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February 2021 | Volume 11 | Issue 9

THEHOMEWOODSTAR.COM

HOMEWOOD’S COMMUNITY NEWS SOURCE

IN THE BUSINESS OF LOVE Glenda Curry, the bishop at All Saints Episcopal Church, stands in front of the church with the handcrafted crozier made by Danny Whitsett. Photo courtesy of Glenda Curry.

Community comes together to craft crozier for new bishop By INGRID SCHNADER

time and decided she never wanted to leave. “I love creativity and anything I can do with my hands,” she said. “I love being able to make things for people and see their reaction. You’re bringing joy to someone’s day.” A few years after Shelby started working there, Edward walked in the shop for a job. At the time, his aunt owned Blakelee’s Bouquets. Edward had been working in video and media, but after going to a rehabilitation

When the Rev. Glenda Curry was named the first female bishop in the Episcopal Diocese of Alabama, she asked one of her fellow parishioners, Danny Whitsett, if he could make her crozier. Whitsett had just one question: What is a crozier? “I didn’t even know what she was talking about, but it’s basically the wooden staff,” Whitsett said. “It looks like a big shepherd's hook.” Whitsett does specialty paint finishes and woodworking, but he doesn’t do very detailed woodworking, he said. “So this was a little bit beyond my comfort level,” he said. “But I was so honored, so I said I would basically just figure out

See FLOWER | page A22

See CROZIER | page A23

Blakelee’s Bouquets owners Edward and Shelby Lee inside the flower shop at 931 Oxmoor Road in Edgewood. Photo by Erin Nelson.

Newlyweds relocate flower shop to Homewood, watch relationships bloom By INGRID SCHNADER

E

dward and Shelby Lee opened a new flower shop in Homewood in December. It’s called Blakelee’s Bouquets, named after their 5-year-old niece, and it’s located in Edgewood at 931 Oxmoor Road. Although the pair is in the business of love — providing customers with bouquets of flowers for every occasion — Edward and Shelby’s love story bloomed at this flower shop, too.

Shelby started working at the flower shop five years ago when it was in Tuscaloosa. She was in college and looking for an easy, parttime job. She thought a job at the flower shop would fit the bill. “I thought people who worked in a flower shop just made a couple of arrangements and then sat around and didn’t do much,” she said. “But it’s actually a fast-paced and fun environment.” She didn’t realize at first how much she would love the industry, Shelby said. But within months, she went from part time to full

INSIDE

Sponsors............... A4 News....................... A6

Business................ A7 Events................... A12

Opinion................. A13 Community..........A14

Schoolhouse........A15 Sports................... A17

Medical Guide........B1 Metro Roundup.... B13 facebook.com/thehomewoodstar

Important Mission

A Time of Growth

Annual ArtBlink Gala goes virtual this year to raise funds for O’Neal Cancer Center research efforts.

Coach Tim Shepler says he’s inspired by Homewood’s young team and its willingness to continue pushing forward.

See page A12

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A2 • February 2021

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The Homewood Star

A4 • February 2021

About Us Editor’s Note By Ingrid Schnader I remember last year’s Valentine’s Day being one of my last memories of normal life before the pandemic hit. My boyfriend and I saw a Beatles cover band in concert, and then we met up with some of my friends at my favorite dive bar. I took a ton of photos that night — my friends and I all sandwiched together in the middle of packed crowds, laughing our heads off. Not a mask in sight. Doesn’t it make you cringe now to see photos like that? Like, how could I have let all of those strangers breathe on me? Of course, the pandemic hit a couple of weeks after Valentine’s Day last year. I’ve gotten used to the “new normal” of working from home and limiting get-togethers, but I’m so excited to return to the way it was last year. With every news story that comes out about the coronavirus

vaccine, I get chill bumps. It feels so good to see an end in sight, even though we have to still be patient and social distance until more people get the vaccine. The good thing about Valentine’s Day is that the coronavirus can’t really ruin it. Sending Valentine’s Day cards to your loved ones is

pandemic-friendly. So is buying chocolates and flowers for yourself or watching romantic comedies on your couch. I won’t be heading out to any concerts or crowded bars this year, but the things I love the most about Valentine’s Day will remain the same. If you’re needing a fun Valentine’s Day story to read, check out my cover story. This sweet couple owns a flower shop that just opened in Homewood, and they recently celebrated their wedding day. Don’t forget to tell people in your life how much you love them. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Please Support Our Community Partners Alabama Goods (A6) Alabama Power (A16, B16) Ascension/St. Vincent’s Health Systems (A15) Bedzzz Express (A3) Birmingham Museum of Art (B13) Blakelee’s Bouquets (A8) Brandino Brass (B14) Bromberg’s & Company Inc. (A12) Byars-Wright Insurance (A19)

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Children’s of Alabama (B1) Closets by Design (A9) Dish’n It Out (A11) Etc. (A23) French Drains Pro (A22) Grandview Medical (B9) Green Springs Animal Clinic (B10) Gunn Dermatology (B8) HomeRN (B7) Homewood Family and Cosmetic Dentistry (A19) Homewood Parks and Rec (A24) Issis & Sons (A21) Kete Cannon, ARC Realty (A7) Momentum Motorworks (A7) NeedCo Inc. (A13) Nicole Brannon, ARC Realty (A1) One Man and a Toolbox (A13)

Contractors with Tennessee Valley Metals in Oneonta install new awnings outside Homewood Nutrition and Parkside Salon on Oak Grove Road on Jan. 5. Photo by Erin Nelson.

Outdoor Living Areas (A21) Oxmoor Valley Orthodontics (B12) Piggly Wiggly (A5)

Publisher: Dan Starnes Director of Operations: Mindy Dent Community Editors: Ingrid Schnader Jon Anderson Jesse Chambers Leah Ingram Eagle Neal Embry Sports Editor: Kyle Parmley Digital Editor: Cathlene Cowart Design Editor: Melanie Viering Photo Editor: Erin Nelson Page Designers: Kristin Williams Ted Perry Contributing Writers: Lauren Denton Account Managers: Layton Dudley Ted Perry Content Marketing Manager: Erica Brock Graphic Designer: Emily VanderMey

Ray & Poynor (A5) Red Mountain Theatre Company (A14) Renew Dermatology (A2, B6) ROME Study, UAB Division of Preventative Medicine (A12) For advertising contact: ggannon@starnespublishing.com Contact Information: Homewood Star P.O. Box 530341 Birmingham, AL 35253 (205) 313-1780 dan@starnespublishing.com

Please submit all articles, information and photos to: ischnader@starnespublishing.com P.O. Box 530341 Birmingham, AL 35253

Published by: The Homewood Star LLC

Local Sales Manager: Gregg Gannon Client Success Specialist: Anna Bain Marketing Consultants: Warren Caldwell Don Harris Michelle Salem Haynes John Yarbrough

Legals: The Homewood Star is published monthly. Reproduction or use of editorial or graphic content without prior permission is prohibited. The Homewood Star is designed to inform the Homewood community of area school, family and community events. Information in The Homewood Star is gathered from sources considered reliable but the accuracy cannot be guaranteed. All articles/photos submitted become the property of The Homewood Star. We reserve the right to edit articles/photos as deemed necessary and are under no obligation to publish or return photos submitted. Inaccuracies or errors should be brought to the attention of the publisher at (205) 313-1780 or by email.

Business Administrator: Anna Jackson

Please recycle this paper.

Shades Creek Dental (B3) Sikes Children’s Shoes (A6) Skin Wellness Center Dermatology (B11) SOHO Social (A10) Southern Coin & Collectibles (A11) Southern Home Structural Repair Specialists (A22) The Harbor at Lay Lake (B15) Truitt Insurance & Bonding (A1) TrustCare Urgent Care (B5) WaveTech Therapy (B12) Whale of a Sale (A13) Window World of Central Alabama (A17)


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A5


The Homewood Star

A6 • February 2021

City

Council approves zoning ordinance changes Some of Homewood’s long, slender corner lots — such as the 2020 Birmingham Home and Gardens Inspiration Home — would be difficult home construction sites if typical setbacks were required for the front and side yards. Photo by Erin Nelson.

By INGRID SCHNADER The Homewood City Council approved changes to the city’s zoning ordinance at its Jan. 11 meeting. These changes were first discussed at the Sept. 15 Planning Commission meeting and were then brought to the Nov. 16 Planning and Development Committee meeting. One change regards corner lots and required setbacks. “This came to me through the Board of Zoning adjustments because they kept seeing the same type of request over and over again on the same issues,” said Vicki Smith, a planner with the city. “Usually when that happens, you know you’ve got a problem, when you get that many.” There are many long, slender corner lots in Homewood, Smith said, and when there are 25-foot setbacks required for both the front and the side, there is not much space leftover to build a house. “Our rules shouldn’t create a situation where you can’t do anything to your lot without getting a variance,” she said. Under the zoning amendment, the corner lots definition was changed to the following: “Corner lots fronting two streets shall use the frontage with the least dimensions as the front property line. The secondary front shall be used as an applicable side building setback, but not less than 9 feet,” City Attorney Mike Kendrick said. The next change deals with accessory structures. Subsection 4 of section D was amended to read as follows: “Accessory structures shall not occupy more than 30% of the rear yard space with an additional 5% allowed if permeable surfaces are used for appropriate structures. All is subject to the 50% maximum lot coverage limitation,” Kendrick said.

Last, there was a change in how residents are notified of a zoning request. Property owners and adjacent neighbors will still be notified of a rezoning request through certified mail, which is a service that requires recipients to sign for the mail. Other nearby property owners will receive their notices via first-class mail, which is cheaper and still fits the standards of the state.

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postponed so all residents could have an opportunity to speak virtually or in person on those issues, which included an eight-unit town house development proposed for 18th Street South, the charter school development proposed for Bagby Drive and the potential college development on Bagby Drive. The Homewood Star went to press before these public hearings were held.

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“A lot of people don’t pick up the certified mail anyway,” Smith said. “It’s a waste of money.” All of the city’s ordinances can be found online at library.municode.com/al/homewood/ codes/code_of_ordinances. There were also planned public hearings for three developments at the Jan. 11 council meeting. However, there was an audio issue with Zoom, and these public hearings were

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TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A7

Business Neighborhood Nutrition brings healthy shakes, teas downtown By INGRID SCHNADER

An artist’s rendering of the 3,200-square-foot Whataburger restaurant in the works in the Wildwood shopping center. Photo courtesy of Castles Design Group.

Whataburger development planned in Wildwood shopping center By INGRID SCHNADER A 3,200-square-foot Whataburger restaurant is in the works in the Wildwood shopping center. The development was brought to the Homewood Planning Commission at its Jan. 5 meeting. The Planning Commission approved an amendment to the Wildwood North Redevelopment Plan to permit the restaurant’s construction. The development is at 195 State Farm Parkway. At the meeting, Matt Sims, a civil engineer for the project with Gonzalez-Strength and Associates, said the landlord will demolish the Regions Bank building on the site and prepare a site for Whataburger to

build a new restaurant. The Planning Commission also approved an amendment to the Wildwood Centre South Redevelopment Plan to permit the construction of a two-tenant retail building across the street from the upcoming Whataburger. This development would be at 275 Lakeshore Parkway in the parking lot next to Costa’s Famous Bar-B-Que. A representative said tenants were already secured for this development, but these tenants were not named at the meeting. The tenants will most likely be restaurants, she said. In the development plans, one unit is 2,325 square feet, and the other is 3,500 square feet. The next Planning Commission meeting will be Feb. 2.

