Page 1

BHPARENT SPRING 2019

YOUR FREE COPY

LOCAL LIFE

THE SLEEP ISSUE FROM THE PERFECT SLEEPOVER TO HANDLING NIGHTMARES WE’VE GOT BEDTIME COVERED

THE 2019 TEACHERS OF EXCELLENCE AND THE HARTMAN FAMILY


HELPING KIDS MAKE CONNECTIONS Allow our experts to help your child move, talk and play to reach your goals.

Occupational Therapy

Physical Therapy

Helps to reduce sensitivity to touch, sounds, smells, tastes and movement. • Handwriting & Cutting Issues • Behavioral Issues • Feeding Issues

Works with your child on “big muscle” skills that often affect movement, such as sitting, crawling, walking and jumping. • Muscle Weakness • Coordination Issues • Sports Injuries

Speech-Language Pathology

605-716-2634

110 N Cambell Street Suite A • Rapid City, SD ChildrensTherapyServicesSD.com Locally Owned & Operated

Helps your child learn to effectively communicate in a variety of ways. • Voice Projection and Stuttering • Social and Appropriate Conversation Skills • Communication Device Set-up


C<ON<A@NG@@KGJJ¸GDF@ò Following the safe sleep guidelines is vitally important to baby's health. + Babies sleep safest on their backs. + Always sleep in a safe crib (no blankets, toys, or bumper pads). + Babies should sleep alone. + Couches, chairs, infant seats, or swings are not safe places for babies to sleep.

Let’s keep our children safe. Visit ForBabySakeSD.com for more.


College Planning Give your child the freedom to dream with CollegeAccess 529 No gift is greater than an education. To learn how to start saving today visit www.collegeaccess529.com. Investors should consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses of CollegeAccess 529 Plan before investing. This and other information is contained in the current Plan Disclosure Statement. Before investing, investors should read the Plan Disclosure Statement carefully, and consider whether their state of residency – or their intended Designated Beneficiary’s state of residency – offers any benefit, such as a state tax deduction, which are only available for investments in that state’s 529 savings program. Only South Dakota residents and Account Owners who designate a South Dakota resident as Beneficiary can invest directly in the CollegeAccess 529 Plan. Certain Portfolios are not available to those who invest directly. Residents of states other than South Dakota can invest in the CollegeAccess 529 Plan only through a financial advisor. Additional fees apply for investments made through a financial advisor. Please see the Plan Disclosure Statement for details. State taxes may apply for residents of states other than South Dakota. CollegeAccess 529 Plan is a section 529 college savings plan sponsored by the State of South Dakota, and managed by Allianz Global Investors Distributors LLC. Notice: The account is not insured by any state, and neither the principal deposited nor any investment return is guaranteed by any state. Furthermore, the account is not insured, nor the principal or any investment returns guaranteed, by the federal government or any federal agency. 637454 | 03482


,LLP

From pregnancy to menopause and beyond, choose the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best in comprehensive womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s healthcare.

Shana Bernhard, MD Angela K. Anderson, MD

Marcia Beshara, MD

Jeffrey Bendt, MD

Pregnancy | Female Surgery | Gynecology | High-Risk OB | Menopause | Birth Control | Laparoscopic Hysterectomy Adolescent Gynecology | 3D Mammography | MonaLisa Touch | PRP Intimacy Injection

605.342.3280 | www.RapidCityMedicalCenter.com


c5llHT/11Pk Summer � Camps

Performing Arts Camp for Grades 5-7 July 22-27, 2018

Meet new BHP Jr. Performing Arts Camp is designed to inspire young friends, JlpJ:t. people 8 to learn about and love theatre in a guided, dynamic, inclusive program tailored to the needs of individual exploreand the students. Campers will spend six fun-filled days making friends, world 'of exploring theatre techniques and learning about the musical Oklahoma! at the beautiful Placerville Camp. q,PJoceri''' performing $450 if paid in full BY March 15 arts, $4 75 after make March 15 $100 deposit required to reserve space in the camp. memories Artist-in-Training Performing Arts Camp for Grades 8-12 for a lifetime Mystery at Crimson House

..

e

July 29-August 4, 2018

BHP Jr. Camps encourage BHP Jr. Artist-in-Training Performing Arts Camp is for creativity and exploration experienced young artists (going into 8th-12th grades) who are ready to challenge themselves and are serious about while givingtheir students the craft. opportunity Artists-in-training to see the will spend an intensive week of theatre world through the diverse transforming into eccentric characters to figure out Whodunit! With in-depth character study, exploration of a lens of the performing arts. Our camps are the perfect score and Broadway-style choreography. choice for families seeking a safe, friendly, and creative camp, combined with dynamic programs designed to meet students wherever they are in their arts journey. Camp schedule includes BHP show and visit. BHP Jr. Performing Arts Camp, For More Information Visit forBlackHillsPlayhouse.com/camps Grades 5th-7th 605.255.4141 June 23 - 28, 2019

Presenting: Rockin’ Robin Hood Camp Enrollment Deadline: June 9, 2019

BHP Jr. Artist-in-Training Performing Arts Camp, for Grades 8th-12th July 28-Aug 3

Presenting: Footloose Camp Enrollment Deadline: July 14, 2019 Camp Locations: Placerville Camp, Friends/Family Performance Hill City High School

$475 if paid in full BY March 15, 2019 $500 after March 15, 2019 $100 deposit required to reserve a space

Where Art & Science Meet to Optimize Your Oral Health. 605.348.0831 • Fibonacci-Dental.com 2800 Jackson Blvd. Suite 9 • Rapid City

605-342-2636 2101 Cambell Street Rapid City, SD 57701

In State Toll-Free 1-888-340-2636

www.royalwheelalignment.com

Martial Arts Classes for Kids Ages 3-18

Full Circle Martial Arts Academy www.fullcirclemaa.com 1.605.388.2133

Tuition Assistance Application Deadline: June 1, 2019 Payment plans available upon request. Camp schedule includes BHP show and visit.

For More Information Visit BlackHillsPlayhouse.com/camps 605.255.4141

WE’RE A FAMILY PLACE! Hands-on fun, lots to see and we’re FREE!

Spring Hours: Tuesday - Saturday 10 am to 5 pm 415 Fifth Avenue in Belle Fourche

4 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


CONTENTS

12

18

14 15 Buzz

9 Spring Cleaning Made Easy Even the most disastrous messes can be picked up with these tips. 11 Season’s Schedules Springing forward is in full mode and these time-savers will be a life saver. 12 Grayson’s Challenge The boy in Spearfish who is collecting more pop tabs than you would think is possible.

BHPARENT Publisher Rick DenHerder Marketing Consultant Natasha Moberly Managing Director Jenna Carda Digital Director John Eining Creative Director John Edwards Senior Designer Chris Valencia Photographer Jesse Brown Nelson Communications Manager Meghan Rose Creative Services Coordinator Mackenzie Yordy Office Manager Jessica McGoldrick Distribution Richard Alley Contributers Molly Barari, Christa Melnyk Hines, Danie Koskan, Pam Molnar, Sandi Schwartz, and Katie Weiderholt Our Puppy Pals Cooper, Marley, and Tucker © Black Hills Parent. All rights reserved. Reproduction of any part of this publication without the expressed consent of the publisher is prohibited. The information included in this publication is believed to be accurate at the time of publishing. Additional advertiser information and articles are available online at blackhillsparent.com. Black Hills Parent magazine is a free, quarterly publication distributed throughout Black Hills area communities—from Rapid City to Spearfish, Deadwood to Hill City, Custer to Hot Springs, and every place in between, including: schools, medical and dental waiting areas, childcare facilities, specialty retailers, and other key locations in this area. Get an exclusive look at Black Hills Parent through our e-letter at blackhillsparent.com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for updates.

14 A True Star Rapid City teen Tiffany Johnson is following her dreams and heading back to Nashville.


26

36

Catching Sleep

Ages & Stages

22 Battling Childhood Nightmares Monsters under the bed beware! Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the tricks to stop the scary dreams.

38 Twos vs Teens Are the ages really that different?

18 Sleepover Survival Guide Hosting your first sleepover? These five steps will make you look like a pro.

The Education Issue 26 Teachers of Excellence These five Black Hills teachers have gone above and beyond.

32 Family Matters: The Hartmans Tarin Hartman shares a day in the life of homeschooling in Custer.

32

36 Weather Woes Weather anxiety is a real thing, and Mike Modrick has tips to get through this thunderstorm season.

Columns

41 Finances: Student Loans Repaying your debts without going broke. 43 Health: Childhood Obesity Ideas to break the habit of sugar galore. 46 Making an Impact Advocates for Creative Theater Students

Local Life

48 Black Hills Cuties 50 Calendar 56 Little Artists

What do you get when you put two giggly pre-teens in a photo studio with pillows, feathers, and pizza? A whole lot of fun! Teagan and Sulivan from Rapid City got to jump on the bed, play with their dolls and even use a retro Polaroid camera. Check it out on page 18.


ADVERTORIAL

LIFE INSURANCE CAN DO MORE THAN EVER

It’s important to understand your life insurance options and it’s advantages from the get-go!

Q

When is a good time to buy life insurance? Many people benefit by having life insurance, when someone else is depending on your income, there’s generally a need for life insurance. You may already have life insurance coverage through your employer. Even so, it’s usually a good idea to consider purchasing additional coverage independently, because policies you buy outside an employer’s plan are portable, meaning your coverage continues even if you lose or leave your job. Also, your employer’s coverage may not meet your financial obligations for adequately protecting your family. Life insurance will never be cheaper than today, so ideally the present time is a good time.

Produce

fresh, local & organic

Q

How much life insurance do you need? One of the biggest questions when talking about life insurance is how much will you need? Since everyone’s financial situation is a bit different, there is no rule to tell you how much to buy. Is it $250,000, $500,000, $1 million or more? Each sounds like a lot of money, I know, but when you have to pay for final expenses, outstanding credit card balances and other debt, the total can quickly add up.

Tom Berger Associate Manager Farm Bureau Financial Services 709 Omaha St Rapid City SD 57701 Office: (605)348.3470 Cell: (605)209.4414 tom.berger@fbfs.com www.agenttomberger.com

“Did you know a small 10 or 15 year WL policy can be paid for before a newborn reaches middle school? That policy will be with them forever and could even provide guaranteed insurability when they start a family of their own!” –Tom Berger

Join us for Member-Owner Appreciation Day on Saturday, March 16 and enjoy 10% off your purchase!

