Page 1


Contents Committees

3

Welcomes

4

Campus Map

8

Keynote Speakers

9

WorldCALL Scholarship Recipients

16

Programme Summary Tuesday, November 13th, 2018

17

Wednesday, November 14th, 2018

20

Thursday, November 15th, 2018

27

Friday, November 16th, 2018

35

A-to-Z Abstract Index

42

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Committees WorldCALL 2018 Steering Committee Ana Gimeno (Chair), Spain Mike Levy, Australia Sue Otto, United States Thomas Robb, Japan Claire Bradin Siskin, United States

Bin Zou, China Dorothy Chun, United States Trude Heift, Canada Antoine Alm, New Zealand Eric Hagley, Japan In-Seok Kim, South Korea Sangeetha Gopalakrishnan, United States Mirjam Hauck, United Kingdom Nguyen Van Long, Vietnam Kazunori Nozawa, Japan

Local Organising Committee Emerita Bañados Santana (Chair), Chile Nora Rocca Righton, Chile Alejandra Deij Sepúlveda, Chile Camila Navarrete (Assistant), Chile Daniela Sánchez (Assistant), Chile Carmen Morales (Assistant), Chile Ignacio Ulloa (Assistant), Chile Katherine Araya (Assistant), Chile Ariadna Pinto (Assistant), Chile Luis Marín (Assistant), Chile Angela Acuña (Assistant), Chile David Julien (Assistant), Chile Patricia Carrillo (Assistant), Chile Ben Walters (Assistant), Chile Brock West (Assistant), Chile Isabel Head (Assistant), Chile Nicolás Campos (Assistant), Chile Alejandra Diaz (Assistant), Chile Alex Moore (Assistant), Chile Michael Ellsworth (Assistant), Chile

Latin American Consultative Committee Evelyn Izquierdo, Venezuela Liliana Cuesta, Colombia Jennifer Verschoor, Argentina Vera Menezes, Brazil Mónica Stella Cardenas Claros, Chile Erika Cruvinel, Brazil Carla Arena, Brazil Rita Zeinstejer, Argentina Izabel Araujo, Brazil Scholarship Committee Thomas Robb (Chair), Japan Thang Siew Ming (Co-Chair), Malaysia Isil Boy Ergul (Juror), Turkey Hora Hedayati (Juror), Iran Neny Isharyanti (Juror), Indonesia Nadezhda Kabanova (Juror), Russia Nina Lyulkun (Juror), Russia S. Susan Marandi (Juror), Iran Shriyananda Rathnayake (Juror), Sri Lanka Rita Zeinstejer (Juror), Argentin

International Advisory Committee Jozef Colpaert, Belgium Bryan Smith, Belgium Glen Stockwell, Japan Muriel Grosbois, France

Welcome from the Vice-Rector 3


Dear WorldCALL attendees, I am very pleased to welcome participants from near and far to the University of Concepción and the fifth WorldCALL Global Conference. I have no doubt that both participants and attendees of the conference will enjoy their time on our beautiful campus, recently named a National Historic Monument, as well as in our city and region. This global conference provides us with an early taste of the University of Concepción’s upcoming 100th anniversary celebrations. It is more than appropriate because language education has been part of the university’s academic project from its very beginnings. In fact, English Education was one of the four original departments of the university, founded 99 years ago as a result of community efforts. And now, as the university approaches its centenary, the importance of language education endures in the very same academic space, although it has been transformed by the fast pace of technological change. Likewise, this international meeting, which will be held for the first time in Latin America and in Chile, is a recognition of the systematic work that the University of Concepción has been developing for more than a decade in the area of CALL. It represents an important opportunity to deepen new areas of investigation and to strengthen professional and academic interests in the design, creation and implementation of CALL-orientated learning environments, something we have long recognized as important on an institutional level. Language education has nearly a hundred years of history at our university. We hope that the ideas developed in the presentations over the next week contribute to this long and important tradition both here and around world, as the field rapidly evolves. Lastly, I would like to express my gratitude to the International and Local Conference Organising Committees and my sincere hopes that it be a successful and pleasant experience for all attendees. Welcome to WorldCALL5! Carlos von Plessing Rossel Vice-Rector, Universidad de Concepción

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Welcome from the Chair, WorldCALL 2018 Steering Committee Dear WorldCALL attendees, It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the fifth WorldCALL Conference, the first to be held in South America. This event brings us all together for four intense days at the Universidad de Concepción, the third most prestigious university in Chile and one of the most academically outstanding in Latin America. WorldCALL is an umbrella association for organizations that focus on Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) around the world. It aims to enhance CALL in the global community by bringing educators from all five continents together. As an international association, WorldCALL provides a worldwide focus for the promulgation of innovative research, development, and practice in the areas of CALL in education and training; enhances the opportunities for knowledge and skills transfer to those nations currently underserved in the areas of CALL; and serves as a forum for exchanging information and forging professional relationships among educators, researchers, and industry leaders across the world. As the worldwide organisation that is concerned with CALL in all of its manifestations – technology-enhanced language learning, network-based language learning, and information and communications technologies for language learning – WorldCALL is ideally placed to highlight the benefits of new technological developments. It plays a leading role in providing a forum for discussing the application of state-of-the-art technologies for language learning and teaching, developing the virtual classroom, supplying professional training and development for teachers and, significantly, giving developing countries, through sponsorship, the opportunity to project their culture worldwide and to become involved in the application of technology in language learning. The WorldCALL Conference has previously been organised on four other continents: Melbourne, Australia (1998); Banff, Canada (2003); Fukuoka, Japan (2008), and Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom (2013). As you can see, WorldCALL takes place every 5 years so we could call it the “Olympic Games” or the “World Cup” of Computer-Assisted Language Learning! In 2018, WorldCALL has continued its scholarship programme to enable postgraduate students and junior academics to attend the Conference. The scholarship programme, first introduced in 1998, is a positive way in which WorldCALL brings the experiences of language professionals to colleagues working in less developed nations. The exchange of ideas and experiences also promotes the development of international, informal human networks that bridge the gap between technologically advanced countries and those underserved in the areas of technology and CALL. I am particularly delighted, therefore, to welcome eight WorldCALL scholarship awardees who, through a competitive process, have proven their academic excellence and passion for CALL. They are joining us from Bangladesh, North Cyprus, Ethiopia, Honduras, Indonesia, Argentina, and Vietnam. Congratulations to all! This year, the scholarships programme was coordinated by colleagues Tom Robb and Siew-Ming Thang, to whom I would like to express my gratitude. I would also like to thank former WorldCALL Executive Director, Professor Mike Levy – who handed the baton over to me in 2016 – for his many years of commitment to the Association and for the support received from his institution, the University of Queensland, Australia. We are very fortunate to have Mike Levy, one of the world’s most recognised scholars in CALL, with us this year as a keynote speaker at this Conference. Thank you, Mike! Many thanks are also due to David Barr and Claire Bradin Siskin for leading the Programme Committee and putting together such an outreaching, high-quality academic programme. This would not have been possible without the help of our 37 international reviewers who diligently put their expertise at our service. I thank Claire too for her work as the WorldCALL webmaster who, for many years, has maintained and updated our website. Claire has this year stepped down from the WorldCALL Steering Committee, as has our colleague Sue Otto, so we shall be seeking to invite two new CALL scholars onto the Steering Committee this year.

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Last, but not least, I would like to express my immense gratitude to Emerita Bañados for her courage in taking on the commitment of organising such an internationally challenging conference, a conference that creates enormous expectation among the CALL community worldwide. Emerita has been backed by a wonderful team of colleagues from the Universidad de Concepción who have displayed their enormous generosity in supporting us in this endeavour. I would like to mention Alejandra Deij, Nora Rocca, and all the members of the local Organising Committee, together with Zentidos, Concepción Convention Bureau, and Sernatur. We are also greatly indebted to the Rector of the University of Concepción, the Vice Rector, and the President of the Regional Government for their unconditional support. WorldCALL 2018 is also very special in another way. For some years, colleagues and I have been trying to stimulate the formation of a Latin CALL Association to unite CALL scholars, developers, and practitioners in Latin America. We know for a fact that there are many spread around the southern part of the American continent. We hope this initiative has an effect on CALL researchers and practitioners in the region that could establish network relationships with other sister organizations and convene to organise an annual conference that, in turn, would help build up more networking. This annual conference and networking would inevitably lead to projects, collaboration, joint endeavours, and ultimately would help establish a community of practice. I hope you will all help me in this! As the theme of the conference suggests, we have tried to reach out to the vibrant community of Computer-Assisted Language Learning practitioners, developers and researchers at large by ¨CALLing all the CALLers Worldwide.¨ We hope you enjoy Concepción, a lively, friendly and bustling city in the Bío Bío region, and the many cultural attractions and gastronomic delicacies it has to offer its visitors. Welcome to WorldCALL! Welcome to Concepción! Professor Ana Gimeno Chair, WorldCALL 2018 Conference Steering Committee Executive Director of WorldCALL Department of Applied Linguistics Universitat Poiltècnica de València, Spain

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Welcome from the Chair, WorldCALL 2018 Local Organising Committee Dear WorldCALL 2018 attendees, I am very pleased to wish a warm welcome to all of you, the participants of the WorldCALL 2018 Conference: “¡Bienvenidos a la Universidad de Concepción, Chile!” The WorldCALL 2018 Conference will be the first WorldCALL Conference to take place in Chile, a long-awaited dream, and first time ever in Latin America. Chile, which means “where the land ends” in the native Mapuche language, is comprised of a narrow strip of land between the Andes Mountains and Pacific Ocean. Concepción is Chile’s second largest city, a former capital, and the place where the nation declared its independence from Spain in 1818. Today, it is a major center for education, arts, and music known for its museums, theaters, and other cultural venues. The city is located minutes away from the Pacific Ocean, with its beaches and worldclass surfing, and only a couple of hours from ski centers in the Andes Mountains. It is also a gateway to southern Chile’s unspoiled native forests, volcanoes, lakes, and fjords. You can be assured an outstanding stay in this wonderful city. The conference will be hosted on the beautiful grounds of the Universidad de Concepción, one of the top universities in Latin America and home to our b-learning environment UdeC English Online. I welcome you to our campus with pleasure and confidence, knowing that you will enjoy its remarkable mix of classicism and modernity, watched over by a background of rolling, green hills. I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone that made the WorldCALL 5 conference a reality. There’s the WorldCALL Steering Committee, who trusted us to carry out this unique event, the Local Organising Committee members and assistants who all endeavored to make WorldCALL 5 a reality, and the Universidad de Concepción’s authorities for the support provided to carry out this conference on our campus. I would also like to express my deep gratitude to the Regional Government, Sernatur, Concepción Convention Bureau, and the many others that made this conference possible – a list so long that it would be impossible to name everyone. Most importantly, I would like to thank you! Whether you are attending your first WorldCALL conference or have been to other conferences that WorldCALL has held around the world, I appreciate you for coming to this unique event. I hope that you take home great memories, new resources, and friendships that will help you to further develop the field of CALL, wherever you are located. It gives me great pleasure to welcome you to Concepción! Professor Emerita Bañados-Santana Chair, WorldCALL 2018 Local Organizing Committee Director, UdeC English Online

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Campus Map – Universidad de Concepción

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Keynote Speaker – Mike Levy BIO: Dr. Mike Levy is an Honorary Professor at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. His research work focuses on CALL (Computer-Assisted Language Learning), and includes studies on the distinctive role of technology in mediating language learning, including how the technology itself shapes the interaction at both the macro and the micro level. His interests span theory, design and practice and his work has included studies on digital media, mobile language learning, dictionary use, online cultures, teacher education and learner training. Professor Levy has published over 50 research articles on CALL. His sole, co-authored or edited books include: Computer-Assisted Language Learning (OUP, 1997), CALL Dimensions (Erlbaum 2006, with Glenn Stockwell) and Teacher Education in CALL (Benjamins 2006, with Phil Hubbard). In 2015, he received the article of the year award for the CALICO Journal. In this article, he examined the role of qualitative research and CALL. He has continued working in this area, and is currently a guest editor for a special issue of Language Learning and Technology on qualitative research for publication in 2018. He is on the editorial boards of ReCALL, CALICO, Language Learning & Technology and System. He has been closely involved with WorldCALL since its inception with the first Conference held in Melbourne, Australia in 1998. With each of the preceding four conferences, he has been the lead editor or co-editor of a book or journal special issue centred around the conference theme.

ABSTRACT: WorldCALL Then and Now – Engagement, Adaptation, and Change Much has changed since the first WorldCALL Conference in Melbourne, Australia in 1998. Now, twenty years later we are successfully “installed” in Concepción, Chile at the fifth WorldCALL Conference. In the twenty years between these two events the world has become a very different place. As far as new technologies are concerned we have moved from a somewhat idealistic vision of the Internet to one that is far more nuanced and complex. Disruption and change now surround us in a more uncertain and unpredictable world (Foer, 2017; Greenfield, 2017). Compare, for example, Sherry Turkle’s relatively neutral title for her description of identities in ¨Life on the Screen¨ (1995) with her stance in the later work, ¨Alone together: Why we expect more from technology and less from each other¨ (2012). Events in the wider world – political, economic, social, technical – inevitably impact upon the lives of educators and their students, often in subtle ways, if not directly. Constant reappraisal is required; adjustments need to be made. After all, our students do not remain with us forever. We are always, in a sense, helping prepare them for what comes after when they find their place in the wider community. This presentation examines some of the key changes as they may relate to the implementation and use of new technologies in language learning. Thus, it will consider current notions of literacy, input/output (humans/computers), and what might now constitute the ‘authentic’, as in language learning tasks and materials (reading/listening). Some broader issues will also be included such as those arising from developments in AI, machine translation, automation, gaming, privacy, copyright, and safety online. Across this complexity, the goal is to highlight the connectivity between the wider world and the world of the language classroom. Through increased awareness and informed debate, it is hoped this will place us in a stronger position to understand and plan for the changes ahead.

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Keynote Speakers – Joan-Tomás Pujolà and Christine Appel BIO (Joan-Tomás Pujolà): Dr. Joan-Tomàs Pujolà holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He is a senior lecturer at the Department of Language Education of the Faculty of Education at the University of Barcelona (UB) and coordinator of the PhD Program in Teaching Languages and Literature. He has been director of the Masters’ degree in Training of Teachers of Spanish as a Foreign Language (UB and Pompeu Fabra University) and is currently co-director of the distance learning version of the same Masters’ degree (UNIBA-UB). He is currently the principal investigator of the research group realTIC (Research in teaching and learning languages with ICT). He is also the coordinator of the consolidated group of teaching innovation DIDAL_UB (Dynamics of Educational Innovation for Language Learning) at the UB. Dr. Pujolà was awarded the first EUROCALL Research Award in 2001 for the work developed in his doctoral thesis. His research focuses on various topics related to CALL: the educational potential of web 2.0, the multimodal aspects of internet communication and the power of images to reflect learning processes, the interactivity of teaching digital materials developed for language learning, and feedback processes in distance language learning and teaching. Recently he is working on researching innovative methodologies to improve the teaching and learning of foreign languages, such as the implementation of mobile learning, PLEs, flipped classroom, and gamification. He has collaborated with Dr. Appel (UOC) in the developing of tandemMOOC and in the GAMELEX project.

BIO (Christine Appel): Christine Appel is a senior lecturer in the Centre for Modern Languages at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) in Barcelona, where she coordinates EFL courses and training programmes for online language teachers. At UOC she has contributed to the innovation of online teaching practices in her role as director of the eLearn Center, in charge of the educational model of the university, and as coordinator of European projects including SpeakApps which received the Learning Impact Awards 2014, Silver medal, IMS Global Learning Consortium. Dr. Appel holds a PhD in Applied Linguistics from Trinity College, University of Dublin and has been involved in the teaching of languages, teacher training and research in CALL for over 20 years in her positions in Trinity College, University of Dublin, Dublin City University and currently UOC. Her current research interests include tandem language learning, CMC, oral production and speaking interaction online, task-based learning, teacher training, computer-supported collaborative learning in the L2, L2 learning and social networks and gamification. She is a member of the research group realTIC (Research in teaching and learning languages with ICT). Current projects in which she is involved have an emphasis on innovation in the area of online teaching and learning of languages and include the tandemMOOC project, and Gamelex. Both projects are in collaboration with Dr.Pujolà.

ABSTRACT: Challenging Our CALLing – Empowering the Language Learner 10


The use of technology in language teaching education has played a key part in placing language learners in the centre of the learning process, empowering them and maximising involvement in their teaching-learning processes. CALL is instrumental for learner autonomy. ‌. Or are we fooling ourselves into technology use complacency? Are we CALLers giving a real voice to our students? New technologies are continuously emerging and new modes of communication are becoming part of learners’ lives. Learners today have all the information they need at their fingertips and can connect with people around the globe anytime, anywhere. Exciting new learning scenarios allow teachers and learners to work with texts that go beyond the traditional written and oral formats. Yet, we are still far from realizing all the existing potential and help the learner be the real protagonist. During this keynote we will explore different CALL scenarios within a framework of personalised learning, and how we should conceptualize our CALLing as language teachers, designers and lifelong learning professionals as we strive to empower learners who are, after all, the true CALLers.

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Keynote Speakers – João Telles BIO: Dr. Telles has been a visiting professor, workshop leader, and lecturer in several universities in the Americas, Asia, and Europe in the areas of CALL, transcultural communication, and discourse and learning foreign languages in teletandem. He was a visiting professor at the Universitè Charles-de-Gaulle, Lille III, France (2003) and at Georgetown University (2014-15), USA. For twenty years, as an Associate Professor, he was in charge of the Foreign Language Teaching Practicum, undergraduate level, in the Department of Education, UNESP – Universidade Estadual Paulista at Assis, Brazil. He taught in the Graduate Program of Language Studies, UNESP - Rio Preto where he supervised several Master dissertations and Ph.D. theses. He has a Ph.D. in Educational Linguistics from OISE – Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, Canada, and a MA in Applied Linguistics (Foreign Language Acquisition) from the Catholic University of São Paulo, Brazil In 2006, Professor Telles was the creator of a pioneering project of telecollaboration in Latin America and the world – Teletandem: Foreign Languages for All. The project aimed at providing democratic access to foreign languages and cultures by economically and socially challenged students of UNESP – São Paulo State University. These students were isolated in a small city in the southeastern inlands of Brazil. They would be future teachers of foreign languages in the Brazilian public school system and they needed oral practice in the foreign language and development of awareness of cultural differences between Brazil and other countries. Dr. Telles, a tandem learner of Italian language himself, transferred the principles of face-to-face foreign language learning in tandem (autonomy, reciprocity, and one language at a time) to the virtual, interactive and collaborative context of learning foreign languages – a teletandem. That was done by the new (at the time) text, voice and webcam image resources of VOIP technology of the Windows Live Messenger. The combination of these resources allowed the students to collaborate online in learning each other’s languages. The project received financial support from FAPESP – The São Paulo State Foundation for the Support of Research. Computers with webcams were installed in a language lab. For the last ten years, Teletandem Brazil has been pairing Brazilian students of UNESP with students from universities around the world to learn Portuguese and other languages. So far, the project generated several and relevant Ph.D. theses, MA dissertations and publications about learning foreign languages in teletandem, telecollaboration and the development of foreign language teachers for teletandem mediation sessions. By means of visiting professorships and online teacher workshops about telecollaboration, teletandem mediation sessions and learner strategies, the Brazilian research team has been assisting several universities in the Americas and Europe in the implementation of their own teletandem programs. ABSTRACT: The Performativity of National Identities in Telecollaboration Teletandem is a virtual, autonomous, and collaborative context where pairs of foreign language students help each other learn their native languages (or language or proficiency) by using text, voice, and webcam images of apps such as Skype and, most recently, Zoom. After presenting an overview of the state of the art of research on teletandem, the lecture will present the concepts of performativity and transculturality as future alternative guidelines for foreign language teachers to grapple issues of cultures and expression of national identities in students’ telecollaboration through teletandem. The lecture may be of interest to those whose work and research focus on developing students' awareness of transcultural discourse.

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Keynote Speakers – Carol Chapelle BIO: Carol A. Chapelle, Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Professor of TESL/applied linguistics, is Co-Editor of the Cambridge Applied Linguistics Series. Her research explores issues at the intersection of computer technology and applied linguistics. Her books are Computer Applications in Second Language Acquisition: Foundations for Teaching, Testing, and Research (Cambridge University Press, 2001) and English Language Learning and Technology: Lectures on Applied Linguistics in the Age of Information and Communication Technology (John Benjamins, 2003). Other books focus on language assessment and research methods: Assessing Language Through Technology (Chapelle & Douglas; Cambridge University Press, 2006), Inference and Generalizability in Applied Linguistics (Chalhoub-Deville, Chapelle & Duff, editors; John Benjamins Publishing, 2006), ESOL Tests and Testing: A resource for Teachers and Administrators (Stoynoff & Chapelle; TESOL Publications, 2005). Her most recent books are Building a Validity Argument for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (Routledge, 2008) and Tips for Teaching with CALL (Pearson-Longman, 2008). She is Past President of the American Association for Applied Linguistics (2006-2007) and former editor of TESOL Quarterly (1999-2004), Her papers have appeared in journals such as TESOL Quarterly, Language Learning, Language Testing, and Language Learning & Technology, as well as in Handbooks and Encyclopaedias of Applied Linguistics. She teaches courses in applied linguistics at Iowa State University and has taught in Arizona, Denmark, Hawai'i, Michigan, Spain, and Quebec. She has lectured at conferences in Canada, Chile, England, France, Germany, Japan, Iceland, Mexico, Morocco, Scotland, Singapore, South Korea, Spain, and Taiwan.

ABSTRACT: Recalibrating Content-Related Strategies for Language Learning in the Digital Age Technology provides access to an unprecedented array of content for use in language learning. Once relegated to the study of language for specific purposes, the content of language learning tasks today is recognized as central to the pedagogical choices made by teachers, material developers, and curriculum designers. The centrality of content is evident in all forms of CALL activities from advanced-level, data-driven learning in corpus-based CALL to Internet collaborations for intermediate learners, and a range of materials for input, interaction and controlled production for beginners. These CALL pedagogies can enrich the experiences of learners, but challenges remain for maximizing the affordances of new technologies to make the most of content in, for example, corpora selected for investigation, topics for collaboration, and subject matter chosen to provide comprehensible input for language learning tasks. By illustrating selected pedagogies in CALL, this paper will demonstrate the need to recalibrate our strategies for working with the academic, personal and social content that is integral to language learning. With respect to academic content used in corpus-based pedagogies, how can teachers and material developers teach the scientific and technical language of academic English registers that are relevant to individual students? For cross-cultural collaborations on the internet, how can teachers scaffold the interpersonal language and cultural knowledge needed for productive collaboration and development of intercultural competence? When selecting materials to provide input, how can teachers provide beginners with interesting and current content that opens the door to the real-world societies of the languages they are teaching? I show that current technology-based practices and affordances challenge the profession to improve strategies for engaging with language and content in order to maximize the potential of technology as a tool for connecting learners to the world of language learning opportunities. I argue that CALL professionals are ideally suited to do so because of the dynamic, content-rich pedagogy inherent to learning through CALL.

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WorldCALL Scholarship Recipients One of the goals of WorldCALL is to provide as many scholarships as possible for professional development to those who are working with CALL in developing countries so that they can benefit from the exchange of ideas and make contact with leaders in the field. The scholarship committee, under the chairmanship of Thomas Robb, has worked diligently to allocate scholarships and work with successful recipients to plan their trips. We are delighted to announce the scholarship recipients who are joining us at WorldCALL 2018.

Recipients:

Country

Muhammed Shahriar Haque

Bangladesh

Ildeniz Ă–zverir

Turkey

Tesfamichael Getu

Ethiopia

Carlos Javier Saavedra Robles

Honduras

Alvita Kurniawati

Indonesia

Doris Molero

Argentina

Long V. Nguyen

Vietnam

Nu Thuy Uyen Nguyen

Vietnam

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Tuesday, November 13th 08:00-18:30

Registration

09:30-11:00

Workshop 1 (Part 1): Using Technology to Enhance English Language Learning Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Ignacio Ulloa Contreras, Ariadna Pinto Avilez

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Workshop 2 (Part 1): Revisiting Classroom Activities and Dynamics Through M-Learning Apps – Version 3.0 Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Alexandra Simões Andrade

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

Workshop 3 (Part 1): Language Teaching and Learning with Corpus Linguistics – CQPweb and #Lancsbox Corpora & Databases for Language Learning Andressa Rodrigues Gomide

Edificio CFRD, Room PC2

Workshop 4 (Part 1): The Use of Academic Corpora in Pre-Service Teacher Education Corpora & Databases – Vocabulary Juan Molina Farfán, María Graciela Badilla

Edificio CFRD, Room PC3

Workshop 5 (Part 1): What Are You APP to? Spicing up Your Classes Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Juan Guillermo Cuevas Lepe Colloquium 1: Clistore – An Open-Access Multilingual Dictionary Interface and Authoring Tool for Language Teachers Ana Gimeno

Edificio CFRD, Multimedia Room

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break

11:30-13:00

Workshop 1 (Part 2): Using Technology to Enhance English Language Learning Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Ignacio Ulloa Contreras, Ariadna Pinto Avilez

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Workshop 2 (Part 2): Revisiting Classroom Activities and Dynamics Through M-Learning Apps – Version 3.0 Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Alexandra Simões Andrade

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

Workshop 3 (Part 2): Language Teaching and Learning with Corpus Linguistics – CQPweb and #Lancsbox Corpora & Databases for Language Learning Andressa Rodrigues Gomide

15

Edificio CFRD, Room PC2


Workshop 4 (Part 2): The Use of Academic Corpora in Pre-Service Teacher Education Corpora & Databases – Vocabulary Juan Molina Farfán, María Graciela Badilla Workshop 5 (Part 2): What Are You APP to? Spicing up Your Classes Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Juan Guillermo Cuevas Lepe Colloquium 2: M-Learing, Active Learning Joan-Tomás Pujolà

Edificio CFRD, Room PC3

Edificio CFRD, Multimedia Room

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

13:00-15:00

Lunch (not provided)

15:00-16:30

Symposium 1 (Part 1): Sustainability and Inter-University Collaboration in Higher Education Capacity Building for English for Specific and Academic Purposes (ESAP) Cross-Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Lut Baten, Claudia Harsh, Liliana del Pilar, Ana Fernández, Sake Jager

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Workshop 6 (Part 1): Creating Information Gap Activities in Moodle Using Groups, Access Restrictions, and the Database Module Design & Development of CALL Language Learning Activities David Campbell

Edificio CFRD, Room PC2

Workshop 7 (Part 1): Bringing the Real World into the EFL Classroom Through Computer Assisted Authentic Activities Design & Development of CALL Language Learning Activities Ildeniz Özverir

Edificio CFRD, Room PC3

Not Specified

Workshop 8 (Part 1): Effectively Inserting Mobile Learning into the EFL Classroom Course Management Systems Alexandra Simões Andrade Colloquium 3: Task Design for Online Speaking Practice Christine Appel

Edificio CFRD, Multimedia Room

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

16:30-17:00

Coffee Break

17:00-18:30

Symposium 1 (Part 2): Sustainability and Inter-University Collaboration in Higher Education Capacity Building for English for Specific and Academic Purposes (ESAP) Cross-Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Lut Baten, Claudia Harsh, Liliana del Pilar, Ana Fernández, Sake Jager

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Workshop 6 (Part 2): Creating Information Gap Activities in Moodle Using Groups, Access Restrictions, and the Database Module

Edificio CFRD, Room PC2

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

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Mobile Technologies & Language Learning David Campbell Workshop 7 (Part 2): Bringing the Real World into the EFL Classroom Through Computer Assisted Authentic Activities Design & Development of CALL Language Learning Activities Ildeniz Özverir Workshop 8 (Part 2): Effectively Inserting Mobile Learning into the EFL Classroom Course Management Systems Alexandra Simões Andrade Colloquium 4: Teachers' Shared Reflection on the Dimensions of Telecollaboration João Telles 18:30-19:30

Itata Valley Wine Tasting

Edificio CFRD, Room PC3

Edificio CFRD, Multimedia Room

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

Wednesday, November 14th 08:00-20:30

Registration

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

09:00-10:00

Opening Ceremony

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

10:00-10:50

Keynote Speech WorldCall Then and Now – Engagement, Adaptation, and Change Mike Levy

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

11:00-11:30

Coffee Break

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

11:30-12:00

Reflective Practice: Implementing 21st-Century Skills in Teaching EFL Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Hiroyuki Obari

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: Developing a Body of Knowledge – Working with Corpora in an Undergraduate Italian Subject Corpora & Databases Matt Absalom

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Reflective Practice: Towards a New Task Design Model – A Research-Based Approach for Telecollaboration and Beyond CALL Framework Jozef Colpaert

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Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte


12:15-12:45

Research: Debates to Build Professional Language Performance in English Collaborative Learning – Speaking Soraya García-Sánchez

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Not all MMOGs are Created Equal – A Framework for Evaluating the Social L2 Learning Potential of Vernacular Games CALL Framework Jonathon Reinhardt

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research and Development: Mobile Language Learning for Social Inclusion with Arabic Speakers Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Pronunciation Linda Bradley, Khaled Al-Sabbagh

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Perceptions of High School L2 Listeners on Video-Based Captions Learner Behaviour – Listening Daniela Ramírez Orellana, Mónica Cárdenas-Claros

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Reflective Practice: CALL in Multicultural and Multilingual Learning Intercultural Language Learning Anna Kyppo, Teija Natri

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: BMELTET – Blending MOOCs for English Language Teacher Education with Telecollaboration Collaborative Learning Marina Orsini-Jones

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: O MOODLE Espaço Colaborativo para o Ensino de Língua Materna Collaborative Learning Gizele Santos de Araujo

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

Reflective Practice: Exploring Mobile Support for English Language Teachers in a Context of Conflict – The Case of Informal Syrian Refugee Teachers in Jordan Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Gary Motteram, Nasmi Al Masri, Heba Hamouda, Shai Omarali

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: English Students´ Oral Corpus in Chile – Design, Structure and Applications Corpora & Databases Chinger Zapata

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Research: Expert Views on Competencies and Expertise in CALL CALL Framework Jeong-Bae Son Research and Development: Perspectives and Trajectories of Language Teachers in the 21st Century – An AILA Research Network

18

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec


Cross-Institutional Collaborations for Teacher Professional Development Ursula Stickler, Regine Hampel, Sarah Heiser Reflective Practice: Flipping for Autonomy – Developing LA in a Flipped Environment CALL Environments Christian Ludwig

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research: The Use of Soramimi for Native-Like English Pronunciation in Japanese Students Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Pronunciation Jeremy White, Ryo Jajika, Ryosuke Yamanishi

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Interaction of L2 Listeners with Help Options in Computer-Based Listening Materials Learner Behavior – Listening Mónica Cárdenas-Claros

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Research and Development: Developing Intercultural Awareness Through Online Exchange Intercultural Language Learning Pasi Puranen

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: Managing a Virtual Immersion Program Telecollaboration in Language Learning Rachida Primov

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Analyzing Digital Literacy Practices via L2 Collaborative Reading Collaborative Learning – Reading Joshua Thoms, Fred Poole 13:00-15:00

Lunch & Poster Sessions Vietnam's Mother-Tongue-Based Bilingual Education for Ethnic Minority Children Hanh Nguyen Thi Bich Methods of Literacy Skills Education of Syrian and Persian Migrants’ Children – Widespread Problems of Teaching in German-Only Barbara Kolkmann-Klamt The Individual Innovativeness Theory – A Framework for CALL Research Claudia Monte Jorge Martins CALL Literacy – A New Model Dara Tafazoli A Principled Approach to Using New Technologies in Language Teaching Paul Lyddon A Collaborative Recursive Cycle in Distance Education Vanessa Ribas Fialho,Vilson J. Leffa, Alan Ricardo Costa, André Firpo Beviláqua

19

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room Empreudec Parking Lot Tent


Pedagogical Implementation of Multimodal Teaching in College English Audio-Video Speaking Class Shan Li, Zhihong Lu Linguavision, a Singing Competition for Language Learners Michael Barker The Design and Use of a Bilingual Essay Corpus Sumie Akutsu Teachers' Perceptions Toward Using Clilstore, a CLIL-Specific Authoring Tool and Repository Ana Gimeno Formative Proposal for the Increase of Innovation and Entrepreneurship Skills in Engineering Students Nicolás Mardones Pérez, Ariel Leiva López, José Ahumada Alveal 15:00-15:30

Reflective Practice: What is the Desirable Dictionary Interface to EFL Learners? Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Toshiko Koyama

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Corpus-Based Materials in an Academic Writing Context – Learning the Meta-Discourse Recourses of a Written Text Corpora & Databases Susan Marandi, Katayoun Rezaie

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Reflective Practice: The Use of ICTs as a Resource for Teacher Training Program in a Brazilian Context Teacher Professional Development Paula Graciano Pereira

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Technology Showcase: Platform Design for Autonomy Course Management Systems Luis Gonzalez, Jayshri Mizeret-Lad

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research and Development: My Speech Trainer (Myst) – Improving Academic English through Automatic Speech Recognition Technology Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Speaking Helmer Strik, Catia Cucchiarini

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Perception and Attitude towards Local Developed Educational English Video Clips – A Case Study in a University in the IX Region of Chile Learner Behavior – Videos Margot Godoy Peña, Silvana Flores, Espinoza, Olusiji Lasekan

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Reflective Practice: EFL Teacher Perceptions of Intercultural Digital Literacy in Using Skype for Classroom Telecollaboration Intercultural Language Learning – Telecollaboration Christopher Allen

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

20


Research: Embracing Queer/Cross Cultural Awareness in Foreign Language Education through Social Media and Digital Literature Online Communities Thorsten Merse 15:00-16:15

Symposium (Part 1): Getting Published in CALL Journals Cross Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Marta Gonzalez-Lloret, Ursula Stickler, David Barr, Ana Gimeno, Jozef Colpaert, Trude Heift, Ana Oskoz, Bryan Smith, Mathias Schulz Symposium (Part 1): CALL for Help: Critical CALL for Diversity, Inclusion and Sustainability Growing Diverse Online Communities of Language Learners/Teachers Louise Ohashi, Philip Hubbard, Mark Pegrum, Sarah Guth, Mirjam Hauck, Francesca Helm

15:45-16:15

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

Research: How is MALL Mobile? Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Heather Dianne Lotherington

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Improving Data Analysis Training through Digital Mindmapping and Digital Data Matrix Building Corpora & Databases Liliana Cuesta Medina

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Reflective Practice: Language and Technology – The Creation of a CALL Discipline for Future English Teachers Teacher Professional Development Claudia Monte, Jorge Martins, Eglantine Guély Costa

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Research & Development: Climbing a Mountain – Learning Slovak in New Language Learning Environments CALL Environments Anna Kyppo

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Reflective Practice: Micro-Credentials and Digital Badges – A Framework for Learner-Centeredness and Learner Autonomy Learner Autonomy Jun Iwata, Shudong Wang, John Telloyan, Lynne Murphy, John Clayton

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research: Towards a Framework for Flipped Language Learning and Teaching CALL Framework Yuping Wang

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Research: International Virtual Exchange Project – Improving Students´ Language and Inter-Cultural Development Intercultural Language Learning – Telecollaboration Eric Hagley, Rubén Pulgarín Cruz, David Campbell

21

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería


Research: Learners´ Multimodal Identities Construction in Online Telecollaborative Interaction Telecollaboration in Language Learning Hsin-I Chen

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

16:30-17:10

Coffee Break

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

17:10-17:40

Research and Development: Data Visualization for Corpus Linguistics Software – Enhancing Learners´ Experience Corpora & Databases Andressa Rodigues Gomide

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Symposium (Part 2): Getting Published in CALL Journals Cross-Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Marta Gonzalez-Lloret, Ursula Stickler, David Barr, Ana Gimeno, Jozef Colpaert, Trude Heift, Ana Oskoz, Bryan Smith, Mathias Schulz Reflective Practice: Pre-Service Teachers´ Training for MALL Teacher Professional Development Mar Gutiérrez-Colón Plana

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Research and Development: Saving the High Street – Designing Online Study for Local Business Design & Development of Language Learning Systems Noriko Maki, Eucharia Donnery, Don Maybin

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Impact of Online Dialogue Journal Writing on Students´ Writing Anxiety Learner Behaviour in Online Journal Writing Siew Ming Thang, Anne Rowena David, Hazita Azman

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Research: Teachers’ Perceptions of Technology Use for Raising Students´ Intercultural Awareness Intercultural Language Learning-Teacher Professional Development Tiare González-Vidal, Paul Moore

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: CALL for Less Commonly Taught Languages – Does it Really Make a Difference? CALL & Particular Languages, Groups or Regions Monica Ward

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Symposium (Part 2): CALL for Help: Critical CALL for Diversity, Inclusion and Sustainability Growing Diverse Online Communities of Language Learners/Teachers Louise Ohashi, Philip Hubbard, Mark Pegrum, Sarah Guth, Mirjam Hauck, Francesca Helm 18:00-19:00

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Coach (bus) Transfer to Teatro Bío Bío

22

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room


19:00-20:30

Welcome Reception

Teatro Bío Bío (offsite)

Thursday, November 15th 08:00-17:45

Registration

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

09:00-10:00

Keynote Speech Challenging our CALLing – Empowering the Language Learner Joan Tomàs Pujolà & Christine Appel

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

10:15-10:45

Symposium (Part 1): Dimensions of the UdeC English Online B-Learning Environment Blended Learning Emerita Bañados, Patricia Bañados-Lanyon, Katherine Araya, Patricia Carrillo, Angela Acuña, Alejandra Deij, Carmen Morales Mella, Camila Navarrete, David Julien, Benjamin Walters, Michael Ellsworth, Luis Marín, Nicolás Campos, Daniela Sanchez

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: The Use of Database in Conventional Classrooms of Spanish Corpora & Databases Takeshi Kakihara, Kenichi Kamiya

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Research: Silence as a Challenge – How Online Language Teachers Deal with the Void Call Framework Ursula Stickler Reflective Practice: CALL in the Initial Teacher Education in Brazil – Reflecting on Its Challenges and Opportunities Teacher Professional Development Cíntia Lacerda Rabello

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Reflecting on ePortfolio Practice – A Novel Language Learning Environment and Catalyst for Change in EAP Practice CALL Environments – EAP Peggy Hartwick, Julie Mccarroll, Allie Davidson

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Reflective Practice: The Use of a Mobile Application to Raise Vocabulary Awareness in Academic Contexts Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Vocabulary Juan Molina Farián, Marcelo Careaga Butter

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Reflective Practice: Exploring Flipped English Classroom Impact on EFL Learners’ Grammar Learning Learner Behaviour – Flipped Classroom Zeynep Kocoglu, Cem Bulut

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

23


Reflective Practice: Social Engagement in the Digital Wild – Developing Intercultural Competence by Participating in Online Communities Intercultural Language Learning in Online Communities Ellen Yeh, Nicholas Swinehart

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: Re-Foundationing the Language Center – A Support Model for Online Instruction Online Learning Andrew Ross

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Symposium (Part 1): How Technological and Collaborative Innovation Help Promote the Teaching of Less Commonly Taught Languages Across Institutions in the USA Cross Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Koen Van Gorp, Christopher Kaiser, Ahmet Dusun, Nocholas Swinehart, Luca Giupponi, Emily Heidrich, Lauren B Rozen

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

10:45-11:30

Coffee Break

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

11:30-12:00

Research and Development: Engaged CALL – Evidence of the Positive Effects of Learner Engagement in CMC Tasks Learner Behaviour in Online Learning Tim Marchand

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Research and Development: Learning English as a Foreign Language With Duolingo App Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Adriana Sambugaro de Mattos Brahim, Andreia de Jesus, Amanda Ferrari Cândido, Gabriel Rossetto Marques, Luana Bento, Luana Guerra de Oliveira Morimoto Reflective Practice: Contents of a CALL Professional Development Course for Academic English Teachers Teacher Professional Development Hora Hedayati

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Design and Development of an Online Platform to Facilitate English Learning and Teaching at Universidad de Atacama CALL Environments – B-Learning María E. Pilar, Franco Torrejón, Lorena Campos Martinez, Patricio Marré Reygada

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research: “Language Learning on Tap!” Twitter as an Autonomous Language Learning Tool – The Learners’ Perspective Mobile Technologies & Language Learner – Twitter Fernando Rossell-Aguilar

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Chatbots for Informal Language Learning Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Antonie Aim

Auditorio Facultad de Ingeniería Comercial

24


11:30-12:45

Research and Development: Collaborative Partnerships in CALL Materials Development Design & Development of CALL Materials Caoimhín Ó Dónaill

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: Fostering E-Social Presence in a Distance Course at a Traditional F2F University Online Learning Liliana Simón

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Symposium (Part 2): Dimensions of the UdeC English Online B-Learning Environment Blended Learning Emerita Bañados, Patricia Bañados-Lanyon, Katherine Araya, Patricia Carrillo, Angela Acuña, Alejandra Deij, Carmen Morales Mella, Camila Navarrete, David Julien, Benjamin Walters, Michael Ellsworth, Luis Marín, Nicolás Campos, Daniela Sanchez Symposium (Part 2): How Technological and Collaborative Innovation Help Promote the Teaching of Less Commonly Taught Languages Across Institutions in the USA Cross Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Koen Van Gorp, Christopher Kaiser, Ahmet Dusun, Nocholas Swinehart, Luca Giupponi, Emily Heidrich, Lauren B. Rozen