A new shop selling shakes and teas opened on 18th Street. Owner Faith Hurtado opened Neighborhood Nutrition in August in the former Lucky Cat Rolled Creams storefront at 2908 18th St. S. Neighborhood Nutrition is the sister store to Magic City Nutrition, which is in downtown Birmingham in the Battery. Neighborhood Nutrition customers love that they can buy shakes and teas that not only taste good but also make them feel good, Hurtado said. “Our goal is to take things like protein shakes, vitamins, et cetera, and make them less intimidating and overwhelming,” she said. “Making sure you get the good stuff you need throughout the day can be tough and often daunting, so our customers love that they can leave knowing they are getting those vitamins and nutrients and delicious drinks.” Energy teas at the shop are packed with B vitamins, vitamin C and natural caffeine, she said. Each shake has 200-250 calories, 24-32 grams of protein and 21 vitamins and minerals — but tastes like birthday cake or brownies. “It doesn’t get much better than that,” Hurtado said. Hurtado signed the lease for the space in February 2020, right before the pandemic forced businesses to temporarily shut down, so she didn’t open the shop immediately. “We weren’t sure when the right time was, but in August we finally decided to open our doors, with very little idea of what might come of it,” she said. “But the Homewood community welcomed us with open arms

Faith Hurtado pours a smoothie. Hurtado opened Neighborhood Nutrition in August in the former Lucky Cat Rolled Creams location on 18th Street. Staff photo.

and has made it an incredible first six months open. “We thought it would be tough to build relationships with our ‘neighbors’ through masks and quick interactions, but the community we have been able to build through it all has been unreal. We truly are so honored to be a part of Homewood. “ Neighborhood Nutrition is open 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. Follow the shop on Instagram at @nbrhd nutrition for more information.

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The Homewood Star

A8 • February 2021

Although the storefront at 715 Oak Grove Road will remain an ice cream shop, the inside will look much different, and there will be a walk-up service window. Photos courtesy of Michael Eady.

Neighbor-owned ice cream shop opening in West Homewood By INGRID SCHNADER More than a dozen West Homewood families are coming together to invest in a new business in their neighborhood. The business will be Neighbors Ice Cream and will be in the former Magic City Sweet Ice location at 715 Oak Grove Road. The shop will serve a variety of flavors of ice cream, candy and other sweets. Michael Eady, a spokesman for the group, said his family has lived in West Homewood for almost five years. During his time in the neighborhood, he said he remembers frequently visiting Magic City Sweet Ice. “I’ve got four young kids, so you can’t go to Patriot Park without your kids begging to go to Magic City Sweet Ice,” he said. “We definitely went there a lot.” The same can be said for many of the other families invested in Neighbors, Eady said.

They also spent years taking their families to the ice cream shop on Oak Grove Road. So when the family-owned Italian ice cream shop announced at the end of 2019 it would be closing, these West Homewood neighbors decided to open their own ice cream shop. “Several of us were friends,” Eady said. “Ultimately a few months back, I came to the conclusion that I thought this would be a neat concept to have an ice cream shop that’s owned by the community.” Eady hosted a small group of neighbors in his backyard and shared his idea. When he asked the others if they would be interested, he got an “overwhelmingly positive” response, he said. “From there, it went to ‘This person knows this person who might also want to be involved,’” he said. “The original goal was to have 10 families. We had a little bit more of a positive response than we thought. So we

expanded it to 15 families involved.” Eady, who lives a block away from the shop, said it’s a family-centric neighborhood with “kids everywhere.” This is one of the reasons he wanted the location to remain an ice cream shop, he said. “We wanted to do something we felt like there was a need for in the neighborhood,” he said. “We’ve had two new restaurants pop up here in the last couple of years with Seeds and GM Pizzeria that the neighborhood loves and loves to support, and we felt like if there was something missing, it was an ice cream shop. It wouldn’t compete with anything here — we didn’t want to do that.” The 15 families involved aren’t just investing in an ice cream shop, though — they’re investing in the neighborhood, Eady said. “There’s kind of built-in accountability,” he said. “Your customers are your neighbors, and you want your neighbors to be happy, right?

You want to treat them well. That’s a big part of the DNA of the job. There’s going to be a very high level of customer service.” While it’s impossible to know everyone’s name, he said he anticipates employees will be able to call many of the customers by name. “We want people to come in and feel welcome,” he said. “If I walk into the shop, I want the person scooping ice cream to say, ‘Hey Michael, how are y’all doing? Say hey to the kids,’ and those types of things.” Although the storefront is remaining an ice cream shop, Eady said the storefront was gutted and renovated and won’t look anything like Magic City Sweet Ice. There will be picnic tables in the front of the shop in addition to some indoor seating. The shop will also have a walk-up service window. He said he anticipates an early 2021 opening. Visit neighborshwd.com for more information.

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TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A9

Buka, a new neighborhood wine shop, market and takeaway cafe, as seen Jan. 5 on Oxmoor Road. The shop plans to open in February. Photo by Erin Nelson.

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West Homewood welcomes Buka By INGRID SCHNADER The team from Woodlawn Cycle Cafe, which closed its downtown location in August, is bringing a new cafe concept to West Homewood. The eatery, called Buka, is a neighborhood wine shop, market and takeaway cafe with quality, daily essentials, the company said in an email to The Homewood Star. “We have sourced our favorite household staples including fresh-cut meats, cheese, fresh bread, our house-made spreads wine selection and small home goods,” the company said. “Our takeaway menu is focused on seasonal produce with nutrient-minded dishes for easy grab and go.” Buka will be one of the newest tenants at the 186 Building on Oxmoor Road. Other tenants who have also opened recently at that building are West Homewood Co. and Tempting Faces. When asked how the team got the idea for the concept for Buka, the company said customers over the years have asked about buying Woodlawn Cycle Cafe’s selection of housemade spreads.

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“This, in addition to the idea of a graband-go neighborhood market and cafe, set the idea of Buka in motion,” the company said. The owner of the company has memories of growing up with a small market downstairs, and these memories also inspired the concept for Buka, in addition to the team’s years operating as Woodlawn Cycle Cafe for five years. The team has worked to create a space that is comforting to guests who are picking out a bottle of wine or grabbing a quick lunch, the company said. “We are focusing on being a convenient spot for the neighborhood with daily essentials that happens to have a great, healthy takeaway menu,” the company said.

Byars | Wright, a family-owned independent insurance agency that has an office in Homewood, is celebrating its 75th anniversary. Photo by Layton Dudley.

Family-owned insurance company celebrates 75 years in business By INGRID SCHNADER Byars | Wright, a family-owned independent insurance agency that has an office in Homewood, is celebrating a milestone anniversary. In 1946 — 75 years ago — G.L. and Jean Byars started the company in Jasper with a simple goal. G.L. would sell one policy a day for one year, and his wife would type them up for him. The agency has grown over the years, and in 2019, it opened an office in Homewood at 1701 28th Ave. S. “That was a long time coming because so many of our team members live in Homewood and were driving to one of our other offices,” said Brand Manager Lacey Rae Visintainer, who lives in Homewood. “And so many clients are in Homewood and surrounding areas.” Byars | Wright focuses on commercial insurance but also sells personal insurance policies. When asked what makes Byars | Wright stand out, Visintainer said the company protects relationships.

“That is the heart of everything we do,” she said. “We’re not just selling insurance policies; we’re actually looking to build and protect relationships with our clients, whether it’s home or business. … That’s how and why we’ve survived for 75 years.” Gabe Clement, who is the branch manager at the Homewood location, thanked the community for its support. “We wouldn’t be where we are today without the incredible support from our communities, customers and family,” he said. “We are so grateful for those relationships, and we are especially grateful to our Homewood community. Though we’ve served many customers here and always had strong partnerships throughout this city, opening our doors on 28th Avenue in 2019 was one of the best decisions we’ve made in the past 75 years. The future is bright at Byars | Wright, and with the continued support of our Homewood community, we know that the next 75 years will be even better.” For more information, visit byarswright.com.

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The Homewood Star

A10 • February 2021

18 Street S.

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TheHomewoodStar.com

Now Open BOOST Kids has moved to 1754 Oxmoor Road after previously operating in downtown Birmingham. It offers occupational therapy for children, and it specializes in feeding therapy, developmental delay, handwriting help and kids yoga. 205-767-9207, boostbirmingham.com

1

Owner Farrah Shunnarah opened French & Towers Salon Co. on Jan. 5 at 2904 Linden Ave., the former location of Wheelhouse Salon. 205-538-5926, frenchandtowerssalonco. squarespace.com

2

Coming Soon The Valley Hotel, 2727 18th St. S., is scheduled to open by mid-February. A Curio by Hilton, this hotel will contain three dining concepts: Ironwood Kitchen + Cocktails, The Terrace Bar and The Valley Coffee Co. Of the 129 guest rooms, nine will be luxury suites. There is also 7,000 square feet of space to accommodate meetings, weddings and events. valorhospitality.com/hotel/the-valley-hotel-acurio-by-hilton

3

Neighbors West Homewood, 715 Oak Grove Road, plans to open in early 2021 a new neighborhood-owned ice cream shop concept at the newly renovated Westwood Shopping Center. Founded by 15 West Homewood families, the shop will serve a variety of flavors of ice cream, candy and other sweets. neighborshwd.com; Instagram @neighborshwd

4

Whataburger is building a 3,200-squarefoot restaurant at 195 State Farm Parkway in the Wildwood shopping center. whataburger.com

5

Relocations and Renovations 6

After spending 66 years at the same 18th Street location, Sikes Children’s

February 2021 • A11 Shoes will be relocating to a new building in the spring of 2021. Until then, the business will operate out of a temporary location at 2707 18th Place S. 205-879-3433, sikesshoes.com

News and Accomplishments Vulcan Park Foundation, 1701 Valley View Drive, announced in January the 2020 honorees for The Vulcans Community Awards. The Vulcans honor 10 civic-minded people this year in four categories — Lifetime Achievement, Hero, Game Changer and Servant Leadership — and are divided into two groups: The Vulcans and Spears. The winner of Lifetime Achievement in The Vulcans is Dr. Perry Ward, longtime president of Lawson State Community College. A 5-month exhibit at Linn-Henley Gallery will honor the winners. 205-933-1409, visitvulcan.com

7

Alabama’s #1 Source for Gold and Silver

Anniversaries SoHo Standard, 1830 29th Ave. S., is celebrating its 1-year anniversary. SoHo Standard’s menu includes steak, fish, crab cakes, duck and quail, along with appetizers, salads and sides. 205-423-8080, standard.sohosocial.bar

8

Closings Ambiance, 2808 18th St. S., has closed its brick-and-mortar location, but products are still available online. ambianceclothingandhome.com

9

Steel City Pops announced on Facebook that it is closing its Homewood location at 2821 Central Ave., Suite 109. According to the post, the gourmet popsicle shop plans to open another storefront in Homewood at a location yet to be announced. In the meantime, customers are encouraged to visit the Steel City Pops store at The Summit. steelcitypops.com

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10

Business news to share? If you are in a brick-and-mortar business in Homewood and you are... Now open Coming soon Relocating or renovating Announcing a new owner Celebrating an anniversary Hiring or promoting an employee Announcing other news or accomplishments Let us know! Share your news with us at thehomewoodstar.com/about-us

205.822.4900

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The Homewood Star

A12 • February 2021

Events ArtBlink Gala goes virtual to raise funds for cancer center

A scene from the 2019 ArtBlink fundraiser, an annual event at The Kirklin Clinic on the UAB campus that raises money for research at the O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center. This year’s installation will be held online and is free for anyone to watch. Photo courtesy of UAB O’Neal Comprehensive Cancer Center.