Meat

Summer Classes Start May 13 Ballet • Modern • Tap • Jazz • Acro • And More!

local & grass-fed

Dairy

local eggs, organic milk & cheese

Three Studios – One Big Academy Family 605.719.5678 – 230 Main Street, RC 605.342.4426 – Canyon Lake Drive, RC & Sturgis Community Center

Wellness

high-quality vitamins & supplements

605.348.3331

www.breadroot.com 100 E. Boulevard North Rapid City, SD

8 2

BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

April 27, 2019 “Candyland” and “Game On!” Performances @ Rushmore Plaza Civic Center www.RCDanceArts.com • Fall Preview Open House May 18


t I p Kee n a e l C

GET ORGANIZED BUZZ

Wash Legos® in a laundry net

DIY CLEANER

Pick up sequins with painter’s tape Glitter? Use a lint roller Stick toy cars to a magnetic strip

“Life truly begins after you have put your house in order.” - Marie Kondo

Use rubbing alcohol to remove markers off walls

Remove dried food particles from the microwave without scrubbing! Place two lemon halves and a half of a cup of water in the microwave, then heat it for 5 minutes. When the time is up, wait 15 minutes with the microwave door shut. Times up! Open the door; wipe it out with a dry cloth, and voila! No more baked-on food.

SPACE

Storage Galore

If you’re on the Tidying Up craze following Marie Kondo’s instruction of organizing, you’ll know that boxes and dividers are going to be your best friend. Try using the boxes you already have for organizing your shelves around the house.

• Oatmeal container = store paintbrushes • Tissue box = office supplies • Cereal box = magazine and book storage • Altoid container = hair ties and bobby pins • Toilet paper rolls = makeup brushes

BHPARENT 9


WELCOME H ME FIRST-TIME & REPEAT HOMEBUYER LOANS • Competitive Rates • Downpayment Assistance • Closing-Cost Assistance

CHUCK KNOWS BEEF AND HE’S PLEASED TO MEAT YOU. He is the only all-knowing beef expert powered by Google Artificial Intelligence. From cuts and recipes to nutrition and cooking tips, if you’ve got a question, he’s your man. Or, uh, robot?

Start the conversation at

CHUCK KNOWSBEEF.COM

) A B A ( s i s y l a n A r o i v a h e B d e i Appl Autism h it w n e r d il h C Therapy for ! y a M n i g n i m Co

cial, child’s play, so ur yo t ou ab ns er feScape’s If you have conc unication, or other skills – Li lp. m m can he behavior, co havior analysts be ed ns ce /li certified w covers ost insurance no feScape m d an d, ge an State law has ch ildren to age 18 with autism. Li d. ai treatment for ch arty payors, including Medic -p ird th t os m accepts

Contact Us Today at 605.791.7400 10

BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

LifeScapeSD.org/ABA


SCHEDULES BUZZ

TRY THIS

Elements of a good command center

• Whiteboard calendar for the whole family to see • Folder storage to keep all the paper in one place • Showcase board to display artwork and accomplishments • Message board for encouragement throughout the week • A space of their own to allow kids to be involved in the planning

APPS

HOW TO

The Art of Saying “No”

A play date here, a lunch commitment there… volunteer, homework, dinner… the list goes on! To stay productive and minimize stress, you have to learn the gentle art of saying ‘no’. • Value your time and know your priorities. Your sanity and schedule truly do matter, especially to your family.

• “ It’s not you, it’s me.” It’s a classic line, right? However, asking for another chance at a later time, or asking for more notice is a good way of keeping your relationship in good standing.

• Don’t apologize. Most will start with “I’m sorry”, but that comment alone will weaken your case. Stick to your decision! You’ve got this.

This free app is a huge timesaver for families wanting to do more than share a Google Calendar. Keep events, activities, grocery lists, recipes and more all in one place. And even better yet? There’s a journal to capture the memories you make throughout the year.

Teachers across the Black Hills are utilizing the free app – Remind. Not only can they remind parents about homework, but also give updates about what is happening in class and an opportunity to ask questions.

BHPARENT 11


GRAYSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Giving back while giving his all words Jenna Carda photos Jesse Brown Nelson

PULL TAB DROP OFF LOCATIONS

are surrounding the Black Hills and you can get involved. Check out blackhillsparent.com for the full list of locations and start collecting your tabs!

12 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


FUNDRAISING AMAZING KIDS

Be ready for a giant hug if you get the opportunity to meet Grayson Chapeau – an 8-year-old boy from Spearfish who is inspiring adults and making a difference in peoples’ lives across the region. Grayson is your typical boy. He loves to play with his cars and Legos®, runs around the house with his four other siblings, and has a love of math which he will proudly tell you about. However, there is something special about this boy — a light of positivity that radiates through him. And it’s even more impressive when you hear about his medical journey.

apparent something as simple as strep or mono was not the case. Grayson had an immense amount of pressure on his brain and his life fligh to Minneapolis Children’s Hospital was on its way. Jeremiah – Grayson’s dad – flew with him as Chelsey scrambled to pack and find help for her other two children at the time. Her mom dropped everything to help and family, friends, and neighbors were right alongside her. “Having the community and family here… it was overwhelming and humbling all at the same time,” said Chelsey. In Minneapolis, the Chapeau family

a “home away from home” as families travel back and forth for appointments, all at no expense. The RMHC in the Upper Midwest have helped over 6,500 families and the pop tab program has helped raise over $800,000. Learning of the program’s impact, Grayson was on board. His first year collecting tabs, he had 88 pounds. That grew into a goal to raise 100 pounds the following year. With schools, businesses, and the community behind him, Grayson was able to bring 433 pounds to RMHC-UM. Grayson transferred hospitals and

CHALLENGE It was September of 2014 and this rambunctious four-year-old had been dealing with what doctors believed was a rare bacterial flu. Vomiting was persistent for weeks, and the energetic guy was so lethargic he could barely stay awake to get ready in the morning. But, the mystery remained because bursts of life would come and go. One morning, Chelsey, Grayson’s mom, was getting Joshua and Saray (the oldest twins) ready for school. Grayson seemed non-responsive after falling back to sleep halfway on the couch. Little did they know, Grayson was fighting for his life. After a long visit of various tests at the Emergency Room, the attending doctor suggested a CT scan. “I wanted to know what the answer was, and I wanted to know how we could fix him,” Chelsey says as she relives the night that changed their lives. “But, I was praying it wasn’t something major. Strep? Mono? So much easier to deal with.” When the doctor got the results, it was

would soon find out that Grayson had an inoperable tumor in the center of his brain – diffused astrocytoma grade 2. This little boy was about to undergo six weeks of radiation for five days a week, chemotherapy for over a year, all in addition to a targeting drug to stabilize the tumor’s growth. Back and forth, the family went from Spearfish to Minneapolis. The community was raising awareness and support for the family, and that is where the pop tabs made their appearance. A long-time friend from Belle Fourche had asked Chelsey to take a bag of pop tabs to the drop off location in Minneapolis during their next visit. Kindly obliging, Chelsey said yes, but Grayson had questions. What were they used for? Since 1987, the Ronald McDonald House Charities has been collecting aluminum pop tabs which get recycled and earn money to fund the houses available for families going through their own medical journey. These houses are

is now seeing professionals in Denver every three months. Continuing his pop tab challenge, Grayson set a goal of 500 pounds for his first year in Colorado. To his awe, with the help of the community he was able to collect 867 pounds. “It’s about one million aluminum pop tabs to get to 623 pounds,” explained Chelsey. “and we had gone above and beyond that.” This year, Grayson is aiming for 1,000 pounds – all to help those in need. He continues to have check-ups with his medical team in Denver every three months to watch the tumor and in July, they will be taking their next round of tabs to the Ronald McDonald House. “It’s not a positive thing,” Jeremiah says, “but one thing we’ve learned from Grayson is to stay joyful. Your attitude can really make a tremendous difference. His attitude has been amazing and it has made this experience better than it could have been and it’s being used for positive things.” BHPARENT 13


Star She means what she sings

words Danie Koskan photos Jesse Brown Nelson 14 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


DREAMS AMAZING KIDS

Tiffany The Rapid City teenager writes songs that are both personal and universal. An aspiring singer and songwriter, Tiffany Johnson delights in not only composing lyrics about life as she knows it, but also weaving together words and melodies in a way that connects with her audience. “It’s capturing a single moment in your life that other people can relate to,” she said. The 15-year-old began taking her craft seriously when she was eight, but her penchant for putting feelings to music was apparent long before she wrote anything down. “It originated when I was really young,” she said. “I would sing about whatever I was doing around the house.” These days, she draws inspiration from artists like Taylor Swift and Ed Sheeran who pen and perform their own songs. “I want to be a songwriter,” Tiffany said. “My true passion is in writing songs.” Last year she paid her first visit to Nashville, where she attended a songwriting camp and performed at such famous venues as the Country Music Hall of Fame and Bluebird Café—the sort of places up-and-coming songwriters are found. “I was really excited because they’re hard to get into,” she said.

“Tiffany is a great role model and exemplifies what focus, hard work, and persistence (along with a dream) will get you,” said Ross Johnson, Tiffany’s father. “Her story is just beginning and I can’t wait to see what she will accomplish in the future,” said Ross.

tiffanyjohnsonsings.com Follow her accounts on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

She’ll return in March to rub shoulders with fellow songwriters and industry professionals at Tin Pan South, the world’s largest songwriting festival. In the meantime, she’s a freshman at Stevens High School, navigating the ups and downs of adolescence. This season of life is never short on subjects for her next song. “The lyrics just come,” she said. “I’ll be sitting in math class, and I have to write them down.” One of the more personal tunes she’s written is “Here’s to Forgetting You,” which speaks to leaving the past behind and moving on. Her first song, “This is My Year,” addresses the anxiety children feel as they head back to class. Tiffany doesn’t just write songs and sing them. She provides her own accompaniment. Her dad taught her how to play guitar, and the pair plays together often. She also plays piano, ukulele and drums. Tiffany credits the Dahl Arts Center’s Emerging Artists Program with giving her a strong performance foundation. The weekly talent showcase puts promising acts in front of an appreciative local audience. Tiffany stepped up to the open mic in 2014 and never stepped back. Today she performs original sets at Youth & Family Services Kid Fair, Central States Fair, Summer Nights in Rapid City and Spearfish and other venues throughout the Black Hills. But her sights are set on bigger stages. “I want to travel around the world,” Tiffany said. “I want … people to be inspired by my songs. I want them to feel something.” BHPARENT 15


Funding for this project was provided by the United States Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Grant: #FM0085. These services are available to all eligible persons, regardless of race, gender, age, disability, or religion.

2019

e th r fo T N E R A P H Join B

SATURDAY, APRIL 6 10 A.M. - 2 P.M.

Summer planning made easy - camps, classes, workshops - all in one place! Find out more at BlackHillsParent.com 16 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

FREE TO A T

TEND

Event Sponsor

Stress-Free Fundraising


Sleepover e d i u G l a v i v Sur ening 5 steps to having a tear-free ev

words Jenna Carda photos Jesse Brown Nelson 18 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


PARTY TIME CATCHING SLEEP

In the life of a pre-teen, sleepovers can be a big deal. It’s their time to shine and host friends at their home. Make it the best it can be by following these five steps to a tear-free evening.

1. Have a Plan

Before the event arrives, be sure to have a plan in place. What activities will you be doing? Is there going to be a bedtime? What movies will they watch? The best laid plans before a group of friends comes over will keep them busy and keep the tears to a minimum. So where do you start? Keep it simple, and try creating a theme. It can be a dream team where they where a jersey and watch athletic movies. It can be a luau where they get to dress up in homemade skirts and enjoy pineapple pizza. The options are unlimited and so much easier when you put a theme to your event. Tip: Be sure to ask about any dietary restrictions beforehand!

