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Page 1

Our Inaugural

COVER CONTEST page 6

PEKKA! page 14

The Double-edged Sword of the

Pending Legislation Doctrine page 48

December 2018–January 2019 VOL. III, ISSUE 1


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Editor and Publisher MIRIAM DRENNAN

Creative Consultant EVELYN MARIE PARRISH

Historian YVONNE EAVES

Acting Managing Editor JENNIFER GOODE STEVENS

Contributors YVONNE EAVES

CLARE FERNANDEZ

HANNAH HERNER

JASON HOLLEMAN

EMILY TULLOH

ELLIOTT WENZLER

Art Direction and Design ELLEN PARKER BIBB

Photographers JEANNINE MANES

Promotions & Events SHERYL SPENCER ALAN WADDELL

Distribution DON GAYLORD

COVER

“CELEBRATION” The Owls of St. Luke’s Preschool

Advertising Inquiries: 615.491.8909 or 372WestNashville@gmail.com. @372WN

@372Wn

@372wn

372WN is a print and digital magazine published every other month by Next Chapter Publishing, LLC. All content presented herein, unless otherwise noted, is the exclusive property of Next Chapter Publishing and cannot be used, reprinted, or posted without permission. 372WN is free for readers; excessive removal of the product or tampering with any of our distribution racks will be considered theft and/or vandalism and subject to prosecution.


CONTENTS VOL. III, ISSUE 1 | December 2018–January 2019

MAIN FEATURE 6

372WN’s Inaugural Cover Contest: St. Luke’s Preschool Delivers!

CURRENT HAPPENINGS 14

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Rinne’s Reign: The Dark Horse Who Stole Nashvillians’ Hearts

JM Eberhardt Strolls into Nashville’s Start-up Waters

42

Holiday Events

54

Holiday Directory

56

Winter Reminders for Household Pet Owners

FEATURES 20

Intravenous Solutions: A Different Kind of Juice Bar

28

Harvey’s Nativity Scene: Gone, but Not Forgotten

48

Metro Government 101: Buying Time for Neighborhoods

IN EVERY ISSUE 27, 51 372W . . . ? 62

372WestNosh

64

372Who kNew?


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372WN.com | December 2018–January 2019


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written and photographed by Emily TULLOH

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372WN.com | December 2018–January 2019


We Asked, St. Luke’s Preschool

When 372WN approached St. Luke’s Preschool about an art contest that would serve as our December–January cover, we did not expect it to be so challenging to select a winner. We were thrilled to enlist our ad partners as judges, throw a party, and let them vote with their change. The money, of course, would be given back to St. Luke’s Preschool. And boy, did they deliver! Three classrooms were asked, “What does celebration mean to you?” and were challenged to answer through art. Each class collaborated to create one composition to submit for our cover contest. It was a simple prompt that led to a lot of fun conversations and resulted in a trifecta of artwork, three iterations on the same theme—each one unique and beautifully representative of what celebration looks like through a child’s eyes. Alas, only one could be the cover—but we decided to let our readers see what a tough choice we had!

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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WINNER

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elecia Blake is the teacher in the Pre-K classroom, known more formally as The Owls. She gave some insight into how the four- and fiveyear-olds arrived at the idea for their piece: “It took us several days to come up with what we were going to do,” she explains. “I asked the kids, ‘What do you think about celebration?’ They said, ‘birthday and cake and ice cream.’ So I asked, ‘If we did art, what would you put on the paper?’ They said ‘people and hats and streamers,’ and that’s how we came up with the idea.” Blake was truly impressed when she saw the end result and says that “to see all their creativity come together as one . . .

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that was the most stunning thing.” She admits that “listening to them talking about it, I couldn’t visualize how it was going to turn out . . . but to actually put it together and see it, that was amazing.” Blake’s calm demeanor is an asset when it comes to focusing her class on daily learning. She speaks to what makes her job at St. Luke’s so special: “I love the diversity . . . and seeing my work manifested through them.” Her daughter Ranesha Blake is also her colleague, taking up a post in the two-year-old room, which gives even more meaning to “the close-knit, family setting” she loves at St. Luke’s.


RUBY: “Party” and “Decorating”

FIONA: “Halloween”

What does celebration mean to you?

TRINITY: “Happy Birthday” and “Toys”

MILEY: “Party” and “Disneyland” December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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ext door, the three-year-olds, also known as The Lions, are buzzing with activity. Small groups of children are engaged in different activities from a water sensory bin to computer learning. Their teacher, Esperanza Alexia, has just returned from nursing her own baby and falls seamlessly back into her role. She recalls what inspired the kids to create their artwork about celebration: “We asked, ‘What kind of celebration do you like?’ They said, ‘Christmas.’” She adds, “They came up with the idea that it could also be for the Fourth of July because at most celebrations you have sparkles and stars.” She says that for them “it was about different colors and mixing colors.” She admits that at first “I worried a little about how they would

What does celebration mean to you?

GABRIELLA: “Go to a party” and “Toys” and “Blue and pink and purple cupcakes” 10

372WN.com | December 2018–January 2019

react to sitting down to do the artwork. But they enjoyed it, and we actually ended up doing more.” “Every day is so different,” says Alexia, citing it as one of the reasons she loves her job. She explains that St. Luke’s is different in their approach to learning. “A lot of times daycares are more about play . . . in here, we learn,” she says. According to Alexia, the teachers focus on meeting each child where they are. “If they are already where they should be [developmentally], we try to push them up a little more.” Her dedication is evident in her tenure at St. Luke’s. “I’ve been here for 15 years, and St. Luke’s has changed a lot. We started out helping the community, and now we have to spread a little bit more because the community has changed around us. We’re still trying to help people, even though we’ve opened some [enrollment] up to new neighbors.”

ALEXANDER: “Cake” and “Presents”


JOSHUA: “Birthdays” and “Toys” and “Sing a song” and “Cereal”

ASHER: “Video games” December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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he youngest class to participate in our cover contest was St. Luke’s two-year-old class. Their teacher, Ranesha Blake, explains how the process started: “We sat down with the kids and explained what celebration could be and they automatically yelled ‘party!’” After a lively conversation about what they like to do, eat, and wear at parties, Ranesha says, “I got out a lot of different props that they could use for their artwork and they just went to town with it . . . I let them do it all. They chose the different colors, the shimmer—it was a dramatic thing for them. They liked it.” She had her doubts about how they would react to working on one piece as a group, but confirmed that “each kid gave 100% with the artwork . . .

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you have kids who want to do their own thing sometimes, but they were all into it,” she says. When the kids were done, Ranesha describes her reaction: “This is beauty; I feel like this is celebration, especially for this age,” she says. “This is a little masterpiece.” Ranesha is effervescent and encouraging, punctuating the conversation with anecdotes about each child. Her enthusiasm pairs well with this active bunch, aptly named The Roos. She admits that she loves “the unpredictable moments” and adds with a chuckle, “You never know what they’re going to say.” For her, the best part of the job is “seeing them grow and seeing them absorb new things that we teach.” She says, “Seeing them learn new things and then

repeat the things that they learn, it lets you know that your work is being manifested.” Though the community around them is changing, the diversity and mission that have been representative of St. Luke’s for over 100 years remains the same. Samantha Breault has just stepped in as the new Child Development Director and speaks to St. Luke’s recent decision to open preschool enrollment up to everyone. “This was a lower-served, lower-income community, and now it’s getting gentrified,” she says. “One of the things that St. Luke’s is still committed to is serving the underserved population and the people who need the support. Our model is that 70% of our students are on a sliding scale, and we save about 30% for full-pay families. That helps


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us in a number of ways. Not only can we be more diverse, we can also serve a variety of needs in the community.” The program accepts children from six weeks of age all the way through Pre-K. “I have a background in early education as well as schoolaged education,” Breault says. “The resources and the curriculum and the commitment of our teachers make this a standout program.” The quality of the program is reflected in the happy faces of the kids who attend, and it is a joy to share some of their bright smiles and beautiful artwork with our readers.

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While it was a little more difficult to get the two-year-olds talking, twins Easha and Ellie were quick to agree that colors and singing are top priorities when it comes to celebrating. They stopped for a moment to smile for the camera before running off to grab their coats and head outside to play.