By INGRID SCHNADER Most years, the annual ArtBlink Gala brings 800-900 people together in downtown Birmingham to learn about the O’Neal Cancer Center’s efforts in cancer research and to watch 18-20 artists create works of art live on stage. Safely bringing hundreds of people together in person isn’t possible this year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, so ArtBlink will look a little different. The program will be online and is free for anyone to watch — opening up the opportunity for more people to participate in the event and learn about the O’Neal Cancer Center. Instead of watching artists live on stage, the cancer center’s production company filmed the artists creating their works, and participants will be able to watch these videos during the program. These works will be auctioned in an online platform that night and through the weekend. Danya Segrest, the cancer center’s director of corporate development and special events, said going virtual has allowed the gala to invite artists of more diverse mediums. In addition to paintings, the artwork featured at this year’s event will include pottery, glass and metal sculptures. “We’ve got some neat things, and there are

opportunities for people — especially art lovers — to see inside an artist’s studio and then bid on the artwork,” Segrest said. The event annually raises about $700,000, she said. Despite the challenges of planning a virtual event during a pandemic, by mid-January, Segrest said the board had already raised $625,000. “Are we behind from last year? Yes,” she said. “But consider all of the challenges we’ve faced. We just have fantastic community members, our sponsors, our individual donors who have stepped up and said, ‘We’re going to raise as much money as we can for the cancer center because the mission is important, and we want to make sure that cancer research can still advance at the same rate.’” The cancer center’s mission is especially important in the aftermath of the coronavirus

pandemic, Segrest said, because people have missed their routine cancer screening appointments to avoid contracting the virus. “Your annual mammogram is supposed to catch a breast cancer diagnosis at the earliest stage as possible,” she said. “So if you put off your annual mammogram and skip a year because of COVID-19 … that advances the potential of your cancer to grow or to advance into a later stage, which makes it much more difficult to treat.” This year’s event will honor George Wheelock III as the ArtBlink 2021 Director’s Circle Honoree. A founding member of the advisory board, Wheelock has “played every kind of role, from fundraising chair to president of the board,” Segrest said. “He’s been the biggest cheerleader for the cancer center and has helped us grow through

the years,” she said. “We’re excited to be able to honor him for the almost 40 years of service he’s given to the cancer center.” Tickets for the event are $200 and can be purchased online at artblink.org. The price includes dinner and cocktails for two and access to the virtual event. The dinner, catered by Cafe Iz, can be picked up in the parking lot at 1 Independence Plaza in Homewood on Feb. 5. A ticket is not required to watch the online event. “My hope is that people will take the time to tune in and really learn more about the O’Neal Cancer Center,” Segrest said. “We are the only National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center in the state of Alabama, which means we provide access to clinical trials, which can really make a significant impact in people’s survival rate. I think there’s an opportunity to share what a gem we have in our own backyard.”

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Contact our staff to see if you qualify. 205-934-8821 (8am-5pm M-F) • moveforward@uab.edu Funded by the National Cancer Institute


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A13

Opinion

One Man & a Toolbox Handyman Services

Ordinary Days By Lauren Denton

Baking with kids and letting it go My dad’s youngest sister, was happy, and I checked my little “good mom� box. Joanne, was a pastry chef. My Then the girls got a new set mom has told me the story of of cookie cutters for Christmas, how, for my fifth birthday, Joanne wanted to make petit fours for my and I knew what was coming. We birthday party. She set up camp in were going to have to figure out my parents’ kitchen and whipped how to make real dough: mounds up a beautiful platter of the little of butter, two kids fighting over a rolling pin, flour sprinkled all treats. over the counter — on purpose! After the party when my mom went in the kitchen, she said But I put on my big girl pants and Denton it looked like a flour bag had decided to let them do it. exploded, along with all the sugar and icing. I helped make the dough — it was a new There was even flour on the cabinet knobs process for all of us — and showed them how where Joanne had opened doors to look for to roll it out, then I sat back and let them get mixing bowls. to work. I think of this story any time one of my Their first batch was filled with nicely kids says she wants to bake something in the shaped cookies, all spaced out well, ready to kitchen. I tend to find flour in cracks and crev- be iced. The second batch somehow included ices I didn’t even know we had, sugar trails two massive handprint cookies (that I was sure from the pantry to the counter, and hours after I wouldn’t cook well but they did), a couple think we’re finished, I still find drips of batter in shapes I was never able to identify and a few random places. And don’t even get me started extra pieces of dough that were too small to on those little round sprinkles. shape into anything. When it came time to ice But even more than the goes-with-the-terri- them, I decided to keep it easy and skip Alton tory part of baking with kids, I have this annoyBrown’s royal icing recipe and instead pulled ing little perfectionistic streak that pokes its out the tubs of Duncan Hines frosting and a jar ugly head out from time to time. It’s the one of sprinkles. that sits on my shoulder and whispers, “She’s And surprise, surprise, without me in the overstirring that batter.� “If the rows aren’t way, acting like the kitchen director the whole straight, the cookies are going to run together time, they actually did everything great. The in the oven.� Or “It’d be a whole lot easier and dough held up, none of the cookies ran together quicker if you just take over the baking part and in the oven, and they tasted great. But more importantly, Kate and Sela had a let them eat the cookies when you’re done.� I try to shut that voice down, but sometimes blast. They giggled and encouraged each other it’s pretty loud. Especially when I have other and sneaked fingerfuls of icing and sprinkled things on my to-do list or when I know the sprinkles. At one point, Kate gave me a hug clean-up is going to be especially tedious. and said thank you. I asked, “For what?� She So the other day when Sela and I had a rare said, “For letting us make cookies and use the sprinkles and eat the icing.� couple of hours alone together and she asked if she could make cookies, my enthusiasm took Message received, loud and clear. The a bit of a hit. I know as a mom, I’m supposed kitchen is a good place to practice new things, to look for opportunities to teach my kids all to learn from mistakes, and to have fun, whether kinds of life skills, and I do (mostly), but for you’re 8, 11 or 41. I could have squelched all some reason, practicing those life skills in the their creativity and micromanaged every little kitchen — actually letting them learn from their step, which was what that annoying voice was mistakes — fills me with a particular kind of telling me to do, but what I learned was that it was much more fun to let go then sit back anxiety. But I took a deep breath, and I said yes. As and watch. Sela pulled out all the bowls and spoons and ingredients we’d need, I told myself to let go of When I’m not writing about my family every concern for the showers of flour onto the and our various shenanigans, I write novels floor, every worry about batter consistency and and go to the grocery store. My novels are in messy fingerprints and sugar granules under- stores and online. You can reach me by email at foot. And for the most part, it worked. I did help lauren@laurenkdenton.com, visit my website, her with the flour, but other than that, I backed laurenkdenton.com, or find me on Instagram off to avoid over-controlling the process, and @LaurenKDentonBooks, Twitter @LaurenK she did most of it herself. She was proud, I Denton, or on Facebook ~LaurenKDentonAuthor.

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The Homewood Star

A14 • February 2021

Community Have a community announcement? Email Ingrid Schnader at ischnader@starnespublishing.com to be considered for inclusion in an upcoming issue.

Alabama Power grant to support HICA, Hispanic community The coronavirus pandemic has adversely affected communities across the globe. In the U.S., communities of color have been especially hard-hit. A grant to the nonprofit Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (HICA) from the Alabama Power Foundation will help Hispanic families navigate through these tough financial times and secure stable and permanent homes, while also expanding opportunities for Hispanic small businesses and entrepreneurs. “This past year has been a challenge for the local Hispanic community, on so many levels,” said Mark Crosswhite, Alabama Power CEO and a member of the Alabama Power Foundation board of directors. “Through this grant from the foundation, we hope the coming year will provide better economic opportunities for Hispanic businesses, entrepreneurs and families to grow and thrive.” The multilayered grant will help fund professional, technical and marketing services and support for Hispanic small businesses and entrepreneurs to help them expand and create jobs. It will support financial workshops for Hispanic families to help them build credit, reduce debt and increase savings while also providing support to aid first-time homeowners, as well as rental assistance and housing

The Alabama Power Foundation is providing a grant to the nonprofit Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (HICA) to help Hispanic families navigate through the pandemic’s tough financial times and secure stable and permanent homes while also expanding opportunities for Hispanic small businesses and entrepreneurs. Photo courtesy of Alabama NewsCenter.

counseling for Latino families. In addition, the grant will support a HICA program that provides microloans to small Hispanic businesses, and a program that provides tax assistance and counseling for businesses and families. “Our Community Economic Development Program is focused on providing opportunities for lower- and moderate-income Latino communities across the state,” HICA Executive Director Isabel Rubio said. “It promotes financial stability and asset-building through education, technical assistance and other support frameworks. “The COVID-19 pandemic has put additional burdens on many Latino families,” Rubio added. “With the help of the Alabama Power Foundation, we hope to continue to work with families and businesses to help them get through these very tough times while paving the way for a more promising future.”

Founded in 1999, HICA is a community development and advocacy organization supported by the United Way of Central Alabama. HICA champions economic equality, civic engagement and social justice for Latino and immigrant families in Alabama through a variety of programs and services. HICA’s Community Economic Development Program, which the foundation grant will support, provides a variety of services — from financial literacy workshops to business planning and development — tailored to help Latino families build financial stability. The Alabama Power Foundation has been a longtime supporter of HICA and its many activities supporting the Hispanic community. Among those is the annual celebration of Hispanic culture, Fiesta, which takes place in Birmingham in the fall. Alabama Power employees also serve as volunteer leaders with the organization. Deyse

Lopez and Lauren Salas Lambiase are Alabama Power employees of Hispanic heritage who work in the company’s Economic and Community Development Department. Both serve on the HICA junior board. Other Alabama Power employees have volunteered over the years in support of other HICA programs and events. “The Alabama Power Foundation is proud to support HICA through this latest grant and to support the many programs and services HICA provides to help our Latino neighbors, businesses and entrepreneurs,” said Tequila Smith, Alabama Power Foundation president. “The Hispanic community is an important part of Alabama’s diverse and rich tapestry of cultures,” she said. “Through HICA’s efforts and the work of many others, we see a promising future of growth and vitality for the Latino community in Alabama.” – Submitted by Alabama NewsCenter.


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A15

Schoolhouse Have a schoolhouse announcement? Email Ingrid Schnader at ischnader@starnespublishing.com to be considered for inclusion in an upcoming issue. John Carroll Catholic High School senior Amanda Hall signs a letter of intent to play collegiate soccer at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Photo courtesy of Alyssa Weisberg.

Reba Hudson, Casey Piola and Robert Perkins stand with Superintendent Justin Hefner and Board of Education members after being recognized for receiving certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Photo courtesy of Merrick Wilson.

Board recognizes new NBC teachers By INGRID SCHNADER The Homewood Board of Education on Jan. 19 recognized three educators for receiving certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The teachers were: Reba Hudson, the assistant principal at Homewood Middle School who has also served as a sixth grade math and science teacher; Robert Perkins, an English teacher at Homewood High School; and Casey Piola, a social studies teacher at Homewood High School, all received their certifications. They join 42 other educators who have received that certification. “We are so proud of our National Boards program in Homewood,” said Patrick Chappell, the director of instruction at Homewood City Schools, at the board meeting. “We were

recognized a couple of years ago for having one of the larger percentages of national board teacher certification in the country, not just in Alabama.” The certification process is prestigious and requires hard work, he said. It has a multiple choice portion and three portfolio entries. The portfolio entries force applicants to reflect on their methods and measure their effectiveness. Also at the Jan. 19 meeting, the school board recognized Teachers of the Year: Detra Gilliam from Edgewood Elementary; Jenna Campbell from Hall-Kent Elementary; Alli Phelps from Shades Cahaba Elementary; Hudson from Homewood Middle School; and Melissa Dameron-Vines from Homewood High School. The next board meeting will be 6 p.m. Feb. 16. Visit homewood.k12.al.us/page/4418 for instructions to join the meeting online.

John Carroll soccer player Amanda Hall signs with Blazers John Carroll Catholic High School is proud to announce that senior Amanda Hall has signed to play collegiate soccer at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Hall is a five-year soccer letter winner at John Carroll and helped lead the Cavaliers to an Alabama High School Athletics Association 6A state championship in 2018 and an AHSAA 5A state semifinal appearance in 2019. Additionally, Hall was on the 2020 team that was ranked number one in Class 4A-5A before the season was shortened due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She has been named the team captain for the Cavaliers 2021 season. Hall was selected to the 2018 Coaches AllState 6A first team and the 2018 Birmingham Metro A-Division first team. She was the only underclassman included on these elite rosters. Additional accolades include: the 2019 Coaches All-State 5A team, the 2019 Coaches

Super All-State team honorable mention, the Birmingham Metro A-Division first team, the 2020 Alabama High School Athletic Directors and Coaches Association North All-Star team, and the 2020 Coaches All-State first team. In addition to her soccer career at John Carroll, Amanda was a member of the Vestavia Hills Soccer Club, Attack 02 Black, from 2014 to 2018. The team won the Alabama State Cup in 2014, 2015 and 2016 and won the Disney Soccer Showcase in 2017. In 2019 and 2020, Amanda has competed with the Alabama FC in the Elite Clubs National League. Amanda is also a member of the John Carroll girls basketball team, Mu Alpha Theta, the National Honor Society, SportsLeader and Campus Ministry. She is the daughter of Matt and Amy Hall and lives in Maylene. – Submitted by Alyssa Weisberg.

