRAN KRAUSE

Have a deep, dark fear of your own? Submit it to cartoonist Fran Krause at deep-dark-fears.tumblr.com, and you may see your neurosis illustrated in these pages.

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HARRY BLISS

“Lemme know when you’re ready to howl at it...” MORE FUN! CALCOKU & SUDOKU (P.C-4) CROSSWORD (P.C-5)

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Rock the Runway AN ART HOP FASHION

SHOW

2019 Designers • Billie Jean Vintage • Camie Cuttitta • Carmen George Weddings • Cassidy Frost Designs • Cole Glover • Delaney Brunvand • Emma Destito • Frank DeAngelis • Grace Tolles • Katarina Lisaius • Katharine Montstream • Mariana Capatina • Meg Knudsen • Mika James Millard • Nina Szenasi • Sami Henninge

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ART 2019

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY REAL SEPTEMBER 5-11

VIRGO (AUG. 23-SEPT. 22):

I don’t know if the coming weeks will be an Anaïs Nin phase for you. But they could be if you want them to. It’s up to you whether you’ll dare to be as lyrical, sensual, deep, expressive and emotionally rich as she was. In case you decide that yes, you will, here are quotes from Nin that might serve you well. 1. “It is easy to love, and there are so many ways to do it.” 2. “My mission, should I choose to accept it, is to find peace with exactly who and what I am.” 3. “I am so thirsty for the marvelous that only the marvelous has power over me. Anything I cannot transform into something marvelous, I let go.” 4. “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” 5. “It was while helping others to be free that I gained my own freedom.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19): John Muir (18381914) was skilled at creating and using machinery. In his twenties, he diligently expressed those aptitudes. But at age 27, while working in a carriage parts factory, he suffered an accident that blinded him. For several months, he lay in bed, hoping to recuperate. During that time, Muir decided that if his sight returned, he would thereafter devote it to exploring the beauty of the natural world. The miracle came to pass, and for the rest of his life he traveled and explored the wilds of North America, becoming an influential naturalist, author and early environmentalist. I’d love to see you respond to one of your smaller setbacks — much less dramatic than Muir’s! — with comparable panache, Aries.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Of all the children on the planet, 3 percent live in the U.S. And yet American children are in possession of 40 percent of the world’s toys. In accordance with astrological omens, I hereby invite you to be like an extravagant American child in the coming weeks. You have cosmic permission to seek maximum fun and treat yourself to zesty entertainment and lose yourself in uninhibited laughter and wow yourself with beguiling games and delightful gizmos. It’s playtime! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The ama are Japanese women whose job it is to dive to the sea bottom and fetch oysters bearing pearls. The water is usually cold, and the workers use no breathing apparatus, depending instead on specialized techniques to hold their breath. I propose we make them your inspirational role models. The next few weeks will be a favorable time, metaphorically speaking, for you to descend into the depths in quest of valuables and inspirations.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Renowned Cancerian neurologist Oliver Sacks believed that music and gardens could be vital curative agents, as therapeutic as pharmaceuticals. My personal view is that walking in nature can be as medicinal as working and lolling in a garden. As for music, I would extend his prescription to include singing and dancing as well as listening. I’m also surprised that Sacks didn’t give equal recognition to the healing power of touch, which can be wondrously rejuvenating, either in its erotic or non-erotic forms. I bring these thoughts to your attention because I suspect the coming weeks will be a Golden Age of nonpharmaceutical healing for you. I’m not suggesting that you stop taking the drugs you need to stay healthy; I simply mean that music, nature and touch will have an extra-sublime impact on your well-being. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you visualize what ancient Rome looked like, it’s possible you draw on memories of scenes you’ve seen portrayed in movies. The blockbuster film Gladiator, starring Russell Crowe and directed by Ridley Scott, may be one of those templates. The weird thing is that Gladiator, as well as many other

such movies, were inspired by the grandiose paintings of the ancient world done by Dutch artist Lawrence Alma-Tadema (1836-1912). And, in many ways, his depictions were not at all factual. I bring this to your attention, Leo, in the hope that it will prod you to question the accuracy and authenticity of your mental pictures. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get fuzzy and incorrect memories into closer alignment with the truth and to shed any illusions that might be distorting your understanding of reality.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “When you’re nailing a custard pie to the wall, and it starts to wilt, it doesn’t do any good to hammer in more nails.” So advised novelist Wallace Stegner. I hope I’m delivering his counsel in time to dissuade you from even trying to nail a custard pie to the wall — or an omelet or potato chip or taco, for that matter. What might be a better use of your energy? You could use the nails to build something that will actually be useful to you. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I hid my deepest feelings so well I forgot where I placed them,” wrote author Amy Tan. My Scorpio friend Audrey once made a similar confession: “I buried my secrets so completely from the prying curiosity of other people that I lost track of them myself.” If either of those descriptions apply to you, Scorpio, the coming weeks will be an excellent time to secure a remedy. You’ll have extra power and luck if you commune with and celebrate your hidden feelings and buried secrets. SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “No Eden valid without serpent.” Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote that pithy riff. I think it’s a good motto for you to use in the immediate future. How do you interpret it? Here’s what I think. As you nourish your robust vision of paradise on earth, and as you carry out the practical actions that enable you to manifest that vision, it’s wise to have some creative irritant in the midst of it. That bug, that question, that tantalizing mystery is the key to keeping you honest and discerning. It gives credibility and gravitas to your idealistic striving.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The coco de mer is a palm tree that grows in the Seychelles. Its seed is huge, weighing as much as forty pounds and having a diameter of nineteen inches. The seed takes seven years to grow into its mature form, then takes an additional two years to germinate. Everything I just said about the coco de mer seed reminds me of you, Capricorn. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you’ve been working on ripening an awesome seed for a long time and are now in the final phase before it sprouts. The Majestic Budding may not fully kick in until 2020, but I bet you’re already feeling the enjoyable, mysterious pressure. AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): If you throw a pool ball or a bronze Buddha statue at a window, the glass will break. In fact, the speed at which it fractures could reach 3,000 miles per hour. Metaphorically speaking, your mental blocks and emotional obstacles are typically not as crackable. You may smack them with your angry probes and bash them with your desperate pleas yet have little or no effect. But I suspect that, in the coming weeks, you’ll have much more power than usual to shatter those vexations. So I hereby invite you to hurl your strongest blasts at your mental blocks and emotional obstacles. Don’t be surprised if they collapse at unexpectedly rapid speeds.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-March 20): In the thirteenth century, the Italian city of Bologna was serious about guarding the integrity of its cuisine. In 1250, the cheese guild issued a decree proclaiming, “If you make fake mortadella ... your body will be stretched on the rack three times, you will be fined 200 gold coins, and all the food you make will be destroyed.” I appreciate such devotion to purity and authenticity and factualness. And I recommend that in the coming weeks, you commit to comparable standards in your own sphere. Don’t let your own offerings be compromised or corrupted. The same with the offerings you receive from other people. Be impeccable.

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8/27/19 3:59 PM


OPEN-MINDED Looking for something new. A real open-minded, no-drama kinda woman. Been single for a while now and hoping for some real fun and maybe more. lokin, 32, seeking: W

Respond to these people online: dating.sevendaysvt.com WOMEN seeking... GREAT LIFE, LOOKING FOR COMPANY Strong, smart, independent woman on the threshold of new adventures seeks a funny, interesting, open-hearted man to keep company with. A spark of mutual attraction between us is important to me — we’ll feel it if it’s there. Then the fun is figuring out the rest. Firefly57, 62, seeking: M, l READY FOR THE NEXT ADVENTURE Warm, affectionate, professional lady ready to date. Working in a library has taught me never to judge a book by its cover. Let’s get together for coffee or an adult beverage and see where it leads. Redcutie, 51, seeking: M, l NEVER HAD COUNTRY LIKE THIS SWF country girl through and through. Love to have fun, not looking to jump into anything serious. I’m 5ft, thick, chunky, big butt, even bigger boobs. I love it all. I’m told my head game is on point, I have a tongue ring and I swallow, too, but DON’T get greedy now. I love to ride, too, and doggy style. Crzygrl80, 39, seeking: M, l READY FOR A NEW ADVENTURE I’ve recently moved back to Vermont to be close to my family and make a career change. I’m enjoying the chance to reconnect with the things I love most about this area: hiking, the amazing food culture. The things I enjoy most are hiking, baking, reading and a great Brit com. Onceachef14, 49, seeking: M, l

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AWESOME CURIOUS AND ADVENTUROUS LOVER Living the dream life and looking to share with similar mindful, meditative gentleman. Absolutely love jazz and spa music, long walks on the beach, great sunsets, and relaxing dinners. New to yoga and non-animal cuisine. Oh, did I mention? I am a fabulous cook and love to wow people with my creations. Ready to dance with me? Jewels, 61, seeking: M, l HAPPY TRAVELER Recently retired and loving it! Looking to find a friend or more to spend a lovely Vermont afternoon or evening with. A hike or a movie and dinner or a feisty conversation on the lakefront with cups of coffee or wine. Most folks are looking for the same thing, no? Grab your dog and let’s go! dani, 62, seeking: M, l GARDEN, READ, COOK, FISH, GOLF Looking for a partner, casual date, LTR. Golf, intelligent conversation, fishing, movies, exchange ideas, volunteering. MissDairyGoodnessVT, 65, seeking: M LET’S PLAY My busy schedule makes it difficult to meet people. I like a man who is lean, clean and well endowed. I’m slender, fit and told that I’m attractive. I’m independent and love a good laugh. At this moment, I could go for a night of some straight-up headboard-banging sex, and perhaps some meaningful conversation over morning coffee. cashelmara, 54, seeking: M WANT LAUGHTER, PASSION, PLAYFULNESS, KINDNESS? I am a teacher. I am casual in style, strong in spirit, compassionate in heart and adventurous in spirit. I am looking to meet someone for dating. More than FWB, but not necessarily long term. Want to meet and see where it goes. Who knows if it’s right ... Just want someone to go out and have fun with! kaybe, 27, seeking: M, l GROUNDED, THOUGHTFUL, OPTIMISTIC, ATHLETIC I’m a newly single professional, petite and athletic, seeking companionship. Of great value to me and what I seek in others is kindness, thoughtfulness, interesting conversation and spontaneity. My interests run the gamut of quiet Sunday morning with the newspaper to travel to daylong hikes, bike rides and Nordic skiing. Movies, music and unscripted adventures also top the list. 400river, 56, seeking: M, l FOODIE, DOG ADORER, TALKATIVE GOOF I am a gregarious individual who is looking for someone to have fun with me and my dog, Ollie. I can cook for us after we exercise Ollie, and I love trying new recipes. I also like a rainy/snowy day inside on the couch with a book in my hand. Verbose1, 60, seeking: M, l ECLECTIC, EXTROVERTED, HAPPY I’m a successful budding entrepreneur. Looking to meet someone who has the same shared interests. I’m getting to know the area. Nixprenom, 33, seeking: M, l

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

FLYING WITH MY OWN WINGS I like to fly with my own wings but welcome that special someone to fly with me. I’m interested in the arts, gardening, walking in the woods, sitting at the waterfront. People tell me the thing that stands out in me is my ability to laugh at myself. I’m looking for a flying, unique man whom I cannot live without. hollyhock, 68, seeking: M, l ARE YOU KIND? Mountain girl seeks adventure mate for fun times: travel, laughter, good food, fishing, perhaps. Looking to meet someone who is genuine, honest, silly, easy to be around. I have many interests and experiences and want to meet someone to share good times with. If you’re looking for a fun, spicy, goofy, nonmaterialistic, intelligent woman to hang with, then respond and describe yourself. dragonflydancer, 42, seeking: M, l SPECIAL, HANDY, LOVABLE I am self-sufficient. I can play in the mud in the day and dress to the nines at night. I love to give parties but also love to sit by a fire and cuddle. I am a lady and always will be. If you want someone who cares and is intelligent, I am waiting. Starchild, 61, seeking: M, l

MEN seeking... LET’S HAVE FUN Retired May 2018 and relocated to Williston (from New York). Looking to make new friends. Hoping to fulfill lifelong dream of a cross-country road trip with no time schedule. Join me? papapope, 67, seeking: W, l NOT YOUR AVERAGE OLD HIPPIE Looking for my old hippie gal. I’m downto-earth, love the outdoors and all its wonders. I enjoy gardening, lawn care, home/property maintenance, bike riding, flea markets, yard sales. From spring ’til fall, you’ll never see me wear shoes except for businesses. I’ve only ever owned one suit, and that was for funerals. Let’s dance naked under the stars. CARETAKER4YOU, 62, seeking: W, l GENUINE, OUTDOORSY AND PASSIONATE I’m looking for a long-term, passionate sexual relationship: spontaneous, fiery, beautiful. Outdoor adventures, snuggling, cooking, movies, dates, kissing — I want all of these, too. But I’m craving the kind of sex that’s so hot we can make movies. mtnman12, 31, seeking: W, l KIND, COMPASSIONATE, DOWN-TOEARTH I have a good sense of humor. I write nice songs and do interesting photographic work. I am honest and open and love the outdoors. A many-generational Vermonter, a family man, unique. I am retired but continue to produce new songs and photography. trout, 72, seeking: W, l LET’S PLAY! In shape, in touch, experienced. I crave the heat, passion and sheer exhilaration that comes from when two people really connect. Looking for like-minded playmates. NorthStarVT, 46, seeking: W

A SOUL-SPIRITED KIND OF FELLOW I’m looking for a woman who is interested in life and the world around her — who loves books, the arts and cultural events. I hope she is passionate about how she lives and what she believes in. Perhaps she loves to garden, as I do. autumn37, 68, seeking: W, l REALIST TIRED OF GAMES I’m looking for stimulating conversations with lovers of music and food. I enjoy being outside all year long. I’m also finally getting back into longdistance running. You don’t need to be a specific size or shape; independence and individuality are what I find sexy. If you can’t be honest with yourself, then we probably won’t get along very well. NunyaB, 43, seeking: W IT’S ALL ABOUT BEING PRESENT I love words and how they can move emotion. Studying to be a poet after 38 years. In the produce business. Going for walks and conversation; love holding hands. No extreme sports. Enjoy going for long rides in the NEK. Love anything to do with water. I am looking for a kind, loving, mature woman with a few extra pounds. poet56, 63, seeking: W, l LOOKING FOR EXCITEMENT I am a fit, attached male who is looking for that special lady to ignite that spark in me that I am not getting at home. I am an outdoors kind of man. I love to hike, bike, fish, etc. Mtnx, 46, seeking: W SUGAR MAGNOLIA BLOSSOMS BLOOMING Life is for living! I do things I enjoy: kayaking, sailing, scuba diving, gardening, photography, and seeing live music as often as possible. I’m easygoing and environmentally conscious. Hoping to meet a likeminded woman to share the fun. I’m not perfect and not looking for it, just someone whose imperfections blend well with mine. *No Trump supporters! DriftinAndDreaming, 54, seeking: W, l BI MARRIED, LOOKING FOR SAME Hey there. Bi married, looking for same for down-low fun in the Middlebury area. I am very submissive and aim to please. You should be clean and DD-free, because I am, too. Want a regular thing with a guy or trans woman. I’m into giving pleasure and bottom. Have crossdressed, too, for right person. So let me know. Johnny4ter, 47, seeking: M, TW

ONE TIME ONLY I’m bi-curious. I want to give my first blow job to someone who’s at least eight inches. Age, race unimportant. You are disease-free, clean and trimmed. I want you to shoot that load down my throat. One time only. Be discreet and polite, and let’s grab a beer. Onetimeonly, 55, seeking: M

TRANS WOMEN seeking... SAPIOSEXUAL, MERCURIAL, HONEST ‘TIL DEAD I love learning new things and meeting new people, or learning old things from others’ perspectives. Or old people from new perspectives (says the pot to the kettle). I love it both on intellectual and emotional bases to an extent that I can’t really describe other than “bliss.” Life is so very short, so make every moment count. Wintermute, 36, seeking: M, W, TM, TW, Q, NC, NBP, l GENEROUS, OPEN, EASYGOING Warm, giving trans female with an abundance of yum to share (and already sharing it with lovers) seeks ecstatic connection for playtimes, connections, copulations, exploration and generally wonderful occasional times together. Clear communication, a willingness to venture into the whole self of you is wanted. Possibilities are wide-ranging: three, four, explorations, dreaming up an adventure are on the list! DoubleUp, 62, seeking: Cp, l

COUPLES seeking... EXPERIENCE SOMETHING NEW We are a loving couple of over five years. Love to play and try new things. Spend free time at the ledges. Looking for people to play with. Perhaps dinner, night out and maybe breakfast in the morning. Looking for open-minded men, women or couples who enjoy fun times and new experiences. 2newAdventurers, 51, seeking: M, W, Cp, Gp OPEN-MINDED ROLE-PLAY We are an open-minded couple looking for others. Must be discreet. Please let us know your interests. If you are a male replying, you must be bi or bi-curious. VTroleplaying, 46, seeking: M, W, Cp ATTRACTIVE MARRIED COUPLE Attractive, caring and honest married couple looking to meet a female for fun times both in and out of the bedroom. She is bi-curious; he is straight. We are very easygoing and fun to be around. Will share a photo once we communicate. Let’s see what happens. VTcouple4fun, 48, seeking: W PROFESSIONAL COUPLE LOOKING Professional couple looking for fit, professional men. Ampefm, 44, seeking: M