2. Choose the Participants

Surely there are big ideas to have a massive party where everyone is going to get along. But knowing your child, and your family, are you ready to host more than five girls or boys? If this is your first sleepover, start with one

guest. Later, advance to three invitees. Ideally, you will want to keep your numbers even to avoid leaving anyone out. Knowing the children and their families is also important. Talk to their parents ahead of time and fill them in on your plan set for the evening. Don’t be offended if they ask questions or want to check out your house. This is their baby they are sending away for an entire evening!

3. The Sticky Situations

In addition to picking up valuables or delicate objects around the area the group will be staying in, you will want to prepare siblings and spouses for your extra guests. For younger siblings, plan separate activities with you so they don’t feel left out. For older children, make their space a Keep Out Zone for the party guests. Another case you will want to get ready for is the inevitable tears, homesickness, and teasing. It’s important to be accessible to your child’s guests and let them know where you will be if they have a situation they would like

BHPARENT 19


Who has time for sleep when the party is this much fun? Make some memories and equip your child to be the best host ever.

you to address. Be patient and try to put yourself in their shoes. Put a policy in place and keep parents’ numbers nearby if they need to come get their child.

4. Lay the Ground Rules

Whether your group is large or small, it’s best to make sure everyone understands the ground rules before the evening is underway. Here are some good places to start, but add your own as the group evolves. • No leaving the house without asking • Stay together at all times – don’t leave anyone out • Check in your cell phones – keep them accessible, but it’s good to have tech-free time to cut down on drama opportunities • Lights out at midnight

5. Have Fun!

Probably the most important step of the evening is to just have fun. Be sure to check in with the party, but your little host will take pride in being the go-to person for the night. Looking to limit the chaos as the night progresses? Start the evening with a high-energy game or event, keep them busy but pace the fun throughout the evening, and wind down with a movie. Sleepovers are memories in the making, and you’re going to have the best one yet! 20 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

Teagan and Sulivan had a blast at our studio sleepover photoshoot! Not only was there a massive pillow fight complete with feathers going everywhere, the girls were able to jump on the bed, test out a polaroid camera, and enjoy some classic pepperoni pizza.


KIDS GROW.

We have them covered. Sizes preemie to 6Y

^

Newborn to 3Y

Preemie to 8Y

Beanies & Knit Hats

Newborn to 6T

Sizes 0 to 6Y

…From Can’t Talk

TO ALWAYS ASKING WHY.

+

4-32 lbs

5-65 lbs

40-120 lbs

Buy Online. Pick Up In-Store.

ShopKicksAndGiggles.com Fast. Free. Today.

Mon-Fri 10am-5:30pm | Sat 10am-5pm

^ and Toddler

329 Main Street | Rapid City | 605.343.8722


Bump in the Night The upsides of battling childhood nightmares words Sandi Schwartz

22 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


NIGHTMARES CATCHING SLEEP

It’s the middle of the night and you’re in a deep sleep. You hear a loud cry of “Mommy!” or feel a touch on your arm. At first you’re not sure if this is all part of your dream. Eventually, you wake up and realize your child is frightened and needs you. Then you stumble into her room in a total daze, faced with the challenge of needing to comfort your little one after she’s had a nightmare. Given this middle-of-the-night drama, it may be shocking to learn that nightmares in childhood are actually normal and play a positive role in kids’ emotional growth and coping skills. About half of all young children experience nightmares, especially two- to six-yearolds. Children are particularly prone at this age because this is when they’re developing fears and imagination, and trying to learn the difference

between fantasy and reality. Nightmares tend to peak by 10 years of age, and then they usually decrease. Children’s nightmares stem from many different types of experiences that cause emotional responses, such as hearing a scary story, watching a frightening movie, worrying about school, struggling socially, or reacting to a family change or crisis like a new sibling or divorce. Facing new milestones – potty training, moving out of a crib, learning to ride a bike – can also cause bad dreams. Eating too close to bedtime, some medications, and sleep problems can also lead to nightmares. What is also interesting is that experts have found that fear is not the only emotion that can trigger nightmares; confusion, guilt, disgust, and sadness are also culprits. Nightmares typically happen in the second half of the night during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Because of this

timing, children usually can remember their dreams when they wake up. REM sleep stimulates the parts of the brain used in learning. Some scientists believe that dreams are the brain cortex’s effort to find meaning in the signals received during REM sleep. This process could be beneficial to our children even if they may be scared temporarily from a troubling dream. As a reaction to stress, nightmares help our children work through their emotions or traumatic events. They consolidate bad feelings into a concrete memory that can be more easily processed, filed away, and forgotten. Michael Nadorff, assistant professor of psychology and sleep behavior medicine specialist at Mississippi State University, equates nightmares to having our own exposure therapy to review and confront experiences so we can overcome our fears about them. A recent

BHPARENT 23


How do we know when nightmares become a problem? There are nightmares, and then there are chronic night terrors and Nightmare Disorder. Here are some signs to look out for to make sure your kids aren’t experiencing something more serious: · Are the nightmares significantly interfering with sleep? · Are your kids avoiding bedtime because they are so worried that they will have a nightmare? · Are the nightmares getting worse and occurring more frequently? · Are they impacting your child’s school day and interaction with family and friends? · Are they repeatedly waking up with detailed recollection of long, scary dreams that involve threats to their survival, security, and physical well-being? If you notice these issues persisting, then it’s important to speak to your pediatrician about what is going on. It may be time to explore treatment options like therapy to address stress and anxiety, or a sleep study for a more detailed evaluation.

24 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

Comforting our children in the moment is important so they can express how nightmares make them feel and realize that they’re okay.

video published by New York Magazine effectively presents how nightmares transform fears into something positive. In addition, when our children have bad dreams, we can gain insight into their deepest thoughts and concerns. Rosalind Cartwright, Ph.D., professor emeritus of psychology at Rush University in Chicago, explained how nightmares are like having an internal therapist, helping surface one’s deeprooted emotions and fears. It’s almost like revealing a secret emotional code that we may not be privy to during the day. By connecting with our children after a nightmare, we can help them work through their issues so that they feel better. Comforting our children in the moment is important so they can express how nightmares make them feel and realize that they’re okay. When they’re upset, go to their bedroom and give them physical contact like a hug or back rub until they calm down. Ask them to talk about the nightmare, but don’t push too hard if they don’t want to discuss it. Console them verbally by saying, “I understand your dream must have been scary,

but it was not real. Mommy sometimes has bad dreams, too. You’re okay. I am here to comfort you. I love you and you are fine.” If they want to check under the bed or in the closet for monsters, go along with this exercise. Once they have calmed down, tuck them in with their favorite blanket or stuffed animal and reassure them that you will be down the hall if they need you again. If they argue with you about going back to sleep, explain that they need to get their rest so they can enjoy the next day. Provide an example of something fun for them to look forward to. You can continue to address the nightmare the next day by encouraging them to express themselves. Consider getting creative like drawing or painting pictures, journaling, reading stories and discussing them, or acting them out with puppets. Look for patterns in the themes of their nightmares to try to understand what the stressor may be. The most important thing is to encourage your children to talk it out so that they address what’s bothering them while they’re awake.


,LLP

Your trusted home team for ENT in the Black Hills 605.342.3280 | www.BlackHillsENT.com

BHPARENT 25


PROUD SPONSORS OF THE 2019 EDUCATION HONOREES

TEACHERS OF EXCELLENCE words Jenna Carda photos Jesse Brown Nelson

Richard Aaron Jones 8th Grade English at East Middle School, Rapid City Richard Aaron Jones’s story is unique. Who knew he would become a teacher? As a high school dropout, Jones – as his students call him – did not like school. He never found a sense of support and saw opportunities elsewhere, making the choice to work rather than attend the rest of his schooling career. Married, and with a son of his own, Jones knew he needed to find something more than his hourly wages. As a broadcaster for the past 15 years, Jones enrolled into college to add to his credentials. Eventually, his History and French classes led him back to education where it clicked – he could make the 26 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

difference in kids’ lives that he himself didn’t have growing up. In 2002, Richard, his wife Theresa, and his son Robert moved from Texas to Rapid City taking his first teaching job at Dakota Middle School – later to become East Middle School. “Middle school is hard; it truly can be the worst time of their life – they are starting to become people but they don’t have any power,” said Jones. “Middle School students still need their teachers to be a mentor for them and a guide. They don’t see you as an obstacle yet.” Jones is an advocate for more than learning in his classrooms. He stresses the importance of relationships, the importance of a support system, and choices you make. From reading literature to assigning large projects preparing students for high school classes, each lesson can relate back to their individual lives and the choices they make.

For example, learning about a type of storytelling like a “Hero’s Journey” is easy to take in when dissecting a Disney movie. But, reiterating it into his students’ own lives and relating the content to their own journey is what makes his teaching unique. “Mr. Jones is always giving of his time and talent,” said assistant Principal Terry Lundeen. “He is uplifting to staff and students on a daily bases and takes pride in being here for the right reasons.” Encouraging good choices, Jones gives students at East Middle School the opportunity to get involved. During lunch, he opens his room to play board games; on Wednesdays, he hosts “Jamin’ with Jones” – letting kids bring their guitars after school and play alongside him, and rarely leaves before 5 o’ clock in the evening throughout the week. “Mr. Jones knows what it’s like to hate school. But because of his experience, he’s here to make sure kids don’t have that experience themselves,” said Mr. Lundeen.


Julianne Zoller

K-2 Art at Mountain View Elementary & West Elementary, Spearfish When you walk into Julianne Zoller’s classroom, you will immediately feel the creativity and coziness she creates. Nearly 600 students between kindergarten and second grade walk through her doors, getting to learn new skills as little artists. “When kids are given the instruction they need, they are unstoppable,” said Julianne. In 2003, Julianne began teaching in Sturgis. Now, she has been teaching elementary students in Spearfish for the past 10 years. “My dad was an art teacher, I have siblings who are teachers, and it just seemed like the natural fit for what I wanted to do,” said Julianne. Each lesson of art is paired with deeper learning, often based in history. First-graders have taken Da Vinci’s inventions and begin to learn about dimensions and shading. Younger students’ creativity blooms when their names become personalized with animals, shapes, and lines. And for second-graders, color combinations are the class’s focus. But, there is more to the lessons that may meet the eye. Julianne roots a lot of her projects in the stories of the past – teaching her students about the lives, inventions, and creations of past artists like Van Gogh and Da Vinci. “It’s obvious she is passionate about her content area and about her students in general,” said Brooke McLellan, Julianne’s colleague. “She genuinely cares and her lessons are differentiated in whatever way necessary to accommodate all students’s learning.” There is no limit to what students in Julianne’s class will walk away with year after year. Beautiful pictures, yes; but art students also learn skills such as problem solving, self-confidence, and acceptance – skills that will stick with them into their future lives. “They are learning through challenges, and when they accomplish a project – they are so proud,” said Julianne. “I want them to know they have the power to do anything they want – art is just one thing in a world of opportunities.”