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The Homewood Star

A16 • February 2021 Homewood City Schools recently named Reba Hudson as an assistant principal at Homewood Middle School. Photo courtesy of Merrick Wilson.

Clockwise, from left: Edgewood winner Sophie Abouarraj. HallKent winner Ender Wiget. Shades Cahaba winner George Wessel. HMS winners Austin Drake and Hayes DeCoudres. Photos courtesy of Merrick Wilson.

HCS spelling winners announced

Homewood names middle school assistant principal Homewood City Schools recently announced Reba Hudson will be an assistant principal at Homewood Middle School. While at HMS, Hudson has served as a sixth grade math and science teacher and the seventh grade girls basketball coach. Hudson has worked in education for 13 years. She is certified by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and holds a Google I and II certificate. This year, Hudson was selected as HMS’ Teacher of the Year. She earned her bachelor’s degree in education from Birmingham-Southern College, where she was also named BSC’s Female Athlete of the Year. In 2014, Hudson was a 2014 BSC Hall of Fame inductee. She went on to receive her master’s degree from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and completed her educational leadership degree from the University of West Alabama. “Homewood City Schools is proud to have Reba Hudson’s continued leadership in the Homewood community,” the school system said in a release. – Submitted by Merrick Wilson.

Homewood City Schools officials say they are proud of all of their spelling bee participants for their hard work this year. The following school spelling bee winners will represent their schools in the district spelling bee:

EDGEWOOD ELEMENTARY

► Winner: Sophie Abouarraj, fourth grade ► Runner-up: Margot Smith, fifth grade

HALL-KENT ELEMENTARY

► Winner: Ender Wiget, third grade

► Runner-up: fifth grade

Nolan

Isley,

SHADES CAHABA ELEMENTARY

► Winner: George Wessel, fourth grade ► Runner-up: Lily Grace Strong, third grade

HOMEWOOD MIDDLE

► Winner: Austin Drake, eighth grade ► Runner-up: Hayes DeCoudres, seventh grade – Submitted by Merrick Wilson.

OLS students spread Christmas cheer through the spirit of giving The true meaning of Christmas was spread with joy through the spirit of giving at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic School. The school community each year lives out its mission statement of generously sharing its time, talents and treasures during the holiday season to help others not only locally, but across the world as well. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has presented challenges for students to participate in individual class service projects, the school has found ways for the children to lend a hand to help those less fortunate.

This holiday season started with the “Box of Joy Christmas” project, which is a Catholic Christmas ministry facilitated globally by Cross Catholic Outreach. The gifts the students donated are delivered in other parts of the world and provide basic needed items and toys for extremely poor children. In addition, the students also wrote letters of encouragement to health care workers at local hospitals, thanking them for their tireless work and dedication during this pandemic. They understand the

We’re here to help. We’re here to help during difficult times. Contact us at: • AlabamaPower.com/HeretoHelp • 1-800-245-2244 or 1-888-430-5787 for businesses • At a local business office We offer payment options for those struggling to pay their bills. Let’s work together on a solution. APC-H2H 01/2021

challenges these workers face and wanted to send a cheerful message of appreciation. The largest service project in which the children participated was the collection of items for Food for Our Journey, a faithbased initiative that utilizes a food truck to deliver food to the hungry in the Birmingham area. Each class brought specific items to provide a variety of foods and supplies to the organization so that Christmas food boxes could be distributed to the homeless in the Birmingham area. – Submitted by Mary Stephens Pugh.


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A17

Sports

Patriots growing in challenging season Homewood’s Louie Nanni (1) passes the ball as he’s guarded by McAdory’s Dee Fuller (3) during a Dec. 7 game at Homewood High School. The Patriots have six juniors on this year’s squad, and players such as Nanni are showing vast improvement. Photo by Erin Nelson.

By KYLE PARMLEY It would have been easy for the Homewood High School boys basketball team to throw in the proverbial towel this season. The Patriots have had to deal with plenty of challenges, the protocols necessitated by COVID-19 and the team’s youth chief among them. In a vacuum, it’s difficult to contend with each of those. In combination, it has proven a tall task. There are no seniors on this Homewood basketball team, no built-in leaders to guide the team through the uncharted waters of playing sports amid a pandemic. There was also hardly any returning varsity experience to this year’s team outside of Woods Ray and Carter Vail, who both contributed as freshmen a season ago. But head coach Tim Shepler has been inspired by what he has seen from his young team and its willingness to continue pushing forward. “They’re battling and trying and getting better and fighting,” he said. The proof of improvement is in some of the team’s final results. While Homewood is not a program built on moral victories — the Patriots won the state title just five years ago — there is something to be said for a team that lost to Class 7A powers Spain Park and Vestavia Hills early in the season by convincing margins. The Patriots have since played those teams again and shrunk

those margins of defeat significantly. The truth is that Homewood has struggled on the offensive end for much of the season but managed its way to a 7-11 record through Jan. 19. Shepler believes the record would be closer to the .500 mark had some games not been canceled over the

first half of the season. “They’re learning how to compete,” Shepler said. “Our goal is: Can we turn a corner and turn those close losses into wins and get over the hump? That’s kind of where this group is.” The Patriots have six juniors on this year’s squad, with Donte’

Bacchus as the team’s leading scorer and guys such as Louie Nanni showing vast improvement as well. Christian Thompson is someone Shepler said is representative of the whole team, in that he is a player only learning and scratching the surface of what he can be in the future. Thompson is

the Patriots’ leading rebounder and becoming more of a valuable post presence with each game. As the Patriots head into postseason play, Shepler believes that on the right day, his team has what it takes to advance out of the area tournament as one of the top two teams. Mountain Brook is likely the favorite, but none has a clear edge over the other between Homewood, Chelsea and Briarwood. “I’m really proud of them, but they’ve got to continue to learn how to compete and battle and believe in each other and grow as a team,” he said.

REMEMBERING ‘GRANDY’

On behalf of the Homewood High School basketball program, boys head coach Tim Shepler wanted to honor and recognize David Clark, a longtime supporter of Homewood athletics. Clark, referred to as “Grandy,” passed away Dec. 23 at the age of 87. Clark hosted the Homewood boys basketball team on its preseason retreats every year with open arms and was a strong advocate for the Patriots’ program. Four of his grandsons were associated with the Homewood football and basketball programs as well. “Grandy has been a great friend of Homewood athletics and in particular Homewood basketball,” Shepler said. “He was an amazing person, an amazing believer and always opened up his house.”


A18 • February 2021

The Homewood Star

Homewood’s Brinley Cassell (2) dribbles the ball as she looks to make a play in a game against McAdory on Dec. 7 at Homewood High School. Photos by Erin Nelson.

SNAPSHOTS: HOMEWOOD HIGH BASKETBALL

Above: Homewood’s Brian Condon (10) shoots a layup as he’s guarded by McAdory’s Eli Berry (15) in a Dec. 7 game at Homewood High School.

Above: Homewood’s Christian Thompson (34) shoots a layup while being guarded by McAdory’s Triston Gilmore (32). Right: Homewood’s Brian Condon (10) dribbles the ball while being guarded by McAdory’s Josh Wilson (4).

Above: Homewood’s Caidyn Cannon (10) dribbles the ball toward the goal. Left: Homewood’s Anna Grace Gibbons (15) shoots a 3-pointer in the Patriots’ game against McAdory.


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A19

Varsity Sports Calendar

Do you run a local business?

BASKETBALL Feb. 1: Girls @ John Carroll. 7 p.m. Feb. 2: Boys @ Hewitt-Trussville. 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8-13: Area tournaments. TBD.

So do we.

Feb. 15-16: Sub-regionals. TBD. Feb. 18-25: Regionals. TBD.

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BASEBALL Feb. 11: Doubleheader @ Pelham. 4 p.m. Feb. 15: Doubleheader @ Minor. Noon. Feb. 18: Doubleheader vs. McAdory. 4 p.m. Feb. 23: vs. Thompson. 4 p.m. Feb. 25: Doubleheader vs. Pelham. 4 p.m.

Shootout. TBD. Feb. 5: Girls @ Huntsville. 6 p.m.

SOFTBALL

Feb. 9: Girls vs. Shades Valley. 6:30 p.m.

Feb. 11: vs. Thompson. 4:30 p.m.

Feb. 15: Girls @ Shades Valley. 5 p.m.

Feb. 16: @ Clay-Chalkville. 4:30 p.m.

Feb. 16: vs. Altamont. Boys at 6 p.m.; girls at 7:30 p.m.

Feb. 18: @ John Carroll. 4:30 p.m. Feb. 23: vs. John Carroll. 4:30 p.m. Feb. 25: vs. Shades Valley. 4:30 p.m.

SOCCER Feb. 5-6: Boys at Lakeshore

Feb. 18: Boys vs. John Carroll. 6:30 p.m. Feb. 19: Girls @ John Carroll. 5 p.m. Feb. 23: Boys vs. Hewitt-Trussville. 7 p.m. Feb. 26: vs. Briarwood. Girls at 5 p.m.; boys at 7 p.m.

(205) 417-1321 | byarswright.com


The Homewood Star

A20 • February 2021

Above: A crane lowers a metal sculpture titled “The Outpouring” by Illinois-based sculptor Salem Barker as it is installed Dec. 18 in front of the new Valley Hotel in downtown Homewood. Below: Christina Barker and her three children, Promise, 2, Ezra, 6, and Isaiah, 8, watch the installation from the balcony of the Valley Hotel. Photos by Erin Nelson.

RAISING ‘THE OUTPOURING’

David Green, left, and Robin Savage look at images on the cellphone of Illinois-based sculptor Salem Barker, right, of the progress of the metal sculpture.

Workers gaze up at the metal sculpture.


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A21

NEW YEAR, NEW SPACE!

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The Homewood Star

A22 • February 2021

Shelby Lee makes a holiday flower arrangement at Blakelee’s Bouquets in Homewood. Lee and her husband, Edward, opened the flower shop at 931 Oxmoor Road in early November. Photo by Erin Nelson.

FLOWER

CONTINUED from page A1 program for drug use, he wanted a life change, Edward said. “I was working for my aunt and was just going to deliver part time to kind of reacquaint myself with the world, come up with a new routine and be around decent people,” he said. Shelby likes to get to know her coworkers, and she said she’s very nosy. But when Edward’s aunt introduced him to Shelby during work, she noticed Edward was standoffish. “We had a big window that I would stand behind, and sometimes I would scare our drivers,” Shelby said. “I remember he walked by, and I banged on the window, and he jumped. And then he just looked at me like he hated me. It was awful.” Shelby tells the story while laughing, but at the time, Shelby said she remembers thinking “Oh no, he hates me.” Edward said he was keeping to himself back then because he didn’t know how long he was going to be there. “It was just going to be a stopgap, but I actually really enjoyed it,” he said. “I enjoyed the people, and I saw what she likes in it.” The couple started dating. As they fell in love with each other, they also fell in love with the flower shop. “My favorite thing is the people who come in to order flowers and the reasons they come in,” Shelby said. “Sometimes people will forget and come at the last minute, and it’s funny to hear about. “We actually had someone come in a couple of days ago. He scared me — he came in running because it was his anniversary, and he said he forgot. He had to get it right then. His wife was basically on her way home.” Edward laughed and said, “He basically busted in and said, ‘I’ve got a problem.’ And usually when someone busts in and says they’ve got a problem, you think it’s with you.” Some of Edward’s other favorite memories are when his niece, Blakelee Imgram, comes into the shop. Blakelee loves pink flowers, she said, and she doesn’t let her young age stop her from arranging her own flower bouquets.