SHY BUT FUN Educator with still lots to learn. Enjoy the company of a woman who is unique, funny, and bright. I’m intelligent, humorous, well read, musical and slightly geeky. Somewhat introverted, warm and friendly once I know you. Not particularly outdoorsy; love the lake and sun or a fireplace and a movie. Up for being coaxed out of my box. noman, 63, seeking: W, l

AWESOME COUPLE LOOKING FOR FUN! We are an incredibly fun couple looking for awesome people to share our time and company and play with us. Discreet, honest and chill — request the same from you. Message us; let’s get to know each other, have some fun and see where this goes! vthappycouple, 46, seeking: Cp

GEORGE Hello there. I’m here to find someone who would like to have the man of her dreams! A man who is active, spiritual, funny, energetic. I’ve built up my own business working hard. Now I’m ready for a healthy relationship! Handy_ George_handyman, 53, seeking: W, l

FULL TRANSPARENCY Adventurous, educated, open couple married 12 years interested in meeting another open couple for some wine, conversation, potential exploration and fun. She is 40 y/o, 5’11, dirty blond hair. He is 41 y/o, 5’10, brown hair. ViridisMontis, 42, seeking: Cp


i SPY

If you’ve been spied, go online to contact your admirer!

dating.sevendaysvt.com

BUMPING INTO BEVIE Don’t know you, but we kept “bumping into each other” at the Bevie Warehouse. Sure would like to accidently bump into you again, if you see this. When: Friday, August 30, 2019. Where: Bevie Warehouse. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914849 IN LINE AT WILLISTON WALMART You were standing in line buying a tent. You turned around to smile at someone in a wheelchair directly behind you in line, then looked up to catch my smile as I stood there admiring your beautiful energy. I had long blonde curly hair. Wish I knew how to cross paths with you again. When: Friday, August 30, 2019. Where: Williston Walmart. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914848 EVERYONE READS THE I-SPYS A year ago, you sat across my desk while I feigned competence and tried to convince myself that you weren’t THAT cute, your jokes weren’t THAT funny, and it wasn’t THAT cool you grew vegetables for a living. I hope things get easier for you. If it helps, remember: I’m frequently thinking of you, and always rooting for you. When: Wednesday, August 29, 2018. Where: not Chittenden County. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914847

ARREST ME! Me pumping gas at the Georgia Mobil, you were babysitting traffic. Tuesday, 8/27, early evening. Couple glances and then you were gone. You in your Sheriff’s truck, me in a blue Fusion. I can’t help get your smile out of my head. Would love to buy you a coffee and watch traffic together! When: Tuesday, August 27, 2019. Where: Georgia Mobil. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914846 A DREAM WORTH WAITING FOR You are special to me beyond words — not a day goes by that I don’t think of you. The sparks between us were obvious the moment your eyes first met mine. We’ve spent most of our waking lives on our feet, but not enough time in each other’s arms. Let’s fix that first and figure out the rest in time. When: Monday, August 26, 2019. Where: Antarctica. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914845 LOVELY LADY AT STARBUCKS You were on your computer. Your computer screen was smudged up, but you looked great. My heart went pitter-patter as I walked by you. I hope I get to see you again. When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Starbucks, Rte. 2, South Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914843

EXCHANGED SMILES AT THUNDER ROAD You: eating something hot and worried about burning your mouth. Short, accompanied by a few younger people. White sneakers with blue stripes. Me: one step lower and to your right. I would’ve chatted you up, but I was on the clock supervising someone, and it would’ve been inappropriate. Had to leave early. Just wanted to say I like your form. When: Thursday, August 22, 2019. Where: Barre. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914844

HOT SOUP ON THE CURB I was sitting on the curb in your parking spot, sweating down hot soup on a hot morning. You kindly didn’t run me over before running into the co-op. When: Tuesday, July 30, 2019. Where: Onion River Co-op. You: Gender nonconformist. Me: Woman. #914842 RESERVOIR ROCK TRAIL ENCOUNTER I ran into you and your puppy on the trail to the “Rock.” Loved your smile and the sparkle in your eyes! When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Waterbury Reservoir Rock Trail. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914840

SUMMER OF ‘69 AT MSAC You held my hand when we all stood in a circle at the end and sang along with Joe Cocker. Said your name is Rick. In hindsight, I’m intrigued. Wished I’d been a bit bolder. Want to get together and trade Woodstock stories sometime? When: Thursday, August 15, 2019. Where: Montpelier Senior Activity Center. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914841 ROCHESTER ROB If my surgery on Friday doesn’t end well, I just thought I’d say this: I love you, I’m so glad to have met you, be well, eat good food, don’t drink on an empty stomach, and you’re amazing. But if it does go well, LET ME LOVE YOU! When: Sunday, July 20, 2014. Where: Rochester. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914839 BLEW EACH OTHER KISSES Merging onto Rte. 15 in Essex Monday at 5:20 p.m. from I-289. Long line of traffic at the red light by McDonald’s, but you waved my little car in ahead of your tan pickup. I thanked you with a very impromptu “kiss” which you returned. You made my day. Single? Coffee sometime? When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Rte. 15 and I-289, Essex. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914838 NICE BUTT AT DOG PARK Hi. I saw you at the Starr Farm Good Place, and you had a very smelly butt. Gave it a good sniff but would like to sniff again sometime. Please respond and we can maybe share a treat and see where it goes. When: Monday, August 19, 2019. Where: Starr Farm Dog Park. You: Gender non-conformist. Me: Woman. #914837 MAL MAÏZ CONCERT You are the cute brunette with glasses who pulled me to the front to dance with you. I was with a friend. Would you like to be friends and dance some more? When: Sunday, August 11, 2019. Where: Middlesex. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914836 “WHAT HOLIDAY IS IT?” WINOOSKI Friday night I got out of my car. You asked if I knew what holiday it was, since the parking was free. We laughed about my parking space. I said I’d blame you if I got a ticket! Sorry you didn’t come into Waterworks. Single? If so, meet me so I can tell you what holiday it was! When: Friday, August 16, 2019. Where: outside Waterworks, Winooski. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914835

Ask REVEREND Dear Tingly Toes, 

Irreverent counsel on life’s conundrums

Dear Reverend,

I’m divorced, 67 and have neuropathy in my feet that makes me self-conscious about trying to find another woman for a relationship. How or where do I find someone? The dating sites are full of scammers and cost too much money.

Tingly Toes (MALE, 67)

I’m not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV, so I had to do a little web searching to find out what neuropathy is. And here’s what I learned: Peripheral neuropathy is a common nerve problem that has many causes and symptoms, mainly pain, tingling or numbness in the hands or feet. It doesn’t seem to be curable, but many treatment options are available. I assume that you’ve been seeing a doctor to manage the condition, but if you aren’t getting the desired results, I recommend seeking another doctor or treatments that you haven’t tried yet. Have

ENAMORED Beautiful eyes. Smooth, perfect shoulders I want to kiss. Skin so soft, perfectly tan. You were in a cemetery and on a park bench after swimming in the lake, at the lookout point, hair blowing in the wind. So beautiful. Smile so mesmerizing. I’ve seen you in my dreams and in the flesh. I’m captivated. Forever enamored. Are you? When: Saturday, July 20, 2019. Where: Burlington area and more. You: Woman. Me: Woman. #914834

MR. SEAFOOD MAN AT SHAW’S About a month ago, I asked you the price on prime rib, and I’ve not seen you except for on Saturday, 8/10/19. I think, from what I always find, it’s difficult to be forward and make the first move. I was the lady in the olive green Barbour vest with the blue-and-white-striped blouse. If you are married, then that’s my “no-go” territory. When: Saturday, August 10, 2019. Where: Shaw’s. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914828 MERMAIDS While investing in a special journal, you asked me about my T-shirt, which features a double-headed mermaid in a jar. I have decided to title the journal “Mermaids.” The first story I will write down in it will be this one. Also, my dream about the mermaid and another writing project begun days ago about a two-headed woman. When: Thursday, August 8, 2019. Where: Earthbound Trading Company. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914827

WAS THAT YOU? Was that you at the Radio Bean? You were looking me down. I did not say anything because I thought you would think I’m too old. I’m 59 and male. If this is you, contact me. When: Saturday, August 17, 2019. Where: Radio Bean. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914833 CBD GIRL ON PEARL ST. I talked to you today, and your name was Kiera. I commented on your cool dress and how good your formulations were. The free CBD roll on sample worked great. I thought you were really cute, intelligent and nice. Are you up for a vegan dinner, hike or the like? When: Tuesday, August 13, 2019. Where: CBD shop, Pearl St., Burlington. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914832 HANDSOME MAN AT BLANCHARD BEACH You were out for a bike ride, and you came onto the beach. My friend and I were sitting in the sand. You opened a beer, walked in the water for a little bit, then left. I really wanted to say something, but I just couldn’t find the words. I hope to see you again there soon. When: Tuesday, August 13, 2019. Where: Blanchard Beach. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914831 NEW WORLD TORTILLA, TALL, DARK... I was picking up my takeout. You: wearing a red T-shirt and tattoos, in town for family matters. I left but couldn’t help but wonder whether we had met at the OP all those years ago. If you are still in town, let’s revisit our old haunts. When: Saturday, August 10, 2019. Where: New World Tortilla. You: Man. Me: Woman. #914829 YOU’RE IN SCHEDULING AND BEAUTIFUL You made my surgery appointment today for my left arm in September. Seeing anyone? When: Wednesday, August 7, 2019. Where: at your desk. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914825

you looked into CBD, massage or more homeopathic remedies? Getting your symptoms under control would help with the self-confidence. As for how to find someone for a relationship, if I had the absolute answer for that, I’d run my own dating site and would be a zillionaire. I’ve never explored dating websites myself, so I understand your hesitation, but I’ve got friends who’ve used them and have had some luck meeting people. The sites just for seniors might be worth investigating if you haven’t already: Silver Singles and Our Time, to name a couple. Why not try one out for a month or so?

WALKING YOUR DOG IN WATERBURY Your kids were getting their hair cut in the salon, and you were leading your pup around the building to keep her interested. We spoke briefly. I wondered if I could have gotten your number, but this is a work environment, after all. If you read this, I’d love to introduce your doggy to my lab/pointer mix sometime. When: Thursday, August 8, 2019. Where: S. Main St., Waterbury. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914826 I NEARLY TRIMMED YOUR HAIR... You: walking with a friend I knew from around Lab B, toward a store next to my pharmacy. We all hung out for a bit. I offered to trim your hair; we got into a hot mess instead. You walked me home, holding my hand. Can’t stop thinking of seeing you again under better circumstances. You made me very happy. When: Saturday, August 3, 2019. Where: South Winooski, by Walgreens. You: Gender non-conformist. Me: Trans woman. #914824 SUNDAY FESTIVAL OF FOOLS SOUND CHECK We said “hello/goodbye” during a sound check at Red Square during the Festival of Fools. Before that, you were sitting on an outdoor couch facing my direction between two of your friends when we looked at each other. I think we might both be locals, but hopefully this ad will help us connect. We’ll see! When: Sunday, August 4, 2019. Where: Church St. You: Woman. Me: Man. #914823

Of course, you should check out the Seven Days personals in the paper and online. You might like the Love Letters section, where you can exchange good old-fashioned letters with people who interest you. If the online thing is really not an option, you’ll just have to get out and about in order to meet people. Take a class, join a book club, go to concerts, volunteer for a nonprofit. Do things that you enjoy, and you’re bound to run into someone who shares those interests, probably when you least expect it. No matter what, you’ll have fun while you’re at it! Good luck and God bless,

The Reverend

What’s your problem?

Send it to asktherev@sevendaysvt.com. SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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Internet-Free Dating!

I’m a SBM, 70 y/o, seeking a SWF or SWM bi, cp, tw, tm. 36 to 70 y/o. Looking for HJ or BJ. Love to perform oral and receive the same. Be discreet and DD-free. Love to kiss, role-play and have sweet sex. #L1346 Beautiful, pretty, handsome, healthy, fun, active, happy and sexy Latino SWM acting 45 w/ natural body features for SWF in the 40s. Hiking, flat-water kayaking, walking, camping, soccer, cooking, dining out, swimming, holding hands, travel, making love frequently. DD-free. #L1344

Separated guy, 57, tall, mostly in shape. Seeking outdoorsy, active lady for adventure and travel and hopefully a longterm relationship. I have many interests. Nonsmoker, 420 OK. Must like dogs, be funny and fun. #L1350 Easy on the eyes. Discreet 52-y/o SWM, 5’9, 160 pounds. Brown and blue. Seeking any guys in shape, DD-free, who enjoy receiving oral and are a good top and last a long time. Well hung guys a plus. Chittenden County and around. #L1349 Old man seeking old woman. Any race. Love more and out more. Lonely. Frisky. #L1345

If you are a hot SWF between 24 and 29 and looking for a lion to enter your jungle, then I can do better. I am a “TIGER” ready to roar. I am 29, tall, tan and handsome. I am a one-woman man not interested in polygamy. I work full time, so I can help with the bills. I would like you to be a nonsmoker, athletic, fun, kind and the mother of my future babies. If you are the right gal for this position and ready to be the future Mrs. Tiger, then don’t miss this opportunity. #L1340 I’m a SM, 71 y/o, seeking gal for a blind date for the Gov’t Mule show at Waterfront Park on September 15. #L1347

HOW TO REPLY TO THESE LOVE LETTERS: Seal your reply — including your preferred contact info — inside an envelope. Write your penpal’s box number on the outside of that envelope and place it inside another envelope with payment. Responses for Love Letters must begin with the #L box number. MAIL TO: Seven Days Love Letters

P.O. Box 1164, Burlington, VT 05402

PAYMENT: $5/response. Include cash or check

(made out to “Seven Days”) in the outer envelope. To send unlimited replies for only $15/month, call us at 802-865-1020, ext. 10 for a membership (credit accepted).

PUBLISH YOUR MESSAGE ON THIS PAGE!

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Submit your FREE message at sevendaysvt.com/loveletters or use the handy form at right.

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We’ll publish as many messages as we can in the Love Letters section above.

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Interested readers will send you letters in the mail. No internet required!

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

I’m a SWM, 66, seeking a SWF 55 to 68. I enjoy being outdoors, a nice dinner out and a home-cooked meal at home. Homebody, handyman. Weekend getaways. NEK. #L1343 I’m a gay, Christian male seeking to connect with other LGBTQ Christians for socializing and worship. Let’s meet to feed our stomachs and our souls! #L1342 I’m SWM, young 70, seeking SF. I’m healthy, honest, caring, considerate, passionate and a straight shooter. Seek an unpretentious, reasonably trim gal ready for dancing, prancing and romancing! Let’s share humor and hugs, music, the outside, road trips, firelight, and the Milky Way. Let’s begin! Glover, NEK. #L1341

Reply to these messages with real, honest-to-goodness letters. DETAILS BELOW. I’m a single male, 62 y/o, seeking a male or female for friendship. Friendly and caring person, 5’9, 150 pounds. Looking for friends who love running, walking, biking, hiking or other activities, even dancing. I’m a nonsmoker, kind, intelligent and respectful. Still working part time but love being out early a.m. I love folk, jazz and classical music. The summer is still here, but soon the colors will be here. Hope to hear from you. #L1348 Beautiful, pretty, healthy, fun, active, happy, sexy SWM acting 45 w/ natural body features: handsome face, V-lines, butt, chest and Latino looking for SWF, 40s. Hiking, flat-water kayaking, camping, soccer, cooking, dining out, swimming, travel, cuddling, making love frequently. DD-free. #L1337 I’m a SWF, 73 y/o, NS. Would like to meet a man who is alone like me and wants someone for companionship and to have fun together. #L1336

I am a 59-y/o submissive cross dresser looking for fun times. #L1330

I’m a 43-y/o SWM seeking straight or bi-curious men, 18 to 45 y/o, to give HJ or BJ to. I am fit, attractive, very clean and DD-free. I expect the same from you. Very discreet fun only. Reply with contact number and most discreet time to text you. Chittenden County. #L1335 SWF seeks SWM, 55 to 68. Chittenden, Addison counties only. Turn-ons: tall, average build, intelligent, ambitious, Jewish men welcome. Turn-offs: bars, fat, laziness, insecure men, smokers, drugs. Me: 5’8, average build, brown/brown, enjoys reading nonfiction, night sky, breakfasts in diners, beer and burgers, conservative. Friends first, please. Phone number needed. #L1334 I’m a caring, kind, creative spirit seeking a male or female for a beautiful friendship based on values. I’m middle-aged, 5’9, 150 pounds. Love drawing, poetry, jazz, folk, nature, the woods, Emerson, Coltrane, Sheehan, Mother Theresa. There is nothing that nature cannot repair. Nonsmoker. #L1323

Describe yourself and who you’re looking for in 40 words below:

Required confidential info:

(OR, ATTACH A SEPARATE PIECE OF PAPER.)

__________________________________________

I’m a _________________________________________________ __ ____

NAME

AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

seeking a____________________________________________ ___________ AGE + GENDER (OPTIONAL)

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_______________________________________________________ MAIL TO: SEVEN DAYS LOVE LETTERS • PO BOX 1164, BURLINGTON, VT 05402 OPTIONAL WEB FORM: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/LOVELETTERS HELP: 802-865-1020, EXT. 10, LOVELETTERS@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

THIS FORM IS FOR LOVE LETTERS ONLY. Messages for the Personals and I-Spy sections must be submitted online at dating.sevendaysvt.com.


