Page 1

Walk Through Richland Creek page 12

LIGHTS OUT, WEST NASHVILLE! page 6

The Nashville Self-Rising Society's

Biscuit Baking Primer page 30

August–September 2017 VOL. I, ISSUE 5


615-383-1444

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Editor and Publisher MIRIAM DRENNAN

Creative Consultant EVELYN MARIE PARRISH

Historian YVONNE EAVES

Copy Editor JENNIFER GOODE STEVENS

Contributors: EVELYN ALLEN

HOLLY DARNELL

KEENA DAY

DEANA DECK

CLARE FERNANDEZ

NAOMI GOLDSTONE

CHUCK HIGGINS

RANDY HORICK

JOHN LOMAX III

SCOTT MERRICK

R.B. QUINN

MINDY MERRELL

STEPHANIE SEFCIK

Art Direction and Design ELLEN PARKER-BIBB

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372WN is a print and digital magazine published every other month by Next Chapter Publishing, LLC. All content presented herein, unless otherwise noted, is the exclusive property of Next Chapter Publishing and cannot be used, reprinted, or posted without permission. 372WN is free for readers; excessive removal of the product or tampering with any of our distribution racks will be considered theft and/or vandalism and subject to prosecution.


CONTENTS

OF NOTE:

In June, 372WN received two regional awards from the Printing Industry Association of the South and a Certificate MAIN FEATURE of Merit at the 2017 National 6 Lights Out: Nashville’s Total Solar Eclipse 2017 Premier Print Awards!

VOL. I, ISSUE 5 | August–September 2017

CURRENT HAPPENINGS 12

A Walk in the Creek: An Immersion Experience

16

All the Park’s a Stage

FEATURES 20

The Old School Farm: Celebrating Community

24

We Are Unique and We Are One: Global Education Center

30

The Nashville Self-Rising Society’s Biscuit Baking Primer

36

Richard Bennett – West Nashville Guitar Wizard

40

It’s the Principal of the Thing: West Nashville’s Elementary School Principals

44

Brightside Bakeshop Shines in the Nations

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A Tale of Two Writers: Kathy Chiavola and Bill Flowerree

52

Class Is in Session! Gettin’ Schooled in West Nashville

59

Nashville Tree Task Force: Is Your Neighborhood Missing Trees?

IN EVERY ISSUE 60

372WestNosh

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Weedeaters

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372WhokNew?

CORRECTION: On page 28 of our June issue, we erroneously reported that the 61st Avenue United Methodist Church property was for sale. The church has closed, but we’re thrilled to learn that it will continue to be occupied by Iglesia Metodista Ebenezer UMC!

August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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kristin hostettler

residential. commercial. property management.

{real estate professional} office : 615.297.7711 mobile: 615.476.2133 421 east iris drive #300 nashville, tennessee 37204

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Nashville Violins (1/4 page, they’re redesigning)


BREAKFAST - LUNCH - AFTERNOON TEA OPENING AUGUST 2017

Serving globally inspired, locally sourced food and an extensive selection of teas and coffee in our beautifully renovated space. Reserve your afternoon tea or a special event now.

cafeevents@thistlefarms.org • 615-953-6440 • 5128 Charlotte Pike Nashville, TN 37209


LIGHTS OUT:

NASHVILLE’S TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE 2017 by Chuck HIGGINS

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John Fogerty asked, “Have you ever seen the rain comin’ down on a sunny day?” Well, on August 21, 2017, you may be able to see the stars come out on a sunny day—at 1:29 p.m. local time, to be exact. One of the most fantastic cosmic events—a total solar eclipse— will be optimally visible right here in Middle Tennessee.

August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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he Moon will pass directly between the Earth and the Sun, and the dark shadow of the Moon will follow a path across the continental United States from Oregon to South Carolina—right through the heart of Tennessee (see Figure 1, opposite page). The day will turn dark, and stars and planets may become visible. Assuming the weather cooperates, everyone in Nashville will be able to see it. But if you live in Franklin, you will miss it by a hair (Figure 2, opposite page).

Now before you say you saw the last one that occurred here—no human alive today saw the last total solar eclipse that passed over Middle Tennessee, and you’ll be hard-pressed to wait for the next one. The last total solar eclipse in Middle Tennessee occurred before our states were united, before we were British colonies, and even before we were discovered by Western explorers. In 1478—the last time the daytime sky turned dark here—Native Americans were the only witnesses. Who knows who will be here for the next one in 2566? Solar and lunar eclipses happen four to seven times per year. Most of us have seen a lunar eclipse; typically, half the planet can see any particular lunar eclipse. Many of us have seen a partial solar eclipse. The most recent solar eclipse in the continental U.S. was in 1979; totality was only visible in the northwest. Few people witness a total solar eclipse because the geometry is very rare for any particular place on Earth. Most of them are visible only over the oceans.

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clipse2017.nasa.gov

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WHY ARE THEY SO RARE? In a word, syzygy. Try that in your next Scrabble® game. In astronomy, any three-body alignment is a syzygy, but a total solar eclipse is a very, very precise syzygy. The Moon must be in a new phase for a solar eclipse to happen, and a new phase happens monthly because of the orbit period. The Moon’s orbital plane is also tilted with respect to the Earth-Sun orbital plane, which is why we don’t have an eclipse every month. The Sun-MoonEarth eclipse syzygy has a six-month period due to Earth’s orbit. Earth rotates with a 24-hour period, and Earth has 360° of longitude and ± 90° of latitude. Finally, and most importantly, the dark lunar shadow, called the umbra, is cone-shaped, and that cone extends earthward barely reaching the Earth to make a 100-milewide dark spot (Figure 3, below). Thus the dark spot of totality in your backyard is once-in-many-lifetimes rare. Earth rotating, moon orbiting, Sun-Moon-Earth aligning, angles changing, shadows reaching, darkness consuming, eyes straining, awe-inspiring. Rare!

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE: Monday • August 21, 2017

This will be the first total solar eclipse visible in the continental United States in 38 years. SUN

PARTIAL ECLIPSE TOTAL ECLIPSE

EARTH

MOON

UMBRA Not to scale:

PENUMBRA

If drawn to scale, the moon would be 30 Earth diameters away from Earth. The sun would be 400 times that distance.

MOON’S ORBIT

EARTH’S ORBIT

FIGURE 3. The geometry of a total solar eclipse (not to scale). To proper scale the Moon is about 4 times smaller than Earth and is about 30 Earth diameters away from us; the Sun is about 100 times larger than Earth and is 12,000 Earth diameters away. [Credit: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov]

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RICA

NASA a.gov

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE ON AUGUST 21, 2017 Figure 2

FIGURE 1. The entire North American continent will see the eclipse. Nashville is the largest city in the 80-mile wide total eclipse zone that begins over the Pacific Ocean and passes across the continental United States from Oregon to South Carolina to end over the Atlantic Ocean. [Credit https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov]

FIGURE 2. The total eclipse path is shown across the state of Tennessee. Notice that many cities near Nashville will be outside the approximately 80-mile wide path of totality. Totality is longer the closer you are to the centerline of the eclipse. Nashville will get about 2 minutes of totality. [Credit: https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov] August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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Another fun way to observe the partial eclipse is to stand under a tree and let the leaves of a tree act as a pinhole camera to make dozens of little crescent suns on the ground below. I cannot emphasize enough how incredible and awe-inspiring nature will be on this day. August 21 will be a hot summer day, but you will feel a small temperature change during the solar eclipse. You will step into the shade whether you like it or not. Plants and animals will be tricked by this event. Birds will go quiet as they find their evening roost, crickets will begin to chirp, and nocturnal animals will emerge as this brief nighttime begins. After two minutes, it will be over; the Sun will slowly re-emerge and daylight will return to normal. This wondrous event reminds us of our direct connection to the cosmos. Science will be learned, smiles will abound, stories will be told, and photographs will not do justice to the images firmly set in memory. You will remember this. Children will remember this. May we all be inspired for a lifetime. IN

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So what are your plans for Monday, August 21, from about noon to 3 p.m.? Use the map in Figure 2 to make sure you are in the path of totality during that time. Around noon, the Moon will begin to pass in front of the Sun, the penumbral shadow covering Earth. Over the next 90 minutes, the Moon will slowly cover more and more of the Sun; however, the Sun is so bright that you won’t notice any changes until about an hour into the eclipse. About 1:10 p.m., the sky will begin to look like twilight, and over the next 18 minutes the sky will get darker and darker until about 1:28 p.m., when darkness will fall across the land for about two minutes. Just before totality, due to the uneven lunar surface, bright beads of light will shine through the valleys on the Moon, and the Moon will appear like a large diamond ring. You might see the Moon’s umbral shadow sweep across the sky at more than 1,000 miles per hour, just before the sunlight disappears. It will be awesome! Bright planets and stars will appear in the sky (Figure 4, below). The glow of light you’ll see around the Sun is called the solar corona, a thin veil of hot gas that is always there but is usually too faint to see (Figure 5, opposite page). Overall, totality will not be as dark as night because partial sunlight makes the sky appear orange-yellow. Viewing a solar eclipse is easy; however, you need special solar eclipse glasses to view the Sun safely until the two minutes of totality. Many places sell eclipse glasses (for example, eclipseglasses.com in Memphis) and they are inexpensive to purchase, about $2.00. You can observe the Sun safely in a telescope with a proper solar filter, or you can use #14 or darker welder’s glass, or make your own pinhole camera (for safety information, visit: www.eclipse2017.nasa.gov/safety).

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Sounds of laughter shades of life are ringing Through my open ears inciting and inviting me Limitless undying love which shines around me like a million suns And calls me on and on across the universe. —“Across the Universe,” Lennon–McCartney, 1969

Chuck Higgins is a West Nashville resident and an associate pro-

fessor of physics and astronomy at Middle Tennessee State University. He will be helping host a public viewing event on the MTSU campus on August. 21. All are invited to join him; for more information see www. mtsu.edu/eclipse.

FIGURE 4. This is a simulation of what you will see during the total solar eclipse. You can see many bright stars and planets during the daytime on August 21 at 1:29 pm. [Stellarium software simulation].

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FIGURE 5. This is a photo montage of the November 14, 2012 solar eclipse taken in the South Pacific showing the partial and total eclipse phases. The center image shows the glowing corona, “crown” of light around the Sun. [Credit: Rick Fienberg,

https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/images-videos].

HELLO SENIORS!

St. Luke’s Community House is here to help you.

Need Meals?

Mobile Meals delivers freshly prepared meals

Things to Do?

The Senior Friends Club meets for weekly activities

Help?

We assist with referrals and seasonal programs

To enroll for FREE services, call (615) 350-7893 or email info@stlch.org. www.stlch.org • 5601 New York Avenue, 37209 August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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A Walk in the Creek: An Immersion Experience in West Nashville’s Natural Jewel

by Randy HORICK photos by Sonia Fernandez LeBLANC

Entering the water, the first thing we see are the black snails. There must be hundreds per square foot. They practically cover the flat limestone rocks below the surface of this stretch of Richland Creek, which might fairly be described as West Nashville’s neighborhood waterway. The flat rocks rest on fossiliferous limestone that forms the creek bed. The water’s relentless influence slivered them out from the bedrock and brought them here. The snails are less than a quarter-inch long—too small for anyone who didn’t already know they were snails to recognize them. Way too small to see from the banks. Our guide, Monette Rebecca, fishes out one of these dark specks and holds it close. She looks for the direction of the shell’s spiral. One way indicates a native species that is highly sensitive to polluted water. An abundance of these snails would be a positive indicator for this embattled urban stream. Whorls in the other direction would indicate a more pollution-tolerant, non-native species. Their proliferation may not be such a great sign.

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rguably, no one alive knows more about Richland Creek than Rebecca, whose property leads down to the water not far from where we’re wading. By her estimate, she’s walked the creek more than 100 times, looking for telltale signs of vitality. Today, a muggy, late May afternoon, she’s giving the creek a checkup. At its healthiest places, Richland Creek is West Nashville’s natural jewel. It isn’t exactly hidden, yet the depth of its environmental richness isn’t well known. As an urban stream system, it’s not unique. But it’s rare. Many urban creeks have been engineered into concrete courses that disappear for long stretches in underground culverts. But the Richland Creek watershed, which extends almost to Radnor Lake and Warner Parks, has remained mostly natural. “It’s a complete ecosystem, from the bottom of the food chain to apex predators,” Rebecca says.