12:15-12:45

Research and Development: A Data-Driven Approach to Generate Partial and Synchronized Caption for Second-Language Listeners Corpora & Databases – Listening Kourosch Meshai, Maryam Sadat Mizaei Research and Development: Effective Models and Guidelines for Large-scale Distance Learning Projects CALL Framework Tania Davidson Reflective Practice: E-learning At University Level – Exploring the Potential of Blogs for Collaborative Online Projects in Foreign Language Teacher Education Teacher Professional Development Thorsten Merse, Christian Ludwig

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Research and Development: Digital Stories to Improve Study Abroad Orientation Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Jeremy White

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Reflective Practice: Using WhatsApp for Teaching French as a Foreign Language Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – WhatsApp Daniel Kwang Guan Chan

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

25


Reflective Practice: Foreign Language Development and Motivation in Higher Education – The Case of Engineering Programs in Chile Learner Behavior Mariana Oyanedel

13:00-15:00

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Research and Development: The Pleasure of Authorship in Designing CALL Materials – How to Make it Happen Design & Development of CALL Materials Vilson J. Leffa, André Firpo Beviláqua, Alan Ricardo Costa, Vanessa Ribas Fialho

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Complexity of the Affordances of Emergent Mobile Technologies in K-12 Educational Context Mobile Technologies & Language Learning Martine Pellerin

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Lunch & Poster Sessions Mreader – Increasing Reading Comprehension via an Online System Harry Carley Increasing Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC) Through Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) – Meeting the Needs of Japanese University Students Eucharia Donnery Development and Assessment of ePortfolio Plugins to Assist EFL Learners' Goal-Setting and Self-Learning Kazumichi Enokida, Mitsuhiro Morita, Tatsuya Sakaue, Shusaku Kida Exploring Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in HE Language Courses Using MOOCs Barbara Conde Gafaro Tapping the Potential of Digital Technology to Transform Poster Presentations Jaime Selwood, Paul Lyddon The Impact of WhatsApp as a Tool to Develop Writing Zeynep Kocoglu, Ebru Noya Teaching and Learning Language through Social Networks Hom Raj Khadka, Sharmila Paudel The Impact of Using Memrise on Students' Vocabulary Learning and Their Perceptions to Support Practices in the Teaching of Vocabulary Italo Jara Parra The Use of WhatsApp to Learn English in the Amazon Allana Lima, Walkyria Magno E Silva, Roberto Luz da Silva The Impact Of Blended Professional Development On Rethinking Teaching Practices María Carolina Orgnero

26

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent


15:00-16:00

16:00-16:30

16:30-17:00

16:30-18:30

Keynote Speech Teletandem – The Performativity of National Identities in Telecollaboration João Telles

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Coffee Break

Empreudec Partking Lot Tent

Research and Development: A CALL Environment for Practice and Feedback on L2 Idiom Learning Corpora & Databases – Vocabulary Catia Cucchiarini, Ferdy Hubers, Helmer Strik

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Research and Development: A Framework for Enhancing Mobile LearnerDetermined Language Learning in Authentic Situational Contexts CALL Framework Agnieszka Palalas, Norine Wark, Przemyslaw Pawluk

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Research and Development: CALL – Pre-Teachers’ Experience in Learning and Using Digital Artifacts Teacher Professional Development Patricia Vasconcelos Almeida

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Confessions of a First-Time Hybrid Language Course Instructor – Lessons Learned and Questions for the Future CALL Environments – B-Learning Nina Langton

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research: WhatsApp as a Support for the Development of Deaf Portuguese Learners’ Autonomy in Language Advising Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – WhatsApp Eder Barbosa Cruz

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Reflective Practice: Using CALL to Design to Design a Self-Access Listening Course on Mobile Design & Development of CALL Materials – Listening Claudia Spataro

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: A Systematic Review of 3D Virtual Environments for Language Learning Virtual Reality Chunping Zheng, Linyu Xu, Quanqian Cheng, Zitong Yang, Mengya Gao, JyhChong Liang, Chin-Chun Tsai

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Gamification and Its Potential for Second Language Acquisition. Learner and Teacher Experience in a Six-Week Gamified Course for GFL Gamification Bart Pardoel, Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous, Androulla Athanasiou

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

Symposium: Telecollaborative Discourses – Examining L2 Learners’ Attitudes Towards the L2 Culture

27

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería


Cross-Institutional Collaboration to Disseminate Innovation Ana Oskoz, Mara González-Lloret, Ana María Gimeno Sanz, Margarita Vinagre Symposium: CALL Teacher Education – Lessons Learned from Experiences Teacher Professional Development Jeong-Bae Son, Mike Levy, Gary Motteram, Philip Hubbard

17:15-17:45

Research and Development: A Study of Effects of Collocational Tool on Learners’ Writing Corpora & Database – Writing Zeynep Kocoglu, Nursel Duransoy Reflective Practice: Learning English as a Second Language – Integrating Technology, Complexity and Task-Based Learning CALL Framework – Task Based Language Learning Juarez Lopez Research and Development: E-portfolios Scaffold English Language Teacher Development in Chile Teacher Professional Development Betsy Gililand, Katterine Pavez Bravo, Andrea Muloz Galleguillos

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Research: L2 Blended Learning in Chilean Higher Education – Perception of Students and Teachers CALL Environments – B-Learning Angie Fuentealba Cartes, Felipe Opazo Oyarzo

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research: WhatsAPP in a Foreign Language Learning and Teaching from A complexity Thinking Perspectivity Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – WhatsApp Shirlene Bemfica Oliveira

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Video Design and Use to Prepare Language Learners for Workplace Contexts Design & Development of CALL Materials – Videos Le Thi Hong Yo, Ayman Nassif

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Creating Flexible Spaces to Promote Language Interaction and Foster 21st Century Skills in 3DVLEs Virtual Reality Nuket Savaskan Nowlan, Nandmi Sama, Peggy Hartwick

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: Aucune Anomalie Détectée! Practice your French with Astronautes FLS Gamification Denis Liakin, Walcir Cardoso, David Waddington, Natallia Liakina Reflective Practice: Students’ Perceptions of Studying English Online Learner Behavior in Online Learning Gabriela Ibáñez Vasquez

28

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

Sala de Conferencia Facultad de Educación


18:00-18:30

Reflective Practice: The Adoption of Metacognitive Strategies as Predictors of Success Among Online Business English Students in Ecuador Learner Autonomy Christopher Allen, María del Carmen, Boloña López Technology Showcase: Strengthening Indigenous Language and Cultural Identity using Technology – Case Study CALL & Particular Languages, Groups or Regions Marion Bittinger Technology Showcase: Automatic Speech Scoring System Based on ROFALL Testing & Assessment Zhihong Lu

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Students' Perceptions of Studying English Online Learner Behaviour in Online Learning Gabriela Ibáñez Vásquez

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research: The Impact of the Use of Video Games as an Instructional Resource on Adult Learners’ Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition and Investment in EFL Gamification – Vocabulary Simón Cerda Acuña, Vicente Bañados Contreras, Camila Correa Ramirez, Sandy Isla Gutiérrez, Andrés Otárola Maldonado

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research: Examining Technology-Mediated Language Teaching And Learning In EAP Programs Online Communities – EAP Geoff Lawrence

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Technology Showcase: Why Should We Use Database Software Instead of PowerPoint? Intercultural Language Learning Kenichi Kamiya, Takeshi Kakihara

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: From Research on Pedagogy and Technology to Practice of Mobile Learner-Determined Language Learning Using Free Apps Mobile Technology & Language Learning Agnieska Palalas, Przemyslaw Pawluk, Norine Wark 18:30-19:30

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Itata Valley Wine Tasting

Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

Friday, November 16th 08:00-17:45

Registration

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

29


09:00-10:00

Keynote Speech Recalibrating Content-Related Strategies for Language Learning in the Digital Age Carol Chapelle

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

10:30-11:00

Reflective Practice: Building a Community of Readers – Motivation, Guidance, and Success in Extensive Reading Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Reading Cory Koby

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: Stories of Using Social Media in Second Language Teacher Education Social Networking Technologies Ana de Laurentiis Brandão

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Research: Relationship Between English Language Learners’ Technology Acceptance and Online Self-Regulation Learner Autonomy Chunping Zheng, Lili Wang, Jyh-Chong Liang, Chin-Chung Tsai Research: Promoting Pre-Service Language Teachers’ Inquiry Skills in a Blended Model Teacher Professional Development Sandra Morales

11:00-11:30

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Mapping Astoria – Engaging with the Multilingual City Using Digital Tools Worldwide Collaborative CALL Stephane Charitos, Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research and Development: A Comparison of APPS for English Language Learning Apps for Global Use Vera Menezes de Oliveira e Paiva

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Research: Brazilian University Professors’ Views on Teacher Education for CALL Teacher Professional Development Claudia Monte Jorge Martins, Carla Barsotti

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: A New Method for Summaries Evaluation on a Reading Comprehension Tool Testing & Assessment – Reading Diego Palma Sánchez, Christian Soto Fajardo, María Fernanda Rodríguez Poblete, Antonio Gutierrez

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Coffee Break

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent

30


11:30-12:00

Research and Development: The Scrolling Cloze Test as a Measurement Tool. Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Reading Thomas Robb

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Reflective Practice: Integrating Embedded Summary Writing into a Listening-Based Speaking Test for Chinese EFL Learners Testing & Assessment Zhihong Lu, Chunping Zheng, Fuan Wen

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

Research: English Language Learners’ Motivational Profiles and Their Role in Online Self-Regulation Learner Autonomy Chunping Zheng, Linyu Xu Research: An Action Learning Program for Technology Integration in EFL Classes Teacher Professional Development Finita Dewi

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Online Learning Through Virtual Exchange – A New Role for CALL Experts Worldwide Collaborative CALL Sake Jager

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research: Automated and Peer Feedback Within the Busuu Language Learning Social Networking Site APP Social Networking Technologies – Feedback Fernando Rosell-Aguilar

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research: An Explorative Study of Informal Online Language Learning Collaborations Learner Behaviour in Online Learning Anna Motzo

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Reflective Practice: Pecha Kucha for Improving Students’ Presentation Ability in Speaking Class CALL Materials – Speaking Patricia Angelina Lasut 12:15-12:45

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Online Extensive Reading in EAP Courses Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Reading Amy Marquardt

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Assessing the Validity of Educational Software for Foreign Language Learning Testing & Assessment Kyria Rebeca Finardi

Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

31


Research: Understanding Online Self-Regulated Learning from a Sociocultural Perspective – The Case of Eight High-Achieving EFL Learners Learner Autonomy Chunping Zheng, Mengya Gao, Lili Wang Research: Teacher Education and Professional Development – An Investigation on the Relationship Between ICT and Identity Constitution Teacher Professional Development Luciani Salcedo de Oliveira

13:00-15:00

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Research and Development: Be the Change, Take the Challenge – Teaching Sustainable Development Goals Worldwide Collaborative CALL Shirlene Bemfica de Oliveira Oliveira

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Reflective Practice: Voice Recording Assignments on Facebook Social Networking Technologies – Speaking Mari Yamauchi

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Research and Development: Exploiting Virtual Reality to Advance Sociocultural Knowledge for Language Learners Virtual Reality Maryam Sadat Mirzaei, Qiang Zhang, Stef van der Struijk, Toyoaki Nishida

Auditorio Facultad de Ingeniería Comercial

Research and Development: Preparing Pre-Service and in-Service Teachers for Implementing Technology-Enhanced TBLT in Public Schools in Brazil Teacher Professional Development – TBLT Silvia Penna, Anelisse Fonseca Dutra

Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research: Collaborative Writing of Argumentative Texts in English Pedagogy With ITC Collaborative Learning – Writing Lucía del Rosario Ubilla Rosales, Lilian Gómez Álvarez

Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería

Lunch & Poster Sessions Mobile-based English Dictionaries in Chinese EFL Learners’ Incidental Vocabulary Learning Danyang Zhang Using Podcasts to Improve Students’ English Language Skills Joe Lauer A Computer-Adaptive Training Mobile Application to Enhance Independent and Continuous Vocabulary Learning in English Hiroya Tanaka, Akio Ohnishi, Atsushi Mizumoto A Preliminary Analysis of Australia’s Readiness for E-Learning Siamak Mirzaei, James Wilden, Anna Shillabeer The Learning Potential of Podcasting in a Mobile World Jaime Selwood

32

Empreudec Parking Lot Tent


Improve Motivation and Participation in Students by Using CALL In and Out of the Classroom Camila Isadora Villalobos Meneses Weblogs in an Esp Context – Exploring Students´ Perceptions and the Impact on Students´ Web Literacy Skills Dánisa Salinas, Susana Díaz The role of ELT+IT in Promoting Global Collaboration and Networking Victor Rojas Bautista Open Educational Resources (OERs) in the Training of Language Educators – The Perspective of Critical Literacy André Firpo Beviláqua, Vilson J. Leffa, Alan Ricardo Costa, Vanessa Ribas Fialho Innovating Teaching in Engineering Careers – Results of a Pilot Plan on Active Learning Izaskun Álvarez-Aguado, Dominique Müller Pollmann, Jimena Pascual Concha 15:00-15:30

Research and Development: Improving Reading Comprehension in Spanish Using iSTART-E Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – Reading Christian Soto, Danielle McNamara, Kathryn S. McCarthy, Antonio Gutiérrez, Jordan González, Jianmin Dai, Cecilia Malbrán Research and Development: Gaining Control – Training in Conversation Management Through CALL Learner Autonomy – Speaking Don Maybin

15:00-17:00

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Research: Developing Pre-Service English Teachers' Visual Literacy – Applying Visual Representations to the Teaching of Literacy-Based Reading Teacher Professional Development Jun-Jie Tseng

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Gamifying Teacher Professional Development Through Minecraft MOOC Gamification – Teacher Professional Development Vance Stevens

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Research and Development: Integrating Task-Based CALL Activities in the Spanish Foreign Language Classroom to Enhance Speaking Skills Design & Development of CALL Activities – Speaking Daniel A. Castañeda

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Roundtable: Networking, Sustainability and Collaboration – Launching the LATIN CALL Association Symposium: Text-to-Speech Synthesis and L2 Education – Focus on Pronunciation Pronunciation Instruction in EFL Contexts

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Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería


Fernanda Soler Urzúa, Walcir Cardoso, Jennica Grimshaw, Tiago Bione, Tiago Bione Symposium: CALL Challenges Around the World: Voices of Experience Worldwide Collaborative CALL Thomas Robb, Muhammed Shahriar Haque, Ildeniz Özverir, Tesfamichael Getu, Carlos Javier Saavedra Robles, Alvita Kurniawati, Doris Molero,, Nu Thuy Uyen Nguyen 15:45-16:15

Research and Development: Effects on Teaching and Development of Reading Comprehension Through the Incorporation of the Methodology of Collaborative Learning with Portable Technology Mobile Technologies & Language Learning – 0Reading Miriam León Herrera, María Gricela Oyarzún Cornejo

Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería

Research and Development: Creating a Self – Access Learning Platform for Foreign Languages Course Management Systems Daniel Kwang Guan Chan, Wai Meng Chan

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Research: Giving Task Instructions in Online Language Teaching Via Webconferencing Teacher Professional Development Müge Satar, Ciara Wigham

16:30-17:00

Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria

Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Reflective Practice: Communicative and Symbolic Competence in Gamified Language Learning Activities in Mobile APPS Gamification Rafael Vetromille-Castro, Bruna Berres Hartmann

Auditorio Facultad de Educación

Reflective Practice: Can't Say You Didn't Know – Obliging Students to be Informed About Plagiarism Course Management Systems Roisin Dewart, Emily Rosales

Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas

Technology Showcase: The Importance of Integrating Didactical Methods and New Technologies Apps for Global Use – Speaking Maren Pauli

Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte

Technology Showcase: Extending Student Presentations Beyond the Classroom with Digital Storytelling “Moxtra” Apps for Global Use – Speaking Tim Knight

Reflective Practice: Digital Material Design and Meaningful Learning in Online Courses Offered by NUPEAD – Exploring Games and Gamification Strategies in Language Teaching

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Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec

Auditorio Facultad de Educación


Gamification Susana Dos Reis, Adilson Fernandes Gomes, Anidene Siqueira Cecchin Research and Development: Between Plagiarism and Co-Authorship in Open Educational Resources – Brazilian Language Teachers Making their Points Design & Development of OERs Alan Costa, André Firpo Beviláqua, Vanessa Ribas Fialho, Vilson J. Leffa 19:00-20:00

Coach (Bus) Transfer to Hotel Sonesta Salón Talcahuano

20:00

Closing Ceremony and Conference Gala Dinner

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Auditorio Facultad de Ingeniería Comercial

Hotel Sonesta Salón Talcahuano


A CALL Environment For Practice And Feedback On L2 Idiom Learning Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Catia Cucchiarini Centre for Language and Speech Technology, Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands c.cucchiarini@let.ru.nl Ferdy Hubers Centre for Language and Speech Technology, Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands Helmer Strik Centre for Language Studies, Radboud University Nijmegen, Netherlands ABSTRACT Formulaic expressions are highly conventionalized ways of expressing meanings through more or less fixed word combinations, which appear to be very frequent in native language, but less so in second language (Pawley & Sider, 1983; Siyanova, Conklin, & van Heuven, 2011). Research shows that learning idiomatic language in the L2 is important for various reasons. First, because a considerable proportion of language is idiomatic in nature (Pawley & Sider, 1983; Siyanova et al., 2011). Second, because learning idiomatic language has a positive effect on L2 proficiency (Boers et al., 2006; Hsu & Chiu, 2008). Third, because incorrect use of formulaic language can induce a processing burden in native listeners (Stengers et al., 2011; Millar, 2010). Idiomatic expressions are a particular category of formulaic language that turn out to be especially problematic for L2 learners (Cieślicka, 2006; Concklin & Schmitt, 2008; Steinel et al. 2007; Wray, 2000). The acquisition of idiomatic language can be facilitated through more intensive exposure to the target language as, for example, in studies abroad (Towell et al., 1996; Siyanova & Schmitt, 2008). Such high levels of exposure to the target language, and in particular, to idiomatic language cannot be achieved in traditional classroom environments. CALL systems can offer alternative solutions, but research so far has been limited. In this presentation we describe the CALL system and the idiom database and exercises we designed for practicing idiomatic expressions within our project on Idiomatic Second Language Acquisition (ISLA). We report on a study on CALLbased idiom learning. Dutch L2 students who were first pretested on their knowledge of Dutch and Dutch idioms participated in four consecutive experimental sessions. They practiced with Dutch idioms varying along relevant dimensions such as frequency, transparency (the degree of correspondence between the literal and the figurative meaning of an expression) and cross-language overlap (the extent to which L2 idioms exist in L1), and received automatic feedback from the system. The results show that CALL-based practice was effective in supporting L2 idiom learning and that cross-language overlap had a positive effect. Implications for future research and teaching practice will also be discussed.

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A Collaborative Recursive Cycle In Distance Education Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Vanessa Ribas Fialho Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil vanessafialho@gmail.com Vilson J. Leffa Universidade Católica de Pelotas, Brazil leffav@gmail.com Alan Ricardo Costa Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Brazil alan.dan.ricardo@gmail.com André Firpo Beviláqua Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil andre.firpo@gmail.com ABSTRACT The objective of this study is to investigate data collected from an online training course to teachers of Spanish as a foreign language, offered in sixth editions, using the recursive cycle of teaching materials in the analysis of what was produced by the teachers. The emphasis in on teachers’ practice in the design of Open Educational Resources (OERs), considering the reformulations introduced from one course edition to another, with different students and different instructors. These reformulations were applied to each of the recursive cycles, including needs analysis, materials development, implementation and evaluation as we moved forward in offering the courses. Needs analysis is concerned with meeting students’ interests and needs at the level they need help, avoiding teaching them what they already know or offering materials that is too difficult for them. Development involves aspects such as defining objectives, approaches, language content items and how to order them. Implementation is delivering the developed materials to students, which can be done online, face-to-face or in a blended learning situation. The evaluation cycle, finally, analyzes the results produced by the materials with the students. In our six editions of the courses we collected data from different teachers remaking materials previously designed by other teachers. This is what we understand as asynchronous collaboration, as seen from a historical perspective, constructed over time, in which we were looking for changes introduced in the developed materials as we move from semester to semester. The preliminary results show that while some features in the materials are preserved, others are removed or modified by the new teachers. We noticed that these changes occur mainly in terms of materials layout, which seems to be caused by new resources that become available for teachers and students, along with new pedagogical needs and teaching contexts. However, we still need to develop a culture of collaboration, which is necessary for teachers to produce OERs, either with their peers or from OERs repositories on the Internet.

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Comparison Of Apps For English Language Learning Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Econรณmicas y Administrativas Vera Lucia Menezes de Oliveira e Paiva Brazil vlmop@veramenezes.com Tiare Alejandra Gonzรกlez-Vidal ABSTRACT This paper presents a comparative evaluation of four mobile apps for English language learning: Duolingo, Busuu, ABA and Babbel. They were chosen because they are the most popular choices on the iTunes list of educational apps. Due to the fact that the first level lessons are free in all apps, this investigation only considered the first unit of each course by making a comparison of the following aspects: if apps were free or paid; price; course organization; feedback; concept of language underlying the lessons; teaching method; use of gamification; quality of input; reading activities, listening activities, speaking activities, vocabulary and degrees of interaction. The prevalent teaching method is translation with strong emphasis on vocabulary and grammar patterns. Since the concept of language underlying the four courses is that of a set of structures, there is no concern with authentic material. Text and audio input is often quite artificial, although Bussu and ABA offer more plausible input. The videos on ABA, although set out for instructional purposes, exhibit dialogs which resemble real life and emphasize intonation to produce meaning. The use of synthesized voices, such as on Duolingo, makes intonation artificial. ABA and Bussu offer the best material, although the other ones also present good quality such as ongoing feedback. Bussuu is the only one supported by a sociocultural perspective. It fosters interaction among students and encourages them to collaborate in a community of practice. None of the apps emphasize oral comprehension activities. Reading is limited to words, phrases and, in some cases, dialogs. As for writing, Busuu is the only app that offers contextualized writing activities. It offers better quality material, although it is not totally free. However, should the gratuity criterion be the most relevant for the learner, the only option left is Duolingo. A chart synthesizing the findings will be provided to the audience.

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A Computer-Adaptive Training Mobile Application To Enhance Independent And Continuous Vocabulary Learning In English Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Hiroya Tanaka Hokkai-Gakuen University, Japan tanaka-h@hgu.jp Akio Ohnishi VERSION2 Inc., Japan a-ohnishi@ver2.jp Atsushi Mizumoto Kansai University, Japan mizumoto@kansai-u.ac.jp ABSTRACT Vocabulary learning in another language requires learners to work independently and continuously both in and out of class. To help Japanese EFL learners customize their independent vocabulary learning according to their present vocabulary knowledge, we have developed a computer-adaptive training mobile application, DoraCAT, which allows learners to diagnose their vocabulary knowledge, select target words to learn, rehearse and memorize them, and review them to consolidate the knowledge. DoraCAT has a data set of 7,971 words at 19 difficulty levels from a nationwide English proficiency test, EikenÂŽ with example sentences. The learning cycle consists of three stages: the diagnostic test, the training mode, and the review mode. Learners first take a multiple-choice diagnostic test of 15 fill-in-the-blank sentences with Japanese translations. The item difficulty level is adjusted according to each item response. If the response is correct, the difficulty level goes up by one level. If it is incorrect, the level goes down by one level. After completing the test, learners get feedback on each item tested and on their current vocabulary knowledge level at the 19 Eiken levels. Then they are guided to choose words to put into training mode. The training mode is divided into two stages: learning and rehearsing of the target words. After learners learn the form, meaning, and sound of the words in example sentences, they check whether they remember them in three types of rehearsal: word recognition, form and meaning recognition, and word in an example sentence recognition. If learners successfully remember and recognize the word, it will be saved in the learning records, i.e., the review mode. If not, it will remain in the training mode. In the review mode, learners can see their learning records and check the words they have learned. If they find they need to practice any words again, they can put them back into the training mode. It is expected that this learning cycle adapted by the system will lead to greater vocabulary retention. We will present the basic functions of DoraCAT and discuss how our methodology can benefit learners, teachers, and system developers in CALL.

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A Data-Driven Approach To Generate Partial And Synchronized Caption For Second Language Listeners Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Kourosh Meshgi Kyoto University, Japan kouroshmeshgi@gmail.com Maryam Sadat Mirzaei RIKEN AIP/Kyoto University, Japan maryam.mirzaei@riken.jp ABSTRACT We have proposed partial and synchronized captioning (PSC) tool to facilitate second language (L2) listening by providing minimal, but necessary assistance for L2 listeners when they encounter difficulties that arise from low-frequency words, specific terminologies, high speech rate, and perceptually difficult words/phrases (e.g. potential breached boundaries). PSC uses fine-selected criteria to automatically detect instances of difficulties for L2 listeners and provides these instances in the caption, while omitting easy-to-recognize cases to reduce the cognitive load. In this view, generating partial caption is a classification task to categorize each word of the caption either as difficult for the L2 learner (to show in the caption) or easy (to omit). To perform this classification, we made a data set of labeled words (easy vs. difficult) out of our corpus. These words are annotated by several instructors for a target proficiency level of the L2 learners, and cases with high annotation-agreement level were selected. Next, a pool of features are extracted by considering multimodal aspects of each word, which includes lexical (e.g. frequency, specificity, length, syllables), syntactic (e.g., part-of-speech, sentence structure), semantic (e.g. polysomic words, co-references, idiomacity) and acoustic or perceptual complexities (e.g., speech rate, hesitation and pauses, noise and distortion). A classifier is then trained on the annotated dataset to automate the detection of difficult words/phrases for a target proficiency level of L2 learners. Using machine learning technologies, the most informative features to make partial captions are recognized and analyzed. This new version, data-driven PSC, is then compared with the rule-based version and the annotated dataset. Results showed that data-driven PSC outperforms the rule-based version in detecting L2 listening difficulties and its performance is closer to our annotations. A preliminary experiment with L2 learners was conducted to check the effectiveness of data-driven and rule-based PSC on the recognition of specific points, where the two versions showed different words/phrases. Results suggest that the enhanced version included better clues to foster L2 listening recognition for specific segments. It is anticipated that with more enhancement, PSC can provide a better form of assistance to foster listening to authentic materials for L2 learners at different levels.

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A Framework For Enhancing Mobile Learner-Determined Language Learning In Authentic Situational Contexts Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Agnieszka Palalas Athabasca University, Canada agapalalas@athabascau.ca Norine Wark Athabasca University, Canada norinewark@gmail.com Przemyslaw Pawluk George Brown College, Canada ppawluk@georgebrown.ca ABSTRACT Mobile technology offers untethered personalized, learner-determined language learning by merging the mobile learner’s personal, authentic real and virtual worlds. The framework presented herein introduces three learner dimensions and four external elements that dynamically formulate the learner’s personal situational learning context, and provides guidance for designing mobile language learning activities within this context. The presentation goes on to illustrate how environmental affordances can be capitalized upon to extend and enrich learner-determined language development within this evolving context. Conference attendees are invited to join the dialogue by contributing ideas on strategies, activities, and environmental affordances that enhance mobile learner-determined language development as well. This submission is based upon cumulative findings from research on mobile language learning (Palalas, 2012, 2015), learner-determined emergent technology integration (Wark, in progress), and a mobile-assisted language literacy project (Palalas, Pawluk, & Wark, 2017; Palalas & Wark, 2017). Study results highlight the benefits of m-learning activities in the learner’s authentic situational context and identify context, with its related design principle, integrate environmental affordances, as a key pedagogical requirement in mobile language learning design (Palalas, Pawluk, & Wark, 2017; Palalas & Wark, 2017). The learner’s authentic situational context interweaves three key dimensions: (1) the learner (including personal history and experience), (2) language (with its multiple sub-dimensions), and (3) technology (including mobile devices; Bamberger & Tal, 2007; Palalas, 2015), with four dynamic elements: (1) the setting (time and space), (2) participants, (3) technology, and (4) behaviours and interactions, governed by social-cultural norms (Palalas & Wark, 2017). The synergy between learner dimensions and external contextual elements yields three prevalent, inter-dependent learning concepts: relevancy, adaptation, and personalization (Palalas, 2015; Palalas & Wark, 2017). These salient concepts enable instructors and learners to adjust activities by varying context-dependent and independent degrees of learner freedom, system control, structure and progression, content themes and topics, support and feedback, and interaction, as well as task types, layouts, and difficulty levels, with the benefit of environmental affordances.

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In summary, this presentation offers a pedagogical framework and interactive dialogue on practical strategies, activities, and environmental affordances that enhance language learning opportunities within the mobile learner’s personal situational context.

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A New Method For Summaries Evaluation On A Reading Comprehension Tool Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Diego Andrés Palma Sánchez Universidad de Concepción, Chile dpalmasan@gmail.com Christian Marcelo Soto Fajardo Universidad de Concepción, Chile christiansoto@udec.cl María Fernanda Rodríguez Poblete Universidad de Concepción, Chile mfernanda.rodriguez16@gmail.com Antonio Gutierrez Southern Georgia Univerasity, United States agutierrez@georgiasouthern.edu ABSTRACT COMPRENDE is an educational technology that uses different approaches to teach reading comprehension strategies to student from 5th to 7th grade. In this work we proposed a new version of COMPRENDE that incorporates Artificial Intelligence (AI). The goal of the AI module is to provide flexibility over the type of student-generated text that can be evaluated by our system. The system can evaluate accurately free-text, and it can also provide more meaningful feedback from the evaluation. For this purpose, a summaries evaluator has been developed using a discourse-based method that fuses syntactic and semantic models. The approach combines shallow linguistics features and speech patterns to evaluate the semantic content and coherence of free text responses, using computational linguistics and machine learning techniques. To evaluate the semantic content of the text, we use two classic models of the literature: Vector Space Modeling, and Latent Semantic Analysis. We represented documents as mathematical vectors in which the dimensions are the frequency of words, relying on the assumption that texts with similar content should have similar scores. On the other hand, to evaluate the coherence of a text, we use a semantic model and a syntactic model. The semantic model represents sentences as mathematical vectors (word embeddings), and it establishes coherence between sentences as the mean distance of their vector representation. This semantic model is implemented by using the vector-based methods of Latent Semantic Analysis and Word2Vec. Finally, for the syntactic modeling we use an entity grid representation of the texts, which basically extracts syntactic patterns from the texts. This method relies on the assumption that coherent texts will have similar underlying syntactic patterns. Initial experiments show that our system obtains an accuracy of 90% when the content of the text is evaluated, and an accuracy between 55% to 60% when assessing text coherence. In addition, the system provides feedback to the student by specific messages that help them to generate a better connection between the ideas of the text.

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A Preliminary Analysis Of Australia’s Readiness For E-Learning Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Siamak Mirzaei Flinders University, Australia siamak.mirzaei@flinders.edu.au Adam James Wilden Flinders University, Australia adam.wilden@flinders.edu.au Anna Shillabeer Flinders University, Australia anna.shillabeer@flinders.edu.au ABSTRACT E-learning is following an upward trend in Australia. However, e-learning adoption is considered without determining the readiness for e-learning in Australia. There are several existing e-learning readiness models. These models identified several factors to analyse for e-learning readiness in organisations. In our study, we focused on technological infrastructure as the common factor mentioned by these models. In our preliminary analysis, we found out that Australia is not quite ready for e-learning because of lack of appropriate internet connectivity in rural/remote areas.

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A Principled Approach To Using New Technologies In Language Teaching Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Paul Lyddon Osaka Jogakuin College, Japan palyddon@gmail.com ABSTRACT Given the ever-expanding range of new devices (e.g., laptops, smartphones, tablets), software applications (i.e., apps), and technology-enhanced learning environments (e.g., course management systems and other online learning platforms) vying for possible implementation in our teaching practice, it has become increasingly difficult to make informed decisions about which ones to invest in. Besides technological proficiency and institutional constraints, other factors guiding our considerations as to whether and how to use new technologies include our curricular goals and objectives (e.g., vis-à -vis specific skill areas such as reading, writing, speaking, and listening), our view of language (e.g., structural, cognitive, sociocognitive), our theory of learning (e.g., Behaviorism, Cognitive Constructivism, Social Constructivism), our philosophy of teaching (e.g., Idealism, Realism, Pragmatism, Existentialism), and our preferred instructional methods (e.g., Didactic, Socratic, Inquiry, Discovery). However, many of these influences evade rational scrutiny, as they are often only implicit. Consequently, our eventual choices may unwittingly be skewed by one factor or another at various times and, thus, turn out inconsistent if not gimmicky and, ultimately, ineffective. This presentation will help audience members more clearly articulate their own positions with regard to these factors through six basic focus questions: 1) Why do I really want to use the given technology? 2) What am I supposed to be teaching? 3) What do I think is the nature of language? 4) What do I think constitutes learning? 5) What kinds of activity structures do I think best create the conditions for second language acquisition? 6) What uses of the given technology would best serve these purposes under my given situational constraints? It will then offer a principled approach to adopting new technologies in their teaching and illustrate its application across the various levels of Puentedura’s (2013) Substitution-Augmentation-Modification-Redefinition (SAMR) Model of the progressive instructional impact of computer technology.

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A Study Of Effects Of Collocational Tool On Learners’ Writing Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Nursel Duransoy Yeditepe University, Turkey duransoy@gmail.com Zeynep Kocoglu Yeditepe University, Turkey zbkocoglu@yeditepe.edu.tr ABSTRACT Verb-noun collocations constitute a considerable amount of English. Online tools can be more effective in learning and teaching them. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore effects of an online verb-noun collocation assistant on the use of verb-noun collocations in paragraphs of EFL learners. This quasi-experimental study with pre- and post-tests will be performed on 25 Turkish speaking learners of English aged 17-19 years. The study sample will use an online verb-noun collocation assistant developed by the researcher. Data will be collected with pre- and post-tests, recordings of thinkaloud of self-editing sessions, recordings of classes during which collocations are taught explicitly, paragraphs produced by students and two focus group interviews. Statistical tests will be utilized to evaluate the results of pre- and post-tests. Content analysis will be made to evaluate data collected through focus group interviews, recordings of think-aloud and classes. Findings will be discussed in detail in the presentation.

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A Systematic Review Of 3D Virtual Environments For Language Learning Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Chunping Zheng Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China zhengchunping@bupt.edu.cn Lingyu Xu Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China woshiyikeshi1102@126.com Qianqian Cheng Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China 1174985953@qq.com Zitong Yang Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China 291543231@qq.com Mengya Gao Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China 1226015847@qq.com Jyh-Chong Liang National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan aljc@mail.ntust.edu.tw Chin-Chung Tsai National Taiwan Normal University, cctsai@mail.ntust.edu.tw ABSTRACT Three dimensional virtual environments (3DVE) have been noted as effective learning space which can promote learners’ language acquisition and academic performance. This paper reviewed a total of 41 papers published in the Language Learning & Technology, ReCALL, Computer-assisted Language Learning, System, CALICO Journal and Computers & Education from 2010 to 2017. At first, the current study explored the yearly publication trend of the journals and the research productivity of different countries. Then, based on systematic content analyses, the present paper shows that a majority of the research were empirical studies employing a variety of research methods. Particularly, most of the empirical investigations adopted the mixed research method and only a few articles adopted pure quantitative or qualitative method. The main research topics we reviewed include the affordance of the 3DVE for improving leaners’ linguistic and non-linguistic knowledge and skills, learner characteristics in the 3DVE, nature of interactions in the 3DVE, features of language-learning tasks in the 3DVE and design and development of the 3DVE for language learning. Drawing upon the synthesized research findings, we claim that the 3DVE has become a burgeoning area of research with great potential for innovating language education. However, there are still a number of challenges need be addressed for better 47


facilitating language learning. Pedagogical implications were summarized and suggestions for future pedagogical innovations were also discussed at the end.

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An Action Learning Program For Technology Integration In EFL Classes Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Finita Dewi Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia, Indonesia finita@upi.edu ABSTRACT The utilization of technology in language classroom in Indonesia is still limited to its usage as learning resources. Thus, technology tends to be underused and less utilized in supporting EFL students’ learning process. In Indonesia context, teachers are demanded to master and utilize ICT in teaching and learning process as one of the indicators of their professional competences. In addition, the 2013 National Curriculum also stated that one ot the graduate competency standard for students is that students should have the knowledge and skill on utilizing technology for personal and academic purposes. In response to this demand, there is an urgent needs for teachers to have technological pedagogical and content knowledge in order to integrate technology appropriately into language classroom. Despite the increasing number of studies in technology integration, little has been done to investigate EFL teachers’ knowledge and skill in technology integration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which the Technology-Supported English Language Teaching Professional Development (TSELT PD) program which is based on the TPACK framework from Mishra & Koehler (2008) could enhance the secondary in-service English teachers’ knowledge and skill in planning and implementing technology integrated English lesson. Using qualitative study approach in the framework of action learning, this study involved three secondary EFL teachers in Bandung, Indonesia. Participants were selected through Technology Knowledge survey. The data source of this study were taken from 1) Survey of teachers’ TPACK before and after the TSELTPD program, 2) teachers’ lesson plan, 3) classroom observation, and 4) teachers’ discussion during the lesson design process. There were three stages of data collection procedures, among others are 1) survey of teachers’ TPACK, 2) TSELT PD Workshop, and 3) Classroom implementation. The result of the study shows the development of teachers’ TPACK in planning and implementing technology-integrated English lesson in their English classes.

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An Explorative Study Of Informal Online Language Learning Collaborations Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Anna Motzo The Open University, Great Britain a.motzo@open.ac.uk ABSTRACT This paper presents initial findings of a doctoral research study on the nature of spontaneously formed informal online peer collaborations to practise or learn languages without teacher presence. The study explores the behaviours, characteristics and motivations of users of italki, an online language-learning dedicated site. It particularly sheds light on how informal and autonomous learners work together to practise languages and nurture their individual learning through social interactions and collaborations. Alternative ways to measure student success are investigated. It also generates insights into the ways by which these self-directed adult learners plan and construct their own learning experience beyond the site itself within their own personalized online learning environment. Finally, the roles enacted by these multi-faceted learners will be discussed. Using a Community of Practice framework the author analyses how the three interwoven concepts of collaboration, interaction and participation shape and impact on language learning and practice. The study adopts a mixed-method interpretivist methodological position and uses a concurrent status design with an emphasis on a qualitative inquiry which applies netnography, an online ethnographic approach, combined with both qualitative and quantitative data. Concurrent triangulation of both methods and data is applied in order to study the phenomenon of informal online language learning. A survey is used to capture an overview of the online social experience, while participants’ lived experience of their online learning is captured through semi-structured in depth online interviews Online observations, captured in the researcher’s fieldnotes and enriched by conducting SNA, provide insight on types of interactions and the structure and relationships of the collective(s) formed. Data are analysed using thematic analysis techniques in order to identify patterns across the dataset in relation to the research questions, furthermore statistical analysis is also used to analyse numerical data. Preliminary conclusions (although exhibiting some divergence) suggest the dominant phenomenon is one of language practice rather than learning and note the impact and importance of role-playing and centrality of the social dimension and its fostering of resilience. This study aims to inform reflections on national and international curriculum development in second language teaching and the challenge of motivation for language learning.

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Analyzing Digital Literacy Practices Via L2 Collaborative Reading Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room Dr. Joshua Thoms Utah State University, United States joshua.thoms@usu.edu Fred Poole Utah State University, United States frederick.poole@aggiemail.usu.edu ABSTRACT A current focus of CALL research investigates various aspects related to students’ developing second language (L2) digital literacies (Chun, Kern, & Smith, 2016; Hafner, Chik, & Jones, 2015; Kern, 2015). While no single definition exists in the CALL literature (Meyers, Erickson, & Small, 2013), some (e.g., Lankshear & Knobel, 2008) consider digital literacies as “a shorthand for the myriad social practices and conceptions of engaging in meaning making mediated by texts that are produced, received, distributed, exchanged, etc., via digital codification” (p. 5). This study contributes to the evolving understanding of what digital literacy entails by investigating the affordances of second language (L2) collaborative reading via the use of a digital annotation tool (DAT). A DAT allows learners to annotate digitized texts and make comments that others can collectively read in a virtual space. Although some preliminary work has been carried out to highlight possible ways in which DATs can be used (Blyth, 2014), there is a dearth of empirically based research that focuses on the linguistic, literary, and social aspects of L2 collaborative reading in languages other than English as a second or foreign language. Our talk will present analysis of learner-learner interactions within a virtual environment when collaboratively reading eighteen Spanish poems over a four-week period in a Hispanic literature course at the college level via an ecological theoretical perspective (van Lier, 2004). In addition to providing empirical data that illustrate the theoretical construct of affordance in a virtual, collaborative reading environment, we also address the pedagogical ramifications of using a DAT to involve learners in L2 collaborative reading. Following a case study approach (Duff, 2008), two primary research questions are explored: (1) what are the features of learners’ annotated comments that either spur or limit virtual interaction(s) among learners in a DAT environment?; and (2) what are the benefits and challenges of L2 collaborative reading from both a learner and instructor perspective? In addition to analyzing learners’ annotated comments, other data sources include instructor and focal student interview data.