At the end of 2019, just as Edward was making plans to propose to Shelby, another opportunity also came up: an opportunity to buy the flower shop from his aunt. In January 2020, Edward, Shelby and Edward’s sister bought the store, and they continued operating it in Tuscaloosa for about seven months. However, they noticed most of their deliveries were in Birmingham, and in December they moved to Homewood. On Jan. 2, one year into owning Blakelee’s Bouquets together, Edward and Shelby celebrated their wedding day. They did their floral arrangements themselves. Despite having to change their business model in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic, both Shelby and Edward say 2020 was one of their best years yet. “We’ve done a whole lot of personal growing,” Edward said. “And we got to spend an entire year engaged, and that was fun. We got to go through all four seasons together. It’s

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been good for us.” Edward and Shelby plan to spend their first Valentine’s Day as a married couple a bit differently than other couples. They’re typically too busy to celebrate Valentine’s Day on Feb. 14 or even during that week — Valentine’s Day is the busiest season of the year for them. They’ll probably go on a trip, they said. Shelby said she loves a good road trip with

guys, always,” Edward said. ► Give the florist a call. “If you give your local florist a call, they will help you a thousand times more than if you order online,” Edward said. “Tell them what you want, and they’ll treat you good.”

stops along the way at antique stores. Beyond that, the couple have big plans for the future. Edward said they hope to expand and hope the COVID-19 vaccine works so they can start to see people’s faces. “It’d be really nice to look people in the face again and shake hands,” he said. “We really want to build a relationship with the community,” Shelby said.

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TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • A23

Left: Danny Whitsett holds the crozier he created for the Rev. Glenda Curry. “In particular, I love the carving of the pilgrim’s shell because it reflects my understanding of the spiritual life,” Curry said. Photo courtesy of Danny Whitsett. Right: The leather case for Bishop Glenda Curry’s crozier, made by Becky Stayner. Photo courtesy of Becky Stayner.

CROZIER

CONTINUED from page A1 how to do this.” He started his research and noticed that some croziers were very ornate, but Curry told Whitsett she just wanted a simple shepherd’s hook. Whitsett decided he would make it out of wood from places that meant a lot to Curry. The first place he thought about was Camp McDowell — a camp located outside of Jasper that is a ministry of the Episcopal churches in the Diocese of Alabama. He called his friend who works there and asked if there was any old wood, maybe from a piece of an altar or a cross. Then they thought about a rocking chair. “Everyone, when they go to Camp McDowell, they rock in these rocking chairs,” Whitsett said. “So there are some really old ones, so I went and got a piece of that.” Then he thought about Curry’s previous

church, which was the Episcopal Church of the Epiphany in Leeds. This church didn’t have much old wood for Whitsett to use, he said, because it had recently moved into a new building. “But they said, ‘Well, in this old building, we have this very generic, thick kind of oak shelf,’” Whitsett said. “And I said, ‘You know what? I’ll figure out how to make this work.’ So I got that.” A person from a church in Birmingham, St. Mary’s On the Highlands Episcopal Church, reached out to Whitsett and knew he was working on Curry’s crozier. The church was under construction and was getting rid of a long, wooden handrail. So Whitsett took that as well. Last, Whitsett wanted a piece of All Saints Episcopal, where Curry was a rector until stepping into her role as the bishop. Whitsett knew the church had a dogwood tree on which children loved to climb. The church had to tear down the tree, so he grabbed a piece of that

wood, too. “So I got all of these pieces, and I’ll tell you, I did not know how to really do it,” he said. “I had turned wood before, but not a lot.” Whitsett went to a friend who is a cabinet woodworker, Aaron Lane. Lane gave Whitsett blank pieces of wood and taught him how to carve. He learned how to turn down pieces of wood he’d collected from Camp McDowell, St. Mary’s and the Epiphany church, and he made them each the same thickness. This made up the majority of the crozier. For the hook of the crozier, Whitsett reached out to another friend in woodworking, Cliff Spencer. Spencer suggested they cut the dogwood into a thick block and then cut the shepherd’s hook from that block. Whitsett also carved a pilgrim shell on the shepherd’s hook. As a final finishing touch, Becky Stayner from Biscuit Leather Company made a leather case for the crozier. Whitsett said the entire process was fun.

“It was a nice departure from what I’d been doing day in and day out,” he said. “And knowing what I was making, knowing that this was going to be in the bishop’s hand everywhere she goes. Every church she goes to, she walks in and she’s dressed up in her bishop’s miter, which is her hat, and she’s holding this staff.” People have told Whitsett that whenever Curry visits a church — which isn’t often right now because of the COVID-19 pandemic — Curry will tell the story of how Whitsett made the crozier and gathered wood from each place. Curry said she chose Whitsett to make the crozier, despite him not knowing what a crozier was at first, because she knows Whitsett is a great artist who knows her well. “What I most like about it is the careful, meaningful and loving way it was created to represent my ministry and the people who I served,” Curry said. “In particular, I love the carving of the pilgrim’s shell because it reflects my understanding of the spiritual life.”

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Homewood

Parks & Recreation

Homewood Community Center Fitness Center & Track Open with one hour fitness sessions. Signup in advance encouraged to guarantee a spot. Fitness Center 20 patrons per session; Track 10 patrons per session. For more information please visit: www.homewoodparks.com/fitness

Central Barre Barre Fitness classes now at Homewood Community Center Class Times & Location Tuesday: 6:15am – 7:15am Saturday: 8:15am – 9:15am All classes in Fitness Studio 2 @ Homewood Community Center

Dance Trance Tues & Thurs 5:45pm-6:45pm Mon, Wed & Sat 9:30am-10:30am Dance Trance is a highcardio, high-energy dance fitness experience that leaves participants soaking wet!  It is a non-stop workout that feels more like a party than an exercise class. www.dancetrancefitness.com

YoLimber

Fast Track Line Dance

Vinyasa yoga classes in an energetic environment using upbeat music. All levels welcome. Tuesday 8:00am-9:00am Wednesday 12:00pm-1:00pm Friday 9:30am10:30am Contact Marla: 205-223-8564 mac@yolimber.com

We learn the current and classic intermediate-advanced line dances.  This class is not for beginners. Saturday 10:00am-12:00pm For more information: Jackie Tally jgtally@aol.com (or) Helen Woods aquafool@aol.com

North Star Martial Arts

Confi.Dance

North Star Martial Arts primary focus is to make a life lasting impact on our students, and their families. Classes range from beginners to adults. For detailed class listings and times please visit the park’s website or www.northstarkarate.com. 205-966-4244 masterjoe@northstarkarate.com

Confi.Dance is a dance class in a small group setting to teach you the secrets of looking good on the dance floor and having more fun than you thought possible. Class Meets:  Wednesday 3:00pm – 4:00pm at Homewood Community Center For more information: Jackie Tally jgtally@aol.com

Belly Dancing with Aziza

Bench Aerobics Step & Line Dance

Class Fee: $60 cash only Contact Aziza: 205-879-0701 azizaofbirmingham@att.net www.azizaofbirmingham.com Learn the ancient art of Middle Eastern belly dance with Aziza, over 40 years of experience in performance and instruction. Each session is 5-weeks long Classes Resume in 2021

Class Times & Location Tuesday: 4:15pm – 5:15pm (Step Aerobics) Thursday: 4:15pm – 5:15pm (Cardio Line Dance) All classes in Fitness Studio 2 @ Homewood Community Center Cost: $15/month or $3/drop-in (1st class FREE) For more information contact Rosa at 205-253-9344 or benchaerobics@bellsouth.net

Follow us for athletics, community centers programming and event updates @homewood.parks

@homewood_parks

@homewoodparks


SECTION

B

Mending kids’

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FEBRUARY 2021

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Medical Guide Special Advertising Section

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B2 • February 2021

2021 Spring Medical Guide

The Homewood Star

Special Advertising Section

Shades Creek Dental 1045 Broadway Park, Suite 101, Homewood, AL 35209

205-417-2750

shadescreekdental.com

Q: Tell us a little about Shades Creek Dental. A: We are locally owned and operated. Dr. Ron MacBeth lives in Homewood with his wife and two daughters. We love this community and are happy to give back and help those we call our friends. Q: What is a visit to your practice like? A: As a general dentistry practice, we provide services across the board from routine cleaning all the way to full smile makeovers. However, what makes us truly unique is our dental experience. We have amazing team members who all appreciate how uncomfortable the experience can be, and we have analyzed every aspect of the dental process to make it as enjoyable as possible. From the latest technology and techniques to the little things like personalized follow-up phone calls, we truly care and want to establish trust with our patients. Dr. MacBeth even gives all his patients his personal number in case of an emergency. Q: What kind of feedback do you get from your patients? A: We would encourage our readers to look at our over 200 five-star reviews on Google to see what others have to say. We want people to feel comfortable with who we are before they give us a call to schedule an appointment. Q: What’s your philosophy for what you do? A: There is no one-size-fits-all to dentistry. We provide the highest quality dental care that is in line with our patients’ goals and vision for their teeth. For some this is routine cleanings with a focus on healthy, functioning teeth for eating. For others, this means cosmetic veneers and a full smile makeover. Q: Tell us a little bit about your history. When did you open? A: We opened in March 2018 after over a year of planning. We started with only two dental chairs and a small team that has quickly expanded to four dental chairs with as many team members. At this point we are happy with the current size of our practice because it allows for the individual attention our patients deserve while also allowing us to accept new patients into the practice.

Dr. Ron Alyn MacBeth

Q: Dr. MacBeth, tell us a little bit about your background. A: I attended Birmingham-Southern College where I graduated with a biology degree. I then went to the UAB School of Dentistry for my dental training. I have since continued my educational experience with Spear Education, which provides dental continuing education for striving dentists who are dedicated to the pursuit of clinical excellence in dentistry. Q: What does success look like to you? A: The biggest success of our practice is being able to give back to the community in which we serve. We love sponsoring all three elementary school festivals, the summer reading program at the Homewood Library, the Grace House Pumpkin Festival and the West Homewood Neighborhood Association. We believe that our success is tied to the success of the community that we live in, and we are proud to work with so many great people. And at our practice, the highest compliment is when someone comes in and then refers their friends and family. Q: Can you do most procedures there, or do you give referrals to specialists? A: While we are a general dentist, we

try to keep as many dental procedures at our clinic as we can to make the experience as convenient as possible. Those range from simple cleaning and fillings to cosmetic veneers and minor surgical procedures. However, with all of the different procedures available today, it is impossible to be the master of everything. Therefore, we have established a network of other specialists

who offer experiences similar to ours to make sure our patients always get a comfortable experience. Q: What precautions are you taking to prevent the spread of COVID-19? A: Our office follows infection control recommendations made by the American Dental Association, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and the Occupational

Safety and Health Administration. We follow the activities so we are up to date on any new rulings or guidance that may be issued to make sure that we practice at the highest level of patient safety. We screen our patients, take their temperature and take steps to limit the amount of people in the office at any given time. We also encourage hand washing and social distancing.