Biologists have identified at least one species (of freshwater sponges) in the creek that has been found nowhere else on earth. Rebecca formed the Richland Creek Watershed Alliance to help preserve this remarkable but precariously situated stream system. Threats are everywhere. By increasing runoff, development near the creek impedes its ability to mitigate floods. Straightening a stream’s course—one such alteration was allowed after the 2010 flood—ironically adds to this adverse effect while damaging the habitat for wildlife. Overuse of fertilizers take their toll. It’s an uphill but not Sisyphean struggle. In one notable victory, Rebecca led a successful effort to remove a low-water dam on the back side of the McCabe Park Golf Course. It was a double victory for the creek’s inhabitants, Rebecca explains: “Fish species can migrate


more freely upstream, and more spring-fed water gets downstream.” As she points out, you can’t really appreciate this interplay between the urban environment and the natural one merely from a picturesque vantage point on a greenway bridge. “When you creek-walk, you experience the stream in a whole different way,” she says. “You see things you’d never see otherwise.” You can perceive the interconnectedness of everything here, and its fragile balance. On woods-lined stretches you may briefly forget you’re in the middle of a city, and you can almost sense, as Norman Maclean did on Montana’s Big Blackfoot River, how, “eventually, all things merge into one.” When you look at it through Rebecca’s eyes, you can begin to see why the health of Richland Creek should matter to West Nashvillians. We wade in just below a meander where fast-running water has maintained a channel through a little

forest of water plants that found enough deposited sediment to take root. The plants provide good spots for small fish to hide and for insects to lay eggs. Hovering dragonflies— one of the few species to survive the Cretaceous extinction 65 million years ago—feast on mosquitos and midges. The small fish, in turn, sometimes eat dragonfly larvae. The water temperature here, measured by Rebecca’s CO2 monitor, is 21.8 degrees Celsius, or 71.2 degrees Fahrenheit. That’s within the ideal temperature range for smallmouth bass that like cooler water and clearer streams than their largemouth cousins. Cooler water, explains Rebecca, who holds

a degree in environmental science, means more dissolved oxygen that freshwater animals need for respiration. For urban streams, maintaining a favorable temperature is complicated by higher levels of runoff from developed areas that reduce opportunities for rainwater to seep into the ground. The warmer runoff water elevates the creek’s temperature, especially after a rain. Today, three days since the last thunderstorm, the runoff has subsided, and the creek is back to its base flow from cool springs in the hills near the top of the watershed. Heading downstream, where Rebecca has heard recent reports of a beaver lodge, some results of what she calls an “unnatural flow regime” appear. All the runoff from rainstorms in an urban watershed mean water levels rise very fast. This “flashy flow,” in turn, erodes streambanks. We pass a casualty—a large tree on an eroded bank

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has fallen into the creek. On the meander’s near side, where the creek is depositing gravel instead of denuding the bank, stands a big maple that’s safe for now. Its towering canopy shades the creek, which also helps keep the water cool. “There aren’t many of the old trees left now,” she says. But even the unnatural collapse of trees provides opportunities. Bigger fish can lurk under submerged

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branches. In other ways, too, death can actually reveal a healthy stream. Plucking out the body of a baby bass, Rebecca notices that it has been partially eaten. Maybe it was food for a great blue heron, or for the solitary mallard we see in a quiet pool; it flaps its wings and splashes across the water as we disturb its peace. Curving meanders, like the one we’re on, slow the water’s flow,

allowing mosses to grow on the submerged limestone. It’s slick for creek walkers but offers excellent cover for the darters we send rushing to hide under natural shelves that water has hewn from the bedrock. “Darters are less pollution-tolerant than most other fish species,” Rebecca says, so their presence is a healthy indicator. We turn over a few flat rocks looking for salamanders that often nestle themselves underneath. Instead, we see tiny isopods (even smaller than the snails) that feed on detritus in the water. A crayfish, about two inches long, accelerates away in reverse. When it pauses near a rock, it is almost invisible. Especially, we see thousands of shells of various species of freshwater mussels. Some wash onto gravel banks; others come to rest between rocks in the water. Some are intact, as if they’ve recently been prised open, very possibly by a raccoon. “There are many more mussels here than I used to see,” she says, indicative that it’s another hopeful sign. Rounding a bend, we enter a long, straight section. About 100 yards downstream, something breaks the smooth flow of the water. Perhaps it could be the beaver dam. Walking in that direction, we see holes in the bank that are someone’s homes. Maybe the residents are belted kingfishers, Rebecca says. They make burrows along Tennessee streambanks. Maybe chipmunks made these holes. Atop the high bank on the other side is a jarring reminder of where we really are: a concrete wall behind the Richland Creek Apartments. Beneath the wall, sections of streambank have badly eroded. About 15 feet above us, a white plastic chair is wedged against a tree—evidence of how high the flashy flow can reach. We find no evidence of a beaver dam, just large rocks forcing water to detour around them. It’s just


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as well, Rebecca explains. Beaver trapping is legal yearround in Tennessee. “If word gets out that beavers are here,” she says, “someone might set traps” that could crush a child’s leg. Beavers are another healthy sign that wildlife in its natural setting can coexist with humans in an urban watershed. But it’s a constant struggle. “We’ve seen a good spot today,” Rebecca concludes. “There are more bad spots around here than good ones.”

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August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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All the Park s a Stage

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by Stephanie photos courtesy of

SEFCIK

Rick Malkin Photography

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s April turned to May, veritable magic was unfolding inside WNPT’s warehouse; its concrete floors and imposing overhead lights were no match for the words of the Bard and the twitter of a penny whistle. Hayley Platt’s red hair whips through the air as she shakes her head, the last few notes drifting from the penny whistle at her lips in her audition for The Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s summer and winter stages.

“I can do Lord of the Rings, too,” she quips, looking to the table where Artistic Director Denice Hicks sits with Santiago Sosa and David Ian Lee, directors of the two summer Shakespeare in the Park shows. Sosa, who will be directing A Winter’s Tale, makes an unintelligible comment that sends Hayley into a full Irish jig, leaving the directors’ table gaping like Bottom, everyone’s favorite jack from Midsummer Night’s Dream. “Oh, I’m a competitive Irish dancer,” Hayley says before she smiles and takes what seems like a tangible auric energy from the room with her. If her audition is any indication, the Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s 2017–18 season will be crammed full of talent. As more players take the audition stage, bringing their Bluetooth speakers, live accompanists and one miniature guitar that may or may not actually have been a ukulele, it is easy to feel for the directors and the difficult choices they face. These actors are talented, and their eagerness is palpable. The monologues are varied, from Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, the many and various “history” plays, such as Henry IV, V, VI and more, and the song choices are even more so. Jonah Jackson, the man with the ukulele/guitar and another natural redhead, performs a monologue as Prince Hal from Henry IV, Part 1. It is confident, adequate—but Sosa and Lee want to see more. Sosa asks, “Can you do that Prince Hal again in a dialect and make it something . . . the many and various “history” plays, such as Henry IV, V, VI, and more, and the song choices even more so different?”

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There is a moment of sympathetic anxiety, a look to Jonah, the expectation to see indecision, fear or the back of his heels as he runs from the room. Instead, the room echoes with the first syllable of an unmistakably Scottish lilt. He is already in it, transformed, a Scottish troubadour wearing East Nashvillian hipster dress. He snatches up his tiny guitar and uses it to accent a wildly enigmatic and truly hilarious interpretation of Prince Hal’s innermost thoughts. Two weeks later, in mid-May, the directors hold callback auditions. All three directors are in attendance, this time on one of Nashville Public Television’s TV sets, which appears to be set up as a living room. The actors come in groups of three and four and read “sides,” small pieces of scenes, together. Hicks occasionally gives direction to the groups and reminds them, “We (the audience) find this scene funny, but you don’t,” when they need to be scared of a ghost that does seem quite amusing upon watching. Simultaneously, in the parking lot, a group of actors is learning to wield swords, rapiers and daggers—trying their hands at the lead roles. The stage-fighting instructor demonstrates several

moves and then gestures to the trunk of his car and says, “Okay, go ahead and take a sword.” Who knows what passers-by are thinking as eight Nike- and Adidas-clad young men and women pull 16th-century weapons from a sedan. Jonah is again among the group, and he has fighting experience as a two-time alumnus of the Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s summer apprentice program. The apprentice company, affectionately called “Apco” by its participants, is NSF’s combined training and performance company that takes amateur actors ages 13 and up through an intensive training program before rehearsals for the summer shows begin. Sosa, director of this summer’s The Winter’s Tale, began directing Apco last summer and increased the training and rehearsal schedule to provide participants with an even more immersive experience. The program features four weeks of intensive training combined with four and a half weeks of rehearsal, compared to the industry-standard

2- to 3-week rehearsal period. Jonah adds, “Even when we got the point of mostly being in rehearsal rather than formal training, we still had Apco group warmups and would continue to get notes about the text, so the training never stopped.” Hicks and NSF leadership determined the rehearsal schedule to prepare actors for the physical demands of the shows, building endurance to deal with the Nashville summer heat, and of course observe some humility mixed with humor—“It takes us more than seven days to create a world . . . after all, we’re not God.” Where does this preparation lead a young actor like Jonah? Out of the role of “student” and into the realms of “professional” and even “mentor” to new Apco members. Jonah emphasizes the responsibility to lead

Jonah Jackson

A Midsummer Night’s Dream

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The Nashville Shakespeare Festival Leadership Team (Denice Hicks pictured second from right)


by example: “Coming into rehearsal prepared with a firm knowledge of the script and your role, as well as a willingness to play and collaborate is so important.” He knows from experience that younger actors will be looking to the professionals to literally model their behavior. “I always want to go into a rehearsal process prepared and with kindness in my heart and thankfulness to be doing the work,” Jonah says. He is excited, in particular, about working with Sosa again, who he says “has at least four versions of the script, between what he’s written, highlighted, scanned and made notes in,” and he “encourages others to the same dedication to the work.” Hicks explains that “Shakespeare requires a lot of creativity. In most modern plays, stage directions tell where to go, or even how to say things.” Due to the lack of stage directions from the time, Shakespeare’s plays generally have very little commentary, which leaves it up to the director and actors to make creative, intelligent choices. The most famous, or infamous, stage direction in possibly all of Shakespeare is up for interpretation this summer in The Winter’s Tale. Following a long and heartbreaking monologue by Antigonus, lord of Sicilia, comes the puzzling direction “[Exit pursued by a bear].” This one seemingly impossible direction has been frustrating modern Shakespeare scholars for decades, and theories range from the fantastic to the (more realistic) possibility that in 1609, the Globe Theatre featured an Arctic polar bear cub given to King James I. Sosa and his actors will surely need some extra rehearsal time dedicated to their own unique portrayal of this wide-open and mysterious direction, where Lee will need to parse out the (sometimes volatile) relationship between Antony and Cleopatra, two powerful and unyielding rulers. Outdoor performance brings a

it.” Anyone who has been to a park show has surely seen at least one actor get dive-bombed by a bat. Hicks recalls one difficult scene from Romeo and Juliet in 2011 where “poor Romeo had to wait for music to stop playing from the other side of the park while Juliet was dying.” Poor Romeo, but it’s a sure bet that the audience was right there with him, anticipating his impending death with bated breath. The beauty of the removal of the “fourth wall,” a theatre term that refers to the invisible barrier between the audience and the on-stage world, means that the audience actually becomes part of the show. Shakespeare in the Park is a world in which “Midsummer” fairies can steal popcorn, villains and rogues may hide among camp chairs and bench seats, and scorned lovers may seek solace (or gossip) among

wildly different range of unpredictability. How do these actors deal so seamlessly with swooping bats, hospital helicopters and other unpredictable “outdoorsy” things like an unrestrained, freely moving continued on page 58 audience? Hicks laughs. Clearly, this is something that has been addressed before. Make a Move “We warn in the Right Direction the actors with to expect everything— there’s no fourth Top Producing Realtor Make a Move wall,” she in the says. “The Right Direction characters (not just the actors, TOP PRODUCING but also the DANA BATTAGLIA REALTOR characters) are experiencing Converting Transactions into Friendships what the One Step at a Time! audience is experiChristianson Patterson Courtney & Associates encing, so Danasemail@aol.com | 615-504-9792 | DanaBattaglia.com they can’t just ignore

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August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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The Old School Farm Celebrating Community

by Evelyn ALLEN

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photos courtesy of The

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Old School Farm/MillarRich


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here is no simple formula for building community. It is some combination of magic, hard work and common interests that binds people together. Only minutes from Nashville, in the tiny community of Scottsboro, The Old School seems to have hit on the right mix. Rowan Millar and Susan Richardson—both with careers in social work—joined forces as MillarRich, a for-profit organization, and threw some seeds to the wind. “Susan and myself started our first company MillarRich in 2008,” Millar explains. “MillarRich provides community and residential services for children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. This led to us looking for a larger office facility in 2012, at which time we came across Wade School in its abandoned state of 17 years.” MillarRich bought the historic 1936 Wade school house in 2012.