Dogs are always allowed when you own.

Bauer Monday, Gravel September 30 Farnham, LLP 6-8 p.m. at

Presented by:

Attorneys at Law

The Flynn Space

A free workshop for first-time home buyers. Talk with experts, ask questions and grab a drink! ATTORNEYS

REALTOR

Daniel N. Farnham, Esq. & Jonathan M. Stebbins, Esq.

MORTGAGE LOAN ORIGINATOR

Erin Dupuis

Pete Nolasco

FLAT FEE REAL ESTATE

NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

BAUER GRAVEL FARNHAM, LLP

RSVP TODAY! 1T-HouseParty090419.indd 1

Go to: sevendaysvt.com/houseparty SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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9/2/19 12:23 PM


2019 2020 2018

NEW SEASON NOW ON SALE!

SEA 2019

SON

SEPT

19

SCOTT STAPP of Creed

The Space Between The Shadows Tour

OCT

5

PARAMOUNTVT.ORG 30 CENTER ST. RUTLAND, VT • 802.775.0903

SEPT

20 THE FOUR ITALIAN TENORS

SEPT

OCT

13

JUSTIN HAYWARD The Voice of The Moody Blues

OCT

26

NOV

9

KIP MOORE:

OCT

FEB

21

RICHARD MARX

17

PINK MARTINI

NOV

NOV

23

22

JOURNEYMAN: A TRIBUTE TO ERIC CLAPTON Featuring Kofi Baker

JAN

3/4

JAN

11

FEB

JAN

Comedian

25

FEB

29

MAR

1

MAR

13

MAR

OCT

20

TENTH AVENUE NORTH

DEC

1

NATALIE MACMASTER & DONNELL LEAHY:

FEB

15

MAR

17

Russian National Ballet Presents

SWAN LAKE

An Acoustic Evening of Love Songs

21

3 WYNONNA JUDD & THE BIG NOISE

BOB MARLEY

THE INTERNATIONAL SENSATION

28

OCT

A Celtic Family Christmas

JAN

12

TWELVE TWENTY-FOUR A Holiday Rock Orchestra

OCT

16

NOV

16

Special Guest: Tucker Beathard

DEC

2

Feat. China Forbes

Room To Spare Acoustic Tour

20

OCT

28

C is For Celebration

OCT

11

SEPT

21

MAR

27

MAR

28

APR

20

APR

30

MAY

27

TROUBADOURS: A TRIBUTE TO JAMES TAYLOR & CAROLE KING

PLUS Untitled-25 1

BROADCASTS FROM 8/30/19 4:15 PM


Humane

Society of Chittenden County

COURTESY OF KELLY SCHULZE/MOUNTAIN DOG PHOTOGRAPHY

Honey AGE/SEX: 8-year-old spayed female ARRIVAL DATE: August 20, 2019 REASON HERE: Owner was moving and could not take Honey along.

SUMMARY: Big goofy smile? Check. One floppy ear? Check.

Heart of gold? Quadruple check! As her name would imply, Honey is a total sweetheart who can't wait to give her love to a new family. A fun-loving, bouncy gal who’s ready to take on the world, Honey is down for whatever you’re up to — especially if there are treats involved! Come on in and get a dose of Honey, but be prepared to fall in love!

DOGS/CATS/KIDS: Honey has some history living with a dog. She has no experience living with cats or children.

housing »

DID YOU KNOW?

Back-to-school season impacts your canine family members, too! Changing schedules and less time with their people can lead to increased boredom and stress, particularly for active pups. Try to keep your pet’s daily exercise and eating routine as consistent as possible and provide brain-engaging toys or food puzzles to help them handle their alone time. Don’t forget the end-of-day snuggles!

APARTMENTS, CONDOS & HOMES

on the road »

CARS, TRUCKS, MOTORCYCLES

pro services »

CHILDCARE, HEALTH/ WELLNESS, PAINTING

buy this stuff »

APPLIANCES, KID STUFF, ELECTRONICS, FURNITURE Sponsored by:

Visit the Humane Society of Chittenden County at 142 Kindness Court, South Burlington, Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 6 p.m., or Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 862-0135 or visit hsccvt.org for more info.

music »

INSTRUCTION, CASTING, INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE

jobs »

NO SCAMS, ALL LOCAL, POSTINGS DAILY

NEW STUFF ONLINE EVERY DAY! PLACE YOUR ADS 24-7 AT SEVENDAYSVT.COM.


CLASSIFIEDS on the road

CARS/TRUCKS

BURLINGTON AIRPORT TAXI Reliable, friendly, courteous, Vermont native. Taxi w/ us to or from Montreal, Boston, New York, Albany, Manchester, Canada. Credit cards & cash accepted.

housing ads: $25 (25 words) legals: 52¢/word buy this stuff: free online services: $12 (25 words)

Martin Gil Landscape Design/Install

Estate stone walls

display service ads: $25/$45 homeworks: $45 (40 words, photos, logo) fsbos: $45 (2 weeks, 30 words, photo) jobs: michelle@sevendaysvt.com, 865-1020 x21

BURLINGTON 6-BR Remodeled, furnished house downtown. Water, garbage & sewer incl. Laundry on-site. Opportunity to earn $5,000-10,000 managing & cleaning the Airbnb unit in building. Frequent Airbnb guests. Minimum $2,000 sec. dep., $2,700/mo. w/ one-year minimum lease. Call Dennis 520-203-5487.

CASH FOR CARS! 802-324-3693 We buy all cars! Junk, 2015 CHEVY MALIBU LT high-end, totaled: It Excellent condition. 65K doesn’t matter. Get free miles. $14,500/OBO. Has towing & same-day 802-793-0767. Call/ text transferable compass cash. Newer models, SM-ClassyDisplay-MartyGil082819.indd FURNISHED ROOM for showing. 8/27/19 10:14 AM 1 warranty (5 year too. Call 1-866-535DOWNTOWN /100,000 mile) $2,000 9689. (AAN CAN) Room for rent w/ 1-BR TAFT FARM cost from dealer. Extra SENIOR LIVING others $600/mo. $200 4 winter tires: Master 10 Tyler Way, Williston, sec. dep. Immediate Craft Glacier Grip, $800 independent senior occupancy. Directly value. living. Newly remodeled downtown, owner1-BR unit on 2nd floor occupied, remodeled, avail., $1,165/mo. incl. completely furnished utils. & cable. NS/pets. building. Laundry Must be 55+ years of on site, all utilities, age. cintry@fullcirclevt. Wi-Fi, cable TV incl. com or 802-879-3333. Opportunity to earn We Pick Up $5,000-10,000 a year & Pay For Junk 2-BR TAFT FARM to manage Airbnb & SENIOR LIVING Automobiles! basement unit in same 10 Tyler Way, Williston, building. Computer skills independent senior required. Call Dennis living. Newly remodeled 520-203-5487. 1-BR BURLINGTON APT. 2-BR unit on main floor 2nd-floor Victorian 1-BR Route 15, Hardwick avail., $1,365/mo. incl. KEEN’S CROSSING IS apt. All HDWD floors, offutils. & cable. NS/pets. NOW LEASING! 802-472-5100 street parking. Electric Must be 55+ years of 1-BR, $1,054/mo.; 2-BR, 3842 Dorset Ln., Williston incl. 234 Shelburne age. cintry@fullcirclevt. $1,266/mo.; 3-BR, Rd. NS/pets. Lease. 802-793-9133 com or 802-879-3333. $1,397/mo. Spacious interiors, fully appli3-BR, 4-BA BTV anced kitchen, fi tness TOWNHOUSE center, heat & HW incl. sm-allmetals060811.indd 7/20/15 1 5:02 PM In Burlington’s New Income restrictions North End. W/D apply. 802-655-1810, hookups, 2 off-street keenscrossing.com. appt. appointment parking spots. Avail. 10/1. $2,025/mo. + sec. RICHMOND FURNISHED apt. apartment dep. & utils. Email: STUDIO cedarst6466@yahoo. Studio fully furnished, BA bathroom com. quiet setting in Richmond. All utils. incl. BR bedroom AFFORDABLE 2-BR APT. $1,200/mo. NS/pets. AVAIL. Call 802-434-5900 for DR dining room At Keen’s Crossing. more info. 2-BR: $1,266/mo., heat & DW dishwasher HW incl. Open floor plan, SMALL HOUSE ON LAKE HDWD hardwood fully applianced kitchen, In Malletts Bay, fi tness center, pet $1,500/mo. + sec. dep. HW hot water friendly, garage parking. Furnished 2-BR, utils. Income restrictions separate. Short-term LR living room apply. 802-655-1810. lease: Nov.-Apr. Call KeensCrossing.com. Paula 864-0838. NS no smoking Request application BURLINGTON OBO or best offer from thomasbusinesSingle room, Hill sagency@comcast.net. refs. references Section, on bus line. No cooking. Linens sec. dep. security deposit furnished. 862-2389. No pets. W/D washer & dryer NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your perfect match today! (AAN CAN)

Homeshares BURLINGTON

Share home w/ professional in her 60s, passionate about animals & environmentalism. Seeking dog-lover to help w/ pet care & light housework. $500/mo. (all inc). Private BA. No add’l pets.

MIDDLEBURY Share a home w/ senior veteran who enjoys sharing stories. $200/mo. rent in exchange for help w/ light cleaning, cooking 2x/week & companionship. Private BA.

RICHMOND Provide light companionship, mowing & snow removal for gentle senior in his 80s. Some understanding of memory loss preferred. Private BA. $400/mo (all inc).

housing

FOR RENT

CLASSIFIEDS KEY

HOUSEMATES

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 and similar Vermont statutes which make it illegal to advertise any preference, limitations, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, sexual orientation, age, marital status, handicap, presence of minor children in the family or receipt of public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or a discrimination. The newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate, which is in violation of the law. Our

C-2

readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Any home seeker who feels he or she has encountered discrimination should contact:

OFFICE/ COMMERCIAL

HUD Office of Fair Housing 10 Causeway St., Boston, MA 02222-1092 (617) 565-5309 — OR — Vermont Human Rights Commission 14-16 Baldwin St. Montpelier, VT 05633-0633 1-800-416-2010 hrc@vermont.gov

OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE AT MAIN STREET LANDING on Burlington’s Waterfront. Beautiful, healthy, affordable spaces for your business. Visit mainstreetlanding.com & click on space avail. Melinda, 864-7999.

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

print deadline: Mondays at 4:30 p.m. post ads online 24/7 at: sevendaysvt.com/classifieds questions? classifieds@sevendaysvt.com 865-1020 x10

Call 863-5625 or visit HomeShareVermont.org for application. Interview, refs, bg check req. EHO Homeshare-temp2.indd 1

services

CAREGIVING LIVE-IN CARETAKER Caretaker of animals, people &/or property. Work/life experience & friendly personality well suited to variety of caring needs. Single mature male, nonsmoker, cats. Willing to relocate in New England (VT, NH, ME). Resumé w/ excellent refs. avail. upon request. Contact William or “Chip” 802-355-9409. Avail. for immediate start.

COUNSELING INTERFAITH SPIRITUAL HELP Spiritual director, helper, deep listener. For beginners through mystics. Flexible approach to suit your needs. In Middlebury & by phone or video calls. Barbara Clearbridge, 802-3249149, clearbridge@ feelingmuchbetter.org, feelingmuchbetter.org.

CREATIVE ART MARKETING CONSULTANT Are you an artist or crafter struggling w/ the business & marketing side of your creative business? Schedule a consultation w/ artist, author & speaker Corrina Thurston. corrinathurston.com/ consulting.

ELDER CARE A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1-855-993-2495. (AANCAN)

FINANCIAL/LEGAL DENIED SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY? Appeal! If you’re 50+, filed for SSD & were denied, our attorneys can help get you approved! No money out of pocket! 1-844-218-7289 (AAN CAN) STRUGGLING WITH YOUR PRIVATE STUDENT LOAN PAYMENT? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888-670-5631. (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Eastern) (AAN CAN)

HEALTH/ WELLNESS MASSAGE FOR MEN BY SERGIO Deep tissue, Swedish. By appt. only. In and out calls in the Burlington area. Please call ahead of time. 802-324-7539. PRIVATE SOUND HEALING SESSIONS Book a 30-minute or 1-hour private sound healing session w/ Amber Arnold of Sacred Vibrations at the Clemmons Family Farm. Amber uses carefully tuned singing bowls & other traditional healing instruments played in concert. Their vibrations will help the left & right brain synchronize & rebalance. Relax, mediate & enjoy. PSYCHIC COUNSELING Psychic counseling, channeling w/ Bernice Kelman, Underhill. 30+ years’ experience. Also energy healing, chakra balancing, Reiki, rebirthing, other lives, classes, more. 802-899-3542, kelman.b@juno.com.

HOME/GARDEN HARVEST SERVICES VT-CBD Labs is able to offer its drying & storage services to farmers throughout Vermont & the northeastern US. Reserve your spot today! vt-cbdlabs. com. Contact us at: info@vt-cbdlabs.com, 802-338-9000.

9/2/19 11:37 AM

LEO’S ROOFING Shingle metal & slate repair. Metal roofing repair or replacement. Call for free estimate: 802-503-6064. 30 years’ experience. Good refs. & fully insured.

buy this stuff

FURNITURE GLASS TABLE TOPS 42” & 36” diameter x 1/2” thick. New & slightly used clear tempered glass. 802-862-9633, beaudin@comcast.net, Shelburne.

GARAGE/ESTATE SALES ANTIQUES, TOYS AND MORE! Multiple generations’ worth of china, toys, furniture, jewelry, cut glass & more coming down from attic. 129 Caroline St., Burlington. Sat., Sep. 7, 9 a.m.-noon. BIG YARD SALE! Cleaned my mom’s house. Lots of interesting stuff. Sep. 7 & 8, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 30 Pine St., S. Burlington. Free stuff Sun afternoon.


REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONALS: List your properties here and online for only $45/week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon to homeworks@sevendaysvt.com or 802-865-1020, x22.

BROWSE THIS WEEK’S OPEN HOUSES: sevendaysvt.com/open-houses DOWNTOWN BURLINGTON

DESIGNED FOR YOUR LIFESTYLE!

BURLINGTON | 94 NORTH WINOOSKI AVENUE | #4715628

SOUTH BURLINGTON | 30 LAURENTIDE LANE

NEAR THE VILLAGE OF SHELBURNE SHELBURNE | 1117 WEBSTER RD. | #4771904

OPEN 1-3

NEW LISTING

Sat & Sun

Looking to add to your investment portfolio? Don't miss this wellmaintained property consisting of 8 units in 2 buildings. Easy rentals with 3 bedroom, 1 bedroom and studio apartments - just two blocks from the top of Church Street. Plenty of off-street parking available. Excellent location! $999,000

Lipkin Audette Team 846.8800 LipkinAudette.com

Explore the Model Home and Design Center at Hillside at O'Brien Farm. Located on a picturesque hillside, this 30+ acre neighborhood offers 118 energyefficient homes in the heart of South Burlington. Choose from 20 unique home designs, floor plans, and finishes. Prices Starting at $356,000.

MULTI-FAMILY PROPERTY

SOBU MULTIFAMILY YARD SALE Several families are teaming up for one big sale! Wellesley Grove, 630 Hinesburg Rd., South Burlington. Sat., Sep., 7, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. STUDIO DOWNSIZING SALE! Salsalina Studio, 266 Pine St., Burlington, Vt. Sep. 14-15, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Furniture, electronics, couch, dressers, cabinets, tables, desk, TV stand, printer, DVD/ CD players. maggier53@ gmail.com.

Call or email Kristen today to get started: 865-1020 x22, homeworks@sevendaysvt.com

Burns Real Estate Team 44 Shelburne St., Burlington 802-343-0462/802-373-3506

PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP Get stronger & harder erections immediately. Gain 1-3 inches permanently & safely. Guaranteed results. FDA licensed. Free brochure: 1-800354-3944, drjoelkaplan. com. (AAN CAN) PICK YOUR OWN HEMP PLANTS VTCBDPossibles is offering locally grown hemp plants to make your own tinctures, salves and edibles. Come to the farm and choose your plant(s) from our carefully grown lot. Avail. beginning end of Sep. Supply limited. Make arrangements early for best selection. Contact VTCBDPossibles@

yahoo.com or call 802-482-3848.

8/26/19 4:25 PM

List your properties here and online for only $45/ week. Submit your listings by Mondays at noon.

Chuck and Cindi Burns

MISCELLANEOUS

Burns Real Estate Team 44 Shelburne St., Burlington 802-343-0462/802-373-3506

homeworks

NEW LISTING

MOVING SALE / GARAGE SALE HW-C21-Burns1-082819.indd 1 Sat., Sep. 7. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 6 Catherine St., Five Sisters Neighborhood, south end of Burlington.