BHPARENT 27


PROUD SPONSORS OF THE 2019 EDUCATION HONOREES

Marshall Kambestad

6th Grade Reading & English at Southwest Middle School, Rapid City Taking inspiration from his parents, both with teaching professions, Marshall Kambestad knew at an early age he wanted to be a teacher for the positive impact they make in students’ lives. Middle school is a time for students and their families to transition. As a sixthgrader, they are facing a new school, new classmates, and more than one teacher they have to see day after day. “In sixth grade, students are still exploring the world and it’s fun guiding them to find their footing in middle school,” said Marshall. 28 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

Taking his role as a mentor and leader to the next level, Marshall attends as many student activities as possible. Whether it is a black belt testing for karate to synchronized swimming meets, he does his best to make sure every student feels welcomed and cared for. Marshall began his career in Sioux Falls before making his way back to his hometown of Rapid City. After eight years of teaching, English has easily become Marshall’s favorite subject. “You really get to see the creative side of kids and get to know them better,” explained Marshall. “Just based on the writing projects we do, their personalities really come through.” As a runner and a past coach, Marshall creates an atmosphere that is relaxed but challenging when students are in his classroom. He raises the bar and

encourages his kids to bring their “A-Game” to class each day – resulting in accomplishments his students can truly be proud of. “Mr. Kambestad has made my sixth-grader excited about school and learning again,” said Jennifer Wright – a parent to one of Marshall’s students. “He finds the good in each of his students and encourages them to do their best.” From memorizing 100-second speeches the students write themselves, to working in groups and critiquing anonymous writings, both kids and parents admire the steps Marshall takes to set his students up for success. And during a time of numerous changes, it’s the little things like being available and putting in the extra work that make a difference.


Holly Johnston

1st Grade at Lead-Deadwood Elementary Being a teacher is Holly Johnston’s calling in life. From age five, Holly told her uncle she was going to be a teacher, and today, she is in her 21st year of being a mentor, a role model, and yes – a teacher – to her students at LeadDeadwood Elementary School. Beginning her career at Summit Elementary, Holly began teaching first-graders. And after 16 years in northeastern South Dakota, an opportunity at Lead-Deadwood opened up. In 2014, Holly, her husband, and her children made the move and have called the Black Hills home ever since. “My class is a very caring group of kids. They truly amaze me,” said Holly. “Someone drops something, and they are right there to help pick it up. If you have a bad day, they are there for a hug or a pat on the back.” That attitude is inspired by how Holly leads by example. She sees her students as family and extrudes a caring atmosphere in her classroom each and every day. “I want my students to love to be here. I do everything in my power to make them love to be at school.” That philosophy and mission is being carried out, and parents notice. “We have a daughter who hated school and was in trouble a lot,” said Amber Vogt, a parent to one of Holly’s students. “After being diagnosed with ADHD, we met Holly and she immediately made me feel comfortable with her understanding and willingness to work with our daughter.” Now, her student loves school, is caught up in each of her subjects, and truly looks up to Holly as a person and role model. With a love of learning, Holly makes sure kids have fun while they are participating in lessons and projects. She is there to support her students and let’s their voices be heard. “I’m not sure what we would have done if we would not have met this wonderful teacher,” said Amber.

BHPARENT 29


PROUD SPONSORS OF THE 2019 EDUCATION HONOREES

Eve Finnegan Berry Patch Preschool Room at Rapid City YMCA Child Care

Three- and four-year-olds are their own kind of wonderful. As preschoolers, these kids are learning like sponges and finding their own personalities without their parents. This is only one aspect that lead teacher Eve Finnegan admires of her students at Rapid City’s YMCA Child Care Berry Patch Room. “This is my favorite age. They have zero filter,” said Eve with a smile. “They are pure and completely themselves. They are just beginning and conquering so much, from socializing and communication skills to the things we are learning. I love the spunky attitudes of my threenagers.” Eve has always known she wanted to

30 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

be a teacher. From playing school and mom when she was little, to mothering each of her six siblings, being a leader and role model to others is what Eve was meant to do. Starting her career with at-risk youth in Minnesota, family and marriage brought her to South Dakota. She started an inhome daycare until her own daughters were in school before starting at the YMCA as a teacher’s aide in 2016. In the summer of 2018, Eve was promoted to a lead teacher and is now supported by three of her own aides. “I have the most amazing team and we work so well together that it is just fun to come to work. It’s a treat,” said Eve. “We enjoy the kids, the conversations, and that’s what makes it a community. We all genuinely care about each other.” And a community it is. “Eve puts her

whole heart into making her classroom a welcoming place for children and their families,” said Eve’s supervisor Nicole Weiss. “There is nothing she wouldn’t do to make sure the kids in her class are happy, safe, and learning.” Focusing a little bit in each subject, from science and math to literacy and art, preschoolers in Eve’s class will know how to write their name, know their numbers and letters, and know how to count before they head off for Kindergarten. “When you see them accomplish something (even something so small), and they are so proud, it is the most rewarding thing to be a part of,” said Eve. Being surrounded by little kids is Eve’s favorite thing, with every day being different from the day before. And with a passion for learning, Berry Patch is the perfect place for Miss Eve to be.


WE PROUDLY

SUPPORT

OUR EDUCATORS A teacher’s workday extends beyond the classroom. They are role models, they inspire, and they mold us into who we are today. We want to say “Thank You” by offering special pricing for educators. Check out gmeducatordiscount.com for more information.

Must be employed by a public school, private school, college or university. Please note that teachers employed by state or municipal governments may be subject to restrictions that limit their ability to accept this offer. For more information, go to www.gmeducatordiscount.com for rules and guidelines. Authorization numbers obtained are valid for 90 days toward the purchase or lease of an eligible vehicle at The Program Price.

Call or Text (605) 343-1282

2323 E Mall Dr. Rapid CIty Formerly Rapid Chevrolet Cadillac BHPARENT 31


family matters

Mother, wife, teacher, principal, photographer, and business owner – Tarin Hartman of Custer wears many hats. words Katie Wiederholt photos Tayhart Photography “It’s 24/7,” she said. “We appreciate the freedom home-schooling offers.” Tarin and her husband Tod balance raising and home-schooling six children with owning and managing three businesses. He stays busy with Tod and Son’s Construction and she runs Tayhart Photography. The two also recently opened Southern Sonder, an event venue just outside of Custer, specializing in weddings, elopements, and small gatherings. The decision to home-school came naturally for Tarin, who received most of her education that way. She was born in Arizona, but her father, a pastor and contractor, moved the family to the southern Black Hills when Tarin was a young child. She spent most of her childhood in Hot Springs and attended public school for a while, though most of her education was through home-schooling. She has 19 siblings and her mother home-schooled all of them at one point or another. Her parents involved her in her educational decisions, and by high school, Tarin had desired to be schooled at home. Now Tarin and Tod, who was born and raised in Custer and attended public school, have involved their older children in education decisions, as well. Tarin has been homeschooling for 11 years, since the oldest Hartman child, Damon (age 16) started school. She also home-schools Toriana (age 14), Truen (age 12), Graysen (age 10), Brecken (age 6), and plans to home-school Tinleigh (age 3). A typical school day for the Hartman kids involves being part of the family businesses. This approach to learning is important to Tarin, who grew up helping her father with the family construction business and also worked at Evans Plunge in Hot Springs. “I consider that a huge part of their schooling,” she said. For instance, Truen and Graysen spend a lot of time helping Tod with the construction business. Through that, they hone their math and communication skills. The South Dakota Department of Education requires standardized testing for grades 4, 8, and 11. Each year in January, the public school district is required to notify all home-school settings within their district boundaries about those testing requirements. 32 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

Parents wishing to provide alternative schooling for their children must also complete a public school exemption certificate annually and submit it to the local public school administration office. They also must submit transcripts as graduation approaches to prove requirements have been met. The Hartmans balance meeting those requirements with introducing their children to unique experiences. Recently, the family took a month to travel to Arizona and conducted school along the way, while visiting historical sites. “Each homeschooling family has a unique way of doing things, and that’s one of the things that drew me

I have a supportive group of fellow home-schooling parents in the Custer area. I couldn’t do it without being able to communicate with other moms and get out of the house once in a while. to homeschooling,” she said. “I’m able to customize teaching methods to each child and I love that.” Although Tarin loves home-schooling, it is not without a few challenges. She is teaching several different grades at the same time. “It was especially difficult when the four oldest were younger,” she said. “But as the kids have gotten older, they have really helped teach one another, which is helpful and a good learning experience for them.” Another challenge has been realizing there’s no “one size fits all” method of teaching. “They all learn and accept teaching in different ways,” she said. Home-schooling offers Tarin the ability to approach education in a flexible way unique to each child. She embraces the challenges and rewards that come along with wearing so many hats.

Photos: Whether the Hartmans are outside playing and hiking, or inside cooking and learning, this loving family is always up to something great.

How do you do it with six kids? How do any of us do what we do? That’s what God has given us, and it’s great. It’s really no different than parenting any other number of kids. There are just a few more of them to keep each other occupied. How do you ensure good socialization takes place? It’s huge to be part of outside activities. We figured that out when our oldest started playing soccer at a young age. Besides being with siblings and close friends, he hadn’t really been in structured settings with other kids. It was so good for him to learn to listen to other adults, line up with a group, and respect others. Since then all six kids have been involved in at least one activity outside the home. If they sign up for something, we ensure they commit to it and at least complete that one season. How is your curriculum derived? Each one of the kids learns so differently, so I don’t use the exact same curriculum for all of them. Some of our curriculum pieces are handme-downs from my mother. Others I purchase through online resources like Rainbow Resource Center and Khan Academy. Who do you turn to for support? My mom is my biggest support. She’s my first go-to when I need help. I am one of 20 children, all of whom were home-schooled at one point or another. I have also been part of a home-schooling cooperative in Rapid City in past years, and I have a supportive group of fellow home-schooling parents in the Custer area. I couldn’t do it without being able to communicate with other moms and get out of the house once in a while.


TITLE SECTION

Each one of the kids learns so differently, so I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use the exact same curriculum for all of them.

BHPARENT 33


Banana Bunch Children’s Learning Center

A place to Imagine. A place to Explore. A place to GROW!