“Over the next year, we did a complete gut and remodel of the school,” Millar recalls. “We utilized the converted classrooms as office space and a conference room.” The building not only provided services to disabled adults, but it also soon became a space for community gatherings. The wood floors and tall ceilings only lightly echo what had once been an elementary school. “The nine acres offered up the opportunity for something new,” Millar explains. “Like employment opportunities for adults with special needs.” Within a year of completing the school’s renovation,

MillarRich started their nonprofit, Old School Farm, as a work resource for their clients. They hired farmer Ben Brown and transformed their nine acres into a lush, organic farm. The farm turned into job training for some of The Old School clients. Now some of the clients are hired as employees and are integral to the farm’s success, helping with cultivation, harvesting and processing the food. In addition to growing vegetables, the clients take care of chickens and newly built greenhouses, which extend the growing season. “We have been able to grow into a sustainable employer and

“Pull up a chair. Take a break. Come join us. Life is endlessly delicious.” –RUTH REICHT

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producer of fine, organic produce,” Millar says. In the years that followed, MillarRich opened the school to the community. While continuing their social work, The Old School became a community gathering for local potlucks. The Bells Bend community is home to many small, organic farms, and The Old School was welcomed into the tight-knit community as one of the monthly potluck destinations. A diverse group of young, idealistic farmers, long-time locals and creative and professional refugees from the city form the backdrop to the Old School Farm. “In 2015, we decided another good way to support the farm and offer other training and employment opportunities would be through a restaurant and events space,” Millar says. “Susan and I took this on after interest from the community, and other farms in the neighborhood thought it would be a great place for the community to come together and also support the Old School Farm and the other

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community farms by purchasing directly from the local farmers.” The Old School Farm restaurant was opened and features the culinary delights of chef Kirstie Bidwell, whose career in Nashville began with Pinewood Social and then the award-winning French brasserie, Le Sel. Serving new American and classic European cuisine, the menu is completely sourced from Old School Farm and local farmers. The restaurant supports a collection of farmers, foragers and growers, continuing MillarRich’s desire to offer a place for community to nurture local commerce. The restaurant is also a place for The Old School to train and employee their clients. “We also offer educational and volunteer classes for students,” Millar adds. “And we are in the process of opening Old School Farm Pottery Studio, which will also offer classes as well as being a retail option.” Falling in step with the rest of the Bells Bend community, the Old School Farm builds on the themes of local, sustainable community development. In recent years, the community has also garnered attention through their fierce, successful political opposition to the development of the river floodplain known as Bells Bend. Having strengthened their collective voice, what

remains is a farm community committed to preserving its way of life. Through Millar’s and Richardson’s shared vision, The Old School has cultivated a rich and multifaceted community that supports not only their intended clientele, but the greater community of Scottsboro and Bells Bend. From abandoned school building to thriving farm, the fruits of their labor nine years later include a restaurant with all locally sourced food, featuring the culinary skills of Bidwell, an organic farm run by Brown, event services and a pottery workshop. Beautifully and tastefully redecorated, the restaurant and speakeasy-style music room have replaced the cacophony of children’s voices. Today, a visit to the Old School Farm will find the adult clients engaged in farm work, restaurant work and office work. Visiting children learn hands-on about farming and community. The farm bustles with energy fueled by hope and cooperation. Baskets of green peas, carrots and greens await Chef Bidwell’s kitchen or a journey to a local farmers market. The most recent addition to the property is a multipurpose event barn. This beautiful structure is open on one side and views the farm and the rolling Tennessee hills; it is used for a variety of activities. One might find a barn dance or a Saturday-evening gathering of bluegrass musicians on the event schedule. A fundraising event this


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from thriving and pursuing our dreams. Integral to all of this are the pleasures of community—music, fresh food and beverages, and connecting with people like and unlike ourselves. They’ve raised the bar on how service, community and commerce might work together. Whether intentionally or by happy chance, Rowan Millar and Susan Richardson have created a wonderful place to celebrate community. WE

past May drew people from the far edges of the state with a performance by country music star Drake White. Bidwell’s culinary creations were served by the farmers who produced the food. Some of the adult clients were in attendance, organizing or helping with food preparation and service. It was a beautiful, cool May evening for attendees to dine on delicious fare and listen to music, with the verdant farm and setting sun providing a bucolic backdrop. In the spirit that a healthy community should grow, new branches of interests seem to crop up on a regular basis. Millar and Richardson hold the space for people to engage the farm experience. Their clients have opportunities to grow and learn through the farm and restaurant, as do visitors and volunteers. MillarRich doesn’t stop dreaming and allowing the community to weave its way into their lives and work. The model of community that MillarRich has created proves that a healthy community includes everyone and that we all benefit

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WE ARE UNIQUE AND WE ARE ONE:

by Clare FERNANDEZ photos courtesy of Global Education Center, unless otherwise noted

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ashville is a melting pot of cultures, and its diversity is growing along with the footprint of the city. When seeking to learn more about the many cultures represented here, look no further than Global Education Center. With offices in historic Richland Hall on the Charlotte Avenue corridor, this 20-year-old nonprofit celebrates the oneness of all people through multicultural arts programming that highlights the importance of shared cultural appreciation.

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Roots in anti-bias education Global Education Center’s founding director Ellen Gilbert served as an anti-bias, multicultural arts education specialist for more than 15 years before starting the Global Education Center. At the time, the minorities most represented in area schools were African American, Native American and southeast Asian. As a teacher, Ellen witnessed minority, immigrant and refugee children entering the school system among teachers and students who had very little understanding of their lifestyles, stories and cultural norms. Ellen introduced these diverse cultures to the students using the arts. “We approach anti-bias education through the arts because they are such an effective and powerful force for bridging cultural divides, dispelling myths, unlearning stereotypes and alleviating fears,” she says. She also spent many years providing professional development to preK-12 teachers on anti-bias education techniques and methods to bring multiculturalism into the classrooms “in a culturally relevant and respectful way, all with a goal of helping teachers create classrooms that are welcoming, safe havens for all students and their families.” These roots in anti-bias education serve as the foundation of the programs at Global, which extend beyond traditional schooling to

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Global Education Center founder Ellen Gilbert. photo credit: Sonia Fernandez LeBlanc

include the entire community. Their space on Charlotte includes several dance studios, a percussion studio, a recording studio and a library full of multicultural resources for students and teachers. “By partnering with our staff, artists and board members who represent many different cultures, we ensure that the voices of our minority and underserved communities are reflected and respected,” Ellen adds.

Engaging the Nashville community Unique and thoughtful programming drives the organization’s

mission. From dance classes for children and adults to school and community outreach programs, Global is a place where people of all cultures can come together to express themselves and to learn and embrace the cultures of their fellow Nashvillians. Here is a closer look at their offerings. Passport to Understanding: A school outreach program that reaches approximately 45,000 students in Nashville (and surrounding counties’) schools each year. The program promotes cross-cultural understanding and respect through hands-on cultural museum presen-


tations, writing workshops, drum and dance residencies, performances and concerts, and professional development for teachers. The goal, according to Ellen, is for teachers and students to create and foster welcoming, inclusive and imaginative classrooms. Summer Multicultural Arts Camp and the Roots, Rhythm and Rhyme children’s classes: They are an extension of the school outreach program. The six-week summer camp gives youth the opportunity to explore music, dance, stories, games, sports and culinary arts representing nearly 30 cultures. Roots, Rhythm and Rhyme is an after-school and Saturday program in which students can choose from 15 different classes each week, including world percussion, capoeira, folkloric dance, flamenco dance, ballet, karate and more. This year, Global expanded this program to include classes offered to youth in the Davidson County Juvenile Detention Center and to those in the system who are back in the community. These multicultural arts programs geared toward youth have proven effective in helping those involved to better understand themselves, their peers and the cultural differences that make them unique. “As they explore various cultural arts together, they consistently find that while their personal stories might be very different, their familial and community stories are quite similar in our divided America,” Ellen says. “An overall goal of all of our youth programming is to help children and youth find their place in this wide, diverse world in a way that lets them love and respect themselves, their families and their peers as well as helps them find their place in our community.” In addition to dance classes for children, Global also offers classes for adults in a range of options from bharatanatyam to Argentine tango to swing dance to Brazilian zouk to

Global is a place where people of all cultures can come together to express themselves and to learn and embrace the cultures of their fellow Nashvillians. capoeira. Tirra Omilade has been teaching the African dance class since 2010. One of the most impactful experiences she has encountered through her years of teaching at Global is “how students feel alive and whole as a result of the African dances and drumming,” Tirra says. “Something that touches my heart are the children who come to class. It is amazing to see the next generation of African dancers emerge right before the eyes of the community.” Tirra believes in the work of Global because it “unites people from all walks of life to share culture, to touch each other’s humanity and to inspire everyone to be more of who they are personally and culturally.” She adds, “The Global Education Center truly promotes the empathy that is sorely needed in the world, and Nashville is better for it.”

Annual memberships are the center’s primary source for general operating funds. Members benefit from reduced prices on classes, workshops and performances. There are multiple memberships levels with varying perks, including individual and family for $25 and $50, respectively. Membership information can be found at www. globaleducationcenter.org/membership.html. Monica Cooley, the director of Kala Nivedanam, a South Indian

Getting involved There are other ways that West Nashvillians can get involved with and support the center. Registration and cost information can be found under “Classes” on the website. Donations are always welcome, and levels of giving can be found at www.globaleducationcenter.org/give.html. August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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A native Nashvillian, Clare Fernandez is an arts integration advocate, lifelong actress, obsessive proofreader, and lover of coffee, wine and laughter. She works as a Data Analyst by day and enjoys spending her free time serving on the board of Poverty & the Arts, reading, hiking at Radnor Lake, belting show tunes off-key, writing and exploring the growing arts and culture scene in Nashville. S

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Housed in its current location for just over 20 years, Global has benefitted from the population and growth of the surrounding neighborhoods. In 1997, the organization purchased the histor-

dance, music, writing, visual arts and more. Being in two historic buildings is financially difficult on the small nonprofit, but that doesn’t stop Ellen from dreaming big. That dream is a capital campaign to raise funds for improvements to the facilities, including energy efficiency modifications and expansions for additional offerings. The most important goal, however, is for the growth of the Global family and for minority community members to continue to help facilitate programming in order to maintain cultural relevance and cross-cultural respect across all facets of the organization. “I also truly hope that we never lose sight of our mission to use the arts of diverse cultures to highlight our commonalities and promote cross-cultural understanding and respect,” Ellen says. “We are unique in our mission and our programming, and we take our special role in the artistic fabric of our community very seriously.”

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Committed to West Nashville

ical building where they still reside and rented the adjoining building for many years before it was donated to them by H.G. Hill Realty. In 2013, Global partnered with Conexión Américas to open a satellite studio at Casa Azafrán Community Center, serving predominantly Latino families in the area. But their primary location in West Nashville is home. Centrally located near parks, libraries, schools and one of the busiest bus routes in the city, Global is perfectly placed for access to fun field trips for the students, as well as access for students and families attending programs at the studio. “The current gentrification of the area has displaced many of our families and our artists, forcing them to actually move out of Nashville or to its very outskirts,” shares Ellen. “People try to buy our buildings on a regular basis, but we are committed to staying in West Nashville. We are also committed to keeping our minority and international family together within the welcoming home we have created for all.” The future of Global Education Center is full of promise, thanks to a supportive and involved community. Currently, between 1,400 and 1,500 people attend programs at Global, learning various forms of

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dance and music school in residence at Global, has been an affiliated artist with Global since its inception in 1996. She is also a major donor and longtime board member, contributing her time and money “to ensure that the Center survives and expands to reach even more people.” She shares in Ellen’s passion “for sharing authentic information about the world’s diverse cultures in order to bring people together in mutual respect and harmony.” She adds, “Nashville needs an arts organization that represents minority cultures. Global Education Center serves artists and communities without political power or significant resources. Yet, these groups also deserve to have visibility and be represented. The amazing educational work that GEC does on a small budget is extraordinary.”

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Nashville Self-Rising Society’s BISCUIT BAKING PRIMER by Mindy MERRELL and R.B. photos by Louis

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Seems like nowadays the only way many Nashvillians know how to find a biscuit is to stand in line or pull into the drive-thru. These foodserviced, souped-up cousins of the South’s everyday home bread are not your only option.

