Growing 2gether Step by Step

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THIS BOOKLET BELONGS TO:

DATE OF BIRTH:

WEIGHT & LENGTH:


TABLE OF CONTENTS We lc om e .

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0-3 mont h s .

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3-6 mont h s .

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6-12 mont h s .

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12-1 8 m ont h s .

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18-24 mont h s .

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2-2 .5 y e ar s .

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2 .5 -3 y e ar s .

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3- 4 y e ar s .

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4-5 y e ar s .

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5 -6 y e ar s .

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I am re ady for s c ho o l , when . . . . H ow c an y o u he lp m e? .

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W hat i s e ar ly inter vent ion? . D e lay e d sp e e c h and ADHD . SP D and Aut i sm .

Im p or tanc e of M ovem ent .

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W here c an y o u g o for he lp? . A b o ut t he P roje c t .

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T han ks for t he supp or t .

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WELCOME THIS BOOKLET OFFERS A GUIDE AND INFORMATION FOR PARENTS ABOUT THE MILESTONES OF THE HEALTHY DEVELOPMENT OF A CHILD BETWEEN THE AGE OF 0-6 YEARS OLD.

It explains why this development is crucial for the future wellbeing of a child. It also provides essential information on the signs of common delays that can be seen in young children. Parents can use the booklet as a checklist to see how their child is developing. In case of any concerns, parents should seek help for their child as soon as possible.

The first years in a child’s life are crucial. As our children grow, they have to face an ever-changing world. They will need many different skills to be successful in life so that one day they can become happy and content adults.

Children need to be able to move, see and hear freely, also perceive their environment correctly through touch, smell and taste. That is how they learn to understand the world around them. A cute toddler will one day go to school and grow to be an adult. To be able to take part in the world and work with others they have to learn how to communicate.


0-3 MONTHS

5

I can turn my head to both sides My parents can feed me easily By laying on my tummy, I can hold and lift up my head I pay attention to sounds, faces and patterns I enjoy a bath I recognise my hands I respond by smiling to my parents I am opening my fingers I am able to say “oooo” and “aaaaaa”

my

we i g ht & l

ng

th a

t 3 mon

th

s

e

I recognise my parents’ voice


3-6 MONTHS

6

I can turn to both my sides I can turn onto my tummy I can hold my toys I can move a toy from one hand to another I am using both my hands equally My eyes can follow a moving toy I sleep peacefully I can find the source of sounds If someone talks to me, I can respond with simple sounds

we

ig ht & l e ngt

h

at

my

I am able to imitate my parents’ mimics (happy, angry, amazement)

6 m o nt hs


6-12 MONTHS

7

I can creep on my tummy I can sit by myself I am able to hit two objects together I can follow a falling toy with my eyes I imitate syllables “mamamama” (babbling) I pay attention to my name I find myself in the mirror I behave differently with strangers than with my parents I understand very simple instructions “clap your hands”, “wave” I am able to eat with my hands

le n

gth a t 1 2 mo nt hs

e my w i g ht &

I can crawl


12-18 MONTHS

8

I am able to stand up I can pick up small things I point to something with my pointing finger I can drink by myself I am able to take objects out of and put into a box I can walk I can bite and chew I try to eat with a spoon I can imitate animal sounds

we

ight

& heigh

t at 18

my

I use my own words to name at least 5 things

m o nt hs

my first word was:


18-24 MONTHS

9

I eat various kinds of foods I am able to unpack small objects I can squat and stand up without help I can answer questions with yes and no I am interested in being with other kids I can build a tower from 4 blocks I enjoy scribbling I can show at least 5 body parts I can throw and catch a ball

my

we i g ht & h

ig h

t at 24 mont

hs

e

â—?I can play alone for 10 minutes


2-2.5 YEARS

10

I can climb the stairs without help I speak in simple sentences I ask “What is this?” many times a day I can name at least 5 body parts I can recognise myself as a different person from others It’s disturbing for me if I peed or pooped in my nappy I name myself (for example as baby) I am able to twist objects (for example bottle) I can jump I can kick the ball I feel what the other person feels

