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PACIFIC AIR FORCES Commander Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii

Dear Friends and Neighbors

Commander Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii

19 September 2009

On behalf of the 45,000 men and women of Pacific Air Forces, Aloha and welcome to the 2009 “Wings Over the Pacific” Air Show. We’re pleased you can join us for this weekend’s events and excited to showcase how your United States Air Force is serving Hawaii, our great nation, and our partners and allies in the Pacific Region. This year marks 65 years of our command providing American airpower in the Pacific. Since 1944, your Pacific Air Force has participated in every major U.S. combat operation and over 140 humanitarian operations. As American Airmen, our active, guard and reserve members are integral members of a greater joint team of Soldiers, Sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. Together, we form a balancing and stabilizing force in this region that covers half the globe and includes 3.5 billion people. Your United States Air Force defends America and our American dream everyday—at home, throughout the region, and around the world. Team Hickam is proud to present your Air Force during this Airshow weekend. Mahalo for your strong support of your nation’s military members and their families. Happy 50th, Hawaii--enjoy the show!

19 September 2009

Dear Friends and Neighbors

It is our distinct pleasure to welcome you to Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, home of Pacific Air Forces, the 15th Airlift Wing and our 2009 Open House, featuring the Air Force Thunderbirds aerial demonstration team. Many years of proud aviation tradition will be on display throughout the weekend. This year’s theme, “Wings Over the Pacific,” will honor past and present aviators who have paved the way for future generations through their steadfast, unselfish commitment to aviation. Our ability to provide combat-ready, expeditionary Airmen capable of short-notice, worldwide deployment is a direct reflection of their heroic sacrifices. We hope you enjoy these two days of outstanding displays, live entertainment, keiki rides and games, great food, and finally, the precision flying of the worldfamous Thunderbirds. This will be one of the most exciting events this year as we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Hawaii’s statehood. We’re confident you will be thoroughly impressed by your Air Force here in Hawaii. We are truly honored and pleased to co-host you and your family this weekend.

Sincerely

Sincerely

GARY L. NORTH General, USAF

GIOVANNI K. TUCK, Colonel, USAF Commander


Wings over the Pacific OPEN HOUSE Entertainment Line-Up:

STAGE 1

(Located below Hickam Tower)

September 19 12 p.m. 12:45 p.m. 1:15 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.

September 20 11 a.m. 12 p.m. 12:45 p.m. 1:15 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m.

PACAF Band (1st Set) Break PACAF Band (2nd Set) Thunderbirds Ground Show Thunderbirds Demo

Navy Jazz Band PACAF Band (1st Set) Break PACAF Band (2nd Set) Thunderbirds Ground Show Thunderbirds Demo

Entertainment Line-Up: STAGE 2

(Entertainment Tent)

September 19 10 a.m. 11 a.m. 12 p.m. 1 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

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Elephant Band Paradise X S Dita Holyfield and Red Handed Nesian Nine Thunderbirds Ground Show Thunderbirds Demo Hip Hop Dance Show Analog

September 20 10:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 12 p.m. 1 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m. 4 p.m. 4:30 p.m.

The De Lima Ohana Hawaiian Dance Paradise X S Soul Cafe Thunderbirds Ground Show Thunderbirds Demo Tahitian Dance Analog

B. J. Penn will sign autographs underneath the 15th Services Entertainment Tent... Time will be announced.

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HISTORY OF THE

Thunderbirds

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The Thunderbirds are starting the 56th season in the team’s history.

In 1947, while the jet age was still in its infancy, military aviation was hurtled into the future with the creation of the U.S. Air Force as a separate service. Just six years later, on May 25, 1953, the Air Force’s official air demonstration team, designated the 3600th Air Demonstration Unit, was activated at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona. The name “Thunderbirds” was soon adopted by the unit, influenced in part by the strong Indian culture and folklore of the southwestern United States where Luke is located. Indian legend speaks of the Thunderbird with great fear and respect. To some it was a giant eagle, others envisioned a hawk.

When it took to the skies, the earth trembled from the thunder of its great wings. From its eyes shot bolts of lightning. Nothing in nature could challenge the bird of thunder, the story said, and no man could stand against its might. A more appropriate name couldn’t have been selected as it is with the same commanding presence the Thunderbirds took to the skies. Seven officers and 22 enlisted were selected for the first demonstration team. Most were handpicked from the cadre at Luke. Continued on page 10

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Continued from page 8

The first aircraft selected for the new demonstration team was the straight wing F-84G Thunderjet built by Republic Aviation. Their straight wing configuration was considered well-suited for aerobatic maneuvers, and although the aircraft could not exceed the speed of sound like some military aircraft, it easily met the needs of a demonstration aircraft. The original demonstration sequence consisted of a series of formation aerobatics lasting 15 minutes. Mindful of their mission to show the Air Force’s best aircraft, the Air Force selected the swept wing F-84F Thunderstreak as their second aircraft in 1955. The Thunderstreak was modified for the team by adding smoke tanks for the first time, and red, white and blue drag chutes. With the move from F-84F to the F100 Super Sabre in 1956, the Thunderbirds because the first supersonic aerial demonstration team. That same year, the Thunderbids moved to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. In the spring of 1969 the team received the first of the new McDonnell Douglas F-4E Phantom IIs and became the team’s conversion. It is said to be the most extensive conversion in history. No federal endorsement of sponsors intended.