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Assessing The Validity Of Educational Software For Foreign Language Learning Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Kyria Rebeca Finardi UFES, Brazil kyria.finardi@gmail.com ABSTRACT This paper discusses the validity of educational software as relevant tools for language learning in terms of their potential to promote the building up of mental connections through the development of cognitive operations required in knowledge acquisition. With that aim, four studies (Finardi, Prebianca, Schmitt & Andrade, 2014; Finardi, Prebianca & Schmitt, 2015; Prebianca, Vieira & Finardi, 2014; Prebianca, Santos Junior & Finardi, 2014) carried out to investigate the validity of educational software as tools to promote English as a foreign language (EFL) learning are reviewed in terms of: (i) the aspects of the interaction between the software and the learner; (ii) the cognitive/mental operations learners need to undergo in order to perform the tasks required by the software; (iii) the pedagogical strategies implemented by the software and (iv) the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) aspects of the software so as to determine its degree of interactiveness and usability. In general, findings of all studies suggest that the quality of mediation offered by the educational software is an important factor in the use of technology to promote language learning. Also, mediating factors such as intentionality, transcendence and meaning seem to be reflected on human-computer interaction features of the software, thus indicating a straightforward relationship among the software pedagogic characteristics and its interactiveness and usability features. Results point to the conclusion that the lack of feedback focused on pedagogic hints rather than on technical ones is a negative feature of the software analyzed indicating a fragile relationship between their pedagogic and ergonomic characteristics. Taken together, the findings of these studies also show that the instrument designed and used for data analysis in the studies reported here have been accumulating evidence that supports its validity as a way to assess pieces of technology commonly employed by teachers and learners to learn English. In other words, the piece of research presented here seems to present interesting insights to language practitioners and researchers in terms of educational software contribution to learning.

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Automated And Peer Feedback Within The Busuu Language Learning Social Networking Site App Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Fernando Rosell-Aguilar The Open University, Great Britain Fernando.rosell-aguilar@open.ac.uk ABSTRACT The possibility providing and receiving feedback from fellow language learners has been highlighted as one of the features of language learning social networking sites (LLSNS) and their mobile application versions that differentiate them from from other mobile apps, which only offer automated feedback. This paper presents the results of learners’ engagement with feedback from a large-scale survey (n=4095) into the use of one of the most popular language learning apps in the market: the busuu mobile app (over 60 million registered users). Data were collected through an online questionnaire with 30 items: multiple-choice and open questions. The survey was distributed both in English and in Spanish. The results provide a profile of busuu app users, show patterns of use, and what app features learners find most valuable for language learning. Most users are at beginner level and learn for personal interest. They find the app has helped them improve their knowledge of the language they’re learning, with vocabulary as the main area of improvement. Despite the agreement from most language learning professionals that feedback needs to be meaningful and provide opportunities to reflect on errors, the results from this survey show that over 76% of learners consider automatic feedback - which only provides the learner with whether their answer is correct or incorrect without further explanation - is either good or very good. The results also show that over 40% of learners using the busuu app do not take the opportunity to share their work for native speakers to provide corrections, although the majority of those who do find the feedback useful. During this presentation we will explore the reasons provided for this. Finally, the paper will discuss the challenges and potential of language learning apps as language learning sources. The high expectations from users and the fact that a third of respondents use busuu as their only language learning source suggest that a large proportion of users consider apps a reliable tool for language learning.

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Automatic Speech Scoring System Based On ROFALL Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Zhihong Lu Foreign Languages Department at Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China luzhihong@bupt.edu.cn ABSTRACT The automatic speech scoring system is developed to score the students’ English speech tests records on Rofall, an online language training platform for students to practice English listening, speaking, reading and writing out of the classroom or in the classroom. This system is aimed at an open - typed speech test: first, students will listen to a short passage; second, they will discuss the passage and record it at the same time. When students submit their audio files to Rofall, the automatic scoring system will give the score in a short time. There is little difference between system-score and human-score. Teachers can use the system to provide guidance to the students’ practice result timely. For students and teachers, the system can be accessed and reused through a computer that can connect to the Internet. First, students should open the browser on computer and log in the Rofall platform. Students can do the speech tests on the platform and the system will save the audio file. Second, input the students’ speech audio file into the automatic scoring system to get the score. Students will not only get a total score but also points for different sub-projects (word, sentence, relevance with topics, etc.) from the system. Third, log in the Rofall platform as a teacher. Teachers can see the scores of all the students. To get a more accurate score, teachers can input the students’ English level features (regular grade, College English Test-4/6*, etc.) into the system. Furthermore, you can check the students’ historical data to Learn about their learning progress. Fourth, developer can use the data collected through Rofall to train the system continually, change the score weight of sub-projects depends on the demand of teacher, gradually improve the accuracy of automatic scoring. *CET is the abbreviated form of “College English Test”. The national College English Test Band Four (CET-4) in China to evaluate non-English majors’ comprehensive language proficiency. Apart from CET-4, there is also CET-6, which is widely used to evaluate above-average students’ language proficiency. Both CET-4 and CET-6 are necessary to college students in China.

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Be The Change, Take The Challenge: Teaching Sustainable Development Goals Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Shirlene Bemfica de Oliveira Oliveira Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais (IFMG), Brazil shirlene.o@ifmg.edu.br ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to present the theoretical and methodological basis of a global project and some of teachers and students impressions. “Be the Change, Take the Challenge” is a global and collaborative project for High School students from Barbara Anna Zielonka’s authorship that focuses on the teaching of UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), global collaboration and English language learning. The project is built on the idea of partnership and its basis is on the power of global collaboration, in order to discuss and take action on social, environmental and political issues concerning the Earth Planet. A hundred and one schools from all over the world have participated in a number of tasks and assignments that has helped students become acquainted with the SDGs and they had the opportunity to use English language for meaningful purpose, to enhance computer-assisted language learning in the global community, and to develop their problem solving skills. Being exposed to so many different thoughts, attitudes, opinions, and solutions was an eye opener to many students who have never worked in international teams before. Be the Change, Take the Challenge corroborates the Multiliteracies approach to teaching and learning English which considers the growing linguistic and cultural diversity present globally with the advent of globalization and the multiplicity of channels, means or semiotic modes of communication created from new technologies and social media (COPE, KALANTZIZ, 2000). This ‘sociocultural turn’ which has shifted from the mind of the individual strictly to the social practice in which individuals take part of actions in order to learn (LANKSHEAR, 1999). From this semiotic perspective, the creativity, dynamism, innovation, interest and motivation of the meaning producers are eminently cultural and ideological, as they are related to different world views of different subjects in different contexts and promote the re-appropriation of the world at the center of representation and, therefore, the learning process (COPE; KALANTZIS, 2009). The results point to participants’ dynamic meaning construction, participation, awareness and development on the conceptions of language, of learning, and of the world, as well as on their own attitudes towards their lives.

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Between Plagiarism And Co-Authorship In Open Educational Resources: Brazilian Language Teachers Making Their Points Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Alan Ricardo Costa Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Brazil alan.dan.ricardo@gmail.com André Firpo Beviláqua Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil andre.firpo@gmail.com Vanessa Ribas Fialho Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil vanessafialho@gmail.com Vilson J. Leffa Universidade Católica de Pelotas, Brazil leffav@gmail.com ABSTRACT Issues on co-authorship and coproduction of open materials have intensified in the field of CALL from researchers’ interest on Open Educational Resources (OERs). According to UNESCO, OERs are materials belonging to the public domain or released under open licenses (for access, use, adaptation and redistribution) and do not bypass authorship. The concept popularized mainly in European literature is that we have moved from the irrefutable concept of “author” in modernity to the subjective concept of “co-author” in postmodernity. On one hand, OERs make co-authorship possible (allowing for review, reuse, redistribution and remix); on the other hand, they demand respect for authorship in legal form. In this complex context, co-producing OERs for language teaching demands knowledge of the topic to avoid the unnecessary confusion between copying open license materials, which is lawful, and plagiarism, which is against the law, resulting in crime and a waste of OER collaborative potential. Considering this context, this investigation aims at checking Brazilian teachers of Portuguese, as mother tongue, and English or Spanish, as foreign and second languages, regarding their concepts and beliefs of “plagiarism”, “co-authorship” and “co-production”. These concepts were identified through semistructured interviews with teachers and participant observation of two continuing training courses to produce OERs, using an open authoring system, developed in our project and known as Electronic Learning Organizer (ELO). The first course had the participation of teachers from Southern Brazil, and the second one, teachers from Northeast Brazil. The results confirmed that language teachers: (1) are aware of the importance in co-authorship and collaboration to produce OERs; (2) do not know Brazilian and international copyright laws; (3) are afraid of committing plagiarism. The conclusion is the need for an open authoring system which automatically provide teachers with the necessary help they may need when producing their own OERs, protecting and respecting authorship, in line with open licenses as provided by Creative Commons.

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BMELTET: Blending MOOCs For English Language Teacher Education With Telecollaboration Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Marina Orsini-Jones Coventry University, Great Britain m.orsini@coventry.ac.uk ABSTRACT Based on the outcomes of a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course)-blend project that received an English Language Teaching Research Award from the British Council in 2016-2017, this paper reports on how the FutureLearn MOOC Becoming a Better Teacher was blended into English Language Teaching (ELT) university programmes in Coventry (UK) and Valencia (Spain)in conjunction with telecollaboration (or Online Intercultural Exchange). It discusses how the addition of a MOOC blend can enhance an online intercultural exchange by adding to it increased opportunities for social collaborative interaction on a global scale, while at the same time fostering the students’ reflection on online learning and teaching to support their future teaching practice. It illustrates how participating students - 12 third year undergraduate student from Florida Universitària in Spain studying module Didàctica de la Llengua Estrangera I: anglés and 25 MA in English Language Teaching and Applied Linguistics students from Coventry University studying module Theories, Methods and Approaches of Language Learning and Teaching - participated in both synchronous and asynchronous exchanges on the MOOC content. The paper reports on the results of the project, that included a pre- and post-MOOC survey and compares its outcomes to those of related ‘distributed flip’ MOOC blend projects for ELT. The discussion will focus in particular on how a holistic approach to the integration of technology into teacher education programmes with a blend of formal and informal platforms can support students in reflecting on their beliefs on both technology and autonomy in language learning and teaching.

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Brazilian University Professors’ Views On Teacher Education For CALL Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Claudia Beatriz Monte Jorge Martins UTFPR, Brazil claudiab@utfpr.edu.br Carla Barsotti UTFPR, Brazil cbars@utfpr.edu.br ABSTRACT To become a Foreign Language (FL) teacher in Brazil it is necessary to take a licentiate degree, which takes three to four years to be completed. The course enables individuals to act as elementary/ secondary teachers. Due to this short period, professors have many challenges to find the balance between theory and practice, and to decide on what subjects to include in the curriculum. With the advent of technology, CALL has also become one of many areas that competes to be included in the curriculum of Modern Language courses in Brazil. But are future language teachers being prepared for CALL? The objective of this presentation is to report and discuss the results of a study conducted with FL professors from Modern Language courses in the state of Paraná, Brazil, more specifically the results concerning their views on teacher education for CALL in their institutions. These results are part of a bigger mixed methods study on CALL integration that had two distinct phases: a quantitative and a qualitative phase. In the qualitative phase, sixteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with teachers from twelve higher education institutions located in eight different cities throughout the state. Participants were selected according to the quantitative phase and to Rogers’ Individual Innovativeness Theory. Data analysis used the constant comparative method and the software MAXQDA. After coding the data five categories emerged. One of them was “Teacher education in Modern Languages courses: the negligence of the CALL dimension”. It showed that teacher education for CALL practically does not exist and when it does, it is related to teachers’ individual initiatives. Thus, a vicious circle is formed and, to break it, changes must begin to take place in the current courses, as participants themselves suggested. Our objective here is to share these results and the possible strategies that can be taken so that teacher education for CALL to become real. The process of change is slow in universities and it rarely accompanies the same rhythm of the advances that occur in society, however, there is an urgent need for educational institutions to invest in this area.

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Bringing The Real World Into The EFL Classroom Through Computer Assisted Authentic Activities Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 15:00 End Time (Part 1): 16:30 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 17.00 End Time (Part 2): 18:30 Edificio CFRD Room PC3 Ildeniz Özverir Eastern Mediterranean University, Turkey ildeniz.ozverir@emu.edu.tr ABSTRACT This half day workshop will be about designing and implementing authentic activities based on the following guiding principles. The principles were derived through design-based research and thus we believe this workshop will be particularly beneficial to participants who would like to design and implement task-based activities grounded on a set of pedagogically sound principles. This workshop will be conducted in four phases: In phase 1 the guiding 11 principles of authentic activities (Ozverir, Herrington, & Osam, 2016; Ozverir, Osam, & Herrington, 2017) will be presented. According to these principles, authentic activities: 1. have real world relevance 2. are complex and ill-defined 3. provide the opportunity for students to examine the task from different perspectives, using a variety of resources 4. provide the opportunity to collaborate 5. provide the opportunity to reflect 6. lead beyond domain–and skill–specific outcomes 7. are seamlessly integrated with assessment 8. yield polished products valuable in their own right rather than as preparation for something else 9. are open-ended allowing competing solutions and diversity of outcome 10. are conducive to both learning and communicating 11. provide motivational factors In phase 2 an activity will be demonstrated as an example. In phase 3 participants will work in groups and will be given a task to complete. In this task participants will complete an authentic activity in the role of language learners. The task will be about designing a holiday package as travel agencies do (for their customers). In order to complete this task participants will need a computer connected to the Internet. In phase 4 participants will be expected to design an authentic activity based on the guiding 11 principles relevant to their context and share this with other participants. Throughout the workshop participants will be asked to use Google sites (user name and password will be provided by the presenters and participants will be expected to develop web pages), Google chrome or Internet explorer and alike.

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Building A Community Of Readers: Motivation, Guidance, And Success In Extensive Reading Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería Cory Koby Miyagi Gakuin Women's University, Japan corykoby@gmail.com ABSTRACT When practiced correctly, the benefits of extensive reading (ER) have been proven to include incidental vocabulary and grammar acquisition, increased reading comprehension and speed, and gains on language tests such as the TOEIC. But getting student to “buy in” and develop ideal reading habits have proven to be a rather difficult challenge for many ER practitioners. After a moderately successful inaugural year of a new ER program at a mid-level Japanese university, during which students (n=67) read an average of 250,000 words, the presenter sought to improve the program structure, with particular focus on motivational factors—both negative and positive, as well as intrinsic and extrinsic. At first glance, the increase to an average of 380,000 words for the second cohort of first-year students (n=76) in 2017-18 appears significant. A careful comparison of the reading habits of these two groups reveals an even more improvement in the program’s results in its second year. The presenter will detail this ER program’s structure, and explain the motivational approach they took in order to foster a healthy and positive reading culture in their classes. In addition to discussing changes made between the 2016 and 2017 academic years, further changes implemented in the current academic year will be discussed, which include the administration of the TOEIC test to incoming freshmen. This data, along with subsequent annual TOEIC treatments will, when correlated with reading volumes and reading speeds measured over the duration of the 2-year program, provide rich data in the years to come. Presentation attendees will come to understand the particular features of this ER program, and gain specific knowledge which will aide them in developing or improving ER programs of their own. Specific mention will be made of the ER-specific LMS that this program employs to manage the high volume of reading, as well as administer brief comprehension quizzes to readers in order to validate that reading has, in fact, occurred. This LMS provides students access to a digital library of over 800 books, which significantly augments a traditional paper-based book collection and/or library.

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CALL Challenges Around The World: Voices of Experience Symposium Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Thomas Robb Kyoto Sangyo University (Emeritus), Japan trobb@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp Muhammed Shahriar Haque East West University, Bangladesh shahriar@ewubd.edu Ildeniz Özverir Eastern Mediterranean University, Turkey ildeniz.ozverir@emu.edu.tr Tesfamichael Getu Mekelle University, Ethiopia tesfamichael.getu@mu.edu.et Carlos Javier Saavedra Robles Eternity Christian School and Institute, Honduras carlos.saavedra@eternitycs.com Alvita Kurniawati Duta Wacana Christian University, Indonesia pipitkh@staff.ukdw.ac.id Doris Molero E-Language Center Jujuy, Argentina doris3m@gmail.com Long Nguyen University of Foreign Language Studies – UDN, Vietnam nvlong@ufl.udn.vn Nu Thuy Uyen Nguyen University of Foreign Language Studies, Vietnam ABSTRACT This symposium is composed of representatives of the 8 WorldCALL bursary recipients, all of whom hail from countries with limited technical and financial resources. Each participant will speak on one specific challenge they have faced in implementing technology for language education and describe the process they went through to achieve a useful outcome. Participants who share similar problems, as well as those who might offer solutions, are particularly encouraged to attend. 61


CALL For Help: Critical CALL For Diversity, Inclusion And Sustainability Symposium Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 16:15 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 17:10 End Time (Part 2): 17:40 Edificio CFRD, Capacitaciรณn Docente 2 Room Philip Hubbard Stanford University, United States phihub@gmail.com Louise Ohashi Meiji University, Japan ohashi@meiji.ac.jp Mark Pegrum University of Western Australia, Australia mark.pegrum@uwa.edu.au Sarah Guth University of Padova, Italy sarah.guth@unipd.it Mirjam Hauck The Open University UK, Great Britain mirjam.hauck@open.ac.uk Francesca Helm University of Padova, Italy francesca.helm@unipd.it ABSTRACT This symposium highlights ways CALL might serve a critical role in fostering diversity and inclusion across languages and cultures. It raises awareness of barriers to participation in CALL and presents approaches and voices which seek to address these. Introducing CALL for Help (Moderator) Philip Hubbard, Stanford University The introduction stresses the central role for service in CALL. The conclusion mentions other possible paths for enhancing diversity and inclusion. Reaching Beyond Conferences: The Potential of CALL in Supporting Diversity and Inclusion Louise Ohashi, Meiji University

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This paper considers how factors such as nationality, financial status, and family responsibilities can prevent language educators from attending conferences, shares some of their untold stories, and outlines ways CALL can enable wider participation. Connecting Cultures Via Intercultural, Ethical and Critical Literacies Mark Pegrum, University of Western Australia Based on a revised version of Dudeney, Hockly & Pegrum’s (2013) Digital Literacies Framework, which underpins several European language and literacy projects, this paper shows how teachers can help language learners to build intercultural bridges by foregrounding ethical and critical literacies. Virtual Exchange: Promoting Understanding through People-to-People Interactions Sarah Guth, University of Padova Rather than connect people, the Internet and social media seem to be isolating them in bubbles with like-minded people. Virtual exchange (telecollaboration) is one way educators can use the Internet to help students connect with, learn from and collaborate with peers with very different life experiences. Critical Digital Literacies for a Sustainable Future Mirjam Hauck, The Open University UK This contribution presents a framework for teacher preparation for technology-enabled, people-to-people education programs in languages and across the curriculum. The latter provide an ideal context for promoting a critical and sustainable approach to developing digital literacies and citizenship taking account of the socio-political context (Brown, 2017). Dissecting Discourses around CALL Francesca Helm, University of Padova While CALL can be seen to provide solutions to problems, 'helping' people and expanding access to language learning, is it always the best solution? This contribution unpicks some of the assumptions embedded in policy and commercial discourses around CALL and explores the underlying motivations for investing in CALL.

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CALL For Less Commonly Taught Languages – Does It Really Make A Difference? Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 17:10 End Time: 17:40 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Monica Ward Dublin City University, Ireland monica.ward@dcu.ie ABSTRACT In theory, CALL can contribute a lot in the Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTL) learning context. It can provide access to resources that would otherwise not be available, enable learners to interact with other learners and place the teaching and learning of the language on a more modern footing. Learners can leverage the benefits of CALL that are available to students of the Most Commonly Taught Languages (MCTLs), especially English. However, what does CALL really look like in practise in the LCTL context? The difficulties involved in the design, development and implementation of CALL resources (in the broadest sense) are magnified in the LCTL contexts. Key challenges include finding suitably qualified teachers, dealing with language standardisation issues and learner motivation. The term LCTL is a broad one and covers well established and standardised languages with a rich literary tradition to Minority Languages (MLs) and Endangered Languages (ELs) with perhaps no literary tradition or standardised form of the language. It is also important to look at the teaching and learning environment holistically and to consider computing infrastructure available and at what point along the CALL normalisation spectrum the teaching and learning takes place. The decision to learn a particular language can have social or political associations in any context, and in some ML and EL contexts of engaging with CALL can have an impact on power relations in a community. This paper looks at the role that CALL can play in different LCTL contexts. It reviews examples from around the world and compares and contrasts how CALL has been used in these differing environments. The paper presents some suggestions for those working with LCTLs along with some questions and challenges for the CALL community to consider.

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CALL In Initial Teacher Education In Brazil: Reflecting On Its Challenges And Opportunities Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Cíntia Regina Lacerda Rabello Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil cintia_rabello@hotmail.com ABSTRACT This reflective practice paper aims to discuss the challenges and opportunities of CALL integration in initial teacher education in Brazil. The context of the practice is an elective discipline in a language institute at a public university in Rio de Janeiro. The discipline aimed at introducing the concept of CALL and providing participants with hands-on practice with varied technologies for language teaching and learning, such as virtual learning environments (VLE), social media, digital games, mobile apps, etc. Students also had the opportunity to experiment different teaching approaches such as flipped classroom, project-based learning, webquests, BYOD, m-learning, b-learning and e-learning. The participants comprise seven undergraduate students of different language courses, who were about to graduate and already had some teaching experience. Although official documents for teacher education in Brazil state that teachers should be able to use digital tools effectively in the classroom, CALL integration in initial teacher education is still a challenge, as many language teacher education courses do not approach CALL in their curricula. Thus, this action research aimed to evaluate the experience through the analysis of participants’ perceptions on the discipline and on the pedagogical use of digital tools for language teaching. Research tools included a reflective diary, students-teacher’s interactions on the VLE, and CALL materials and digital portfolios designed by participants. Participants were able to perceive the many opportunities of technology integration in the language classroom, highlighting the use of authentic and meaningful materials for language teaching and practice and the creation of digital narratives. One of the main challenges presented by participants was the lack of CALL training at university since none of them had ever had any discipline that approached the use of digital technologies for language teaching throughout their pre-service teacher education. Hence, the paper urges for CALL integration in the curriculum of initial teacher education in Brazilian universities. This integration should focus on students’ digital literacy and the critical appropriation of digital tools so that these technologies can be used effectively in the classroom bringing up transformations in language teaching and learning practices in both basic and higher education.

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CALL In Multicultural And Multilingual Learning Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Anna Kyppö University of Jyväskylä, Language Centre, Finland anna.kyppo@jyu.fi Teija Natri University of Jyväskylä, Language Centre, Finland teija.natri@jyu.fi ABSTRACT Multilingual and multicultural learning and teaching is one of the greatest challenges in the period of rapidly growing mobility and globalization. In accordance with the European Council of Languages (2006), mutual understanding is an essential condition for communication and acceptance of cultural differences. Along with using multiple languages in different situations, the learners of tomorrow are expected to switch between languages according to various circumstances. This presentation offers insight into an interdisciplinary course of multilingual interaction designed at the Jyväskylä University Language Centre. The course implemented partly in class and partly in mobile learning environments aims at enhancing students’ multilingual and multicultural academic communication competences by promoting the use of their entire linguistic repertoire in different social learning situations. Due to the simultaneous use of multiple languages in both synchronous and asynchronous learning environment, the course offers a unique ground for numerous learning and teaching designs. While the primary focus of the course was on teachers’ approach to multilingual teaching and teachers’ and students’ mutual interaction, the focus of the latest courses has been on the interchangeable use of various languages including the less commonly taught languages, and more efficient employment of task-based learning in the multifaceted learning environment. Learners’ interactional and reflecting skills in multilingual and multicultural settings were also in the foreground. Learners’ experiences, collected through learning journals and reflective feedback, suggest that the use of multimodal interactive learning environments may support multilingual and multicultural learning and enhance learner agency. We believe that the skills of reflecting, self-assessment, giving and responding to the feedback should be in the core of professional and academic competencies. When integrated into technology-enhanced learning, they may contribute to the enhancement of life-long learning skills.

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CALL Literacy: A New Model Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Dara Tafazoli University of Cordoba, Spain z52tatad@uco.es ABSTRACT Digitization and globalization have reformed the field of language education and literacy. Different studies have been discussed the importance of teachers’ computer literacy and competency (e.g., Cunningham, 2000; Lam, 2000; Park & Son, 2009; Tafazoli, Gomez Parra & Huertas Abril). Research on a new literacy called “CALL literacy” has been ignored since the application of technology in language classrooms. This study aimed to present the new model of “CALL Literacy”. The CALL literacy in this study is defined by the researcher as the ability to use technology at an adequate level for teaching or learning a second or foreign language. This model contains three main parts of a) language literacy, b) computer literacy, and c) teaching or learning literacy, which are integrated to comprehensively shape the idea of CALL Literacy model.

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CALL Teacher Education: Lessons Learned From Experiences Symposium Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Econรณmicas y Administrativas Jeong-Bae Son University of Southern Queensland, Australia jeong-bae.son@usq.edu.au Mike Levy The University of Queensland, Australia m.levy@uq.edu.au Gary Motteram University of Manchester, Great Britain gary.motteram@manchester.ac.uk Philip Hubbard Stanford University, United States efs@stanford.edu ABSTRACT The content of courses for educating teachers in the use of technology for language learning has changed in response to technological developments and approaches to teaching such courses. The presenters of this symposium are contributors to the book titled "Language teacher education and technology: Approaches and practices", Bloomsbury (2017). Through the chapters they wrote for the book, they described their CALL training courses offered in their own contexts and discussed a range of features and issues of the courses respectively. In the symposium, they explain and expand what they wrote in the chapters and talk about lessons they have learned from experiences as CALL teacher educators. The first presenter looks at options and issues concerning CALL evaluation and knowledge assembly from the past, to the present, and into the future with a view to preparing students for a rapidly changing world. The second presenter focuses on key features of his course and discusses issues and challenges of teaching the course. The third presenter explores the changes that have taken place over the years that his course has been running, showing the changing views of student participants towards technology, the changing nature of the contexts they work in and the theoretical underpinnings that drive the decisions that teachers make in how they use technology to support their teaching. The fourth presenter discusses his ideas of teaching and those of former students who have adopted approaches in their own teacher education courses which are similar to or different from his own. The fifth presenter outlines his course, which introduces students to basic concepts of CALL in conjunction with relevant topics from across Applied Linguistics, and discusses how students collaboratively construct a highly contextualized curricular project as the cumulative course task. Finally, the sixth presenter discusses his course and accompanying website and highlights the rationale behind the course and recent challenges faced, notably linking the content with the TESOL Technology Standards. All presenters are well placed to offer insights into what and how teachers can be taught to use CALL.

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CALL: Pre-Teachers’ Experience In Learning And Using Digital Artifacts Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Patricia Vasconcelos Almeida Universidade Federal de Lavras, Brazil almeidaufla@gmail.com ABSTRACT The digital technologies are inserted in people’s daily life due to the globalization that the worldwide network of computers has diffused in the present time. The computer connected to the internet, as well as the smartphones and other devises, have become fundamental artifacts, not only for social human relations, but also in the educational context. Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is an area of knowledge that can be used in academic studies and practices to demonstrate the importance of promoting a pre-service teachers’ contact with technology, so it is clear that the use of digital technology should be approached in formal teaching and learning situations in the language teachers’ training academic context. In this perspective, Braga (2013) recalls that the process of creating didactic materials and pedagogical activities using digital technology ends up being little explored during the teachers’ formation and when they are, it is insufficiently done. According to the author, this position makes teachers’ training even more difficult in terms to prepare them to be autonomous and proactive in relation to their initiative to exploit the resources offered by schools such as computer labs and their equipment, which are connected to the internet. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to present how the pre-service teachers of a University in the south of Minas Gerais in Brazil prepared and proposed language activities using the computer as a pedagogical resource. The activity should take only fifteen minutes in a computer lab during the subject "Computer-Assisted English Language Learning". We also observed how they perceived the overall process of using a digital technology in their training processes. Data were collected during one semester and they were analyzed qualitatively and interpretatively. The results showed an evolution in the way pre-service teachers have appropriated social networks as a way/tool to promote foreign language teaching in their proposed practices and have allowed us to raise some hypotheses about the reasons that determined the use of Facebook as mediator artifact of pedagogical practices.

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Can't Say You Didn't Know - Obliging Students To Be Informed About Plagiarism Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Roisin Dewart Université du Quebec à Montreal (UQAM), Canada dewart.roisin@uqam.ca Emily Rosales Université du Quebec à Montreal (UQAM), Canada rosales.emily@uqam.ca ABSTRACT Plagiarism is a serious academic infraction that bears heavy consequences for university students, especially those who are poorly informed about learning and assessment contexts where plagiarism is most likely to occur. Based on work by McGovern, Pulford & Siddique (2016), this presentation will describe how Moodle was used in the online implementation of a plagiarism awareness campaign in 2017 called “Can’t Say You Didn’t Know", targeting university students enrolled in English as a Second Language courses. In a French-speaking university, where measures in French were already in place to inform students of academic offenses, high rates of reported cases of academic fraud, in particular, plagiarism and copying were observed among students enrolled in a 30-credit English as a Second Language certificate program. Most reported cases concerned speakers with little experience in a university environment and whose limited proficiency in French made existing resources about plagiarism and citing sources inaccessible. Inconsistent rates of classroom instruction about plagiarism and citing sources among teachers were also observed, leading to an urgent need to ensure uniform awareness of university regulations concerning academic fraud. Through careful consideration of issues regarding the need for simple implementation (for teachers) and ease of use (for students), the project aimed to create an online tutorial that would encourage mandatory teacher and student participation. Moodle was adopted as the course management system for this project. The test developers worked in close collaboration with technical support teams at the institutional level to implement the tutorial across multiple Moodle courses in a two-phase process. Teachers completed questionnaires about their experience using the online tutorial. Issues relating to the creation and implementation of the online Moodle tutorial at the departmental level, teacher and student feedback, as well as the tutorial’s overall impact on the number of reported cases of plagiarism will be discussed. Further development of this project is intended to address other types of academic fraud.

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Chatbots For Informal Language Learning Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Antonie Alm University of Otago, New Zealand antonie.alm@otago.ac.nz ABSTRACT Chatbots have come a long way since ELIZA, the computer program that gave users the (short-term) illusion of conversing with a Rogerian psychotherapist. Weizenbaum’s (1966) aim was to study the “natural language communication between man and machine”, yet it is the appealing idea of virtual personal assistants that prevailed and which has led to successful applications in business, personal development and education. Language learners, in particular, could benefit from this development. The opportunities for virtual communications are already numerous: language learners can use Siri in their second language (L2), talk to a virtual L2 pet, or use language app chatbots. As chatbots become widespread in all spheres of life (such as Luka, which advises on restaurants, weather and news; Lark, a pocket coach and nutritionist; Penny, a virtual bank manager), these virtual assistants do not only provide good language practice if used in the L2, they also have real-life relevance. Research has shown the benefits of text-based online communications for language learning, also described as “conversation in slow motion” (Beauvois, 1995). Communicating through chat, as opposed to face-to-face, creates a safe space in which the language learner can take time to respond and react on their terms. Further, talking to a machine can not only be a good substitute for a conversation with an L2 speaker, it can also reduce speaking anxiety, especially in early stages of language learning. The shift from desktop to mobile devices and from text-based to voice-operated systems further enhances the use of chatbots in informal learning situations. Yet, little is known about the self-initiated chatbot use by language learners. In this presentation, I will discuss the emergence of L2 mobile chatbots and the implications of their informal use for language education. I will focus on five chatbots, which are stand-alone programs (Andy, Eggbun), or integrated into language learning apps (Duolingo, Mondly, Memrise) and analyse the chatbot-experiences of informal language learners. The findings of this investigation will provide some indication of the suitability of chatbots for language learning and their potential applications for formal language education.

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Climbing A Mountain – Learning Slovak In New Language Learning Environments Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Anna Kyppö University of Jyväskylä, Language Centre, Finland anna.kyppo@jyu.fi ABSTRACT The aim of this presentation is to throw light on the development of teaching and learning Slovak in the new language learning environments. New developments in teaching led to the design of an experimental e-learning course in Slovak based on the philosophy of dynamic learning and using the metaphor of climbing a mountain for learning Slovak. The course was grounded in constructivist views of learning and teaching, which emphasize the importance of learning by doing and process-like nature of learning. The teaching experiment included reflection-on-action research, with the goal of exploring learners’ beliefs about themselves as e-learners be-fore the course, and their perceptions and experiences of learning during and after the course. Thematic analysis was used to analyze students’ beliefs about themselves as elearners accessed primarily from learning diaries, pre-course, on-course and post-course questionnaires, course evaluations, interviews and teacher’s observations. The findings show that almost all the learners believed that they learned a lot and perceived themselves as e-learners. The learners’ reflections show that they made clear progress in their receptive skills (reading and listening) but had difficulty in developing their productive skills (speaking and writing). New e-learning skills, for example, in doing research, creating content and collaboration, were adopt-ed and further developed. The teacher’s role in the e-learning environment is viewed from both the learners’ and the teacher’s perspective and the functionality, clarity and authenticity and learner-centredness of e-learning environments are evaluated. The study was aimed at exploring how the affordances currently offered by technology-enhanced learning, mobile learning and combinations of various learning environments can be better used in the teaching and learning of less commonly taught languages. The findings of the study may contribute to the development of network pedagogy for other less commonly taught languages.

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Clistore – An Open-Access Multilingual Dictionary Interface and Authoring Tool for Language Teachers Colloquium Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 09:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Ana Gimeno Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Spain agimeno@upvnet.upv.es ABSTRACT This presentation will introduce teachers to Clilstore (www.multidict.net), a multifaceted site that (i) caters for teachers who wish to create or find multimedia language learning units to use with their students and (ii) offers an open access repository of language learning units in a variety of languages and levels that students can access directly and use independently. The emphasis in Clilstore units is on multimedia, i.e. using combinations of video, audio, images, text, hyperlinks, and supporting secondary technologies that allow the creation and sharing of interactive exercises. A key element that makes Clilstore a unique tool is the way the software treats embedded texts. At the touch of a button all the words in a text are automatically linked to the tool’s multilingual dictionary interface, Multidict, which places online dictionaries in over 100 languages at the learner’s disposal, thereby enabling them to interrogate texts at their own pace and according to their own learning requirements.

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Collaborative Partnerships In CALL Materials Development Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Caoimhín Ó Dónaill Ulster University, Great Britain c.odonaill@ulster.ac.uk ABSTRACT The development of authentic language learning resources within the Higher Education sector presents particular challenges to the CALL practitioner, especially in relation to lesser taught languages such as Irish. The normalisation of technology usage within the HE learning environment, particularly the ubiqitous provision of virtual learning environments and the promotion of a myriad array of Web 2.0 resources which learners are encouraged to engage with, are factors which put pressure on materials developers to keep pace with demand for engaging materials while maintaining currency, relevance and pedagogical underpinning. This paper will report on initiatives taken at Ulster University to develop strategic partnerships with media companies to utilise their archives for language learning purposes. This process involves the careful selection of content on the basis of their language learning potential and their thematic content, before being built into language learning units using the Clilstore content authoring and sharing platform (www.multidict.net/clilstore). These units then, provide a means for students to engage with the authentic content with the support transcriptions linked to online dictionaries and follow-on exercises (see Gimeno-Sanz, Ó Dónaill, Andersen, 2014). Strategic partnerships such as this, therefore, provide mutual benefits for all stakeholders, the language teachers get access to high quality authentic content and the content creators’ materials are brought to new audiences who are provided with a scaffolded introduction to challenging authentic speech. This type of collaboration has also been informed by Hubbard’s work on CALL content curation, and what he refers to as ‘imposing order on chaos... the collection and organization of digital content with value added by a language learning expert who serves much the same role as a curator of exhibits in a museum’ (2012).

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Collaborative Writing Of Argumentative Texts In English Pedagogy With ICT Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Lucía del Rosario Ubilla Rosales Universidad Católica de Temuco, Chile lubilla@uct.cl Lilian Gómez Álvarez Universidad de Concepción, Chile ligomez@udec.cl ABSTRACT Nowadays, learning English is a priority locally and worldwide; therefore, it is essential to have trained teachers whose skills comply with international standards. However, this is not an easy task, especially when it comes to improving writing skills; due to it is one of the most difficult skills to develop. Thus, the objective of this study was to determine if the collaborative writing methodology would help TEFL university students to improve their performance in the production of argumentative texts in English as L2, supported by an online collaborative tool (Google Drive) in a blended environment. The research was done in intact classes, with an experimental group (G1) using collaborative writing methodology, and a control group (G0) using individual writing methodology. The model included a pretest, an immediate posttest and two delayed posttests for both the experimental group and the control group, after they followed a twelve-session treatment, supported by a blog. Simultaneously, both groups completed an initial questionnaire to collect demographic information, and a perception questionnaire about their experience and the methodology used. The texts students had to produce in both groups involved the same difficulty and extension, to ensure comparisons were appropriate and valid. Likewise, the design involved identical assessment instances, writing tasks and work for both groups. The results validated the general hypothesis of the study, namely that collaborative writing work improves the performance of advanced TEFL students in the production of argumentative texts in English as L2, supported by a collaborative writing tool (such as Google Drive), in a blended modality and in an academic university context. Finally, it also reaffirmed the idea that collaborative work not only allows students to learn from the suggestions and collaboration of their peers but also encourages learners to participate in more meaningful writing activities by increasing their motivation, because they are constantly supported and guided by their partners.

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Communicative And Symbolic Competence In Gamified Language Learning Activities In Mobile Apps Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Rafael Vetromille-Castro Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), Brazil vetromillecastro@gmail.com Bruna Berres Hartmann Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel), Brazil brunabhartmann@gmail.com ABSTRACT CALL research has been dealing with the impact of digital technologies in different learning contexts - either in formal, institutionalized settings or informal, autonomous learning environments. Smartphones and tablets have contributed for the growing engagement of individuals in more informal and autonomous learning experiences especially due to the proliferation of applications (henceforth “apps”) that promise to teach languages. App developers have incorporated gaming features to language learning apps, or, in other words, have “gamified” digital learning activities as an attempt to help learners learn. One of the assumptions made is that users’ motivation is increased when educational activities include rankings, characters and other game-like aspects. We do not deny the role motivation may play in the language learning process. However, our concern lies on the (non)existence of affordances for the development of language skills that provide individuals with real, powerful, communicative resources. Popular apps do not explore the potential of digital literacies/multiliteracies for language education when they do not provide affordances for the full development of communicative competence. When it comes to more complex, intrincated discourse skills, language apps appear not to tackle cultural and power relationships established by language in use, and fail to foster the development of symbolic competence. Facing the contradiction between the potential for global communication digital technology has and the apparent limitation of language learning apps in methodological terms – or, their theoretical neutrality – we analyzed activities from popular apps, trying to identify aspects of communicative competence they may have been designed to develop. Also, we tried to check if and to what extent the apps and their activities provide users with affordances for multiliteracies through the reflection on cultural, social, political issues in the language, so that symbolic competence may emerge. We concluded that the apps have not been designed for language education, but for basic, limited language instruction. The point we make is that the global context of instant messaging, live broadcasting and other digital resources demands for language education (instead of simply language instruction) and app developers should be aware and able to deliver language learning activities that go beyond motivation.

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Complexity Of The Affordances Of Emergent Mobiles Technologies In K-12 Educational Context Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Martine Pellerin University of Alberta, Canada pellerin@ualberta.ca ABSTRACT The use of mobile technologies has invaded all spheres of our daily life. In the educational literature, mobile technologies have been recognized as valuable tools in supporting teaching and learning in K-12 (e.g., Liu, Navarrete, Maradiegue, & Wivagg, 2014; Karsenti, 2017). Studies in in the field of mobile assisted language learning (MALL)—have examined the role of the affordances offered by tools such as mobile phones in enhancing learning opportunities and the learning environment (e.g., Stockwell, 2012). Given the recent increases in the use of mobile technologies in K-12 and language education contexts, researchers and educators need to examine more closely the role of the affordances of mobiles technologies such as iPad in reshaping not only the learning environment but also the learners’ learning experiences. The paper examines the complexity of the affordances of mobile technologies in the K-12 educational language context. It builds on an ecological perspective (van Lier, 2008) informed by theories of dynamic systems and com¬plexity (LarsenFreeman & Cameron, 2008) to explore the concept of affordance as a complex and dynamic system. The research project is informed by a qualitative research paradigm and critical epistemological perspectives (Denzin & Lincoln, 2005). It also involved ethnographic and participatory research methods that focused on young learners involved in their daily activities (Greene & Hogan, 2005; Hatch, 2007). The findings indicated that the concept of affordances involves the interplay between the technological affordances of the mobile devices; the learning environment, which includes the physical and social space as well as the pedagogical practices endorsed; and the learners’ physical, social, cognitive, and metacognitive behaviors. Moreover, the outcomes of the research project suggest that the physical affordances of the mobile devices, by themselves, do not transform the nature of learning or the learning process. The paper is intended to suggest a paradigm shift in perceptions of the affordances of mobile technologies and their impacts on the learning process in the K-12 educational language context.

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Confessions Of A First-Time Hybrid Language Course Instructor: Lessons Learned And Questions For The Future Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Educaciรณn Nina Langton University of British Columbia, Okanagan, Canada nina.langton@ubc.ca ABSTRACT This first-time online instructor chose to deliver a beginning Japanese course in a hybrid format where students did most of the work online but met face-to-face once a week. This format theoretically exploits both the convenience of anytime, anywhere online access and opportunities to interact and learn as a face-to-face community. While theory was applied in the design of the current course, practical application of the curriculum proved to be more challenging. Attempts to engage students online through interaction, particularly between learners, were not always successful. Part of the lack of success can be attributed to technical issues with internet connections and the learning curve involved in acquiring new digital skills, but learner dispositions also appeared to play a role. Online learning provides many opportunities to utilize multi-media instruction, an important part of student satisfaction with an online course (Bollinger & Wasilik 2009). As students are pragmatic about the learning materials they choose to engage with in terms of improving their grade (Murray et al. 2012), multimedia resources for this course were designed to relate directly to graded requirements. However, student engagement with these resources was varied. While the potential for the use of innovative multi-media and learner-centered digital materials seems clear, the time and effort required for both students and instructors to master their use must be taken into account, and the trade-offs that are inevitably made between time spent familiarizing and supporting students in the online environment and delivering the linguistic content of the course can be troubling from a pedagogical standpoint. The initial iteration of this course has provided much material for reflection, and this presentation aims to provide a forum for sharing the results of that reflection in the form of practical suggestions for instructors involved in or contemplating online language instruction, as well as raising questions and issues that remain for further contemplation. While the target language in this case is Japanese, the issues raised apply to any beginning hybrid language course.