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Committed to serving your family’s dental needs. ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS! December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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RINNE S ’ REIGN The Dark Horse Who Stole Nashvillians’ Hearts by Emily TULLOH

“I share my road because it’s not typical . . . I wasn’t a high prospect.” –Pekka Rinne

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372WN.com | December 2018–January 2019


Pages 14–19: Pekka Rinne (photos provided) + Complete Health/Physicians Urgent Care (½ page ad)

photo courtesy of Nashville Predators/John Russell

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Current West Nashvillian Pekka Rinne grew up in the countryside of Finland, outside one of the northernmost cities on the globe. There the ancient evergreens tower and sway in the subarctic air, dwarfing the wood-clad Nordic structures below. Great plains and marshes stretch out to meet the icy coastline at the Gulf of Bothnia. From that town of fewer than 18,000 inhabitants came a poster boy for elite athleticism—a net-minding juggernaut who would help transform one of U.S.’s southernmost hockey towns into one of the NHL’s most thriving markets. Rinne has been the Nashville Predator’s goalie—our goalie—for over a decade. He is the franchise’s all-time leader in Goalie Games Played, Wins and Shutouts. Broaden your scope to his league-wide performance, and the superlatives

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go on. Rinne finished last season with a 42-13-4 record and a .927 save percentage with a 2.31 goalsagainst average. His .939 evenstrength save percentage and his 26.41 goals saved above replacement were the best in the NHL. Translation? Rinne is an awesome goalie. His achievements are staggering, especially when you take into account how it all started. His isn’t a story like those of Tiger, Serena and Venus, Gretzky or LeBron. “I always had goals, and I was very passionate about hockey, but I wasn’t your biggest talent,” says Rinne. His greatness as an athlete wasn’t assumed—it was acquired. “My Dad wasn’t into hockey, and neither were the rest of my siblings.” His affection for the sport was personal—a child’s love. “I think I was four or five years old when I started playing street hockey,” he explains. “My cousins were our neighbors in the countryside of

Northern Finland, so I started playing with them.” Rinne was much younger than his cousins, who made him the default goalie, or, as he puts it, “they used me as target practice.” It wasn’t the catbird seat, but he was knocking on their door every day to get back out and play. Although Rinne dabbled in other sports, including Finnish Baseball and Track & Field, it was hockey that captivated him; specifically, the goalies. “When I was young, we would get NHL weekly coverage,” he recalls. “At the time, it was Martin Brodeur, Patrick Roy, Mike Richter, John Vanbiesbrouck . . . my room was covered with posters of them. As I got a little bit older and [Miikka] Kiprusoff started playing NHL, Kiprusoff was one that I really looked up to. Obviously with him being Finnish, it was really awesome.” Rinne’s path toward being an athlete was gradual, even


photo courtesy of Nashville Predators/John Russell

awkward, at times. As a teenager, he experienced a growth spurt that sent his hockey game into a tailspin. His long, lanky frame felt like a handicap, affecting everything from his coordination to the fundamentals of skating. The pressure to put in more time with training and the frustration he felt led him to quit hockey for one summer. By the time the season started back up, his boycott ended when he realized how much he missed the sport. He recalls some of the best times he had playing hockey as a youth: “All of the tournaments—that was always so exciting. Filling up a bus . . . it was just a group of friends going to a tournament in a different city in Finland. When you’re young you think, ‘Oh, I’m so independent.’” Along with the fun came the realization that grit and hard work would be at the epicenter of his journey as an athlete. This reckoning resounds in his advice for up-and-comers to the sport. “It’s all about the work,” he says. “Keep your head down and do the work. At least then you can maximize your potential and put yourself in the best possible situation.” A lot of people helped propel Rinne in his career. His position at the goalpost may have been born out of a player deficit in a family scrimmage, but it turned into his permanent position in the rink. “My cousin was a big influence on me,” he says. “He’s seven years older than me, and he was a goalie . . . I always looked up to him. And obviously along the way, there have been coaches and goalie coaches that I need to thank.”

photo courtesy of Nashville Predators/John Russell

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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His parents, however, are the ones he credits the most with his success. “Any parent who’s a hockey parent sacrifices so much to take their kid to practices, and especially with me being a goalie—with all of the gear, it’s very expensive,” he says. “So, I have the utmost respect for how they always scraped up enough to get me a new set of sticks or what-not.” Rinne’s journey to Nashville and the NHL never seemed certain or even probable during his early career. But in 2004, that all changed when he was drafted by the Predators in the eighth round after a scout observed him on the ice for a mere six minutes. He was playing backup for his local team in Finland at the time. Fast-forward to today, and he’s at the top of his

photo courtesy of Nashville Predators/John Russell

game on hockey’s biggest stage. He is known for his work ethic and mental stamina in the face of immense pressure. and his stature has become his commodity. At 6’5” tall and weighing over 200 pounds, he capitalizes on every square inch of corporal advantage he has. Up. Down. Up. Down. He kneels with such nimble repetition that it puts every good Catholic to shame. His glove intercepts the puck with swiftness and intention. His glove hand has been his trademark—like Aretha Frankin’s “Respect” or Jimi Hendrix’s improvisation. Rinne’s connection to his family in Finland remains strong, and the biggest milestones in his career— from his recent 300th career win to his acceptance of the Vezina Trophy—are marked by ostensible emotion and always include a tribute to his family. There have been many such occasions to celebrate, but when asked which career milestone means the most to him he responds without hesitation: “When we went to the Stanley Cup finals, that was very special—even though it ended up in disappointment, and we ended up losing the final. The entire playoffs and what it takes to go that far, the whole

photo courtesy of Nashville Predators/John Russell

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372WN.com | December 2018–January 2019

journey, that was probably the best moment in my career.” Nashville is a far cry from Rinne’s original stomping grounds in rural Finland, but after nearly 14 years here, he is practically a native. At the center of his agenda when he finds time off? Food. “I love trying out new restaurants,” he explains. “Rolf and Daughters, Folk, City House . . . I really enjoy going to a good restaurant for good food. In that sense, Nashville is really booming,” says Rinne. “And I like to cook,” he adds. “You eat so much in restaurants during the season, especially on the road, that when I’m at home I try to cook.” “I’m getting older,” he explains, with a chuckle, as he offers a bit of perspective regarding his weekend repertoire. “I’m not going out much anymore, so I don’t really have any favorite bars.” Although downtime is hard to find, especially during the season, Rinne indulges in books and goes to concerts as often as he can. “I love music,” he says. He even finds the time (and energy) to play tennis and quips about the friendly rivalry between him and his girlfriend. “When we have a little bit of time, I play with my girlfriend. It sounds pretty lame,” he laughs. “But she’s really good and actually, she beats me once in a while even though I consider myself a pretty good player.” Nashville has embraced Rinne with gusto, and he has reciprocated by giving back to our community in a big way through the 365 Pediatric Cancer Fund. “It [started] during a time when I signed a seven-year deal with Nashville, so that gives you a lot of security,” he says. “In this profession, that’s very rare. So Shea Weber and I wanted to find a way to give back while doing something that was close to us. It was pretty obvious from the get-go that it would be directed toward kids.” The foundation works with Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Van-


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is something you dream about, and that’s my ultimate goal.” Whether this goal becomes a reality or not, Nashville will be there supporting our team and, of course, our goalie. ’S MAG

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and his endearing character draws fans from all sides. Rinne is known for his unfailing optimism—he’s always forward-thinking, and it’s pretty clear what he has his sights set on. “I consider myself a hockey player first so when I set goals, the first thing that comes to my mind is hockey. Obviously, the Stanley Cup

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derbilt to raise money and awareness for cancer research. “When you talk about kids and sickness together it is an unfortunate situation, and it affects so many people and their families,” says Rinne. The initiative also works with the team to host a series of events that give the kids and their families a chance to get a special hockey experience. Rinne’s passion is palpable as he describes the highlight of his role. “My job is pretty nuts, I get to enjoy the best parts,” he says. “A few times a year, I go to the hospital and see the kids and present a check with the Predators Foundation and our sponsors that we’ve gained together throughout the year.” He adds, “Hopefully when I’m done with hockey, it’s something that keeps living and stays as a legacy.” His record on the ice has solidified his legacy as one of the greatest goalies the sport has seen,