662.0162 LipkinAudette.com

Chuck and Cindi Burns

HW-C21-Burns-082819.indd 1

BURLINGTON | 86 NORTH UNION STREET | #4769618

Located in the heart of Burlington, this 100% occupied, 10 bedroom triplex has attractive units and numbers! Additionally, it has hardwood floors throughout, coinoperated laundry, detached garage, and 6 off-street parking spaces. Only blocks to Church Street Marketplace, UVM Medical Center, UVM, and Champlain College. $940,000

Lipkin Audette Team

Lots of charm describes this home including a fireplace in the living room, wood floors, builtin bookshelves, and a wonderful open/large kitchen. The floor plan is exceptional and could easily offer in-home office space, Airbnb or accessory unit. There is also the possibility of sub-dividing to have an additional building lot - contact agent for more details. $485,000

professionals. www. Untitled-25 1

8/26/19 4:01 PM

PETS

NICE DACHSHUND PUPPIES! Have two sets of purebred Standard Dachshunds (not minis) for sale. One set of 6, all males, born last Aug. 22. $250 each. Second set born Jul. 4 weekend, mix of males & females, $350 each. Mineville, N.Y. (across from Vergennes). 518-837-1901 or email dwightdmoody@yahoo. com.

WANT TO BUY WANTED: FREON R12. WE PAY CA$H. R12, R500, R11. Convenient. Certified

refrigerantfinders.com/ ad, 312-291-9169.

music

INSTRUCTION BASS, GUITAR, DRUMS, VOICE LESSONS & MORE! Learn piano, voice, guitar, bass, violin, drums, voice, flute, sax, trumpet, production & beyond w/ some of Vermont’s best instructors in spacious lesson studios at the Burlington Music Dojo

on Pine St. All levels & styles are welcome, incl. absolute beginners! Gift certificates avail. Come share in the music. burlingtonmusicdojo. com, info@burlington musicdojo.com. GUITAR LESSONS MALLETTS BAY Andreas Guitar. 16+ years teaching in Chittenden County alone. Mallets Bay & Downtown Burlington Locations. franky andreas@gmail.com, 802-578-4912. HARMONICA LESSONS W/ ARI Lessons in Montpelier & on Skype. First lesson just $20! All ages & skill levels welcome. Avail. for workshops, too. Pocketmusic. musicteachershelper.

com, 201-565-4793, ari. erlbaum@gmail.com. PIANO LESSONS FOR ALL AGES New piano studio in Burlington accepting students of all abilities. Learn to read music, play by ear, write songs and improvise. randalpiercemusic.com, randal.pierce@gmail. com, 802-999-1594. TROMBONE, TRUMPET LESSONS Trombone, trumpet, piano, voice. Teacher w/ over 35 years of experience, M.M. Eastman School. All ages. $60/1 hour, $45/0.75 hours, $30/0.5 hours. 6608524. octavemode@ gmail.com. www. octavemode.me. stuart@octavemode.net 802-660-8524.

STUDIO/ REHEARSAL REHEARSAL SPACE Lovely, air-conditioned & furnished creativespace rooms avail. by the hour in the heart of the south end district. Monthly arrangements avail. as well. Tailored for music but can be multipurpose. info@ burlingtonmusicdojo. com, 802-540-0321.

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ACT 250 NOTICE MINOR APPLICATION #4C0320-29 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 - 6093 On August 21, 2019, Saint Michael’s College filed application #4C0320-29 for a project generally described as dismantling and removal of Founder’s Hall, the construction of new pedestrian walkways and the establishment of a new lawn area. The project is located

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

LEGALS » C-3


fsb

FOR SALE BY OWNER

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45! Contact Kristen, 865-1020, ext. 22, fsbo@sevendaysvt.com.

EXECUTIVE RANCH

NORTH HERO FARMHOUSE Executive ranch on 12 acres. Four bedrooms, two-car attached garage. New 30’x40’ out building with heat and hot water, with a 14’x11’ overhead door. $328,500 Tony: 802-6739768

draft permit may also be

FSBO-142_topper_view 090419.indd 1 viewed on the Natural

Resources Board’s web site (http://nrb.vermont.gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C0320-29”.

[CONTINUED] 423 College Parkway in Colchester, Vermont. The District #4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a

No hearing will be held and a permit may be issued unless, on or before September 16, 2019, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or subcriteria at issue, why a hearing

Calcoku

Stunning property on 11.22 acres includes 2 bedroom farmhouse built in 2000, heated studio building and unheated shop building, beach and mooring rights. $392,000. 802-233-0310.

is required and what If you feel that any of 9/2/19 FSBO-antell082119.indd 3:15 PM 1 additional evidence the District Commission will be presented at the members listed on the hearing. Any hearing attached Certificate of request by an adjoining Service under “For Your property owner or other Information” may have interested person must a conflict of interest, or include a petition for if there is any other reaparty status. Prior to son a member should be submitting a request for disqualified from sitting a hearing, please conon this case, please tact the district coordicontact the district nator at the telephone coordinator as soon as number listed below possible, no later than for more information. prior to the response Prior to convening a date listed above. hearing, the Commission must determine Should a hearing be that substantive issues held on this project and requiring a hearing have you have a disability been raised. Findings of for which you are going Fact and Conclusions of to need accommodaLaw will not be prepared tion, please notify us by unless the Commission September 16, 2019. holds a public hearing. Parties entitled to

Using the enclosed math operations as a guide, fill the grid using the numbers 1 - 6 only once in each row and column.

72x

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Junction, VT 05452 participate are the Mu2:18 PM 802-879-5658 Rachel. nicipality, the Municipal8/19/19 Lomonaco@vermont. Planning Commission, gov the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and ACT 250 NOTICE adjoining property owners and other persons to MINOR APPLICATION #4C1324 the extent they have a 10 V.S.A. §§ 6001 particularized interest - 6093 that may be affected by On August 19, 2019, the proposed project Michael Crete, 201 Main under the 10 criteria. Street, Winooski, VT Non-party participants 05404, filed application may also be allowed 4C1324 for a project under 10 V.S.A. Section generally described 6085(c)(5). as the redevelopment Dated at Essex Junction, of four properties on Main Street in Winooski Vermont this 23rd day (211-225 Main) totaling of August 2019. 0.62 acres (the Project Tract) as a four-story By: /s/Rachel Lomoresidential and comnaco Rachel Lomonaco, mercial mixed-use District #4 Coordinator building with associated 111 West Street Essex improvements. The

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CALCOKU

1 2 7 3 5 Difficulty - Hard

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

CONTACT KRISTEN, 865-1020, EXT. 22 FSBO@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Complete the following puzzle by using the numbers 1-9 only once in each row, column and 3 x 3 box.

6

5+

List your property here for 2 weeks for only $45!

9

No. 600

SUDOKU

8 1

5 7 3 4

Difficulty - Medium

BY JOSH REYNOLDS

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★★

DIFFICULTY THIS WEEK: ★★

Fill the grid using the numbers 1-6, only once in each row and column. The numbers in each heavily outlined “cage” must combine to produce the target number in the top corner, using the mathematical operation indicated. A onebox cage should be filled in with the target number in the top corner. A number can be repeated within a cage as long as it is not the same row or column.

Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way that each row across, each column down and each 9-box square contains all of the numbers one to nine. The same numbers cannot be repeated in a row or column.

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

9 8 5 6 2 7 4 3 1 1 7 4 9 5 3 6 2 8 ANSWERS ON P. C-8 8 4 1★★5★ = 7HOO,9BOY! 6 2★★3= CHALLENGING ★ = MODERATE 5 1 9 2 7 8 3 4 6 4 3 7 1 6 9 2 8 5 8 6 2 4 3 5 9 1 7

Project is located at 211 Main Street in Winooski, Vermont. The District 4 Environmental Commission is reviewing this application under Act 250 Rule 51 — Minor Applications. A copy of the application and proposed permit are available for review at the office listed below. The application and a draft permit may also be viewed on the Natural Resources Board’s web site (http:// nrb.vermont.gov) by clicking on “Act 250 Database” and entering the project number “4C1324.” No hearing will be held, and a permit may be issued unless, on or before September 20, 2019, a person notifies the Commission of an issue or issues requiring the presentation of evidence at a hearing or the Commission sets the matter for hearing on its own motion. Any hearing request must be in writing to the address below, must state the criteria or sub-criteria at issue, why a hearing is required, and what additional evidence will be presented at the hearing. Any hearing request by an adjoining property owner or other interested person must include a petition for party status. Prior to submitting a request for a hearing, please contact the State Coordinator at the telephone number listed below for more information. Prior to convening a hearing, the Commission must determine that substantive issues requiring a hearing have been raised. Findings of Fact and Conclusions of Law will not be prepared unless the Commission holds a public hearing. If you feel that any of the District Commission members listed on the attached Certificate of Service under “For Your Information” may have a

conflict of interest, or if there is any other reason a member should be disqualified from sitting on this case, please contact the State Coordinator as soon as possible, no later than prior to the response date listed above. Should a hearing be held on this project and you have a disability for which you are going to need accommodation, please notify us by September 20, 2019. Parties entitled to participate are the Municipality, the Municipal Planning Commission, the Regional Planning Commission, affected state agencies, and adjoining property owners and other persons to the extent that they have a particularized interest that may be affected by the proposed project under the 10 criteria. Non-party participants may also be allowed under 10 V.S.A. Section 6085(c)(5). Dated at Essex Junction, Vermont this 29th day of August, 2019. By: Aaron J. Brondyke State Coordinator 111 West Street Essex Junction, VT 05452 802/595-2735 aaron.brondyke@vermont.gov NOTICE OF LEGAL SALE View Date 09/05/2019 Sale Date 09/06/2019 John Rathbun Unit# 109 Easy Self Storage 46 Swift South Burlington VT 05403 (802) 862-8300 PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The City of Burlington is submitting its Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report on the expen-


SEVENDAYSVT.COM/CLASSIFIEDS diture of Community Development Block Grant and HOME Investment Partnership Act funds for the program year ending June 30, 2019 to the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development. A draft Report will be available on September 4, 2019, at the Community & Economic Development Office, 149 Church Street, Room 32, City Hall, Burlington, and online at www.burlingtonvt.gov/cedo. The public is encouraged to review the Report and to comment through September 24, 2019. A Public Hearing on the Report will be held at the City Council meeting of Monday, September 23, 2019, in Contois

Auditorium, City Hall at 7PM. Comments will be heard at the Hearing on the Report and on housing and community development needs. Written comments can also be submitted directly to the Community & Economic Development Office at the above address or by e-mail to vrussell@burlingtonvt. gov. For more information, or information on alternative access, contact Valerie Russell, Community & Economic Development Office, at 865-7232.

Say you saw it in... sevendaysvt.com

STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURTCIVIL DIVISIONCHITTENDEN UNITDOCKET NO. 7478-19 CNCV IN RE: ABANDONED MOBILE HOME OF ALMA COOK NOTICE OF HEARING A hearing on The Housing Foundation, Inc.’s Verified Complaint to declare as abandoned and uninhabitable the mobile home of Alma Cook, located at 89 Mount Mansfield Avenue, Lot #21 in Colchester, Vermont has been set for September 12, 2019 at 1:30 p.m. at the Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Unit, Civil Division located at 175 Main Street in Burlington, Vermont. Nancy L. Bean, Docket Clerk Date: August 28, 2019 VERIFIED COMPLAINT FOR ABANDONMENT PURSUANT TO 10 V.S.A. § 6249(i) (Uninhabitable) NOW COMES The Housing Foundation, Inc. (“HFI”), by and through its counsel Nadine L. Scibek, and hereby complains as follows: 1. HFI, a

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Show and tell.

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View and post up to 6 photos per ad online.

Vermont non-profit corporation with a principal place of business in Montpelier, County of Washington, State of Vermont, is the record owner of a mobile home park known as the Windemere Mobile Home Park (the “Park”) located in the Town of Colchester, Vermont (the “Park”). The Park is managed by the Vermont State Housing Authority. 2. Alma Cook (“Cook”) is the record owner of a certain mobile home, described as a 1968 Price Myers Corp., 12’ x 48’ mobile home (the “Mobile Home”), bearing serial number 50294129 located on Lot #21, Windemere Mobile Home Park, 89 Mount Mansfield Avenue in Colchester, Vermont. 3. Alma Cook (“Cook”) leased a lot in the Park for her mobile home from HFI pursuant to a written lease. She paid a security deposit of $407.00. 4. HFI has attempted to contact Cook, but her phone has not been in service. Plaintiff’s Counsel last spoke with Cook on May 28, 2019 and Cook advised that she had not been living in the mobile home since February, 2019 because

the home was unlivable due to an electrical fire and burst pipes. 5. Cook’s last known mailing address is 89 Mount Mansfield Avenue, Colchester, Vermont 05446. The last known resident of the mobile home was Cook. 6. The mobile home is empty and has been abandoned. 7. The following security interests, mortgages, liens and encumbrances appear of record with respect to the mobile home: a. Cook is in arrears on obligations to pay property taxes to the Town of Colchester, Vermont in the aggregate amount of $54.69, plus any additional interest and penalties. The delinquent property taxes are now a lien on the property. Mobile home 8. storage fees continue to accrue at the rate of $433.00 per month. Rent, storage fees and late charges due HFI as of August 23, 2019 total $3,032.37. Court costs and attorney’s fees from this action total over $600.00. 9. HFI sent written notice by certified mail to the Town of Colchester on July 26, 2019 of HFI’s intent

Open 24/7/365. Post & browse ads at your convenience. to commence this abandonment action as required by statute. 10. The mobile home is unfit for human habitation. Thomas Young, Property Manager and duly authorized agent for the Park owner, will testify under oath as to the poor and unlivable condition of this mobile home at the abandonment hearing. WHEREFORE, HFI respectfully requests that the Honorable Court enter an order as follows: Declare that 1. the mobile home has been abandoned; 2. Transfer the mobile home which is unfit for human habitation to the Park owner, HFI without a public auction so that it may be removed and disposed of accordingly. 3. Order pursuant to 10 V.S.A. § 6249(j) that the mobile home and any security deposit paid be conveyed to the Park Owner in “as is” condition, and free from all liens and other encumbrances of record. DATED AT Burlington, Vermont this 23rd day of August, 2019. By: Nadine L. Scibek Attorney for The Housing Foundation, Inc.

ERN #2726 DATED at Newfane, Vermont this 23rd day of August, 2019. By: Thomas Young, Duly Authorized Agent VERIFICATION STATE OF VERMONT WINDHAM COUNTY, SS. At Newfane on this 23rd day of August, 2019, Thomas Young, duly authorized agent of The Housing Foundation, Inc., owner of the Windemere Mobile Home Park in Colchester, Vermont, being first duly sworn, made oath that he has read the foregoing Complaint, and that the facts contained therein are true. Before me, Nadine L. Scibek - Notary Public Commission Expires: 1/31/21 Lic. #157.0007638 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CIVIL DIVISION CHITTENDEN UNIT DOCKET NO. 748-8-19 CNCV IN RE: ABANDONED MOBILE HOME OF RHONDA PLOOF

Extra! Extra! There’s no limit to ad length online. NOTICE OF HEARING A hearing on The Housing Foundation, Inc.’s Verified Complaint to declare as abandoned and uninhabitable the mobile home of Rhonda Ploof located at the Mountain View Mobile Home Park, 154 Buck Hill Road East, Lot #3 in Hinesburg, Vermont has been set for September 12, 2019 at 1:45 p.m. at the Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Unit, Civil Division located at 175 Main Street in Burlington, Vermont. Nancy L. Bean, Docket Clerk Date: August 28, 2019 VERIFIED COMPLAINT FOR ABANDONMENT PURSUANT TO 10 V.S.A. § 6249(i) (Uninhabitable) NOW COMES The Housing Foundation, Inc. (“HFI”), by and through its counsel Nadine L. Scibek, and hereby complains as follows: HFI, a 1. Vermont non-profit corporation with a principal place of business in Montpelier, County of Washington, State of

LEGALS »

DOUBLE-CHEDDAR ANSWERS ON P. C-8

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

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1185 Shelburne Road, South Burlington

[CONTINUED]

NEW South Burlington property! 1185 Shelburne Road is located 5-10 minutes from downtown Burlington. Amenities include: • Banking • Retail • Dining on first floor of building • Laundry & Parking included

Resident spaces in the building for entertaining and relaxing, a beautiful terrace on our top floor includes a grill and amazing lake views. One bedrooms available for immediate occupancy, $1500-$1575. Open houses daily!