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s longtime West Nashvillians, food writers, biscuit and cornbread lab teachers, and founding members of the Nashville Self-Rising Society, s bi p o r we’re going to bat for real, homeed ak m d A dd a little w ater an baked Southern biscuits. So, come on, skip the line, get in the kitchen and keep the tradition alive. With a little time and some everyday ingredients from a regular supermarket, you’ll quickly have a line at your own kitchen door. A brief Nashville biscuit backstory

Nashville plays a prominent role in Southern biscuit history, thanks to the marketing genius of Cohen E. Williams. In 1941, he bought the Royal Flour Company (est. 1899) and renamed it “Martha White” after its top brand of Southern soft wheat flour. The now-iconic Martha White Self-Rising Flour with “Hot Rize” secured a foothold in Southern home-cooking culture thanks to two critical moves by Williams—he wisely partnered with Nashville’s blossoming country music industry to promote his product and reach his customers, and he created the Martha White Kitchens to help teach folks how to use his product and to gain their trust. For those who don’t know, self-rising “Hot Rize” simply means that the flour comes perfectly blended with just the right amount of leavening and salt for baking biscuits, and all kinds of other quick breads and cakes. This early modern convenience streamlined the daily task of biscuit making.

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Martha White’s early radio career began in 1947 when Williams sponsored the 5:45 a.m. “Martha White Biscuit and Cornbread Time” on Nashville’s 50,000-watt clear-channel station—650 WSM-AM—just as families were waking up and making morning biscuits. In 1948, Martha White began what would become a long-time sponsorship of the live, Saturday-evening “Grand Ole Opry” broadcast. Then in 1953, Martha White partnered with Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs as the bluegrass duo toured the South in the Martha White Bluegrass Express bus. These soonto-be legends also became known as the “world’s greatest flour peddlers,” as they sang the Martha White jingle “You Bake Right with Martha White” that would become one of the most-recognized standards in bluegrass history. Since then, many country and bluegrass artists have proudly championed home baking with “Hot Rize.” Williams’ second brilliant move was to create the Martha White Kitchens in 1952. With home economist Alice Jarman at the helm, the Kitchens developed and shared useful, trusted recipes and kitchen wisdom in an effort to promote the convenience, consistency and versatility of self-rising flour to generations of home cooks, 4-H clubs, Brownie troops and home economics classes. The Royal Flour Company building was the home of the first Martha White Kitchen. It then moved to 1808

West End Avenue (now the Hutton Hotel), then to the Baker Building at 110 21st Avenue near Vanderbilt University, and later to Maryland Farms in Brentwood. Self-Rising Society member and West Nashvillian Linda Carman went to work for Jarman in 1975 and later became Martha White’s test kitchen and consumer affairs director. Today Linda keeps her hands in biscuit dough as the company spokesperson and all-around Southern baking expert. “I talk to folks all around the South, and I’m still learning things about biscuits,” Linda says. “One thing is for sure, these home-cooking traditions keep our culture vital and alive and knit our families together.” (Interestingly, Martha White and its Tennessee rival from Knoxville, White Lily, are now sister brands owned by J. M. Smuckers Co.) Mindy Merrell worked with Linda in the Martha White Kitchens back in the 1990s, and between them they have close to 80 years of self-rising baking experience. Together Mindy and R.B. Quinn have taught hands-on biscuit, shortcake and cornbread labs to folks of all ages to encourage home cooking. So, enough with the backstory. Let’s get in the kitchen and get busy with the Nashville Self-Rising Society’s primer on basic biscuit baking for the home cook.

The Nashville Self-Rising Society founding members, L to R: Mindy Merrell, Linda Carman and R.B. Quinn.

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Biscuit baking primer Biscuits are a simple, everyday quick bread made with flour, fat, milk, leavening and salt. When you start with perfectly blended, self-rising flour, the only job left is to distribute the fat in the flour and add enough liquid to make a soft dough. Some important things to keep in mind:

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Trust the bag. The basic biscuit recipe on any bag of self-rising flour is a test-kitchen-vetted, home-economist-approved path to excellent results. If you learned to make biscuits another way, by all means keep your tradition alive. If you’re looking for guidance, the recipe on the bag is the place to start.

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Get a pastry cloth. Let’s face it—creating a floury mess in the kitchen is the biggest obstacle to biscuit baking, and a pastry cloth helps reduce the mess. It’s just a big, inexpensive square of heavy canvas that you lay out on the counter and dust with flour. Kneading and rolling out dough on a floured cloth is easier and neater. The dough won’t stick to the floured cloth, and the mess is largely contained on the canvas. When you’re finished, just fold it up, still coated with flour, and store it in a sealable plastic bag in the freezer. It’s ready to go whenever you get a hankering for biscuits, a pie crust or rolled-out cookies.

WORKHORSE SOUTHERN BISCUITS Here’s the Nashville Self-Rising Society version of the basic biscuit recipe that’s pretty much on every bag of self-rising flour. You can’t go wrong here. 2 cups self-rising flour ¼ to 1/3 cup shortening, lard or butter

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Bake them any way you like. Separated on a baking sheet will product crispy sides, touching will produce a higher rise and soft sides. You can’t beat the yinyang of cast iron skillet biscuits—crusty bottoms and soft sides.

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Biscuit cutters and pastry blenders are nice but not necessary. If you don’t have either one, don’t sweat it. Distribute bits of fat in the flour with your fingertips, a big fork or by criss-crossing it into the flour with two knives. Who says your biscuits need to be perfectly round? Just cut them into squares with a knife. Or make a round cutter by removing both ends of a food can.

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Don’t be afraid to handle the dough. A little gluten development helps create the structure of a biscuit. Or, make easy drop biscuits by stirring in a little extra milk. This yields a softer dough that can be dropped by the spoonful onto a baking sheet.

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Same goes with milk and buttermilk. Buttermilk will give the biscuits a denser texture and tangy flavor. Sweet (regular) milk makes the biscuits a bit crisper. Use what you’ve got.

Heat the oven to 450°F. Place the flour in a large mixing bowl. Add your choice of fat. Cut it in with a pastry blender, two knives or your fingertips until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in the milk to form a soft dough. Add a little extra milk if all the flour is not moistened or the dough seems too stiff. Place the dough on a floured pastry cloth or counter and lightly knead about 10 times or until smooth. Press out the dough to a ½-inch to ¾-inch thickness. Cut into rounds with a floured cutter or into squares with a floured knife. Place the biscuits on a baking sheet, in a cake pan or in an iron skillet. Bake about 12 to 14 minutes or until golden brown. Brush with melted butter, if you like. Serve warm. Makes about 12 to 15 2-inch biscuits. ST

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Have questions, need help, or interested in more biscuit recipes? Find us at www.rbandmindy.com.

Mindy Merrell and R.B. Quinn are West Nashville-based food writers. Visit them at www.rbandmindy.com.


Are you looking to buy or sell real estate? Contact me for a free, NO OBLIGATION consultation!

August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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by John LOMAX

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RICHARD BENNETT West Nashville Guitar Wizard

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t’s all in service to the song,” says Hillwood resident Richard Bennett,

who has certainly served his share of songs. His sterling career as a high-profile guitarist/producer is in its fiftieth year. While you may not have heard of Bennett, you have heard his work on such cuts as “Song Sung Blue,” “Let Your Love Flow,” “Piano Man,” “Guitar Town,” “All My Exes Live in Texas,” “Forever in Blue Jeans,” (which he co-wrote) and plenty more. If you’ve seen Mark Knopfler in concert in the past 23 years, or Neil Diamond’s current tour, then you’ve seen him in service to the songs in their shows. If you caught Diamond’s April Bridgestone show, you saw a double dose of Bennetts—his son Nick is Diamond’s other guitarist. The Diamond shows mark a return for Richard, who played a key role in the legend’s touring and recording activities from 1971 to 1987, joining Diamond when he was just 20! He’s been back with Diamond as the superstar celebrates his 50th year of touring and while Knopfler works on songs for a Broadway musical. Born in Chicago on July 22, 1951, and raised in Phoenix, Bennett found an early mentor in Al Casey, an Arizonan in Los Angeles who had become part of the “Wrecking Crew,” L.A.’s version of Nashville’s “A-Team”—the elite musicians who played on hundreds of pop, rock, soul and country hits. Bennett vividly recalled his first session, which came unexpectedly during a visit to L.A. “Al asked me to go to a session, just tag along and watch,” he remembers. “There were three guitarists booked for the session, only two showed up. So they asked me if I would step in. I had just turned 17 . . . and then summer was over. I had to go back to high school in Phoenix, run around the track and all that,” he laughs. “All I could see was getting out of there as fast as I could, which I did. I went to L.A. the day after I graduated.” A couple of years of scrambling followed. “I took a couple of little club things. Al put me to work in his music store, teaching so I had a little income.” He gradually worked his way into the L.A. session world, and by 1971, he was racking up dozens of credits. “The trick is to contribute and support and not play dead, either. Contribute something meaningful to the track and not take away. It’s not about you,” he advises.

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“Nashville very much operated the way L.A. had once; you put a band together, and you made a record. It was a big plus for me to move here.”

photo credit: Michael Lukas

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photo credit: Mike Humeniuk

Working with Richard Bennett on a variety of projects, including Emmylou Harris album ‘Bluebird,’ over the years has been a pleasure. Whether he is producing or playing, his sense of commitment and attention to detail is always obvious. He is a veritable encyclopedia of modern music and has a unique gift for coming up with the right part at the right time that

That same year, a studio pal he’d met, drummer Dennis St. John, joined up with Neil Diamond and convinced him to upgrade his band. “This was when Neil was transitioning from having a few rock hits to something more,” he explains. So Bennett and another studio friend, Emory Gordy Jr., “just joined up, no audition or anything, just started playing with Neil in early 1971.” Back then, many studio aces dodged touring gigs as they feared their absence would not make the hearts of producers grow fonder. “They used to be afraid that someone would fill their slot, but I never worried about that; I was young and arrogant, I guess,” he chuckles. “I thought it would be more beneficial to offer whatever I had to offer, to run out and tour with Neil, who was considered a big rock act then. I thought that would lend more prestige than working in the studios. . . . Of course now with the way things are, everybody’s got a road gig. That’s the only way you can make ends meet anymore,” he notes wryly, referring to the diminishing volume of session work today. “I think you just stay on top of your game, playing for people,” he adds. “It just kinda hones the edge sharp again.” Bennett clearly maintained his first-call status. His 15-page discography shows work with Billy Joel, Gladys Knight, Ringo Starr, Marvin Gaye, Billy Graham, Roger Miller, Liberace, Glen Campbell, The Four Tops and heaps more during this period. By 1985, though, Bennett’s fondness for the L.A. music scene was fading. “The thing about Nashville for me then was that L.A. had been seriously changing the way they made records; programming had come in, keyboards had taken over. The days of getting five, six people together on a floor to make a record together—there was less and less of that going on, and that’s all I knew how to do,” he muses. “But Nashville very much operated the way L.A. had once; you put a band together, and you made a record. It was a big plus for me to move here.” His near-seamless transition into the Music City scene was aided because he’d been coming to town “three or four times a year, for a couple of years” for sessions at the request of top Nashville label head/producer Jimmy Bowen. He teamed with Gordy and another L.A. transplant, Tony Brown, to craft Steve Earle’s Guitar Town, one of the 1980s’ most influential

helps turn a good song into a great record. He truly cares about his craft and creates a wonderful working environment in the studio. One of my favorite musicians and favorite people, as well. Dave Pomeroy Bassist/President, Nashville Musicians Association, AFM Local 257

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With “Weird Al” Yankovic, Lake Hollywood, 1981. photo credit: Jon “Bermuda” Schwartz 372WN.com | August–September 2017


albums. He lent his licks to releases by Waylon Jennings, Reba McEntire, George Strait, Patty Loveless, The Oak Ridge Boys, Emmylou Harris, Hank Williams Jr. and others during his first years here. Bennett had become so established by 1992 that hit producer Allen Reynolds asked him to co-produce Harris and the Nash Ramblers’ live set, At The Ryman. This project not only earned a Grammy award, it focused people’s attention on the venue and helped save it from the wrecking ball. Yes, folks, our city came very close to obliterating one of its most iconic landmarks. It was With Neil Diamond, Oakland Coliseum, October 1983. photo credit: Dwayne Farrell saved because Harris and others loudly sounded the alarm. FOR MORE INFORMATION: He continued his steady session work richard-bennett.com throughout the 1990s and attracted the fansite.richard-bennett.com attention of Dire Straits leader Mark Knopfler, who was launching a solo also career and returning to his songwriter/ RICHARD’S WIFE, CHRISTINA WARD-BENNETT OVERSEES folk roots, away from the massive rock THE HILLWOOD/WEST MEADE LISTSERV, JOIN AT: guitar stadium shows. groups.yahoo.com/group/HillwoodNeighborhoodListserv/ Bennett signed on with Knopfler in 1994 and has remained in place, touring the world with him and playing on Knopfler’s solo recordings. At home, he keeps himself as busy as ever. This spring he produced Steve Earle’s June release, “So You Wannabe an Outlaw,” and played on the latest albums by Alison Krauss, Rodney Crowell and Vince Gill, among others. 25 years experience Additionally, Bennett has been showcasing the with Alcoholic 25Tennessee years experience Beverage Commission. solo side of his skills beginning with Themes for a with Tennessee Alcoholic 25 years experience Beverage Commission. Rainy Decade in 2004. These gorgeously captivating, Retired ExecutiveAlcoholic Director. with Tennessee dreamy instrumental soundscapes have continued Retired Executive Director. Beverage Commission. Complete knowledge of all through four additional releases, 2015’s Contrary licensing applications, Complete knowledge of all Retired Executive Director. Cocktail being the latest, with son Nick’s guitar work requirements and procedures licensing applications, Complete knowledge of all forlicensing retail liquor and featured on those. Hear samples and buy them on requirements andstores procedures applications, liquor-by-the-drink applications. for retail liquor stores and Richard’s website. requirements and procedures liquor-by-the-drink applications. Rising to the pinnacle of musical success is one Avoid dealing with for retail liquor stores and governmental bureaucracy Avoid dealing with thing, staying there is quite another. Here’s one way liquor-by-the-drink applications. and red tape. governmental bureaucracy Bennett maintains his place, and it’s great advice for Danielle Elks Avoid dealing with and redbureaucracy tape. those seeking the same: “Practice? It’s usually the Danielle Elks governmental same whether I’m on tour or not, roughly two hours and red tape. Danielle Elks throughout the day. Some is dedicated attention to a task—like scales, arpeggios, hook work—and some is simply mindless fiddling around or working on a new song. I’ve always thought, as long as the instruP.O. Box 162 • Burns, TN 37029 ment is in hand, it’s practice.” P.O. Box 162 • Burns, TN 37029

Applying for a liquor license? Applying for a liquor license? Let me help! Applying for a liquor license? Let me help!