YOUR MOST PROFITABLE

FUNDRAISER MADE EASY

Year Round Programs • 6 Weeks - 12 Years Old • A Starting Strong Provider • Accepts Child Care Assistance • Summer Day Camps for School Age Children

Licensed

Monday - Friday 6:00am - 6:30pm

605.341.2333

924 E St Patrick St • Rapid City

605.250.2919

BLACKHILLSCOUPONS.COM

WWW.TUTORDOCTOR.COM/ SOUTH-DAKOTA

SUCCESSFUL CAREER PATHS INTERSECT WITH YOUR HOME

34 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


“Positive Uplifting Music”

605-399-1071 www.kslt.com 1853 Fountain Plaza Dr. Rapid City, SD 57702


Weather Woes How to manage a child's fear of storms words Christa Melnyk Hines

36

BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


STORMS AGES & STAGES

With sirens howling, thunder crashing and lightening forking out of dark clouds, most anyone might feel a mixture of unease and awe with nature’s dramatic display. Many families, however, would

leather gloves, and safety whistles. With storm season imminent, take a few minutes several times a week to conduct family storm drills. Set up a small table in your basement for you and your family to engage in a familiar

“When you feel safe, there is a beauty to thunderstorms that kids can learn to appreciate…” prefer to skip the show given the emotional havoc that storms wreak on their kids. Sarah Rost-Hyde from Box Elder says her daughter, age 9, has always had a fear of storms – large or small – since she was young. Running inside, her daughter will take cover under blankets or safely beside her mom for protection. “Thunderstorms with loud cracks are the worst,” said Sarah. “Now that she’s a little older, she can deal with the little storms by putting in her headphones. But, when the big storms hit – I just have to hold her.” If volatile weather sparks a crushing wave of panic in your child, calm storm preparation, soothing relaxation techniques and a dash of Weather 101 may help ease her fears. Build calm before the storm. “The most important thing that parents can do is prepare their children for severe weather way before it happens,” says Dr. Edward Christophersen, a pediatric psychologist. “Parents need to be cognizant that their behavior directly influences their child’s behavior. So, parents should very calmly practice their threatening weather procedures.” Create a severe weather plan with your family. Designate a safe area in your home, preferably a basement, or a bathroom or closet in the middle of the house on the lowest level. Store a storm safety kit in your safe area that includes a battery-powered weather radio, flashlight, blankets, a pair of

and relaxing activity like a board or card game. When threatening weather happens, calmly follow the plan you and your family practiced. Practice relaxation techniques. Play weather sounds for your child while you’re relaxing together, playing a game, eating dinner, or while she’s doing homework. Begin with very gentle sounds like a light rain and slowly progress to more serious rain and thunderstorms. “The rationale here is to get the child to pair or associate weather sounds with frequently occurring activities that are not anxiety provoking,” Dr. Christophersen says. Download free weather sounds to your laptop or smartphone, like “Sleepmaker Rain” or “SleepOwl”.

BOOKS FOR STORMS: • Storm Song • Little Critter: Just a Big Storm • Children's Book: Thunderstorms are NOT Scary [Bedtime Stories for Kids] • A Party for Clouds: Thunderstorms (Bel the Weather Girl) • The Monster Storm WEBSITES: • scied.ucar.edu/webweather/ thunderstorms • weatherwizkids.com/ • weather.gov/cae/justforkids.html APPS: • kidweatherapp.com Seasons and Weather! Science educational games • commonsensemedia.org/appreviews/seasons-and-weatherscience-educational-games

Teach Weather 101

Sometimes, children will need a more in-depth conversation to answer their questions. This is where a weather 101 talk is great! “Kids are frightened of storms because they are loud, big, and can do a lot of damage,” said Chief Meteorologist at KOTA Mike Modrick. “Teach your kids the basics, show them they can watch the storms safely from inside and sit with them. And teach them over and over to come inside when storms pop up.” The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR) has great teaching modules for kids. There, parents and children can learn how storms, lightening, and hail form. Mike also suggests teaching children how to stay safe during a storm with basic rules. These include: coming inside when there is a storm, having a “safe space” during a warning, and watching the local new to follow the weather. “When you feel safe, there is a beauty to thunderstorms that kids can learn to appreciate, even in the heavy rains, the gusty winds, and my favorite, the rainbow after,” said Mike. When to seek help. Children commonly experience specific fears or phobias, but typically phobias wane as kids grow older. If your child’s phobia lasts more than six months after the storm has occurred and impairs her ability to participate in daily activities, find an experienced anxiety disorder therapist with supervised clinical experience in treating phobia. Dr. Christophersen says a reputable therapist will likely conduct a standardized anxiety screening. Avoid therapists who want to start therapy by giving your child an IQ test. Springtime in the Black Hills of South Dakota can be a rollercoaster of weather. Be prepared and help your child get through the season with a plan in place, and ways to handle their weather woes.

BHPARENT 37


There is more in common with a twoyear-old’s personality and a teenager’s attitude than you may have ever thought. words Pam Molnar photos Jesse Brown Nelson

W

hile picking up my prescription at Walgreens last week, the woman in front of me had two small children. I guessed their ages to be 4 and 2. It was around dinner time and everyone was in meltdown mode, including their mom. She apologized several times to the cashier and to me for the scene we were witnessing, but I just waved her off. I told her I have been in her shoes plenty of times and I completely understood. When she left, the cashier said to me, “I’m glad mine are in high school now. That is such a tough age to parent.” I nodded in agreement but carried those words in my head into the parking lot and on the way home. Was parenting a teen any easier than a two-year-old? Actually, there are a lot of similarities between them. They have outbursts in public. Yes, they still happen. Of course, they are not exactly the same but they are still embarrassing. Recently I brought my daughter with me to the store to pick up something things for dinner. “Why do we need that? I can just have cereal.” I told her we were not eating cereal for dinner. Moments later, I stopped at the end of the aisle where they had a display of cereal on sale. As I put some in the cart, my daughter mocked loudly, “I thought we weren’t eating cereal,” just as another woman was passing us. Thankfully she gave me a sympathetic smile and kept moving. They are both picky eaters. When my kids were younger, I told them they had to eat a number of bites of something equal to their age before I would excuse them from eating it. Now, as teenagers, their busy schedule keeps them from the family dinner table. Every morning, I ask who will be home for dinner. “Maybe. What are we having?” If they don’t like what is on the menu, their practice, or jobs coincidently overlaps with our dinner.

38 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


HUMOR AGES & STAGES

Common Symptoms May Include: indecisiveness, outbursts (typically in public), sleepless nights, unpredicatable moods You still don’t get a full night’s sleep. With two year olds, you have fights about bed times, they have bed-wetting accidents, bad dreams and like to get up early. With teenagers, you have fights about curfews, you worry what they are doing while they are out, you doze restlessly on the couch until they get home and then you hear them gaming or Facetiming long after you have gone to bed. You worry when they are quiet. Two year olds are loud by nature. They haven’t mastered their inside voices, they play act without fear of being made fun of and their toys are unnecessarily noisy. When they are quiet, they are probably up to no good. Teenagers are very similar. They come through the family living spaces like tornados – talking, playing music and with phone alerts going off constantly. They share stories about their day as they fill up on after school snacks and head upstairs to unwind. It’s when they enter the house quietly and go straight to their room without a word that you worry about what is going on in their world. You always have to pick up after them. It’s understandable when your two-year-old misses the garbage, cleans up spills haphazardly hoping no one notices, leaves her towels on the bathroom floor and her handprints all over the place. Sadly, even after 15 years of reminding, you will still find her doing these things. The only difference is that the handprints are bigger. But, at the end of the day, both a two-year-old and a teenager appreciate everything their parents do for them — even if they don’t quite know the perfect way to tell you.

Pam Molnar is an essayist, mother of three and a terrible twos survivor. With the help of her teens, she is fluent in sarcasm, hashtag and autocorrect.

BHPARENT 39


GREAT BARGAINS FOR THE UPCOMING SEASON!

EXCLUSIVE SAVINGS!

Infant, Children, Teens, Maternity, Women & Mens Clothing, and so much more.

Pop Up Seasonal Consignment Shop

Spring Sale: April 25-27 at the Rushmore Civic Center! UpWeGrowSale.com

ATTRACTIONS, ENTERTAINMENT, DINING, SHOPPING, AND GOLF. G INCLUDILIN FAM YES FAVORITI & WATIK RUSH IN MOUNTA

Do you know someone in the Black Hills who is doing something amazing?

View Offers & Order Online at BlackHillsCoupons.com

Email ideas to editorial@blackhillsparent.com

WHATEVER YOUR FINANCIAL GOALS ... We’ll help you reach them.

Thrivent Financial offers a full range of products, services and tools to help you achieve financial security, including: • Life insurance • Health insurance • Retirement options • Mutual funds • Retail brokerage • Managed accounts • Annuities • Estate and legacy strategies • Education funding options We’ll create a financial strategy that reflects your goals and values. Black Hills NW NE Group 2210 Jackson Blvd Rapid City, SD 57702

605-399-9373

Calvin Sievers

LUTCF®, FIC Financial Consultant

Rebekah J Maggard FIC Financial Associate

Benjamin J Rust

Financial Associate

CA Insurance 0I91279

Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial, the marketing name for Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Not all products are available in all states. Securities and investment advisory services are offered through Thrivent Investment Management Inc., 625 Fourth Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55415, a FINRA and SIPC member and a wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent. Thrivent Financial representatives are registered representatives of Thrivent Investment Management Inc. They are also licensed insurance agents/producers of Thrivent. Investment advisory services, including fee-based financial planning services, are available through qualified investment advisor representatives only. For additional important information, visit Thrivent.com/disclosures. Thrivent.com • 800-847-4836

40 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

20328 R4-18


FINANCE COLUMN

What does student debt look like in America? The numbers speak for themselves. words Calvin M. Sievers CLTC®, FIC , LUTCF, Financial Associate at Thrivent Financial® - Black Hills NW Nebraska Group In 2017, the Pew Research Center published a brief based on data from the Federal Reserve Board. It revealed: Americans owed more than $1.3 trillion in student loans by June 2017, more than two and a half times what they owed a decade earlier.

• The median borrower with •

outstanding student loan debt for his/her education owed approximately $17,000 in 2016. Higher educational attainment could mean more money owed – the median amount for those with a postgraduate degree, for example, is approximately $45,000.

What is the true cost of college?

Families should estimate the cumulative cost of education for schools on their children’s bucket list and evaluate what financial resources they have available to pay for tuition.

How can loans help?

Families should take stock of the loan options available and identify what will work best given their financial circumstances and needs.

What scholarships and grants are available?

Students should be proactive about exploring scholarship and grant opportunities and work with a guidance counselor to understand the criteria for applying.

With these kinds of figures, it’s important for families to start planning early on. As a part of that, parents and students should sit down together, discuss their goals when it comes to higher education and develop a smart strategy for evaluating expenses and handling debt. It may be wise to partner with a financial professional who can provide additional guidance and help answer important questions, including:

What options do I have besides loans?

Students have many options beyond debt including working while in school, looking for lower cost schools, living off campus to save money on housing costs, and enlisting the help of family and friends that may want to support their educational efforts.

How do I get rid of debt when I have it?

Students with debt should have a strategy for paying back money quickly. Budgeting and refinancing can help graduates manage their payments month-to-month. As with any major financial decision, investing in higher education requires forethought and planning. Children and parents should navigate the journey together, and be open to seeking help when they need it to make sure they are on the best path to being wise with money.

This article was prepared by Thrivent Financial for use by the Black Hills NW NE representative FR-Calvin M. Sievers. He has an office at 2210 Jackson Blvd in Rapid City and can also be reached at (605) 399-9373.