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being the creative voice behind some of Nashville’s favorite businesses and brands. She has lived in Hillwood since 2010.

photo courtesy of Nashville Predators/John Russell

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Intravenous Solutions: a different kind of juice bar

by Hannah

HERNER

photos by Jeannine Manes

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When you’re sick, medical personnel might give you an IV or some oxygen as part of your treatment. Now at a new West Nashville business, you can get those things by choice. It’s a different kind of juice bar, one that does not require liters of liquid kale or other drinkable landscaping to make you feel good. Intravenous Solutions delivers the healthy stuff directly into your veins.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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fter a big workout, before a long flight, to treat migraines or hangovers, to improve skin, to prep for surgery, to stave off the flu or treat just plain dehydration, customers can now go to Intravenous Solutions in the plaza at 2817 West End Ave. Founder and Middle Tennessee native Dr. Alan Davenport has been practicing anesthesia for 32 years, owns three surgery centers and six office sites for his anesthesia group, and is on to his newest venture—wellness. There are things people can do to take care of themselves so that, ideally, they won’t have to see him at one of his other centers.

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“I’ve always had an interest in health, particularly maintaining health,” Davenport says. “I think people greatly underappreciate how much adequate hydration and adequate maintenance of your body’s normal function are so important to health and wellness. We don’t take care of our bodies like we should.” Davenport says the body only absorbs about 15 percent of any vitamins taken in pill form, so getting vitamins directly into veins can have a more potent effect. It costs around $100 to get an IV at Intravenous Solutions. There are pre-formulated mixes for hangovers, skin wellness and basic hydration and energy, as well as what they call the “cocktail,” an “intravenous solution for anyone” that contains vitamin C, magnesium, calcium and B vitamins. Customers can also personalize their vein cocktails with ingredients such as calcium, B vitamins, magnesium, zinc, dexamethasone for nausea, caffeine for migraines and the list goes on. In the winter, vitamin C is especially popular as a shield against cold and flu season. But just like a trip to the hair salon, customers can consult the professionals—in this case, the nurses on staff—to find what would suit them best. The center also offers an oxygen bar and face masks and is set to offer other services, such as Botox® and spider-vein treatment, in the future. In addition to the IVs in the center’s West End location, Intravenous Solutions has a mobile set-up to bring their services to your home, business or event. The menu offers a host of specialized options, but one tried-and-true service is one to cure dehydration. Clinical manager Amanda Troller, RN, says it’s easy to get dehydrated—through being too busy or forgetting to drink enough water, athletic performances, high heat or sunburn.

I think a lot of people get dehydrated even when they’re not feeling particularly run down. They’re still dehydrated. It’s amazing what just one bag of fluids will do.

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December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Getting the intravenous solution can have a greater effect than just chugging water, because it has electrolytes and minerals like sodium and potassium—similar to the fluids naturally found in the body—so you can hydrate quicker, Troller says. Davenport said he’s worked on his fair share of emergency C-sections and aneurysms, and his vision with Intravenous Solutions was to offer wellness services in a “spa-like setting” that, though less clinical-looking, adhered to certain clinical standards. Intravenous Solution’s interior features minimalist decor in a quiet space, complete with massage chairs and cream-colored linen curtains hanging between stations.

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lives. They’ve seen the city grow into a place big enough to support a business model that started in places like New York City and Los Angeles. “With the way Nashville’s growing, it’s time for something like this,” Davenport says. Through this new business, Davenport hopes to encourage people to take a more proactive approach to their health. “How can you promote someone’s appreciation for health?” he says. “Most people can’t appreciate it until they get sick or until they have a devastating event that’s potentially life-changing.” Perhaps subjecting yourself to a needle prick could be worthwhile. WE

And with 12 years in pediatric care under her belt, Troller welcomes the change of pace. Davenport and Troller have cared for the sickest of the sick people, and they welcome the chance to help keep people from getting to that point. One barrier to entry, however, is fear of needles—a common fear that can be surprising to hear from customers who have tattoos. Nevertheless, Intravenous Solutions offers a numbing cream to ease any discomfort, applied 30 minutes before the appointment. Customers are encouraged to make an appointment 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Appointments typically last 30 to 45 minutes. Davenport and Troller have lived in the Nashville area their entire

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Hannah Herner is a freelance journalist, resident of Bellevue and recent graduate of The Ohio State University. She is also an alternative music fan, tap dancer and a Jeni’s ice cream enthusiast.


372W. . . ? Marcia McKeogh Where is West Nashville? West Nashville is kind of huge and amorphous. I mean I know what The Nations is, I know what Sylvan Park is, but you know, west of where? I-440? I don’t know. I don’t know if there is a real estate area that defines it or what.

What is West Nashville? I think it’s an optimistic work in progress. I think we don’t have too many sights where historic buildings should have been reserved but aren’t because most of the buildings over here were cheap little houses... I think in that way (the gentrification) is less contentious than what has

WHERE is West Nashville? WHAT is West Nashville?

happened to other places. I think a lot of the people who have been bought out here were content to take the money and go somewhere else. I think it’s all been fairly amicable.

Let us know at 372WestNashville@gmail.com and you might see yourself here in our next issue!

McKeogh has lived in her home in the Nations since 2006 and has worked at Tin Wings on 51st Avenue for over three years. She also works at West Nashville wine and liquor. She gets a letter from someone interested in buying her home about once a week, she said.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Nativity Scene

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Gone, but Not Forgotten

by Yvonne

EAVES

photos courtesy of Metro Archives

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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any Nashvillians 60 and older may not remember shopping on Black Friday as children, buy they may share special memories of the nativity scene on display in Centennial Park at Christmas time. The larger-than-life event began in 1953 and was repeated for 15 years. Every year from the night before Thanksgiving until January 6, businessman Fred Harvey Sr. presented the majestic scene to the city of Nashville. The decision was made before Christmas 1968 to end the popular and well-loved tradition.

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Harvey’s

A gift to Nashville

Harvey had been the manager of Marshall Field’s basement store in Chicago. The Harvey family moved to Nashville in 1942, and Harvey opened Harvey’s Department Store. While traveling near Innsbruck in the Bavarian Alps, Harvey came across a very detailed Italian nativity. He was so impressed by it that he searched for the artist, Italian Guido Rebecceni. He wanted to share with Nashville the scene that had made such an impression. The largest department store in Nashville, Harvey’s was known for its carousel horses. The horses had been acquired from the former Glendale Park, which had been a zoo at the end of a streetcar line near Oak Hill. Not only could customers of the downtown Harvey’s enjoy the carousel, diners at the lunch counter could watch a live monkey! Shoppers stood in front of funhouse mirrors and enjoyed other amusement-park style memorabilia. Harvey’s was known as “the store that never knew completion.” Fred Harvey Sr. died in 1960, and Fred Harvey Jr. kept the store open in his father’s memory.