we

ight

& heigh

t at

2.5

my

(If my friend is crying, I give him a tissue)

my first sentence was:

years


2.5-3 YEARS

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I am able to categorise objects by colours I climb the stairs with switched feet I try to dress myself I can play “as if� games I give signs if I need to pee or poop I can imitate movements I can jump off a step without hurting myself I can draw a line I can insert shapes on a board correctly I am able to form sentences with 3-4 words

he

ight at 3 yea rs

my we i g ht &

I am interested in playing with other kids


3-4 YEARS

12

Anybody can understand my speech I am potty-trained I can use stairs with switched feet I can use objects and pretend they are something else I can count up to three I can dress myself without help I can copy easy drawings, like lines and circles I can ride my three-wheeler I can stand on one foot for at least one second

we

ight

& heigh

t at

4y

my

I can share my feelings

ears


4-5 YEARS

13

I can tell stories and short poems I can name basic colours I can draw different objects with different shapes I can roleplay e.g. pretend to be mum or dad I can play with other kids I can count up to 10 I have friends I can hold the pencil properly with 3 fingers I prefer to use one of my hands to handle objects

he

ight at 5 yea rs

my we i g ht &

I am able to jump forward with both legs at the same time


5-6 YEARS

14

I can ride my bike I understand amounts up to 5 I know the seasons, the days of the week I can use a fork, (spreading) knife and a spoon properly I can jump on one leg and count my jumps I understand how to use a dice for board games I answer the question “Why?� I am able to play alone for at least 30 minutes I have stopped using baby language

we

ight

& heigh

t at 6y

my

I have a vivid imagination

ears


I am ready for school, when... I can draw a person I can follow rules I can play and cooperate with others I can work on a task for at least 10 minutes I can memorise more than 5 elements I can focus for at least 30 minutes I can handle interactions with others I can speak clearly I know directions and dimensions (up, down, inside, outside, etc.) I am using one of my hands to handle objects (spoon, pen, toothbrush) I am independent & fulfilling my primary needs (eating, toileting, drinking)

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How can you help me? Parents are the most influential persons in a child’s life. They create the everyday environment in which the child grows and develops self-confidence. For this, children need indoor and outdoor experiences that are age appropriate. It is important for parents to talk to their children, give them time, space and a variety of toys/tools for play. Parents are the key persons for noticing how their child’s development is progressing. They should pay attention if the child: • Holds a toy or a book too close to their eyes OR the head is tilted when focusing • Does not react or overreacts to sounds • Uses one side of the body more often than the other • Does not like touching certain textures • Uses few words or none and/or does not understand when spoken to • Does not have eye contact; does not look where it is pointing • Prefers to play by herself and/or shows aggressive behaviour towards others If you have any concerns about your child, then you should look into early intervention for further assistance.


What is early intervention? Early intervention provides support for children with developmental delays and their families. When a child shows signs of any delay, early intervention specialists provide necessary examinations. Based on the results, specialists set up individual programmes for each child. Early intervention is necessary when the child fails to reach the age-appropriate level in one or more fields of development: • • • • •

movement seeing or hearing speech and language social skills and behaviour cognitive development

Supporting the family - both the close and the wider environment - is part of early intervention. It is complex counselling, which is realized through the cooperation of several expert professionals and parents. It is crucial for parents to consult a specialist as soon as possible if they have concerns about the healthy development of their child. The sooner the delay is recognised, the earlier the correction process can be started. Early intervention contributes to maximising your child’s potential to lead a happy, balanced and independent life.

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Delayed speech and ADHD Speech and language develop together from the day of birth. If there is a deviation, several signs can be noticed: • • • • •

Lack of babbling Lack of words at the age of 1-1.5 year No sentences by the age of 2.5-3 years Uses the wrong prepositions or none Does not follow simple instructions, or misunderstands them

Many different conditions can result in speech delay and language development. It is essential to find a way to overtake the errors of communication; otherwise, it can lead to learning difficulties later in school. ADHD is one of the most common disorders in children. It stands for attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder. The most common symptoms in children are: • • • • • • • •

Easily distracted and forgetful Trouble paying attention Difficulties in completing tasks Hyperactive and fidgeting Disorganised and tends to lose things Impulsive Emotional turmoil Noisy


SPD and Autism

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SENSORY PROCESSING DISORDER

AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER

Children discover the world through their senses, and the nervous system organises the obtained information. This process goes well once the sensory organs (eyes, ears, touch, information from their own body) work properly and the child can process the received stimuli accurately.