Call Larkin Realty today and schedule your showing, 802.864.7444 4t-larkinrealty082119.indd 1

8/19/19 4:04 PM

FOR LEASE MARKET & DELI • TILLEY DRIVE • SOUTH BURLINGTON, VT

Available Summer 2020

• • • • •

2,400 square feet 438 employees currently on Tilley Drive 8,900 Average Daily Trips 11,327 Households within a 3 mile radius 2,046 Employees within a 1 mile radius

7. Mobile home storage fees continue to accrue at the rate of $422.00 per month. Rent, storage fees and late charges due HFI as of August 23, 2019 total $3,762.58. Court costs and attorney’s fees from this action to date exceed $700.00. 8. HFI sent written notice by certified mail to the Town of Hinesburg on August 2, 2019 of HFI’s intent to commence this

PIZZAGALLI PROPERTIES, LLC Contact: Bob.Bouchard@pizzagalli.com Telephone: 802-660-6805 4t-pizzagallirealty090419.indd 1

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SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11, 2019

Vermont, is the record owner of a mobile home park known as the Mountain View Mobile Home Park (the “Park”) located in the Town of Hinesburg, Vermont (the “Park”). The Park is managed by the Vermont State Housing Authority. 2. Rhonda Ploof (“Ploof”) is the record owner of a certain mobile home, described as a 1985 Champion Titan, 14 x 70 mobile home, bearing serial number 1735 (the “Mobile Home”), located on Lot #3, Mountain View Mobile Home Park, 154 Buck Hill Road East in Hinesburg, Vermont. 3. Ploof leased a lot in the Park for her mobile home from HFI pursuant to a written lease. Ploof paid a security deposit to HFI in the amount of $250.00. 4. Ploof is deceased. Her date of death is November 14, 2018. No probate estate has been opened per the Chittenden County Probate Court. 5. The mobile home has been abandoned and is empty. The last known resident of the mobile home was Ploof. 6. The following security interests, mortgages, liens and encumbrances appear of record with respect to the mobile home: a. Ploof is in arrears on obligations to pay property taxes to the Town of Hinesburg, Vermont in the aggregate amount of $554.14, plus any additional interest and penalties. The delinquent property taxes are now a lien on the property.

9/2/19 11:27 AM

abandonment action as required by statute. 9. The mobile home is uninhabitable. Thomas Young, Property Manager and duly authorized agent for the Park owner, will testify under oath as to the poor and unlivable condition of this mobile home at the abandonment hearing. WHEREFORE, HFI respectfully requests that the Honorable Court enter an order as follows: 1. Declare that the mobile home has been abandoned; 2. Transfer the mobile home which is unfit for human habitation to the Park owner, HFI without a public auction so that it may be removed and disposed of accordingly. 3. Order pursuant to 10 V.S.A. § 6249(j) that the mobile home and any security deposit paid be conveyed to the Park Owner in “as is” condition, and free from all liens and other encumbrances of record. DATED AT Burlington, Vermont this 23rd day of August, 2019. By: Nadine L. Scibek Attorney for The Housing Foundation, Inc. ERN #2726 DATED at Newfane, Vermont this 23rd day of August, 2019. By: Thomas Young, Duly Authorized Agent The Housing Foundation, Inc. VERIFICATION STATE OF VERMONT WINDHAM COUNTY, SS. At Newfane, on this 23rd day of August, 2019, Thomas Young, duly authorized agent of The Housing Foundation, Inc., owner of the Mountain View Mobile Home Park in Hinesburg, Vermont, being first duly sworn, made oath that he has read the foregoing Complaint, and that the facts contained therein are true. Before me, Nadine L. Scibek - Notary Public Commission Expires: 1/31/21 Lic. #157.0007638 STATE OF VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CIVIL DIVISION CHITTENDEN UNIT DOCKET NO. 749-8-19 CNCV IN RE: ABANDONED MOBILE HOME

OF WILLIAM F. & LUCY RINGWIG NOTICE OF HEARING A hearing on The Housing Foundation, Inc.’s Verified Complaint to declare as abandoned the mobile home of William F. & Lucy Ringwig located at the Windemere Mobile Home Park, 38 Mount Mansfield Avenue, Lot #10 in Colchester, Vermont and authorize the sale by auction has been scheduled on September 12, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Vermont Superior Court, Chittenden Civil Division, 175 Main Street in Burlington, Vermont. Nancy L. Bean, Docket Clerk Date: August 28, 2019 VERIFIED COMPLAINT FOR ABANDONMENT PURSUANT TO 10 V.S.A. § 6249(h) (Auction) NOW COMES The Housing Foundation, Inc. (“HFI”), by and through its counsel Nadine L. Scibek, and hereby complains as follows: 1. HFI, a Vermont non-profit corporation with a principal place of business in Montpelier, County of Washington, State of Vermont, is the record owner of a mobile home park known as the Windemere Mobile Home Park (the “Park”) located in the Town of Colchester, Vermont. 2. William F. & Lucy Ringwig (“Ringwigs”) are the record owners of a certain mobile home described as a 1999 Patriot Homes, Inc., 14’ x 60’, bearing serial No. PAT24255-IN (the “Mobile Home”), located on Lot #10, Windemere Mobile Home Park, 38 Mount Mansfield Avenue in Colchester, Vermont. 3. William Ringwig signed a new leased for the Lot in the Park from HFI on August 29, 2014. HFI is holding a security deposit of $250.00. 4. William & Lucy Ringwig are deceased. William’s date of death is April 14, 2018 and Lucy’s date of death is May 26, 2009. No probate estate for either Ringwig has been opened per the Chittenden County Probate Court. 5. The mobile home has been abandoned and is empty. The last known legal resident of the mobile home was William Ringwig. 6. The following security interests,

mortgages, liens and encumbrances appear of record with respect to the mobile home: a. Ringwigs are in arrears on obligations to pay property taxes to the Town of Colchester, Vermont in the aggregate amount of $740.89, plus interest and penalties. The delinquent property taxes are now a lien on the property. b. Ditech Financial LLC, 2100 E. Elliot Road, #T112, Tempe, AZ 85284. 7. Uriah Wallace, a duly licensed Vermont auctioneer, is a person disinterested in the mobile home and the mobile home park who is able to sell the mobile home at a public auction. 8. Mobile home storage fees continue to accrue at the rate of $433.00 per month. Rent, storage fees and late charges due the Park as of August, 2019 total $4,751.79. Court costs and attorney’s fees incurred by the Park in this action currently exceed $2,000.00. 9. The Park sent written notice by certified mail to the Town of Colchester on April 30, 2019 of its intent to commence this abandonment action. WHEREFORE, the Park Owner respectfully requests that the Honorable Court enter an order as follows: 1. Declare that the mobile home has been abandoned; 2. Approve the sale of the mobile home at a public auction to be held within 15 days of the date of judgment, pursuant to 10 V.S.A. § 6249(h); and 3. Grant judgment in favor of the Park Owner and against the mobile home for past due and unpaid rent and mobile home storage charges through the date of judgment, together with Park Owner’s court costs, publication and mailing costs, auctioneer’s costs, winterization costs, lot cleanup charges, attorney’s fees incurred in connection with this matter and any other costs incurred by Park Owner herein. DATED AT Burlington, Vermont this 23rd day of August, 2019. BY: Nadine L. Scibek Attorney for HFI ERN #2726 DATED at Newfane, Vermont this 23rd day of August, 2019.


AUTO •COMMERCIAL •REAL ESTATE

PUBLIC AUTO AUCTION

BY: Thomas Young, Duly Authorized Agent VERIFICATION STATE OF VERMONT WINDHAM COUNTY, SS. At Newfane, on this 23rd day of August, 2019, Thomas Young, duly authorized agent of The Housing Foundation, Inc., owner of the Windemere Mobile Home Park in Colchester, Vermont, being first duly sworn, made oath that he has read the foregoing Complaint, and that the facts represented therein are true to the best of his knowledge. Before me, Nadine L. Scibek - Notary Public Commission Expires: 1/31/21 Lic. #157.0007638 STATE OF VERMONT VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT CALEDONIA UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 133-5-18 CACV U.S. BANK TRUST N.A., AS TRUSTEE OF THE LODGE SERIES III TRUST v. PAUL H. WHITTALL AKA PAUL H. WHITTALL JR. OCCUPANTS OF: 231 Spring Street, St Johnsbury VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered December 14, 2018, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Paul H. Whittall Jr. to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Mortgage Financial Services, Inc., dated October 20, 2003 and recorded in Book 287 Page 494 of the land records of the Town of St Johnsbury, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments

of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Mortgage Financial Services, Inc. to Federal National Mortgage Association dated October 4, 2016 and recorded in Book 420 Page 162; (2) Assignment of Mortgage from Federal National Mortgage Association to MTGLQ Investors, L.P. dated October 9, 2017 and recorded in Book 427 Page 95; (3) Assignment of Mortgage from MTGLQ Investors, L.P. to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as Trustee of the Chalet Series III Trust dated March 12, 2019 and recorded in Book 444 Page 31; and (4) Assignment of Mortgage from U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as Trustee of the Chalet Series III Trust to U.S. Bank Trust National Association, as Trustee of the Lodge Series III Trust dated May 2, 2019 and recorded in Book 444 Page 288, all of the land records of the Town of St Johnsbury for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 231 Spring Street, St Johnsbury, Vermont on September 17, 2019 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: Being all and the same lands and premises as conveyed to Paul Whittall by Warranty Deed of Charles J. Gallagher and Anne D. Gallagher dated May 1, 2002 and recorded in Volume 268 at Page 252 of the Town of St. Johnsbury Land Records. Being a parcel of land, together with the apartment house, garage, right of way, and any other improvements thereon, located on the westerly side of Spring Street and on the southerly side of

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Winter Street, and now known and numbered as 231 Spring Street, and previously numberes as 28-30 Spring Street. Reference is hereby made to the aforementioned deeds and their records and references thereof. and to all prior deeds and their records all in further aid of this description. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : July 23, 2019 By: /S/ Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 STATE OF VERMONTVERMONT SUPERIOR COURTCHITTENDEN UNIT, CIVIL DIVISIONDOCKET NO: 1070-11-15 CNCV WILMINGTON SAVINGS FUND SOCIETY, FSB, D/B/A CHRISTIANA TRUST, NOT INDIVIDUALLY BUT AS TRUSTEE FOR PRETIUM MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST v.

sevendaysvt.com

JENNIFER J. HUTCHINS F/K/A JENNIFER J.

BARNIER AND SCOTT R. HUTCHINS OCCUPANTS OF: 4 Faith Street, Burlington VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered August 30, 2016, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Jennifer J. Hutchins and Scott R. Hutchins to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc., dated April 5, 2005 and recorded in Book 913 Page 219 of the land records of the City of Burlington, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Incorporated, doing business as Lendingtree Loans to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., dated November 26, 2014 and recorded in Book 1264 Page 319 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., to Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, D/B/A Christiana Trust, not individually but as Trustee for Pretium Mortgage Acquisition Trust, dated February 15, 2017 and recorded in Book 1333 Page 348, both of the land records of the City of Burlington for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 4 Faith Street, Burlington, Vermont on September 26, 2019 at 1:30 PM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

Saturday, September 7 @ 9AM 298 J Brown Dr., Williston, VT 800-474-6132 • 802-878-9200 ’17 Forest River Wildwood ’15 Chevy Trax ’15 Nissan NV200 ’14 Honda Odyssey ’14 Nissan Altima ’13 Ford Focus (2) ’13 Hyundai Sonata ’13 Mitsubishi Fuso ’13 Nissan Murano ’12 Chevy Equinox ’12 Chevy Impala ’12 Kia Forte Koup ’12 Mazda 2

LEGALS »

Online Bidding Available on Lane 3

Online Bidding Powered by Proxibid

See Auto List at THCAuction.com

TODAY NAME DATE(

SIZE O EMAIL

We are pleased to have the opportunity to bring to market the Bob Felch Hit and Miss Engine Collection. The culmination of nearly thirty years work.

SECTIO

Wednesday, September 18 @ 11AM 15 North Elm St., St. Albans, VT Open House: Thur., Sept. 5 from 2-4PM

Built in 1860, this home boasts 5 bedrooms and two full baths with 1,987±SF, basement, 1-car garage. Close to amenities.

Secured Creditors: SW Rentals

Online Only Ends: Wed., Sept. 18 @ 4PM 355 US Route 302, Barre, VT Preview: Wed., Sept. 11 from 11AM-1PM SW Rentals of Barre has closed its doors and we have been retained to sell a great lineup of commercial tools, rolling stock & party supplies.

3BR Ranch on 0.23± Acre Lot

Wednesday, September 25 @ 11AM 13 Meadows Drive, Barre Town, VT Open House: Tues., Sept. 10 from 3-5PM 3BR/1BA ranch home with 960±SF, on a slab, carport. Great starter or retirement home in a nice neighborhood.

Foreclosure: 3BR/1.5BA Home Thursday, September 26 @ 11AM 5714 Dorset St., Shelburne, VT

6.4± acres in Chittenden County. Minutes to the interstate or downtown Burlington. Desirable neighborhood. Debtor in possession. Please do not attempt to access.

Thomas Hirchak Company • THCAuction.com • 800-634-7653 Untitled-73 1

TO: Lo COMP PHON

Hit and Miss Engine Collection

Foreclosure: Renovation Project

Online Bidding Powered by Proxibid

ADVER Thom FROM Phone Adver

1/16= 1/8= 1

Simulcast: Tues., September 10 @ 10AM 550 Stewart Road, Berlin, VT

To wit: LOT OF LAND WITH ALL BUILDINGS THEREON SITUATED AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF THE INTERSECTION OF JAMES AVENUE AND FAITH AVENUE HAVING A FRONTAGE ON THE NORTH SIDE OF JAMES AVENUE OF 80 FEET, A FRONTAGE ON THE EASTERLY SIDE OF FAITH STREET OF 110 FEET, A NORTHERLY LINE OF 74.80 FEET AND AN EASTERLY LINE OF 114.81 FEET, IT BEING LOT NO. 4, BLOCK C AS SHOWN ON A PLAN ENTITLED

’12 Mazda 3 ’11 Chevy Impala ’11 GMC Sierra 1500 ’11 Honda Civic ’11 Hyundai Accent ’11 Jeep Compass ’11 Nissan Versa ’11 Subaru Outback ’10 Ford Escape ’10 Ford F-150 (3) ’10 GMC Sierra 1500 ’10 Mercedes Benz GLK350 AND MORE!

300 VEHICLES EXPECTED

EMAIL

SEVEN DAYS SEPTEMBER 4-11,8/30/19 2019 9:24 AM C-7


Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

The above lot is conveyed subject to the restrictions and obligations and with the benefits of the rights and privileges enumerated in a Declaration of Covenants, Restrictions, Rights and Benefits pertaining to Quechee Lakes Subdivision dated March 25, 1970 and recorded in Book 64, page 182 of the Hartford Land Records, as the same

TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall

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be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED : July 16, 2019 By: /S/ Rachel K Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 THE CONTENTS OF STORAGE UNIT 0103459 LOCATED AT 28 ADAMS DRIVE, WILLISTON VT, WILL BE SOLD ON OR ABOUT THE 19TH OF SEPTEMBER 2019 TO SATISFY THE DEBT OF ELLEN ROSE BOY. Any person claiming a right to the goods may pay the amount claimed due and reasonable expenses before the sale, in which case the sale may not occur. TOWN OF WESTFORD DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to 24 V.S.A. Chapter 117 and the Westford Land Use & Development Regulations, the Development Review Board will hold a public hearing at the Town Offices, VT Route 128, at 7:15 pm on Monday, September 23, 2019 in reference to the following: Site Plan Review for a parcel (14 acres) located on Cambridge Road & Old #11 Road in the Village, Form Based Code (T3) & Water Resource Overlay Zoning Districts. The applicant proposes site improvements to mitigate wetland impacts, increase public safety and expand interior storage. Owner: Town of Westford

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For information call the Town Offices at 8784587 Monday–Friday 8:30am–4:30pm. Matt Wamsganz, Chairman Dated September 4, 2019

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TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase

Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

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Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described.

NOTICE: THE LAW FIRM OF BENDETT & MCHUGH, PC IS A DEBT COLLECTOR AND IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. IF YOU HAVE PREVIOUSLY RECEIVED A DISCHARGE IN BANKRUPTCY WHICH DISCHARGED THIS DEBT, THIS CORRESPONDENCE IS NOT AND SHOULD NOT BE CONSTRUED TO BE AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT, BUT ONLY ENFORCEMENT OF A LIEN AGAINST PROPERTY

MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered January 3, 2019, in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Arthur Frogel and Joan Frogel to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., dated April 8, 2013 and recorded in Book 487 Page 469 of the land records of the Town of Hartford, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 530 Morgan Road, Quechee, Town of Hartford, Vermont on September 16, 2019 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage,

Being Lot 3031 as shown on a plan of lots entitled “Quechee Lakes Corporation Section III, Old Quechee Road, Quechee, Vermont, Scale; 1”= 100’, Date: September 18, 1970, Proj. No. 109970, K.A. LeClair Assoc., Inc., Civil Engineers, Hanover, NH”, a copy of which plan is on file on page 2 of Book 1 of the Land Plats in the office of the Hartford, Vermont Town Clerk, to which reference may be had for a further and more particular description of said lot.

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Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description.

DATED : August 26, 2019 By: /S/ Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032

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“HOWE FARM ESTATES, SECTION A, LOT LAYOUT OWNED BY ADRIEN B. THIBAULTCONTRACTOR” DATED MAY, 1968. THE ABOVE REFERENCED PLAN IS RECORDED IN VOLUME 188, PAGE 798 OF CITY OF BURLINGTON LAND RECORDS.

Meaning to convey hereby all and the same land and premises together with buildings and improvements thereon and appurtenances thereto belonging that was conveyed to Harry Hyra and Elizabeth B. Hyra by Warranty Deed of Steven A. Usle and Diane S. Usle dated November 10, 1983 and recorded in Book 101, Pages 348-349 of the Hartford Land Records, to which deed and record and the deeds and records therein referred to, reference may be had for further description.

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The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale.

may from time to time be amended.