The nativity scene, staged at Centennial Park, also never knew completion. The first year there were five people and a few palm trees: Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus in a manager and two angels. Every year, more figures were added. Shepherds, lambs, wise men, camels, more angels and palm trees. The scene grew to 120 figures, 45 people and 75 animals. Two hundred and seventy-five feet long and 75 feet deep, the Parthenon was a perfect background for the dazzling sight. The nativity was placed on 125 yards of pale blue fabric. Its figures were covered with thousands of miniature lights that twinkled like crystals, and floodlights lit the entire setting. It took 40 technicians to get the scene ready for public viewing. The nativity scene became a major attraction for Nashville. People traveling across the country would stop to see it; one year in the mid-1950s, people recorded seeing cars with license plates from every state in the country parked at Centennial Park.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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All good things must come to an end

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All of the expenses of the nativity scene were absorbed by the Harvey’s; it is believed that they spent at least $250,000 on the nativity scene, which was a lot of money when gasoline was about 30 cents a gallon. The costs included storage, setup and very high electric bills. Security was also hired to protect the scene from vandals. Many of the figures were made of a rubberized, weather-proof substance created by local manufacturer Genesco. The figures eventually didn’t hold up in the outdoor setting, and the winter of 1963 was brutal. December held many record-breaking cold days with a lot of snowfall. By the mid- to late-1960s, pieces of the nativity were beginning to decay. Also, people were beginning to question why the city would allow a Christian-themed display on a public space. Critics were also complaining Harvey’s was trying to profit from Christmas. After 1967, Harvey Jr. decided pieces of the nativity scene were beyond repair. He found an advertising company in Cincinnati that wanted to display the nativity in a local indoor mall. After a couple of years, the pieces were rubble. There have been other nativity scenes around Nashville—Opryland USA set one up for the holidays during its last few years in operation. Today the Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center has one. But none have captured the same charm as the one that had the Parthenon as the background and the twinkling lights. AZ

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Long considered West Nashville’s historian, Yvonne Eaves spends a lot of time documenting its changes through the lens of her camera. She is the former president of the Cohn High School Alumni Association and author of Nashville’s Sylvan Park (along with co-author Doug Eckert, Arcadia Publishing). S

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Sources: “Hidden History of Nashville” by George Zepp “Lest We Forget” Ridley Wills II Nashville Public Library Vertical Files

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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ENTREPRENEUR

JM Eberhardt Strolls into Nashville’s Start-up Waters by Clare

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FERNÁNDEZ


John Mark “JM” Eberhardt is a Louisville native and West Nashville resident who launched his first start-up in 2011. Seven years and four start-ups later, he and the team at bluField Inc. are bringing technology like no other to Nashville for residents and tourists alike: an app that they have dubbed the “digital concierge” for the average consumer.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Entrepreneur at heart JM is a bit of a serial entrepreneur, having started his first venture in college in the late 1990s. He launched his first start-up in 2011—a barbershop mobile app that allowed men to make appointments in real time. The start-up was a top 50 finalist in the Global Entrepreneurship Week competition and was accepted into the Nashville Entrepreneur Center’s accelerator program. JM moved to Nashville at the end of 2012, and he was in the inaugural class of The TENN, which highlights the top 10 startups in the state through Launch

If you’re a local, do you know how to be a tourist in your own city? If you’re a tourist, are you overwhelmed by the options at your fingertips? Enter Stroll.

Tennessee. He scaled the barbershop app to 46 states and six countries, and soon a few companies contacted him about incorporating Bluetooth Beacon technology. He researched the technology and its potential. “I went to the biggest company that contacted me and said, ‘Hey, I have forward-facing consumer software that I think we can integrate with your hardware and just sell it,’” he recalled. They said no. But JM is not one to let a “no” get him off track. His dedicated research led to his latest start-up, bluField Inc., which he co-founded in 2014 with business partner, Charleson Bell, who also happened to be part of The TENN accelerator program. In June of that year, they filed a patent that began the process for their consumer-facing mobile application, Stroll™. They patented “‘mobile-mesh,’ or a ‘fluid,’ network architecture with the propensity for globalized local positioning functionality; i.e., acquiring the location information of a person or place in connection with a general area, using any wireless communications protocol—Bluetooth or Wi-Fi,” JM said. They started looking at go-tomarket strategy, and tourism—a $2.4 billion/day industry—was the biggest market. So they focused their idea and got to work.

The Birth of Stroll JM and Charleson call their company, bluField Inc., “the Internet of Bluetooth® technology.” The platform was developed in part to facilitate the Smart Cities initiative that was launched in September 2015 by President Barack Obama’s administration. According to White House archives, Smart Cities are “communities that are building an infrastructure to continuously improve the collection, aggregation, and use of data to improve the life

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of their residents—by harnessing the growing data revolution, lowcost sensors, and research collaborations—and doing so securely to protect safety and privacy.” When it comes to making cities smarter, Stroll is like no other. The application enables free, public Wi-Fi access and provides “real-time access to customized modules, traffic data, footfall trends and analytics, which can be used to increase municipal efficiencies,” JM said.

JM’S ADVICE for ENTREPRENEURS

Seek wise advice and shut out everybody’s opinion. Fear is an illusion. You know this better than anybody. Even if you get it wrong, you’re right. You created it. In your gut, you know what it takes. You can’t do it alone. Roles happen organically. If you want people to be excited, carve out a lane for someone to create. Everybody is a born creator. Don’t be afraid of sharing ideas.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Within the app, a city can obtain metrics such as destination information, transit updates, and a real-time, real-location 911 locator, known as Stroll Safely™. bluField can also provide subscription-based Smart City Modules to the city. “Mobile app-enabled modules include: efficient parking, traffic citation and violation software, public transit/school bus mobile enhancements, law enforcement efficiency and infrastructure repair reporting,” said JM. “This completely integrated, turnkey solution, failsafe, city-wide network infrastructure immediately transforms a city into a Smarter City.”

Stroll your way through Nashville For the consumer, Stroll offers a unique way to experience all that Music City has to offer. It can engage and inform you on a different level. If you’re a local, do you know how to be a tourist in your own city? If you’re a tourist, are you overwhelmed by the options at your fingertips? Enter Stroll. A user first selects their interests and moods (brunch? nightlife? fine dining? retail?). Then a list of sights to see and activities to do populates to a feed (similar to Instagram) based on the user’s preferences and current location. “With Stroll, according to your preferences, your interests find you in real time, based on where you’re located,” JM said. Most of the businesses participating in the beta test of Stroll are in downtown Nashville. They’re not trying to attract just tourists— they want the locals, too. “Stroll will enable some people who are local to be more of a tourist,” JM added. It can also encourage tourists to explore parts of the city they may not have otherwise. When you’re in an area with Bluetooth Beacons

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activated, the available options move with you. The options that pop onto your feed change with your location. In the app you can also view a list of all the businesses and search for a business (whether or not they have a partnership with the app) using the map feature. Stroll is currently in the final stages of development, but it will launch with nationwide distribution in December 2018. bluField has agreements with Nashville and Dallas, a pilot program in Las Vegas, and plans for expansions to additional cities. The free app is available for iOS and Android users. Businesses can curate and upload their own content 24/7 using desktop, laptop or mobile devices. [Full disclosure: 372WN has signed on as an early-adopter partner; special benefits are available to 372WN advertising partners.] “There is no other service for businesses to target ads in real time,” said JM.

The ups and downs of starting a business bluField is JM’s fifth start-up and he has learned a lot, both about himself and about the start-up industry. He says this has been his most challenging start-up experience, but in many ways it has been his most rewarding. The hardest thing has been being able to tell the story properly. JM and his team are coordinating with entire cities, not just a single franchise. “The goal is to target the entire city,” he said. “It’s a more robust experience.” Stroll is a platform that encompasses smart technology for entire cities. He used to lead with the technology when pitching the application, but he hit a brick wall. Now he simply tells potential partners why the app is good for the city.

When JM drives for Uber and Lyft on the side, he sometimes tells people about his app. They often tell him he created what they need before they knew they needed it—which JM sees as the ultimate compliment. Last year, he went through possibly his biggest challenge to date. An outfit from Silicon Valley wanted to license the technology. bluField’s attorneys vetted them, and they negotiated a $10 million license deal to operate in two new industries for bluField. They signed the deal, but when it was time to pay out, the Silicon Valley outfit filed bankruptcy. So bluField didn’t end up raising any money last year after this deal fell through. It was a blow that had ramifications far beyond business for JM. In February of this year, he said, he planned to end his life. “I had never been in a tough place; I had never struggled,” he shared. “I had always been a winner and felt like a winner.” But, he said, something deep within him kept him from carrying out his plan. “There’s a thing in your gut that says, ‘this is what you’re supposed to do.’” And for him, bluField and Stroll are what he is supposed to do. Whatever comes of them, he said, JM knows deep down that it will be successful. The biggest reward for JM out of all the aspects of business is the creation. “Anything that you think of is a reality as long as you take the steps towards it,” he shared. “Otherwise, it’s just a dream.” Looking back, he says he was a bored overachiever growing up. He learned about business and African-American leadership through his fraternity in college. And now he’s making his dream into a reality right here in Nashville, and he says bluField wouldn’t be where it


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A West Nashville native, Clare is an entrepreneur, arts advocate, writer, actress, and woman of many laughs. She has varied experience in nonprofit management and community engagement. Clare enjoys reading, traveling, hiking, game nights, cooking, theatre, and all the coffee. She is a founder of Nashville Sudbury School.