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Contents Of A CALL Professional Development Course For Academic English Teachers Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Hora Hedayati UNSW Global, Australia Hora.Hedayati@gmail.com ABSTRACT While digital technologies play an integral role in language programs and language teacher education programs, it appears that the application and contents of such courses are as varied as are the course organisers. The aim of the present study is to examine how Academic English teachers in an English speaking University utilise digital technologies in their classes and what components they consider essential to be integrated in CALL professional development courses with an emphasis on academic context. In doing so, fourteen academic English teachers at a university direct entry programs with certain characteristics are interviewed using a semi-structured interview techniques. The main characteristics include experience in teaching English for academic purpose, experience in using digital technologies in classroom and engagement in CALL professional development opportunities. The transcripts are being analysed using content analysis. The results suggest that EAP teachers consider the following categories to be of particular importance: technology knowledge, technological content knowledge, technological pedagogical knowledge, technological pedagogical content knowledge, and professional knowledge. Examples for each of these categories will be presented and pedagogical implications for designing professional development courses that promote EAP teachers’ practical and beneficial application will be discussed.

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Corpus-Based Materials In An Academic Writing Context: Learning The MetaDiscourse Recourses Of A Written Text Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 S. Susan Marandi Alzahra University, Iran susanmarandi@alzahra.ac.ir Katayoun Rezaei Alzahra University, Iran ktyn.rezaie@gmail.com ABSTRACT The recent learner-centered approaches to language teaching call for creating a learning environment in which the use of available technology can promote the practice of discovery learning and enhance learners’ autonomy. Due to the potential benefits of corpora as an interactive tool, they can successfully be applied to engage learners in a data-driven approach to learning which as Boulton (2011) has stated, is paired with learners’ independency and creativity. Corpora prepare materials for teachers to create practice exercises, provide learners with just-in-time feedback (Cotos, 2017), and scaffold them not only in lexico-grammatical learning but also in learning the functional aspects of language. Nevertheless, there is a dearth of evidence on the use of corpora for learning functional features of writing. However, the use of appropriate meta-discourse resources is a challenging task for learners to deal with in completing their writing tasks. Thus, the current research has made an attempt to examine the impact of using corpora on learning the correct usage of interactive metadiscourse resources of transitions: (1) comparison (2) addition (3) consequence (Hyland, 2005). For this purpose, an academic writing class of 20 Iranian undergraduate students, majoring in English literature was selected as the context of this mixed-method research. During the few first sessions learners were familiarized with the use of corpora and the following sessions they were required to complete some exercises designed based on the concordance lines of Compleat Lexical Tutor, which contains several TLU domain corpora, to practice correct usage of interactive transitions while discovering the concordance tool. Meanwhile, they also composed a number of writing essays using the meta-discourse resources practiced. The learners’ writing tasks were corrected and indirect feedback was given by the teacher on the transitions to further correct/revise their errors exploring the TLU domain corpora. Moreover, semi-structured interviews were conducted with the volunteers to evaluate their attitude toward using corpora, its possible benefits and drawbacks, and the potential problems they had while utilizing it. The findings of the study have implications for the use of corpusbased materials in learning functional features of language and bring further evidence for discovery-based learning experience.

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Creating A Self-Access Learning Platform For Foreign Languages Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Daniel Kwang Guan Chan National University of Singapore, Singapore daniel.chan@nus.edu.sg Wai Meng Chan National University of Singapore, Singapore chanwm@nus.edu.sg Nu Thuy Uyen Nguyen University of Foreign Language Studies, Vietnam ABSTRACT Language learning involves regular exposure to the target language, preferably on a daily basis. Technology can be harnessed as a valuable tool in recreating a virtual language and cultural learning environment, which will in turn help students to achieve the desired proficiency in a FL. In particular, blended learning through the use instructional technologies allows for the optimisation of teaching/learning time on task to learn the target language more effectively. In view of these, an online Self-Access Language Learning Environment (SALLE) portal – accessible both using the mobile phone and the computer – was created to serve the teaching needs of a language centre that teaches 13 different languages at an Asian university, including foreign languages that do not use Latin scripts, such as Mandarin, Thai, Japanese, Korean, Hindi and Arabic. This unique SALLE portal allows for the creation of an infinite number language learning games and exercises that are fully customised and adapted to the needs of the individual language programmes and their students’ demands, through a user-friendly back-end creation system that can be used for the teaching and learning of all 13 languages. Types of games and exercise include matching, language Tetris, hangman, memory game, sequencing, word snake, catching/shooting, mole game, mind-map and skimming, all of which can serve to engage the learner in a fun way outside of the classroom. This portal encourages learner autonomy and improves student motivation while allowing ample exposure to the target language, the acquisition of new language skills and the reinforcement of previously learnt grammar and vocabulary in a student-centred way. The entire process of creation involved not only pedagogical considerations but also thought processes on how to make the back-end creation system as user-friendly and idiot-proof as possible. Further plans for the SALLE portal include the addition of a “Personal Learning Environment” element as well as a “Vocab Book” from which the above exercise types and games can draw from to generate learning activities on this fully customised online learning platform.

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Creating Flexible Spaces To Promote Language Interaction And Foster 21st Century Skills In 3dvles. Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Auditorio 106, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Nandini Sarma Carleton University, Canada Nandini.sarma@carleton.ca Nuket Savaskan Nowlan Carleton University, Canada Nuket.nowlan@carleton.ca Peggy Hartwick Carleton University, Canada Peggy.hartwick@carleton.ca ABSTRACT 3D Virtual Learning Environments (3DVLE) are receiving much attention from scholars for their role in fostering 21st Century skills, such as critical thinking, collaboration and problem solving, and in affording opportunities for learner engagement, for example, in a target language. However, creating unique and effective 3DVLE language activities requires the ongoing involvement of expensive technical designers. To empower classroom teachers to design their own spaces, this research team explores the use of provisionable artifacts, such as non-player avatars, that will allow teachers to create their own unique activities by assigning content to these artifacts without the help of external technical resources. This presentation will report on preliminary findings on such classroom teacher-created activities in an intermediate French as a second language classroom. The research team set out to identify the types of activities and provisionable artifacts that enhance student directed learning and the achievement of specified language and learning outcomes. Study participants were tasked to read, listen, share, and write a summative report based on their experiences exploring and gathering clues in a 3DVLE. Participants were asked to record their interactions which were later observed and analyzed to address the following questions: 1. What type of learning activities engage language learners and promote both language proficiency and 21st century skills in 3DVLE asynchronous and/ or synchronous non-teacher-facilitated contexts? 2. What are the observable interactions and where are they best situated in the task in order to provide insight as to students approaching 21st century skill levels? The presentation will share preliminary results pertaining to task effectiveness, evidence of the use of skills, and participant interactions with the provisionable artifacts in the environment. These observables were selected by the research team based on previous task designs as characteristic of 21st century learning and related to course and language learning outcomes. Research findings will aid in understanding the design of multi-purpose 3DVLEs for enabling multilanguage learning. The ability to repurpose the virtual space through provisionable artifacts for multiple languages and multi-levels, dovetails nicely with the development of 21st century skills. 82


Creating Information Gap Activities In Moodle Using Groups, Access Restrictions, And The Database Module Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 15:00 End Time (Part 1): 16:30 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 17.00 End Time (Part 2): 18:30 Edificio CFRD Room PC2 David Campbell Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan campbell@obihiro.ac.jp ABSTRACT Moodle is a powerful and flexible learning management system, but for many users the power and flexibility equals confusion and frustration. Instructors may be forced to use it by the administrators in their schools or they may have never been adequately trained, but by learning some of the basic features of Moodle (groups, restrict access/completion settings and the database module) in this workshop participants will have the opportunity to create information gap activities in Moodle. This workshop will take attendees through the steps of making groups/groupings and why this is important. They will also learn how to set the different access restriction and completion criteria to guide students through an activity and create the “gap in information� required for the activity. Finally, they will set up an activity using the database module to capture the students responses. Having some knowledge of Moodle (high beginner to intermediate) would be helpful.

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Creating Information Gap Activities In Moodle Using Groups, Access Restrictions, And The Database Module Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 17:00 End Time: 18:30 Edificio CFRD Room PC2 David Campbell Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan campbell@obihiro.ac.jp ABSTRACT Moodle is a powerful and flexible learning management system, but for many users the power and flexibility equals confusion and frustration. Instructors may be forced to use it by the administrators in their schools or they may have never been adequately trained, but by learning some of the basic features of Moodle (groups, restrict access/completion settings and the database module) in this workshop participants will have the opportunity to create information gap activities in Moodle. This workshop will take attendees through the steps of making groups/groupings and why this is important. They will also learn how to set the different access restriction and completion criteria to guide students through an activity and create the “gap in information� required for the activity. Finally, they will set up an activity using the database module to capture the students responses. Having some knowledge of Moodle (high beginner to intermediate) would be helpful.

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Data Visualization For Corpus Linguistics Software: Enhancing Learners’ Experience Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 17:10 End Time: 17:40 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Andressa Rodrigues Gomide Lancaster University, Great Britain a.rodriguesgomide@lancaster.ac.uk ABSTRACT The use of corpus linguistics (CL) in second language learning and teaching is now well-established in the field of language acquisition (Granger 2009) and is said to be one of the most prominent applications of CL (Bennett 2010). In this field, CL methods are mainly used as a learning tool and as a reference source. A common practice when CL is a learning tool is the use of hands-on activities, in which students work directly with authentic data (O’Keeffe, McCarthy, and Carter 2007), characterised by Johns (1991) as data-driven learning. CL has also been used as a reference to inform material production and to describe learners’ language (Meunier 2010). However, there is still resistance to CL from both learners and teachers (Romer 2006). Studies have reported that learners have difficulties in formulating queries, understanding the tools functioning and interpreting the results (Yoon and Hirvela 2004). Presenting data through visual aids has been shown to facilitate information insight and to enhance the user experience (Few 2004). This presentation outlines some recent work on improving the experience of language learners and teachers with CL software, through the development and implementation of a new data visualization. This consisted of three steps: (a) identifying the target audience and understanding their needs; (b) development and implementation of the visualization; and (c) user assessment of the newly developed tool. User needs were assessed via (a) literature investigation into papers reporting corpus-based methods and (b) a contextual design approach (Beyer and Holtzblatt 1998), allowing observation of how users interact with CL software in their own environment. These observations were then used as a starting point for the development of a new visualization to better handle corpus metadata. Key issues for a successful data visualization, such as its functionality, aesthetics and accuracy (Cairo 2016) were also considered. The new functionality was implemented in CQPweb (Hardie 2012), an open-source piece of software for corpus linguistic analysis. Finally a user assessment was conducted to allow final adjustments to they system to be further fitted to the users’ needs.

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Debates To Build Professional Language Performance In English Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Soraya GarcĂ­a-SĂĄnchez Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain soraya.garcia@ulpgc.es ABSTRACT This study is based on exploring the debate as a communicative task that enhances language strategies and builds communicative professional confidence in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners. On the one hand, communicating effective messages in English and being able to refute back in a formal and polite environment improve a variety of language learning achievements that are produced individually but have a collaborative interdependence result for its effective impact. On the other hand, the debate is a communicative strategy that is often supported by CALL resources. Moreover, the debate belongs to everyday conversations and professional environments in order to promote reasoning and discussions. To link social, emotional and cognitive skills with communicating messages in English through the debate task is the purpose of this presentation. The proposed structure of the debate establishes an interdependent collaborative work that can be successfully planned by means of combining cognitive, communicative and emotional intelligences that will increase EFL performance. Decision making together with the investigation of target content, role positions, and the production and communication of well-linked messages in EFL will be shown at upper intermediate level B2 in tertiary education. The empirical data suggests that interactive patterns and argumentative rebuttals in English support an educational ecosystem for 21st century learners, who would use face-to-face and technological devices to interact and access information.

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Design And Development Of An Online Platform To Facilitate English Learning And Teaching At Universidad De Atacama Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Educación María E. Pilar Franco Torrejón Universidad de Atacama, Chile pilar.franco@uda.cl Lorena Marisol Campos Martínez Universidad de Atacama, Chile lorena.campos@uda.cl Patricio Antonio Marré Reygada Universidad de Atacama, Chile patricio.marre@uda.cl ABSTRACT This research originates based on the needs of UDA English Center (UEC) to promote the learning of English, seal ability at UDA, through innovative technological tools. The population involved in this project includes students from different fields of study, as engineering, geology, medicine, midwifery and pedagogy courses. The students at UDA have to learn English due to the foreign language learning requirements established and because their profession imposes the need. This research main objective is to develop an online platform to enhance English learning by facilitating access to English language resources and automatization of academic processes. The platform includes three main components: 1) Blearning as a core methodology for teaching English in a module-based design, helping students to access to synchronic and asynchronic English learning environments; 2) Assessment for learning is another central component in the methodological framework at UEC. Ability based assessment online procedures will be implemented to guide language learning achievements. 3) Fostering learners’ autonomy, in line with the requirements of Modelo Educativo UDA, is an outstanding issue to be developed through the online platform proposal. The online platform proposed is being built based on open source software and applications, programmed in PHP, which helps create a more efficient back-end interface. The platform is flexible and harmonizes with any operating system currently in use, like Android, Windows, Linux and Mac OS, and will be constantly updated according to the needs of the students at UDA English Center. The researchers in this project seek to build a user-friendly front-end interface which provides continuous access to information for the students and expect to witness a significant improvement in the students’ learning outcomes in English. In summary, this platform optimizes academic processes by making information easily and readily accessible from any electronic device with internet connection. This project contributes to implement b-learning methodologies, b-learning assessment strategies and learners´ autonomy through an online platform that fosters EFL learning and teaching at UEC, Universidad de Atacama.

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Developing A Body Of Knowledge: Working With Corpora In An Undergraduate Italian Subject Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Matt Absalom The University of Melbourne, Australia mabsalom@unimelb.edu.au ABSTRACT Since Prensky (2001) coined the dichotomy digital natives versus digital immigrants, it has somehow become an accepted truth, not unlike the passage of much fake news in today's media-blitzed world. Bennett and Corrin (2018) remind us that the uncritical acceptance of this position leads us to make mistaken assumptions about young people's digital literacy. Prompted by my realisation that, compared to my own usage as a purported digital immigrant, my digital native students have a very unsophisticated approach to the use of online resources when it comes to seeking out authentic, idiomatic language and, particularly, in the case of translation tasks, I have set about to explore their capacity to integrate new materials into their arsenal of language learning tools. This began in the second-half of 2017 with a small project which invited students in an advanced Italian language subject at a major metropolitan Australian university to explore corpusassisted approaches to translating a small selection of idiomatic expressions. Students were divided into two groups with one group (control) being provided with a set of expressions to translate. The other group (experimental) was provided with the same expressions as well as a summary of resources to consider using and instructions on how to do so. On completion of this task, students were asked to fill in a questionnaire to interrogate their behaviour during the task. After describing the findings from this initial preliminary project, I will outline new developments in 2018 which have seen the development of an apprenticeship-style approach to using corpora following the work of Claire Kennedy and Tiziana Miceli (2001, 2010, 2017) which was integrated into a similar advanced Italian subject in the same university. I will also comment on some of the linguistic and lexical intricacies that have arisen in students work following their systematic use of corpora.

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Developing Intercultural Awareness Through Online Exchange Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio 105, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Pasi Puranen Aalto University, Finland pasi.puranen@aalto.fi ABSTRACT New technologies for computer mediated communication and learning offer ever-growing possibilities for language teaching and learning more skills for intercultural awareness. Technologies are valuable ways to interact between different cultures and increase cross-cultural understanding among university students and offer new ways for computer-supported collaborative learning. Online intercultural exchange enables students to interact in a more authentic environment and build new online communities. In this presentation, I will analyze how our students, throughout these different projects, were able to develop their intercultural competence and awareness by utilizing different online tools and learning contexts. The main research questions of this study are how students developed their intercultural awareness during the online exchange projects and how they were able to share their knowledge and views through social networking by using online tools. To gather more data, the students at the end of each project completed a survey in the form of a questionnaire consisting of ten statements. A five-point Likert scale ranging from 1 to 5 was used to gauge the students' reactions to the projects. Individual interviews were also conducted upon completion of the projects to find out about the students' attitudes to their learning experiences and their understanding of their own and that of their counterparts' cultures. The students' evaluation of the projects and their learning experience was positive and they considered using different platforms as learning contexts to be very convenient for online engagement. The project helped students to exchange views about cultural aspects and clarify questions that arose. As a conclusion, it is evident that sharing thoughts and views on Facebook and videoconferencing has been a meaningful learning experience and students have been able to discover and share useful information about each other's cultural traits. The projects have clearly given the students an opportunity to communicate, exchange ideas, further discuss, and analyze them critically with their peers to enhance intercultural learning.

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Developing Pre-Service English Teachers' Visual Literacy: Applying Visual Representations To The Teaching Of Literacy-Based Reading Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Jun-Jie Tseng National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan jjtseng@gapps.ntnu.edu.tw ABSTRACT The Ministry of Education in Taiwan is currently promoting a new K-12 national curriculum with a focus on students' literacy development. In particular, they are encouraged to express their life experiences, thoughts, values, and affections through semiotic resources. In fact, computer technology can afford them the opportunity to engage in multimodal representation and communication. Thus, multimodal literacies should be developed and acquired by English learners in order to make connections between English subject and their everyday lives. One of the multimodal literacies involves visual literacy. However, foreign language teachers have not yet prepared themselves for the new literacy-based teaching practices, so they have little idea how to apply visual imagery to foreign language teaching and learning. To address this problem, the present study attempts to train pre-service English teachers to apply visual representations (VRs) to curriculum-based reading materials through a teacher development framework that integrates relevant theories such as the New London Group's (2000) multiliteracies pedagogy, systemic-functional theorization of multimodality of Halliday (1976) and Kress and van Leeuwen (2006), and Freebody and Luke's (2003) "four roles" model. Supported by this theoretical framework, this study is situated in an ELT methods course, aiming to shed light on (a) how the student teachers incorporate VRs into the teaching of literacy-based reading and (b) how they perceive the theory-supported teacher education course. While data regarding incorporating VRs into teaching come from their lesson plans, VR-enhanced instructional materials, and interviews, data regarding their perceptions of learning in the teacher education course come from a questionnaire survey and interviews. Findings will be reported and discussed. Research and pedagogical implications will be provided as well, together with recommendations for future research. This study intends to understand how pre-service teachers demonstrate VRs in curriculum-based reading materials and how they perceive the theory-supported TESOL teacher development course. It is hoped that this study can contribute to the literature by developing EFL teachers' VR competence in relation to the teaching of literacy-based reading.

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Development And Assessment Of ePortfolio Plugins To Assist EFL Learners' GoalSetting And Self-Learning Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Kazumichi Enokida Hiroshima University, Japan kenokida@hiroshima-u.ac.jp Mitsuhiro Morita Hiroshima University, Japan mmorita@hiroshima-u.ac.jp Tatsuya Sakaue Hiroshima University, Japan tsakaue@hiroshima-u.ac.jp Shusaku Kida Hiroshima University, Japan skida@hiroshima-u.ac.jp ABSTRACT The presenters have been developing and delivering a variety of online self-learning materials for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners at the tertiary level in Japan. Especially, they have delivered more than 800 episodes as podcasts for the last ten years, which generally rank well on iTunes Store. The primary goal of these online materials is to provide students with more exposure to English outside of the classroom. There have been two major challenges in integrating these materials into the EFL instruction. First, while these materials have been found effective in improving the learners’ English skills in a fun way, just putting them online does not lead to fostering their autonomous learning. One possible reason is that very few students, especially non-English majors, are aware of what they can do with their current English proficiency levels, and how they can set up their own achievement goals. And second, typically in podcast materials, it has been difficult for the instructors to know exactly how these materials are being used by students. The presenters believe the ePortfolio system is a viable solution to address these challenges. A Mahara-based system has been set up, and two plugins optimized for EFL learners have been developed. The first one is aimed to help the students find what they can do with their English levels, and then set up their own achievement goals using their TOEIC scores. Among the suggestions given to the students is which podcasts are most suitable to achieve their goals. And the second plugin is to enable students to listen to the podcasts they choose from the ones recommended. Detailed data has been recorded, such as the listening durations, frequency of use, and the listeners’ reviews and rankings. In this presentation, the development of these two plugins is explained, and then the potential of the ePortfolio system is assessed, especially in terms of how it could assist EFL learners' goal-setting and self-learning.

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Digital Material Design And Meaningful Learning In Online Courses Offered By NUPEAD: Exploring Games And Gamification Strategies In Language Teaching Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Susana Cristina dos Reis Dos Reis UFSM, Brazil reis.suzi@gmail.com Adilson Fernandes Gomes Gomes UFSM, Brazil Anidene Siqueira Cecchin Cecchin UFSM, Brazil ABSTRACT Research in Computer Assisted Language Learning have focused on the investigation of the use of games and gamification in the EFL classroom, mainly highlighting theoretical aspects as well as the importance of defining a framework to guide the digital material development to be useful in the teaching practice (GEE, 2005; LOPEZ, TODA, BRANCHER, 2014; KAPP, 2012; SYKES; REINHARDT, 2012).Taking it into consideration, in our research group (NUPEAD), we investigate how to put in practice the actions and guidelines on how to explore games and gamification in the classroom and how to explore them into the digital teaching materials design in order to promote learner´s multiliteracies, meaningful learning and ubiquitous learning (GEE, 2008; COPE; KALANTZIS, 2015; McGONICAL, 2012; OGATA et al, 2009). In this paper, we discuss three cases studies applied in courses offered at a Federal University in Brazil. To do that, we collected data by online questionnaires, the material design and logs reports collected from Moodle during the courses application. The participants are mainly teachers in continuing education and the cases studies discuss: 1) guidelines to design digital material that integrate games and gamification into the design; 2) the experience of teaching about gamification in a distance education modality; 3) a proposal of digital material to teach writing production online. Results indicate that the online learning culture exploring digital games and gamification strategies by distance or by including these principles into the design of digital material is something new to be learned among the social actors of digital environments mainly in relation to how explore the material proposed, since it is necessary to experience the processes knowledge to promote the learner´s multiliteracies mainly the processes that emphasizes the new, in a critical and practical way. Our experiences highlight that the course material should follow a planned staged design approach as well as the steps of analysing, testing and evaluating the games and the material before including it into the design. The gamification strategies are useful to engage, motivate and get the participants interacting and solving the challenges the courses offer in a hipertextual, multimodal and ubiquitous learning environment.

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Digital Stories To Improve Study Abroad Orientation Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Educaciรณn Jeremy White Ritsumeikan University, Japan jwhite@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp ABSTRACT Studying abroad, whether for one week or one year, is one of the most rewarding yet stressful activities students can undertake during their education. In Japan, thousands of university students undertake short-term study abroad programs around the world to learn the language and culture of other countries. These programs offer a variety of teacher centred pre-departure orientation sessions for students based on essential subjects such as how to overcome communication breakdowns with host family members, general etiquette in the community, and other high-anxiety situations in day-today dealings. However, Japanese university students studying abroad often return to report of their shock in relation to their experiences in the host country. This shock can on occasions prevent students from focusing on learning the language while in the host country and discourage them from wanting to continue their study on their return to Japan. This presentation will demonstrate how a move from teacher centred pre-departure classes to the use of digital stories made and presented by students has become an effective way to reduce the anxiety felt by students when studying abroad. The presenter will highlight how advancement in mobile technology, specifically smartphones, has allowed for students to take on the role of teachers by providing first-hand accounts for individuals planning to take part in study abroad activities. The presentation will show the results of a study in which 52 students from a university in Western Japan were required to plan, develop, produce, and edit their own digital stories in English during their five-week study-abroad experience in Australia. Through interviews with students it was discovered that they not only benefited from this experience in terms English language learning, but that the process of making a digital story was an effective way to reduce their own anxiety level and increase their positive feelings towards studying abroad. The presenter will conclude by demonstrating how to make a digital story, including necessary themes, and showing examples of the completed digital stories.

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Dimensions of the UdeC English Online B-Learning Environment Symposium Thursday, November 15th Start Time (Part 1): 10:15 End Time (Part 1): 10:45 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Emerita Bañados Universidad de Concepción, Chile ebanados@udec.cl Patricia Bañados-Lanyon Universidad de Concepción, Chile patriciabanados@udec.cl Katherine Araya Universidad de Concepción, Chile kaaraya@udec.cl Alejandra Deij Universidad de Concepción, Chile adeij.eo.udec@gmail.com Patricia Carrillo Universidad de Concepción, Chile pcarrillo.eo.udec@gmail.com Angela Acuña Universidad de Concepción, Chile angela.eo.udec@gmail.com Carmen Morales Mella Universidad de Concepción, Chile cmorales.eo.udec@gmail.com Camila Navarrete Universidad de Concepción, Chile navarretecam@gmail.com David Julien Universidad de Concepción, Chile Davidpjulien@gmail.com Benjamin Walters Universidad de Concepción, Chile benwalters@udec.cl

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Michael Ellsworth Universidad de Concepción, Chile michael.s.ellsworth@gmail.com

Luis Marín Universidad de Concepción, Chile luismarin@udec.cl Daniela Sanchez Universidad de Concepción, Chile dasanchez@udec.cl Nicolás Campos Universidad de Concepción, Chile ncamposc@udec.cl ABSTRACT Introduction Emerita Bañados This symposium will depict how we have given shape to a CALL b-learning environment for teaching English as a foreign language to university students from different study programs at the Universidad de Concepción (UdeC), Chile. We will discuss the questions asked and the answers found when designing and implementing this environment. Questions include: How can we help students from underprivileged regions achieve the English language proficiency level they need to participate in this global and knowledge-based society? What can we – as language teachers, CALL practitioners, and researchers – do to harmonize theory, practice and technology so as to create effective, high-quality language learning environments that are viable, equitable and endurable in the long run? Where do we start? What’s the value of technology in SLA Processes? How can technology empower a Language Learning Environment to help learners overcome poor proficiency in English communication? What are the factors that may promote an optimal CALL language learning environment? What opportunities does technology give us to facilitate the SLA processes involved? How can CALL tasks help achieve language learning more efficiently? Is it worth the effort? Combining Theory, Practice, and Technology in the B-Learning Environment for EFL Learners at the Universidad de Concepción Emerita Bañados Effective English language teaching and learning can be achieved by combining theory, practice and technology to fit language learners’ needs. Key second language acquisition theoretical principles, claimed to promote conditions that may entail optimal second language learning CALL environments (Egbert & Hanson-Smith, 1999), can be put into practice advantageously by utilizing information and communication technologies creatively. This presentation will describe the principles that have been put into practice in the English b-learning environment implemented at the Universidad de Concepción, which encompasses a formal instructional English program that aims at developing integrated communicative competence skills. The program emphasizes on developing listening comprehension, oral production, and intercultural competence; it focuses on authentic communicative interaction on the basis of a meaningful contextualized topic-based and learner-centered syllabus. Results have shown a high impact on learners’ communicative competence and satisfaction levels with the overall b-learning environment. After 14 years, over 33.000 learners who have joined the program are able to communicate in English efficiently. 95


The b-learning pedagogical model underlying the English language learning environment has been conceived by seeking a balance between flexibility and quality (Bañados 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2016, 2018). Thus, it combines the benefits that learners get by studying autonomously in an e-learning interactive multimedia platform (UdeC English Online), the advantages of face-to-face classes with EFL teachers and native English speaker instructors, learners’ participation in telecollaboration projects with foreign peers, exposure to continuous corrective feedback, online and face-to-face tutoring, and a face-to-face and online evaluation system that helps learners become conscious of their English language learning outcomes. The presentation will describe the EFL b-learning environment and the relationship among its components. It will focus on the theoretical issues underlying the use of technology in the design of CALL tasks and in the opportunities technology offers for interactional activity claimed to be beneficial for effective language learning. Particularly, it will focus on three types of interactions made available through CALL: (a) interpersonal interaction between people (both face-to-face and through CMC), (b) between person and computer, and (c) within the person’s mind (Chapelle, 2003; Ellis, 1999). Independent Learning With the Interactive Multimedia UdeC English Online Platform 
 Patricia Bañados-Lanyon and Katherine Araya This presentation will show the activities learners are expected to carry out autonomously in the UdeC English Online platform for any given lesson of the online Modules. It will illustrate two types of interaction made available through CALL tasks: between person and computer, and intrapersonal interaction within the learner’s mind (Chapelle, 2003; Ellis, 1999). The instructional design built into the online software materials and tasks follows guidelines to support the types of interactions that interactionists’ theory would predict to be beneficial to language learners (Chapelle, 1998). Online materials should provide: opportunities for input enhancement making key linguistic characteristics salient, modifications of linguistic input, opportunities for comprehensible output, opportunities for learners to notice their errors, opportunities for learners to correct their linguistic output, opportunities for the learner to act as a participant in L2 tasks and support modified interaction between the learner and the computer. As for person-computer interaction, during this presentation examples of the application of these guidelines will be used to illustrate the different salient feature devices that have been devised to provide opportunities for learners to obtain enhanced L2 input, as well as opportunities to focus on output. Examples of devices for prompting intrapersonal interaction will also be depicted. Video-Web Interaction With an International English-Speaking Network Through Telecollaboration Alejandra Deij The learning methodology of the UdeC English Online b-learning environment includes B1 and B2 proficiency level learners participating in telecollaboration projects and teletandem sessions with a network of higher education institutions. We consider that CMC is absolutely natural and essential in English language teaching and learning. In order to provide equal opportunities for all B1 proficiency level students, we have made partnerships with universities in USA, Canada and Australia to offer them opportunities to take part in telecollaboration projects with foreign students who are learning Spanish as a foreign language. Thus, we provide opportunities for communication with native speakers of English in real sociocultural contexts, benefitting not only from speaking practice but also from gaining tolerance and respect and understanding of other cultures, which enable learners to become global citizens. This instant, real-life communication, provides opportunities to focus on output and get immediate corrective feedback, as well as opportunities for negotiation of meaning in an intimate environment. Video web interaction is highly motivating and helps students learn from the mirroring experience of seeing the way a foreign student learns Spanish and in this way, reflecting on their own language learning process. This presentation aims at sharing a successful 10-year experience in telecollaboration between Chilean UdeC B1 level English students with students of Spanish at A2 and B1 levels of several international universities. The presentation will 96


show our findings at promoting learner’s autonomy, improving their language skills and having an intercultural experience in a real sociocultural context. It will show the evolution of the model we have implemented, the solutions we have developed for common problems in Telecollaboration, and the goals we have set for future projects. Online and Face-to-Face Tutoring by EFL Teacher-Tutors Patricia Carrillo and Angela Acuña Tutoring provides significant information for both learners and tutors. Online and face-to-face tutoring are relevant components in the UdeC English Online b-learning environment. Learners are supervised through online and face-toface tutoring done by EFL instructors who coach them to achieve their language learning goals. Each lesson demands that learners submit speaking, pronunciation and writing assignments to their personal online portfolios. Their work is checked, selectively revised and graded, and returned with feedback given by their teacher-tutors. Tutors can monitor their learners’ progress first-hand as they listen to their recordings and check assignments uploaded by students in their online portfolios. For students, tutoring represents the opportunity to work independently, but with guidance, and for tutors it’s an efficient way to check learners’ progress and identify common difficulties in the learning process to reinforce them in face-to-face class sessions. For the oral production CALL tasks students use a unique online role-play recorder and an Office tool for the written activities. Tutors listen to learners’ recordings, grade them and give them personal feedback. Learners not only get valuable information on their weaknesses and strengths, as they focus on their own output, but they also lower their anxiety levels as they have opportunities to improve their language with the feedback provided. Face-to-Face Classes With EFL Teacher-Tutors Carmen Morales Mella and Camila Navarrete As in other countries, drop-out rates for online courses in Chile are high, reflecting a lack of time and commitment. Chileans tend to prefer face-to-face interaction classes (British Council, 2015, p. 33). Whereas, in the UdeC English Online b-learning environment, learners demonstrate interest, motivation, responsibility, and a willingness to participate and learn – with a very low drop-out rate. Learners attend a weekly 1.5-hour face-to-face class with their EFL teacher-tutor, who guides their learning process to help them achieve their language proficiency goals. During these sessions, students interact in communication-based activities, designed to give practice in the thematic, functional, and linguistic contents of the lesson. Teachers can verify learners’ progress and clarify any doubts students may have from their independent work with the online software. Face-to-face sessions promote both teacher-student and student-student relationships, getting to know each other in many aspects. This familiarity lowers students’ levels of anxiety and, therefore, builds students’ confidence to enable language learning to flow naturally. During face-to-face sessions, students are given goals and tasks. The main tasks are based on TBLT methodology, PBL (Problem-Based Learning) (Savery & Duffy,1995), and collaborative learning. They are carried out with diverse communicative interaction dynamics to involve an active participation of all learners at the same time. Tutors can view students’ performance, check the progress they make, address their weaknesses, praise their strengths, and provide them with immediate feedback. Such interactions become more productive by using the English Online platform autonomously in order to reinforce contents at learners’ own pace and time. To conclude, a b-learning model with all the benefits of e-learning would not be successful without the support of faceto-face instruction to achieve English language learning outcomes. These learning dynamics are meant to motivate students to support independent online work through periodic collaborative learning tasks, in which learners are monitored and assessed.

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Face-to-Face Classes With Native English Speaker Instructors for Authentic Communication and Sociocultural Immersion David Julien, Benjamin Walters, and Michael Ellsworth Learners attend a weekly one-hour face-to-face class with a native English speaker instructor. Class sessions are designed to be fun and a source of motivation for learners. Face-to-face sessions with native speakers focus on developing cultural awareness for learning the target language together with features of its culture (Byram & Fleming, 1998; Canale & Swain 1980) and on vocabulary learning. During these sessions, students learn about the customs and the sociocultural similarities and differences with regards to their own language and culture. They learn about pragmatic and sociocultural issues related to the topic of each lesson and have the opportunity to learn day-to-day expressions used by native speakers. They discover different traditions and take part in various cultural fun activities organised by the native speaker instructors. Pedagogical activities are based on games, role-plays, and simulation tasks to reduce learners’ anxiety levels and facilitate learning by having fun. Learners get to a point where they overcome their shy Chilean nature to speak English in front of others. Thus, learners have opportunities to get used to managing themselves comfortably in cross-cultural settings. Face-to-Face and Online Assessment as Indicators of Learning Outcomes Luis Marín, Daniela Sanchez, and Nicolás Campos This presentation describes one of the seven components of the UdeC English Online b-learning environment (Bañados 2004, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2016, 2018). It focuses on face-to-face and online process and product evaluation system, and on the results of a sample of students from the University of Concepcion during the course of an academic term. The whole evaluation system has been conceived as an indicator for accountability of language learning outcomes. Learners’ initial L2 proficiency level is assessed through an oral interview with a native speaker and through a pool of online tests, aligned with international standard proficiency levels such as the Common European Framework for Modern Languages. Speaking skills are assessed in face-to-face sessions that take place three times during the semester: before the semester begins (diagnostic interview), at the end of the first half of the semester (midterm interview) and at the end of the term (final interview). All the other skills that can be automatically corrected by a computer are assessed through periodic online tests, taken every two weeks after the completion of each lesson. Students take a total of 8 online quizzes in each module (6 lesson quizzes plus 2 unit quizzes). Thus listening, reading, vocabulary, pronunciation discrimination, and integrated skills are assessed online. The online tests have an automatic grade-reporting system. Process evaluation allows learners to become aware of their learning achievements, and offers them possibilities to recognise different areas of their learning process and their weaknesses and strengths. The results of the group of EFL students during the course of a semester will be presented, showing their performance at the beginning of the course, how they progressed after every lesson and at the end of the term, concluding whether the learners achieved the goals set for their level.

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Effective Models And Guidelines For Large-Scale Distance Learning Projects Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Tania Davidson Edusoft Ltd., Israel taniad@edusoft.co.il ABSTRACT Technology offers a wealth of language learning opportunities. It also challenges educators to find suitable models of implementation, particularly where large-scale distance learning projects are involved. Such challenges frequently center around technical logistics, student motivation and curriculum delivery. Edusoft together with Laureate International Universities, Inc. has developed a sophisticated implementation model to ensure the success of our English Discoveries distance learning courses. The presenters believe that online materials developers need not only to provide relevant, interesting and methodologically sound material for the learner, but also to create successful models of implementation that will ensure students remain motivated and engaged throughout their studies. We will also explain how timely and relevant teacher training is directly related to successful implementation and delivery. We will be presenting examples from several large-scale distance learning projects that are currently underway in a number of universities in Latin America. The main challenges of distance learning when applied to language learning and the factors involved in developing a successful online language learning program for adult learners will be addressed. Examples of preparing both teachers and students for teacher-lead synchronous sessions will be provided. Techniques and tools for combating student isolation and dropout rates will be discussed, and special emphasis will be placed on providing timely synchronous instruction to encourage cooperative and collaborative learning. We will show how maximizing communicative synchronous sessions, as well as e-mail and forum interactions between teachers and other learners can create a “lifeline� for learners. We will also demonstrate how our range of online management tools can play a vital role in helping teachers track and support large numbers of distance students. These tools can be valuable in extracting analytics on both teachers and learners to not only measure performance, but also to better understand asynchronous behavior and build profiles of successful learners. We will conclude with a discussion of the challenges involved in assessing distance learning courses and attempt to provide practical suggestions for both quantitative and qualitative methods of assessment for the distance learner.

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Effectively Inserting Mobile Learning Into The EFL Classroom Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 15:00 End Time (Part 1): 16:30 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 17.00 End Time (Part 2): 18:30 Edificio CFRD Multimedia Room Alexandra Simões Andrade Faculdade CNEC de Itaboraí, Brazil 2023.alexandraandrade@cnec.br ABSTRACT This workshop is the result of a series of meetings with English teachers from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (that took place in late 2016 and troughout 2017) in order to conduct a Reflective Research regarding the use of Mobile Learning (ALLY, 2010) & (BEAL, 2017) in the English as a Foreign Language classroom in the country. At first, the surveyed teachers demonstrated lack of knowledge and/or interest as far as the use of technology in the classroom is concerned. Surprisingly for the researcher, most of the participants had either no idea of the concept of M-Learning or the benefits its use can generate when properly implemented in the (languages’) classroom. Therefore, a workshop was developed with the aim of introducing M-Learning to the groups of teachers aforementioned as an attempt to have them reflect upon their practices and the importance of using technology in the English classroom, especially taking into account the digital natives we come across in our classrooms on a daily basis. The participants were required to take their own devices with certain apps previously downloaded (QrCode Reader, Google Photos, Padlet, amongst others). The researcher selected certain well known activities and dynamics commonly used to help and facilitate the teaching-learning process, such as Jeopardy, Scavenger Hunt and Paragraph Writing, and after reformulating them through the use of M-Learning carried them out with the teachers. As the results were extremely positive, the workshop was officially born and since then has constantly been reshaped, according to the latest trends, and presented to language teachers, as well as technology enthusiasts, throughout Brazil and parts of the world. The main purpose is to present ideas and suggestions, having participants’ active collaboration, in order to achieve innovation, creativity and motivation in the English as a Foreign Language classroom. It goes without saying that contemporary education means transforming your teaching so that it becomes authentic and meaningful to both students and teachers.

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Effectively Inserting Mobile Learning Into The EFL Classroom Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 17:00 End Time: 18:30 Edificio CFRD Multimedia Room Alexandra Simões Andrade Faculdade CNEC de Itaboraí, Brazil 2023.alexandraandrade@cnec.br ABSTRACT This workshop is the result of a series of meetings with English teachers from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (that took place in late 2016 and troughout 2017) in order to conduct a Reflective Research regarding the use of Mobile Learning (ALLY, 2010) & (BEAL, 2017) in the English as a Foreign Language classroom in the country. At first, the surveyed teachers demonstrated lack of knowledge and/or interest as far as the use of technology in the classroom is concerned. Surprisingly for the researcher, most of the participants had either no idea of the concept of M-Learning or the benefits its use can generate when properly implemented in the (languages’) classroom. Therefore, a workshop was developed with the aim of introducing M-Learning to the groups of teachers aforementioned as an attempt to have them reflect upon their practices and the importance of using technology in the English classroom, especially taking into account the digital natives we come across in our classrooms on a daily basis. The participants were required to take their own devices with certain apps previously downloaded (QrCode Reader, Google Photos, Padlet, amongst others). The researcher selected certain well known activities and dynamics commonly used to help and facilitate the teaching-learning process, such as Jeopardy, Scavenger Hunt and Paragraph Writing, and after reformulating them through the use of M-Learning carried them out with the teachers. As the results were extremely positive, the workshop was officially born and since then has constantly been reshaped, according to the latest trends, and presented to language teachers, as well as technology enthusiasts, throughout Brazil and parts of the world. The main purpose is to present ideas and suggestions, having participants’ active collaboration, in order to achieve innovation, creativity and motivation in the English as a Foreign Language classroom. It goes without saying that contemporary education means transforming your teaching so that it becomes authentic and meaningful to both students and teachers.