TheHomewoodStar.com

2021 Spring Medical Guide

February 2021 • B3

Special Advertising Section

EXPERIENCE THE DI FFERENCE of Shades Creek Dental Learn more about us and how to keep your teeth heathy by visiting

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2020

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CALL TODAY (205) 417-2750

1045 Broadway Park, Suite 101 Homewood, Al 35209

Hear what ma kes us different directly from our patients Read our reviews on Google

Photo by Sarah Sexton Photography


B4 • February 2021

2021 Spring Medical Guide

The Homewood Star

Special Advertising Section

TrustCare Urgent Care 1337 Montclair Road, Birmingham, AL 35210

205-203-8226

708 Montgomery Highway, Vestavia Hills, AL 35216

Q: Please describe TrustCare Urgent Care’s area of expertise. A: TrustCare — the No. 1 rated walk-in urgent care clinic in Mississippi — is now open in Birmingham. With more than 3,000 online reviews, averaging 4.9 out of 5 stars, we are most often praised for timeliness of care, compassion of the providers and cleanliness of the facilities. Our passion for high quality patient care and exceptional customer service has now been extended to online health visits and primary care. Our board-certified local physicians and highly skilled and certified nurse practitioners treat many illnesses and injuries. Q: What type of services and/or products do you offer? A: We offer treatment for abdominal and stomach pain, allergic reactions, asthma, colds, coughs, sore throats, eye and ear infections, flu, insect and animal bites, joint pain, nausea, scrapes and abrasions, sinus infections and work-related injuries. In addition to our walk-in urgent care, we offer Direct Primary Care, which is an especially good option for those who have lost their insurance or have high deductible insurance. Direct Primary Care (DPC) is a modern health care model that makes managing your health care so much easier and more affordable. Instead of traditional care with co-pay, deductible and unexpected medical bills, DPC is built on a monthly subscription membership (much like a gym membership). You receive extended time with Dr. David Hardin, at our Vestavia Hills location, including unlimited clinic visits by appointment. DPC includes virtual care so you can access your doctor by phone, text or video chat. TrustCare offers DPC as TrustCare Prime, and it starts at $69 per month. If you would like more information about TrustCare Prime, visit

trustcarehealth.com

205-203-8282

our website or call 205-303-1723. Q: How long have you been in business or practicing? A: TrustCare has been in operation in Mississippi since 2012. We expanded to Birmingham in 2020. Our Vestavia location opened in January 2021. Our next location in Cahaba Heights will open this spring. Q: What wants or problems does TrustCare provide a solution to? A: COVID-19 evaluation and testing has become our most requested service during the pandemic. We offer a rapid swab test with same-day results. We also have a PCR test suitable for travel to many places. Those results can take several days. Because we are walk-in, patients can come in for COVID-19 testing whenever they feel they need it. Q: What is your benchmark for success?  A: Our goal is to exceed the patient’s expectations. From the convenient check-in through the entire exam process, TrustCare is committed to helping you experience our trademark guarantee that you will Feel Better Faster™. Q: What is your approach or philosophy to customer service? A: Although TrustCare is a health care company providing much needed medical care in a quick-pace environment, customer service is at the heart of what we do. People want to get well, but they also want to feel like their provider cares about their needs and well-being. That is what TrustCare does best. Q: Could you share a TrustCare success story?

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A: Notes like this one from many of our patients make us thankful we can serve the community: “We had a wonderful experience here! Despite the demand for COVID testing, TrustCare has really risen to the occasion and provides a safe environment where they have a great process for getting you in and tested. After you sign in, they let you wait in your car and fill out your information on your phone. Then they text you when it’s time to come into your room. I went for a COVID test and treatment for a sinus infection and would highly recommend. After such a positive, friendly and helpful experience, I will be making this my primary doctor’s office.” — L. West, Birmingham. Q: Spring and warmer weather will be right around the corner. What seasonal advice or tips would you like to share with potential patients? A: Allergies will be even harder to navigate due to concerns it could be COVID-19 symptoms. We offer allergy testing and a simple allergy treatment. Sublingual immunotherapy, or allergy drops, is a safe, convenient way to treat the cause of your allergies and help you build longterm tolerance to the things that once made you miserable. Allergy drops are custom to each patient based on testing, history and exam. Drops can be used safely for a broad range of people including infants and children, those with food allergies, people with chronic health conditions such as asthma, sinusitis and those with multiple allergies. Q: What do you most want potential patients to know about TrustCare? A: Our locations are open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 1-7 p.m.


TheHomewoodStar.com

2021 Spring Medical Guide

Special Advertising Section

February 2021 • B5

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B6 • February 2021

2021 Spring Medical Guide

Special Advertising Section

The Homewood Star

Before After

1651 Independence Court, Homewood, AL 35209

Q: What is Morpheus8? A: Morpheus8 is an advanced radio frequency microneedling device. It works by tightening and smoothing the skin. The tiny needles penetrate deep into the skin and fat, and then the radiofrequency waves work between the needles to stimulate collagen in the skin. This “morphs” the aging face or body into a more desired smooth and sleek appearance for all skin tones. This treatment is ideal for areas with loss of elasticity such as the neck, jaw and tummy, but it can also be used to treat stretchmarks and acne scarring. Q: Does Morpheus8 really work? A: Yes! We researched all of the different radiofrequency devices and chose Morpheus8 specifically because we believe it is the best device to offer our patients to achieve tightening with little downtime, leading to a more youthful appearance. Q: Is Morpheus8 permanent? A: The tightening effect is lasting, though aging continues. Therefore, additional treatments may be desired in the future for maintenance. Visible results can be seen within a few days, but typically after three weeks the most noticeable results appear. Improvements

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continue up to three months after treatment. Continuing at-home care with physician-grade skin care can also improve results. Q: How many Morpheus8 treatments do you need? A: We recommend a series of three for most areas, though additional treatments may be needed especially for certain skin concerns, such as when treating scar tissue. Typically, we suggest patients space treatments one to two months apart.

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to make the treatment more comfortable. The pain associated from Morpheus8 is heat related. Topical numbing is typically enough for pain control, but additional medications can be prescribed if pain is a concern for the patient.

Q: Who would benefit from a Morpheus8 treatment? A: Patients with skin laxity — such as creepy, hanging skin — or patients who desire smoothing can benefit greatly from this radiofrequency needling treatment. Some of our favorite places to treat with Morpheus8 are the jawline, around the eyes and the neck. But the entire face can be enhanced with the rejuvenative effects of the Morpheus8 procedure.

Q: Describe the Morpheus8 treatment procedure. A: After numbing the skin on your face and then cleaning the area, the clinician will choose settings appropriate for the area of the body that we will be treating. The treatments are delivered at different energy levels and depths of penetration. Most treatments include about three passes of the device over the treatment area. Typically, the area will be red after the procedure, which typically resolves over 24 hours. There can sometimes be a few small bruises in the treatment area. The patient needs to avoid sun exposure until the redness dissipates and use a gentle cleanser, a gentle moisturizer and a sunscreen after the procedure.

Q: Is the Morpheus8 treatment painful? A: Although the Morpheus8 treatment can be uncomfortable, we numb your face for about 45 minutes prior to the procedure with topical numbing cream

Q: What areas of the body can be treated with Morpheus8? A: Any body area with laxity and fat can be treated, but the primary areas are the lower face jowls and neck.


TheHomewoodStar.com

2021 Spring Medical Guide

February 2021 • B7

Special Advertising Section

HomeRN info@homerncare.com

Q: What services does HomeRN offer? A: HomeRN is a concierge nursing service that will offer on-call nursing services, adult sitter services, medication management and even an extra level of expertise that can attend physician appointments with you to make sure that all your needs and concerns are being covered and you and your family have a good understanding of your treatment plan. Essentially, we are there to do whatever the family needs to fill the gaps: everything from filling a pill planner every week to facilitating communication between the physician, the family and the patient. Q: Eliza Maxwell, why did you start HomeRN? A: About a year ago I had a family friend who’s father got very sick. As a nurse practitioner who has worked in home health for many years, my friend turned to me for assistance. My friend asked if I would come over and check on her father after he was discharged from the hospital. What I thought would be a 30-minute visit turned into a four-hour session. His wife, who had no medical experience, was now the primary caregiver of someone who had a lot of new

medication and new medical equipment that she did not know how to administer or utilize. I realized there was a need for someone to fill the gap in care between when someone leaves the hospital and their first follow-up visit. For many patients, there needs to be someone on call who can answer any questions that may come up. Q: What type of knowledge and expertise do you provide for patients? A: I will be working as a nurse in this role, but I will be bringing all the knowledge and experience of a nurse practitioner. I will see every patient and begin with a primary assessment, no matter if they just had surgery or a small change in their condition. Q: Does the medical knowledge of your staff set HomeRN apart? A: Absolutely. Unlike many other services, every member of our staff is medically trained. Many of our sitters are nurses, nursing students or Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs). Q: How has the pandemic affected the demand for home services like your own? A: I think because of the pandemic, families are leery

205-644-2906

homerncare.com

of assisted living facilities and nursing homes because of the restrictions that have been placed on things like visitation. With HomeRN, the family can have a nurse provide these services in the home, without those restrictions. Q: Does HomeRN offer a more personalized experience than larger agencies? A: Yes. We offer more of a concierge service. Rather than just a big home health service coming into your home, you can work with people who live in this community and have that connection with the community like I do. That makes a huge difference when you are making the choice to trust someone in your home. Q: What impact does this service have on the overall health and well-being of the patients that you work with? A: Most of the people who are calling on us and need our services are patients who are sick, who have had a change in status or have recently undergone surgery. Often they are feeling very vulnerable at the stage where we come in, and our goal is to provide comfort, education and reassurance to the family as well as care for the patient.

Eliza Maxwell

homeRN is hiring Nursing Students who have a passion for care. Working as an in-home caregiver offers great experience with flexible hours to work around your schedule, and will help students build relationships and opportunities for the future and boost confidence working one-onone with patients in your care.

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B8 • February 2021

2021 Spring Medical Guide

Special Advertising Section

The Homewood Star

Gunn Dermatology 32 Church St., Mountain Brook, AL 35213

205-415-7536

gunndermatology.com

Dr. Holly Gunn is a board-certified dermatologist. She opened her practice in August in Mountain Brook, where she lives with her husband Stephen and their four daughters.

want. I want to be a helper who improves patients’ lives. Q: Do you have a success story? A: We have numerous great patients we’ve treated with skin cancers and major skin infections. We’ve also treated patients with cosmetic distractions who felt they had not been able to adequate treatment until coming to Gunn Dermatology.

Q: What are your areas of expertise? A: We’re experts on all skin-related ailments and conditions, as well as skin rejuvenation, and we treat all generations — from babies to grandparents. I’m skilled in medical, pediatric and surgical dermatology and have a special interest in cosmetic dermatology.

Q: How are you and your staff complying with COVID-19 safety measures? A: We follow all of the CDC guidelines and more.

Q: What problems can you solve for patients? A: I do everything that makes the skin feel and look better and become healthier. I also help patients who have disfiguring scars due to acne, skin-cancer removal or genetic conditions. Q: When did you realize you wanted to be a doctor? A: From the age of 5 in Mobile, I told my parents I wanted to help people. The doctors I looked up to as a child were in mom-and-pop offices helping people feel better. This is living out my dream. Q: What’s your educational background? A: I earned a B.S. in biochemistry from the University of Maryland in 2003 and completed medical school at the University of South Alabama in 2007. I completed an internal medicine internship, research fellowship and dermatology residency at Pennsylvania State University Hershey Medical Center. I earned a

Q: Warmer weather is coming soon. What seasonal tips would you share with patients? A: Wear sunscreen! I’m passionate about skin cancer prevention and also warn people about sun-tanning beds.

Holly Gunn, MD, and Lyndsey Stutts, DNP master’s degree in public health sciences at Penn State. Q: What’s your professional background? A: I was medical director for a dermatology department at a large hospital in Cincinnati prior to becoming an assistant professor of dermatology at UAB and medical director of the UAB Dermatology Cosmetic and Laser Clinic.

I’ve also worked in private practice. Q: What’s your benchmark for success? A: Happy patients who have healthier skin. I’ve had so many patients improve their lives by becoming more confident after cosmetic treatments or getting their skin condition under control. Some of these patients are given the confidence to change careers or get a job they really

Q: What’s your philosophy of customer service? A: You’re an individual with unique needs. We love to get to know our patients and give them exactly what they need and nothing more. Q: What sort of atmosphere does your practice have? A: I want Gunn Dermatology to have a warm, friendly feeling. Q: What do you want potential patients to know? A: We are here for them and have appointments available for most days.

New Year. New You. Take advantage of Vivace or Full-face resurfacing for $600 off one service or do both treatments and receive $1500 off! Start the new year off with tighter skin with Dr. Gunn’s two favorite aggressive skin tightening and smoothing treatments.