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here that people are just helpful. And the beauty of a place growing is the diversity of mindset, perspective. You don’t want everybody to be the same. A lot of why Nashville has grown the way it has is because it has embraced diversity.” WE

is today without Nashville Convention & Visitors Corporation, Bohan Advertising, Michael Bertram and the Nashville Entrepreneur Center. “I think Nashville is just a really special place,” JM said “There’s a weird element in the water around

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MIDAS TIRE & AUTO SERVICE OVER

600 tires in stock Price Match + Free Oil Change

6008 CHARLOTTE PIKE 615.356.6367 Monday–Friday 7am-7pm Saturday 7am–6pm

6015 HIGHWAY 100

(at the 70/100 split, formerly American Tire)

615.353.5666 Monday–Friday 7am–6pm Saturday 7am–4pm

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Get Out and

CELEBRATE, West Nashville-style!

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There are any number of ways families in Nashville can celebrate the holidays, and West Nashville is home to a considerable number of them. If you’re in the market for lights, shows, events, giving back and more, we’ve got you covered.

LIGHTS Nashville is famous for going all-out when it comes to decorations. Enjoy these beautiful displays while you can, whether they’re located in the neighborhood or a little farther out. Holiday Lights—Horse Drawn Carriage Tours 5:00-8:30 p.m., December 8, every 30 minutes 4:30-8:00 p.m., December 9, every 30 minutes

If you are feeling Victorian, you can take in the holiday lights on a nostalgic horse-drawn carriage ride through the Hillsboro West End neighborhood and make a special memory. Individual tickets are $23; children younger than 2 who ride on an adult’s lap ride free. Group tickets are available. Park free at 2800 Blair Boulevard at Natchez Trace to start the ride. Carriages depart every 30 minutes. Tickets can be reserved at http://groupspaces.com/HWEN/item/1191283

Cheekwood Estates Light Display Now through December 30

Cheekwood’s light display boasts over one million lights each year. Tickets on “peak nights,” which are Thursday to Sunday, are $22 for non-members and $17 for members (children age 2 and under are free). You can $3 for this walking tour by attending on non-peak nights (Monday–Wednesday) and by purchasing online in advance. There are two timeslots available: 5:00 p.m.–7:00 p.m., 7:00 p.m.–9:00 p.m. 615.356.8000 | 1200 Forrest Park Drive cheekwood.org/calendar/holiday-lights

The Dancing Lights of Christmas (formerly at Jellystone Park) Now through December 31

A true family tradition, this drive-through light show relocated last year to Wilson County at the James E. Ward Agricultural Center (home of the Wilson County Fair). Open at 5:00 p.m., rain or shine, tickets can be purchased for $25 per car or church van, or $50 per commercial vehicle. 945 East Baddour Parkway (Lebanon, Tenn.)

Hillsboro-West End Neighborhood Ongoing

The Hillsboro-West End Neighborhood does the season up big with lots of lights, inflatables, lighted archways, artsy manger scenes, music and more. You don’t have to pay to enjoy the festive scenery—most of the neighborhood has sidewalks, making it safe to explore on foot. According to many neighbors, some of the best streets in Nashville to see lights are (alphabetical by street name): Central Avenue between the 3500 and 3700 blocks Eastland Avenue between 14th Street and 16th Street Elmington Avenue Fairfax Avenue and Blair Boulevard Illinois Avenue Indiana Avenue Kentucky Avenue Michigan Avenue Morrow Avenue Park Avenue Richland Avenue’s 3500 block Sunset Place between 25th Avenue and Natchez Trace West Linden Westmoreland Avenue Westwood Avenue

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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SHOWS The holiday season rings in some of the best shows and musical compositions. Celebrate the Christmas spirit with one of these performances.

Handel’s Messiah December 13–16

The Grinch Christmas & Sing-a-long

Featuring the resounding Hallelujah Chorus, it’s Nashville’s grandest Messiah—full of passion, drama and passages of stunning beauty. Celebrate the season as your Nashville Symphony & Chorus perform one of the most inspiring works of music ever written, conducted by Giancarlo Guerrero. 

December 1

615.687.6400 | 1 Symphony Place | nashvillesymphony.org

Take a trip to Whoville at this holiday music extravaganza with the Nashville Symphony. Perfect for the whole family, this concert will celebrate the season with a musical retelling of Dr. Seuss’ beloved story, along with other holiday favorites, including a singalong bonanza! Doors open at 10:00 a.m., for fun, family-friendly, holiday-themed pre-concert activities, including an Instrument “petting zoo,” crafts, a book nook, and much more. Show begins at 11:00 a.m. NOTE: This sensory-friendly concert offers a relaxed atmosphere for patrons of all ages, including accommodations for people on the autism spectrum and people with sensory sensitivities.  615.687.6400 | 1 Symphony Place | nashvillesymphony.org

Andrew Peterson: Behold the Lamb of God December 9–10

Sing! An Irish Christmas (with Keith and Kristyn Getty) December 21

Ireland’s Keith and Kristyn Getty, writers of modern hymns and carols, will return to celebrate Christmas with their seventh annual tour of Sing! An Irish Christmas. The Gettys are joined by their band of instrumentalists, fusing Celtic, bluegrass, Americana, and classical music as well as cultural dance and the choral sounds of the holiday. Keith and Kristyn and their special guest friends perform a program that unites tradition and innovation in celebration of the season. 615.687.6400 | 1 Symphony Place | nashvillesymphony.org

Amy Grant & Vince Gill, Christmas at the Ryman (with Rodney Crowell)

Centricity Music artist Andrew Peterson, a guy with a guitar, yes, but a guy-with-a-guitar who is so intentionally rooted in the stuff of life—in family, friendship, community, home and even the very plot of land he lives on—that he seems almost counter-culture. Okay, maybe Andrew Peterson is counter-culture. But it’s not his fault. It’s the culture that shifted. Over the last ten years Andrew Peterson has quietly carved out a niche for himself as one of the most thoughtful, poetic, and lyrical songwriters of his generation.

Now through December 23

615.889.3060 | 116 5th Avenue | Ryman.com/events

December 24

It wouldn’t be Christmas in Nashville without a little country flair, so this show is a wonderful chance to celebrate a new tradition in Music City. Amy Grant and Vince Gill will return to the Mother Church this year for a twelve-night performance run. 615.889.3060 | 116 5th Avenue | ryman.com/events

Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker This beautiful, whimsical and timeless show is a great choice for the afternoon of Christmas Eve, away from the frenetic pace of holiday shopping. 615.889.3060 | 116 5th Avenue | Ryman.com/events

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EVENTS AND MARKETS

2nd Annual 12 Bars of Xmas Crawl

Some are kooky, some are fun, some are meaningful . . . all are memories in the making.

12:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

12South Winter WarmUp/Winter Warmer Beer Festival December 1

The 12South Winter WarmUp 6K and 12K race starts at Sevier Park and meanders around historic 12South. There’s a Kids 1K run, too. Celebrate your athletic achievements at the Winter Warmer Beer Festival after the race. Benefits Hands On Nashville and the Waverly-Belmont Backpack Program. 12southwinterwarmup.racesonline.com

Nashville Christmas Parade 8:30 a.m., December 1

The 65th Annual Piedmont Natural Gas Nashville Christmas Parade begins at the intersection of North First Avenue and Brandon Streets, and will travel south towards Broadway, where it will turn right onto Broadway and end at North 8th Avenue and Broadway. More information at nashvillechristmasparade.com

December 1

The dress code for this event is probably the best all year; think onesies, ugly Christmas sweaters and elf costumes. You’ll get a 16oz. cup for all your drinks, a “commemorative Santa hat,” food and drink specials and no covers to the locations on the crawl. Tickets start at $16. Check them out on Facebook.