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Effects On Teaching And Development Of Reading Comprehension Through The Incorporation Of The Methodology Of Collaborative Learning With Portable Technology Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería María Gricelda Oyarzún Cornejo Tempus Educare. Asistencia Técnico Educativa, Chile gricelda.oyarzun@gmail.com Miriam Paz León Herrera Doctorado en Psicología. Universidad de La Frontera, Chile m.leon05@ufromail.cl ABSTRACT This research aimed to determine the effects on teaching and development of reading comprehension through the incorporation of the methodology of collaborative learning with portable technology in teachers and students participants of the project " Collaborative Links" in the Araucania region. The research was conducted through quantitative methodology supported by qualitative techniques. In the quantitative aspect, there was implemented a quasi-experimental design with pre post test control group. The sample was composed by 191 students in the experimental group and 187 in the control group of 4th grade of primary school. In relation with the qualitative field, the technique implemented was focus group with seven teachers involved in the project "Collaborative Links". This project purpose was to assign uses of mobile technologies in the classroom in order to support student learning process through measurement tools and new forms of collaborative intervention, as well as teaching management through measurement tools and new forms of collaborative intervention, as well as teaching management. This program was led by the research center EDUINNOVA of the Universidad Católica de Chile, supporting its implementation the Computer Education Institute of the Universidad de La Frontera. As results it was observed an increased of 11% in reading comprehension performance in the experimental group, compared to 6% in the control group, with statistically significant differences in favor of the experimental group, t(228) = 4.06, p <.001, 95% CI [2.26, 6.51]. In the classroom observations, it became evident that teachers appropriated the teaching guidelines suggested in the "Collaborative Links" program, incorporating mobile technology in their activities. Meanwhile, in focus group, teachers group, teachers noted that the use of technology in the classroom, mediated by a collaborative methodology, became a highly motivating resource for students, providing them, besides, evaluation process of the educational contents. This study shows the relevance of implementing innovative educational models, where students become builders of knowledge and technology is used as a facilitating tool improving reading comprehension and a vector showed that enhances positive interactions within groups collaborative work.

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EFL Teacher Perceptions Of Intercultural Digital Literacy In Using Skype For Classroom Telecollaboration Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio 105, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Christopher Allen Linnaeus University, Sweden christopher.allen@lnu.se ABSTRACT This presentation explores differing perceptions of intercultural digital literacy among in-service secondary and upper secondary school teachers of English in state Swedish schools as realised through their use of Skype in facilitating telecollaborative ventures involving their classes of learners. As part of their assessment for an online course in ICT for language teachers offered by a Swedish university, educators were tasked with proposing a set of classroom ICT activities promoting intercultural literacy, which was introduced as a theoretical concept as part of the overall digital literacies framework put forward by Dudeney, Hockly and Pegrum (2013). This framework was adopted as the cornerstone of the ICT course, which focused on the teaching of modern foreign languages through ICT -based tools and resources. The teachers' assignment was to outline a digital literacies language project for language learners at any level which promoted internationalization through intercultural literacy and awareness. In the digital literacy framework put forward by Dudeney et al (ibid), intercultural literacy is included under the 'connections' focus area. In discussing intercultural literacy on the course, teachers were introduced to activities such as Mystery Skype by a leading classroom practitioner in the field. Skype, which for the last decade or so has emerged as one of the world's leading telecommunications software applications, permits classes of foreign language learners in different countries to communicate via video chat and communication. Results emerging from an analysis of the teachers' project descriptions pointed strongly to the adoption of Mystery Skype in facilitating intercultural literacy and telecollaboration. Mystery Skype is a guessing game in which participating classes of learners in different countries take turns to pose questions to each other in order to determine the nationality and geographical location of the learners in the 'partner' classroom. The activity thus promotes communicative authenticity and intercultural awareness in communicative language teaching. This presentation describes and analyzes the different perceptions of intercultural literacy contra communicative competence among the teachers as realised through their classroom Skype projects.

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E-Learning At University Level: Exploring The Potential Of Blogs For Collaborative Online Projects In Foreign Language Teacher Education Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Thorsten Merse Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich (LMU), Germany t.merse@anglistik.uni-muenchen.de Christian Ludwig Pädagogische Hochschule Karlsruhe, Germany christian.ludwig@ph-karlsruhe.de ABSTRACT The blogosphere has become a part of everyday life and our personal knowledge tools. While this has led to the assumption that blogs are also a viable tool when teaching and learning a foreign language, little research has been done on the actual use of blogs in the foreign language classroom with adult and non-adult learners alike. The purpose of this talk is to report on the results of a collaborative virtual project between student teachers at the University of Munich and the University of Education Karlsruhe in Germany. All students involved in the project attended a class on contemporary approaches to teaching literary texts and visual media like picture books and comics in the EFL classroom. Small groups of students from each of the two classes joined together digitally and collaboratively to engage in, and complete, an elearning project. In this project, students were asked to read, analyze, and discuss the respective works in a shared online environment and to develop ideas for using these works in the classroom with their future learners, e.g. to foster literary learning, cultural learning and language learning. As a final outcome of the collaborative e-learning project, each group then created a blog page, presenting their chosen text, methodological approaches and learning objectives. The purpose of the accompanying study was twofold: first, to obtain insights into how the participants curated the chosen literary text for a classroom scenario by working together online; and secondly, to investigate how employing blogs can improve studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; writing skills in the target language. It will be argued that blogging as a collaborative writing activity can not only enhance studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; foreign language competence but also improve their media literacy development and their professionalization as future teachers. Practical illustrations of incorporating a blog in the classroom will be presented throughout the talk to exhibit the rich variety of opportunities that blogs provide for authentic foreign language use and deep pedagogic learning.

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Embracing Queer/Cross-Cultural Awareness In Foreign Language Education Through Social Media And Digital Literature Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Dr. Thorsten Merse Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München (LMU Munich), Germany t.merse@anglistik.uni-muenchen.de ABSTRACT This presentation explores the potential of social media and digital literature to initiate foreign language learner’s in-depth engagement with sexual and gender diversity. The talk begins with rooting this timely and educationally relevant endeavour in current reorientations in intercultural learning theories that are the result of my conceptual research in this field. This includes moving beyond a vision of intercultural learning that seeks to foster an understanding and awareness of cultural phenomena between allegedly distinct nationally or ethnically defined ‘cultures’, and instead to cross over into a conceptualization of intercultural learning that (also) addresses greater cultural diversity, explores a more diverse set of cultural practices, and gives voice to marginalized cultural identities. I will then embrace a focus on sexual and gender diversity as an exemplar of these diversifying and de-binarizing tendencies in intercultural learning. In doing so, I will stress the necessity to foster cultural awareness across differences of gender and sexual identity so that learners can ‘queer’ heteronormative views on the world. Against the backdrop of these theoretical considerations, I will continue to move into teaching practice where the question emerges how these new calls in cultural learning can be met on the level of texts, media and tasks chosen for the classroom. I will elaborate on the potential of social media and digital literature as carriers of cultural meaning to bring queer and LGBT voices into the classroom. I will present a repertoire of such media and literatures in order to illustrate what a multi-voiced and diversity-oriented text ensemble can look like in practice (e.g. consisting of online representations of queer youth, or of interactive app literature with queer themes and protagonists). By referring to this text ensemble, I will put forward a research-driven typology of tasks that provide a springboard for engaging learners in questions of sexual and gender diversity. The presentation will conclude with a glimpse into learners’ products generated from these tasks, and with a discussion of the potential and challenges of embracing queer/crosscultural awareness in foreign language education contexts through social media and digital literature.

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Engaged CALL: Evidence Of The Positive Effects Of Learner Engagement In CMC Tasks Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Tim Marchand Gakushuin University, Japan tim.marchand@gakushuin.ac.jp ABSTRACT This paper explores the issues of motivation, task engagement and learner autonomy in one particular CALL setting: an English language course for first year university students in Japan. In this course, lesson materials and tasks were provided online through a dedicated news-based blog. Each week, students wrote their reactions to news stories on the blog, and these comments then form the basis of a learner corpus. Over the course of one academic year, learners submit 20-40 written reactions to the news articles, producing texts that demonstrate an engagement with the various news topics, and an interaction with each other in a form of computer-mediated communication (CMC). After several iterations of the course, the learner corpus has now reached over 500,000 words in size. The size of the corpus, and the fact that the news stories themselves cover a range of topics which the learners may find intrinsically more or less interesting, offers the opportunity to examine how motivation and engagement with lesson materials may affect learner performance in producing their written responses. The paper examines the importance of engagement with the materials and learner autonomy from two perspectives. Firstly, the question of topic interest and its effects on learner output will be explored. After submitting comments on the blog to news articles, learners were asked to rate their level of interest and knowledge on each news topic. Correlating the scores of these with the CMC produced, the paper will explore whether increased engagement with lesson materials had any discernible effects on the nature of the written responses. Secondly, the issue of learner autonomy and motivation will be examined with reference to learner profiles. These were obtained through questionnaire data, as well as identifying certain common traits of learner behaviour as they applied themselves in the CALL tasks. The paper concludes by affirming that learner engagement is an important factor that needs to be considered when developing CALL systems and tasks.

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English Language Learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Motivational Profiles And Their Role In Online SelfRegulation Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Linyu Xu Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China woshiyikeshu1102@126.com Chunping Zheng Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China zhengchunping@bupt.edu.cn ABSTRACT In the field of Second Language Acquisition, close attention has been paid to the role of motivation and self-regulation, as two major variables for delineating individual differences among L2 learners. This quantitative study investigated English language as a foreign language (EFL) learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; motivational self system and further compare their online self-regulated learning strategies with different motivational profiles. A total of 423 sophomore students at a comprehensive university in China voluntarily participated in the study. They were invited to respond to two questionnaires, namely the Online Language Learning Motivation (OLLM) and their Online Self-regulated English Learning (OSEL). At first, results of exploratory factor analysis confirmed the validity of the research instruments. Then, cluster analysis revealed that learners could be categorized into four groups with varying motivational profiles, namely the instrumentality-oriented group, lowengagement group, high-commitment group, and interest-oriented group. The one-way ANOVA following the cluster analysis further indicated that learners with different motivational profiles demonstrated evident differences in terms of their online self-regulation. Learners in the instrumentality-oriented group tended to exhibit the highest level of engagement in online self-regulation. On the contrary, students in the low-engagement group showed the lowest level of investments in online self-regulated learning. Related pedagogical implications were discussed at the end.

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English Students’ Oral Corpus In Chile: Design, Structure And Applications Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Chinger Zapata Universidad Católica del Norte, Chile czapata@ucn.cl ABSTRACT In the last years, the use of corpora has proved to be a valuable tool for research, teaching and learning languages. Corpora serve the scenario to study phonetics, morphology, syntax, grammar, lexis, pragmatics, semantics, discourse, among others, from a synchronic and diachronic perspective. Many linguistic organizations and universities worldwide are building their own corpora. The most well-known native English speakers’ corpora in England are the COBUILD (1980) from the University of Birmingham and the BNC (2007) from the University of Oxford. In the United States we have the COCA (2016) from Brigham Young University and the OANC (2016) from the American National Corpus Project Organization. In Chile, there is a non-native English speakers’ corpus proposed by Ortega from Universidad de Chile. In her report, Ortega presented a preliminary data collection phase of the corpus. However, since its publication back in 2014, there has been no more news about it. It is still presumed under construction. The need to study EFL students’ oral production more accurately and the non-existence of a formal non-native English speakers’ database has motivated us to pursue the construction of our own corpus. The main objective of this paper is to report on the design, development, structure and applications of the English Students’ Oral Corpus in Chile, (ESOC-Chile). This corpus is exclusively composed of EFL university students from the English Pedagogy Program of the School of English at Universidad Católica del Norte in Antofagasta – Chile. Data were collected through interviews. The sample was composed of 32 informants out of a universe of 180 students. The result is a database containing a total of 73631 words distributed in 3944 different types of words in three formats: oral texts, tagged texts and untagged texts. Researchers, teachers and students are expected to study the informants’ oral production in the corpus in order to have a better understanding of the students’ communicative competence and thus improve the instruction of the language.

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Enhancing EFL Reading Skills: A Game-Based Learning Application (Stratapp) Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room Mar Gutiérrez-Colón Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain mar.gutierrezcolon@urv.cat Anca Frumuselu Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain ancadaniela.frumuselu@urv.cat ABSTRACT ABSTRACT: In the MALL literature there is mainly evidence of the effects of mobile devices on mother tongue reading comprehension. The lack of extensive reviews on foreign language reading comprehension gave rise to this paper. Thus, the aim of this proposal is on the one hand, to review a selection of implementation studies between 2012 and 2017 which focus on L2 reading comprehension through the use of mobile devices, and on the other hand, to make a proposal of a game-based learning application, entitled Strategies App (short for StratApp) to boost the English academic reading skills of university students. First, the paper will introduce an overview of the main implications of mobile learning in educational settings and the impact of technology and mobile devices on developing learners’ L2/FL reading skills. Then, it will present initial advances of the game-based application that is currently being developed as part of the European project, Erasmus+ KA2 Partnership Strategies, in order to enhance foreign language reading comprehension. The aim of the project is to improve the English academic reading skills of university students (to go from and A2 to a B2 CEFR level) through the use of StratApp, which will be accessed through mobile technology or web. The app will combine the obvious educational purpose (improvement of academic skills) with game-design elements and game principles. The game will provide a thematic scenario that will act as a plot thread. Then it will be divided in mini-games or missions, each one designed at improving a specific aspect of academic reading skills as designed in the preliminary research. StratApp, therefore, addresses different aspects of reading skills and the structure induces players to work harder on aspects they do not master. Scenarios are organized by skills level, following the CEFR, starting with an A2-B1 level. Completing all scenarios will imply a B2 reading academic competence. Initial advances of the project concerning L2/EFL reading strategies and skills developed and the materials and activities created for the app will be presented at the conference.

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E-Portfolios Scaffold English Language Teacher Development In Chile Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Betsy Gilliland University of Hawai'i Manoa, United States egillila@hawaii.edu Katterine Pavez Bravo Universidad de Atacama, Chile katterine.pavez@uda.cl Andrea Muñoz Galleguillos Universidad de Atacama, Chile andrea.munoz@uda.cl ABSTRACT University students preparing to teach English as a foreign language (EFL) in Chilean schools must demonstrate not only their language proficiency, but also their pedagogical content knowledge in order to receive their teaching licenses. In one Chilean university, teacher educators developed a program-wide electronic portfolio (e-portfolio) documenting student teachers’ pedagogical and linguistic development across their four years of study. The students, all L1 Spanish speakers, upload artifacts demonstrating achievement of national standards and write reflections in their L2, English. In this Research & Development paper, we describe the e-portfolio platform development as an assessment tool and focus on how it serves as a subject-specific (English language) learning tool. From March 2016, the e-portfolio aims to document both language and content learning across the undergraduate degree program. Students upload artifacts from their teaching (video, lesson plans, etc.) and write reflections on artifacts and separate reflective essays (e.g., teaching philosophy statements) in English. Along with ongoing feedback from peers and formative evaluation from professors, students receive process scaffolding and technical help from a dedicated language instructor assigned to an e-portfolio program resource room. Since the program’s inception, the presenters have worked with colleagues to revise the e-portfolio assignment sequence. Research showed that writing a Philosophy of Teaching in English was difficult for some first-year students. The new approach scaffolds reflection writing into three stages, making it a gradual process implemented at different points in teachers’ formation. First-year students consider the teaching experience from the perspective of learners in high school. Second or third year students then compare and contrast their experiences of high school and university teaching. Finally, during the practicum, students write their own teaching philosophy, including their conception of teaching and learning, a description of how they teach, and justification for such teaching. This presentation also discusses how the Chilean university instructors reached across the Pacific Ocean in developing the e-portfolio system. The two Chilean presenters collaborated with the American presenter as they investigated models and developed action research investigations into their EFL teacher education students’ linguistic and professional development.

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Examining Technology-Mediated Language Teaching And Learning In EAP Programs Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio 105, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Geoff Lawrence York University, Canada glawrenc@yorku.ca ABSTRACT Technology-enhanced English-for-academic purpose (EAP) programs are seen as a promising strategy to support the steady growth in international/multilingual student enrolments in post-secondary institutions (Institute of International Education, 2015). Educational technologies can benefit EAP learning by enhancing learner autonomy, language output, collaborative interaction, learning communities and developing 21st century skills (Kessler, Bikowski & Boggs, 2012; Stockwell, 2012). Unfortunately very little is known about the use of technologies in EAP teaching and learning. This paper discusses government-funded research documenting the largely undefined use of technologies in postsecondary North American EAP programs. This study surveyed EAP teachers and administrators in over 40 universities and colleges across North America using quantitative and qualitative approaches. This was followed by institutional site visits where classroom observations, key informant interviews and student focus groups took place to deepen understanding of the benefits, challenges and potential of technology-mediated EAP approaches from stakeholder perspectives. An integrative theoretical framework including Garrison, Anderson & Archerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (2000) Community of Inquiry framework, connectivism (Siemens, 2005) and an ecological perspective (van Lier, 2004) was used to critically understand technologyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s affordances and the creation of cognitive, social and teaching presence within technology-mediated learning environments. Findings will be shared that include excitement about emerging areas of technology to engage learners and provide enhanced instructional opportunities. Nevertheless, the vast majority of EAP classes remain face-to-face with webenhanced use of technology where many educators remain skeptical of social media, gaming and describe themselves as mass followers or late adopters of educational technologies wanting to see the outcomes of technology use before adopting such approaches. Factors constraining technology use will be outlined including inadequate support, training, new approaches to pedagogy, unpaid teacher time and the technology visioning dilemma in teaching. Strategies to bridge such limitations and implications for EAP teaching, teacher education and research will be summarized. The paper will conclude with an invitation to interested audience members to participate in an ongoing community of EAP CALL practitioners, a capstone goal of this research.

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Expert Views On Competencies And Expertise In CALL Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Jeong-Bae Son University of Southern Queensland, Australia jeong-bae.son@usq.edu.au ABSTRACT In understanding CALL teacher development, it is meaningful to see the differences between a novice teacher and an expert (experienced) teacher and identify the characteristics of experts in CALL. This paper reports the results of a study conducted to investigate CALL experts' views on the development of CALL competencies and expertise. Out of 20 CALL experts (experienced CALL researchers and practitioners) who were contacted, 16 experts (10 male and 6 female; an average of 25 years of working in the field of CALL, ranging from 10 to 35 years) accepted the invitation to participate in the study and completed an online questionnaire first. At the time of the survey, they all worked at universities, except one participant who worked at a commercial company developing English language learning programs. Data from the questionnaire indicate that the participants spent an average of 9 hours (ranging from 4.5 to 14 hours) per day on the computer and mobile devices and most participants (81%) learned how to use CALL themselves in the first place. Among those 16 participants who completed the questionnaire, 14 experts (9 male and 5 female; an average of 25 years of working in the field of CALL, ranging from 10 to 35 years) participated in follow-up email interviews consisting of six main questions: Who do you think CALL experts are?; What do you think are the two or three most distinguishing characteristics of CALL experts?; What specific knowledge, skills and competencies do you think a CALL expert should have?; What do you think is the most important role a CALL expert should play?; How do you keep up to date with what is happening in the field of CALL?; If you are asked to help CALL novices develop their level of competence in CALL, what advice would you give them? Their responses to these interview questions show their understanding of expertise in CALL and reflect their views on CALL experts.

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Exploiting Virtual Reality To Advance Sociocultural Knowledge For Language Learners Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Econรณmicas y Administrativas Maryam Sadat Mirzaei Kyoto University/ The RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project, Japan maryam.mirzaei@riken.jp Qiang Zhang Kyoto University, Japan qiang.zhang@ii.ist.i.kyotou.ac.jp Stef van der Struijk Kyoto University, Japan stefstruijk@ii.ist.i.kyotou.ac.jp Toyoaki Nishida Kyoto University, Japan nishida@ii.ist.i.kyotou.ac.jp ABSTRACT This study introduces a virtual reality (VR) environment augmented by artificial intelligence (AI) to create an immersive experience for language learners, facilitate situated communication in the second language (L2), and improve learners' sociocultural knowledge with the assistance of an AI-interpreter. This platform supports situated communication between learners and an AI-agent in VR (or browser) through using avatars that reflect the participants' verbal and non-verbal, realized by the state-of-the-art technologies. The VR platform brings a sense of telepresence, co-presence, and social presence in the given situation (e.g., shopping) and using avatars promotes a sense of agency in learners when conversing in L2. While interacting with the AI-agent, the learners can benefit from the interpretations provided by the AI-interpreter or their tutors, which include the socio-cultural points of the conversation. The use of interpretations is meant to facilitate common ground between the learner and the agent, aiming to increase awareness of cultural differences when communicating in L2. These interpretations aim to bring the learner and the AI-agent closer by providing detailed analysis on the verbal and nonverbal behaviors associated with the L2 culture. They also signal mood changes during the conversation, based on the analysis of the participants' behavior and utterance. Further, learners can also discuss their own interpretations of the situation that can be recorded and replayed so their peers or teachers can experience the same situation from the learner's viewpoint (1st person view) in addition to observing the whole interaction from the thirdperson view. Learners can also explore whether different decisions can elicit different behaviors in the AI-agent and are allowed to change their decisions on the fly. Preliminary experimental analysis with L2 participants revealed that most learners appreciate the sense of presence in the situation that is beyond classroom experiences and gave positive feedback on the assistance provided by the AI-interpreter or their tutors. Learners repeatedly commented on the questionnaire and the open survey that the interpretations significantly assisted them with understanding the sociocultural aspects of the L2.

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Exploring Flipped English Classroom Impact On EFL Learners’ Grammar Learning Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Cem Bulut Turkey bulutcm@gmail.com Zeynep Kocoglu Yeditepe University, Turkey zbkocoglu@yeditepe.edu.tr ABSTRACT The present study aims to investigate whether using FC method is more effective than the traditional method in teaching grammar to EFL learners. An experimental research was conducted with the participants of two classes at the second grade (N=39 in total) in a vocational school in Turkey. A grammar perception survey was given to the both experimental and control groups in order to see their attitudes towards their own grammar knowledge. Then, a pre-test covering merely the grammar points in the course book was administered. Immediately after the pre-test, the treatment period was started by delivering the grammar subject of each unit in the course book in the form of video lectures. The control group, in contrast, took the grammar parts of their courses in the classroom traditionally as well as doing their related homework at home. At the end of the 7 weeks of treatment process, a post-test which was administered to the groups. Next, the same grammar perception survey was given to explore whether the students’ attitudes towards grammar changed or not. Results indicated that the experimental group achieved significantly higher scores than the traditional group. In addition the majority of the participants in the experimental group found the FC strategy considerably engaging and helpful for learning grammar.

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Exploring Mobile Support For English Language Teachers In A Context Of Conflict: The Case Of Informal Syrian Refugee Teachers In Jordan Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Gary Motteram The University of Manchester, Great Britain gary.motteram@manchester.ac.uk Nazmi Al Masri Islamic University of Gaza, Palestine Heba Hamouda Islamic University of Gaza, Palestine Shai Omarali University of Manchester, BrunĂŠi ABSTRACT We live in a world where there are increasing barriers to accessing education. They can be of various types and can include lack of resources, conflicts, pandemics and displacement of populations, temporary and long-term. At the same time access to a variety of digital tools has become easier all over the world with rapidly developing access particularly to mobiles. These mobiles are increasingly smart and users usually have some access to the internet. Using the methodology of a critical ethnography, this paper explores one project which was an attempt to identify and meet the professional needs of informal Syrian refugee English language teachers living and working in the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan and from the findings of the project presents a potential model of low resource teacher development and how this could be offered. The project team initially worked alongside the British Council who ran a face-to-face training course, working to create a mobile based community and to begin to build a set of offline mobile resources that could be used once the face-to-face course had completed either in Zaatari, or in other similar contexts like the Asraq refugee camp (also in Jordan), or by other groups and individuals with limited access to the internet or mobile data. In this paper I present the model we tried to develop which made use of WhatsApp and a mobile app called Ustad Mobile, running alongside a synchronous tool like Skype. I will present some of the material that was developed and also explore some of the issues of access, barriers and sustainability as well as giving insights into the working lives of this group of teachers. The data set analysed and presented here includes interviews, emails, diaries and records of meetings that reflect the experiences of researchers in the University of Manchester, UK and the Islamic University of Gaza, Palestine.

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Exploring Self-Regulated Learning Strategies In HE Language Courses Using Moocs Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Barbara Lizeth Conde Gafaro The Open University, Great Britain blcg2@open.ac.uk ABSTRACT This study attempts to identify the self-regulated learning strategies that students from the University of Bologna use when engaging with Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which are integrated in their English for Academic Purposes module. Literature from MOOCs identifies self-regulation as an essential feature of the learners that take part successfully in such courses. Participants will voluntarily choose a FutureLearn MOOC related to their academic interests. Data will be collected at two different stages: an online questionnaire before enrolling on the course and a post-online questionnaire, which are adapted versions of a questionnaire designed by Pintrich et al, 1991 and of another online questionnaire designed by Fontana et al. (2015). These will be administered in order to identify and compare the self-regulated learning strategies that participants use before and after their engagement with the MOOC. A comparative analysis between those two questionnaires will be carried out using the SPSS software. Semi-structured interviews will also be carried out in order to follow up the results obtained from the two previous questionnaires. This will help to expand on the beliefs and attitudes of the participants through pre-elaborated guiding questions. It is expected that valuable and elaborate narratives will be elicited from the participants in order to help to clarify and complement the quantitative data. The recorded interviews will be transcribed and exported to the software package, NVivo. They will be coded and grouped into themes corresponding to the self-regulated language learning subprocesses identified in the literature and in the questionnaires. Emerging codes will later be linked to the data from the second survey, to provide well evidenced themes. It is expected that the data gathered from these instruments can help to gain a better understanding of how the integration of a MOOC into a language course (e.g. in academic writing in English) may foster the self-regulated language learning process of the participants as well as their academic performance. Findings may also shed light on necessary tools, affordances and activities that may encourage the development and practice of self-regulated learning strategies in academic language courses and language MOOCs for higher education.

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Extending Student Presentations Beyond The Classroom With Digital Storytelling “Moxtra” Technology Showcase Friday, November 16th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Tim Knight Shirayuri University, Japan tknight@shirayuri.ac.jp ABSTRACT This presentation will show how the mobile app and computer software Moxtra has augmented presentation and oral communication classes at the university level. Even the free version of Moxtra allows students to compile a digital portfolio of voice and presentation work, to which both the teacher and fellow students in a class have access. Other members of the group can give feedback to, and learn from, each other. By sharing their presentations in Moxtra, students can actively participate in the benefits of multi-media learning (Mayer, 2009). The app encourages students to practice their presentations and helps the teacher when it comes to assessment of students’ work. It has contributed to students in a presentation course becoming more confident and less stressed about the task of presenting. Presentation assignments are a common task for students at the tertiary level and they fit well into increasing demands from education ministries for “active learning” by students (Jones and Palmer, 2017). And yet public speaking is often cited in surveys as the scariest prospect for most people, for women even more than for men (Burgess, 2013). Thus, there are things for language teachers to think about before requiring students to make presentations. Apart from the matter of stress which many students feel when having to present (King, 2002), whole class talks take time and limit individuals’ speaking opportunities. Group or poster presentations allow more speaking time, but can restrict the chances for each presentation to be seen. Using the mobile app Moxtra allows and encourages student interactions and appreciation of each other’s work beyond the classroom. Students upload their presentations for others to watch, and give feedback on, as well as learn from. Teachers can also keep these digital presentations as a record, which is helpful for grading. Albeit with one or two caveats, the integration of the Moxtra software with students’ use of their own mobile devices has proved to be an excellent example of “mobile and blended learning” (Brown, 2016) for the presenter.

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Flipping For Autonomy - Developing LA In A Flipped Environment Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Christian Ludwig PH Karlsruhe, Germany christian.ludwig@ph-karlsruhe.de ABSTRACT Both learner autonomy and flipped classroom are buzz words which have been around for a while. Despite the global interest the two approaches have created in the field of foreign language learning, many practitioners are still hesitant to use them for curriculum and syllabus design or individual classroom practice. Taking this as a starting point, this presentation discusses the findings of a practitioner research project which aimed to contribute to the existing research on both foreign language learner autonomy and flipped classroom learning as well as the combination of the two. Since its seminal definition by Henri Holec in the late 1970s, learner autonomy has generally been defined as the ability to take over responsibility for one’s own learning. However, the concept is often misinterpreted as ‘learning in isolation’, ‘learning without a teacher’, or ‘self-directed learning’. Quite in contrast, encouraging students to take over more responsibility for their own learning is a deeply social and collaborative endeavour. Nevertheless, it requires students to take control over their own learning by getting actively involved in decision-making and, in other words, becoming active participants in the classroom. This requires teachers and students to transcend traditional concepts of one-way content delivery. In such a learning environment, taking a flipped classroom approach has many advantages as it shifts the traditional roles in- and outside the classroom and by doing so changes in the class dynamics. Against this background, this presentation reports on the findings of a practitioner research project in which a traditional higher education literature class was flipped. Students were provided with the necessary theory before class through self-recorded vodcasts, reading assignments, and other materials, while class time was used for discussions and collaborative project work. The preliminary results indicate that a flipped classroom approach offers many benefits especially when it comes to developing learner autonomy but requires a lot of effort on both sides.

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Foreign Language Development And Motivation In Higher Education: The Case Of Engineering Programs In Chile Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Marianna Oyanedel Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Chile marianna.oyanedel@usm.cl Daniel Ramírez Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Chile daniel.ramirez@usm.cl ABSTRACT The present study examines the implications of teaching adult language learners with CALL and Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL), a widely accepted approach to teaching foreign languages which not only improves students’ proficiency in the target language but also in the mother tongue (Coyle et al, 2010; Lorenzo et al, 2011). To accomplish this goal, a teaching intervention was designed for a group of 50 Spanish-spoken Civil Engineering students at a well-known university in Chile; the subjects were enrolled in the course "Specific Projects" whose aim is to compose their final writing piece to obtain their Engineering degrees. Two instructors were in charge of the teaching intervention in a six-month period of time. Participants had to write their final thesis projects in English. The evaluation assessed both the linguistic competence proficiency and the application of Engineering concepts in a cohesive and coherent way. The intervention included face-to-face tutoring and virtual feedback, which was made at different times of the process of composition (online and offline). Instructors used with their students a virtual platform to create a virtual learning community, online language resources to develop lexical and grammatical accuracy, and virtual conferences to guide the writing process from beginning to end. Linguistic competence and extrinsic/intrinsic motivation were measured with the use of online platforms, surveys, and semi-structured interviews. The analysis required mixed methods and assistance from software for qualitative and quantitative data. Preliminary results show significant gains at both levels examined, particularly in the discursive level construction. Linguistic competence in the target language increased 48%, while motivation a 35%. This paper presentation will include materials and procedures for data collection and analysis, as well as a detailed account of results in two complementary dimensions: qualitative and quantitative. Avenues for future research and room for academic reflection and feedback is also intended to take place.

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Formative Proposal For The Increase Of Innovation And Entrepreneurship Skills In Engineering Students Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Ariel Leiva López Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile ariel.leva@pucv.cl Nicolás Mardones Pérez Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile nicolas.mardones@pucv.cl José Ahumada Alveal Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile jose.ahumada.a@pucv.cl ABSTRACT International accrediting commissions are demanding engineering careers to incorporate into their study plans proposals to increase innovation and entrepreneurship skills among their students. The current curricula in engineering hardly address the development of these competences. This work seeks to facilitate the acquisition of these skills among students of the Faculty of Engineering of the Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaiso by developing a training proposal that includes three moments based on the Lean StartUp methodology: design, development and takeoff. A pilot study has been carried out on the first two stages of the proposed methodology with 57 students from different engineering careers. The preliminary results show a progressive acquisition of competencies for innovation and entrepreneurship by the students involved. Specifically, 47% of the participants expressed their abilities for the effective identification of environmental problems and the proposal of proposals for sustainable improvement to the problems identified. Similarly, 58% developed skills related to creative thinking and hypothesis validation processes. The main conclusions point to the suitability of the proposed methodology and the flexibility of the model implemented to be extrapolated to other disciplines. In addition, the pilot application of this proposal suggests an effective model for the development of servicelearning projects in the university environment.

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Fostering E-Social Presence In A Distance Course At A Traditional F2F University Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Liliana Simón Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina lilianaesimon@gmail.com ABSTRACT This presentation is focused on the description of a University online course, which has been specially designed for the introductory courses of the English Language courses of studies at the National University of La Plata (UNLP) in Argentina. One of the main course objectives is to provide special scaffolding for those students who wish to become teachers of English and/or English-Spanish translators at UNLP. The level required to pass the introductory course is the CEFR B2 level; therefore, the online course has worked as a guide, which provides the academic knowledge required for the entrance course. The online course has not only focused on the interaction among course participants and tutors but it has also facilitated the social presence which builds a sense of belonging to a group; a learning community which is so welcoming for students who come from other cities, provinces and countries to study at our Faculty. Garrison, Anderson & Archer (2005) in Shearer (2012) highlighted the importance of a community of enquiry that is built through the social presence in which participants “project themselves socially and emotionally as ‘real’ people” together with the teaching presence in reference to “the design, facilitation, and direction of cognitive and social processes”, and with the cognitive presence (“learners are able to construct and confirm meaning through sustained reflection and discourse in a critical community of inquiry”). The research belongs to the thesis dissertation “‘ELT &LT and our thesis conclusions were positive in reference to the use of technology fostering interaction in the online courses. The course course was one of ten projects selected by the British Council & Macmillan Publishers in the 2013 ICT in Action competition.

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From Research On Pedagogy And Technology To Practice Of Mobile LearnerDetermined Language Learning Using Free Apps Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room Agnieszka Palalas Athabasca University, Canada agapalalas@athabascau.ca Przemyslaw Pawluk George Brown College, Canada ppawluk@georgebrown.ca Norine Wark Athabasca University, Canada norinewark@gmail.com ABSTRACT Three inter-related pedagogical design themes and principles supporting mobile learner-determined language learning were distilled from a DBR mobile language literacy project merging iterations of data collection from literature with surveys, interviews, and focus group discussions from literacy, language learning, mobile learning, and mobile technology experts, and adult literacy learners (Palalas, Pawluk, & Wark, 2017; Palalas & Wark, 2017a, 2017b). This presentation introduces these themes and resulting design recommendations and offers some relevant activities that employ freelyavailable apps and digital tools. The most prevalent design theme discerned from the data was Mobility, with the principle, Design for the mobile learner. Attention must shift from perpetually-evolving technologies to address the mobile learner’s distinctive behaviours, actions, preferences, and attitudes as the learner moves across physical and virtual spaces (Sharples & Pea, 2014; Palalas, Pawluk, & Wark, 2017; Palalas & Wark, 2017a, 2017b). A seamless transition across spaces requires standardization and technological support through solutions such as SCORM and xAPI (Murray et.al, 2012). The second theme identified was Learner-Determined, and its related principle, Respond to the learner. In other words, “ask the learner, listen to the learner, and respond to the learner’s wants and needs” (Palalas, Pawluk, & Wark, 2017). Mobile language learning activities should enable learner choice, agency, and flexibility. For instance, Prodigy (Kay & Kwak, 2017) and Duolingo (Munday, 2016) adapt content to the learner’s progress, while learning platforms such as Lynda.com provide space for self-directed learning (Bonk et.al, 2015). The last theme was Context, with its design principle, Integrate environmental affordances into the design. Study results accentuated the importance of incorporating m-learning activities into the learner’s authentic situational context. Dynamic elements of this context include “the setting (time and space), participants, technological factors, and sociocultural norms that govern behaviour and interaction” (Edge et.al, 2011; Palalas & Wark, 2017b). In summary, this presentation provides practical guidance and tools for language instructors and learners within a pedagogical framework designed to promote self-determined personalized language learning across all three design

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themes. To enrich the dialogue, conference attendees are invited to contribute examples of activities and apps that enhance learner-determined language learning as well.

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Gaining Control: Training In Conversation Management Through CALL Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Don Maybin Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan maybin@center.shonan-it.ac.jp ABSTRACT The presenter will describe the evolution from classroom to online of a multilingual language training website, focusing on the development of specific conversation management strategies intended for use by learners for communication in the real world. The structure and teaching principles developed in the classroom were adapted to an online study format; however, one of the principle challenges was the introduction and contextualization of specific communication strategies, for example, asking for repetition or clarifying meaning as the need arises. Ultimately, it was decided to integrate conversation strategy icons throughout the site in order to promote conversation management, whereby users could click the appropriate icons necessary to get through a study module. The icon integration, however, resulted in a range of problems, which became evident when the “new and improved” website was researched with test subjects ranging in age from 15 to 70, who were not typical university students. Some of the hurdles that arose included:    

how to visually represent a specific communication strategy with icons that could be understood across a range of cultures how to introduce overt training with specific modules help learners familiarize themselves with the visual/aural components of a range of communication strategies how to recycle specific training modules in the hope that learners would ultimately be able to produce the necessary core phrases through regular exposure how to identify the ideal stage to aurally introduce the core phrases without interfering with the learner’s original thought processes

The modified version of the website with the integrated icons for conversation management has subsequently been used for conducting blended learning courses (computer study in tandem with classroom instruction) at Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan for over ten years with positive results. It is also being applied in a Ministry of Education research project into distance learning with adult participants in the hospitality sector in Japan.

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Gamification And Its Potential For Second Language Acquisition. Learner And Teacher Experience In A Six-Week Gamified Course For Gfl. Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room Bart Pardoel Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus b.pardoel@gmail.com Salomi Papadima-Sophocleous Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus salomi.papadima@cut.ac.cy Androulla Athanasiou Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus androulla.athanasiou@cut.ac.cy ABSTRACT Students’ motivation is one of the main challenges in Dutch education. As a relatively new approach in Second Language Acquisition (SLA), Gamification has the opportunity to engage and motivate today’s students. This paper aims at examining students’ learning attitude towards gamified language learning, in order to explore the educational potential of Gamification in teaching German as a Foreign Language by developing, implementing and evaluating a gamified, technology-assisted language course, and wishes to contribute to a better understanding of these principles in L2 education, especially when dealing with underage students at a pre-vocational secondary school. The participants use the open-source learning platform Moodle and its app Moodle-Mobile. Although Gamification in the area of education is promising, surprisingly few studies have examined the relationship between the use of game elements and SLA in the context of a pre-vocational secondary school. In a literature review studying 119 research papers on Gamification between the year 2000 and 2014, only 6% of the target population were students from secondary schools (Caponetto, Earp, & Ott, 2014). While some studies explore the possibilities Moodle offers for Gamification (for examples, see Pastor-Pina, Satorre-Cuerda, Molina-Carmona, Gallego-Durán & Llorens-Largo, 2015 or Somova & Gachkova, 2016), there is limited empirical evidence on experiments conducted on gamified courses accommodated by Moodle (Katsigiannakis & Karagiannidis, 2017) – let alone gamified SLA courses. An action research was conducted to examine the learning attitude towards gamified language learning. In an explorative study, forty students from a Dutch pre-vocational secondary school enrolled in the six-week gamified German A1 course, called MISSION BERLIN. Data collection methods include semi-structured focus group interviews, online survey and data from the Moodle environment. Results indicate that there are certain game elements that are more useful in a mobile Moodle environment than others, and that textual complexity, duration of the course and visual design of the Moodle platform influence the students’ learning attitude. An attempt is made to find a balance between learning and gameplay, as this seems to be a key success factor. The paper concludes with suggested improvements and final considerations for the implementation of a gamified course for SLA. 125


Gamifying Teacher Professional Development Through Minecraft MOOC Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Vance Stevens Higher Colleges of Technology / CERT / KBZAC, United Arab Emirates vancestev@gmail.com ABSTRACT Electronic Village Online is an annual teacher training event run under the auspices of TESOL CALL-IS. EVO Minecraft MOOC is a 5-week session that has taken place in Minecraft, a wiki, and Google+ Community space each Jan / Feb since 2015. The presenter conceived the idea for EVO Minecraft MOOC as a way that he himself could develop expertise in the game and thereby use it with students. Other teachers were attracted to the concept, including some who had some experience in the game. Participants were attracted to the session for the same reasons -- not that their learning paths had been prescribed for them in a neatly pre-set syllabus but that by entering the “game” or session, learning would happen for them in a way that participants would come to understand by experiencing the process that Ito et al (2010) characterize as “hanging out, messing around, and geeking out.” We have found that Minecraft is capable of reversing the normal student teacher dichotomy whereby teachers traditionally are assumed to know more than their students. We have found through the experience of participants in our EVO session that that participants tend to take charge of their learning by guiding one another in the vagaries of the game. This presentation explains what teachers (who are learning about the game through the experience of playing it as learners) are learning about designing worlds within the game context that will meet their curriculum objectives and create an engaging and enjoyable experience and task-based environment for learners. But above all, the paper explores how teachers can be made aware of the affordances of Minecraft by creating such spaces for one another and interacting in those spaces. It also serves as an example of how we teachers can use what we have learned through our experience with MOOCs to form communities of practice to reboot our own learning, using the community as curriculum (Cormier, 2008).