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John Lomax III, a West Meade resident since 1987, has worked in the local music industry since 1973. He is author of three books and writes for country music magazines in England and Australia.

Contact: 615-243-1844 or www.ELKSLAW.com Box 162 • Burns, TN 37029 Contact:P.O. 615-243-1844 or www.ELKSLAW.com Contact: 615-243-1844 or www.ELKSLAW.com August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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PRINCIPAL of the THING WEST NASHVILLE’S ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS

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by Naomi GOLDSTONE

It’s the


Dr. Amy Downey Charlotte Park Elementary

School’s back in session (or almost, depending on when you’re reading this). We thought it would be fun to get to know a few of our West Nashville elementary school principals a little bit better and shine a light on all the work that they do for the children in our community!

Originally from West Tennessee, Dr. Amy Downey is beginning her third year as principal of Charlotte Park Elementary. After graduating from Freed-Hardeman with a degree in health and physical education, Downey’s early aspiration was to teach on the college level. “But when I got into teaching, I became very passionate about middle-school children, and I spent 29 years working on the middle-school level—teaching and supervision,” she says. Downey then requested a move to the elementary level because she wanted a better understanding of what students were learning before they entered middle school. “What we do at the K–8 level is so impactful for students to build academic preparedness,” she says. “We’re helping them build the tools they need to survive. It’s not all about the academics, though; it’s about the social awareness, too.” Downey’s advice to students? “Take advantage of the free education you’ve been given, and exercise,” she says. There are two physical education teachers at Charlotte Park Elementary, and Downey believes it is important to provide students with experiences they might not otherwise have. To that end, each grade level at the school gets to do something outside of school. Last school year, the fourth graders went zip lining, and the third graders went ice skating. Downey was selected as the 2017 National Distinguished Principal in the State of Tennessee by the Tennessee Principals Association. “It’s not about me, though,” she insists. “It’s about our teachers, our students, and our community who come together to support the learning and the academic, physical and social health of our kids. I can’t do it by myself, so it’s not about me. It’s about Charlotte Park Elementary.”

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Deltina Short Park Avenue Enhanced Option Elementary School Born and raised in public housing in Nashville, Principal Deltina Short attended Napier Elementary, Cameron and Wharton middle schools, and the historic Pearl High School. She later graduated from the University of Tennessee–Nashville (which was merged with Tennessee State University in 1979) with a degree in elementary education. As a little girl, she said she always wanted to be a teacher. “My second-grade and my seventh-grade teachers were always the reason,” she recalls. “Those two teachers never snubbed me because I grew up in public housing. They believed in me, and I always knew that I could excel and that I would be successful one day.” Short passes along this encouragement to her students at Park Avenue, where she first started in 1999 as a third-grade teacher. She became the school’s assistant principal in 2003, and after leaving for Ross Elementary for two years, Short returned to Park Avenue as its principal in 2007. “I am here because I want to be here, and there’s not another school where I’d want to be,” she says. “I honestly believe that I am here to provide a quality education for every student in a safe and nurturing environment.” Short says she wants to make sure her students know that they are loved and cared for. At the Fourth Grade Awards Day program each May, Short always plays Earth, Wind, & Fire’s song “You are a Shining Star” because, she says, “I want every student to know that they are special.” Short also gives the “I Am Somebody” award to a fourth-grade male and female student. “It’s not just about grades—it’s about academics, behavior and being a good citizen,” she said.

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Robin Elder Sylvan Park Paideia Design Center

“Teaching is really my second career,” Principal Robin Elder says. Before she was Sylvan Park’s principal, Elder worked for AT&T and Verizon, and massive layoffs eventually led her to starting her own business and then to substitute teaching. “Then the school where I was a long-term sub offered me a permanent position, and I loved it. I decided then that I had to get into teaching because I had found my passion,” she says. A native of Atlanta and a graduate of the University of West Georgia, Elder moved to Nashville one year ago to become the principal at Sylvan Park Elementary. “I never thought I’d leave Atlanta, but I was looking for a change,” Elder says. She is so glad to be here, too. “This is a great group of kids, and I have to attribute that to our restorative practices that we use—relationship building with teachers, parents and students.” Elder cannot say enough about the parental support she has at Sylvan Park Elementary. “Our parents are really committed to the teachers, to their children and to the school community,” she says. “We have traditions here that set us apart from other schools in Nashville. For example, we do a Disney play every year, we have a school carnival, we had a ‘Grandparents and Grits’ event, and we do a Valentine’s dance and a Halloween dance.” What advice does Elder give her students? “Give one hundred percent. In elementary school, there is no choice—you have to be here. So, while you’re here, give one hundred percent. Always ask if you don’t know, and always treat everyone with kindness and respect,” she says.


his teachers to know he cares about them, too. “I have to feed my teachers so that they can feed my kids,” he says. “If I take good care of my teachers, they’ll take very good care of the kids. We have to nurture the love of the kids in order to teach them.” Breese inspires his students by using the story of his favorite athlete: Michael Jordan. “I always talk about Michael Jordan and that you will find people who won’t support you, but always follow your dreams,” he says. He also tells his students to “find something you like to do. If you do what you like to do, you’ll always like getting up and doing it.” S

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It was during his winter break when he was a junior at UT-Martin that Principal Steve Breese decided to switch majors. “I went to college to be an accountant, and all of that changed in December of my junior year,” Breese says. “I came home during winter break, and one of my former teachers asked if I could sub. I loved it and then went back to UT-Martin and switched my major to elementary education.” Breese says that the way he approaches teaching and being a principal has been influenced by his own experience. “I was not a typical student because I have ADHD, so school was not always my favorite thing,” he says. So, Breese makes it a point to make sure his students know that he cares about their well-being and their academics. “The students don’t care what you know until they know you care about them,” he says. As principal, Breese wants

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Steve Breese Westmeade Elementary School

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When she’s not being dragged around The Nations by Mr. Ernie Banks and her other three dogs, Naomi Goldstone is a professor of English and coordinator of the African American Studies program at Austin Peay State University. She is also the author of “Integrating the Forty Acres” and blogs at dwonnaknowwhatithink.com.

EDITORIAL NOTE: Former Cockrill Elementary principal Susan Cochrane was interviewed for this article; it was later announced that she accepted another position within the MNPS system. At press time, no replacement has been announced. Congratulations to Susan, and we look forward to meeting the new Cockrill principal!

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KEITH BOLDUS – GENERAL MANAGER KBOLDUS@COMCAST.NET August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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BRIGHTSIDE BAKESHOP Shines in the Nations

by Holly DARNELL photos by Amy Hobbs

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Days are the brightest when waking up with coffee and a special baked good.

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he smell of freshly baked cinnamon rolls wafting through the house, paired with a fresh cup of coffee . . . and it feels like home. This scene is recreated with just one bite from Brightside Bakeshop. The idea for Brightside was hatched on a snowy day in 2015. Owner Andrea Borchers has had the entrepreneur bug since high school and on that fateful day, she had the notion to put her bakery dreams into action. “My love of baking came from my Grandma Erikson, who always had something baking in the kitchen when I came over,” she explains. “My grandmother shared hospitality with other people, and I want to continue sharing that with others. I thought, ‘Why not start now?’” The brainstorming process began with her desire to create a signature, specialty product. Andrea wanted to produce an item that could not easily be recreated in the home kitchen. Initially, she had thoughts of creating brownies and muffins, but she soon fell in love with bread-making. The process and science behind breads intrigued her, and she soon discovered the art of brioche, a French pastry similar to a highly enriched bread. Its high egg and butter content gives it a rich, tender and flaky crumb. Andrea saw that brioche had been popping up in major cities and realized the need for authentic, fromscratch brioche in Nashville. “My inspiration came from several places,” she says. “Flour Bakery + Cafe in Boston, Tartine, Huckleberry, Clinton Street Baking Company and even Instagram. I got bakery cookbooks and did taste-testing for six months before landing on a brioche recipe that I loved. I found I could stick with brioche, because I could provide sweet and savory options.” Continuing to hone her skill and further

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Andrea Borchers with her fabulous brioche.

increase her knowledge, she recently traveled to San Francisco and studied brioche and croissant making at the San Francisco Baking Institute. Making brioche takes three days. The dough is made the first day and let rest for 24 hours. The second day, Andrea rolls it out and then allows the dough to rest for an additional 24 hours. The following morning, it proofs for one hour, allowing the dough to undergo its final rise. Depending on if it is a sweet or savory flavor, it is baked for 20–25 minutes in brioche tins. The recipe and the shape of the brioche tins lend to their beautiful, tall and fluffy shape. Andrea uses meaningful and nostalgic mixers in her kitchen—one was owned by her Grandma Erikson and her husband gave her the other on their wedding day. These mixers enhance the baking process, making her flavorful brioche also full of joy, love and memories. Brightside Bakeshop prides itself on having the freshest and highest-quality products, using local ingredients

brioche looks dense and heavy, but it is the opposite— flaky, light and airy


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whenever possible. Andrea uses King Arthur all-purpose flour; her products are free of preservatives, chemicals, and additives. She bakes out of Citizens Kitchen in The Nations. At first glance, the tall brioche looks dense and heavy, but it is the opposite—flaky, light and airy, it is packed full of flavor. The tall, golden brioche combined with fresh flavors makes a delicious baked good. Sweet options include her wildly popular cinnaroll (oozing with traditional creamcheese filling), salted caramel pecan and chocolate turtle. Her savory brioches include ham and cheddar, sausage and cheddar, and threecheese. All of the sweet brioche is topped with a homemade creamcheese frosting. The bakeshop wants to incorporate other ingredients from the area farmers market in sweet and savory creations, adding local, seasonal flavors and supporting farmers. A strawberries-and-cream roll recently highlighted the seasonal strawberries. Initially, Andrea thought her business would begin as an Etsy shop, but she soon found that she wanted to serve her community locally. The name “Brightside Bakeshop” came about because Andrea has always looked “on the bright side” of things. She wants her baked goods to translate into brighter days for her customers. Andrea says: “Having a treat can make your day better, and I want to spread that joy to Nashville and our community, inspiring others to look on the bright side. Days are the brightest when waking up with coffee and a special baked good.” The bakeshop is primarily breakfast-focused, with the logo mimicking a sunrise. Brightside Bakeshop began selling once a month at the Richland Park Farmer’s Market in October 2016 and soon began to expand. Currently, their products are available at the Nashville Farmers’ Market every Saturday from 8 a.m. until sold out, and Three Corners Coffee over in The Nations. If you cannot make it to the market or coffee shop, online ordering is available. They also offer catering for corporate events and bridal and baby showers. With the growing demand

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Holly Darnell is a registered dietitian and licensed nutritionist and has been practicing for six years. She is the owner of Golden Roots Nashville, a locally sourced meal kit delivery service.