4th Annual Sylvan Park Moms’ Club Holiday Market 12:00 p.m.–4:00 p.m., December 2

Support local moms, find special gifts, mingle with neighbors, listen to Christmas tunes and get in the mood with favorite holiday movies. It’s free to shop, and there will be door prizes! All vendors are local parents. Note: This is an outdoor event, located near the greenway and McCabe’s playground. McCabe Community Center | 101 46th Avenue North

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Preschool Ornament Making

Kids Holiday Party at Richland Park Library

10:30 a.m., December 3

4:30 p.m., December 13

Inserted into their regularly scheduled Preschool Story Time, Richland Park Library gets the season started by providing children ages 3–6 an opportunity to make their very own ornament. And of course, there will be stories and songs for the season!

Holiday fun with food and games! Kids will leave with a great 3D snowflake to dress up their rooms for winter! Designed for ages 6–12, but teens are welcome.

4711 Charlotte Avenue | 615.862.5870

Preschool Holiday Party at Richland Park Library

Nashville Santa Rampage

10:30 a.m., December 17

December 8

Festive games, food and activities! For ages 3–6. See events calendar at nashvillepubliclibrary.org.

While you don’t have to dress up as Santa proper, you do have to have some sort of Santa-esque attire to participate. This event is basically a flash mob of Santas taking over bars and restaurants everywhere in Nashville. Expect gifts, shenanigans and fun, and be ready to hand out your own presents, even if it’s just candy canes. Photo shoot gathering, 8:00 p.m., Christmas tree on 2nd Avenue . . . and then, the real fun begins. www.facebook.com/groups/nashvillesantarampage

Music City Winterfest December 8–9

Make plans to grab Breakfast with Santa* or drinks with friends at the Onesie Brunch*! Get your tickets now to shop the Holiday Market for unique gifts from Nashville craft artisans, enjoy live music by local performing groups, and treat yourself at the food trucks, s’mores stations, pet portraits, beard competition, and tons more. Centennial Park | 2500 West End Avenue Musiccitywinterfest.com *tickets sold separately

Walk Through Bethlehem 1:00–7:00 p.m., December 9

Experience the village of Bethlehem as if it were the day of Jesus’ birth. More than 200 costumed characters perform historical roles in society, going far beyond the typical Nativity scene. Along with live animals, the story at the heart of Christmas is shared in an unforgettable way. Held at Woodmont Christian Church, plan on 20 minutes minimum. 3601 Hillsboro Pike

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4711 Charlotte Avenue | 615.862.5870

4711 Charlotte Avenue | 615.862.5870

GIVE BACK Wonderful Life Holiday Fundraiser December 1

Wonderful Life Foundation invites you to celebrate the spirit of generosity and thankfulness by watching the classic movie, It’s a Wonderful Life, and enjoy dancing, refreshments and a silent auction. The foundation works to provide relief for families experiencing financial hardship while fighting pediatric cancer, and donations are made in advance or at the door. Check their website for more details: wonderfullifefoundation.org (Missed this event? You can still watch the film at The Belcourt December 21–25.)

Angel Tree Program + Red Kettle Program You still have a few days left to make holiday wishes come true with the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree program. “Adopt” less-fortunate children and seniors who would otherwise receive very little or nothing during the holiday season. Angel Trees are located at The Mall at Green Hills and you can also adopt an Angel online. And don’t forget to drop spare change into those red kettles. 615.242.0411 | salvationarmynashville.org


Caroling for Kids Now through December 24

Since 1916, volunteers throughout the Nashville community have Caroled for Kids to benefit the Fannie Battle Day Home for Children. Funds from caroling help the home provide affordable year-round child care for at-risk children in a nurturing environment and support the growth of healthy families. This program is well coordinated, with a songbook that can be printed or pulled up on your phone or tablet. 615.228.6745 caroling@fanniebattle.org fanniebattle.org/caroling

Nashville Rescue Mission Christmas Meals Ongoing

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Help provide Christmas meals for indigent and very low-income people through donations and volunteering at the Nashville Rescue Mission, which is at 639 Lafayette Street. You can donate a meal for only $2.26! More information at nashvillerescuemission.org. VI

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LIVE MUSIC sun 9PM MON 8PM TUE 8PM WED 8PM WED 8PM THU 7:30pm THU 8PM FRI 9PM SAT 5PM

every night

C O U N T R Y S U N D AY

with Chris Scruggs and The Stone Fox Five // WEEKLY

NASHVILLE MASQUERADE

Presented by Red Roots Music // WEEKLY

PRO BLUES JAM

Host & House Band Cara Being Blue // WEEKLY

LUCAS CARPENTER, THE ALMANACKS & FRIENDS MONTHLY // SECOND WEDNESDAY

THE MUSIC CITY LOCAL MONTHLY // LAST WEDNESDAY

GRINDHOUSE NASHVILLE

MONTHLY // SECOND & LAST THURSDAY

D I R T Y T H U R S D AY W I T H H O S T C O D Y PA R K S MONTHLY // THIRD THURSDAY

THE LOCAL GET DOWN MONTHLY // FIRST FRIDAY

H I P P I E C H I C K T WA N G MONTHLY // THIRD SATURDAY

HAPPY HOUR

Mon-Fri // 4-7PM $1 OFF Draft, Wells, & Wine

2-4-1 DRAFTS Wed // All Day

KITCHEN OPEN 7 DAYS @thelocalnash 110 28th Ave N // 615.320.4339 // localnash.com December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Metro Government 101 by Jason

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HOLLEMAN


PENDING LEGISLATION DOCTRINE:

Buying Time for Neighborhoods Two decades ago, the headline of the Nashville Business Journal read, “Preservationists had chance to save Jacksonian long before now,”1 as the World War I-era apartment building lay in a pile of rubble to make way for an asphalt parking lot and another Walgreens drug store on West End Avenue.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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s is often the case in U.S. urban areas, limited resources and a heavy workload by city historic preservation staff have often meant that efforts to protect worthy properties in the city’s landscape occur only when the threat of demolition becomes imminent. So for most of Nashville’s history, the wrecking ball has outpaced the successful adoption of historic zoning designations. There are noteworthy examples of last-minute rescues, like the Ryman Auditorium and the Union Station building; but, overall, by the time the threat of demolition loomed, it was too late for the city to add protections through the zoning process. However, in 2003, when Harding Academy—a private elementary school landlocked in the Belle

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Meade Links Neighborhood—announced plans to demolish several historic homes to make way for a planned expansion, the neighbors rallied under the leadership of future Metro Councilmember Emily Evans. The neighbors worked with then-Councilmember Lynn Williams to try to save the homes from demolition and prevent the school’s expansion into the otherwise-residential area. An ordinance to create a historic overlay over the entire neighborhood was initiated, and the demolition permits the school had been granted were revoked by the city under an untested legal theory known as the “pending ordinance doctrine.” Although the school and neighbors ultimately negotiated a compromise, the case served to

establish a legal precedent that has transformed historic preservation—and more generally, neighborhood advocacy—in Tennessee. Through it, the Tennessee Supreme Court clarified and confirmed the legitimacy of local governments’ rights to act based on the “pending ordinance doctrine.” The doctrine is a theory under the law that prohibits local government agencies, boards and commissions, from issuing permits or taking other actions if the local legislative body is considering adopting rules that would prohibit tomorrow what such a permit would allow today, even if their enactment is still some time to come. In short, the doctrine prevents landowners from rushing developments to “beat the clock” of an upcoming rule change.


the doctrine prevents landowners from rushing developments to “beat the clock” of an upcoming rule change. In the Harding Academy case, neighbors had begun the process of adoption of a historic overlay for the whole neighborhood. The overlay would have protected historic homes that the school intended to demolish. After the legislation was filed, but before it could make its way through the entire process (recommendation by the Metro Historic Zoning Commission, recommendation by the Metro Planning Commission and three readings of the Metro Council at three separate meetings), Harding Academy officials sought demolition for a group of homes within the proposed overlay. Citing the “pending legislation doctrine,” Metro Codes officials rescinded the demolition permits for the houses within the overlay. [Note: In the Harding Academy case, while the doctrine was upheld, demolition eventually was permitted to occur.]