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Getting Published In CALL Journals Symposium Wednesday, November 14th Start Time (Part 1): 15:00 End Time (Part 1): 16:15 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 17:10 End Time (Part 2): 17:40 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Marta Gonzalez-Lloret System Journal - University of Hawaii Manoa (US), United States marta@hawaii.edu Ursula Stickler System Journal - Open University, Great Britain ursula.stickler@open.ac.uk ABSTRACT The goal of this symposium is to bring the inside knowledge that CALL journal editors and associate editors have about how to get published in the top CALL journals. WorldCALL provides an excellent venue for researchers in the South Cone to learn about journals to publish their work as well as a place to network and meet the editors and associate editors of major CALL journals. In this 90-minute symposium, the editors and/or associate editors of CALICO Journal, Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), Language Learning & Technology (LL&T), ReCALL, The EuroCALL Review, and System will briefly present their journals (main aims and scope, research trends and approaches, opportunities for publication, etc.) and share their knowledge about key topics such as how to select the appropriate journal to publish a manuscript; how to designing a publication to maximize the possibilities of getting published; what criteria is used for editorial decisions and who are the reviewers; understanding the editorial decision, how to approach major revisions, and what it means to â&#x20AC;&#x153;revise and resubmitâ&#x20AC;? a manuscript. Finally, the audience will have a chance to have a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the production process of this journal articles and ask questions. Each journal will use 12 minutes to briefly introduce their journals and discuss one of the main topics above. The last 30 minutes will be dedicated to answering questions and engaging in discussion with the audience.

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Giving Task Instructions In Online Language Teaching Via Webconferencing Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec MĂźge Satar Newcastle University, Great Britain muge.satar@ncl.ac.uk Ciara Wigham UniversitĂŠ Clermont Auvergne, France ciara.wigham@uca.fr ABSTRACT Given the increasing popularity of online language learning, investigating online language teachers' skills is a timely research agenda. However, few studies have investigated multimodal pedagogical skills of online teachers (e.g. Guichon, 2013; Guichon & Cohen, 2016; Hampel & Stickler, 2012). An important pedagogical skill for language teachers is giving task instructions, which are crucial in teaching practices. Studying teachers' instruction-giving sequences in a face-to-face language classroom, Markee (2015) identified 6 components of task instructions. In our recent work (Authors, 2017), we investigated teacher-trainees' multimodal instruction giving practices for a role-play task and showed how trainee teachers use semiotic resources to allocate roles, introduce key vocabulary, and mark different stages in instructions. This study aims to extend our understanding by investigating how experienced online language teachers give task instructions for two different tasks (information-gap and opinion exchange). The research questions are as follows: 1. What are the key components of experienced online language teachers' task instructions? 2. Do these key components vary in relation to task type (information gap and opinion exchange)? 3. In which ways do experienced online language teachers employ online resources, such as images, text chat; and embodied resources, such as intonation, gaze, gestures when giving task instructions? Following an exploratory case study methodology, we will explore the instruction-giving practices of four experienced online language teachers. Data was collected through screen recordings of three lessons and semi-structured follow-up interviews with the teachers and learners. While the first lesson exemplifies the teachers' natural settings, the last two lessons are guided by tasks developed by the researchers: an information gap and an opinion-exchange task. Screenrecording data will be transcribed and analysed using ELAN following principles of multimodal (inter)action analysis (Jewitt, 2017; Norris, 2004). Online interviews will be analysed qualitatively using thematic analysis. The findings of this study will advance our understanding of multimodal pedagogical skills of online teachers, thereby contribute to the development of teacher education programmes.

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How Is MALL Mobile? Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Heather Dianne Lotherington York University, Canada hlotherington@edu.yorku.ca ABSTRACT How does mobility affect language education paradigms? Early 21st century aspirations that mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) could provide an accessible, low-cost route to teaching and learning languages described design-oriented approaches in addition to the content-oriented transmission (Kukulska-Hulme, 2009), typical of popular MALL apps (Lotherington, in press). Mobility profoundly augments digital practices by enabling perpetual connection across space and time zones untethered to physical location; dynamic, multimodal interactive communication; and cognitive distribution across devices as well as physical and social spaces. In this rapidly evolving communicational landscape, users are produsers (Bruns & Schmidt, 2011) who contribute to as well as consume web content. Exciting new pedagogies have emerged in this dynamic milieu, including, social media production pedagogies (Thumlert, de Castell, & Jenson, 2015) in which the learner creates artefacts using contemporary digital tools and practices for authentic digital audiences; synthetic immersion opportunities in virtual worlds (Berns, Gonzalez-Pardo & Camacho, 2011) that put learners into goal-directed massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) scenarios; and augmented reality trails for language learners (Holden & Sykes, 2011; Pegrum, 2017). What we see, disappointingly, is that MALL is flooded with content-oriented MALL apps designed by app developers selling a product to a user, rather than teaching a language learner. The unregulated digital marketplace constitutes a multibillion-dollar industry (Louis, 2013), and currently top-selling MALL apps, such as duolingo, claim hundreds of millions of users (Woods, 2017). Scholars have critiqued the commercial appification of m-learning (Reinders & Pegrum, 2015) that sidelines collaborative learning designs for the programming ease of language drills, resulting in boring and pedestrian MALL apps reinventing mid-20th century kill-and-drill pedagogies (Godwin-Jones, 2011; Lotherington, in press). The research reported in this paper examines how mobility disrupts the traditional teaching and learning paradigm and opens potential for innovative pedagogical design. This study includes an extended literature review as well as ethnographic case studies to illuminate the potential of mobility for design-based pedagogies with the intention to elaborate m-learning as a technology to be harnessed (Lawson, 2010) rather than as a product to be consumed.

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How Technological And Collaborative Innovations Help Promote The Teaching Of Less Commonly Taught Languages Across Institutions In The USA Symposium Thursday, November 15th Start Time (Part 1): 10:15 End Time (Part 1): 10:45 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 12:45 Edificio CFRD, Capacitaciรณn Docente 2 Room Koen Van Gorp Michigan State University, United States vangorpk@msu.edu Christopher Kaiser Columbia University, United States ck2831@columbia.edu Ahmet Dursun University of Chicago, United States adursun@uchicago.edu Nicholas Swinehart University of Chicago, United States nswinehart@uchicago.edu Luca Giupponi Michigan State University, United States giupponi@msu.edu Emily Heidrich Michigan State University, United States heidric6@msu.edu Lauren B. Rozen University of Wisconsin, lrosen@wisc.edu ABSTRACT Purpose of symposium In response to budgetary cutbacks at all education levels, changes in demographics, and the rapid growth of educational technology, many institutes of higher education have begun to establish inter-institutional, collaborative partnerships as a means to increase access, reduce costs, and improve performance in language learning, especially for Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs). However, in practice these collaborations face a lot of administrative hurdles and are often not easy to implement. Successful collaborations require a shared vision and commitment from all partners, as well as a willingness to explore alternative models of education like flipped classrooms, proficiency-based language models, asynchronous online classrooms, etc. 130


This symposium aims to address both the challenges and benefits of inter-institutional collaboration and introducing alternative technology-driven educational models for LCTLs. It brings together presenters who are involved in different interuniversity collaborative projects or programs, often supported by external grant money, and have them explore the advantages and disadvantages involved in collaboration, technology, and language learning. Although the symposium will primarily focus on how educational technology facilitates new models for the teaching of LCTLs, it will also showcase models for inter-institutional collaboration and offer alternative paths to institutional viability and sustainability for a wide range of language programs. Rationale The diverse projects/programs involved focus on the use of educational technology in offering Less Commonly Taught Languages (LCTLs). They have all developed alternative educational models either by making use of high-definition videoconferencing to expand course offerings locally while emulating synchronous learner-centered language learning environments, by developing open educational resources (OERs) that can be easily adapted and integrated in existing courses, or by exploring the opportunities innovative asynchronous online learning environment provide for LCTLs. Furthermore, all the projects explore types of collaboration and have their own story to tell about facilitating interinstitutional collaboration. Each of the presentations will address the range of administrative, pedagogical, and technological factors that shape their language learning environment, as there are benefits and challenges in selecting appropriate and sustainable models suited to specific contexts.

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Impact Of Online Dialogue Journal Writing On Students' Writing Anxiety Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 17:10 End Time: 17:40 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Siew Ming Thang Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia tsm.2001uk@gmail.com Anne Rowena David Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia rowena@usm.my Hazita Azman Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Malaysia hazita@ukm.edu.my ABSTRACT This case study investigated the impact of online dialogue journal writing (ODJW) on low proficiency ESL undergraduates’ writing anxiety and writing performance in a Malaysian public university. ODJW was introduced as a supplementary writing project and conducted outside students’ English class time. Students wrote dialogue journal entries to the researcher and a partner based on topics provided in the university’s e-learning portal of the English course the students were enrolled in. This study was framed using Vygotsky’s theory of Constructivism, Krashen’s Affective Filter Hypothesis and Bandura’s Socio-Cognitive Theory. The social constructivists’ view and the elements of Socio-Cognitive Theory offer an alternative to the traditional teacher-centered approach by focusing on individual learners in authentic language learning contexts. A total of 26 first-year undergraduates were involved in this case study for 12 weeks. A mixed approach comprising qualitative and quantitative methods was used to collect the data. The quantitative data were obtained from an adapted version of the Second Language Writing Anxiety Inventory and a Pre-and-post Writing Test. The former measured students’ writing anxiety levels and also types of writing anxiety. The latter was employed to determine students’ writing levels before and after the treatment. Qualitative data collection involved one-to-one interviews with 23 respondents. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data and these were substantiated by the qualitative data which were analysed thematically. The findings reveal that the respondents’ writing anxiety levels were significantly reduced. It also indicates that there is a significant decrease in students’ cognitive anxiety levels, somatic anxiety levels and avoidance behaviour patterns at the end of the study. Students’ also displayed a marked improvement in their attitude towards writing which suggests they have benefited greatly from participating in the ODJW project. Further details and implications of the study will be presented in the paper that will be presented at the conference.

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Implementing 21st-Century Skills In Teaching EFL Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Hiroyuki Obari Aoyama Gakuin University, Japan obari119@gmail.com ABSTRACT The aim of this study is to explore the integration of 21st-century skills into teaching EFL with ICT. This study suggests that integrating flipped learning with 21st-century skills may be an effective approach to improving the learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; language proficiency. The study began in April 2017 and ended in January 2018, targeting 47 first year Japanese undergraduates. Results of the study revealed that the training program had assisted the students in improving their English proficiency from the mean score of TOEIC mini-test 530(SD, 100), CEFR A2 level to 745 (SD, 100), CEFR B1 level, and acquiring the 21st-century skills through collaboration with ICT and mobile technologies during the 10-month period. 90% of students who participated in this study felt that flopped and active learning activities helped them to improve their English proficiency skills and acquire the 21-century skills.

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Improve Motivation And Participation In Students By Using CALL In And Out The Classroom. Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Camila Francisca Isadora Villalobos Meneses Chilhue School, Chile camilaf.villalobosm@gmail.com ABSTRACT In a society where the technology is part of the lives of children and adolescents we as teachers need to learn how to use it as a tool instead of prohibit it as most of school already do. The objective of this research is to use CALL and see how students response to the real use of daily technologies in the service of the education motivating them to learn and at the same time helping concisely to teachers in and out the classroom attending the different needs that students have at the moment to practice in their homes because of the lack knowledge that parents have in english as a foreign language. In this way we are going to give the opportunity to parents and their children to learn in family a globalized language that will help both to have more tools to face a globalized society. The students will be able to watch interactive classes created by the teacher personalized acording to the interests and the sociocultural background of the learners, with content of the four units of each level of learning, with links to other technological tools like prezi, educational pages to exercise their listening, reading, writing and speaking skills, microsoft office, youtube and social networks as facebook and instagram. They also will be able to participe in forums to clear doubts wih other classmates and use it from their cellphones, tablets or computers.

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Improving Data Analysis Training Through Digital Mindmapping And Digital Data Matrix Building. Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Liliana Cuesta Medina Universidad de La Sabana, Colombia liliana.cuesta@unisabana.edu.co ABSTRACT This paper reports on the results of an exploratory qualitative research study on rapidly training L2 English-using graduate students with no previous academic research experience to perform qualitative data analysis. Preliminary data revealed that they had severe deficiencies in selecting, organizing, prioritizing and postulating relationships within their own collected data, mainly because they could neither conceptualize nor synthesize information derived from this data. To address such problems, the pedagogical strategy selected was to support the participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; data-analysis training with the use of ICT-based techniques, such as digital mind-mapping and digital data-matrix building, though a focus on four processes, (a) extracting codes from data, (b) finding significance between associated codes to categories, (c) generating theory, and (d) making connections between theory and practice. Data was collected over a period of 2 years with four groups of graduate students through artifacts, interviews with faculty and students, self-assessment instruments, and focus groups. Data was analyzed through the grounded theory approach. The results showed that, as the study progressed, participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; synthesis and analytical skills improved to the point that they were able to generate inferences and correlations based on their analyses of their data, as necessary for their graduate research work. These results were used to implement more effective qualitative research training strategies and support development of studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; critical thinking skills, through which their planning, management, and/or capacities to modify their learning goals and outcomes also improved. The approach suggested in this paper broadens the scope of strategies for teaching qualitative data analysis, as there procedures to guide students to operationalize concepts and processes in qualitative research have not to date been widely studied. The success of the pedagogical approach examined in the present study suggests both that this is a gap in the research that requires attention, but also that current research teachers could use similar approaches effectively with similar types of populations.

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Improving Reading Comprehension In Spanish Using Istart-E Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería Christian Soto Universidad de Concepción, Chile christiansotofajardo@gmail.com Danielle McNamara Arizona State University, United States dsmcnamara1@gmail.com Kathryn S. McCarthy Arizona State University, United States kathryn.s.mccarthy@gmail.com Antonio Gutiérrez Georgia Southern University, United States agutierrez@georgiasouthern.edu Jordan González Universidad de Concepción, Chile jordaram@gmail.com Jianmin Dai Arizona State University, United States hustacdjm@gmail.com Cecilia Malbrán Universidad Nacional de San Martín, ceciliamalbran@gmail.com ABSTRACT iSTART-E is a Spanish version of iSTART-2, a web-based intelligent tutor developed to improve reading comprehension through self-explanation strategy training. iSTART-E is the new Spanish version of Interactive Strategy Training for Active Reading and Thinking (iSTART; McNamara, Levinstein, & Boothum, 2004). iSTART was developed to help high school and college students develop strategies to increase their understanding of the kinds of complex scientific texts they read in school. iSTART is itself an automated version of an in-class reading comprehension intervention, Self-Explanation Reading Training that is built on the notion that asking students to explain the text to themselves encourages deeper processing of the material, including the integration of prior knowledge and the construction of inferences. This study examined the effects of a blended iSTART-E intervention that included both training in the system and in-class instruction and practice. During 2017, the program was implemented with 22 high school students in Liceo de Nacimiento, Chile. This intervention included 9 sessions during which the students worked directly with the system. To reinforce the strategies, we also implemented an additional class (Session 4) that included a new integrative video and 136


additional examples of self-explanation. Upon completion of this session, students completed two different tests: one to evaluate if the student knew the definition of each strategy and the other to evaluate if students could identify which strategy was used in example self-explanations. Additionally students’ motivation, perception of using the strategies in other contexts (transfer), and perception of improvement were assessed three times during the implementation. Students’ reading comprehension was evaluated using LECTUM, a standardized test with two equivalent forms (A and B) that assesses textual, pragmatic, and critical dimensions. An analysis of variance indicated increased LECTUM scores from pretest to posttest, F (4,07) = 21.17, p < 0.01 (Cohen’s d = 1,28). The best-fitting regression model of reading comprehension performance gains included variables related to deep learning: Identification of elaboration strategy and transfer perception (r2 = 0.32). These results indicate that the strategy training provided in iSTART-E and the additional class enhanced students’ knowledge of comprehension strategies and, in turn, their reading comprehension skills.

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Increasing Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC) Through Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL): Meeting The Needs Of Japanese University Students Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Eucharia Donnery Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan donnery@sc.shonan-it.ac.jp ABSTRACT In the 21st century, the importance of Intercultural Communicative Competence (ICC) at the university level is not an abstract future concept, but a very real need for Japanese graduates entering the employment market as Japanese businesses expand and outsource to South-East Asia. Many companies outsource internationally, and have found that many employees are reluctant to be relocated abroad. Therefore, graduates who can clearly demonstrate self-efficacy within in Bryamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s five ICC areas of attitude, knowledge, skills of interpretation and relating, skills of discovery, and education have quantifiable appeal for employers. For the latter, companies actively seek out students interested in global affairs, who can understand and deal with non-Japanese on equal footing, and who show flexibility in critical thinking skills. By prospective employees actively demonstrating ICC, it gives evidence that they are willing to be cultural bridges between different cultures. Within the Department of Applied Computer Sciences at Shonan Institute of Technology (SIT), Japan, many students exhibit social anxiety-related difficulties in communication, even in Japanese. Therefore, to support the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; journey self-confident articulation, there is a deep commitment to developing learner autonomy and self-efficacy through the Team Project Learning (TPL) program. In this, students work together to create, design, produce a quantifiable body of work in the course of a year, which is then written up and presented to the department in Japanese or English. Each TPL works in groups to conduct research in a field that the chosen professor is qualified to oversee. The role of CALL in English language acquisition has, for shyer students in particular, a distinct advantage as the learning pace is self-governed and provides a private forum in which to develop communicative skills. This presentation describes how one group of SIT university students who were classed as reluctant learners of English achieved significant changes in ICC through the use of CALL in the year 2016-2017. This was accomplished through the use CALL both inside and outside the classroom, on classroom PCs, as well as on personal mobile devices during long commutes.

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Innovating Teaching In Engineering Careers: Results Of A Pilot Plan On Active Learning Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Izaskun Álvarez-Aguado Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile izaskun.alvarez@pucv.cl Dominique Müller Pollmann Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile dominique.muller@pucv.cl Jimena Pascual Concha Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile jimena.pascual@pucv.cl ABSTRACT In engineering careers, the concern for the improvement of pedagogical practice is recent, and the implementation of active learning promotion methodologies is still incipient. Nevertheless, the conclusions of the available studies show how the gradual incorporation of activities in favor of active learning in careers in science and technology supposes a considerable reduction in the student dropout rates and an increase in academic performance. With the purpose of increasing active learning among students of the Faculty of Engineering of the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, a pilot program for teacher training in the use and incorporation of active learning methodological strategies has been designed and implemented. It is an exploratory study with a sample of 13 teachers distributed in 5 subjects of different careers. The training process has five phases: diagnosis of needs, methodological proposal, methodological design, implementation of the strategy and evaluation of the application. In addition to personalized advice for each of the phases described, the participating teachers have attended 5 workshops on active learning. The implementation of the methodologies indicated has been carried out in a timely manner, partial or total, depending on the requirements of the subject and the diagnosis of previous needs. The results of the implementation in terms of improvement in learning show how after the interventions, the scores in the evaluation of the subjects are significantly higher in the experimental group (x = 43.95) than in the control group (x = 35, 24). Regarding the satisfaction of students and teachers with respect to the innovations implemented, the applied surveys show high degrees of satisfaction and considerable benefits in relation to conceptual understanding, motivation and active participation in the learning process.

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Integrating Embedded Summary Writing Into A Listening-Based Speaking Test For Chinese EFL Learners Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Zhihong Lu Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China luzhihong@bupt.edu.cn Chunping Zheng Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China zhengchunping@bupt.edu.cn Fuan Wen Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China fuanwen@gmail.com ABSTRACT This presentation will report the effectiveness of an embedded summary writing task, designed as a test item in an integrated listening-based speaking test for EFL Chinese students in CBT environments at the presentersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; university. To measure the effect, the innovative testing has been conducted repeatedly since 2014 with different groups of secondyear students (at a similar English level) in an English audio-video speaking course (EAVSC) in a digital language lab. In each teaching session, students are required to take a same format test of integrated listening-writing-speaking tasks along with follow-up surveys through ROFALL system, a web-based English language skills training system developed by the authors' team since 2008 at the beginning and the end of the course. In the test, a five-minute online summary writing task is embedded between the listening comprehension section and a one-minute recorded personal statement task to the same listening-input material. The results to be demonstrated in the presentation will focus on the data collected from the four teaching sessions (the fall semester in 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017). The research analyses are conducted through quantitative data from questionnaire feedback and the data of the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oral production in the pre- and post-tests. The research findings through data analyses have proved that summary writing as an embedded task item does have a marked effect on lowering EFL learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; degree of anxiety in their oral production and improving their speech quality in terms of their inductive generalization ability and discourse organization. Embedding summary writing, therefore, reduces testing anxiety, allows students to achieve improved oral performance, and provides better evidence on their oral production capability. The presenters hope to provide EFL instructors and test designers with some pedagogical suggestions through the effective use of the embedded summary writing task in the integrated listening-based speaking tests in CBT environments and also shed light on pedagogical practice of integrating writing tasks into the process of oral production in various EFL teaching contexts in CBT environments.

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Integrating Task-Based CALL Activities In The Spanish Foreign Language Classroom To Enhance Speaking Skills Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Daniel A. Castañeda Kent State University at Stark, United States dcastane@kent.edu ABSTRACT In this descriptive-qualitative study, the researcher explored the extent to which task-based CALL activities enhanced speaking skills among English-Speaking students learning Spanish. The activities for this study were based on three principles: (a) the role of input, (b) the role of output, and (c) the role of learners’ interactions in the language learning process. The first principle asserts that exposure to the target language is essential and that the amount and quality of comprehensible input (i+1) learners receive determine the pace at which they will learn a second language (Krashen, 1981). The second principle states that comprehensible output plays an important part in language acquisition; that is, the learner encounters a gap in his or her linguistic knowledge, becomes aware of it, and may modify his or her output so that new knowledge can be acquired (Swain, 1985). The third principle states that the efficacy of comprehensible input is improved when learners negotiate meaning. The latter happens when a breakdown occurs in communication and interlocutors try to use communicative strategies (e.g., requests for clarification) to facilitate the interaction process. Doing so, learners may receive further input from their interlocutors (e.g., feedback), which can lead to the learning of new language forms (Long, 1996). Based on the principles noted above, the task-based CALL activities were designed and implemented as follows: During the first phase, students researched cultural topics about a specific Hispanic country. Their input sources included online newspapers that deliver content in multimodal forms (e.g., text and/or video). During the second phase, students summarized the information, reflected on the content, and recorded their findings in VoiceThread, an online multimedia slide show. During the third phase, learners met face-to-face in small groups in separate study rooms of the school library to discuss their findings. Students also interacted outside class via Skype and FaceTime for the same purpose. During this session, the presenter will share with the audience the implementation of the activities and some preliminary results of this descriptive-qualitative study. Implications for teaching cultural content will also be discussed.

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Interaction Of L2 Listeners With Help Options In Computer-Based Listening Materials Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Mónica Stella Cárdenas-Claros Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile monica.cardenas@pucv.cl ABSTRACT L2 listeners do not necessarily interact with help options in ways materials designers, programmers, and humancomputer-interaction professionals intend or anticipate it. Listeners adjust, modify and refine their behavior as they familiarize with ancillary elements. At times, they test novel ways to interact with help options that result in indiscriminate use. Other times, they create interactional shortcuts that in principle meet their individual learning goals, but that inadvertently result on help options neglect. Researchers have long agreed that such a shifting behavior together with idiosyncratic design practices have limited CALL researchers’ understanding of what type of interactional patterns translates into language learning gains and/or listening skills development. Additionally, studies examining patterns of interaction with help options have done it purely from a quantitative perspective. In this mixed-methods study, we investigated listener’s patterns of interaction with help options in a robust online platform. Thirteen pre-service teachers from Chile worked independently in six one-hour sessions with six different talks and associated activities hosted in the “Improve your Listening Skills™” (IYLS) platform. The IYLS provides listeners with different routes of interaction and access to one-click-away-help in the form of listening tips, cultural notes, technology/biology notes, transcripts, translations, glossaries, key words, audio/video control buttons, and an online dictionary. The pre- (drag & drop & sentence completion), while-(multiple-choice & dictation-cloze), and post-listening tasks (vocabulary practice & for extension) for each unit are built around 7-minute video segments extracted from TED-talk series. To collect quantitative data, individual listener’s interactions with talks and activities were tracked with screen-capturing technology and were transformed into logs of interaction. The qualitative data stems from semi-structured interviews. Patterns of interaction with help options by the different listeners across talks and activities were grouped and described. Results are discussed along with integrated data. Pedagogical implications along with avenues for further research are also discussed.

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International Virtual Exchange Project: Improving Students' Language And InterCultural Development Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Eric Hagley Muroran Institute of Technology, Japan hagley@mmm.muroran-it.ac.jp Rubén Alberto Pulgarín Cruz SENA Bilingüismo Dirección General, Colombia ruben.pulgarinc@misena.edu.co David Campbell Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan kamiobi@gmail.com ABSTRACT Language educators’ goals should include the promotion of cultural understanding and improving the language skills of their students. However, in Japan and other non multi-cultural countries, EFL classrooms are places where students from the same language background interact, and it is not always easy to achieve those goals. The English students use in such classrooms does not have the immediacy it would have in an international setting. To overcome this problem, Virtual Exchange (VE) can be used. VE gives students virtual mobility, enabling them to participate in a global community, use English in real world communicative events and become more culturally acclimatized. Though there are many benefits to VE, it is often not easily accessible to teachers. The International Virtual Exchange Project (IVEProject) was created to alleviate this problem. It allows students to use the language they’ve learned in class, to interact with students from other countries. This presentation introduces the IVEProject which has had almost 10,000 students and 180 teachers from 8 countries and 42 institutions in South America, Asia, the Middle East and Europe participating in virtual exchanges over the last 2 years. Students interact online in English as a lingua franca using a Moodle platform. Each exchange is carried out over an 8-week period employing various tasks to encourage student interaction. The exchanges, sponsored by a Japanese government grant-in-aid for scientific research, are free of charge to participants. To assuage security concerns and improve connectivity a number of tools are used to connect students. These will be outlined. Finally, student language and inter-cultural development will be covered. In the fall of 2016 and spring of 2017, 303 and 264 Japanese students, respectively, completed pre- and post-questionnaires after participating in it. The questionnaires measured inter-cultural sensitivity and understanding of one's own culture. Mean scale scores for pre- and post-testing of each construct could be used. The significance of difference was checked using the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Improvement in students' understanding of their own culture and appreciation of other cultures resulted. Language benefits can also be seen and these will be outlined too.

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L2 Blended Learning In Chilean Higher Education: Perception Of Students And Teachers Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Angie Fuentealba Cartes Universidad Andres Bello, sede Concepcion, Chile a.fuentealbacartes@uandresbello.edu Felipe Opazo Oyarzo Universidad de la Frontera, Chile f.opazo@gmail.com ABSTRACT The implementation of blended learning has been increasing over the last decade and has become the most promising use of technology for ESL learning around the world (Gruba, Cárdenas-Claros, Suborov & Rick, 2017). Some of the reasons to implement it are discussed by several authors and include the advantages of self-paced learning, maximization and versatility of resources, and the opportunity to have purposeful interactions at a multimodal level (Gruba et.al, 2017). However, this approach still represents a challenge for evolving countries, such as Chile, since students and teachers are not used to adopting new ways of learning (Charbonneau-Gowdy & Cechova, 2017). In Chile, most universities still use the traditional method of teaching English based on books, but some universities have gradually implemented blended learning in English classes for undergraduate programs to follow the worldwide trend. Bearing in mind that this decision making rarely considers the actors directly involved in teaching, it is of paramount importance to ask ourselves about what teachers and students think about these changes. Therefore, the aim of this research is to explore students and teachers’ perceptions about second language learning in blended environments in the Chilean context. The participants are undergraduate students who have been taught English in a blended learning environment for at least two semesters and teachers who have taught English in the same environment for at least two years, in two universities in two cities in Chile (Concepción and Temuco). The instruments to be used to collect the data are a written survey and a likert scale, both applied online. It is primarily expected to find rather negative opinions towards this method from both teachers and students, based on the researchers’ experience. However, it is also expected to identify common suggestions from both sides that can shed light into the aspects that need improvement. A better understanding of how second language learning in a blended environment is perceived in Chile could potentially help both teachers and students to take advantage of this methodology in a more successful way.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Language Learning On Tap!â&#x20AC;? Twitter As An Autonomous Language Learning Tool: The Learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Perspective Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Fernando Rosell-Aguilar The Open University, Great Britain Fernando.rosell-aguilar@open.ac.uk ABSTRACT Since Twitter was launched in 2006, the microbloggging tool has gone from being a little-known service to a world-wide phenomenon with massive impact on news, politics, business, entertainment, sports and education among many other fields. Language Learning was quickly identified as a subject area that could be enhanced by the use of Twitter. Among the many possible uses of Twitter beneficial to language learners, there are linguistic benefits (noticing vocabulary, expressions, idioms and grammar), cultural benefits (access to native speakers and insight into their routines, opinions, media and general interests), and social benefits (extending learning outside the classroom, social presence and distribution). A number of studies have looked into the use of Twitter for language learning, but these have mostly been small scale evaluations carried out by teachers researching the effectiveness of their own initiatives to use Twitter with their own students. To date, there has not been a large quantitative study of how language learners use Twitter autonomously. This paper reports on a large-scale study (n=370) of language learners who use Twitter. It provides a participant profile, their practices (how often they use Twitter, how, where, using what devices, in what language), and beliefs about how helpful Twitter is as a tool to contribute to their language learning experience. Four versions of the survey were written in English, Spanish, French and Italian in an effort to attract a variety of respondents. All versions contained the same questions in the same order. Links to the relevant survey asking potential participants to take part were distributed on Twitter. The results provide the first profile of the autonomous user of Twitter as a language learning tool, show very positive attitudes towards the use of Twitter and provide evidence that learners learn new vocabulary and facts about the areas where the target language is spoken. They also engage in production of target language output and make the most of the opportunities Twitter presents to be exposed to target language input and interaction with native speakers.

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Language And Technology: The Creation Of A CALL Discipline For Future English Teachers Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Claudia Beatriz Monte Jorge Martins UTFPR, Brazil claudiab@utfpr.edu.br Eglantine Guély Costa UTFPR, Brazil eglantineguely@utfpr.edu.br ABSTRACT Teacher education in CALL is so important that now it is a subfield within CALL. Language teachers need to be equipped with the knowledge and skills to integrate technology in their classrooms. They have to be prepared to choose, use, and even refuse technology for their students. However, this area is still under construction and there are many unanswered questions. The main one is: what precisely should be taught, considering that frequently teacher trainers themselves have incomplete knowledge of CALL? In this presentation, we are going to report our reflections on the creation and implementation of a CALL discipline – Language and Technology – for an English Language/ Literature course in a Brazilian university. The discipline started in 2016 and results presented here cover three semesters. The presentation has four parts. In the first part we describe the context, including the curriculum, and explain why we were responsible for this project. The second part brings in how we created and decided on the topics to cover, tasks and activities: the countless discussions and the theoretical foundations of these decisions, and the elaboration of the discipline’s online environment support on Moodle. The third part shows the final version of the discipline for each semester, trying to focus on the relation with macro goals of the course and micro individual tasks of the students, as we try to open the curricula to some individual choices. The fourth part presents the challenges we faced and still face, and explain the changes made. These changes were due to our students’ feedback and our own views and continue to be happening, based on the analysis of the online environment data and on questionnaires that collected data at the beginning and end of the period. Our objective is to share our practice and impressions so that other educators can benefit from these experiences in their own context. To create a CALL discipline is a difficult task but one that has to be undertaken. So this is an attempt to contribute to the field aiming that in the future we have more solid foundation for this task.

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Language Teaching And Learning With Corpus Linguistics: CQPweb And #Lancsbox Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 09:30 End Time (Part 1): 11:00 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 13:00 Edificio CFRD Room PC2 Andressa Rodrigues Gomide Lancaster University, Great Britain a.rodriguesgomide@lancaster.ac.uk ABSTRACT The use of corpus evidence in the classroom has proven efficient in language learning, as it encourages students to develop autonomous learning skills; provides students with authentic and meaningful language in context; and helps students identify patterns in the target language (Bernardini 2002; Tognini-Bonelli 2001; Granger 2009). CL is also valuable in language teaching, as it allows large-scale empirical studies of language learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; production and also comparison of learner language with target norms or between groups of learners coming from different backgrounds (Meunier 2010). This full day workshop will cover the use of Corpus Linguistics (CL) for language teaching and learning. It is part of a series of introductory lectures and practical sessions on topics in CL, offered by the Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS). It is aimed at anyone interested in developing practical skills in CL techniques and in applying these techniques to language teaching and learning. Participants will be introduced to basic corpus linguistic functions such as: corpus search; frequency lists; keywords; collocations; and distribution. Hands-on activities for the exploration of these techniques will introduce participants to CQPweb (Hardie 2012) and #LancsBox (Brezina et al. 2015). These two software packages were developed at CASS at Lancaster University; both are used for the analysis of language data and corpora. Both pieces of software are free to use and only require basic computer skills. For this workshop, the CQPweb server at Lancaster University will be used so that only internet connection and a web browser are needed. #LancsBox, on the other hand, will be run from USB sticks, provided by CASS. During the workshop, participants will learn how to build their own corpora; how to conduct learner language analysis; how to develop material for language teaching; and how to apply datadriven-learning in classrooms. The participants will also be introduced to standard widely-used corpora, such as the Spoken British National Corpus 2014 (Love et al. 2017), a collection of 11.5 million words of contemporary spoken English.

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Language Teaching And Learning With Corpus Linguistics: CQPweb And #Lancsbox Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 13:00 Edificio CFRD Room PC2 Andressa Rodrigues Gomide Lancaster University, Great Britain a.rodriguesgomide@lancaster.ac.uk ABSTRACT The use of corpus evidence in the classroom has proven efficient in language learning, as it encourages students to develop autonomous learning skills; provides students with authentic and meaningful language in context; and helps students identify patterns in the target language (Bernardini 2002; Tognini-Bonelli 2001; Granger 2009). CL is also valuable in language teaching, as it allows large-scale empirical studies of language learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; production and also comparison of learner language with target norms or between groups of learners coming from different backgrounds (Meunier 2010). This full day workshop will cover the use of Corpus Linguistics (CL) for language teaching and learning. It is part of a series of introductory lectures and practical sessions on topics in CL, offered by the Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS). It is aimed at anyone interested in developing practical skills in CL techniques and in applying these techniques to language teaching and learning. Participants will be introduced to basic corpus linguistic functions such as: corpus search; frequency lists; keywords; collocations; and distribution. Hands-on activities for the exploration of these techniques will introduce participants to CQPweb (Hardie 2012) and #LancsBox (Brezina et al. 2015). These two software packages were developed at CASS at Lancaster University; both are used for the analysis of language data and corpora. Both pieces of software are free to use and only require basic computer skills. For this workshop, the CQPweb server at Lancaster University will be used so that only internet connection and a web browser are needed. #LancsBox, on the other hand, will be run from USB sticks, provided by CASS. During the workshop, participants will learn how to build their own corpora; how to conduct learner language analysis; how to develop material for language teaching; and how to apply datadriven-learning in classrooms. The participants will also be introduced to standard widely-used corpora, such as the Spoken British National Corpus 2014 (Love et al. 2017), a collection of 11.5 million words of contemporary spoken English.

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Learners’ Multimodal Identities Construction In Online Telecollaborative Interaction Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Hsin-I Chen National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan hsinichen20@gmail.com ABSTRACT In recent years, with the availability of online communication technologies, more telecollaborative tasks are integrated in language classrooms, bringing together classes of language learners in geographically distant locations to develope learners’ linguistic and intercultural competence through collaborative work (O’Dowd & Lewis, 2016; Vinagre, 2017). While telecollaboration shows great potential for language learning, more looked into the effect of telecollaboration for learners’ linguistic and intercultural competence. There is a lack of research investigating how L2 learners construct identity/-ies in telecollaborative interaction, especially when learners are engaged in synchronous, video-based exchanges with other English-as-an-international-language (EIL) interlocutors. As language learning is a continuous process of identity (re)creation (Norton, 1997), it is thus important to explore how L2 learners communicate their ‘sense of selves’ and construct own identities in online telecollaborative communities of practice. This study explores the online videoconferencing interaction between 16 Taiwanese students and 16 American students in a 6-week US-Taiwan telecollaboration project using Google Hangouts. Informed by the social semiotic perspective of multimodality (Kress & van Leeuwen, 2001) and identities-in-practice (Lave, 1996; Kanno & Norton, 2011; Wenger, 1998), this study adopts a qualitative multiple case study approach and a multimodal analysis to gain in-depth understanding of how five L2 learners construct identities using multimodal resources in telecollaborative videoconferencing interactions. The analyses of digitally-recorded video conversations, semi-structured interviews, learner journals, and observation notes show that L2 learners utilized multimodal and semiotic resources, including verbal (e.g., spoken, textual texts) and non-verbal resources (e.g., eye gaze, gesture, body position) in representing meanings, constructing identities, and positioning themselves in relation to other EIL interlocutors in online multimodal interactions. Additionally, L2 learners were shown to shuttle across those different modalities to initiate or respond as a means for constructing who they are online. This study calls for a need for a multimodal perspective on telecollaboration studies and CALL research that examine not only how the verbal mode is produced and perceived by L2 learners but also how the non-verbal modes such as gestures and body languages that shape learners’ L2 identities-in-practice in online telecollaborative discourse.

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Learning English As A Foreign Language With Duolingo App Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Adriana Cristina Sambugaro de Mattos Brahim Federal Univsersity of Paraná, Brazil adrianacsmbrahim@gmail.com Andreia de Jesus Federal University of Paraná, Brazil aj_ufpr@yahoo.com Amanda Ferrari Cândido Federal University of Paraná, Brazil acanfx@gmail.com Gabriel Rossetto Marques Federal University of Paraná, Brazil rossetto.2306@gmail.com Luana Bento Federal Univsersity of Paraná, Brazil luh.gb.luana@gmail.com Luana Guerra de Oliveira Morimoto Federal University of Paraná, Brazil guerraluana.m@gmail.com ABSTRACT This paper intends to present a project that has been developed since 2016 by undergraduate students of TADS (Tecnology in System Analyses and Development) of Federal University of Paraná, supervised by two professors (a System Development Professor and an English Professor) in the context of a public school in Curitiba city (Paraná State, Brazil). The project is called “Building knowledge throughout computer and internet” (from the original title: “Construindo Saberes através do computador e internet”. This kind of project is called “extension project” in our University, which is planned and supervised by professors in different areas and from different undergraduate courses), and it has had some subprojects. One of them, developed in 2016-2017, was called “Learning English in the Digital Environment”. Its main goal was to use Duolingo App as a resource of Teaching English as a foreign Language with teenage students, mainly because the public schools in Brazil (and for consequence their teachers) do not have necessary funds from the local government to improve their daily teaching resources, in and outside of their classrooms. Therefore, we have proposed in our subproject the use of Duolingo App as an extra resource, because we believed it could be a good way to help students to improve their language skills, due to some aspects: 1) because of the students great interest in using apps for smartphones; 2) the facilities in using these gadgets in classroom and outside of it; 3) because Duolingo App is free; 4) because of some good research results of using this App (MEHTALA, 2015; ENCISO, 2015; MUDAY, 2015; VESSELINOV, R.; GREGO J., 2012). Thus, this paper intends to present our goals as a larger project and also our subproject at Professional and Higher

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Education Sector in Federal University of Paranรก, and mainly the general plan, the data collected and the results of using Duolingo App in the context of Teaching English as a Foreign Language in a public school.

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Learning English As A Second Language: Integrating Technology, Complexity And Task Based Learning. Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Juarez Lopes Instituto Federal Sul Rio Grandense, Brazil lopesjuarez@gmail.com ABSTRACT According to Larsen-Freeman and Cameron, a complex approach does not translate into a complex method for teaching English as a second language (L2). This presentation aims to find points of contact between the seminal work of LarsenFreeman about the Chaos/Complexity Theory, Second Language Acquisition and Technology Mediated Task Based Learning, more specifically the task cycle. There seems to be many similarities between the new Chaos/Complexity Science and L2 acquisition. Although the value of this analogy might be metaphorical, sometimes things are not seen until we have the right metaphor for it. The aim of this presentation is to look at the task cycle, under the perspective of the Complexity Theory, which can be classified as a complex adaptive system as it is possible to find the characteristics of such systems in this cycle. These systems are dynamic, complex, chaotic, unpredictable, sensitive to initial conditions, open, self-organized, sensitive to feedback and adaptive. Although technological progress has affected the way people learn and teach foreign languages, this fact does not seem to have promoted a paradigm change and as a result it has created a rich area to be explored by academic research. In other words, taking into account that there is a growing but yet modest number of research about Technology Mediated Task Based Learning (TBL) and that nowadays it is imperative to bring to classroom the computer and technology education motivated by the undeniable achievements in this area, it seems to be a challenge to take TBL, a strong approach to teaching L2, from the face-to face classroom to the technology mediated classroom using synchronous communication tools. Preliminary results show evidences that the task cycle mediated by technology may be characterized as a Complex System due to the emergence of the main features of these systems in this new research environment. Results also show that the Complex Dynamic Systems Theory may also be transplanted from the traditional face-to-face classroom to the technology mediated learning environment.