Classes start Sept. 5 Join us for affordable classes in languages, cooking, business, art + much more. Fall 2017 registration is ongoing. Most classes are located at the Cohn School in Sylvan Park!

Register now at nashville.gov/ce

August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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A TALE of TWO WRITERS Writing Music on the West Side

Two different writers, two distinctly different styles and stories . . . from one great community: West Nashville!

KATHY CHIAVOLA’S Journey: from Opera to Bluegrass Sylvan Park’s Kathy Chiavola grew up in Kansas City, Missouri, and even before she headed off to college she had built a local reputation as a guitar-playing folk singer serving up side orders of blues and rock—which is interesting, when you consider she was determined to become an opera star. She earned a scholarship in music from Ohio’s Oberlin Conservatory of Music and left Kansas City in her wake. After earning both a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in music, she entered a doctoral program at the University of Indiana and began studying with Metropolitan Opera star Eileen Farrell. To pay the rent, she continued playing gigs in clubs around Bloomington and found herself increasingly drawn to bluegrass. Eventually bluegrass won out, and she moved to Nashville in 1980. Kathy describes her music as “primarily bluegrass, but I have eclectic taste and ability.” It wasn’t long before she became part of the bluegrass underground and was soon playing (guitar and bass)

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photo credit: Sinclair Baldassari

by Deana DECK


with some of the genre’s greats, like Vassar Clements, Doug Dillard, Mark O’Connor and Edgar Meyer. She formed her own band in the mid-1980s which at the time included Jerry Douglas, Edgar Meyer, Bela Fleck and world-champion fiddle player Randy Howard. She and Randy soon became a couple and were inseparable until his untimely death in 1999. Together they played 10 world tours, where Kathy’s vocals and Howard’s hugely expressive fiddle work gained international attention. Bluegrass and country are closely related, so it was no surprise that Kathy eventually expanded her repertoire. She made her country debut with Labor of Love, which gathered unanimous critical acclaim in 1990. It was London’s Tower Records’ No. 1 country CD for two weeks and reached No. 2 on the UK country chart. “My original songs span bluegrass, folk, traditional country, swing, blues, jazz and singer-songwriter songs” she says. And then there’s that voice. In 1995, Kathy was named Outstanding Background Vocalist in the Nashville Music Awards, and she has sung on hundreds of recordings with the likes of Vince Gill, Tammy Wynette, Emmylou Harris and Garth Brooks. In 1996, she released The Harvest, featuring her band along with guests Chet Atkins and Harris, Bill Monroe, Gill and other Nashville legends. The album was named one of the top five bluegrass CDs of the year by the Chicago Tribune. After Randy’s death, Kathy released her third CD, From Where I Stand: A Personal Tribute. The album included songs that Kathy and Randy had cut before his death, as well as originals that fellow bluegrass artist Ginger Boatwright has described as imparting “emotion, raw and rare . . . a feeling of loss and unbearable beauty.” Kathy’s fourth CD, released in 2007, was her first collection of all original

songs and contains a staggering range of influences, from bluegrass to blues, jazz to Latin, country and even a touch of flamenco. Not surprisingly, it received international acclaim and received a 5-Star CD of the month accolade from the UK’s Country Music People magazine. The Nashville Scene has described Kathy’s music as an “intertwining of solid bluegrass tradition and other more wide-ranging

Kathy at home in Sylvan Park

Kathy Chiavola in concert. Prague, November 2016. photo credit: Lilly Pavlak

forms, uniquely rooted in her personality.” Asked what influences her writing, Kathy responds, “My life experiBill Monroe, Kathy and Mark O’Connor ence, state of mind, beliefs, studio, as well as at Belmont Univeropenness to receiving inspirasity. And she’s recently added anothtion, and study of the greats.” er skill to her resume: film producer. Kathy wrote her first song, “Tug She is editing a feature documentary, of War” about her parents’ divorce Sicily Calling, which explores her famwhen she was 12. Unfortunately, as ily’s roots and culture in her ancesshe says, she was not in a supporttral homeland of Ragusa, Sicily. ive environment for songwriting, so she gave it up temporarily. “It seemed impossible. I was a late bloomer and began again late in life, after realizing I had a unique story to tell and after having listened to, studied and performed countless great songs.” As her history indicates, Kathy isn’t one to rest on her laurels. She currently teaches voice in her private

Know someone who should be featured in “A Tale of Two Writers”? Tell us at 372WestNashville@gmail.com

August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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photo credit: Sonia Fernandez LeBlanc

BILL FLOWERREE’S Long and Winding Road According to The Lovin’ Spoonful’s 1967 hit, “Nashville Cats,” there are 1,352 guitar pickers in Nashville. There are probably 10 times as many songwriters—many of them living in West Nashville—like Sylvan Park’s Bill Flowerree (the spelling is Welsh). Influenced by his parents, who were fans of musical satirists like Tom Lehrer (“Poisoning Pigeons in the Park”), he developed an early sense of humor. By the time Bill hit college, he had started writing novelty songs. “I never stopped,” he says. “I gravitate to that and to co-writers who can do that, as well.” He studied psychology at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut, although he actually yearned for a career as a rock ’n’ roll guitar player. “That’s what I really wanted from about age 12,” he says. His college roommate was also a musician.

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“He and I started writing parodies of country songs in the ’70s. We played in a little bar that used to pay us in all the chili and hard cider we could handle.” Although he only became what he calls an “OK guitar player,” he also made an important discovery. “Songwriting is a craft you can learn and maybe someday make a living from. I wanted to see how far it could get me.” He joined the Connecticut Songwriters Association and other songwriters’ groups to hone his craft. “Songwriters associations are great. They’re very serious and very supportive of each other— and of giving honest feedback in a safe environment. “ Bill began having co-writing appointments with other members of the CSA and soon found his attention drawn to Nashville. “I

started traveling here and realized that if I moved here, the number and quality of my co-writing appointments would increase,” he explains. “So whether or not there was any money to be made, it just seemed that if I wanted to pursue songwriting and improve as much as possible at that particular craft, this was the best place to do that. It became a no-brainer.” He moved to Nashville on John Lennon’s birthday in 1997, a testament to one of his major influences. Although he’s naturally drawn to satire and parody, multiple genres influence his work. “First, I fell in love with the Beatles and then later, Cream and Jimi Hendrix, San Francisco rock, British blues—all the late 1960s, early ’70s stuff,” he says. “I still write blues. I write novelty that’s more oriented for the stage, and I write serious country


photo credit: Sonia Fernandez LeBlanc

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songs—but I’ve had limited success with that.” His songs include the Anna Nicole Smith-influenced “Waiting for the Guy to Die” (see it on YouTube), “Twelve Steps from a Six-Pack” and “Two Party System,” which is not a political anthem. Despite having written more than 200 songs, success in terms of a No. 1 hit on the Billboard charts has been elusive. “I’ve had a couple of songs on hold for major artists,” he says. “I had several songs in the original version of the stage play, Motherhood the Musical. That’s where most of my songwriting money came from. I’ve probably had at least 10 international cuts. Sometimes I’ll get some performance royalties— there’ll be a check for $50 from BMI, and it will include, like, 12 cents from Australia for a particular cut. l still feel great every time I get one. “I may have made a total of five figures worth of money from music and spent in the low six figures,” he says with a grin. “There are worse investments than that.” VI

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Are you a songwriter or musician with a distinct style? Let us know—hit us up at 372WestNashville@gmail.com! Deana Deck is a writer who has lived in Sylvan Park since 1985. She has worked in journalism, advertising, public relations, film and video production, and has edited a number of books for local publishers. For 20 years she was the Garden Tips editor at The Tennessean. She also writes songs that she describes as “whimsical blues.”

“Songwriting is a craft you can learn and maybe someday make a living from. I wanted to see how far it could get me.” –BILL FLOWERREE

Bill Flowerree, Writers’ Night at Bobby’s Idle Hour Tavern. photo credit: Deana Deck August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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is in

Gettin’ Schooled in West Nashville by Keena DAY

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ummer is winding down, and school is gearing up! The anticipation for learning something new, gaining a hobby or volunteering seems to go hand-in-hand with this season and West Nashville has a wealth of opportunities for all learners, children and adults alike.

Nashville Community Education Nashville Community Education programs are diverse and affordable with classes that include sewing, social media, finance, arts, career, technology, lifestyle and Spanish— and that’s barely a drop in the bucket of what they offer. You’ll find a catalog containing all their courses online or swing by their offices in the old Cohn High School building and pick up a print edition. Find out more: 4805 Park Avenue, Suite 123 615.298.8050 nashville.gov/ce

Nashville Literacy Council Also located in the old Cohn High School Building in Suite 305, the Nashville Literacy Council’s primary mission is to teach adults how to read and write. Volunteers serve in a one-on-one setting, and all tutors must attend training regardless of background or experience. There are also opportunities for immigrants to learn the English language, gain citizenship, or join conversation clubs to become more comfortable with the language in a relaxed setting. Learners are also encouraged to use the computer lab in the Reading Horizons Program which is a computer based literacy program. Find out more: info@nashvilleliteracy.org 615.298.8060

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Senior Renaissance Center Now in its 29th year, the SRC provides activities for seniors such as Phase-10, a Pool-a-rama every third Wednesday, Bingo every Monday and Friday, and “The Adult Coloring Book Craze” available daily. Kroger on Harding Road donates birthday cakes and ice cream for a monthly birthday bash held every fourth Tuesday. Additional activities include karaoke (second Tuesdays), and Trivia (second and fourth Wednesdays) each month. “This is a great program particularly for seniors who live alone, have had a loved one to pass,” says Judith Redmond, director. “Each senior has a certain job they are responsible for, and this gives them something to look forward to.” The SRC is also located in the old Cohn High School building. Find out more: 615.269.4565

Richland Park Library The Nashville Public Library system offers a wide-variety of community classes throughout the year. Richland Park Library in West Nashville Is not exception, offering courses such as Story time for Pre-School aged children and babies and several themes events throughout the summer, including “Scrabble and S’Mores” and “Maker Family Workshop” which bring families together to create anything from hands-on crafts to simple circuits, this month’s theme being a Seuss-themed story walk in the park. For teens, Richland offers a fanfiction writing group for ages 13-18 on August 15 from 5-6:30 p.m. Teens learn how to craft stories featuring their favorite book, anime/ manga, TV, movie, or comic book characters. Adults can also attend courses at the Richland Library. Every Thursday at 6:15 p.m., adults can join BalancED for a free community yoga program presented by renewed. Participants are required to bring their own mat and should register online at www.renewedsupport.org/balanced-registration. Every Monday night, the library sponsors a Writer’s Night dedicated to writers to chat with other writers or use the space to work on projects independently. Sessions include a brief (and optional) writing exercise and group discussion. Writers of all levels are welcome

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and can contact kevin.mcmahon@nashville.gov for more information. Richland also hosts a Saturday book club open to all newcomers! This month, the book club will be held August 26 at 1:00 p.m. and centered around a discussion of The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman. Contact annie.herlock@nashville.gov to sign up. Find out more: 4711 Charlotte Avenue, Nashville, TN 37209 library.nashville.org Phone: 615.862.5870 x 73945

Welcome to 1979 Welcome to 1979 is a Grammy® award-winning studio where people can track, rdub, or mix projects in a vintage, analog setting. The studio host events throughout the year such as “Tape Camps” recording class, an annual Recording Summit the second weekend in November, as well as vinyl listening parties each month. “Even though there is information about virtually everything available on the Internet, people seek out ways to learn from experts in a tactile environment,” explains owner Chris Mara. “Firsthand experience is getting harder to find, and our Tape Camps offer a unique learning experience while building community.” Find out more: 1110 48th Avenue North welcometo1979.com


NECAT Community members are also encouraged to produce local television programming with Nashville Education, Community and Arts Television (NECAT), a local nonprofit cablecast station that helps people create and broadcast their own shows. To produce local shows, simply enroll to take TV Production 1 and 2 and volunteer on 3 production shoots to learn how to produce (fees apply). After completion of the courses, choose a membership status to either volunteer for shows or produce your very own shows broadcast locally! Classes are scheduled from August 2017–December 2017. “Community members age 13 and up are invited to create their own television shows for broadcast at Nashville Education, Community, and Arts Television,” says Trish Crist, CEO of NECAT. “The nonprofit NECAT exists to teach people who want to make TV shows how to do it, welcome them as members to use the studio and equipment, and broadcast the shows that they create on one of NECAT’s three channels (arts, education, or public access).“ During MNPS Fall Break (October 9–13, 2017), NECAT will host its 4th annual Zombie TV Camp where participants age 13 and up learn to operate all studio equipment and shoot their own shows with a professional actor in special effects zombie makeup by NECAT Artist-in-Residence Rick Prince from the SyFy channel show, “Face Off.” Find out more: 120 White Bridge Rd. #46 (on the Nashville State campus) necatnetwork.org 615.354.1273