BHPARENT 41


My child suffers from asthma, what can I do to help him/her? Asthma prevalence is approximately 3% of the U.S. population, and although it occurs at all ages, it is most common in children younger than 10. This is a great question not only for your child but for all the readers as well. As a clinician there are 6 areas to look into when children suffer from asthma: 1) Keep the environment clean. Environment testing can be done, and then avoiding those allergens can help significantly. Consider using Ventflex (hypoallergenic synthetic) bedding material and installing an air purifier such as HEPA (high-efficiency particulate arresting), which is attachable to central heating and air conditioning systems. 2) Find triggers of allergens in the diet. Basic blood testing is preferred, but patients can also try N.A.E.T. testing or a 4-day rotational diet if blood testing isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t an option for your child. 3) Supplementation. Take a high-quality multivitamin and omega-3 supplement. Multivitamins should contain good sources of B6, B12, Vitamin C, Vitamin E, Magnesium and Selenium.

42 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM 48

Omega-3 supplements should contain at least 1-2,000 mg EPA/DHA. 4) Sleep and hydration. Adults should be getting at least 7-9 hours of sleep each night and children range from 10-14 hours, depending on age. While water intake recommendations can vary, adults should roughly drink 12-16 cups and children range from 4-10 cups, depending on age. 5) Keep the spine aligned. Keeping the spine aligned in the mid-back region through regular chiropractic care helps with lung performance. 6) Exercise. Because some exercise can induce asthma, it is best to monitor this under a doctor. However, the right amount of exercise can help reduce inflammation and asthma.

2019

ASK THE DOCTOR

the Join BHPARENT for

SATURDAY, APRIL 6 10 A.M. - 2 P.M.

FREE TO A T

TE N D

Summer planning made easy - camps, classes, workshops, and more - all in one place! Find out more at BlackHillsParent.com

Event Sponsor

Stress-Free Fundraising

Where Bright Smiles Begin

While these areas are ways to improve symptoms, please keep in mind that if your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s asthma is severe enough to cause anaphylaxis or acute asthma attacks, it is good to have an epi-pen or inhaler on hand, which can be prescribed by your primary doctor. Dr. Robert Kuyper Alternative Health Care Center

RAPID CITY (605) 341-3068

Alternative Health Care Center 2024 Jackson Blvd. Rapid City, SD 57702 605-341-4850

Karli M. Williams, DDS

Brent J. Bradley, DDS

Kelli J. Jobman, DDS

www.bhpediatricdentistry.com


MEDICAL COLUMN ChooseMyPlate.gov The U.S. Department of Agriculture uses the MyPlate guide to help families choose a healthier lifestyle. It’s a reminder to find your healthy eating style and build it throughout your lifetime. MyPlate offers ideas and tips to help you create a healthier eating style that meets your individual needs and improves your health.

Make half your grains whole grains. Grains include whole grains and refined, enriched grains. Choose whole grains more often.

Focus on whole fruits. Whole fruits include fresh, frozen, dried, and canned options. Choose whole fruits more often than 100 percent fruit juice.

Dairy includes milk, yogurt, cheese, and calcium-fortified soy beverages (soymilk). If your child is overweight or obese, it may be beneficial to try low-fat or skim milk.

Vary your veggies. Vegetables are divided into five subgroups and include dark-green vegetables, red and orange vegetables, legumes (beans and peas), starchy vegetables, and other vegetables. Choose vegetables from all subgroups.

The Skinny on Childhood Obesity words Dr. Monaleze Saini, Family Medicine Specialist at Regional Health Eat your vegetables. Parents have probably been saying that to their children since the days of our hunter-gatherer ancestors. However, good nutrition is more important now than it ever was. Families have so many food choices –– and so many bad choices. Nutritious foods can get crowded out by burgers, fries, syrup-soaked instant waffle sticks, high-salt mac-and-cheese and sugar-laden snacks. Growing bodies need a well-balanced mix of protein, fruits, grains, dairy and, yes, vegetables to thrive. They don’t need added sugar, saturated fats and trans fats. The percentage of children affected by obesity has tripled since the 1970s, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2015-16, nearly 1 in 5 Americans age 6 to 19 had obesity. Obesity in children is now the #1 health concern for American parents. It is also the most common chronic disease of childhood. Health and emotional problems follow closely behind obesity. According to the CDC, children with obesity are more susceptible to asthma, sleep apnea, bone problems, joint problems, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Emotionally, kids with obesity must

Vary your protein routine. Protein foods include both animal (seafood, meat, poultry, and eggs) and plant sources (nuts, beans and peas, seeds, and soy products). Choose a variety of lean protein foods from both plant and animal sources.

contend with bullying, teasing, isolation, depression and low self-esteem. Of course, not all children are born with the DNA of a marathon runner, but it’s important to make sure they develop food and exercise habits that keep them as healthy as they can possibly be.

Overweight or Obese? Quick tips for parents if children are overweight or obese: Cook with your kids Eat breakfast Don’t let them graze Avoid using food as a reward Count the colors Use the USDA Nutrition Guide (at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily) Limit screen time to 2 hours or less per day At least 1 hour of physical activity every day Make physical activity fun (dancing, swimming, jumping rope, playing tag)

How do you know if your child is affected by obesity? Although Body Mass Index is not a perfect measure, it’s an easy-to-estimate gauge of overall weight status. There a number of online BMI calculators. If you want to do the math yourself, this is the formula: Weight (lb) ÷ height (in) ÷ height again x 703 = BMI. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds and stand 5 feet, 8 inches tall, then your BMI would be 150 ÷ 68 ÷ 68 x 703 = 22.8 BMI. After that, physicians use CDC pediatric growth charts to compare the BMI of children at various ages.

Your Doctor Can Help

Your child’s doctor is your best advocate in the journey to get your child to be as healthy as they can possibly be. They can help screen your child for possible chronic conditions like high blood pressure or diabetes that accompanies obesity. In turn, they can also help you develop a plan to manage and treat those conditions. BHPARENT 43


NOW ENROLLING FOR...

SUMMER CAMP!! FIT-N-FUN 605.341.0078 www.fitnfun.org 3660 Sturgis Road (on the North end of Just Jymnastics)

Rapid City, SD Fit-N-Fun offers children (ages 3-12) a Summer Camp experience, when school is out, filled with fun hands-on activities and weekly activities! Kids can expect a Summer filled with field-trips, weekly themes, water activities and of course, FUN!!

A pr

EXPO

BUMP

A B B & Y

il 4, 2019

4-7:30pm | 329 Main Street, Ste 1 | Rapid City

Find “Black Hills Bump and Baby Expo” on Facebook or Eventbrite for details!

^

and Toddler

44 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


TITLE SECTION

LET’S RECOGNIZE

EXCEPTIONAL NURSES Has a nurse impacted your life or a loved one’s with their comfort, care and exceptional skills? Is your medical practice that much stronger because a dedicated nurse is improving the lives of patients and colleagues every day? Nominate a Black Hills RN or LPN online at BlackHillsParent.com

BHPARENT 45


ACTS ADVOCATES

FOR CREATIVE

THEATRE

STUDENTS Making an Impact at Central High School – supporting theater students through mentoring, fundraising and scholarships words Molly Barari It started as a group of parents doing fundraising for their high school theater students at Central High School in 2006. Thirteen years later, the Advocates for Creative Theater Students (ACTS) program is thriving at the high school and in the community. The main goal of the program now is to connect adults who love theater with students interested in theater arts. “When it comes to our mentors, they are volunteers in the community who work as bankers, lawyers, teachers – all kinds of professions – but they are also involved in theater,” said Holly Perli of Rapid City, the current president of Central High School’s ACTS group. “We have had a variety of volunteers, including many Central High School alumni, theater professionals, and local talent from the Black Hills Playhouse, 46 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

Firehouse Brewing Theatre, and Black Hills Community Theatre.” Another goal of the ACTS program is to produce a big show every three years, which serves as the main fundraiser for student trips. In recent years, ACTS has helped organize performances of The Laramie Project, Pippin, Hairspray, Rent, and Newsies. The shows serve as fundraisers for overseas trips, which theater students are invited to go on every three years. Since 2008, the students have been to Greece, England, Italy, and the British Isles. They will be taking a trip to Spain, France, and Italy in 2020. “There are always elements of theater on these trips,” said Holly. “Sometimes the students perform, sometimes they collaborate with international professionals, and

Student travelers and ACTS Chaperones in London, June 2017.

sometimes they have backstage tours. These are exciting learning experiences for the students.” In the off years, ACTS sponsors two $500 scholarships to Central High School students who are involved in


PROUD SPONSORS OF THE 2019 BH COMMUNITY NONPROFITS

Top left: ACTS Volunteer Jeff Counsellor, Board members Alicia Counsellor, Sarah Morrison, Holly Perli, and Artistic Director Justin Speck at the State One-Act Festival in Aberdeen, February 2019 Bottom left: Brooklyn DeVries, Mary Duncan, and Alivia Olson attending a production of “An American in Paris” on the international trip to the Capitals of the British Isles, June 2017.

theater. Students must write essays to be considered as recipients for the scholarships. Students do not need to be going into the theater profession to be eligible for the scholarships, but they must have participated in theater during high school. Holly got involved in ACTS because her daughter, Olivia, a junior at Central, participates in theater. Although Holly works as a nurse, she is no stranger to the theater world. In addition to helping with ACTS productions, she has been involved in shows with Black Hills Community Theatre, Firehouse, and Hapaloa Productions. What she loves most about ACTS is that it provides ongoing support for theater students.