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Linguavision, A Singing Competition For Language Learners Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Michael Barker Carleton University, Canada mike.barker@carleton.ca ABSTRACT As the WorldCALL theme list suggests, computer technology can play many roles in the language learning process. A virtual environment may create a synchronous space where student avatars interact in real-time; a software package can shape and track learning over time, guiding students through multiple levels of proficiency. But sometimes technology plays more of a "supporting" role; not explicitly visible but running in the background to support activities underway in the foreground. Such is the case with the technology we use to support Linguavision, a singing competition for students in our academic ESL and modern language classes. Now in its 4th year, Linguavision is an annual event in which students at all levels of language proficiency and musical ability challenge themselves to try something new, to take their language learning outside the classroom and step into the spotlight. And running behind the scenes, a mix of technologies helps make it all possible:     

a contest webpage displays rules, judging criteria, performer biographies/photos, and more. online registrations are collected using a "Forms" plugin on Wordpress. our judging system is built on Google Docs and used to track real-time input from our panel of 10+ judges. a music trivia quiz built on the free "Kahoot!" platform is used to keep the audience occupied via their own portable devices while judges deliberate. social media is used to promote the event and engage the audience.

We have learned a lot since our 2015 debut; what works and what doesn't, how to leverage technology to make the event run more smoothly, and when it is easier to say no to computer technology and use paper and pencil instead. These are the topics, along with an overview of the event itself, that I look forward to sharing with participants in my poster presentation at the upcoming WorldCALL Conference in Concepción. In the meantime, I invite you to visit our website to learn more about the event:

https://carleton.ca/slals/linguavision/

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Managing A Virtual Immersion Program Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio 106, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Rachida Primov University of Miami, United States rprimov@miami.edu ABSTRACT This presentation describes, from technological, pedagogical and managerial perspectives, the implementation of the Virtual Immersion Program at the University of Miamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Modern Languages and Literatures Department. In the Internet-era version of pen pals, the University of Miami has been using for the last six years, free or low-cost technologies to match its students with partners in classes in other countries and to provide them with authentic languageimmersion experiences. The program started with one language, Portuguese and has expanded to Spanish for the last five years and to French this academic year. Approximately 126 sessions were held with the participation of nine universities in six countries in the Fall 2017 semester. Approximately 492 University of Miami classes were involved in the program and their evaluations of the sessions were extremely positive. Virtual Immersion Sessions (also called Teletandem) are a tele-collaborative learning platform that matches pairs of native (or competent) speakers of different languages to interact through voice, text and webcam images using Skype whereby each participant practices his/her target language with his/her partner for half an hour. To maximize fluidity and efficiency, students are paired by linguistic proficiency levels. The core idea is a simple one - I practice my target language; you practice yours. For each 50-minute session, some students may prepare notes on topics or vocabulary, while others may have assignment sheets that they need to complete during the session. Students may also rely on notes, hand gestures, and facial expressions, and they may use pictures and maps to communicate words or phrases they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know. For upper-class division courses, instructors may share syllabi and students may discus books or work on debate projects together. This modality, as implemented at the University of Miami, entails the integration of several constituent logistical and pedagogical aspects, such as the preparation for and scheduling of each session and each participant, and the integration of the session activities with the course syllabi.

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Mapping Astoria: Engaging With The Multilingual City Using Digital Tools Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Stephane Charitos Columbia University, United States sc758@columbia.edu Nelleke Van Deusen-Scholl Yale University, United States nelleke.vandeusen-scholl@yale.edu ABSTRACT Cities bring together a great diversity of people and cultures and constitute the backdrop for many of the socio-cultural processes shaping the new century. Yet urban spaces are not just the product of urban design and architectural concepts, they are also constructed, appropriated, and given meaning through the social interactions and linguistic exchange of the people who live in them. In recent years, language pedagogy has begun to incorporate place-based learning and social pedagogies as a way to engage learners with the urban environments surrounding them, and digital tools and techniques can play an important role in connecting learners with the evolving nature of the modern multilingual and multicultural global city. In this paper, we discuss an incipient project, Mapping Astoria, which is part of a course taught this spring (“Reading the multilingual city”) that proposes to make use of new media and digital mapping technologies to enable students enrolled in the class to examine, visualize and narrate the various ethnic and sociocultural networks that make up one of New York City's most culturally diverse neighborhoods. Astoria is primarily known in the urban mythology of New York City as the city's traditionally Greek neighborhood. However, Astoria is much more than simply New York’s “Greektown.” Today, it is home to a significant number of residents of Italian, Brazilian, Baltic, Irish and Egyptian descent, as well as home to new immigrants from Latin America and South and Southeast Asia. Understanding an “ethnic” neighborhood as a web of complex, multilayered, lived experiences rather than simply an archive of historical records, this project aspires to empower students to explore and reveal the patchwork of personal and cultural histories that structure the northwest urban corner of Queens in order to bring this space alive, and challenge simplistic and idealistic accounts that present it as ethnically and culturally homogeneous. In evaluating this project, we will reflect on the role of technology and digital tools to enable learners to work collaboratively to discover and explore the rich multilingual environments in which they live.

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Methods Of Literacy Skills Education Of Syrian And Persian Migrants Children Widespread Problems Of Teaching In German-Only – Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Barbara Dr. Kolkmann-Klamt GAL Germany, Germany barbara.kolkmann@orange.fr ABSTRACT The literacy skills courses for migrant’s children at primary school don’t differ from the literacy skills lessons of Germanspeaking children. The textbooks are the same and the teaching language is in German-only. The mother tongue isn’t integrated into the literacy skill education process because this needs needlessly time and isn’t necessary at all . However, linguistic and cognition research show that children have quite developed phonetic and semantic strategies in her mother tongue at the end of her first year, compare: Doughty: „(..) input processing rapidly becomes attuned to the ambient language during the first year of life“ and the fact, that by the acquisition of a second language the mother tongue is always activated. Will be the mother tongue excluded the possibilities of associations and of comparison is restrained. The children can’t connect her language with the second language and become unsafe and are discouraged. A research study in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern (Germany) has proved, that after one year only 2% from 120 children had sufficient knowledge to speak or to write the letters. The rest of the children showed basic problems in speaking and writing. This proves, that the current teaching opinion: Teaching in German-only is enough, isn’t enough and that new teaching methods must be created, which integrate actively the mother tongue in the learning process. Particularly, must be discussed the question: Whether foreign language teacher have to dispose of additional qualification to several foreign languages to integrate the mother tongues of the children in the phonetically and semantically education process of literacy skills and is it really possible or it is necessary to develop a helpful computer learning program?

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Micro-Credentials And Digital Badges: A Framework For Learner-Centeredness And Learner Autonomy Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Jun Iwata Shimane University, Japan j_iwata@med.shimane-u.ac.jp Shudong Wang Shimane University, Japan wangsd@soc.shimane-u.ac.jp John Telloyan Shimane University, Japan telloyan@med.shimane-u.ac.jp Lynne Murphy Shimane University, Japan murphy@med.shimane-u.ac.jp John Clayton Waikato Institute of Technology, New Zealand john.clayton@wintec.ac.nz ABSTRACT In e-learning language learning environments, learners have more choice in the time when they learn and the place where learning will occur. While teachers design digital content and activities for their students to achieve identified objectives, the ultimate responsibility of achieving those outcomes is transferred from teachers to their students. Over the last three decades foreign language teaching and learning has been influenced by constructivist strategies, techniques and methods. This means there is a growing focus on learner-centeredness and learner autonomy (Aşık, 2010). In these increasingly personalized learning environments, learners need more self-motivation and self-direction. A fundamental criterion for the success of self-motivated and self-directed English language learning environments is the ability of learners to make the appropriate connections between their existing skills, knowledge and experience and expected skill, knowledge and behaviors (Clayton, 2009). Micro-credentials or digital badges are increasingly being used as valid indicators of accomplishment, skill, knowledge and interest (Clayton, 2012). It is anticipated that today’s age of Information and Communication Technology, micro-credentials and digital badges will be useful for motivational and reward purposes. They are expected to not only provide learners with a broader picture of English language learning achievement but also allow learners to demonstrate their knowledge, skills and achievements through the display of endorsed micro-credential and badge collections. This paper illustrates how the authors created an e-learning framework to help their learners find the medical English language learning courses which suit their needs, interests and English levels. This e-learning framework helps create a holistic view of learner achievements through the display of earned micro-credentials or digital badges. The authors firstly 157


demonstrate how a self-reflective framework allows each learner to make a meaningful connection between their current skill level and the learning activities offered for available courses. The authors then demonstrate how the use of microcredentials or digital badges were designed to help learners confirm their learning achievements and help them become motivated toward further autonomous study.

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M-Learing, Active Learning Colloquium Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 13:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Joan-TomĂĄs PujolĂ Universitat de Barcelona, Spain ABSTRACT Mobile devices have become indispensable to our daily lives. We do many common daily activities using a multitude of apps and services from our smartphones and so we should also use them in the language class to engage students in active learning. Engaging students in the learning process requires students to carry out meaningful learning activities and think about what they are doing. In this pre-conference workshop we ask you to bring your mobile phone or tablet to take part in several activities with the aim to reflect on their potential for the teaching of foreign languages.

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Mobile Language Learning For Social Inclusion With Arabic Speakers Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Linda Bradley University of Gothenburg, Sweden linda.bradley@gu.se Khaled Al-Sabbagh Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden khaals@chalmers.se ABSTRACT The purpose of this research is to investigate the pedagogical implications in mobile learning when entering into a new language. We conducted a two-year-project developing language learning applications for Arabic speaking refugees in Sweden, by far the largest language group of newly arrived migrants. The target group itself owns smartphones to a large extent to stay in touch with friends and family (Bradley et al., 2017). However, these devices could also be used as a means of learning a new language which we have explored in a number of field studies. Through quantitative and qualitative methods of investigation, the smartphone was scrutinized as a learning tool through a design based bottom-up approach. In the process of mapping out the existing research areas of mobile assisted language learning (see Rosell-Aguilar, 2017) together with investigating the area of mobile apps built for Swedish language training, we developed a model for evaluation of apps taking into account technological, pedagogical, linguistic and cultural aspects. The project adopts a sociocultural approach to mobile learning, focusing on ideas of collaborative and interactive learning, where the user is engaged in self-directed learning (see e.g., Kukulska-Hulme, 2013; Pellerin, 2017; Traxler, Barcena, Laborda, 2015). Our research resulted in an app that we developed, targeting Arabic speaking learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; needs when learning Swedish. The focus is on understanding and speaking Swedish to break the ice in the new country. Over 40 persons Arabic speakers were engaged over a period of using the app. They were recorded to compare their language development. In addition, interviews, surveys, logging of screen movements, and observations were performed. We developed a model for evaluation of app usability as well as for mapping language progression. This resulted in the first development of a module in the app targeting pronunciation and everyday phrases, having an impact of language development, where users could target specific weak spots in their own learning. The outcomes show that developing an app embracing user needs is an effective way of seeing language progression among users, since they can practice in a self-directed way.

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Mobile-Based English Dictionaries In Chinese EFL Learners’ Incidental Vocabulary Learning Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Danyang Zhang University of Cambridge, Great Britain dz298@cam.ac.uk ABSTRACT L2 vocabulary acquisition, as an essential aspect in second language acquisition, is a popular focus of great research interest (Schmitt, 2008). As Oxford (1990) refers, vocabulary knowledge is one of the most sizable and unmanageable aspects of language learning. Particularly focusing on China, university students attach much attention to vocabulary learning. Considering the great importance of English vocabulary acquisition and the difficulties Chinese students usually encounter, further exploring their English vocabulary learning is of theoretical and practical significance and becomes the main concern of this research. Profiting from the rapid development of MALL, mobile-based dictionary (MBD) which is flexible and convenient, become increasingly popular among Chinese language learners. Nevertheless, few studies have been conducted on how they use MBD and the efficiency in their English vocabulary learning. In this case, this study aims to fill this research gap, concentrating on MBD in Chinese university students’ incidental vocabulary learning. In specific, there are three main foci of this research. First, it underscores how MBDs facilitate learners’ English vocabulary learning. Second, this research explores how learners use MBDs when reading. Third, as language learners’ attitudes impact their performance (Nyamubi, 2016), what attitudes language learners have regarding the effectiveness of MBD are considered. As a mixed-method study, three methods have been used. The self-report questionnaire was designed to ask participants to report their MBD use. The semi-structured interview particularly aimed to explore the reasons why more attention has been paid to certain words/aspects. For evaluating the effectiveness of MBD the pre-test, immediate post-test and delayed post-test have been successively carried out. Both the attitude questionnaire and the semi-structured interview have been run to determine student’s attitude, as well as investigate the reasons why he/she holds such viewpoints. As an ongoing study, this poster will illustrate an outline to summarise and evaluate some previous literature, before demonstrating the research questions and research design. In addition, some initial findings and future research directions will be introduced. It is my hope that this poster can provide some constructive insights into second language vocabulary acquisition and MALL.

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Mreader: Increasing Reading Comprehension Via An Online System Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Harry Carley Matsuyama University, Japan charry@g.matsuyama-u.ac.jp ABSTRACT Mreader is an online system that incorporates the older method of simple graded readers. This modern procedure allows students to access quizzes for completed books through an online system. Any computing device allows access. Students can gage their progress and move up or down appropriate reading levels depending on their ability to successfully pass the comprehensive quizzes. Instructors have the online ability to set goals, monitor progress, award bonus points, along with many other key points. Mreader may be used independently or as a plugin with the Moodle course management system. The site is free of charge and may be accessed by any educational institution simply by registering. Mreader may be utilized in many ways through blended learning or as a stand alone reading class. The variety of topics and levels from 1-7 ensures that learners are reading at their appropriate point. Additionally, instructors have many tools available to make sure that each student is reading the book that they have checked out. In large classes it may be possible for students to cheat the system by several students reading the same book then all taking the same quiz. Mreader has a tool that checks for similar quizzes taken within close amounts of time. For slow learners or those with special needs the instructor has the option to allow students to retake a quiz more than once. The benefits of reading have proven to not only increase test scores but allow for deeper understanding of a language. While many institutions are encompassing more advanced extensive reading options such as the E-readers there are still many schools that have accumulated vast amounts of physical reading material at significant cost to their institution. These books can not be simply thrown away. Mreader is a bridge between the offline and online world that offers learners and lecturers a simple method to join the two in an economical and educational fashion.

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My Speech Trainer (Myst): Improving Academic English Through Automatic Speech Recognition Technology Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Helmer Strik Centre for Language Studies Radboud University, Netherlands w.strik@let.ru.nl Catia Cucchiarini Centre for Language and Speech Technology, Radboud University, Netherlands c.cucchiarini@let.ru.nl ABSTRACT In universities all over the world, the number of courses taught in English is steadily growing. In many cases the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; oral proficiency is not adequate to cope with real life, academic communication, which has a negative impact on education. The question then is how this can be improved. In order to stimulate the acquisition of oral skills in real-life Academic English (AE), the My Speech Trainer (MyST) project was started by the Centre for Language and Speech Technology (CLST), together with Radboud In'to Languages (centre of expertise for language and communication), and NovoLanguage (a spin-off from the Radboud University). The aim was to develop Computer-Assisted Language Learning (CALL) software that incorporates Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technology to help students improve their AE oral skills including vocabulary, idioms, grammar, and fluency. First, a needs analysis was conducted, which included class observations, interviews with teachers, students, and experts on (teaching) AE, and analyses of video and audio recordings. In addition, an international survey was held among students to obtain data on their proficiency, goals and attitudes. These results were used to develop appropriate content for MyST, which was incorporated in Novo Studio, a product by NovoLanguage, which employs Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) to recognize and analyze spoken utterances, and an editor that allows to easily add content. Content was developed at three levels of increasing specificity: [1] General AE: content based on a literature study we conducted; [2] AE at Radboud University: content based on needs analysis and surveys; [3] AE for a specific topic or course - we teach teachers how they can add such content. In this paper we describe our system in more detail and then we present our first results on studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; use and evaluation of MyST.

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Networking, Sustainability, and Collaboration: Launching the LATIN CALL Association Roundtable Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 17:00 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1

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Not All MMOGs Are Created Equal: A Framework For Evaluating The Social L2 Learning Potential Of Vernacular Games Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Jonathon Reinhardt University of Arizona, United States jonrein@email.arizona.edu ABSTRACT Vernacular digital games—commercial games not intentionally designed for L2 learning—have come to the forefront of CALL research recently because of their attested affordances for individual and social L2 learning (Thorne, 2008; Sykes & Reinhardt, 2012; Peterson, 2013; Chik, 2014; Reinhardt & Thorne, 2016; Reinhardt, 2017). However, L2 teachers may misinterpret and over-generalize research findings because of lack of knowledge of how game titles and genres differ, and how designed game mechanics interact with player and contextual variables to afford learning. Affordances for L2 learning may be available in a MMOG like World of Warcraft for players with high gaming literacy that may not be for those with high linguistic proficiency (e.g. Rama, Black, van Es, & Warschauer, 2012), while the designed mechanics of MMOGs like Guild Wars 2 may actually allow L2 learners to avoid game narratives and social interaction for the sake of individualized gameplay (Zhao, 2014). Other multiplayer genres—e.g. MOBAs, social RPGs, social networking games, and some strategy games—offer L2 learning affordances that differ substantially from one another and depend greatly on player and contextual variables. Single player genres may also be played socially, lending them unique L2 learning affordances otherwise unavailable in multiplayer games (e.g. deHaan, Reed, & Kuwada, 2010; Piirainen-Marsh & Tainio, 2009; Shintaku, 2018). This talk surveys and evaluates research on social L2 gaming from a game design analysis perspective and considers how game mechanics, dynamics, and aesthetics (Hunicke, Leblanc, & Zubec, 2004) interact with player and contextual variables, with implications for formal practice, research, and development. Examples from a variety of studies that isolate (and do not isolate) variables, including the presenter’s own, will be presented to refine a heuristic for evaluating vernacular game titles and genres with regards to their potential affordances for both individual and social L2 learning.

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O MOODLE Como Espaço Colaborativo Para O Ensino De Língua Materna Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Edificio CFRD, Capacitación Docente 2 Room Gizele Santos de Araujo Colégio Militar de Brasília, Brazil giza_06@yahoo.com.br ABSTRACT O computador e a internet são instrumentos que podem criar condições para a superação do modelo tradicional de ensino, uma vez que possibilitam novas formas de atuação tanto do professor quanto do aluno. Quanto mais ativamente uma pessoa participa da construção de um conhecimento, mais ela irá integrar-se e reter aquilo que aprender (LÉVY, 2006). A aprendizagem, sob a perspectiva colaborativa, dá possibilidades para que os alunos tornem-se participantes ativos no processo de suas aprendizagens. Eles têm a oportunidade de aprender com os colegas e de ensinar-lhes. Somado aos apelos das novas tecnologias na educação, numa sociedade que prioriza, segundo Behrens (2000), a produção intelectual com o uso intensivo de tecnologias, o uso do Ambiente Virtual de Aprendizagem MOODLE vem facilitar tanto a aprendizagem colaborativa quanto a autonomia do aprendizado dos alunos, uma vez que, por meio dessa ferramenta interativa, busca-se aperfeiçoar os benefícios da interação entre alunos envolvidos nos mesmos objetivos de aprendizagem. Diferentemente de abordagens instrucionais centradas na figura do professor, a aprendizagem colaborativa volta-se para o papel do aluno. A ênfase recai no aprendizado que ocorre como efeito do trabalho conjunto dos alunos que, engajados em pequenos grupos e trabalhando colaborativamente, buscam o sucesso no aprendizado de todos os envolvidos nas atividades (KRESSLER, 1992). Desse modo, o ensino e a prendizagem da língua materna em ambiente virtual envolve pares ou pequenos grupos de alunos, e cada integrante do grupo é responsável pela sua própria aprendizagem e pela dos demais companheiros, na ideia de que cada indivíduo aprende com o par mais competente, e aprendizes desenvolvem a competência comunicativa em uma língua por meio de conversação em situações estruturadas socialmente ou pedagogicamente. (VIGOTSKY, 1996). Busca-se, neste trabalho, analisar a prática pedagógica de produção textual, desenvolvida de forma colaborativa no MOODLE, realizada em escola regular da educação básica pública, com vistas à identificação da validade de uma abordagem de ensino-aprendizgem colaborativa, intermediada numa plataforma virtual. Para tal, os registros foram tomados por meio de observação direta e descrição do material didático e do ambiente virtual de aprendizagem em si.

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Online Extensive Reading In EAP Courses Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería Amy Marquardt University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, United States amarq22@hawaii.edu ABSTRACT Research has shown that Extensive reading (ER) is an effective approach towards helping second language (L2) students learn to read in the target language. ER can promote learners’ motivation (e.g., Ro, 2013, 2016; Judge, 2011; S. Mori, 2002), decrease reading anxiety (e.g., Ro, 2013; Zhou, 2017), improve reading rate (e.g., Beglar & Hunt, 2014; Bell, 2001; Lao & Krashen, 2000), improve L2 skills (e.g., Robb & Kano, 2013; Jeon & Day, 2016; Mason & Krashen, 1997), and create a flow experience (e.g., Kirchhoff, 2013). L2 learner reactions towards courses in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) including ER where ER uses engaging, levelappropriate, and student-selected books is particularly interesting. However, little research exists on how online ER libraries that can remotely monitor student progress could affect potential connections between online reading and inclass teaching. To address this gap, we researched how 54 university EAP reading students interacted with Xreading, a virtual library that targets multidisciplinary learner needs by offering hundreds of graded readers. The intermediate and advanced participants self-selected and read online ER books for ten weeks, completing weekly reading assignments of either 10,000 or 13,000 words respectively. The study included quantitative and qualitative data to determine the extent to which Xreading affected the learners’ academic reading ability, attitude toward reading English, and overall English proficiency. In addition, teachers were interviewed to highlight instructor perceptions towards using ER online and the challenges they may have encountered. Quantitatively, the Mixed-effect Multi-factorial ANOVA showed that time, class level, and the interaction of the two proved significant concerning ER learning. Time was a significant within-group factor: F (1, 39) = 20.046, p = .000, while class level (intermediate vs. advanced) was a significant between-group factor: F (1, 39) = 3, p = 0.000, and the interaction between the two also proved significant: F (1, 39) = 5.054, p = 0.03. Interviews highlighted improvements seen in students’ reading rates, vocabulary, and grammar and that instructors were positive towards implementing online ER in their EAP courses. While pedagogical implications and challenges will be discussed, online ER has certainly shown positive influences regarding L2 target language reading.

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Online Learning Through Virtual Exchange: A New Role For CALL Experts Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Sake Jager University of Groningen, Netherlands s.jager@rug.nl Shannon Sauro Malmö University, Sweden shannon.sauro@mau.se ABSTRACT Virtual Exchange (VE) is rapidly gaining currency in Europe as the preferred term for denoting forms of collaborative online learning which have a firm tradition in CALL under the names of online intercultural exchange, telecollaboration, and teletandem. As a complement to ‘physical exchange’, however, the term also makes it more prominent as a form of internationalisation (De Wit, 2016), making it a less exclusive language education activity and situating it more generally as an option for international learning across the disciplines. Language and culture educators worldwide are leading the way in bringing VE as innovative practice to other disciplines and areas of application. Well-known CALL practitioners and researchers have taken a leading role in EVE (Erasmus+ Virtual Exchange), a recently launched initiative by the European Commission with the goal of expanding the reach and scope of the Erasmus+ programme via VE. In another European project, EVOLVE, which is the topic of this talk, language experts are working together with experts from other fields to provide an innovative online training and coaching programme (‘Co-Laboratory’) for university educators and other facilitators planning to design and integrate VE in their courses. The training will be complemented by research measuring the impact of the implemented VEs on targeted learning outcomes such as intercultural communicative competence, language proficiency, digital literacy, and discipline-specific or transversal collaboration skills (21st century skills). The project results and findings will be shared with policy and decision makers in universities, university associations and national and European policy networks, thus raising awareness for VE and contributing to establishing it as an innovative educational practice across Europe. In this talk, we will present initial project outputs, including an outline of training and the research plan, and preliminary findings from the pilot study carried out during the first six months.

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Open Educational Resources (Oers) In The Training Of Language Educators: The Perspective Of Critical Literacy Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent André Firpo Beviláqua Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil andre.firpo@gmail.com Vilson J. Leffa Universidade Católica de Pelotas, Brazil leffav@gmail.com Alan Ricardo Costa Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Brazil alan.dan.ricardo@gmail.com Vanessa Ribas Fialho Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil vanessafialho@gmail.com ABSTRACT The theory behind Open Educational Resources (OERs) has been a challenge for the theorists in Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL). On one hand, some contemporary theoretical orientations, among which we highlight the interdisciplinary perspective of Critical Literacy, suggest an education in line with a more active and participatory citizen, capable of critically positioning him/herself on issues such as gender inequality, race, class, among others. On the other hand, a significant part of OERs available in cyberspace is still based on grammar teaching, which contributes little or nothing to a critical commitment. As we will describe in our study, the provision of training in OERs from the Critical Literacy perspective has shown itself to be a promising alternative to this grammatical approach. The objective of this study is to present three OERs developed in a training course in Spanish as a Foreign Language for secondary teachers, offered by a Federal University in Southern Brazil, using a distance learning environment. The research methodology is qualitative, phenomenological-based, with data collected from teachers producing OERs with an open authoring system. For live broadcasts and interactions among participants, the following tools were used: (1) Hangouts On Air; (2) WhatsApp and (3) Facebook. Further details on the development of the training course will be provided in our presentation. The results show that the OERs produced by the teachers, sometimes contemplate the theoretical-methodological principles of Critical Literacy, but other times distance themselves from such a perspective. However, it is possible to perceive a positive training impact sensitizing teachers towards a more critical approach in the production of these materials, thus reducing the distance between what is said and what is done in typical classrooms, where most of these teachers come from. In addition, OERs remain in cyberspace for future adaptations, to be made either by the original authors or fellow teachers, thus contributing to mass collaboration in CALL.

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Pecha Kucha For Improving Students’ Presentation Ability In Speaking Class Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio 106, Facultad de Ingeniería Patricia Angelina Lasut Sanata Dharma University, Indonesia patricia@usd.ac.id ABSTRACT One important factor that affects how people perceive one’s competence is the ability to deliver an effective presentation. To give a presentation is an integral part of the teaching-learning activities which are at the university level. Most students studying English in the English Language Education Study Program, Sanata Dharma University choose to use Microsoft PowerPoint to deliver their presentations in class. However, the additional pressure given to present in English normally causes them to include as much information as possible on their slides. They have the tendency to focus too much on the content and neglect the delivery aspect. As a result, most of the students only end up reading aloud their text-heavy slides, which often leads to boredom. Therefore, it is important to introduce a presentation format that will improve the students’ presentation ability. Pecha Kucha is a creative and innovative presentation format that can help improving their presentation ability. It is a simple, concise and effective presentation format which allows only twenty (20) slides that will advance automatically for 20 seconds each. Recent research has discovered that the presentation format was functional to support collaborative learning and promoting L2 oral presentation skills. By introducing the Pecha Kucha format, the students are able to raise their awareness on the significance of not only the content of their presentation, but also the visual aids and delivery skills that lead to a successful presentation. Pecha Kucha format can also improve the students’ confidence in delivering their presentations in English. Moreover, the use of Pecha Kucha format offers a new style of presentation which is effective to engage the audience. This research reports the experiences of introducing the Pecha Kucha presentation format to improve the students’ presentation ability in the Speaking class in the English Language Education Study Program, Sanata Dharma University.

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Pedagogical Implementation Of Multimodal Teaching In College English AudioVideo Speaking Class Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Shan Li Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China lism713@163.com Zhihong Lu Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China luzhihong@bupt.edu.cn ABSTRACT As is required in College English Curriculum Requirements (Department of Higher Education, 2007), college English teaching in China has been adopting “the computer- and the classroom-based multimedia teaching model” over the past ten years. The digitization of teaching practice has provided an enhanced multimodal leaning environment for college students, where they have an easy access to audio, visual, and other learning materials. With help of computer technology, both English teachers and learners enjoy more autonomy on selection and combination of modes in the teaching and learning process. Multimodal teaching has drawn more attention from researchers in recent years. At the authors’ university, second-year undergraduates take their English audio-video speaking course (EAVSC) in a digital lab equipped with ROFALL system, a self-developed web-based English language skills training system. Online learning materials such as texts, images, audios and videos have been processed and developed to serve as the target language input or lead in topics in speaking tasks including presentation, group discussion, pair work, role play, and personal statement assigned by the teacher, and the students are exposed to a multimodal environment in the English learning process. To investigate effectiveness of such pedagogical classroom practice in relation with EFL learners’ communicative language ability in EAVSC, an empirical study has been conducted in the second author’s EAVSC class repeatedly for several teaching sessions in a similar teaching and learning context. The students are usually required to take the same format of a pre- and post-test of integrated listening-writing-speaking tasks along with follow-up questionnaires. The results show that multimodal teaching has a positive effect on promoting students’ speaking skills and the configuration of various modes has received affirmative feedback from the students. It is expected to suggest some implications on pedagogical implementation in CALL environments and stimulate further study in multimodal contexts.

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Perception And Attitude Towards Local Developed Educational English Video Clips: A Case Study In A University In The IX Region Of Chile Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Margot Teresa Godoy Peña Universidad de la Frontera, Chile magope2@yahoo.es Silvana Flores Espinoza Universidad de la Frontera, Chile magope2@yahoo.es Olusiji Lasekan Universidad de la Frontera, Chile magope2@yahoo.es ABSTRACT The importance of using and creating educational English videos to facilitate blended learning in English language classroom cannot be overemphasized. For instance, it has been found as a useful tool for promoting creativity, meaningmaking, and fostering dialogue among English Language learners. Popular native English TV shows have aided copious of English learners around the world to learn English in fun way. Living English Series produced by Australian Broadcasting Corporation is a good example of one of such shows that has over 500,000 viewership on Youtube. This is an indication that EFL learners have high preference for this approach of learning. Furthermore, the idea of promoting local authentic materials in order to express English language in a local context especially in EFL countries is critical for successful learning of English. However, the creation of Local English video clips by Chileans English teachers and students has not been popular over the years. This is due to several factors such as lack of technical manpower and other form of supports. As a result of this, there are limited studies on the development of authentic learning materials such as practical and familiar English video clips. While most of the studies available focuses on development and assessment of Chilean English textbooks, others attentions has been focused on general implementation of blended learning programs in Chile. Coordinacion de Idiomas is responsible for conducting the English as a foreign Language Program in Universidad de La Frontera. One of the major success of this center is the production of its own pedagogical material; such as, the production of video clips to promote motivation and a great aid for blended learning among the students. The aim of this paper presentation is to share this successful story with respect to the development and challenges of making those videos and its impact in facilitating English language learning. The impact assessment is done through the evaluation of students’ perception and attitude towards the educational videos.

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Perceptions Of High School L2 Listeners On Video-Based Captions Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Daniela Ramírez Orellana Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile ramirezdaniela.ro@gmail.com Mónica Stella Cárdenas-Claros Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Chile monica.cardenas@pucv.cl ABSTRACT This exploratory case study examines the perceptions of high school students regarding three types of captions: full caption, sentence-level caption and keyword captions. Working collaboratively, twelve EFL learners interacted with fitfor-purpose video-based listening materials developed around the topic of Teenage issues in a 10-hour course. Each lesson provided interactive and collaborative activities structured following a pre-, while-, and post-listening format and caption support was gradually retrieved as learners gained familiarity with the contents. Upon interaction with each type of caption participants wrote reflections on their experience. Complementarily, a focus group was conducted at the end of the intervention. To comply with systematic interrogation of qualitative data, 44 written reflections along with the focus group data were transcribed, coded and coalesced into themes and clusters. Inter-coder reliability was calculated at .97. The results show that participants found that irrespective of the type of captions, these complied with two main functions: 1) to assist different aspects of listening comprehension (text comprehension and on-task focus) and language learning (vocabulary learning and pronunciation) and b) to allow for the integration of visual and verbal representations (word segmentation skills) of the language and integration of background and new knowledge. Findings along with integrated data are discussed and pedagogical implications and suggestions for further research are provided.

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Perspectives And Trajectories Of Language Teachers In The 21st Century: An AILA Research Network Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Ursula Stickler The Open University, Great Britain ursula.stickler@open.ac.uk Regine Hampel The Open University, Great Britain regine.hampel@open.ac.uk Sarah Heiser Open University, Great Britain sarah.heiser@open.ac.uk Pauline Ernest Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, pernest@uoc.edu Aline Germain-Rutherford University of Ottawa, Canada aline.germain-rutherford@uottawa.ca Martina Emke The Open University, Great Britain martina.emke@arcor.de ABSTRACT In the last decade, demands on language teachers in terms of technical skills have risen in line with the rapid growth of information and communication technology (ICT) and the benefits it promises for educational purposes. Indeed, today’s learners view technology as critical to their learning experiences (Brooks, 2016; Bullen & Morgan, 2015; OECD, 2012). Through continuing professional development (CPD) in selecting and practising the use of new online tools, as well as understanding the accompanying pedagogical issues, teachers can ensure that they keep abreast of the fast-paced developments in all areas of communication. A number of training initiatives have been developed over the past ten years (see e.g. Cutrim Schmid 2017; Hampel & Stickler 2015) to support language teachers’ development of digital skills. It remains to be seen whether institutional models for professional development and teaching excellence reflect these rapidly changing societal demands and cultural perceptions implicit in communication in the 21st century. Thus, the question arises: to what extent has the digital revolution affected notions of the “ideal” language teacher, perceptions of language teacher training needs, and current models of language teacher training?

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With this in mind, an AILA research network (ReN) has been established bringing together 34 established language educators and researchers from 15 countries and five continents who have worked on ICT and (self-)empowering methods of CPD. The specific objectives of our ReN are as follows:  to collect information about CPD programmes focusing on ICT and/or self-empowerment of teachers  to compare various international approaches to CPD  to compare beliefs about teachers (“ideal” teachers) from an intercultural perspective. We aim to arrive at a detailed picture of language teacher training in terms of digital skills development, according to target culture, culture of origin, teaching and learning cultures. In this presentation we will provide a general introduction to the ReN, along with initial findings regarding CPD programmes for language teachers in ICT and/or self-empowerment that are currently available in various countries around the world.

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Platform Design For Autonomy Technology Showcase Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Luis Gonzalez Lausanne University, Switzerland luis.gonzalez@unil.ch Jayshri Mizeret-Lad Lausanne University, Switzerland jayshri.mizeret@unil.ch ABSTRACT The Language Centre of the University of Lausanne developed its own platform, “PlurieL” which is created to cater for the students’ needs. Learners spend time in the classroom as usual but they also work independently in a multimedia room. Students explore different learning strategies, guided by a teacher in the classroom, multimedia room and remote. Student work is supported by the “PlurieL” platform, which is specifically designed to serve individual needs and to foster autonomy. PlurieL includes an engine to find all the material we have in the multimedia. To have an idea of what kind of activities they can conduct, there is a description of suggested activities, in the period devoted for a session in the multimedia room, to develop various linguistic skills. The reflection on the learning process has been also implemented in PlurieL with a learning journal. The teacher reads it and gives feedback, encouragement and suggests other materials or strategies. The first session in the multimedia, teachers show how to work with the platform, what kind of material they have available (Audio, CD-rom, DVD, etc.) and how to use the platform properly. A database lists the material and other activities described by teachers. The teachers developed activity proposals with examples of competency-related aims and strategies for selected activities. Progressively, we guide students to become more autonomous, giving first a direct link to reach the activity and then giving keywords to introduce in the engine to find some activity and we hope they will finally try to search the material to work with on their own without any proposals and hence guided by their own objectives. The teacher can observe the activity of the student at any time on his/her screen and intervene appropriately to help to find an activity, to understand what s/he has to do or simply to check if everything is fine.

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Preparing Pre-Service And In-Service Teachers For Implementing TechnologyEnhanced Tblt In Public Schools In Brazil Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Silvia Penna Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais Campus Ouro Preto, Brazil silvia.penna@ifmg.edu.br Anelise Fonseca Dutra Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Brazil aneldutra@gmail.com ABSTRACT This work aims to evaluate the impact of a training course over teachers’ pedagogical practices in Brazilian public schools. The “Technology – Enhanced Task Based Language Teaching (TBLT) Course” has been offered for pre-service and in-service teachers and TBLT was elected for this training course since it focuses on what Nunan (2004) calls experiential learning. According to this author, “this approach takes the learners’ immediate personal experience as the point of departure for the learning experience” (p. 12). When the learners face a meaningful task it is more likely that they will find it more engaging, making the learning process more effective. This is especially true in a Foreign language teaching context in which most of (if not the only) contact students have with English is in the classroom. Another essential aspect of language teaching is the need for developing digital literacy. There is a profusion of digital resources available which provide students with access to all sorts of information as well as opportunities to interact in English in real contexts. It is also important to take into consideration Chun (2008) and Hampel’s (2006) statement that “learning a language via technology activates and demand different cognitive, attitudinal, social and behavioral mechanisms from learning a language via faceto-face interaction”. Therefore, by allying TBLT to the use of digital technology this training course aimed to help language teachers reflect on their pedagogical practice, enable them to use online resources and tools in their classes to develop projects and activities that would keep their students interested, encourage their participation and, at the same time, help them develop digital literacy. The results point to an enhancement in the use of digital technologies in the English language classroom, which has contributed to a change in the teachers’ pedagogical practices and to a more enthusiastic engagement of their students in the class. In addition, teachers as well as students have been able to start developing digital literacy, an ability that has enabled them to have access to a variety of online resources.

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Pre-Service Teachers´ Training For MALL Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 17:10 End Time: 17:40 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Mar Gutiérrez-Colón Plana Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Spain mar.gutierrezcolon@urv.cat ABSTRACT mLearning has created a potential for significant changes in the field of language learning and teaching practises. It has also brought in a series of challenges for the instructors; they now need to have enough training and practise to stand up to the characteristics of this unique pedagogical environment. This situation might call for the necessity to remodel the training we provide for the pre-service teachers so that they are not only prepared for but also eager to embrace this new reality. In this paper we are going to present a series of modifications that have been introduced into the ESL Master´s Degree at our institution which included hands-on experience that aimed at changing the possible negative attitudes of the future teachers towards MALL. It needs to be highlighted that a course on CALL-MALL has formed part of the degree for the past 4 years and we have noticed that while the students showed readiness for the incorporation of CALL into their future practise as teachers they, at the same time, were reluctant to display the same enthusiasm for MALL. In 2017, the syllabus for the course was reshaped and included actual lesson planning for MALL environment. The students first took a survey on their beliefs and attitudes towards mobile learning. Then, they commenced the CALLMALL course which included formal and theoretical training. After having finished this part, the course was taught in a mobile environment and the trainees were asked to produce lesson plans for MALL that were shared on the course´s WhatsApp group and that all their peers could see and give feedback to. At the end of the training, they answered the same questionnaire as the beginning of the course, four months earlier. We observed a variance when comparing the two surveys, the results indicated that the attitudes towards mLearning as a possible teaching tool have changed to more positive, with many trainees pointing at the hands-on experience that provided the key to the U-turn for their standpoint. What is more, most of the students were also able to produce exercises that fit the mobile environment singularity.

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Promoting Pre-Service Language Teachers’ Inquiry Skills In A Blended Model Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Sandra Morales Universidad Diego Portales, Chile sandra.morales.fde@mail.udp.cl ABSTRACT Video observation has been used to promote reflection and professional development in initial and continuing language teacher education (Sherin and Van Es, 2005; Seedhouse et al, 2016). Furthermore, establishing online communities where teachers share their videos, comment and reflect upon them has been proved beneficial in fostering reflective practice (Mann and Walsh, 2017). Bearing this in mind, including face-to-face discussion to online reflection (i.e. a blended approach) could support the development of, for instance, inquiry skills that help educators to become researchers of their own teaching practices. The aim of our research was to examine how senior pre-service teachers of the English Language Teaching Program at Universidad Diego Portales developed their inquiry skills for the design of an effective thesis project through a blended model of interactions in their face-to-face courses (Applied Research in TEFL and Professional Practicum I) and in a Video Enhanced Observation (VEO)online community. VEO (www.veo-group.com ) is an observation tool that allows educators to record and tag videos which can then be uploaded onto an online portal to promote reflective practice. For data collection and analysis our study considered a mixed methods approach. Quantitative data were gathered through a pre-and post-online questionnaire and analyzed using Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA). The students and teachers’ interactions in the VEO online community were examined using Word Cloud Analysis. Additionally, data from focus groups with the students were collected and examined applying Thematic Analysis. The students’ research project marks were also included in the dataset. Preliminary findings suggest that the blended model was effective to develop the students’ inquiry skills. The videos and online community were relevant not only to improve the pre-service teachers’ teaching skills but also to develop a ‘critical’ eye to aspects of their lessons that could serve as potential research topics and support their research process. The faceto-face lessons were also essential to foster the pre-service teachers’ inquiry skills as a space for further collaborative discussion and feedback from the instructor. Thus, the students’ reflections in a blended community of practice of preservice researchers fostered collaboration while embarking on the process of doing research.

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Reflecting On ePortfolio Practice: A Novel Language Learning Environment And Catalyst For Change In EAP Practice. Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio Facultad de Educaciรณn Peggy Hartwick Carleton University, Canada peggy.hartwick@carleton.ca Julie McCarroll Carleton University, Canada julie.mccarroll@carleton.ca Allie Davidson Carleton University, Canada allie.davidson@carleton.ca ABSTRACT ePortfolios have recently been recognized as an eleventh high impact practice in post-secondary education (Watson, et al., 2016) due to their effectiveness in developing higher order skills (Eynon and Gambino, 2017). With the proliferation of these online learning environments and emerging ePortfolio practices, there is expanding research about the benefits of ePortfolio as a practice. Still, the role of this space in the achievement of 21st century skills, especially for language learners, remains under researched and underspecified. This presentation/paper describes ongoing collaborative research involving ePortfolios as a learning environment in several EAP courses at a Canadian university. The research asks, how can ePortfolios as online learning space help develop 21st century skills in English for Academic Purpose (EAP) students? What is it about the space and practice that afford the achievement of 21st century skills, such as creativity, communication, and critical thinking (Dede, 2010) in EAP learners? And, how can these be critically assessed? In the current phase of the study, the research team is comparing achievement outcomes in participants exposed to one of two conditions in their ESLA courses: the use of ePortfolio or the use of paper-based portfolio in the process of a research project assignment. The presenter, also one of the teacher-participants in the study, reflects on the strength of the ePortfolio as a novel language learning environment and catalyst for changing practice, but questions the practice and assessment of 21st century learning outcomes from a language learning perspective. Early findings emerging from this larger study suggest that the strength of these spaces include achievement of certain 21st century outcomes and that they are instrumental in affecting change to classroom practice in EAP. However, in order to validate reliable assessment in a language learning context, research needs a clearly grounded definition of the 21st century skills in an EAP context. The presenter argues for the richness of these novel digital learning environments, but calls for more clearly specified definitions of 21st century skills in order to better validate assessment.