Nashville Violins Nashville Violins offers lessons and classes for adults

Diocesan Catholic School

AdvAncEd/SAIS AccrEdItEd

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& AftEr cArE

call for a personal tour: 615-352-1328 6401 Harding Pike | Nashville, TN 37205 www.sthenryschool.org August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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and children of all ages. They have nine teachers and conduct lessons for all bowed string instruments including violin, viola, cello, bass, as well as guitar, mandolin, fiddling, Suzuki and piano. Lessons are taught in private studios, one-on-one, so the student can progress at their own rate, and instruction can be tailored to the students’ needs and interests. Registration is $35 with an additional monthly tuition and can be completed online at www. nashvilleviolins.com. Nashville Violins also has a handson instrument series for beginners, parents, siblings, friends, or those looking to begin a second instrument. No experience is needed and discounts are available for multiple family members of groups! Find out more: 5109 Georgia Avenue nashvilleviolins.com 615.292.5196

divisions. Enrollment is determined by age, so children should meet age requirements listed with each class offering by October 1. Some course offerings include classes for boys 3–5 years old, and a studio division for young dance enthusiasts to train at their own pace with professional instructors in a variety of styles including ballet, jazz and musical theater. The Nashville Ballet is currently enrolling for the fall semester classes which are held from August 14–December 16, 2017. The School of Nashville’s Ballet’s Community Division offers adult classes with a welcoming environment for students age 18 and up of any experience level for those new to dance or diving back into it! Participants are asked to come as they are! Classes include beginning ballet through varying skill levels, and dance classes such as DanceFIx, a high energy adult dance class, or styles such as contemporary or hip hop dance. Community Division Adult Classes are offered on a rolling basis throughout the year, with the exception of Thanksgiving and Christmas Holidays. Find out more: 3630 Redmon Street school@nashvilleballet.com 615.297.2966 x203

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The Nashville Ballet offers a wide range of courses for children and adults. The Ballet Company is located in West Nashville, and have professional training opportunities for students ages 6–18 through a variety of

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design | painting | letterpress

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Keena Day recently relocated from West Nashville to Colorado.

We will miss you, Keena, and you’ll always be a part of the 372WN family!


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ALL THE PARK’S A STAGE,

FROM THE DIRECTOR:

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new friends. The Nashville Shakespeare Festival wants to bring the Bard to the people, and they make it as easy for their audience as possible. The summer shows run from August 10 to September 17, Thursdays through Sundays, as well as Labor Day Monday. Admission is a suggested $10 donation, but as Hicks says: “Pay what you can. We want everyone to be able to see the shows, so bring your kids, bring your grandmother—if you need to bring your dog in order to come, bring your dog.” With its emphasis on accessibility and inclusion, this is Shakespeare for all, including those who may be unsure of the language. Hicks says the shows have a Nashville feel that is “user-friendly,” and that many people come up to her afterward to comment about just that. “They’ll say, ‘I understood it.’ And they seem so miffed by the fact they understood it,” she says, laughing. “But they should understand it, it’s in English!” She explains that it is the actor’s job to understand the language and make it clear to the audience what is being said. For specific dates, times and pre-show entertainment lineups for each show, visit the Nashville Shakespeare Festival’s website at www.nashvilleshakes.org. For those who require it, there is also a sign-language interpreted show, date TBA. VI

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derbilt’s theatre program and now works for the university as a project consultant. In her spare time, she enjoys pub trivia and building furniture in her garden shed.

David Ian Lee’s ‘Antony & Cleopatra’ On the Venn Diagram of History, What People Think Is History and Shakespeare’s play Antony & Cleopatra, there’s less crossover than one might imagine. For this reason, I haven’t much interest in an “historical” depiction of Ptolemaic Egypt or Caesar’s Rome, nor do I want to “drop” this play into a transposed era. Rather, I want to invent the worlds of this play, inspired by feeling and limited only by imagination. I think that may be the best way to encourage audiences to let go of what they think they know about this story and invest instead in our unique production. This play is a clash of cultural values. Cleopatra’s Egypt values passion, self-expression and sensuality, while Caesar and the might of Rome privilege severity, austerity and authoritarianism. “A&C” is a romance and a political thriller, but at its heart is the tension between a drive to perfect the humanity out of man and the messy and delicious things that make us human. We all bring all manner of ourselves to the theatre: we bring what we think we know of a play and what we think we know of our world, but we also bring what we had for dinner and whether our bills are getting paid and whether that person we like really likes us, too. Thinking differently about “A&C”—taking nothing for granted, but rather entering into this production with clear eyes— will, I hope, afford audiences an opportunity to see themselves differently. –David Ian Lee

Santiago Sosa’s ‘The Winter’s Tale’ The Winter’s Tale is a play that continually affirms my love of Shakespeare and the path that I have chosen in life, every single time I visit this piece. Its beautifully structured narrative is an extremely complex, and epically mythological fairy tale that has everything, from love, tragedy, loss, death, pathos, to comedy, family, songs, dances, and even a thrilling court room drama element.  When approaching this masterpiece, I wanted it to feel personal: tangible, but also magical and sensational. Growing up in South America, Simon Bolivar was a mythic, historical character that I was always fascinated with; there were statues of him all over that I would encounter throughout my travels as a young boy; he even had his face printed on many forms of currency. When reading The Winter’s Tale for the first time, all I could see in my mind’s eye was the intimidating, powerful, lion-like gaze of Simon Bolivar every time Leontes spoke. I have since associated the world of Sicilia and Bohemia with that era. This play will explore the difference between the restrained and constricted society of Sicilia and the multi-cultural and expressive people of an imagined Bohemia, inspired by my colorful experiences in Ecuador and my travels throughout South America. My hope is that I can share this, what I consider to be one of Shakespeare’s definitive masterpieces that is very near and dear to me with the people of Nashville by putting as much of myself and worldview into every word that is spoken and every splash of color of this imagined world. –Santiago Sosa

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Is Your Neighborhood

??

MISSING TREES Is Your Neighborhood MISSING TREES What is the TREE REPLACEMENT CODE ?

For single family and duplex properties, existing trees are not protected. All trees may be cut down, but new trees must be What is the TREE REPLACEMENT CODE ? planted according to the Tree Replacement Ordinance. (Chapter 17.24.100, Section 2., b.) www.bit.ly/D6trees

You, or your neighbors, could be owed trees that were never planted. Newly constructed homes are required by city law to have trees planted in the yards before completing the permitting If you want neighborhood full of shady You, or yourprocess. neighbors, could be a owed trees that were never trees, please take time to follow recommendations. planted. Newly constructed homesthese are required by city law to have trees planted in the yards before completing the KNOW? permitting process. IfDID you YOU want a neighborhood full of shady Treestime are to NOT PROTECTED in Nashville. trees,Mature please take follow these recommendations.

Currently in Nashville, no laws apply to protect existing DID YOU KNOW? trees. A property owner may cut down any number of Mature Trees are NOT PROTECTED in Nashville. trees, of any size or type, without any recourse.

For single family and duplex properties, existing trees are not protected. All trees may be cut down, but new trees must be The ordinance requires replacement of trees based on the “lot planted according to the Tree Replacement Ordinance. frontage*” of the property. For every thirty feet (30’) of “lot (Chapter 17.24.100, Section 2., b.) www.bit.ly/D6trees frontage”, or portion thereof, one tree must be planted.

Currently in Nashville, no laws apply to protect existing As for now, we can work to enforce the Metro Tree trees. A property owner may cut down any number of Replacement Ordinance and ask your city officials to trees, of any size or type, without any recourse. create Tree Protection laws.

The ordinance requires replacement of trees based on the “lot The tree mustofbe atproperty. least two For inches (2”) in caliper** at frontage*” the every thirty feet (30’)and of “lot least six feetor (6’)portion tall. Itthereof, should be chosen frombe Metro’s Urban frontage”, one tree must planted. Tree Planting list. www.bit.ly/urbantreelist

As for now, we can work to enforce the Metro Tree Also, youOrdinance can register and individual Replacement and askprotect your city officials to Historic andcreate Specimen Trees within Metro thru this Tree Protection laws. volunteer program. www.bit.ly/historictree

The tree must be at least two inches (2”) in caliper** and at least six feet (6’) tall. It should be chosen from Metro’s Urban Tree Planting list. www.bit.ly/urbantreelist If you are thinking, “WOW, that’s a lot to remember!”

Also, you can register and protect individual Historic and Specimen Trees within Metro thru this volunteer program. www.bit.ly/historictree

Here’s way If youan areeasy thinking, remember “WOW, to that’s a lot to it: remember!” ONE-TWO-THREE! Here’s an easy way ONE to remember it: Tree from the ONE-TWO-THREE! Urban Tree Planting List ONE Tree from the TWO Urban Planting List 2 inches inTree diameter (caliper) TWO THREE 2 inches diameter For every 30 in feet of “lot (caliper) frontage” THREE

For every is30simply feet the of “lot *Lot frontage sidesfrontage” of the property that touch a street, excluding the alley. **Measurement six inches (6”) from the base of the tree. *Lot frontage is simply the sides of the property thatremaining touch a street, the alley. Existing trees on excluding the property do not **Measurement inches (6”) from the they base of theprotected tree. count toward thesixrequirement unless were

during construction in accordance with 17.24.110 - Protection trees remaining on the property do not ofExisting Trees During Development Activities Ordinance. count toward the requirement unless they were protected www.bit.ly/developmentwithtrees during construction in accordance with 17.24.110 - Protection of NEW Trees During Development Ordinance. My HOUSE is MissingActivities Trees. What do I do? www.bit.ly/developmentwithtrees

If you find that your new property is missing trees, it’s likely My NEW HOUSE is Missing Trees. What do I do? your developer didn’t know about the code or the city missed it during inspection. If you find that your new property is missing trees, it’s likely your developer didn’t know about the code or the city missed REACH OUT TO YOUR HOME BUILDER it during inspection. If you want your home builder to plant the required trees missing on your property, you should request immediately REACH OUT TO YOUR HOME BUILDER that they plant thehome treesbuilder as required by the Remember, If you want your to plant thecode. required trees just because your property, house passed inspection, doesn’t mean the missing on your you should request immediately Tree Ordinance was satisfied. Use and thatReplacement they plant the trees as required by the The code. Remember, Occupancy Letter theminspection, by the Building Inspector just because yourissued houseto passed doesn’t mean the Department can remind the builder of their The responsibility Tree Replacement Ordinance was satisfied. Use and to comply with Letter the code even receive the Inspector Use and Occupancy issued toafter themthey by the Building Occupancy Permit. www.bit.ly/useandoccupancy Department can remind the builder of their responsibility to comply with the code even after they receive the Use and IFOccupancy THE BUILDER DOESN’T COMPLY Permit. www.bit.ly/useandoccupancy It may be that your home is several years old, or for some other reason youDOESN’T feel it is too late to work with the builder. If IF THE BUILDER COMPLY so, reach outhome to your neighborhood or It you may can be that your is several years old,association or for some one of the local non-profit treelate groups and with ask for free tree. other reason you feel it is too to work theabuilder. If so, you can reach out to your neighborhood association or IFone ALLof ELSE theFAILS local non-profit tree groups and ask for a free tree. You can plant your own tree and enjoy the satisfaction of knowing youFAILS are doing something that will ensure the future IF ALL ELSE beauty and health yourtree property. You can plant yourofown and enjoy the satisfaction of knowing you are doing something that will ensure the future beauty and health of your property.

My NEIGHBOR’S NEW HOUSE is Missing Trees. Here is what you can do for other houses that are missing trees. My NEIGHBOR’S NEW HOUSE is Missing Trees. IF THE HOUSE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION Here is what you can do for other houses that are missing trees. While a house is being built, remind the project manager of their responsibility to plant a tree(s). You can either do this in IF THE HOUSE IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION person, or print and leave the letter in the following link While a house is being built, remind the project manager of where it will be found by the project manager of the their responsibility to plant a tree(s). You can either do this in construction site. http://bit.ly/treeloveletter person, or print and leave the letter in the following link where it will be found by the project manager of the IF THE HOUSE IS COMPLETE BUT IS NOT OCCUPIED construction site. http://bit.ly/treeloveletter If the landscaping is installed and trees are missing, www.bit.ly/nashcode immediately them using link:OCCUPIED IF THE HOUSEreport IS COMPLETE BUTthis IS NOT If the landscaping is installed and trees are missing, IF THE HOUSE IS OCCUPIED BUTthis MISSING TREES immediately report them using link: www.bit.ly/nashcode Leave a copy of this ‘Is Your Neighborhood Missing Trees’ www.bit.ly/nashtreeflyer flyer the IS owner. IF THEwith HOUSE OCCUPIED BUT MISSING TREES Leave a copy of this ‘Is Your Neighborhood Missing Trees’ flyer with the owner. www.bit.ly/nashtreeflyer

NASHVILLE TREE NASHVILLE TREE TASK FORCE

TASK FORCE

Copyright 2017 Nashville Tree Task Force Ashworth Environmental Design, LLC

Copyright 2017 Nashville Tree Task Force

Ashworth Environmental LLC WN.com | 372 August–September 2017Design,

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372WestNosh

by Constant

EATER

There are just those times when you want a slice of cheesecake with your bacon and eggs, or a leisurely light cocktail that defies conventional happy hours . . . and thankfully, 19th-century foodies did, too, thus birthing the glorious meal called “brunch.” This installment still offers you our picks for breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails, but each of these West Nashville establishments offer a weekend brunch. Bon appetit!