“There is an ongoing relationship between these mentors and the students. They don’t just come together for eight weeks and never chat again,” said Holly. “Students come to know and recognize adult leaders in the community, and the mentors stay in their lives, helping them to grow into open-minded, healthy young adults.” Holly believes it is important for people to be involved with theater because it develops the human condition. It also provides a sense of community that is sometimes lost in society. “Theater builds tolerance, acceptance and respect for each other. It’s an inclusive activity,” she said. “Not everyone is an actor. It takes people

Above: Rehearsal in December 2018 for the ACTS production of Disney “NEWSIES”, involving students from at least 7 schools in the region, parents, alumni, adult professionals and community members.

working on sets, costumes, stage management, and more. It truly takes a village.” BHPARENT 47


PROUD SPONSOR OF BLACK HILLS CUTIES

SHARE YOUR CUTIES ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM WITH #BLACKHILLSCUTIES

48 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM


BLACK HILLS CUTIES

329 Main Street, Ste. 1 Rapid City, SD 57701 (605) 343-7684 blackhillscoupons.com

BHPARENT 49


March

Weekly Fun in the Hills TUESDAYS Growing up WILD! 4-H Youth Program Advisor, Jane Amiotte shares stores that connect children to nature, followed by a craft. 10:15-11 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Little Owl Tuesdays Join the fun and listen to favorite stories and songs with a library storyteller. 9:30-10 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Pre-K Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Toddler Story Time Join us for songs, music, and stories. 9:30-10 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 WEDNESDAYS Pre-K Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Weekly Book Readings Join the Museum of Geology for a weekly children’s book reading and related activity in the Museum’s Kid Zone. 2-3 p.m., Museum of Geology, 501 E St. Joseph St., Rapid City, (605) 394-2467

THURSDAYS Baby Bumblebee Thursdays Bring your little ones for a fun-filled story tim. 9-10 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Toddler Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Hot Springs Public Library, 2005 Library Dr., Hot Springs, (605) 745-3151 FRIDAYS Preschool Story Time 10-11a.m., Hot Springs Public Library, 2005 Library Dr., Hot Springs, (605) 745-3151 Story Time 10 a.m., Custer County Library, 447 Crook St., Ste. 4, Custer, (605) 673-4803 SATURDAYS BHSU Children’s Story Time Come listen to our BHSU or SHS students read a story and enjoy a craft, music, and snacks. 10-11 a.m., BHSU Jacket Zone, 617 N. Main St., Spearfish, (605) 717-5801

Our Spring Favorites Friday 1st Friday Skate Nights Join us every first Friday of the month for our family Skate Night! 5:30-8:30 p.m., Lookout Room, Spearfish Rec & Aquatics Center, Spearfish, (605) 722-1430

Saturday 2nd Black Hills Symphony Orchestra Presents: Young Artist Competition 40th Annual Celebration First Young Artist Competition winner and Boston Pops cellist, Bill Rounds will perform Antonin Dvorak’s Cello Concerto. The 2019 Winner will also perform with the BHSO. 7:30 p.m., Rapid City Performing Arts Center, 601 Columbus St., Rapid City, (605) 394-1786

Saturday 2nd Co-Ed Youth Basketball Skills Camp New to the game or want to improve your game? Introducing a great way for youth to improve their basketball skill training/ development. 9-10 a.m. & 11a.m.-12:30 p.m., Custer YMCA, 644 Crook St., Custer, (605) 673-5134 Wednesday 6th, 8th, 9th Rapid City Rush vs. Utah Grizzlies 7:05 p.m., Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, 444 N. Mt. Rushmore Rd., Rapid City, (605) 716-PUCK (7825)

Saturday 9th Spring UpCycling Class: Wind Sock What better way to watch the wind blow than by creating your very own windsock from tin cans and ribbon. Registeration is required. Free event. 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., Rapid City Recycles, 5165 S Highway 79, Rapid City, (605) 355-3496 Saturday 9th Co-Ed Youth Basketball Skills Camp A great way for youth to improve their basketball skill training/development. 9 -10 a.m. & 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Custer YMCA, 644 Crook St., Custer, (605) 673-5134 Saturday 9th Family Introduction to Backpacking Interested in backpacking but don’t know where to start? Join us to learn more about gear, clothing, food, navigation and more. 10-11a.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Saturday 9th Saturday Art Adventures FREE family-oriented art activities and tours of the galleries are fun and educational. 1-3 p.m., Dahl Arts Center, 713 7th St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4101


PROUD SPONSORS OF FAMILY FUN

Saturday 9th 4Gmx Indoor Motocross 4Gmx hosts an indoor motocross series with riders coming from all over the Midwest and Canada. These riders range from 4 years old to professional motocross racers. 6:30-10 p.m., James Kjerstad Events Center, E Centre St., Rapid City, (605) 355-3861 Sunday 10th Daylight Savings Time Don’t forget to turn your clocks back 1 hour! 6 Wednesday 13th LEGO Club (Ages 8-12) Join us for LEGO Club. Imagine. Build. Display! Show off your designs and creations. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Thursday 14th Shooting Positions Learn and practice different shooting positions to be more comfortable in the field hunting. Adults encouraged to attend with children. 7-8 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310

Saturday 16th St. Patrick’s Day at Deadwood History Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by learning about Irish immigrants who called the Black Hills home. Light refreshments provided. For students in grades K-6. Prices vary. RESERVATIONS REQUIRED. 10 a.m.- noon, Days of ‘76 Museum, 18 Seventy Six Drive, Deadwood, (605) 578-1657 Saturday 16th Beginner Roller Skating For first time skaters and very young children 1-3 p.m., The Historic Roosevelt Events Center, 1010 State St, Belle Fourche, (605) 892-5619 Sunday 17th Family Fun Day: Luck of the Irish This Family Fun Day will include a short film, a book-drawing, a free take-home packet about the Irish and refreshments. Free with membership. 2:00-4:00 p.m., Tri-State Museum and Visitor Center, 415 5th Ave, Belle Fourche, (605) 723-1200

Sunday 17th Family Fun Day: Money, Money, Money This is an opportunity for children, parents and grandparents to interact with each other during educational activities. Enjoy a presentation, crafts, activities, a free take home packet and a book drawing. $2, 2-4 p.m., Tri-State Museum, 415 5th Ave, Belle Fourche, (605) 723-1200

Monday 18th-22nd The Club for Boys Corporate Free Throw Challenge A fun team building event that supports a local nonprofit by shooting hoops, having lunch, and sharing a lot of laughs. 10 a.m., The Club for Boys, 320 N. 4th St, Rapid City, (605) 343-3500

Tuesday 19th Marksmanship Tips Learn tips and tricks to increase your shooting accuracy. Adults encouraged to attend with children. 7-8 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Tuesday 19th Family Bingo Just for Fun!! Don’t bring money. Just bring yourself and be prepared to have a great time! Prizes and refreshments. 6:30-7:30 p.m., Belle Fourche United Methodist Church, 1804 7th Ave, Belle Fourche, (605) 892-2405

Wednesday 20th Tweens Get Crafty! Calling all tweens and early teens who are looking to get crafty! Age 10+ 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Friday 22nd Youth Archery Skills Learn how to shoot a compound bow and archery hunting techniques. 6:00-7:00 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Friday 22nd-23rd Rapid City Rush vs. Idaho Steelheads 7:05 p.m., Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, 444 N. Mt. Rushmore Rd., Rapid City, (605) 716-PUCK (7825)

Friday 22nd-24th YFS’ 24th Annual Kids Fair A safe place to be active and engage in fun, handson activities while spending time with their families! This year’s Kids Fair will feature past favorites such face painting, live entertainment, inflatable attractions, a giant sand box, and dozens of booths just brimming with hands– on activities. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, 444 N. Mt. Rushmore Rd., Rapid City

BHPARENT 51


April

Weekly Fun in the Hills

TUESDAYS Growing up WILD! 4-H Youth Program Advisor, Jane Amiotte shares stores that connect children to nature, followed by a craft. 10:15-11 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Little Owl Tuesdays Join the fun and listen to favorite stories and songs with a library storyteller. 9:30-10 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Pre-K Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Toddler Story Time Join us for songs, music, and stories. 9:30-10 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330

WEDNESDAYS Pre-K Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Weekly Book Readings Join the Museum of Geology for a weekly children’s book reading and related activity in the Museum’s Kid Zone. 2-3 p.m., Museum of Geology, 501 E St. Joseph St., Rapid City, (605) 394-2467 THURSDAYS Baby Bumblebee Thursdays Bring your little ones for a fun-filled story tim. 9-10 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Toddler Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Hot Springs Public Library, 2005 Library Dr., Hot Springs, (605) 745-3151 FRIDAYS Preschool Story Time 10-11a.m., Hot Springs Public Library, 2005 Library Dr., Hot Springs, (605) 7453151 Story Time 10 a.m., Custer County Library, 447 Crook St., Ste. 4, Custer, (605) 673-4803

Tuesday 2nd Marksmanship Tips Learn tips and tricks to increase your shooting accuracy. Adults encouraged to attend with children. 7:00-8:00 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310

Thursday 4th Black Hills Bump & Baby Expo A celebration of moms-tobe, new moms, babies and families in the Black Hills Area. The Expo (previously The Baby Bash) provides the opportunity to learn about the wonderful resources, services and products available to you locally to help you have a healthy pregnancy, birth and new parenting experience. 4-8 p.m., Evergreen Media, 329 Main St, Ste. 1, Rapid City, (605) 343-7684

Friday 5th Friday Skate Nights Join us every first Friday of the month for our family Skate Night! 5:30-8:30 p.m., Lookout Room, Spearfish Rec & Aquatics Center, Spearfish, (605) 722-1430 Friday 5th Youth Archery Skills Learn how to shoot a compound bow and archery hunting techniques. 6-7 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Friday 5th-6th Rapid City Rush vs. Kansas City Mavericks 7:05 p.m., Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, 444 N. Mt. Rushmore Rd., Rapid City, (605) 716-PUCK (7825)

Friday 5th Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music The Hills Are Alive! A brand new production of The Sound Of Music is coming to Rapid City. The spirited, romantic and beloved musical story of Maria and the von Trapp Family will once again thrill audiences with its Tony®, Grammy® and Academy Award® winning Best Score, including “Climb Ev’ry Mountain,” and the title song. Rushmore Plaza Civic Center, 444 N. Mt. Rushmore Rd., Rapid City, 1-800-GOT-MINE

Saturday 6th 2019 Summer Camps Expo Join Black Hills Parent magazine for the second annual Black Hills Summer Expo! Bring the kids and plan your summer in one spot – camps, classes, workshops, and more… all in one spot. The event is free to attend and is open to everyone. 10 a.m.- 2 p.m., Evergreen Media, 329 Main St., Ste.1, Rapid City, (605) 343-7684

Saturday 6th Catch It, Clean It, Cook It! Fish for trout, learn to clean one and cook it! Everything you need will be provided. 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310

Sunday 7th Family Series: Charlotte’s Web Charlotte’s Web is based on E.B. White’s loving story of the friendship between a pig named Wilbur and a little gray spider named Charlotte. Wilbur has a problem: how to avoid winding up as pork chops! Charlotte, a fine writer and true friend, hits on a plan to fool Farmer Zuckerman. She will create a “miracle.” Spinning the words “Some Pig” in her web, Charlotte weaves a solution which not only makes Wilbur a prize pig but also ensures his place on the farm forever. 2:00 p.m., Rapid City Performing Arts Center, 601 Columbus St., Rapid City, (605) 394-1786 Wednesday 10th LEGO Club (Ages 8-12) Join us for a once monthly LEGO Club. Held the second Wednesday of the month. Imagine. Build. Display! Show off your designs and creations. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330


PROUD SPONSORS OF FAMILY FUN

Thursday 11th - 13th 12th Annual Ron Bender Memorial Racquetball Tournament Come...play...remember an old friend. Ron was one of the first real racquetball players at the YMCA. He is remembered as being part of the group that played a very active role in developing racquetball at the Y, helping raise the funds and assisting with the design to make the existing racquetball courts. Ron was a true friend to the Y and most of the players. Come back and make this memorial tournament a fun time. Registration deadline: Monday, Apr 8 YMCA of Rapid City, 815 Kansas City St., Rapid City, (605) 718-9622

Friday 12th-14th Junie B. Jones The Musical, Jr. Join Junie B. on her first day of first grade, where many changes are in store: Junie’s best friend Lucille has found new best friends - and Junie B. makes friends with Herb, the new kid at school. Add in a friendly cafeteria lady, an intense kickball tournament and a “TopSecret Personal Beeswax Journal,” and first grade has never been more exciting. 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., Performing Arts Center of Rapid City, 601 Columbus St, Rapid City, (605) 394-1786

Saturday 13th Easter Bunny Hop The Easter Bunny himself will be at Koko FitClub! Come enjoy an afternoon of mingling and getting a selfie with the Easter Bunny! Coloring, stickers, and snacks! 10:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Koko Fit Club, 5312 Sheridan Lake Rd, Ste. 105, Rapid City, (605) 719-3359 Saturday 13th Fishing Basics Try-It Day Learn to cast, hook, land and identify different kinds of fish. All materials provided. NO REGISTRATION REQUIRED. 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Saturday 13th Saturday Art Adventures Join us every second Saturday of the month at the Dahl Arts Center for an adventure in art! FREE family-oriented art activities and tours of the galleries are fun and educational. 1:00-3:00 p.m., Dahl Arts Center, 713 7th St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4101 Tuesday 16th Family Bingo Just for Fun!! Don’t bring money. Don’t bring a credit card. Just bring yourself and be prepared to have a great time! For the entire family. Prizes and refreshments. 6:30-7:30 p.m., Belle Fourche United Methodist Church, 1804 7th Ave, Belle Fourche, (605) 892-2405 Wednesday 17th Tweens Get Crafty! Calling all tweens and early teens who are looking to get crafty! Join us for an activity day on the third Wednesday of each month.