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PAR 3

SECURITY GUIDELINES On behalf of Colonel Giovanni K. Tuck, the 15th Airlift Wing Commander, welcome to Hickam Air Force Base, ‘The Pearl of the Pacific’. We will do everything to ensure your Air Show and Open House experience is safe and enjoyable.

To speed your entrance into the flightline area, large bags, ice chests and coolers will not be permitted. Essential carryalls (baby bags, etc.) and other packages may be inspected to ensure everyone’s safety. Glass containers are not allowed and will be confiscated. Spectators should minimize the number and size of permitted items to reduce the inspection time.

Prohibited items on the flightline (subject to confiscation):

Bathrooms

• Coolers (includes cold/hot storage containers) • Backpacks/Duffle Bags • Large camera bags (larger than 8” x 8”) • Chairs • Glass (exception: baby formula/food jars are allowed) • All weapons to include pocket knives • Alcohol • Camel Backs • Drugs (prescription medication authorized) • Skateboards, rollerblades, bicycles, etc.

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ATM

Smoking is not permitted near aircraft or on the flightline ramp areas.

Water

• Fanny packs/purses • Food snacks (must fit inside fanny pack/purse) • Non-alcoholic drinks (soda, water, juice etc. in plastic container) • Camera/Video Recorder (must fit inside 8” x 8” camera bag) • Personal items to include sunblock, lotion, etc. Smoking is not permitted near aircraft or on the flightline ramp areas.

Aircraft Static Display Safety Reminders:

Parking

Water

Bathrooms

ATM

Info

Food and Entertainment

Permitted items:

Entrance

AMC Terminal Parking

Bathrooms

Water

Water

Bathrooms

Entrance

We ask for your cooperation in keeping prohibited items safely outside the flightline area. At the entry points to the Air Show flightline, all individuals and bags are subject to inspection.

1. Observe all safety notices and obey all instructions from Hickam Safety and Security personnel, Air/ Ground crew, and Police. 2. Stay behind all marked barriers. 3. Use extreme caution when walking near aircraft wings, engines, and viewing stands due to sharp metal edges. 4. Dispose of all trash in proper receptacles; do not throw litter on the ground. 5. No running or horseplay is permitted. 6. Please take care when entering and exiting the busses and follow all instructions from the driver.

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2009 Thunderbird Pilots

Lt. Col. Greg Thomas, 40, in his second season as the commander/leader of the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds” flies the No. 1 jet, leading all air demonstrations and comanding the 120-person squadron. Colonel Thomas entered the Air force in 1992 as a distinguished graduate from ROTC at Wright State University, in Dayton, Ohio. Before his assignment to the team Colonel Thomas was the Director of Operations, 12th Fighter Squadron, Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska. He has logged more than 2,700 hours as an Air Force Pilot, with more than 240 hours of combat experience and nearly 1,800 hours in the F-15. Colonel Thomas hails from Cincinnati, Ohio.

Maj. John Baum, 33, in his first season, is the Left Wing of the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds”, and flies the No. 2 jet. Major Baum enlisted in the Air Force in 1993 as the Avionics Sensors Specialist and earned his commission from EmbryRiddle Aeronautical University in 1999. Before his assignment to the Team, Major Baum was the F-35 Tactics Development Team Lead, F-16 Instructor, USAF Weapons School, Nellis AFB, NV. He has logged over 1750 hours as an Air Force pilot, with more than 265 hours of combat experience in F-16C/D. Major Baum hails from Lake Ronkonkoma, NY.

Maj. Kirby Ensser, 33, in his second season with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds”, flies the No. 3 jet. Major Ensser entered the Air Force in May 1998 as a distinguished graduate from the U.S. Air Force Academy with a Bachelor of Science degree in Management. Before his assignment to the team, Major Ensser was an F-15C Mission Commander and Flight Commander in the 67th Fighter Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan. He has logged more than 2,500 hours with 1,300 in the F-15C/D and F-16C/D. Major Ensser hails from Bayard, Nebraska.

Maj. Sean K. Gustafson, 37, in his first season, is the Slot Pilot of the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds” and flies the No. 4 jet. Major Gustafson entered the Air Force in 1997 from the University of Central Florida. Before his assignment to the team, Major Gustafson was a Traditional Reservist as the Training Officer at 93rd Fighter Squadron, Homestead AFB, FL. He has logged over 2000 hours as an Air Force pilot, with more than 80 hours of combat experience in F-16C/D. Major Gustafson hails from Kenora, Ontario.

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2009 Thunderbird Pilots

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Maj. Tyrone D. Douglas, 34, in his second season, is the Lead Solo of the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron “Thunderbirds,” and flies the No. 5 jet. Major Douglas entered the Air Force in 1997 as a distinguished graduate from the University of Kansas. Before his assignment to the team, Major Douglas was the Asst. Chief of 57th Wing Standardization and Evaluation Nellis AFB, NV. He has logged over 2200 hours as an Air Force pilot, with more than 150 hours of combat experience in F-16C/D. Major Douglas hails from Kansas City, MO.