To wit: Meaning and intending to mortgage and convey all and the same lands and premises as conveyed to Arthur Frogel and Joan Frogel by deed of Elizabeth B. Hyra dated 15 October 2002 and recorded at Book 337, Page 65 in the Hartford Land Records. The Property is described in that deed as follows:

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STATE OF VERMONT VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT WINDSOR UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 362-8-17 WRCV WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. v. ARTHUR FROGEL, JOAN FROGEL, QUECHEE LAKES LANDOWNERS’ ASSOCIATION, INC. AND VERMONT DEPARTMENT OF TAXES OCCUPANTS OF: 530 Morgan Road, Quechee, Town of Hartford VT

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price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale.


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ATTENTION RECRUITERS: POST YOUR JOBS AT: PRINT DEADLINE: FOR RATES & INFO:

JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POST-A-JOB NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

YOUR TRUSTED LOCAL SOURCE. JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

VALET

PRODUCTION MANAGER The Center for an Agricultural Economy in Hardwick is hiring a Farm to Institution Production Manager. This role is critical for the aggregation, processing and distribution of minimally processed local and regional products for institutional use. Operating within a shared-use kitchen poses logistical and food safety challenges that require consistent attention to detail. The position is full-time (up to 40 hours a week) and is primarily expected to be in the Vermont Food Venture Center facility during production days. The Farm to Institution Production Manager must be able to work long hours on their feet and consistently move 25-50 lbs at a time. This role holds responsibility for the satisfactory completion of production and logistical tasks with the Kitchen Team. For a job description and how to apply, visit: hardwickagriculture.org.

ASSET MANAGEMENT ADMINISTRATOR

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Senior Care Hiring Event! Meet our team AND enjoy a hot dog and beverage! Thursday, Sept. 12, 4-6:30 pm 3038 Shelburne Road Shelburne, VT • $12 to $16.50 per hour • FLEXIBLE HOURS • 12 hours/week minimum • Part and Full Time positions No previous experience necessary! Excellent positions for students, retirees, veterans. Apply: homeinstead.com/483

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The Asset Management Administrator is responsible for supporting the City’s Asset Management program in its proactive oversight of Burlington’s infrastructure. In coordinating the program, this position will establish systems, train staff, and collaborate with asset managers in defining workflows, managing data, conducting condition and risk assessments, setting levels of service, prioritizing financial investments and reporting on performance. By building a robust asset management culture within the City, this position will lower the total cost of ownership for the City’s infrastructure, enhance collaboration among departments and asset managers, and strengthen policies and procedures relating to asset stewardship. Requirements include a Bachelor’s Degree in engineering, geography, environmental science or a closely related field and two (2) years of asset management program experience. Position is considered Limited Service Full Time. To apply, please see our website: governmentjobs.com/careers/burlingtonvt

AUTO MECHANIC

Hart & Mead Rte 116 Hinesburg Individual will be responsible for repairing and servicing vehicles brought into the shop for basic maintenance, minor repairs as well as full auto service. Send resumes to: hartmeadinc@gmavt.net.

Drivers wanted for hospital in Burlington, VT. Part time or full time. Mornings, afternoons, or evenings. No weekends. Must have valid driver’s license w/ good driving record and 1t-Hart&Mead082819.indd enjoy helping people. $12.50/hour to start, plus performance bonuses and some vacation/sick leave. Apply at: manager@ champlainparking.com.

9/2/192v-ChamplainParkingManagement082819.indd 1:25 PM 8/26/19 1

Executive Director

Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro seeks an Executive Director to lead our visual and performing arts center in operational, financial and administrative functions. The ideal candidate will possess experience in artistic and strategic programming, audience development and fundraising, and managing a non-profit organization. For more information and a complete job description visit

https://highlandartsvt.org/careers

Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Highland Center for the Arts is an Equal Opportunity Employer

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8/27/19 10:15 AM

LOGISTICS COORDINATOR Are you a detail person who loves to 5:44 PM organize things and handle logistics? Local Motion, Burlington’s non-profit for walking and biking, is seeking a Logistics Coordinator to coordinate multiple facets of its outreach programs, including supplies and equipment inventory and delivery logistics. Average 20 hours/week. Full job description and how to apply at localmotion. org/join_our_team.

TRAILSIDE CENTER WEEKEND OPENINGS Our Trailside Center Bike Rentals is still open and business is good! We are looking for staff for weekends through mid-October. To apply, send resume to jobs@localmotion.org.

WOMEN, MINORITIES AND PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ARE HIGHLY ENCOURAGED TO APPLY. EOE.

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8/26/19 11:39 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.04.19-09.11.19

PERSONAL ASSISTANT AND/OR BUILDING MANAGER For the owner of a downtown Burlington, VT building near Maple and Saint Paul Street. Needed ASAP. Free Rent and possible additional salary depending on “para legal” skills (preferred but not required).

Graphic Designer

Skills required: Proficient computer and clerical skills required; Business, Public Administration (city planning), pre-law or construction law preferred but not necessary. Power Point preferred but not required.

Highland Center for the Arts in Greensboro seeks a part-time Graphic Designer to create and oversee all print, online and graphic collateral for consistency in brand, style and tone, in collaboration with colleagues. The Graphic Designer may work off-site, but attendance in person at regular meetings is required.

Compensation: Free rent: either a one bedroom basement or a room with others in a quiet, respectful, adult living setting. Additional salary depending on experience and term commitment.

https://highlandartsvt.org/careers

Applications will be accepted until position is filled.

Additional duties and possibilities: Manage one Airbnb unit, work remotely and with part time flexible hours. Assist with building management and some bookkeeping functions. Send Resume and cover letter to: Dennis Ailor, ailorinc@msn.com 221 Saint Paul Street Burlington, VT 05405

Highland Center for the Arts is an Equal Opportunity Employer

9/2/19 5v-Northline082819.indd 12:28 PM 1

Crisis & Outpatient Services Program Manager

8/26/19

Stop by our store on Route 7 for an application or call 802-985-2000 for more information.

Ideal candidates will have: • A Master’s degree and VT State Clinical License • Experience with both crisis and outpatient team-based care settings • Clinical and administrative supervision experience • Background in team and program development • Experience with evidence-based practices, electronic health record utilization, and provision of services for individuals involved with the legal system a plus! NCSS views its employees as our greatest asset, and invests in them accordingly. As one of the largest employers in Franklin and Grand Isle Counties, we offer you the opportunity to make a difference in people’s lives. If you want to work for an organization with high expectations that nurtures growth and development, and provide opportunities to fuel your passion, we invite you to apply now at ncssinc.org/careers or send your cover letter and resume to careers@ncssinc.org.

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FULL-TIME

4/6/18 12:21 PM

LANDSCAPING TREE WORKER EQUIPMENT OPERATOR Year-round position with benefits. Job rate: 5:14 PM $16-$19/hr DOE. Must be at least 18. A valid Vermont driver’s license is required. Contact: bmercure@ meachcovefarms.org for full job description and application.

Radio North Group is Looking...

Our Behavioral Health Division is seeking a Leader to oversee our Crisis and Outpatient Teams that consist of a wide range of roles and providers engaged in challenging and meaningful work. In addition to supporting the teams with daily operations, the Program Manager also provides support to agency and divisional teams while responding to unmet community needs.

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We are looking for morning bakers in our busy Shelburne store. Some basic baking experience needed. Some weekend availability.

Shelburne

io Technician d a R e il b o M & Sales Person

NCSS provides a comprehensive benefits package and is a short 25 minute commute from Burlington, VT.

PART-TIME, PERMANENT

The building: We are respectful working class adults (or mature students) in a completely remodeled, large, stylish home directly in downtown Burlington (Saint Paul Street just south of Maple). Off street parking, laundry on site, sunny back patio and garden, cable TV (40” flat screen), WIFI, 2v-Harringtons041118.indd completely furnished.

For more information and a complete job description visit

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Baker

If you have interest or experience in Motorola Communications products and systems, look to Radio North. We see opportunity ahead!

SALES PERSON who has knowledge of the sales process,2v-MeachCoveFarms073119.indd ASSISTANT 1 7/26/19 can use lead generation software, willing to make cold PROPERTY calls and appointments with leaders in the education, MANAGER healthcare, manufacturing, security and financial Busy Real Estate Office marketplace. Some sales experience will be an asset. MOBILE RADIO TECHNICIAN with some automotive electronics experiences will be helpful. Knowledge of in-building electronics systems is an asset. Job entails installation of two-way radio, siren and lighting systems in Police, Fire and Rescue as well as commercial vehicles and office electronics. BENEFITS included competitive salary that rewards performance and dedication along with a comprehensive benefit package. Please send resume with salary requirements to

John.P@RadioNorthGroup.com.

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is currently seeking a motivated individual to join our team. We are looking for someone with office and customer service experience or a college degree. The ideal candidate will be able to work flexible hours and have strong computer skills. Experience with Quickbooks is a plus! This is a full-time position in a fast-paced environment. Please send us a resume outlining your interest to vtpma@aol.com.

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FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

RESERVATIONS MANAGER

We have an amazing opportunity for an experienced Reservations Manager interested in leading and supporting a team of professional Tour Sales Consultants selling worldwide, multi-brand, active travel vacations. If you’re passionate, goal oriented, want to make a difference in the lives of others and are looking for balance in your quality of life – check us out!

Visit our career pages at www.vbt.com or countrywalkers.com for more details and to apply.

MAIN OFFICE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Champlain Broadband (Burlington Telecom) is looking for an energetic person who is willing to work hard and grow with our company. The Customer Sales and Service Representative will be responsible for the customer service experience related to services for video, high speed internet and telephone for residential and commercial customers. For more information concerning this position or to apply, please visit schurz.com/careers.

9/2/192v-SchurtzCommunications090419.indd 1:58 PM 1

PROFESSIONAL OFFICE CLEANER

The Vermont Economic Development Authority has an immediate opening for a motivated and upbeat individual to fill the position of Main Office Administrative Assistant. This person should be prompt, professional and possess a strong working knowledge of office procedures and a firm grasp of Microsoft products. A minimum of 7 years’ experience in a related field is required. VEDA offers a competitive salary and benefits package and is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Interested and qualified individuals should submit a resume with references to: Vermont Economic Development Authority Attn: Office Manager 58 East State Street, Suite 5 Montpelier, VT 05602-3044 You may email your resume to cbrown@veda.org.

Looking for a cleaner with an eye for detail.10-15 hours/week, Mon-Fri, 6-9pm. Chittenden & Franklin county. $18 hour. Physically demanding, & fast paced. Must be reliable, have own transportation and pass background check. Encourage veterans, retirees, & college students. Perfect part time job. Contact us today!

VERMONT CENTER FOR CRIME VICTIM SERVICES 8/23/192v-Stonewall-KnoxCompany082819.indd 5:33 PM

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Seeking a champion for victims to join our mission-driven team collecting restitution from criminal offenders. Work includes: contacting and negotiating with criminal offenders via phone and letter to collect outstanding payments and maximize the dollars collected for victims; analyzing financial and legal information to determine an offender’s ability to pay; researching and investigating each offender to find assets. The right candidate should be a team player, detail-oriented, an excellent communicator, a skilled negotiator, self-directed, persistent and goal-oriented. Associates Degree or 2 years work experience in a relevant field. Energetic work environment, great co-workers and excellent benefits. Salary range $41,000-$60,000/year. Full time position. E.O.E. Email your COVER LETTER and RESUME no later than Monday, September 16th to: hiring@ccvs.vermont.gov.

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New, local, scamfree jobs posted every day!

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

The Vermont School Boards Association (“VSBA”), a non-profit membership organization serving school board members throughout Vermont, is seeking an Executive Director to effectively lead the organization through exciting and challenging times ahead. For information on how to apply please see vtvsba.org/hiring or send an email to klamb@vtvsba.org.

Wendy's - Essex Junction

ALL POSITIONS Wendy's in Essex Junction, VT is now hiring FT/PT 16 years and older. Competitive wages, 401k, health insurance available and flexible scheduling. Apply online now at: nowhiring.com/wiley. Any questions: 802-872-9099

8/26/192v-Wendy's082819.indd 5:40 PM 1

PUBLIC POLICY MANAGER VBSR, a business association with 700 members who believe business has the power for good, is hiring a Public Policy Manager to help give our members a voice on sustainable economic development and social equity issues. More at vbsr.org.

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09.04.19-09.11.19

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stonewallknoxvt@gmail.com

RESTITUTION UNIT COLLECTION CASE MANAGER

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Customer Sales & Service Representative

Join VBT and Country Walkers, an award-winning, Vermont-based active travel company and be part of our high performing, international team.

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NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

8/26/19 3:13 PM

DENTAL HYGIENIST Busy dental office in Randolph, VT seeking a part-time dental hygienist. We are a fast paced, energetic office looking to add an outgoing hygienist to our team. The position may work into a full-time opportunity.

Please send resume to dentist@cwilsondds.com.

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jobs.sevendaysvt.com

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.04.19-09.11.19

DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

UVM Dining, as managed by Sodexo is a proud dining partner of the University of Vermont. Nestled in-between Lake Champlain and the Green Mountains, our talented culinary team is dedicated to serving up fresh ingredients and healthy options to a diverse campus community. With a strong commitment to sustainability and social responsibility, we source from an ever growing network of local farms.

WE OFFER:

Porter Medical Center is seeking its first full-time Development Director to build upon current scheduling success, establish new programs, and introduce UVM Dining, as managed• byFlexible Sodexo is a proud dining partner of the of Vermont. Nestled in-between Lake Champlain and the Green Moun fresh endeavors! •isShift meals provided our talented culinary team dedicated to serving up fresh ingredient healthy options to a diverse campus community. With a strong comm At least five years of development experience, to sustainability and social source from an ever grow • responsibility, Employee we Assistance network of local farms. strong relationship-building skills and comfort Programs working independently required. Join our team; discover our unique dining spaces and experience the Vermont all the while enjoying some awesome benefits! • Career development To apply, visit UVMHealth.org/PMC and • click on Competitive salary opportunities “Careers” or email a cover letter and résumé to accrued paid time off • Generous Hollie Bachilas at hbachilas@portermedical.org. Free Bus Pass • 401(K) - 1% automatic • enrollment with a 6% max match

Looking to work in a fast-paced work environment with dependable pay, great benefits, weekends off and plenty of growth potential? Join us on…

Join our team; discover our unique dining spaces and experience the taste of Vermont all the while enjoying some awesome benefits! • Competitive salary

• Generous accrued paid time off

• 401(K) - 1% automatic enrollment with a 6% max match • Free meal during your shift!

• Home for the holidays! (except for catering)

Tuesday, September 10th 3:30 pm to 5:30 pm Manufacturing Solutions Inc. 153 Stafford Avenue Morrisville, VT 05661 msivt.com

• Career growth opportunities including, culinary training, mentoring and job shadowing • Company discounts: Theme Parks | Cellphones | Tuition Reimbursement Clothing/Accessories | Computers | Home Goods Financial Establishment | Vehicle Rental and Purchase Health & Wellness | Sporting Events etc.

• Employee Resource Groups & Company wide networking events • Employee Assistance Programs through LifeWorks • Work/Life balance

• Employee recognition programs

Apply today! Sodexo.Balancetrak.com (search Vermont)

• Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance, Profit Sharing, 401k Plan, Paid Holidays/Vacation Time and much more! • Access to on-site gym for employees and their families.

CURRENT OPEN POSITIONS Assemblers Warehouse Manager Manufacturing Department Manager Dump Truck Driver/Laborer

Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employer

• Free meal during your shift!

• Tuition reimbursement, etc. Career growth opportunities including, culinary training, mentoring

• Home for the holidays! (except for catering)

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9/2/19 2:12 PM shadowing

• Shift differential

• Company discounts: Theme Parks | Cellphones Tuition Reimbursement pay |for working Clothing/Accessories | Computers | Home Goods weekends Financial Establishment | Vehicle Rental and Purchase Health & Wellness | Sporting Events etc.

Reach out to schedule an interview:

NICOLE.CANNON2@SODEXO.COM Hiring for Multiple Positions • Employee Assistance Programs through LifeWorks

• Employee Resource Groups & Company wide networking events

Hot dogs and beverages available to all that inquire!

SEE YOU THERE!

SHARED LIVING PROVIDER

WE’RE HIRING We offer competitive salary & awesome benefits!

Culinary Team Members, Lead a fundraising program Dishwashers and offer competitive & awesome be for UVM Health Network/Porter Medical We Center! Catering salary Professionals

HOT DIGGITY DOG! WE’RE HAVING A JOB FAIR!

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WE’RE HIRING!