February Special

We will be having a special for Valentine’s Day coming up for Luscious Lips & Lashes! Stay up to date with our specials by following us on our social media pages or by signing up for our email list on www.gunndermatology.com

(205) 415-7536 | gunndermatology.com 32 Church Street, Mountain Brook, Alabama 35213 LIKE & FOLLOW

MEDICAL | PEDIATRIC | SURGICAL | COSMETIC


TheHomewoodStar.com

2021 Spring Medical Guide

Special Advertising Section

February 2021 • B9

Grandview Medical Group – Homewood 3525 Independence Drive, Homewood, AL 35209

Q: Please describe your practice’s area of expertise. A: I am a family medicine physician who can see adolescents to geriatric individuals. Q: What type of services do you offer? A: Routine medical screenings and exams, labs and in-house X-rays. Q: What wants or problems do you provide a solution to? A: Medical health issues. Q: How long have you been practicing? A: Six years. Q: Please describe your educational and experiential background. A: I received my doctorate from Saba University and completed my family medicine residency at St. Vincent’s East. After that, I joined Norwood Clinic until recently joining Grandview. Q: What is your benchmark for success? A: Successful management of an individual’s medical conditions using a team-based approach with treatment regimen.

205-971-2475

grandviewmedicalgroup.com

Q: How have you and your staff adjusted your operations and/or services to comply with COVID-19 safety measures? A: We are now doing telemedicine visits by phone and video in order to avoid unnecessary exposure for everyone. We also offer inoffice visits while maintaining proper distancing, with temperature checks and masks for those individuals who come into the office. Q: Spring and warmer weather will be right around the corner. What, if any, seasonal advice or tips would you like to share with potential patients? A: For now, continue all safety measures that are currently in place until COVID-19 is on the decline. Q: What do you most want potential patients to know about you and your practice? A: We strive to be personable, punctual, and an engaged part of your medical team to help keep everyone in the best health possible. Q: How can I get more information or schedule an appointment? A: Give us a call.

Dr. Gregory Mayberry

13 PRIMARY CARE LOCATIONS. SAME-DAY APPOINTMENTS. 205-971-DOCS.

Grandview Medical Group makes it easier to see a primary care provider in Birmingham – quickly. Just call 205-971-DOCS. Most calls will result in a same-day appointment with a physician or a nurse practitioner at one of our 13 primary care locations. Walk-ins are welcome, too. If you or a family member age five or older needs to see a doctor fast, think Grandview Medical Group. Visit GrandviewMedicalGroup.com or call 205-971-DOCS to schedule your same-day appointment.

Chelsea • Columbiana • Grandview Physicians Plaza • Greystone • Homewood Hoover • Lee Branch • Liberty Park • Springville • Trussville • Vestavia Hills

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Look Forward. 2/10/20 1:57 PM


B10 • February 2021

2021 Spring Medical Guide

Special Advertising Section

The Homewood Star

Green Springs Animal Clinic 434 Carr Ave., Homewood, AL 35209

Q: What kinds of animals will you see? A: We see small, domesticated animals (dogs and cats), but we also see exotics (rabbits, lizards, guinea pigs, etc.) and the occasional chicken!   Q: What kinds of animals do you not see? A: Large animals such as livestock and horses.  Q: What is your background and areas of expertise? A: I am a 1995 graduate of the Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine. My areas of focus are surgery, dermatology and behavioral training.    Q: What made you decide to get into veterinary medicine? A: A commitment to extend proper education to the pet owner as well as provide quality care for lifelong animal wellness.  It is extremely gratifying to be able to assist the recovery of an ailing pet. Pets don’t have the ability to speak for themselves and ask for help, so we as veterinary professionals have to connect with them in every way possible to figure out what they need. Growing up around outdoor sporting dogs that worked so hard to please their trainer/ owner, it warmed me inside to take care of them.

Q: What services do you provide? A: State-of-the-art minimally invasive laser surgery, nutritional and behavioral support, in-house pharmacy, in-house bloodwork laboratory, digital radiography, dental care, grooming, boarding, vaccines, preventive care, end-oflife care and overall wellness.  Q: Do you offer any boarding? A: Yes, we are equipped for short as well as extended stays. We have runs and cages for all sizes and shapes and have a play yard for exercise. Q: What days and hours are you open? A: Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday 8 a.m. to noon; and Sunday 3-5 p.m. for boarding pickup only.  Q: Can you tell me about your staff? A: Our staff is absolutely our greatest asset! Our associates are extremely knowledgeable and effective doctors, but they possess an even greater skill: compassion. That is a virtue you are born with, and no amount of education can offer a caring, compassionate attitude. Our technicians are highly trained and dedicated to serving our clients and making sure they feel 100% confident their pet is receiving the best

205-942-5144

gsaclinic.com

care available. Our face of the practice, the administrative staff, definitely bridges the client to the practitioner in such an effective way. They know every client by name, every pet’s personality and how to make each person that walks in feel at home.    Q: What is the most unusual animal you have treated? A: An orphaned whitetail deer that had a urinary blockage requiring surgery. Q: Do you have any pets of your own? A: We get asked all the time if we have a house full of pets! We only have two: a beautiful, spirited retrieving/working standard poodle, Lulu, who turned 2 years old this month, and a lazy little lovable cat, Edward, who is 4 years old. They bring us a lot of joy!  Q: Why should I choose Green Springs Animal Clinic? A: We are one of the declining numbers of familyowned veterinary clinics in the greater Birmingham area. More practices are being sold to corporate owners each year, which unfortunately has given rise to meeting quotas instead of meeting needs. We want our clients to see the same faces time after time when they walk in. We aim to provide personalized care with every visit.

Dr. Gregg Tucker

Family Owned Since 1965

Green Springs Animal Clinic

Our Full Hospital Services Include: Surgery • In-house Pharmacy • Grooming & Boarding Behavioral Training • Nutritional therapy • Wellness and More!

Your Pets... Our Family! 205-942-5144 | 434 Carr Ave


TheHomewoodStar.com

2021 Spring Medical Guide

February 2021 • B11

Special Advertising Section

Skin Wellness Dermatology 3415 Independence Drive, Suite 200, Birmingham, AL 35209

205-871-7332

skinwellness.com

Q: Dr. Hartman, you and your practice have become known as one of the best cosmetic dermatology centers in the area. Was that your goal when you opened your practice? A: I knew cosmetic dermatology was an area that people would be excited about exploring, but I also knew that I wanted to develop a trusting relationship with my patients. The best way to do that is to provide great medical dermatology care so that when patients are ready to explore the cosmetic side, we don’t have so many barriers to overcome before they will trust us to enhance their appearance. Q: Do you have cosmetic dermatology patients who are not medical patients as well? A: Yes. My practice takes a holistic approach to skincare and establishing a trusting relationship goes both ways. When I first began, I met most of my patients on the medical side of dermatology, and they later became cosmetic patients as well. As my reputation as a cosmetic dermatologist grows and my practice has become more focused on cosmetics, I meet a lot of my patients on the cosmetic side first. Q: What trends do you see emerging in cosmetic dermatology? A: As we have better technology and more tools at our disposal, one trend in my office and among many of my peers is to create more customized and tailored treatment plans for each patient. Instead of addressing one issue, we take a holistic approach. If you don’t, you are never

Dr. Corey Hartman

Q: Do you think that cosmetic dermatology and injectables have become more commonplace? What do you think is contributing to that? A: Cosmetic dermatology has become a more public conversation. I think social media has helped to demystify cosmetic dermatology, and as it enters the mainstream it becomes less of a taboo topic. It has naturally become something that people feel more comfortable sharing. It used to be that nobody would talk about Botox, but now people come with a group of friends to get Botox.

going to truly make the patient happy. We develop longitudinal plans to help our patients have success right now and place them on a preventative path for the future. Even if you are coming to me for Botox, we also have to talk about your skincare regimen, your lifestyle, your diet and your habits. Q: How do you handle cosmetic dermatology consultations?

Dr. Rayna Dyck

A: Cosmetic consultations and visits are less regimented than the medical ones. When people come to me for help, I start by asking what they have noticed that they are not happy with, or what they would like to improve. The patient is always most important to me, and I want to understand what is important to them. My practice is very big on educating our patients and letting them move forward at a pace that is comfortable for them.

Dr. Deborah Youhn

Q: What advice do you have for patients new to cosmetic dermatology? A: Go very slowly and choose someone who you really trust. Cosmetic dermatology is a field of medicine that combines art and science. It’s important to find a doctor who listens to you. As a dermatologist, I always want to be mindful of the patient’s budget, how the product is going to feel on their faces, the downtime and long-term treatment goals. I customize a treatment plan for each patient. All of that information comes from educating and listening to the patient. My best advice is If you don’t feel heard, then you might not want to proceed with that doctor. Q: What interests you most about cosmetic dermatology? A: I love helping people to wake up in the morning feeling confident and their absolute best. My specialty as a dermatologist isn’t always about saving lives, but it is definitely about enhancing people’s lives.

Brittany Rigsby, CRNP

Alison Hayes CRNP

For appointments, call 205.871.7332 or visit us at skinwellness.com HOMEWOOD 3415 Independence Drive, Suite 200, Homewood, AL 35209 | CHELSEA 398 Chesser Drive, Suite 6, Chelsea, AL 35043


B12 • February 2021

2021 Spring Medical Guide

Special Advertising Section

The Homewood Star

Oxmoor Valley Orthodontics 415 W. Oxmoor Road, Birmingham, AL 35209

WaveTech Therapy

2100 SouthBridge Parkway, Suite 260, Birmingham, AL 35209 205-777-3736

wavetechbirmingham.com

Q: What is WaveTech Therapy’s area of expertise? A: WaveTech Therapy uses acoustical (sound wave) therapy to treat erectile dysfunction, neuropathy, chronic pain and more. We use FDA-cleared equipment to deliver sound waves to the treated area, which results in larger, healthier blood vessels, decreased inflammation, reduced plaque and growth of new blood vessels. In addition, the sound waves activate signaling pathways in the body that transmit stem cells, growth factors and other healing substances to the source of the underlying issue. These substances help reverse your unhealthy condition and rejuvenate the affected area for lasting results. Q: What problems does WaveTech Therapy offer solutions to? A: Acoustical wave therapy is a non-invasive treatment option for many conditions. The therapy does not require

medication, needles or adjustments and is pain-free. Because it is non-invasive, there is no downtime from daily activities. Another advantage to acoustical wave therapy is that it can lead to true healing of the area treated rather than a temporary fix. The two quality-of-life issues we help improve are sexual health and pain relief. Q: What is your approach to customer service? A: We strive to offer a comfortable, professional and private setting for our customers. We focus on educating them on their conditions and acoustical sound wave therapy so they understand the treatment. Q: What do you most want potential customers to know? A: WaveTech Therapy is an effective, non-invasive, alternative treatment for many conditions. The therapy has lasting effects and is pain-free, medication-free and needle-free.

Bring Back Your Love Life. Call today for a free ED consultation.

CALL TODAY

205-777-3736 wavetechbirmingham.com birmingham@wavetechtherapy.com WaveTech Birmingham 2100 Southbridge Parkway Suite 260 Birmingham, AL 35209

205-942-2270

ovortho.com

Q: Tell us about your practice. A: My practice is limited to orthodontics. Our specialty focuses on aligning crooked teeth, correcting bites and helping create beautiful smiles. We get the opportunity to help change our patients’ lives, one smile at a time! We get to do all this in a historic train depot, which makes it even more fun. Q: What is most important to you in your practice? A: Quality care and connections. I am a lifelong learner in the latest advances in orthodontics and have taken the extra step Dr. Deborah Sema of achieving board certification. I always strive for the best results we can get for community events. our patients. We are a smaller practice with a solo Q: Do you only do braces for certain practitioner. Seeing more patients isn’t ages? what motivates us; being able to really A: Having more than 20 years of connect with our patients and their experience in helping create beautiful families and giving them each quality smiles has given me the opportunity to orthodontic care with personal attention have worked with thousands of patients, is what we love. from ages 7 to 80. We love connecting with our patients My team and I use many different outside of the practice, too. I live, work means to create beautiful smiles: and attend church in Homewood and traditional/clear braces, Damon braces really do love our community. I and and Invisalign. my team enjoy being involved with


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • B13

Metro Roundup DOWNTOWN

Winners announced for 2020 Vulcans Community Awards By JESSE CHAMBERS Vulcan Park Foundation recently announced the 2020 honorees for The Vulcans Community Awards, honoring civic pride and leadership in the seven-county Birmingham area. The Vulcans honor 10 people this year in four categories — Lifetime Achievement, Brought to Hero, Game Changer you by our and Servant Leadership sister paper: — and are divided into two broad groups: The Vulcans and Spears. Over 100 nominations were received ironcity.ink this year, and recipients were chosen by an independent panel, according to a Vulcan news release. Due to COVID-19, there will be no traditional awards banquet. Instead, Vulcan was scheduled to host a virtual awards celebration Jan. 28 and, the same night, open a five-month exhibit at Linn-Henley Gallery honoring the winners. For more information about the exhibit at Linn-Henley Gallery, call 205-933-1409 or go to visitvulcan.com.