Maj. Rick Goodman, 33, in his first season as the Opposing Solo of the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 6 jet. Major Goodman entered the Air Force in 1997 as a graduate from the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, CO. Before his assignment to the team Major Goodman was an F-15E instructor pilot at the United States Weapons School at Nellis AFB, NV. He has logged more than 2,300 hours, over 1,800 hours in the F-15E, with 350 hours of combat experience over Iraq and Afghanistan. Major Goodman hails from Hot Springs, AR.

Lt. Col. Derek Routt, 38, in his first season, is the Operations Officer of the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds,” and flies the No. 7 jet. Colonel Routt was commissioned through ROTC in 1992 from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Before his assignment to the team, Colonel Routt was an Assistant Director of Operations and Flight Examiner in the F15C/D, 65th Aggressor Squadron, Nellis AFB, NV. Colonel Routt has been a memebr of the Air National Guard since 2006 and is sponsored by the state of Nevada. He has logged over 2300 hours as an Air Force pilot, with more than 80 hours of combat experience in the F-15C/D.

Maj. Anthony Mulhare, 35, in his second season with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds,” flies the No. 8 jet as the team’s advance pilot and narrator. Flying to each air demonstration site in advance, Major Mulhare ensures all arrangements for the performance are complete and then narrates each demonstration. He also flies media and orientation flights in the F-16D. Major Mulhare entered the Air Force in 1995 from the U.S. Air Force Academy. Before his assignment to the team, he serves as an assistant director of operations and F-16 instructor pilot in the 308th Fighter Squadron, Luke AFB, AZ.

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2009 Thunderbird Pilots

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Maj. Charla Morgan Quayle, 36, is starting her second season with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron as the team flight surgeon. She is responsible for providing medical care for the 130member team with a priority placed on keeping the pilots in optimum health to fly their rigorous flying schedule year round. She served as a staff Ob/Gyn for three years and obtained her Board Certification prior to becoming a flight surgeon and being selected for the USAF Thunderbirds. She has flown approximately 200 hours in F-16s, F-15s, C-17s and C-130s. Major Quale hails from Fullerton, CA.

Capt. Petrina Hanson, 33, in her first season with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds”, is the team’s Executive Officer. She provides executive support and oversees information management, budget, training and all personnel actions. She also serves as the squadron commander during the commander’s frequent deployments. Before her assignment to the team, Capt. Hanson served as Officer in Charge, Force Management Operations, Military Personnel Flight, 35th Mission Support Squadron at Misawa Air Base, Japan.

Maj. David Lemery, 33, is in his first season with the U.S. Airforce Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds”, as the team’s Maintenance Officer. He is responsible for 90 Thunderbirds maintenance personnel and the maintenance of 11 Block 52 F-16 aircraft. Major Lemery entered the Air Force in 1999 as a distinguished graduate from ROTC through the University of Texas at San Antonio. Before his assignment to the team, Major Lemery served in the 46th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron as the Maintenance Operations Officer, Eglin AFB, FL.

Capt. Jason McCree, 30, in his first season with the U.S. Air Force Air Demonstration Squadron, “Thunderbirds,” is the team’s Public Affairs Officer. Captain McCree manages the Thunderbirds’ extensive recruiting, marketing, graphics and publicity programs. He graduated from the University of West Florida with a Bachelor of Arts degree in psychology, and he entered the Air Force in 2001 via UWF’s Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps Program. Before his assignment to the team, Captain McCree served as the chief of public affairs at the 92nd Air Refueling Wing in Spokane, WA. Captain McCree hails from Pensacola, Florida.

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Hawaiian’s First Airplane Coming Home Rare Piece of Aviation History Returning to Hawaii In 1929, only the most intrepid adventurers were familiar with the miracle of flight. So the visionary founders of Inter-Island Airways sought out the sturdiest, most comfortable aircraft of the day to introduce Hawaii residents to air travel: the Bellanca CH-300 Pacemaker. Inter-Island Airways, later renamed Hawaiian Airlines, would go on to introduce Hawaii’s first scheduled air service between the islands with two amphibious Sikorsky S-38 planes. But it was the Bellanca that got residents used to the idea of traveling by air. And now, 80 years later, the Bellanca is returning to grace the skies over Honolulu once again. Hawaiian Airlines has found the historic plane and is bringing it back to No federal endorsement of sponsors intended.

Hawaii in time to celebrate its 80th anniversary on November 11, 2009. Hawaiian located the antique airplane with an aviation enthusiast in Oregon and organized a largely volunteer restoration project to return the plane to flying condition at Port Townsend Aero Museum in Washington. Pratt & Whitney, manufacturer of the vintage motor that powers the Bellanca as well as the jet engines on 14 of Hawaiian’s current fleet of aircraft, is helping to underwrite the project. Hawaiian is making plans for special flights and public appearances for the plane following its arrival and reassembly on Oahu in September.

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