8/26/19 5:28 PM

• Work/Life balance SODEXO IS AN EOE/AA/ • Laborer M/F/D/V EMPLOYER • Employee recognition programs • Home Services Assistant- this division primarily provides maintenance services to clients, along with oversight of small projects. Seeking entry level assistant3v-UVMSodexo010919.indd 1 1/4/19 11:12 AM Apply today! Sodexo.Balancetrak.com (search Vermont) OPEN POSITIONS! willing to develop broad range of skill sets. Sodexo is an EEO/AA/Minority/Female/Disability/Veteran employe Technical and Project Manager, • Experienced Carpenter

Aged Cheese Supervisor, Quality Assurance Technician and Industrial Technician for all shifts. At Vermont Creamery, our employees are our greatest Upper Valley Services in Moretown is seeking an experienced resource. We are a community Shared Living Provider. that empowers our team to A 58-year-old gentleman with developmental disabilities is engage and live our mission every day. We know that the in need of a new home, with secure experienced providers. A whole is greater than the couple or two individuals preferred. The individual needs intense4t-RedHouseBuilding082119.indd 1 8/19/19 1:06 PM sum of its parts, and here, the 24-hour supervision in the home and out in the community. whole is powered by a spirit of He enjoys warm weather, car rides, his recliner and blanket, collaboration and transparency. music, french fries, and sweets. He is blind and non-verbal and We know benefits matter; that’s Sheehey, Furlong & Behm P.C., a Burlington, VT law firm, why we offer a competitive has some physical limitations as well. He needs assistance in is seeking to hire a registered nurse to fill a nurse paralegal package. Our benefits program all areas of personal care and is often incontinent. It is essential includes medical, vision and position. Qualified applicants should possess a nursing that the physical space is designed to maximize his safety, as he dental insurance, retirement degree, clinical nursing experience including reviewing likes to maneuver around on his own. A minimalist setting also plans and a total well-being and interpreting medical records, good writing and verbal approach. Perks to keep you required to ensure health and hygiene. This gentleman needs communication skills, and a willingness to learn. healthy and happy include a to be supported in a home without children or animals, due to wellness program, time off, and The successful candidate will primarily be responsible for challenging behaviors. He is typically not aggressive toward tuition assistance. A certified B assisting attorneys in reviewing and summarizing medical providers but may self-abuse. Corp since 2014, we’re using our documents, conducting medical research, identifying business as a force for good. Upper Valley Services will help by providing a high level of and evaluating expert witnesses, assisting in evaluating To apply, please call 802-479-9371 case management support, in-home staffed support, including and organizing medical evidence, and similar tasks. This or apply online at: awake overnight hours, in-home day support and a respite vermontcreamery.com/our-team position may also perform some paralegal work in non-

Join one of Vermont’s leading construction companies. Exciting projects, Employee-Owned, Good people and excellent benefits. Most work is within a 1.5 hour radius of Burlington. Provide resume with references to info@redhousebuilding.com.

NURSE PARALEGAL

budget. Generous tax-free Shared Living Provider stipend for the right committed person. Also available are day time support, in-home respite, and awake overnight hours. Send resumes to: sjacques@uvs-vt.org

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medical cases as needed. Forward cover letter and resume by email to: hiring@sheeheyvt.com, and include “Paralegal Nurse” in the subject line.

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FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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HEMP FARM HARVEST HELP Seasonal Hemp Harvest Crew Wanted - Full and Part time Positions Available September-December. The farm is a 7 day work week operation. We are seeking team players to join our farm crew in Lamoille County! If you are a self starter who loves working outdoors email us at greentopfarmllc@gmail.com or call (802) 888-1609. 2h-GreenTopFarm082819.indd 1

8/27/19 11:27 AM

BRAND NEW KITCHEN OPENING SOON

Do you work in food services and want to join an amazing staff, have great hours, and work with the best residents? Our dining team is expanding!

Floor Manager- Full Time This position oversees the daily operations of food service delivery in each dining room. The floor manager is responsible for managing the operational flow of the dining room for the purpose of creating a high quality dining experience for our residents. Duties include coordinating dining room set up and closing functions, greeting and seating dining guests, and overseeing service. Minimum of two years’ experience as a supervisor specializing in food delivery in the health care or hospitality industry highly preferred.

Wait Staff- Full and Part Time This is a perfect opportunity for individuals with the time and drive to begin their working experience, or for professionals who wish to supplement their current career endeavors. Experience as a server is preferred but not required. We will train applicants who demonstrate strong customer service skills and a desire to work with an active population of seniors.

New, local, scam-free jobs posted every day!

Cook- Full Time Wake Robin provides a fine dining experience with a focus on farm to plate freshness, and a work environment that is hard to find in the restaurant industry. • We work from scratch, not from a box • 40% of our produce is local/organic • Innovative on-site protein butchering and smoking • Manageable schedule ending in early evening • Superb kitchen facilities with excellent benefits Our cook will have experience producing high quality soups, sauces and entrees from scratch, demonstrate experience in all aspects of cooking from grilling to sautéing, and pay strong attention to the quality of food consistency and delivery.

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Wake Robin offers an excellent compensation and benefits package and an opportunity to build strong relationships with staff and residents in a dynamic community setting. If you have high standards of service and are interested in joining our team; please send resume to HR@wakerobin.com or visit our website, wakerobin.com, to complete an application. Wake Robin is an EOE. 7/30/19 1:05 PM 8t-WakeRobin090419.indd 1

9/3/19 3:47 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.04.19-09.11.19

INJECTION MOLDING

CAREER FAIR

PATIENT SERVICE SPECIALIST This position delivers high quality customer service to our patients in clinical settings by checking patients in, scheduling and more. Positions available in Burlington, South Burlington and Colchester.

SWANTON MUNICIPAL COMPLEX 120 FIRST ST, SWANTON, VT 05488

SEPT. 12, 2019 2:00-6:00 PM

LEARN MORE & APPLY: uvmmed.hn/sevendays

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eCommerce Operations Turtle

ASSISTANT ASSESSOR

Turtle Fur is seeking an eCommerce Operations Turtle to be the owner of our direct-toconsumer sales channels, ensuring accurate product data, imagery, and listings across our website and 3rd party marketplace channels. Success in this role is measured by growing sales across all sales channels. The ideal candidate will align with the eCommerce department’s guiding values of a growth mindset, communication as a foundation, and responsibility, bringing an entrepreneurial passion for providing top-tier customer experiences through data driven decision making, an obsessive attention to detail, and skill in design thinking and problem solving. To succeed in this role, you will:

The Town of Shelburne is seeking a part-time Assistant Assessor (20-25 hours/week) to work on the forthcoming reappraisal due to start this year and be completed for the 2023 Grand List. This is a temporary position, anticipated to start 10/1/19 and end with the conclusion of the reappraisal in 2023, with the potential for future employment.

• accurately represent products in back-end systems and on customer-facing platforms • monitor and optimize listings on 3rd Party Marketplaces (Amazon, eBay, Walmart) • manage Amazon Sponsored Product Ads for profitable sales growth • KPI reporting for all sales channels • lead a/b testing of listing content, imagery, formatting, and ads • work alongside the Customer Acquisition Turtle to deliver profitable campaigns

The successful candidate will have an Associate’s degree (Bachelor’s degree or higher preferred), the ability to work with the public, understanding of building improvements, and demonstrated relevant work experience in data collection & database maintenance. They must also have a willingness to enroll in specialized coursework related to real estate property valuation, and have knowledge of or willingness and ability to become familiar with relevant software applications. The position involves data collection with site visits to residential and commercial properties in Shelburne. Salary and possible benefits commensurate with experience. A complete job description is available at shelburnevt.org/237/Human-Resources.

Minimum Qualifications • detail oriented and obsessively thorough • highly skilled with Excel and data visualization • knowledgeable of ChannelAdvisor, Amazon, eBay, and Walmart • familiar with Shopify (or other eCommerce Platforms), Google Analytics, and Data Studio • knowledgeable of paid search, search engine optimization, conversion rate optimization, a/b testing, and strategies and techniques • knowledge of NetSuite a plus • eager to help build a company that serves as a role model for our industry peers • 2-5 years of experience in eCommerce or Digital Marketing, preferably in a brand setting • Bachelor’s degree in business, marketing, communications, or similar area of study This full-time role reports directly to the Director of eCommerce and is located at the Turtle Fur headquarters. Many benefits including health/dental insurance, paid time off, 401k with match, disability and life insurance, education reimbursement, dog friendly office, and company cornhole tournaments included. To apply please submit resume and cover letter to bsnow@turtlefur.com.

Please submit a letter of interest and resume to: BettyJean Bogue, Town of Shelburne, P.O. Box 88 Shelburne, VT 05482 or bbogue@shelburnevt.org.

Position open until filled. The Town of Shelburne is an E.O.E.

ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT: SEVENDAYSVT.COM/POSTMYJOB

About Turtle Fur Located just North of Stowe, in the shadows of Vermont’s highest peak, Mount Mansfield, we know tough weather. By creating comfortable, quality products, we help you stay outside longer to enjoy the things you love to do. After giving our brand a facelift in 2018, Turtle Fur is focusing on boosting our internal operations and strengthening our company’s backbone to set us up for 37 more years of leading the snow sports and outdoor industry in quality headwear and accessories.

PRINT DEADLINE: NOON ON MONDAYS (INCLUDING HOLIDAYS) FOR RATES & INFO: MICHELLE BROWN, 802-865-1020 X21, MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Our mission is to create the best headwear and outdoor gear you can buy. We pride ourselves on holding true to our roots of quality, comfort, creativity, and community ...all while having fun.

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MATTHEW THORSEN

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

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Hunger Mountain Co-op is committed to doing business locally whenever possible. We are Seven Days’ largest circulation point in central Vermont. To meet the demand, hundreds of papers are delivered on Wednesday and again on Friday. Seven Days is reaching the audience we want to reach and supports our community. Many people who are not actively looking for jobs still look at the employment section in print and online and end up telling a friend or applying themselves. We believe Seven Days helps us connect with the candidates that we are trying to find.

JAY W. WISNER HR Manager Hunger Mountain Co-op

…it works.

CALL MICHELLE: 865-1020, EXT. 21 OR VISIT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM 15-TESTI-hungermtn(employmenFP).indd 1

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ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.04.19-09.11.19

PART-TIME PUB SERVER

PROPERTY INSPECTOR CENTRAL VERMONT

RECEIVE A $500 SIGN-ON BONUS!

New England Municipal Consultants is looking for property inspectors. NEMC is a local government service company. This is a career opportunity in the Central Vermont region. The applicant should have strong customer service skills along with the ability to learn multiple software systems. You will be part of a growing, successful company with an ability to grow your skills and benefits.

Perrigo Nutritionals, in Georgia, VT, currently has an excellent job opportunity for Packaging Operators with a $500 sign-on bonus. For full job descriptions, to view other opportunities, and to apply, please visit our website at www.perrigocareers.com.

➢ Excellent Wages ➢ Great benefits at reduced rates ➢ Quarterly and Annual Bonus ➢ Profit sharing ➢ 401 (k) with Employer Match

For the right individual salary starts in the mid-40's with mileage allowance and4t-Perriogo090419.indd full benefits available. This is a 40 hour/week position with some time flexibility. Come be a part of a growing Vermont company.

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Please send resume to: NEMC, PO Box 372, Lyndon Center, VT 05850.

DATA ANALYST This position conducts data collection, analysis and evaluation, then provides recommendations and course of action in service delivery and planning. The Data Analyst also serves as an administrator for the organization’s direct service database. Experience with database systems including data collection, data analysis and reporting preferred; experience with federal grant requirements a plus. 10-15 hours per week. See full job description at stepsVT.org/jobs. EOE. People of color, persons with disabilities, LGBTQ individuals and those who have experienced domestic violence are encouraged to apply.

WHERE YOU AND 9/2/19 YOUR WORK MATTER...

2:21 PM

When you work for the State of Vermont, you and your work matter. A career with the State puts you on a rich and rewarding professional path. You’ll find jobs in dozens of fields – not to mention an outstanding total compensation package.

D I R E C T O R - P O L I C Y, E D U C A T I O N & O U T R E A C H – MONTPELIER

The Human Rights Commission (HRC) is seeking a creative, dynamic, and highly skilled team player for the Director of Policy, Education & Outreach position. You’ll support the HRC’s mission to promote full civil and human rights in VT via campaign planning and execution, legislative advocacy, community organizing, and public education, and will assist the Executive Director with shaping and advancing the HRC’s policy agenda. How to Apply: Visit hrc.vermont.gov for full job description and application instructions. For more information Email: human.rights@vermont.gov. Application Deadline: September 15, 2019.

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STEPS TO END DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IS SEEKING:

Are you interested in the growing craft beer scene? Do you know someone looking for an exciting job opportunity? The Otter Creek Brewery’s Pub Space in Middlebury, VT, is looking for an experienced server to join it’s committed crew. This parttime brand ambassador will be available days, nights, weekends and holidays as needed to assist with hosting, serving, busing and more day-to-day requirements related to the Otter Creek pub and restaurant. The ideal candidate will be a motivated self-starter with at least two years of relevant restaurant or service experience. For more information about the position and how to apply: bit.ly/MiddleburyServer

DIGITAL CLIENT ADVISOR JOBS EARN WHILE YOU LEARN

We are looking to Vermont’s raw talent to grow our company. Train for just 8 weeks and enter a full-time career* APPRENTICESHIP PROGRAM FEATURES INCLUDE • $4,800 grant provided during training • Potential to earn $50,000 or more in your first year

Do you have experience in multiple trades? We are in search of an individual who can work independently as well as with others. Work includes installation, repair, and maintenance of buildings, systems, equipment, and machinery. Computer proficiency and a valid driver’s license is a must. Background check is required. Benefits include Health Insurance, Dental Plan, Flexible Spending, Life Insurance, Paid Time Off. For more information, contact Joshua Reese at Joshua.reese@vermont. gov. Department: Buildings & General Services. Status: Full Time. Job ID #2169. Application Deadline: Open until filled.

ADMIN SERVICES COORDIN ATOR III – MONTPELIER

• Full benefits: health, dental, paid vacation, 401k and more

The Office of Public Guardian in the Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living seeks a self-motivated individual to provide administrative and technical support to the Director and a staff of 27 who are located statewide. Extensive knowledge of Microsoft office products is required. You will work with Family and Probate Courts, provide back-up for the State’s Rep Payee Program and work with the DDSD Ethic’s Committee. For more information, contact Jackie Rogers at jackie.rogers@vermont.gov or 802.828.3623. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Status: Full Time. Job ID # 2434. Application Deadline: September 11, 2019.

• Variety of work schedules • Fun & engaging work, using cutting edge technology • Ideal sales environment: NO cold calling or travel! • Generous base salary plus uncapped commission • Obtain state licensure during training

VOCREHAB COUNSELOR I & II - BRATTLEBORO

* Full-time employment guaranteed upon successful completion of the 8-week program.

LEARN MORE—APPLY ONLINE!

VTHITEC.ORG

The ITAR Program is funded in part by a grant from the Vermont and U.S. Departments of Labor. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, disability, genetics, political affiliation or belief.

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BGS MAINTENANCE MECHANIC – BURLINGTON

Voc Rehab is recruiting for a rehabilitation/career counselor with the ability to support consumers with physical, psychological or cognitive disabilities in their efforts to gain employment. Job duties include assessment, guidance and counseling, working with employment staff to secure employment and work experiences, case management, documentation, and collaboration with many community providers. Please Note: This position is being recruited at multiple levels. If you would like to be considered for more than one level, you MUST apply to the specific Job Requisition. For more information, contact Nancy Dwyer at 802-257-0579 or nancy.dwyer@vermont.gov. Department: Disabilities Aging and Independent Living. Status: Full Time. Job ID #1984 OR #2073. Application Deadline: September 08, 2019.

Learn more at :

careers.vermont.gov

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The State of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity Employer

9/2/19 10:53 AM


FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @SEVENDAYSJOBS, SUBSCRIBE TO RSS, OR BROWSE POSTS ON YOUR PHONE AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY! JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

C-17 09.04.19-09.11.19

REGIONAL COORDINATOR FOR CHILD ADVOCATES

JOB FAIR Are you looking for a company who offers generous benefits, competitive pay and career development within a professional work environment? If so, we have many exciting opportunities within our branches and will be holding a job fair where you can meet with a member from our team for immediate consideration!

The Vermont Judiciary is recruiting for three full-time permanent Regional Coordinators to recruit, train and manage Guardian ad Litem (GAL) volunteers. A Guardian ad Litem (GAL) is a court appointed volunteer who advocates for the best interests of children involved in family court proceedings. Positions located in Rutland, St. Albans, or Barre/Montpelier. These position will require coordinating GALs across multiple counties in their specified geographic region.

METAL WORKER & MAKER

Bachelor’s degree & four years at or above a professional level in social work, psychology, child development, mediation, family counseling, law or related judicial/legal setting. Substitutions for college allowed. Starting Salary is $23.35 per hour. Positions come with excellent benefits, health care, vacation, holiday and sick leave. Open until filled.

DATE: September 12 TIME: 4:00 PM - 6:00PM PLACE: 88 Technology Park Way South Burlington

Conant Metal & Light is looking for a metalworker & maker to join our production team.