Breakfast CRUMB DE LA CRUMB 160 Belle Forest Circle

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here’s a reason we’ve nicknamed this place “Crumb de la Yum.” Tucked away just off Old Hickory Boulevard, Crumb de la Crumb is a hidden gem with a menu that combines the comfort food of a Southern grandmother with the sophistication of a New York chefs. Food Network Challenge veteran Lorie Burcham and her husband Jason originally opened Crumb de la Crumb in 2010 as a bakery, with an emphasis on Lorie’s beautiful

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cake designs. When they had the opportunity to acquire the space formerly occupied by The Cottage Café, they quickly expanded their business, offering breakfast and lunch fare made from scratch. Breakfast items are available a la carte, or you can kick things up a notch with one of their French toast plates or breakfast sandwiches. If you have the extra time it takes for their special German pancake to cook, do yourself a favor and splurge—it's downright luxurious to sink into! Crumb’s lunch fare offers an array of delicious salads, sandwiches, and unique drinks, but two items stand out: The vanilla bean lemonade and Burcham’s signature Charleston she-crab soup. (P.S. There’s also a kids’ menu.) Brunch at Crumb de la Crumb is exceptional. A band plays background jazz so light you can actually enjoy the music and have a conversation

without screaming at your dining companions. Like the breakfast and lunch menus, most items are under $10 and Burcham’s she-crab soup and German pancake are also available. Pair food selections with any of the coffees, artisan teas, juices, cocktails, wine, craft and domestic beers offered—but we recommend the lavender vanilla bean lemonade mimosa, complete with lavender buds, while it’s still available. All menus—bakery, café, catering— include dairy-free, gluten-free and vegan options. Bulk items are available for purchase and there’s also an event space that can be reserved. HOURS: 8:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m., Wednesday–Saturday 9:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m., Sunday CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: No


Lunch

Dinner

LUCKY BAMBOO

THE HOP YARD AT FAT BOTTOM BREWERY

5855B Charlotte Pike

800 44th Avenue North

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f you take the ramp that leads you to K&S World Market, you’ll find Lucky Bamboo located right next door, offering some of the best Chinese dishes in Nashville—and some you won’t find anywhere else. Yes, there’s an assortment of hot/cold appetizers, noodle and rice dishes, all cooked to perfection and minus the oily residue that often accompanies similar dishes at other establishments. But where else can you find Chongqing Spicy Chicken, mussels in black bean sauce, or roasted duck noodle soup? In fact, Lucky Bamboo offers a dizzying array of vegetarian, poultry, pork, beef, seafood and lamb options, representing a variety of Chinese regions and provinces. Lunch is served weekdays until 4:00 p.m., and with at least one-day advance notice, they can even cater it. And if you’re stuck planning the next office shindig, they have banquet facilities that can seat up to 300 people. Now for those who have been searching for authentic dim sum in Nashville, Lucky Bamboo is one of a select few places that offers it every weekend until 3:00 p.m. A Chinese breakfast-now-brunch tradition, dim sum consists of small, shareable portions of steamed buns, dumplings, vegetables and more. Dishes are placed on a rolling cart that travels from table to table, usually served in pieces of three or four. Lucky Bamboo’s menu includes shrimp and pork shumai; Chinese broccoli with oyster sauce; chicken feet (they fry theirs); sticky rice (Chinese sausage and wrapped in banana leaves); curry rolls; barbecue pork rolls; Mai Fun noodles with shrimp, chicken, veggies; spare ribs; egg custard; and so much more. Delicious and fresh, Lucky Bamboo’s dim sum is a great detour from the typical brunch fare, and offers too many options to fit

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into one dining experience—so pace yourself and know in advance that you’ll be back for more. HOURS: 11:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m., Sunday–Thursday 11:00 a.m.–10:00 p.m., Friday and Saturday CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: No

nter the Hop Yard at Illinois Avenue and 44th Avenue North and you’ll likely amble through the park-like beer garden past neighborhood and visiting groups of chattering, smiling, beer-drinking people. Life is good at The Hop Yard. You may choose to be seated in one of several inviting table areas or you may want to make your way to the beautiful wooden bar (refurbished and moved from Fat Bottom’s former East Nashville location) and claim one of the comfy, lacquered wood slab stools where Kenny, Josh or other capable beer-tenders will greet you and take your drink order. IPA enthusiasts will want to try the 2 Hop Shakur, a rich and (surprise) hoppy, full-bodied West Coast IPA. All palates will find something happy-making on the extensive list. There’s a full bar, with a modest wine list, craft cocktails—including the Nasty Woman (because: why not?) and the Bad Hombre (because: of course). The tall glasses of the Tart Cherry Berliner Weiss beer are very tempting and clearly popular at the bar.

August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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Cocktails ANSWER. 132 46th Avenue

C The tidy pamphlet-sized menu features “Shareables,” “Salads” and “Plates.” This is, friends and neighbors, bar food—but it’s very well-done, upscale bar food! The Roasted Pear & Arugula Salad is fresh, pleasing, and yummy; and you can’t go wrong with any of the ample burger choices. The affordably priced Hop Yard Brunch is there for us every Saturday and Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. There’s the Classic Burger, a delightful Shrimp and Grits, Corned Beef Hash, and Chicken and Waffles, along with tasty options for the vegetarian in your family. Adult and non-alcoholic breakfast beverage choices abound. General Manager Taylor Easterwood says, “We offer a classic Brunch with traditional breakfast dishes and spruce it up with some of our favorite regular menu items. My Brunch favorites are the Corned Beef Hash and the Low Country Shrimp and Grits, but your favorite is up to you.” HOURS: 4:00 p.m.–12:00 a.m., Monday through Thursday 11:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m., Friday 10:00 a.m.–12:00 a.m., Saturday 10:00 a.m.–10:00 p.m., Sunday Don’t neglect Happy Hour from 4:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: No

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o-owners Victoria Rothberg and Chris Raucci have created an “even-better-than-Nashville” experience at Sylvan Park’s new “answer.” restaurant. The already-hotspot’s look was brought to the table (no pun intended) by San Francisco’s Hanna Collins Designs. The full bar features three excellent craft brew drafts and over a dozen canned and bottled options, a lovely assortment of wines with nearly every one available by the glass, and four tasty craft house cocktails. Tastefully named “bourbon.,” “tequila.,” “gin.,” and “rum.,” they are one and all palate-pleasing and memorable. Chef Raucci works deftly at the expediting table of the open kitchen, putting expert finishing touches on every plate that goes out. Rothberg, the ever-present General Manager, constantly circulates through the bustling restaurant. “answer. really represents a place to come and connect with company,” Rothberg explains. “Our concept is to provide a comfortable environment, like a dinner table at your home. I remember growing up and sitting at the dinner table and my parents would ask questions like ‘how was school, did you make any friends,’ etc. So answer. symbolizes a place for

people to come to hopefully find some answers.” The answer. menu is “small plate,” intended to be shared, which is easily accomplished at the generally small tables. The Bibb salad is delicate and flavorful, the Asian-flaired mussels are citrusy and delectable, and the arancini—fatty pork and shrimp with sushi rice and Asian herbs, is not to be missed. For Sunday brunch, the menu gains items, including several egg dishes, including “French toast.”; a yummy “bowl.” with poached eggs,

grits, bacon, crimini, leeks and bourbon demi; an omelet and a breakfast sandwich. Add a delicious craft “bloody mary.” or a “mimosa.” with fresh squeezed orange juice, and your Sunday groove is assured. Rothberg says that she is “grateful to be in such an incredible neighborhood. We have been amazed at how welcoming and supportive everyone has been in the few short weeks that we have been open.” HOURS: 5:00 p.m.–10:00 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday 10:00 a.m.-–2:00 p.m. (Brunch) and 5:00 p.m.-–9:00 p.m. (Dinner), Sunday CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: Limited number Constant Eater is dedicated to discovering the West Side’s best breakfasts, lunches, dinners and cocktails . . . in the name of fair reporting and satisfied tummies, of course.


WEEDEATERS

by Miriam DRENNAN

only YOU have to know it’s yard clippings My parents purchased a farm when I was three, but we didn’t move there until I was six. My sisters and I spent weekends exploring the property while my parents dreamed of growing and raising our own food. Queen Anne’s Lace grew in abundance, and we’d pick them and pretend the largest blooms were parasols. While I noticed the carrot-y smell of the stems in the springtime, I hardly knew I could snack on it. Queen Anne’s Lace is biennial. Often referred to as a “wild carrot,” the spring blooms carry a carrot scent and the stems make great additions to salads, pestos and other recipes that you might use carrots or carrot greens. But this is August, and we’re looking ahead to fall—and this lovely weed offers something different for the season. When foraged in the fall, the blooms of Queen Anne’s Lace make a delightful jelly that’s tinged with a citrus-y flavor, which we’ll enhance with lemon juice for extra zing. As with just about all floral jellies, you’ll want to pick your blooms first thing in the morning, and you’ll prepare an infusion for the main event. Warning: Be careful where you pick! Avoid picking weeds that may have been treated.

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Extra warning: Do NOT confuse this with Poison Hemlock, which has a similar look but an unpleasant smell. Queen Anne’s lace has a hairy stem. VI

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Miriam Drennan is a freelance writer who lives in The Nations.

QUEEN ANNE’S LACE JELLY Ingredients 2.5 cups very firmly packed Queen Anne’s Lace flowers, snipped from their stems close to the blossom (plan on anywhere from 20–30 flower heads) 4–5 cups boiling water 3 1/2 cups granulated sugar 1 package pectin (recommended: low- or no-sugar variety) 4 1/2 Tbsp. strained lemon juice

Make the infusion Soak blooms for about five minutes, then give them another cold rinse, just to make sure no creepy-crawlies remain, and drain. Place flowers in a bowl and pour the boiling water over them. Cover and let the blooms steep for at least 30 minutes to an hour. Strain the infusion using a cheesecloth-lined colander—you don’t want any petals to sneak in—and ignore the ugly color it makes, the jelly will be prettier. At this point, you should have about three cups of Queen Anne’s Lace infusion; throw out the spent blooms.

Sterilize the jars Place six 8-ounce jelly jars and lids in a boiling water bath while you make the jelly. Make the jelly Make sure you have the remaining ingredients measured out and in place because this part moves quickly. You’ll also want your canning tongs and a clean cloth handy. Pour the infusion into a medium-sized pot and turn it up to a medium-high heat. Stir in the lemon juice and pectin, and keep stirring until dissolved—at that point, just stir frequently. Using canning tongs, remove your jars, lids, and rings to dry while you allow the pot to come to a full, rolling boil—and keep stirring it often. Now add the sugar and stir constantly until it returns to a rolling boil. At this point, some will add a drop of yellow or red food coloring to enhance the light peach color of the jelly, but I don’t think it’s necessary. Let it boil for one minute, and remove from heat. Ladle the very hot jelly into the jars carefully. Wipe the rim with a clean cloth, and top each one with a sterilized lid. Process and seal your jars based on your preferences; if this is your first attempt at jelly, a hot water bath works well (directions will be on the pectin box). Let the jelly rest in place for 24 hours. Enjoy!

Help us start a yard-to-table movement! Send us a recipe or idea for the Weedeaters: 372WestNashville@gmail.com. August–September 2017 | 372WN.com

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372Who kNew? Name: What’s your relationship to West Nashville? How long have you been here? Favorite thing about West Nashville? Favorite food? color? drink? dessert? hobby? Where will you be on Friday night? Dog or cat? Mustard or mayonaise? Mountains or beach? Dream occupation when you were five? What’s your hidden talent? What’s your superpower? What excites you about West Nashville?

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Janet M. Caldwell, Syl van Park resident and owner of YogAbility : YogAbility4U.com


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372wn vol i issue5  

August–September 2017

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