While the state Supreme Court’s decision in Harding Academy provided local governments and neighborhoods with time to prevent irreversible action from occurring in the later stages of the legislative process, it did not entirely prevent the race to demolition (or other similar actions) as zoning changes are considered. Neighbors and local government officials should be aware that the “pending” in “pending ordinance doctrine” doesn’t, under Harding Academy, occur upon the mere filing of a bill. Rather, Metro Government, through its then-Law Director Sue Cain, interpreted the Harding Academy case to hold that “[f]or an ordinance to be considered ‘pending,’ (1) the ordinance must have been ‘introduced’ at Council (passed first reading); and (2) the Metropolitan Council must have received the recommendation from the relevant

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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years old for up to one hundred and twenty (120) days, requires the permit applicant to provide certain notices about the intended demolition to the community, and provides an opportunity for objection, public comment and consideration of alternatives. While such barriers to development come with a financial cost to property owners and developers and the potential for lost projects, they do help to ensure that the unique attributes of our skyline and our individual neighborhoods have a chance to be protected and improved, so that more generations will find Nashville an interesting, appealing community where they want to live, work, play and thrive. At a minimum, such policy

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Metro Council could take a more city-wide preservation approach, such as the “Demolition Delay Ordinance” in place in Norwalk, Connecticut.

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board or commission (e.g. Planning Commission, Historic Zoning Commission, etc.).”2 This means that, at least in Metro Government, demolition and/or other permits are not withheld until a bill is filed, reviewed by Planning and Historic staff, considered by relevant boards and commissions, and adopted on first reading by the Metro Council. And the time between the filing of a bill and adoption on first reading and review by recommending entities can often take weeks— more than enough time for an attentive developer to pull and act upon a demolition permit that may entirely defeat the purpose of the protective legislation being sought. So, is there more that can be done to protect our neighborhoods than what is currently afforded by the “pending ordinance doctrine”? Yes. The “pending ordinance doctrine” is a judicially created authorization to withhold permits from issuance at certain points in the legislative process. However, it may be viewed as a floor, not a ceiling, for historic preservation in Nashville. Should the Metro Council wish to move the timeline up for withholding permits, it could do so by adopting legislation that expressly directs that permits at odds with upcoming legislation could be withheld at the time of filing of the bill rather than after consideration by reviewing bodies and one reading of the Metro Council. Such a change to the Metro Code would give advocates time to protect against disappearing historic resources and against incompatible development. Similarly, Metro Council could take a more city-wide preservation approach, such as the “Demolition Delay Ordinance” in place in Norwalk, Connecticut, which holds the issuance of all demolition permits for structures more than fifty (50)

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the West Nashville Law Group PLLC. He practices primarily in the areas of land use and zoning, condemnation and municipal government law. He represented the Belle Meade Links neighborhood in the landmark Harding Academy case that established the pending legislation doctrine in Tennessee. e was also a member of the Metro Council from 2007 to 2015, representing District 24 in the West Nashville area. 1 See June 7, 1998, guest column written by Bill Hobbs in Nashville Business Journal entitled “Preservationists had chance to save Jacksonian long before now.” 2 See June 20, 2007, letter from Law Director Sue Cain to Metro Department Heads interpreting Harding Academy v. The Metropolitan Government.


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1187 Old Hickory Boulevard, Suite 200 Brentwood, Tennessee 37027 615.457.8392 www.nubodyconcepts.com

Complete Dental Care Huntingdon

Cane Ridge Dental Nashville

The Green Eye Center Gallatin

25 Stone Ridge Cove Huntingdon, Tennessee 38344 731.986.9484 www.completedental.care

1315 Bell Road Antioch, Tennessee 37013 615.717.0507 www.caneridgedentist.com

854 Lone Oak Drive Gallatin, Tennessee 37066 615.452.1602 www.greeneyecenter.com

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Holiday Directory HOLIDAY GIFT:

FREE TIRE ROTATION (Good Through Dec 31st)

TUNE UP • ELECTRICAL • BRAKES • OIL EUROPEAN • ASIAN • DOMESTIC VEHICLES Hillwood • 6008 Charlotte Pike • 615-356-6367 West Meade • 6015 Highway 100 • 615-353-5666

Happy Holidays DANA BATTAGLIA REALTOR

Christianson Patterson Courtney & Associates Danasemail@aol.com | 615-504-9792 | DanaBattaglia.com

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Holiday Directory

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615.491.3787

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Reminders for Household Pet Owners by Elliott WENZLER

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372WN.com | December 2018–January 2019


As the temperature drops, the annual questions about how to best protect pets in the wintertime are bound to come up for Nashville animal lovers. So 372WN decided to bring in some experts and put together a guide that answers many of these common questions.

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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Can my pet stay outside? Two things many dog lovers wonder are what temperature is too low for their pet to endure and whether that temperature varies among breeds. Legally, dogs can’t be left outside in temperatures of 32 degrees and below, according to Lauren Bluestone, director of Metro Animal Care and Control. Like humans, however, there are certain conditions dog owners and neighbors need to pay special attention to even if it’s not below that temperature. “Any dog that might not be as hearty, might be thin or (may have) a weakened immune system, that’s definitely something you want to keep your eyes out for,” Bluestone

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said. She also recommends heated water bowls for outside dogs so that owners can be sure the dogs’ water doesn’t freeze. Pet owners who opt to leave their pets outside can use a doghouse as a shelter from wind and rain, but there are a few ways to improve such structures. For instance, Bluestone recommended lining the doghouse with cedar chips, hay or straw to insulate it. Blankets are tricky, she explains, because if they get wet, they freeze. That will make the animal freeze. If using a doghouse, dog owners should also think about what size the house is, said Dr. Joe Ed Conn of Belle Meade Animal Hospital. It should be big enough so that the

dog can fit, but also small enough so the animal’s body heat can warm it up. It’s also better if the structure is closer to the house where it’s naturally warmer, he said. “If they can get in there and curl up, their body heat will warm that microenvironment,” Conn said. While pets legally must be brought inside when the temperature is below 32 degrees, there are ways to know if your pet is too cold in other temperatures as well. If a dog is shivering or lethargic, it is too cold, Bluestone said. Most breeds can acclimate to cold weather if given the chance to ease into it, though, Conn said.


“They need some time to adjust,” he said. “They will grow a thicker coat as temperatures fall and days get shorter.” It’s also important to be thoughtful about what breed the dog is, Bluestone said. A small poodle, for example, is likely going to need to be brought inside before a husky would. One way to tell if your dog might get cold more easily is the type of coat it has, said Nashville Humane Society spokesperson Kenneth Tallier. Those with short coats, like boxers and pitbulls, can’t handle the cold as well as a Great Pyrenees, he said. “Know your dog, know what your dog is able to handle,” Bluestone said. While some breeds may be able to withstand lower temperatures, it’s important to remember that doesn’t mean they can legally be left outside in below-freezing weather, Bluestone said. If a pet is found to be shivering or has sensitive extremities due to cold, the best way to warm them up is to run a blanket or towel through a dryer cycle and wrap them in it, Conn said. Pets can be easily burned by things like heating pads, he said.