A neurodevelopmental disorder that affects communication and behaviour of a child. First signs appear before a child turns 2 and may include some or all from these signs:

In some children these processes follow completely different, inadequate scenarios: they tend to interpret the surrounding world in a different way than other children. Some of them are disturbed by sounds; some of them speak too loudly or like making loud noises because that feels convenient to them. Others refuse to touch certain things or substances (e.g. sand) or keep fidgeting with something all the time. Some children do not like swings, and there are those who cannot stop running, jumping or spinning around. Some of them are unwilling to eat certain types of food since they dislike the tactile sense it makes in their mouth. They are not doing all these things intentionally – it is their body functions that differ from those of average children.

• Avoids eye contact • Does not point to things of interest • Does not use language for communication • Resists to minor changes in routine or surroundings • Has restricted interests • Has repetitive behaviours (flapping, rocking, spinning, etc.) • Reacts to sounds, smells, tastes, textures, lights unusually • Has Lost previously acquired speech, babbling or social skills If you have any concerns get your child screened and examined by professionals. Research shows that early intervention leads to very positive outcomes later in life for people with autism.


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Importance of Movement WHY IS MOVEMENT IMPORTANT FOR YOUR CHILD? From birth, it is essential to consider the motor development of children. Motor development is a combination of many factors, and the relationship between the nervous system and movements is one of the most important ones. The first few years of the child are crucial for the forming of neurological connections. Movement promotes physical, cognitive and social well-being, joy, agility and self-confidence. The environment of young children, therefore, needs to provide many opportunities to strengthen these relationships. Along with the five sensory senses, the child can plan and execute skilled motor movements. If the sensory process is not appropriate, the execution won’t be proper. Movements show how harmonically the nervous system works and how neurological connections are prepared. With the help of crawling and creeping, the infant can discover the environment, can learn independence, autonomy and the sense of fear. Opportunities for complex neurodevelopmental screening: Longitudinal Complex Test. Design therapy based on the results.


Where can you go for help? FOUNDATIONS THAT PARTICIPATED IN THE PROJECT • • • •

In Hungary – www.bhrg.hu In Slovakia – www.rata.sk In Romania – www.bsjk.ro In Iceland – www.hreyfiland.is

RECOMMENDED BOOK • Carol Kranowitz: The-Out-of-Sync-Child

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About the Project Six organisations from Iceland, Hungary, Romania and Slovakia joined into partnership and established the Bio-Trio project. The goal is to promote healthy communication between children with special needs and their parents, as well as other experts/professionals handling these children. The booklet assists parents in following up their child’s development and get help if they need it. A communication and empathy training helped committed and enthusiastic team members to improve communication and create this booklet. • • • • • •

Anita Madács (BHRG Foundation, Hungary) – Project Manager Berglind Gréttarsdottir (Skólar ehf, Iceland) – Project Manager Brigitta Fazekas (Blessed Scheffler Janos Center, Romania) – Project Manager Jana Muranska (R.A.T.A, Slovakia) – Project Manager Krisztina G. Agueda (HLI, Iceland) – Project Manager & Chief Editor of the booklet Rita Kárpáti (Natura Hungarica Foundation, Hungary) – Main Organiser & Project Manager

We want to thank our two trainers, Krisztina Zsiday Galgóczy and Sára Pásztor for coaching during our project training. Special thanks to Rita Kárpáti for her generous assistance and organisation of the project. Thanks for the support of Erasmus+

Co-funded by the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union

Illustrations: Zita Major


Thanks for the support Blessed Scheffler Janos Center, Romania

UN AH G

ICA AR

NATUR

BHRG, Hungary

Natura Hungarica, Hungary

RATA o.z., Slovakia

Skรณlar ehf, Iceland

HLI - Healthy Life and Integration, Iceland

The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

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