THE VULCANS HONOREES

► Lifetime Achievement: Dr. Perry Ward, president of Lawson State Community College for 33 years. Under Ward’s leadership, Lawson State was named one of America’s Top 50 Community Colleges in 2010 and one of the county’s top five community colleges in 2013.

Dr. Perry Ward, president of Lawson State Community College for 33 years, will be the recipient of the 2020 Vulcans Lifetime Achievement Award. Photo courtesy of Vulcan Park Foundation.

► Hero: Madison Kerns Conrad, director of operations for the Birmingham nonprofit Urban Avenues. In 2020, Conrad led the organization’s CareHealth initiative, a response to COVID-19 that helped health care workers and local restaurants. ► Game Changer: Amanda Storey, executive director of Jones Valley Teaching Farm, which hosts educational programs for thousands of public school children in Birmingham. ► Servant Leadership: T. Marie King, an activist who champions social justice through training, educating, speaking and consulting. She has served communities in Birmingham and around the country and worked with many national organizations for about 20 years.

THE SPEARS HONOREES

► Heroes: Milton King, founder and executive director of Determined 2 Be Mentor and Leadership Program, which helps young men build better futures, and Dr. Sarah Elizabeth Moreman, who was born with hearing loss, and is an English instructor at Jefferson State Community College and chair of the social media team at the Junior League of Birmingham. She spoke at TEDxBirmingham in 2018. ► Game Changers: Keith Richards, founder of Taziki’s Mediterranean Café, and Alicia Johnson Williams, an arts educator and administrator. Richards’ signature charity at Taziki’s is the HOPE Program (Herbs Offering Personal Enrichment), which helps children with special needs in 10 states learn about the herb business and develop job skills.

Williams serves as director of the Negro Southern League Museum and Boutwell Auditorium and is also the artistic director of her own community youth theatre company, Make It Happen Theatre. ► Servant Leadership: Dr. Karim Budwhani of CerFlux Inc. and Quan & Nga Nguyen of Dang’s Alterations. Budhwani, who is a visiting scientist in the UAB School of Medicine, founded CerFlux

in 2018 to use micro- and nanomedicine to fight cancer. He was also active in 2020 in helping to solve logistical and administrative challenges in fighting COVID-19. Quan and Nga Nguyen started Dang’s Alterations 20 years ago in the Trussville and Clay area. After closing their shop in March due to the pandemic, they worked 14-hour days to make masks and provide them for free to the community.


The Homewood Star

B14 • February 2021

HOOVER

New burger, beer joint comes to Lake Crest Whiskey Foxtrot Burger located next door to Johnny Brusco’s Pizza at 2341 John Hawkins Parkway, Suite 119, on Jan. 5. Photo by Erin Nelson.

By JON ANDERSON

EXHIBITION

The former location of Jubilee Joe’s Cajun and Seafood Restaurant in Lake Crest didn’t stay vacant for long. Ben Williams, a longtime restaurateur with Jason’s Deli, is opening a new hamburger and hot dog restaurant combined with a bar that Brought to sells American whiskey you by our and craft beers from the sister paper: Birmingham area. The new “burger and beer” joint is called the Whiskey Foxtrot Burger hooversun.com Dive. Williams and his silent partner and brother, Zac Williams, were hoping to have the new place open in January following some renovation work. Ben Williams, who will be the operator, said they didn’t have to make many changes to the place. They replaced the drop ceiling, put in a new back door, added a new coat of paint and some other superficial changes, but the spot as a whole was an “easy flip,” he said. Opening a new restaurant during a pandemic can be a little more challenging than usual, but “we’re going to let the food speak for itself,” Williams said. “I’m pretty confident we can do well here.” The Whiskey Foxtrot Burger Dive will showcase wagyu beef, a premium type of beef from a Japanese cow breed that has a predisposition to create a marbling of fat on the inside of its muscle tissue instead of the layer of fat that is on the outside of the average cow, which adds tenderness to the beef. Williams is ordering his wagyu beef from Southern River Farms in Augusta, Georgia, and the beef has a phenomenal taste.

If he had to compare his restaurant to any others, it would be the Twisted Root Burger Co. in Vestavia Hills or Jack Brown’s Beer and Burger Joint in Birmingham, he said. But the Whiskey Foxtrot Burger Dive will have more hot dog options. He said he chose this 2,700-square-foot spot in the Lake Crest Plaza because it was the right size for him and he likes the community and is familiar with it. Also, a positive thing is that the former restaurant there, Jubilee Joe’s, didn’t leave

because it was a bad location, Williams said. Jubilee Joe’s was successful and outgrew the place. Kashif “Kash” Siddiqui, the owner of Jubilee Joe’s, said he thinks the Whiskey Foxtrot Burger Dive will do pretty well in that location because it will have a bar and there’s not another bar in that general vicinity. He doesn’t see people going out of their way to get there, but it should serve the people who live and work nearby well, he said. Williams worked for Jason’s Deli for 13

years, opening new restaurants for the company in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and Illinois, he said. Most recently, he was the managing partner for the locations in Inverness and at Brookwood Village. The Inverness location closed at the end of 2019, and the one at Brookwood Village shut down in July. Williams lives in downtown Birmingham, and his brother is from Inverness, he said. “We’re excited,” Williams said. “We just hope we can get through and get to the back end of this pandemic.”

Now Open

artsbma.org

Ways of Seeing

Buildings +Monuments Explore the Built Environment through Art.

Ways of Seeing: Buildings and Monuments is presented by The Philip A.

Ed Willis Barnett, American, 1899–1987, New York Pyramids, gelatin silver print; Gift of Lula Barnett, 1988.218.8

Morris Fund for the Design Arts, a fund of the Community Foundation of Greater Birmingham, with additional support from bDot architecture.

Birmingham Museum of Art


TheHomewoodStar.com

February 2021 • B15

DOWNTOWN

VESTAVIA HILLS

The Backyard Market opens in Vestavia Hills

The UAB 1917 Clinic’s new location in the Dewberry Building in Lakeview has 50,664 feet of space, a substantial upgrade from the previous clinic on 20th Street South. The 1917 clinic is the largest HIV health care unit in Alabama. Photo by Andrea Mabry, UAB University Relations.

By NEAL EMBRY

New home in Birmingham’s Lakeview for acclaimed UAB AIDs clinic By JESSE CHAMBERS

with HIV who are not engaged in care.” The UAB 1917 Clinic, the Birmingham AIDS Outreach largest HIV health care unit in has space in the building as Alabama and one of the country’s well. preeminent HIV clinics, has relo“This move will provide cated to the Dewberry Building at renewed synergy between 1917 3220 Fifth Ave. S. in Lakeview. Clinic and BAO as community ironcity.ink It opened its doors to the compartners in the fight to end the munity and about 3,600 active HIV epidemic while addressing patients Dec. 15, according to the immediate needs of the HIV UAB News. community,” Raper said. In its new location, the 1917 Clinic has The Dewberry Building, located on a public 50,664 feet of space, a substantial upgrade transportation route and with ample parking, is from the previous clinic on 20th Street South. intended to provide easier access for the 1917 “This move will allow for increased capac- patient population. ity to meet the existing and burgeoning need It also provides an easy route back to the for HIV comprehensive multidisciplinary care UAB main campus physicians, researchers, and support service to people with HIV and staff and patients. the community,” clinic director James Raper In existence for three decades, the 1917 told UAB News. “It also allows us to more Clinic has more than 150 staff members and effectively do outreach to identify persons has treated more than 12,000 patients with HIV. Brought to you by our sister paper:

The Backyard Market has opened in Vestavia Hills, taking over the former Joel’s location on U.S. 31 next to Donatos Pizza. Owner Jeff Gentry is a Vestavia native and 1997 graduate of Vestavia Hills High School and said he wanted to use his experience in the grocery business to provide a grocery Brought to store in that area that you by our wasn’t quite as large sister paper: as nearby Publix. The store will also provide breakfast, lunch and dinner options for vestavia dine-in or take-out, voice.com Gentry said. “There’s really nothing on this side of 31,” Gentry said. Gentry and his staff worked quickly after signing the lease in November to open in January, only having to do a deep cleaning of the space, painting and moving a few things around, he said. The store will offer essentials such as milk and locally sourced eggs, as well as specialty cheeses and more, Gentry said. While the business is classified as a market instead of a restaurant, patrons can dine in. Gentry said well-known Birmingham chefs Leo Oliver and John William will be part of his kitchen. Breakfast options will include traditional Southern options such as omelets, avocado toast, crevettes and more. Lunch will include sandwiches, soups, burgers and salads, and dinner will likely include two entrees that are rotated each week, including steak, Gentry said. Patrons can take those meals to go, as

Live easy on Lay Lake Z Custom built 3 Bedroom 2.5 Baths 4 Bedroom 3.5 Baths Z Built with high quality products & finishes Z Solid stone counter tops, custom cabinets, stainless appliances Z Main level garages Z Unfinished daylight basement and/or lakeside garage access for water craft storage

Z Only 5 minutes away from world class golf at FarmLinks at Purcell Farms Z Private & secure gated community

John Williams, the executive chef at The Backyard Market, sautés potatoes and carrots in the kitchen of the new eatery at 633 Montgomery Highway on Jan. 4. Photo by Erin Nelson.

well, and the store will offer plenty of takehome meals for residents, he said. “We’re going to try and make as much stuff as we can in house,” Gentry said. The location provides a nice patio place for families to hang out when the weather is nice, and the store will also have three big-screen TVs to watch sports, Gentry said. The business will employ 12 to 15 people, and the store is hiring for some of those positions, he said.

Live The Harbor at Lay Lake Life A L u x u r y Tow n h o m e D e ve l o p m e n t

Z Private swimming pool Z Private boat launch & dock space

C A L L TO DAY

to s c h e d u l e yo u r p e rs o n a l to u r

Z HOA maintained community Z Phase one to be completed February 2021

CHRISTIE HECKMAN 205-706-4444 KARL HECKMAN 205-492-5669 christie.heckman@exprealty.com

340 Mickey Lane, Sylacauga

theharboratlaylake.com


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Also, you can visit alpwr.co/vm for more information about these safety and reliability measures and for recommendations about planting the right tree in the right place.

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As we work in communities to meet the needs of our customers, please maintain a safe social distance of six feet from our crews and field representatives to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

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If you have any questions before crews come by your home, please call Alabama Power at 205-257-2155 and ask for someone in the Vegetation Management Group to contact you. Or you can email us at apcvm@southernco.com. Work in Homewood and nearby areas is expected to continue through early 2021.

© 2021 Alabama Power Company.

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As part of this process, Alabama Power goes to great lengths to talk with individual property owners. Company representatives are going door to door, leaving notices at locations where work is needed.

Vegetation Management Group 205-257-2155 | apcvm@southernco.com

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Alabama Power crews are working in several Homewood neighborhoods, removing trees and other vegetation that threaten the safety and reliability of our electrical system.

Thank you for your understanding.

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22ND AVE S

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19TH AVE S AV E S S G P RIN

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17TH AVE SW

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17TH AVE S 17TH CT S 18TH AVE S 18TH CT S

15TH AVE SW

18 L K

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14TH ST SW

S

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LOWER SANDY RD

MIMS AVE SW

W

H 7T

AV

ES

ST

BOLIN ST SW

W

LANE PARK RD

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T 1S

V DA 3R

11TH PL S

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The Homewood Star February 2021  

The Homewood Star February 2021  

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