Just like with leaving your pet outside, before taking them on walks or runs in the cold they need to be given proper time to adjust to the conditions and level of exercise, Conn said. Every once in a while, Conn sees a dog experiencing heatstroke-like conditions in colder weather, he said. “What happens is, someone who hasn’t exercised their dog much in the summer and fall decides, ‘hey I can go run with my dog even though he’s

totally out of shape,’” he said. A good rule of thumb is to think of your pet in a similar way you would think of a person, making sure they are ready before bringing them into new conditions, he said. While there isn’t a ton of snow and ice in Nashville, any time such conditions exist, dog walkers should consider the danger to their pets’ paws, Bluestone said. Salt put out to prevent slipping can be painful to the pads of dogs’ feet. Dogs can also cut their feet on

Should I still take my pet on walks? Dog owners should still take their fourlegged-friends out for walks in the winter, but it’s important to use good judgement and maybe make walks shorter, Tallier said. “One of the things that I do: I don’t wear gloves or mittens,” Tallier said. “When my hands . . . have had enough, I know the walk is done.” December 2017–January 2018 | 372WN.com

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Nashville native Elliott Wenzler graduated from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville in May of 2017 with a BA in journalism and minors in both business and Spanish. Wenzler fell in love with journalism through long-form podcasts and magazine pieces that capture the heart of an issue, culture or phenomenon. You can find her enjoying tacos at 51st Deli, jogging in Sylvan Park or playing trivia at Neighbors. N

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When dogs are brought inside for the winter, it’s an opportunity for their owners to get a better look at them and maybe find things that they didn’t notice in the summer, Conn said. Issues like skin problems, lumps or even fleas can go unnoticed when a pet is spending most of its time outside, he said. Another thing to watch out for when bringing pets back inside is the potentially hazardous household items your dog might find appealing, he said. Treats and chocolate left out for the holidays, house plants, decorations and even potpourri can be attractive to a dog, he said. Antifreeze is also a dangerous chemical for pets. If cars of pet owners or their neighbors leak antifreeze, dogs will be attracted to it because it’s sweet-smelling, Conn said. It is extremely toxic and

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Residents who want to report a dog they believe is in unsafe or too cold conditions can call MACC’s main number at 615.862.7928. If it is an emergency, Bluestone recommended calling a non-emergency police line. These types of calls can be anonymous, but MACC asks those who call to at least leave a telephone number so the staff can follow up about details, Bluestone said. Residents who see a stray or runaway dog out in the cold can call MACC, as well, Bluestone said. “If there’s a way to safely keep the dog around, try that,” Bluestone said, but quickly added that if the resident isn’t comfortable trying to interact with the dog, they shouldn’t do so and should

What else should I be concerned about?

can cause kidney failure. If an owner thinks their pet has gotten into antifreeze or is displaying symptoms such as vomiting, loss of appetite, increased water consumption or staggering, they should take the pet to an animal emergency facility immediately, he said. “There is an antidote to antifreeze, but it’s time-sensitive,” he said. Overall, the best way to keep a pet safe in the winter is to know what they’re used to, what they can handle and to pay attention to what kind of changes they might display so there’s time to act quickly if a problem arises. “The key is finding what they’re used to and giving them time to adjust if you plan to make a change in their lifestyle,” Conn said. H

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just call MACC to respond. “If there’s any question in your mind, it’s better to be safe than sorry,” she said.

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sharp ice, Conn said. Dog booties can be used to prevent these issues, but not all dogs will be accepting of this and they should never be forced, Bluestone said. “If you’re worried, just give us a call,” she said.

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372W. . . ?

MK Jones Where is West Nashville? West of Nashville! I think of Vanderbilt a lot. Sylvan Park definitely. I guess I consider Belmont, Belle Meade, 12

Jones, 16, has lived in Sylvan Park her whole life. She has worked at Produce Place on Murphy Road for a year and half. She grew up riding her bike to the store. She is a junior at Hillsboro High School.

South and then Centennial Area.

What is West Nashville? A place in Nashville that I think offers great diversity. Different people, different food experiences, different landscape areas and hot weather.

WHERE is West Nashville? WHAT is West Nashville? Let us know at 372WestNashville@gmail.com and you might see yourself here in our next issue!

December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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372WestNosh

by Constant

EATER

Whether we’ve driven by them hundreds of times or just spotted a new one we want to try, West Nashville’s got you covered for breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails. Bon appetit, salud and cheers!

MIEL 343 53rd Avenue, North 615.298.3663 mielrestaurant.com

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e have often described Miel as “West Nashville’s Hidden Gem,” for reasons that will be made clear by the time you finish reading this. In 2008, when proprietor Seema Prasad decided to open her fourth restaurant, she did take a pause. “I thought, ‘Wow, am I crazy?’” she explains. “But when you love hostility, food, and wine, you open a restaurant!” Though Prasad laughs about those three “loves,” she is serious about food and bevvies. “I wanted Miel to be a neighborhood restaurant that offers an adventurous dining experience, along with a ‘Cheers’ aspect,” explains Prasad. Having moved from Seattle to Nashville in 2001, Prasad was already very familiar with the city before launching her vision. West Nashville was on her radar, so when the historic Johnson’s Meat Market building in Sylvan Park became available, Prasad jumped on it—and her vision is now a reality. “There are definitely nights that the entire dining room knows one another!” she laughs. Miel’s menu is seasonal and Prasad works with Chef Andrew Coins to strike the right balance between go-to favorites and adven-

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turesome choices. “Though there is always something completely approachable on the menu, there is also something that truly pushes the envelope,” she explains, citing marinated olives and blood sausage as two examples. In addition to what’s grown on-site, Coins and Prasad make a conscious effort to procure local, organic and overall responsible ingredients. Right now, late fall and winter vegetables are plentiful, along with charcuteries that are consistently a big hit with patrons. And of course, the pork shoulder dish. “It has crazy following,” she smiles. “Braised pork shoulder, Parisienne gnocchi, fresh mozzarella, arugula and pork jus

. . . it’s kind of addictive. Everything else on the menu rotates based on the availability—if there is something phenomenal available, like king crab, we adjust our menu to accommodate it for that week.” In addition to the complimentary amuse-bouche and seasonally inspired menu, expect to savor a wine list cultivated from Prasad’s 20+ years of experience. Miel also boasts an extensive half-bottle list and older vintages. And then, there are the cakes. Oh, the cakes. Stunning and delicious, “they are more about flavor than sugar,” Prasad explains. “Jennifer [Coins] is one of those incredibly talented pastry chefs

Salt roasted sweet-potatoes, chest nuts, smoked maple


Apple brandy cake

who creates with complexity and freshness. Think citrus meringue that is torched next to candied oranges, on a dark chocolate cake so light, you can eat two pieces!” Or a caramelized sweet-potato cake with molasses buttercream? Apple brandy cake? We could go on . . . but suggest you sample for yourself. A taste of local honey or a selection from their unique post-dinner spirits provides a blissful end to the evening’s experience. Miel also offers happy-hour glasses of wine and accoutrements, like a seasonal cocktail menu (just $5 from 5:00—6:30 p.m.), complete with fresh herbs plucked from the on-site garden. Which brings us to another reason we love Miel: They are a leader of sustainable practices in our fair city. In addition to the aforementioned herbs, gardens of seasonal produce surround the restaurant patio and a rooftop garden grows tomatoes in the summer, absorbing the heat and reducing the electricity demand of the building. And we would be remiss to not mention Miel’s event space! The Barn at Miel is a simple, standalone space next door to the restaurant that hosts 26 seated

guests or up to 50 guests for a cocktail-style reception. The space’s simple touches of barn wood, planked walnut tables and burlap accents complement occasions ranging from casual to chic, leaving plenty of room for your own creative ideas. Having just celebrated Miel’s 10-year anniversary, Prasad summarizes its success: “Miel is about enjoying dining: The food, remarkably paired cocktails and wine, along with service that curates your experience. It’s a place you look forward to popping by, whether you’re there for happy hour or a long meal.”

HAPPY HOUR: Tuesday–Friday, 5:00 p.m.–6:30 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 5:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and January 1st–10th. CREDIT CARDS: All RESERVATIONS: Recommended Constant Eater is dedicated to discovering the West Side’s best breakfasts, lunches, dinners and cocktails . . . in the name of fair reporting and satisfied tummies, of course.

HOURS: Tuesday through Thursday, 5:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 5:30 p.m.–10:00 p.m.; Sunday, 5:30 p.m.–9:00 p.m.

Sweet-potato cake with molasses buttercream December 2018–January 2019 | 372WN.com

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372Who kNew? Name:

Cecilie Maynor

What’s your relationship to West Nashville? Favorite thing about our community? Favorite food? color? drink? dessert? hobby? If you could run any single company or organization in the world, which would you choose? Where will you be on Friday night? Dog or cat? Surf or turf? Dream occupation when you were five? What’s your superpower? What is the one thing you’d most like to change about the world? What excites you most about West Nashville?

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Profile for 372WN

372WN - West Nashville's Magazine  

December 2018–January 2019

372WN - West Nashville's Magazine  

December 2018–January 2019

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