This program does require a minimum age of 10. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Saturday 20th Dinosaur Eggstravaganza There are many fun and educational hands-on activities for the kids that include learning about dinosaurs, their environment, how paleontologists find and dig up fossils, as well as the difference between Hollywood and Science! Free admission and we welcome children of all ages! 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., Museum of Geology, 501 E St. Joseph St., Rapid City, (605) 394-2467 Saturday 20th National Park Free Entrance Day For one week each April, we join with the National Park Foundation to celebrate America’s treasures. National Park Week is a time to explore amazing places, discover stories of history and culture, help out, and find your park! Get ready to celebrate National Park Week 2019 from April 20 to 28! Parks across the country will host a variety of special programs and events. To kick off National Park Week, all entrance fees are waived on Saturday, April 20! South Dakota is home to Badlands National Park, Jewel Cave National Monument, Minuteman Missile National Historic Site, Missouri National Recreational River, Mount Rushmore National Memorial, and Wind Cave National Park. Within a four-hour drive, visit Devils Tower National Monument, Fort Laramie National Historic Site, or Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument.

Saturday 20th National Junior Ranger Day The Junior Ranger Program is a great way to explore national parks, get some cool swag, and maybe even one of those coveted hats the rangers wear! (Well... okay. Yours might be made out of paper, but you’ll still rock it!) You’ll also learn why national parks matter and how you can be a part of the team that helps keep parks healthy. We don’t care what age you are–just come to “explore, learn, and protect” your national parks and become an official Junior Ranger! 10:30-11:30 a.m., Jewel Cave National Monument, 11149 US Highway 16, Bldg B12, Custer, (605) 673-8300

Saturday 20th Beginner Roller Skating For first time skaters and very young children 1:00 - 3:00 p.m., The Historic Roosevelt Events Center, 1010 State St, Belle Fourche, (605) 892-5619 Sunday 21st Family Fun Day, Money, Money, Money An opportunity for children, parents and grandparents to interact with each other during educational activities. Each Family Fun Day has a specific topic and typically includes a video and/or presentation, crafts, activities a free take home packet and a book drawing. Refreshments are also served. $2, 2:-4 p.m., Tri-State Museum, 415 5th Ave, Belle Fourche, (605) 723-1200

BHPARENT 53


May

Weekly Fun in the Hills

TUESDAYS Growing up WILD! 4-H Youth Program Advisor, Jane Amiotte shares stores that connect children to nature, followed by a craft. 10:15-11 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Little Owl Tuesdays Join the fun and listen to favorite stories and songs with a library storyteller. 9:30-10 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Pre-K Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Toddler Story Time Join us for songs, music, and stories. 9:30-10 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330

WEDNESDAYS Pre-K Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Weekly Book Readings Join the Museum of Geology for a weekly children’s book reading and related activity in the Museum’s Kid Zone. 2-3 p.m., Museum of Geology, 501 E St. Joseph St., Rapid City, (605) 394-2467 THURSDAYS Baby Bumblebee Thursdays Bring your little ones for a fun-filled story tim. 9-10 a.m., Rapid City Public Library, 610 Quincy St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4171 Toddler Story Time 10:30-11:30 a.m., Hot Springs Public Library, 2005 Library Dr., Hot Springs, (605) 745-3151 FRIDAYS Preschool Story Time 10-11a.m., Hot Springs Public Library, 2005 Library Dr., Hot Springs, (605) 745-3151 Story Time 10 a.m., Custer County Library, 447 Crook St., Ste. 4, Custer, (605) 673-4803

54 BLACKHILLSPARENT.COM

Wednesday 1st 2019 Black Hills Balloons Season Kick Off! Sunrise flights will depart daily, May 1 through October 31. Call now to schedule your flight and join us for a gorgeous fun-filled flight over the beautiful Black Hills. Black Hills Balloons, Custer, (605) 673-2520 Thursday 2nd Youth Archery Skills Learn how to shoot a compound bow and archery hunting techniques. 6:00-7:00 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Thursday 2nd-5th Friends of the Library Book Sale Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Saturday 4th Family Fishing Basics Day Learn to cast, hook, land and identify different kinds of fish. All materials provided. 10a.m.-3 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Wednesday 8th LEGO Club (Ages 8-12) Join us for a once monthly LEGO Club. Held the second Wednesday of the month. Imagine. Build. Display! Show off your designs and creations. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330

Saturday 11th Family Casting Try-It Day Learn the art of fly casting and practice on our pond. No registration required. 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310 Saturday 11th 2019 Great American Book Festival Authors from around the globe will be in attendance at this year’s festival. The Book Festival and related events, are FREE and open to the public. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Main Street Square, 526 Main St., Rapid City, (605) 716-7979 Saturday 11th Saturday Art Adventures FREE family-oriented art activities and tours of the galleries are fun and educational. 1-3 p.m., Dahl Arts Center, 713 7th St., Rapid City, (605) 394-4101 Wednesday 15th Tweens Get Crafty! Calling all tweens and early teens who are looking to get crafty! Join us for an activity day. Ages 10+. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Saturday 18th Family Paddling Try-It Day Ever wanted to learn paddling skills? Come to The Outdoor Campus to learn some basic skills and safety instruction. No registration required. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., The Outdoor Campus, 4130 Adventure Trail, Rapid City, (605) 394-2310

Find more events online at BlackHillsParent.com

Saturday 18th Family Fun Day: Fairytales and Folktales Families will see a short animated film, do a craft, enjoy a book drawing, and refreshments. $2, 2-4 p.m., Tri-State Museum and Visitor Center, 415 5th Ave, Belle Fourche, (605) 723-1200 Wednesday 22th Teen Friends Presents… Each month features a new topic! A program designed for teens by teens. 3:30-4:30 p.m., Grace Balloch Memorial Library, 625 N. 5th St., Spearfish, (605) 642-1330 Friday 24th Spearfish Sasquatch vs Hub City Hotshots 7:05 p.m., Black Hills Power Sports Complex, Old U.S. 14, Spearfish, (605) 342-5500 Saturday 25th Spearfish Sasquatch vs Hub City Hotshots 6:35 p.m., Black Hills Power Sports Complex, Old U.S. 14, Spearfish, (605) 342-5500 Saturday 25th Storybook Island Summer Opening Day Storybook Island will be opening for the summer season on May 25th. We will be open 7 days a week. 9:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m., Storybook Island, 1301 Sheridan Lake Rd., Rapid City (605) 342-6357 Tuesday 28th, 29th, 30th Spearfish Sasquatch vs Pierre Trappers 6:35 p.m., Black Hills Power Sports Complex, Old U.S. 14, Spearfish, (605) 342-5500


Safe, Caring & Fun

Excellence in service since 1963.

FOR AGES 6-17

MONDAY - FRIDAY RUNS MAY 28 - AUGUST 16, 2018 $12 YEA 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM RLY

ALS ME RENEW 19 SCHOLA MBERSHIP EARLY 0 2 , 1 RSH Y MEALS AND SNACKS | FIELD TRIPS MA AVAILA IPS BEGINS S 6 - 17 BLE AGE SUMMER READING AND STEAM PROGRAMS

SPORTS AND GAMES | ARTS AND CRAFTS SPECIAL EVENTS | MUCH MORE

320 N. 4 th St. Rapid City, SD 57701 (605)343-3500 | www.theclubforboys.org The USDA and the Club for Boys are equal opportunity providers and employers. BHPARENT 55


LITTLE ARTISTS SPRING

What is your favorite thing about Spring in the Black Hills? Playing basketball outside. Axton Age 9

Riding my bike! Mazie, age 10

I like how beautiful the trees and flowers are, and how everything grows so pretty! Kylee, age 6

MY FAVORITE ANIMAL IS…

Upload your drawings at BlackHillsParent.com SHARE! Send in your submissions for “Little Artist in the Hills” for the Summer 2019 issue now!

Trees, flowers, and little baby chicks. Niamh, age 12


GET BHP DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR

BHPARENT GET BHP DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR Never miss a copy. Visit blackhillsparent.com/subscribe for more details.

Jackrabbits Nurse Camp Explore the field of nursing this summer in Rapid City and Sturgis Day camp for high school and middle school students Learn more: 605-394-5390 www.sdstate.edu/nursecamp

BHPARENT 57


,LLP

,LLP

The Institute The Skin Skin Institute

Beautiful, Healthy Healthy Skin Beautiful, Skin At Every Every Age At Age The Skin Institute at Rapid City Medical Center is the largest board certified group of

The Skin Institute at Rapid City Medical Center is the largest board certified group of dermatologists in the region specializing in complete skin care for your entire family. dermatologists in the region specializing in complete skin care for your entire family.

Melody Eide, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Melody Eide, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Briana Hill, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Briana Hill, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Robert Sage, MD, FAAD Fellowship Trained Mohs Surgeon

Jason Noble, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Jason Noble, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Gregory Wittenberg, MD FAAD Fellowship Trained Mohs Surgeon

Tamara Poling, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Lycia Scott-Thornburg, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Tamara Poling, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Jessica Rachetto, PA-C

Lycia Scott-Thornburg, MD, FAAD Board Certified Dermatologist

Lyndsi Slusarski, PA-C

(605) 721.DERM | www.rapidcitymedicalcenter.com/Dermatology Robert Sage, MD, FAAD (3376) Gregory Wittenberg, MD FAAD Jessica Rachetto, PA-C Lyndsi Slusarski, PA-C Fellowship Trained Mohs Surgeon

Fellowship Trained Mohs Surgeon

Profile for Evergreen Media

BH Parent Spring 2019  

BH Parent Spring 2019  

Profile for 3ppubs