You must be a creative problem-solver, good with your hands and capable of mastering a broad array of processes, including welding, Please visit our career page on our website for more detail regarding Go to vermontjudiciary.org/employment-opportunities machining, cold-working of retail openings. staff-openings for a detailed job description and application. (Job glass, assembly of electrical Codes #19032, 19033, 19034) circuits, inspection and www.nefcu.com. (EOE/AA) quality control, and packaging of finished product. It is 4t-NEFCU041818.indd Untitled-5 1 1 4/13/184t-OfficeCourtAdministrator082819.indd 9/2/19 10:57 1:07 AM PM 1 8/26/19 5:56 PM critical that you maintain a consistently high level of quality, productivity, and excellent attention to detail throughout a diverse set of STOWE FREE LIBRARY - STOWE, VERMONT tasks. Send a resume detailing your interest, experience The Stowe Free Library is seeking a and skills to jolene@ Want to join our small and mighty team? technically savvy, customer service conantmetalandlight.com and detail oriented individual to fill

PROGRAM AND SYSTEMS

LIBRARIAN

the position of Program and Systems Librarian to assist in fulfilling its mission: “To Welcome, To Inspire, To Enrich the Mind.” Stowe’s cherished municipal library is located within the historic Helen Day Memorial Building in the village of Stowe, a premier four-season resort community with a population of 4,500. The library houses a collection of 35,000 volumes and receives 100,000 annual visits. A Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent combination of education and experience is required, and an MLS from an ALA accredited school or a Vermont Department of Libraries Certification is preferred. A working knowledge and experience with computers, including Integrated Library Systems (ILS), the Inter-Library Loan system in Vermont, content and web-based applications, current technologies, public access networks, and adult programming is desired. Good verbal and written communication, customer service, organizational, and supervisory skills are required. Candidates must be able to perform detailed work, and lift and shelve books. This is currently a full-time position, includes evenings and Saturday hours, with excellent benefits and a starting hourly pay range of $20.23 - $21.99, contingent upon qualifications and experience. This is a position with much growth potential. A job description and employment application can be obtained on the Town of Stowe website: townofstowevt.org. Send employment application, letter of interest and resume to:

Town of Stowe, Attn: Recruiter, PO Box 730, Stowe, VT 05672 or email recruit@stowevt.gov. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

Customer Service & Office Administrator

Customer Service Operations Administrator half-time 20 hours per week and a flexible schedule. Never be bored!

The position requires “wearing several hats,” including customer service, order processing, communications, and inventory management. What’s VASA? We design and make premium quality fitness machines that are used by athletes and coaches worldwide. Why Vasa? • We’re self-reliant, sporty New Englanders who value a healthy lifestyle and a relaxed, productive working vibe. • We make innovative fitness products that help our customers get results. HOW TO APPLY: Send an email describing why you would be ideal for the job. Include your résumé, 3 professional references, availability and your salary requirements. Email to Rob Sleamaker, CEO/President – Email: robert@vasatrainer.com. To learn more about this position go to: vasatrainer.com/jobs.

EOE

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8/11/19 3:24 PM

PAY IT FORWARD Thisschool schoolyear, year, This PAY IT becomethe theteacher teacher become FORWARD whoinspired inspiredyou. you. who Transition to teaching in This year, only 8 school months with our Transition to teaching in fast-track to a teacher’s become the teacher only 8 months with our license designed for new who inspired you. fast-track to aprofessionals teacher’s & mid-career

license designed for new Transition teaching in wanting toto teach grades &only mid-career professionals 8 months with our five through twelve. fast-track a teacher’s wanting toto teach grades Information Session: license designed for fiTuesday, ve through twelve. September 17 new I 6-7pm

& mid-career professionals Champlain College Miller Center 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington wanting to teach grades Information Session: five through twelve. Tuesday, September 17 I 6-7pm REGISTER

Information Session: Champlain College tapvt.org Tuesday, September 17 I 6-7pm 802.651.5844 Miller Center Champlain College Center 175 Lakeside Ave., Miller Burlington 175 Lakeside Ave., Burlington REGISTER tapvt.org 802.651.5844

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8/29/19 4:20 PM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.04.19-09.11.19

RETAIL ASSOCIATE

EXECUTIVE ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

Hill Farmstead Brewery in Greensboro Bend, Vt., has an immediate retail opening in our Taproom and Bottle Shop for an individual with extensive guest service experience. Ideal candidates must be personable, optimistic, ambitious, motivated, and attentive to detail.

The Vermont League of Cities & Towns seeks a professional, organized, efficient, and computer-savvy executive administrative assistant who has demonstrated multitasking skills and who can provide excellent customer service with a smile. This position works entirely at the VLCT offices. Responsibilities include providing organizational support for all areas of the office, including answering phones and emails, providing account receipts assistance, processing event registrations, and administrative support for the Executive Director and Communications Team. This individual will serve as first point of contact for VLCT members seeking assistance. This position is the primary contact for membership updates and maintains VLCT’s Customer Relations Management (CRM) system.

Our taproom is open Wednesday through Saturday, from noon to 5 p.m. Daily shifts may range from 8-10 hours. Knowledge of beer—and our beer specifically—is a plus, but training will be provided for any hire. Job duties will include but are not limited to the following: excellent customer service, order fulfillment and customer education, operation of point of sale and cash till, and daily cleaning duties. We offer 15$/hour and a competitive benefits package after 90 days of employment. All interested parties should send both a resume and cover letter to jobs@hillfarmstead.com. No phone inquiries. Local applicants are encouraged and will be given preference.

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9/2/19

Help shape our planet’s future.

High school degree required; business school certificate or applicable experience and education preferred. Bachelor’s degree desirable. Experience and proficiency with Windows-based computer software, preferably Microsoft Office, required. General administrative support training and/or experience including editing and proofreading skills preferred. Excellent typing, spreadsheet, and database skills, including CRM software, preferred. Experience in a busy office representing multiple programs is desirable. 2:17 PM The Vermont League of Cities and Towns offers an excellent total compensation package, a convenient downtown Montpelier location, a trusted reputation, and great colleagues! To apply, please email a confidential cover letter, resume, and three professional references to jobsearch@vlct.org with Executive Admin as the subject. Salary range is $37,715 to $56,572, commensurate with experience. The application deadline is Friday, September 20. Resumes will be reviewed as they are received. Position open until filled. Please visit vlct.org/classifieds for the complete job description or vlct.org for information about VLCT. EOE. 7t-VLCT090419.indd 1

Zlata Basic NRG Systems Production Technician

9/2/19 1:52 PM

ADVOCATE/PARALEGAL LONG-TERM CARE OMBUDSMAN PROJECT Vermont Legal Aid seeks a good problem solver with excellent oral and written communication skills to advocate for individuals receiving long-term care services and supports. This person will be part of a dedicated team that provides personcentered advocacy to people living in long-term care facilities, or who receive Choices for Care long-term care services and supports in the community. The position is located in Burlington and requires travel throughout Northwestern Vermont. Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience required. Experience with advocacy, long-term care issues, or elders a plus.

NRG Systems is dedicated to designing and manufacturing smart technologies for a more sustainable planet—that means more renewable energy, cleaner air, and a safer environment for all. Join our team today! Hiring Production Technicians

Salary is $37,250 - $62,650 depending on experience, plus 4 weeks’ paid vacation and excellent fringe benefits. Application deadline is Monday, September 9, 2019. Please send cover letter, resume, and a list of three references to Eric Avildsen, c/o Betsy Whyte (bwhyte@vtlegalaid.org) as a single PDF. Visit our website for more information and complete application instructions.

nrgsystems.com/careers

VLA is an equal opportunity employer committed to cultural competency in order to effectively serve our increasingly diverse client community. Applicants are encouraged to share in their cover letter how they can further this goal.

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MANUFACTURING TECHNICIAN POSITIONS

Principal Technician - Manufacturing Engineer Position Requirements: • Assoc. Degree in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering or related degree. • 10 years of relevant experience. Pay Rates: Starting at $26.00 per hour (not including shift differential). Schedules: Work approximately 14 Days per Month!! • Includes long 4 day weekends every other week! Eligible for Benefits on Day 1: • Medical, Dental, & Vision Coverage. • Paid Vacation Time: Approx. 3 weeks per year (accrued). • Paid Sick Time: 80 hours per year. • 401k Investing Options. Education Assistance: > Up to $5,250 per year in a degree related field. Apply online at globalfoundries.com/about-us/careers or for more information email jobs@globalfoundries.com.

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JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM

Commercial Roofers & Laborers

WAREHOUSE ASSOCIATE

Location: Essex Junction, VT Night Shift: 7pm to 7am

Sr Technician - Manufacturing Engineer Position Requirements: • Assoc. Degree in Electrical/Mechanical Engineering or related degree.

NEW JOBS POSTED DAILY!

Local beverage co-pack looking for warehouse associate. This position involves working with forklifts, pallet jacks, ladders and hand carts. Candidate should be able 2h-ACHathorne030619.indd to lift up to 50 pounds and work on their feet for a min of 8 hours. Willing to train. Hours are Monday through Friday 9:30 to 6:00. Hourly rate starting at $14 per hour. Please email with resume if interested. Hiring@adropofjoy.com.

7/29/19 2v-ADropofJoy090419.indd 11:34 AM 1

8/29/19 10:33 AM

eCommerce Operations Turtle

Turtle Fur is seeking an eCommerce Operations Turtle to be the owner of our direct-toconsumer sales channels, ensuring accurate product data, imagery, and listings across our website and 3rd party marketplace channels. Success in this role is measured by growing sales across all sales channels. The ideal candidate will align with the eCommerce department’s guiding values of a growth mindset, communication as a foundation, and responsibility, bringing an entrepreneurial passion for providing top-tier customer experiences through data driven decision making, an obsessive attention to detail, and skill in design thinking and problem solving. To succeed in this role, you will:

Year round, full time positions. Good wages & benefits. $16.50 per hour minimum; Pay negotiable with experience. EOE/M/F/VET/Disability Employer Apply in person at: A.C. Hathorne Co. 252 Avenue C Williston, VT 802-862-6473

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6/24/19 6:28 PM

EARLY CHILDHOOD NUTRITION PLANNER & COOK

Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption. ABOUT THE POSITION: • Part-time 20 hour per week cook in 5 STAR accredited childcare center. • Responsibilities include preparing meals for children in an early childhood setting and promoting healthy eating habits for children ages birth – 5 years old. • Fun and dynamic opportunity for the right person!

• accurately represent products in back-end systems and on customer-facing platforms • monitor and optimize listings on 3rd Party Marketplaces (Amazon, eBay, Walmart) • manage Amazon Sponsored Product Ads for profitable sales growth • KPI reporting for all sales channels • lead a/b testing of listing content, imagery, formatting, and ads • work alongside the Customer Acquisition Turtle to deliver profitable campaigns

WHAT WE LOOK FOR: • Looking for a motivated and enthusiastic individual who can work effectively in a fast-paced setting, effectively manage deadlines and food program requirements and works well with children. • Food preparation and service experience preferred. • A candidate who is passionate, inspired, and committed to working with a dedicated group of professionals.

Minimum Qualifications • detail oriented and obsessively thorough • highly skilled with Excel and data visualization • knowledgeable of ChannelAdvisor, Amazon, eBay, and Walmart • familiar with Shopify (or other eCommerce Platforms), Google Analytics, and Data Studio • knowledgeable of paid search, search engine optimization, conversion rate optimization, a/b testing, and strategies and techniques • knowledge of NetSuite a plus • eager to help build a company that serves as a role model for our industry peers • 2-5 years of experience in eCommerce or Digital Marketing, preferably in a brand setting • Bachelor’s degree in business, marketing, communications, or similar area of study

WHY JOIN OUR TEAM AT LUND: • Ongoing training opportunities available. • Lund is a multi-service nonprofit that has served families and children throughout Vermont for 125 years. • Our mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. • Commitment surrounding diversity and cultural competence. • Lund offers a comprehensive benefit package for fulltime positions including health, dental, life insurance, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual and holiday pay. • Excellent opportunity to join strengths-based team of multi-disciplinary professionals

This full-time role reports directly to the Director of eCommerce and is located at the Turtle Fur headquarters. Many benefits including health/dental insurance, paid time off, 401k with match, disability and life insurance, education reimbursement, dog friendly office, and company cornhole tournaments included. To apply please submit resume and cover letter to bsnow@turtlefur.com.

About Turtle Fur Located just North of Stowe, in the shadows of Vermont’s highest peak, Mount Mansfield, we know tough weather. By creating comfortable, quality products, we help you stay outside longer to enjoy the things you love to do. After giving our brand a facelift in 2018, Turtle Fur is focusing on boosting our internal operations and strengthening our company’s backbone to set us up for 37 more years of leading the snow sports and outdoor industry in quality headwear and accessories.

Please send resume and cover letter to: Human Resources, PO Box 4009, Burlington, VT 05406-4009 fax (802) 864-1619 email: employment@lundvt.org

Our mission is to create the best headwear and outdoor gear you can buy. We pride ourselves on holding true to our roots of quality, comfort, creativity, and community ...all while having fun.

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C-19 09.04.19-09.11.19

7/15/19 10:02 AM 8t-Lundnutrition082819.indd 1

8/27/19 10:40 AM


ATTENTION RECRUITERS:

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POST YOUR JOBS AT JOBS.SEVENDAYSVT.COM FOR FAST RESULTS, OR CONTACT MICHELLE BROWN: MICHELLE@SEVENDAYSVT.COM

09.04.19-09.11.19

SANDWICH PREP / KITCHEN PREP / BAKER

DR Power Equipment

We are looking for part-time or dedicated full-time employees to fill sandwich prep, grill and bakery positions. Our shop is a kind-hearted and progressive kitchen focused on inclusivity. We are looking for creative individuals with strong work ethics and teamwork experience. Previous restaurant experience with food prep, line cook, baking or counter service a plus. Students welcome to apply, though we will prioritize those who are a good long term fit. Weekday opening and closing availability required. Apply at: tyler@willowsbagels.com.

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Now Hiring

Call Center Reps Location: South Burlington Positions: Full time, benefit eligible

Customer Service Specialist III Sales Specialist III

8/27/19 11:58 AM

To Apply www.drpower.com/careers -or-

Lund offers hope and opportunity to families through education, treatment, family support and adoption.

jobs@drpower.com

RESIDENTIAL COUNSELOR

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Multiple Positions Available

ABOUT THE POSITION: • Full and Part-Time positions available. • Weekday and weekend hours available. • Shifts available: 7am-5pm, 2pm-12am, 11pm-9am • Counselor will have the opportunity to provide parent education and life skill support to pregnant and parenting women and their children in residential treatment setting. • Shift differential offered for 12am-7am hours. • SUBSTITUTE POSITIONS ALSO AVAILABLE! WHAT WE LOOK FOR: • Minimum of Bachelor's degree in human services related field. • Experience providing care to young children. • Ability to multi-task and work in a fast-paced environment; flexibility, adaptability, and openmindedness necessary. • Experience working in residential treatment setting preferred. • Valid driver’s license required. WHY JOIN OUR TEAM AT LUND: • Knowledge of adoption services. • Ongoing training opportunities available. • Lund is a multi-service nonprofit that has served families and children throughout Vermont for 125 years. • Our mission is to help children thrive by empowering families to break cycles of poverty, addiction and abuse. • Commitment surrounding diversity and cultural competence. • Lund offers a comprehensive benefit package for fulltime positions including health, dental, life insurance, disability, retirement, extensive time off accrual (24-29 days annually) and holiday pay (11 days annually). • Excellent opportunity to join strengths-based team of multi-disciplinary professionals. To apply: lundvt.org/about-lund/employment. Or send resume and cover letter to: employment@lundvt.org

8/27/19 10:03 AM

We are a growing company looking for a couple people to fill positions in the painting/ taping trades. Most of the work is in Chittenden Co. but we get work outside of the area so a reliable vehicle is necessary along with your own personal hand tools and a good attitude. Pay is based on experience and the quality of your work. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Please no hard-drug users or slackers. To apply please send me your contact info and a short description of your experience and expectations to abartell35@gmail.com.

8/26/192v-ABartellPainting090419.indd 2:38 PM 1

9/2/19 2:24 PM

Vermont has some of the oldest and least efficient housing stock in the country. The goal is to weatherize at least 25% of those homes by 2020. Join our expert weatherization staff now and help our clients reduce their energy bills, increase comfort and improve their health. We are currently hiring for the following positions: • Project Services Manager for 3E Thermal (FT), a division of Capstone, offers technical support and cash incentives to owners of affordable housing for comprehensive energy efficiency upgrades. Leads the design and implementation of “deep energy retrofit” improvements on multifamily housing projects throughout Vermont. Building inspection skills necessary, statewide travel required. Salary range starts $45K • Weatherization Technician (FT) performs high quality site work including carpentry, targeted air sealing, insulation installation, window and door repair, client education and blower door testing. Starting Wage $18/hour • WAP Specialist/Efficiency Coach (FT) coordinates subcontractors and presents the energy efficiency curriculum to Weatherization clients in their homes. Salary range starts $39K • Administrative Support (FT) assures accurate and timely processing of the Department’s transactions and workflow, supports the smooth running of the office and events. Starting Wage $15/hour Excellent communication, organization, business computer skills, valid driver’s license, reliable insured car and clean driving record required for field positions. Positions open until filled. Competitive salary and attractive benefits package included. Interested applicants should submit a letter of interest and resume to: Capstone Community Action, Inc. Human Resources 20 Gable Place, Barre VT 05641 Or email to: jobs@capstonevt.org

Capstone Community Action is an Equal Opportunity Employer and Provider. Applications from women, individuals with disabilities, veterans, and people from diverse backgrounds are encouraged. 9t-Capstone090419.indd 1

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PAINTERS AND TAPERS NEEDED

9/2/19 1:56 PM

Profile for Seven Days

Seven Days, September 4, 2019  

From Campus to Politics to Business, Memes the Word; Meet Shannon MacVean-Brown, Vermont's First African American Bishop; Kristian Brevik's...

Seven Days, September 4, 2019  

From Campus to Politics to Business, Memes the Word; Meet Shannon MacVean-Brown, Vermont's First African American Bishop; Kristian Brevik's...

Profile for 7days