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Re-Foundationing The Language Center: A Support Model For Online Instruction Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio 106, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Andrew Ross Arizona State University, United States aross8@asu.edu ABSTRACT Arizona State University has in recent years become a national leader in the delivery of online courses and degree programs. There are in an institution of this size a number of different units that develop and deliver online and hybrid instruction across all areas of academic inquiry. Among these are Global Launch, the Global Freshman Academy, and ASUOnline, which is tasked with delivering degree and certificate programs to students around the world. The ASUOnline virtual campus currently enrolls upwards of 30,000 students of a total population of 104,000. In 2011, ASUOnline invited the School of International Letters & Cultures to offer a BA in Spanish entirely online. This sparked an immediate move to develop and deliver online courses across the School's curriculum. Today, over 300 world language, literature, and culture classes are offered each year within the online context. Over the past five years, the School's Learning Support Services center (LSS) has pivoted from concentrating almost exclusively on F2F courses and hybrids, to closely supporting online courses and focusing on the course development practices that will lead to more opportunities, and better designed and delivered opportunities, for our students. In this presentation, I will contextualize the shift in focus to online courses at ASU, outline the move toward a compressed course schedule and its challenges, and discuss the increasing centrality of the language center to the development and delivery of language and culture instruction at all levels, in all contexts. I will offer an overview of the strategies and practices that LSS uses to support online faculty and students, including the employment of orientation modules for online language learners, the involvement of graduate students in a CALL certificate program as researchers focused on online language learning. I will also describe the shift from a competitive instructional design landscape at ASU to a cooperative one, and situate SILC's and LSS's position within this space. In conclusion, I will suggest that rather than decentralizing the place of the language center, online instruction offers opportunities to recast themselves and to extend their influence across intra-institutional boundaries in support of the university's globalization efforts.

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Relationship Between English Language Learners’ Technology Acceptance And Online Self-Regulation Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Lili Wang Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China wanglili.wl@qq.com Chunping Zheng Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China zhengchunping@bupt.edu.cn Jyh-Chong Liang National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan aljc@ntnu.edu.tw Chin-Chung Tsai National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan cctsai@mail.ntust.edu.tw ABSTRACT Information technology has played an increasingly important role in learning English as a foreign language (EFL) and great attention has been paid to learners’ perceptions of technology use when they conduct self-regulated learning online. This research integrated the technology acceptance model (TAM) with EFL leaners’ online self-regulation, and further investigated the structural relationship between these two research constructs. Two questionnaires, namely the Technology Acceptance of Online Learning Environments (TALE) and Online Self-regulated English Language Learning (OSEL) were designed and further administered to 289 EFL learners in mainland China. The confirmatory factor analysis showed that English language learners’ technology acceptance of online learning environments consists of three factors, namely, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use and perceived enjoyment. Meanwhile, their online self-regulated English language learning consists of six factors including goal setting, environment structuring, task strategies, time management, help seeking and self-evaluation. Path analysis further indicated that perceived usefulness had the most dominant and positive predictive power for explaining learners’ online self-regulation. On the contrary, learners’ perceived ease of use was a negative predictor for almost all factors of their online self-regulation except environment structuring. Surprisingly, perceived enjoyment had no significant relation with their online self-regulation. The research findings provided empirical evidence for understanding the nature of structural relationship between EFL learners’ technology acceptance and their online self-regulation. Related pedagogical implications and suggestions for future research were discussed at the end.

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Revisiting Classroom Activities And Dynamics Through M-Learning Apps Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 09:30 End Time (Part 1): 11:00 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 13:00 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Alexandra Simões Andrade Faculdade CNEC de Itaboraí, Brazil 2023.alexandraandrade@cnec.br ABSTRACT This workshop is the result of a series of meetings with English teachers from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (that took place in late 2016 and early 2017) in order to conduct a Reflective Research regarding the use of Mobile Learning (ALLY, 2010) & (BEAL, 2017) in the English as a Foreign Language classroom in the country. At first, the surveyed teachers demonstrated lack of knowledge and/or interest as far as the use of technology in the classroom is concerned. Surprisingly for the researcher, most of the participants had either no idea of the concept of M-Learning or the benefits its use can generate when properly implemented in the (languages’) classroom. Therefore, a workshop was developed with the aim of introducing M-Learning to the groups of teachers aforementioned as an attempt to have them reflect upon their practices and the importance of using technology in the English classroom, especially taking into account the digital natives we come across in our classrooms on a daily basis. The participants were required to take their own devices with certain apps previously downloaded (QrCode Reader, Google Photos, Padlet, amongst others). The researcher selected certain well known activities and dynamics commonly used to help and facilitate the teaching-learning process, such as Jeopardy, Scavenger Hunt and Paragraph Writing, and after reformulating them through the use of M-Learning carried them out with the teachers. As the results were extremely positive, the workshop was officially born and since then has constantly been reshaped, according to the latest trends, and presented to language teachers, as well as technology enthusiasts, throughout Brazil and parts of the world. The main purpose is to present ideas and suggestions, having participants’ active collaboration, in order to achieve innovation, creativity and motivation in the English as a Foreign Language classroom. It goes without saying that contemporary education means transforming your teaching so that it becomes authentic and meaningful to both students and teachers.

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Saving The High Street: Designing Online Study For Local Businesses Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 17:10 End Time: 17:40 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Noriko Maki Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan maybin@center.shonan-it.ac.jp Eucharia Donnery Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan donnery@sc.shonan-it.ac.jp Don Maybin Shonan Institute of Technology, Japan maki@sc.shonan-it.ac.jp ABSTRACT Educators are often reluctant to measure learner achievement in terms of economic output. In this case study conducted by faculty of Shonan Institute of Technology under the auspices of the Japanese Ministry of Education, the goal was to provide language education that would directly benefit a local community struggling to survive economically. The port town of Shimizu, Japan, has traditionally relied on domestic tourism to support the six local “shotengai”, or high streets. Due to de-population and a decline in popularity, the town has seen a marked drop in visitors which has severely impacted local tourist-related businesses. Shimizu, however, is blessed with a deep harbor and some international cruise ships have made it a port of call. From April of 2018, a Hong Kong-based company has contracted to send one cruise ship each week from Shanghai with 2000 passengers, all middle-class tourists looking to experience “la vida dulce” on the high seas. Given the socio-economic demographic, it is unlikely that they are proficient in English or Japanese. The shopkeepers of Shimizu are both intimidated and excited by the prospect of this particular group of visitors, who could hold the key to revitalization of the town. This would be especially true if local staff can provide the high quality of service typically expected in Japan in rudimentary Mandarin, China’s official language. We have been commissioned to provide an online course with support and guidance in basic Mandarin, including tailoring to support specific shop needs. We have taken this opportunity to research the following aspects:   

evolution of self-efficacy, or how each shopkeeper views their potential success at learning enough Mandarin online to satisfy their customers’ needs how willing local business staff are to take on the responsibility of study online without a teacher present, i.e. accountability whether there are changes in individual learner motivation to acquire sufficient Mandarin over the course of this five-month study to conduct business

This presentation describes the design of the project, obstacles encountered, and the final outcomes, including the economic impact on Shimizu’s merchants. 184


Silence As A Challenge: How Online Language Teachers Deal With The Void Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Ursula Stickler The Open University, Great Britain u.stickler@open.ac.uk ABSTRACT Online language teachers are skilled in juggling numerous demands in terms of technical queries, L2 scaffolding needs and emotional or affective requirements of their learners. However, there are certain challenges that can interfere with a successful delivery of online language tutorials; prominent amongst them is the “wall of silence” or an unexpected breakdown in communication that makes teachers fear that they are talking into a void. Although silences in face-to-face language classes have been researched to a certain extent over the past decades (Carbaugh, Berry, & Nurmikari-Berry, 2006; Granger, 2004; Harder, 1980; Jaworski, 1992; Jaworski & Sachdev, 1998; Julé, 2003, 2004; King, 2013; Stickler, Batstone, Duensing, & Heins, 2007; Zhou, Knoke, & Sakamoto, 2005), online silences can have a different quality due to a lack of information available to the participants in online communication {Stickler, 2007 #963}. Specifically in online language tutorials, a lack of feedback can have various reasons, from technical problems to a lack of L2 skills on the part of the learners, and a general reticence or shyness when speaking to virtual strangers. This presentation will, firstly, attempt to provide an overview of different types of silences present in online environments and distinguish these in aspect and causes from silences in face-to-face classrooms. Secondly, the study will show how experienced online language teachers deal with different instances of silence, how they feel about a lack of feedback, and what helps them cope with the “void”. Data for this study comes from a range of sources, including classroom observation, semi-structured and reflective interviews, and eye-tracking experiments.

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Social Engagement In The Digital Wild: Developing Intercultural Competence By Participating In Online Communities Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio 105, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Ellen Yeh Columbia College Chicago, United States eyeh@colum.edu Nicholas Swinehart University of Chicago, United States nswinehart@uchicago.edu ABSTRACT Being able to access and develop new knowledge using new information communication technology is crucial to social inclusion (Warschauer, 2003). In recent years, language learners have been increasingly exposed to online participatory cultures (e.g., social media) which allow them to engage in intercultural communication in specialized online interest communities, or "affinity spaces." These online communities take place outside of the classroom and offer language learners opportunities to explore authentic language use, construct cultural identities (Pasfield-Neofitou, 2000), and experience different learning environments (O'Dowd & Lewis, 2016). This form of online intercultural exchange has been defined as intercultural communication in the digital wild (Thorne, 2010). Language learners may be required to use these English-based social media platforms to expand their social groups and understand target language cultures, but few studies have investigated ways social media can help college-level ESL students negotiate the periphery to achieve fuller participation in local communities. This study investigates how active participation on social media can be used to promote interaction and intercultural competence in a second language. Reddit is the social media used in this study. Participants were university-level English language learners who were required to contribute a minimum number of posts or comments on a social news and discussion site, though they were free to choose their own areas of interest. Social media engagement metrics typically used in online marketing were adapted to measure the quantity and quality of online interaction generated, and participants completed a post-task questionnaire that investigated learner perceptions and attitudes about the language and communities they encountered. A corpus of social media interaction, chat conversation, and discussion thread were also analyzed. Findings and implications contribute towards best practices in developing social media literacy among language learners, enabling them to reach higher levels of participation in online communities of interest.

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Stories Of Using Social Media In Second Language Teacher Education Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 10:30 End Time: 11:00 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Ana Carolina de Laurentiis BrandĂŁo UNEMAT - State University of Mato Grosso, Brazil anabrandao@unemat.br ABSTRACT This narrative inquiry reports on blended teacher learning experiences, combining both face-to-face exchanges and online discussions via Facebook. Specifically, it discusses the impact of this social medium on the shaping of pre-service teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; professional identities. The participants are six Brazilian pre-service teachers and I. We lived alongside each other during the first year of a teacher initiation project in which I collaborated as a teacher educator. The project involved pre-service and in-service English teachers designing and implementing language teaching materials with the help of digital resources. Activities consisted of participation in face-to-face meetings and online discussions in our Facebook group, the organisation of school events, and the design and implementation of genre-based language teaching materials at two state schools. The theoretical background draws on technology normalisation and collaborative language teacher education perspectives, as well on storied views on teacher identity, knowledge and context. The field texts include written, spoken and visual narratives co-composed by the pre-service teachers and I over the course of an academic year, taking the form of journals, learning autobiographies, online interactions, recorded conversations, drawings, class observation forms, teaching plans and materials, and field notes. They are analysed for their holistic content. Via the integration of multiple media modes, Facebook became a useful space for providing the pre-service teachers with opportunities to not only reflect on their teaching assumptions and language learning biographies, but also to explore and share language teaching possibilities and resources afforded by the digital world. Moreover, it became a tool for teaching English as it inspired them to develop teaching practices using their own Facebook groups. However, the pre-service teachers were also exposed to a number of challenges, such as developing self-discipline and confidence to share their thoughts, and using digital resources for pedagogical purposes. This had a profound impact on their identities as second language teachers.

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Strengthening Indigenous Language And Cultural Identity Using Technology: Case Study Technology Showcase Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Marion Bittinger Rosetta Stone, United States mbittinger@rosettastone.com ABSTRACT There is unlimited potential to leverage web-based and mobile technologies to strengthen Indigenous language proficiency and cultural identity. In this Technology Showcase, we’ll show how we’ve used technology to enable the learning of severely endangered Indigenous languages and cultural practices. Specifically, we’ll demonstrate an innovative approach to combining heritage language instruction with cultural content to strengthen both the language (Chikashshanompa’) and the culture of the citizens of the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma. Research (Nicholas, 2008) has demonstrated the nature of the interconnectedness of Indigenous language and culture and the essential role of each in language and identity maintenance and survival. In addition, language maintenance is increasingly seen as essential to the linguistic, educational, and political sovereignty of Indigenous groups (McCarty and Lee, 2014). Web and mobile technologies offer solutions to the challenges posed by curriculum and content development for languages with few remaining speakers. Sponsored by the Chickasaw Nation at the request of its citizens, language-learning software development was undertaken through a collaboration of Chickasaw linguists, Chickasaw native speakers, the Department of Chickasaw Language of the Chickasaw Nation, and Rosetta Stone curriculum and software developers. Cultural practices such as traditional foods, celebrations, agriculture, prayers, and sports were strategically integrated with language content in order to increase learner motivation, enhance identity, and raise awareness of citizens about their ethnic heritage. This demonstration will focus on how stickball, a game central to both traditional and modern Chickasaw culture, and other cultural themes were incorporated into the language curriculum using audio, video, speech recognition technology, and other tools to achieve these goals. We examine the reactions of learners to the software since the product’s initial release in November 2016, and ongoing efforts to support Chickasaw language proficiency through the early intermediate level. Chikashshanompa’, a highly endangered Indigenous language with fewer than 50 speakers remaining, is now available free to Chickasaw Nation citizens via both online and mobile learning platforms in the form of Rosetta Stone Chickasaw. The result is a product that is a unique blend of a critically endangered Indigenous language, traditional culture, and innovative technology.

Students' Perceptions Of Studying English Online Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Facultad de Educación Gabriela Andrea Ibáñez Vásquez 188


Universidad Bernardo O'Higgins, Chile gabyandre86@gmail.com ABSTRACT This study investigates students’ perceptions concerning the effectiveness of learning English via an online platform. In the case of Chilean higher education, there is a lack of empirical evidence of online courses research and to date, there has not been agreement on whether online learning is effective or not. To affirm so, students’ perceptions are crucial to provide a suitable environment and provide a service according to their needs. This research is carried under a qualitative paradigm and it aims at evaluating the students’ perceptions associated with the effectiveness of selected features of a pilot online English course at a private university in Santiago, Chile. This private university has chosen to test the English subject in the online modality for several reasons, mainly infrastructural.In addition, the results of the present study may contribute to expanding research in the field by suggesting that online learning is likely to be judged from the students’ point of view. Also they may provide with important information to the university authorities in order to make decisions regarding the continuity of the English subject in the online modality. As a result, participants pointed out flexibility as the most important benefit of studying online while the most significant disadvantage is the lack of interaction with the teacher. Most of the students would continue studying English online, however, they graded the course with a low grade and had dissatisfied opinions about certain aspects. Inconsistencies in the answers were found while the analysis of the instruments was being carried out and despite the participants’ disconformity in some aspects, most of them are willing to continue studying online. These inconsistencies are identified as lack of autonomy and self-efficacy that lead to the higher dependency on the teacher. Furthermore, it is very likely that these issues are directly related to their family and educational backgrounds.

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Sustainability And Inter-University Collaboration In Higher Education Capacity Building For English For Specific And Academic Purposes (ESAP) Symposium Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 15:00 End Time (Part 1): 16:30 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 17.00 End Time (Part 2): 18:30 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Lut Baten Kuleuven, Belgium Lut.Baten@kuleuven.be Liliana del Pilar University of Caldas, Manizales, Colombia liliana.gallego@ucaldas.edu.co Claudia Harsch University of Bremen, Germany harsch@uni-bremen.de Ana Fernández Peraza Universidad Americana, Costa Rica anavfdezp@gmail.com Sake Jager University of Groeningen, The Netherlands s.jager@rug.n ABSTRACT Sustainability and Inter University Collaboration in Higher Education: Capacity Building for English for Specific and Academic Purposes (ESAP) How can scholars of science and technology gain ground and confidence to professionally communicate in English in a global world? In this workshop the (peda)linguistic underpinning of this growth, with both successes and pitfalls, is highlighted in order to feed an ensuing round table discussion on sustainable networks and projects. It focuses on the results of capacity building projects in which joint or dual PhD diplomas are granted, and which have been bridging and stimulating collaboration among universities worldwide, including Latin America, the results of which will be reported upon as follows:   

Introduction to International Inter University Collaboration: the approach of VLIRIUC.be to capacity building and the role of English. Lut Baten, KULeuven, Belgium. Faculty Identity and FL Planning in Higher Education. Liliana del Pilar Gallego, Universidad de Caldas, Colombia. E-learning, ESAP, and EMI in In-service Training in Iran, Ethiopia & Cuba. Maryam Asoodar, University of Maastricht, The Netherlands. 190


        

Flipping the Classroom with MOOCs. A Pilot Study Exploring Differences between Self-Regulated Learners. Vicente Guillermo Pacheco Salazar, Universidad de Cuenca, Ecuador. SPOC & Mobile Learning: a pilot study to reinforce the transversal skills of English in HE through Google Suite for Education and the use of mobile devices. Jose María Espinoza Bueno, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Perú. The Use of Corpus Linguistics in Lexical Disambiguation: A proposal for Capacity Building in Translation. Clara Alina Escalona Falcón & Alberto Enrique Acedo Bravo, Universidad de Oriente, Cuba. Assessment Literacy and Endeavors towards Certification System Claudia Harsch, University of Bremen, Germany, Ivonne Collada Peña, Universidad de la Ciencias Informáticas, Cuba. The workshop should be of interest to the following stakeholders: Latin-American language educators and researchers Students and university teaching and research staff University policy-makers, international officers, test vendors Course designers and global organisations

It will illustrate digital means and facilities for improved access and autonomy in learning and certification.

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Tapping The Potential Of Digital Technology To Transform Poster Presentations Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Jaime Selwood Hiroshima University, Japan jselwood@hiroshima-u.ac.jp Paul Lyddon Osaka Jogakuin University, Japan lyddon@wilmina.ac.jp ABSTRACT Most posters today still tend to follow a standard traditional format, relying on a paper or cloth medium to impart information in a top-down manner. Sometimes they point their viewers to outside resources, such as by providing web links or downloadable content to supplement or otherwise enhance their principal message. Yet fundamentally these elements are mere add-ons, as opposed to integral components that exploit the native capabilities of digital media. The presenters will showcase the transformative potential of digital technology to redefine the poster experience of their authors as well as their audience. Japanese university students in English composition courses were asked to choose a photo from a recent news story and then contextualize the photo by creating a digital poster using the in-image interaction application ThingLink, once on their mobile phone and again on a desktop computer. Later they shared and discussed their creations with their classmates. Not only were the poster creators more engaged in their efforts understand and communicate about their news stories, but also their classmates were more actively involved in interpreting and discussing the products. Another important finding was the need to distinguish the goals of message creation and negotiation when selecting the most appropriate digital device, as mobile phones and desktop computers demonstrated clear comparative advantages vis-Ă vis these two purposes. Visitors to this poster session will be able to download and explore not only the study data but also the ThingLink app that was used for creating the student posters. Finally, they will be offered suggestions on how they can customize the digital poster concept to fit their own unique learning environments.

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Task Design for Online Speaking Practice Colloquium Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 16:30 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Christine Appel Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain ABSTRACT Language learners need more hours of speaking practice than the contact hours any language course can offer. This presentation will introduce participants to applications and task design principles for online speaking practice. We will review a list of tools that provide opportunities for oral production and/or speaking interaction without the need for the synchronous presence of the teacher. We will then proceed to discuss task design principles for online speaking production and interaction. The starting point for task design will be the Open Educational Resources site in the SpeakApps platform (www.speakapps.eu).

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Teacher Education And Professional Development: An Investigation On The Relationship Between ICT And Identity Constitution Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Luciani Salcedo de Oliveira Universidade Federal do Pampa, Campus Bagé, Brazil lucianisalcedo@hotmail.com ABSTRACT This paper focuses on the research project “Constitution of Language Teachers Identity and the Use of ICT Resources: the education of English as an Additional Language teachers at UNIPAMPA” that is being developed in the Additional Languages Teacher Education Program of the Universidade Federal do Pampa (UNIPAMPA, Campus Bagé, Brazil) where I am a teacher educator. In this Program, teachers-to-be must, besides developing communicative competence in both English and Spanish, become additional language teachers in both languages (SCHLATTER; GARCÉZ, 2012). Taking into account that this is a huge challenge in terms of teacher professional development, this topic must be further explored (NORTON, 2000). In taking this position, the main point of this paper is checking whether the research participants perceive the possible impact of ICT resources on their learning of English as an Additional Language (EAL) as well as on becoming English teachers in Brazil. As the use of ICT resources may help us tackle questions on the identity of future EAL teachers, there is special interest on the following: How do these research participants define themselves as future EAL teachers? (How) do the ICT resources they have been using impact on their process of being/becoming teachers? (How) will this investigation help better integrate ICT resources in the Additional Languages Teacher Education Program of UNIPAMPA? Data have been collected through semi-structured interviews and video narratives with third-year students who have already completed half of their teacher education program as well as have a view about the (dis)advantages of using ICT resources. These future teachers are about to start their first supervised teaching practicum, moment in which they usually have many expectations towards teaching (FARRELL, 2001; JOHNSON, 1996). In data analysis, the lexicogrammatical choices made by the research participants will be discursively analyzed. Findings show evidence for the fact that the use of ICT resources may be very useful in terms of learning English. However, it seems there is a need of empowering future language teachers by increasing their awareness and understanding of their own learning process, and encouraging them to think critically, bringing contributions to the teaching profession.

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Teachers' Perceptions Toward Using Clilstore, A CLIL-Specific Authoring Tool And Repository Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Ana Gimeno Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Spain agimeno@upvnet.upv.es ABSTRACT Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) was recognised as a teaching methodology by the European Commission in its Communication No. 449 on Promoting Language Learning and Linguistic Diversity: An Action Plan 2004 – 2006, published in 2003. In these past years, we have witnessed how CLIL has steadily rooted its teaching principles and is slowly becoming a dominant methodology in all educational sectors that are sensitive to bilingual education. Research and reflective practice literature is currently abundant and CLIL is being the focus of an increasing amount of empirical studies proving the methodology’s worth. In line with this trend, the EU-funded Tools for CLIL Teachers project developed an online authoring tool to support the implementation of CLIL. This tool, which is known as Clilstore, can link every word in a text or a web page to freely available online dictionaries in a wealth of languages. Clilstore’s features are particularly enhanced when videos and their transcripts are embedded into the system from one of the many streaming video applications currently available. The units created within Clilstore become part of an ever-growing repository for learners and teachers alike. The EU’s policy on multilingualism mentioned above states that CLIL involves teaching a curricular subject through the medium of a language other than that normally used. The subject can be entirely unrelated to language learning, delivered in a bilingual context, or include a language learning component serving a dual purpose, that of the subject matter and that of a foreign language. This poster discusses the findings and conclusions drawn from a post teacher training course questionnaire, which lead us to believe that a) teachers are willing to adopt CLIL in their classes and to collaborate with language specialists to put this dual-focus methodology into practice, and b) Clilstore is perceived as a useful tool in order to create, publish and deliver learning materials that aid in conducting dual-focused teaching by supporting content learning as well as foreign language learning.

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Teachers' Shared Reflection On The Dimensions Of Telecollaboration Colloquium Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 17:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec João Telles Universidade Estadual Paulista, Brazil ABSTRACT This colloquium will have participant groups of teachers reflecting on four dimensions of foreign language telecollaboration through teletandem: (a) the linguistic, (b) the cultural, (c) the learners' relationship and (d) the implementation dimensions. Questions and issues will be raised by the groups of teachers and, then, shared with the colloquium coordinator and a group institutional coordinators of foreign language telecollaborative projects from the United States (Michael Ferreira - Georgetown University), Brazil (Rozana Messias - São Paulo State University), Italy (Paola Leone - Università del Salento), France (Souhila Griffi - Aix-Marseille Université), and Mexico (Adelia Peña Clavel - UNAM - Universidad Autónoma de México).

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Teachers’ Perceptions Of Technology Use For Raising Students’ Intercultural Awareness Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 17:10 End Time: 17:40 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Tiare Alejandra González-Vidal University of Queensland, Australia t.gonzalezvidal@uqconnect.edu.au Paul Moore University of Queensland, Australia p.moore5@uq.edu.au ABSTRACT Recent debates as to the roles of technologies in language and culture learning are informed by research which ‘zooms in’ on learners’ moment-by-moment experience (Levy, 2015). Nonetheless, this research often ignores the fact that the here and now reported or experienced by learners is embedded in educational contexts which themselves are informed, and constrained, by national language policies. This is the case of secondary EFL education in Chile, where culture and technology policies have developed separately, without providing teachers with an awareness as to the promotion of a critical understanding of cultural differences among students with the affordances of technology-mediated communication (curriculum en línea, 2017). Acknowledging the need for ‘zooming out’ to truly ‘close in’ on the learner’s experience, this study explored 51 EFL secondary teachers’ perceptions of culture and technology use to enhance students’ intercultural awareness in Chile. Specifically, this study investigated (1) teachers’ cultural views, content and technology-based tasks implemented, (2) web 2.0 frequency of use for intercultural learning (3) and barriers of implementation. A mixed-method design was adopted that included online questionnaires and interviews as data collection tools and descriptive statistical and thematic content analyses were conducted. In the online survey, findings revealed that most participants reported a moderate overall use of web 2.0 tools for culture learning purposes. YouTube, social network platforms and online games were reported as the most frequently implemented, while, blogs, forums and wikis, were used infrequently. Interestingly, interviews reported a much different reality: teachers use YouTube and social networks less frequently than they indicated in the online questionnaires and for enhancing grammar and vocabulary learning. These inconsistencies seemed to be associated by teachers to differences in terms of policy priorities, time, training, resources provision and students’ attitude. This study concludes that there is a need to periodically reassess the theoretical principles underpinning a country’s EFL language policies, mechanisms by which such policies are communicated, and the mechanisms used by stakeholders at a macro and micro-level, and contextual factors influencing the implementation of policies aimed at the integration of language, culture and technology education.

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Teaching And Learning Language Through Social Networks Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Hom Raj Khadka ETC Banke, Nepal khadka.homraj@yahoo.com Sharmila Paudel English Access NELTA Kaski Nepal, Nepal sarmilapoudel853@gmail.com ABSTRACT Recently the Internet has come to influence and control our lives. How is this affecting the language we teach? There is already a widespread opinion that the Internet is bad for the future of language. However, from perspective of technological integration in teaching and learning of English Language, Internet which is the best tools for using technology has encouraged a dramatic expansion in the variety and creativity of language. Flexibility and resourceful learning is extremely considered while teaching and learning through using technology. Great motivational and learners oriented resources are used for interactive and wide discussion so that learners will get ample opportunities to develop their capacity and comprehensive power for comprehending ideas and information. Moreover diverse cultural ideas and crosscultural communication through global participation is the best opportunities and practice for developing sharing culture which is the best way for learning and teaching in this 21st century. Therefore, in this presentation, I will introduce practical classroom activities that will help teenage students to develop all their lin-guistic skills through social networking apps and websites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Edmodo, youtube, Blog and webquest .Participants will learn how to adapt and use memes, viral videos, live stories, etc. to teach English as a foreign language.

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Telecollaborative Discourses: Examining L2 Learners’ Attitudes Towards The L2 Culture Symposium Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de Ingeniería Ana Oskoz University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), United States aoskoz@umbc.edu Marta González-Lloret University of Hawai`i, Manoa, United States marta@hawaii.edu Ana Gimeno Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Spain agimeno@upvnet.upv.es Margarita Vinagre Universidad Autonomia de Madrid, Spain margarita.vinagre@uam.es ABSTRACT The extensive research on learners’ cultural reflections in telecollaborative environments illustrates an indisputable interest in intercultural communicative competence (Byram, 1997) in foreign language (FL) education (Guth & Helm, 2014; Helm, 2013; O’Dowd, 2016; Turula, 2017). These studies have included content analysis, end-of-project questionnaires, interviews and attitudinal surveys, as well as microanalysis of data from both interactional and linguistic approaches to study the development of intercultural competence (Belz, 2003; Tudini & Liddicoat, 2013; Vinagre & Corral, 2017). Following a microanalysis approach applying Byram’s (1997) intercultural competence model and Martin and White’s (2005) appraisal framework, the three presentations in this symposium analyze data from three different bilingual (English and Spanish) telecollaborative projects which used different technological tools (online forums, word clouds, and email) to mediate between university students in the US and Spain. Following the appraisal framework (Martin & White, 2005), the first study (Maryland-Valencia) examines L2 learners’ linguistic markers (affect, judgment, and appreciation) to examine learners’ attitudes towards their own culture and that of the L2 in their online forum discussions. The quantitative and qualitative results illustrate that, albeit reluctant to present negative evaluative values of the L2 culture, learners engaged in discursive practices that enhanced intercultural communication. The second study (Hawaii-Madrid) examines the creation and manipulation of word clouds to promote intercultural awareness. Using Conversation Analysis to find sequences of collaboration with indications of critical cultural awareness (Byram, 1997), this study demonstrates the effectiveness of word clouds and how intercultural awareness can be seen in the different sequences of telecollaboration. Combining both the appraisal framework (Martin & White, 2005) and Byram’s (1997) model of intercultural competence, the third study (Madrid-New York) examines how L2 learners used evaluative language in their samples of attitudinal markers that ultimately led to intercultural competence. Preliminary findings suggest that the participants used similar evaluative tokens in their email interactions, a fact that could be understood as a strategy to converge by adapting to the partners’ communicative practices. The three bilingual presentations will also address pedagogical implications for the successful incorporation of these tools within telecollaborative projects to promote intercultural awareness. 199


Text-To-Speech Synthesis And L2 Education: Focus On Pronunciation Symposium Friday, November 16th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Fernanda Soler Urzúa McGill University, Canada fernanda.solerurzua@mail.mcgill.ca Walcir Cardoso Concordia University, Canada walcir.cardoso@concordia.ca Jennica Grimshaw Concordia University, Canada jennica.grimshaw@gmail.com Tiago Bione Concordia University, Canada tiagobione@gmail.com Jeremy Lane Concordia University, Canada jdolane@gmail.com ABSTRACT The purpose of this symposium is to provide an overview of current research on text-to-speech synthesizers (TTS; also known as “text readers”) as pedagogical tools in L2 education, emphasizing their suitability for L2 pronunciation instruction in English-as-a-foreign-language contexts. The presentations included in this panel will allow for an assessment of how this type of technology can assist L2 learning in contexts where access to English aural input is limited or non-existent (e.g., Brazil, Chile and rural Quebec - Canada). The range of research that will be presented include: (a) the assessment of TTS voices in terms of comprehensibility, naturalness and accuracy (as defined by Derwin & Munro, 2005); (b) TTS role in raising L2 phonological awareness of English segments with a high functional load (e.g., the vowels /i/ and /I/ as in ‘beat’ and ‘bit’ respectively); (c) the use of TTS for accent comprehension training under the High Variability Phonetic Training model (Logan, Lively & Pisoni, 1991; Wong, 2014); and (d) suitability of TTS as a pedagogical tool for the phonological acquisition of English past -ed allomorphy (as observed in the pronunciation of the following past forms: walk[t], listen[d] and visit[id]). The discussion will emphasize the potential of TTS as a complement to L2 pronunciation instruction, particularly its ability to enhance learners’ exposure to aural input and to promote autonomous learning anytimeanywhere, beyond the boundaries of the language classroom.

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The Adoption Of Metacognitive Strategies As Predictors Of Success Among Online Business English Students In Ecuador. Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Christopher Allen Linnaeus University, Sweden christopher.allen@lnu.se Maria del Carmen BoloĂąa LĂłpez Universidad Casa Grande, Ecuador contacts_@hotmail.com ABSTRACT This presentation explores the extent to which online business English trainees are able to adopt specific metacognitive strategies stemming from work in learner autonomy and language learning strategies in accordance with the framework put forward by Oxford (1990) and Chamot and O'Malley (1990) and furthermore whether the adoption of specific strategies can serve as predictors of success in the completion of a Moodle-based workshop. While there is an extensive research literature on language learning strategies from f2f teaching and mainstream language education, the adoption of strategies in purely online and asynchronous contexts has received less attention. The study focuses on academic progress on a Moodle-based ESP workshop for Business English and Entrepreneurship offered by a university in Ecuador. The workshop, running over a three week period, was aimed at exam preparation and project management. The students, all business professionals (profesionalizantes) studying online alongside full-time working commitments, followed a skills and content-based workshop in business English proficiency. The workshop included the selection of self-study resources related to effective communication in business organisations, business writing and entrepreneurship. The workshop also focused on business environments, operations and business tools with a focus on business project management. A final component of the workshop addressed business enterprise, leadership and the fostering of entrepreneurship. Specific language skills in focus included the receptive skills of reading and listening and the productive skills of email writing and oral presentations. Following the completion of the workshop, professionals were interviewed in Spanish about their adoption of metacognitive strategies in developing learner autonomy through the university's Moodle VLE site. Metacognitive strategies were identified in advance based on a previous study (Allen and BoloĂąa Lopez 2018) and included time organization, learning management, progress monitoring in response to teacher feedback and reflective assessment on learning. On the basis of interview responses, students were assigned to various categories depending on their perceived adoption of specific strategies. Using the results from the Cambridge Business English Preliminary Test administered at the end of the workshop by the university, the strategy categories best predicting success on the test were identified.

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The Design And Use Of A Bilingual Essay Corpus Research & Development Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Sumie Akutsu Toyo University, Japan akutsu@toyo.jp ABSTRACT This presentation discusses the design and rationale behind creating a bilingual essay corpus of Japanese university students’ writings. The presentation outlines this work-in-progress project with an online writing system and analytical tools specifically developed for compiling the corpus. The paper also discusses the advantages of using a bilingual approach to compile a leaner corpus and examines the results of preliminary analysis, finding common errors and difficulties among learners’ English based on the results of the study. The language education field has criticised the traditional grammar translation approach, which has been widely used in general English teaching in Japan for many years (Cook, 1998; Larsen-Freeman & Anderson, 2011), while there is academic literature that supports this view with the use of L1 as an effective teaching and learning tool in foreign language teaching (Witte et al., 2009; Zojer, 2009). In order to stimulate the cognitive potential of learners, the use of L1 cannot be avoided so it should be used effectively by applying the newest research outcomes. In an EFL context where lack of exposure to language use is often regarded as a disadvantage to develop the learners' communicative competence, the effective use of L1 is a meaningful way for students to properly learn about specific linguistic and cultural differences while developing their communicative skills. In terms of L1 interference related errors, the tendencies seem to be caused by L1, but to validate the L1 specific errors, a comparison of the bilingual texts can make a meaningful contribution base of the language usage differences compared and traced in the bilingual corpus. In this paper, an approach using learners’ first language to cultivate a learning strategy will be suggested together with some analysis of the task’s outcomes. For this purpose, the objectives of this project and rationale of the approach will be explained first. The functions of the bilingual essay corpus website will be described with some sample texts by students. Finally, in conclusion, the advantages of creating a bilingual corpus will be discussed with the purpose of contrastive analysis to find common errors made by Japanese students.

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The Impact Of Blended Professional Development On Rethinking Teaching Practices Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent María Carolina Orgnero Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina carolina.orgnero@unc.edu.ar ABSTRACT Traditional professional development (PD) is characterized by short sessions in which the trainer, rather than the participants, is usually active during the presentations. When the trainer is active, participants may not benefit from hands-on activities that contribute to long lasting learning. This may explain why many educators that participate in these trainings do not show significant changes in their teaching practices. A departure from this traditional model was implemented at Facultad de Lenguas at Universidad Nacional de Córdoba. Blended professional development trainings lasted 6 weeks with an initial face-to-face meeting followed by four asynchronous meetings that ended with another faceto-face encounter. Training content combined a literacy approach and an instrumental perspective. The purpose of this poster is to share the design of the model, sample activities and insights that participants shared during the training. Preliminary results of the implementation of this blended professional development model suggest changes in professors´ perceptions about the integration of technology into their classes.

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The Impact Of The Use Of Video Games As An Instructional Resource On Adult Learners' Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition And Investment In EFL Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Simón Cerda Acuña Universidad de Playa Ancha, Chile simon.cerda@alumnos.upla.cl Camila Correa Ramírez Universidad de Playa Ancha, Chile camila.correa@alumnos.upla.cl Sandy Isla Gutiérrez Universidad de Playa Ancha, Chile sandy.isla@alumnos.upla.cl Andrés Otárola Maldonado Universidad de Playa Ancha, Chile andres.otarola@alumnos.upla.cl ABSTRACT This investigation looks to provide a new, engaging tool to help EFL learners acquire vocabulary in a way that differs from traditional methods. The main purpose of our investigation is to observe how video games affect learners’ investment and incidental vocabulary acquisition. For this reason, we chose freshmen students from the Multilingual Tourism Administration major from Playa Ancha University, Valparaíso. The study had three participants, two of whom played collaboratively and one who played individually during 12 one hour sessions. Each participant had to answer three oral interviews and two written Vocabulary Recall Tests. The interviews allowed us to understand the people we worked with. Meanwhile, the first vocabulary tests gave us a clear idea of their vocabulary range. The results were contrasted to those of the second vocabulary test at the end of the process to observe their progress. All words included in the tests were taken directly from the game. The game chosen was The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time, because of its focus on contextual clues for progression and critical success to help draw a positive response from the players. At the end of the study, there was a big difference between the results obtained from the first and second vocabulary tests, as well as the different achievements in both cases. In the collaborative case, one of the participant showed an improvement in their vocabulary range, showing more confidence in the new words she had learned, while the other displayed an improvement in her gaming proficiency, managing to perform actions and solve problems her partner was unable to. Although the participant in the individual case did not show a wide vocabulary range in the first test, there was an improvement by the end of the process despite several obstacles. The final results show that video games can have a positive impact on learners’ vocabulary acquisition and investment.

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The Impact Of Using Memrise On Students’ Vocabulary Learning And Their Perceptions To Support Practices In The Teaching Of Vocabulary Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Italo Daniel Jara Parra Universidad San Sebastián, Chile idanieljara@gmail.com ABSTRACT The need for learning English in the Chilean context has gradually risen over time. Moreover, vocabulary is known to be a crucial part to avoid communication breakdowns in English. The use of technology to learn English is known as Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) and on that note, many popular technological resources promise to ease the task of vocabulary learning. Furthermore, there is a wide range of research conducted to test the effectiveness of technology on vocabulary learning. However, more testing is needed to prove the effectiveness of Mobile learning compared to traditional teaching methods and students’ beliefs towards these tools in the Chilean higher education context. Accordingly, the aim of this on-going project is to analyse the effectiveness of a vocabulary learning mobile application called Memrise on students’ performance on a vocabulary test and also to know their perceptions about its use in the EFL classroom. In order to do so, a quasi-experimental design will be used. Two groups of students will learn a set of words using traditional classroom teaching methods. Next, some words are to be selected and each group will study different words using the mobile application of this resource. Data collection will be carried out by means of a vocabulary test as well as a beliefs survey that will be answered by 50 students from a private university in the city of Concepcion, Bio-Bio region. These students are part of the English for General Purposes course from the Essential Training program. Data from tests and surveys will be statistically analysed to understand how results were affected through the use of the resource. Findings of the study are expected to present practical implications for teachers of English to have a wider understanding of how technology can positively contribute to supporting their practices. Moreover, it will serve as a basis for further research on how learning can be enhanced through technology, so that students can succeed in the learning of a foreign language.

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The Impact Of WhatsApp As A Tool To Develop Writing Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Ebru Noyan Batman University, Turkey ebru.noyan@gmail.com Zeynep Kocoglu Yeditepe University, Turkey zbkocoglu@yeditepe.edu.tr ABSTRACT This study attempts to explore the effects of WhatsApp and Pen and Paper dialogue journaling techniques on university studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; writing performance in English and also to compare their efficacy in terms of both writing success and studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attitudes toward the incorporation of these techniques in EFL classes. Forty-five freshmen students divided in 3 homogenous groups of 15, namely WhatsApp dialogue journaling (WDJ), pen and paper dialogue journaling (PapDJW) and control group, participated to the study. The two experiment groups (WDJ and PapDJW) received 12 treatment sessions having the same topics in each session while the control group had no treatment except weekly class requirements. During each session, students in WDJ group were expected to create online dialogues on the previously provided topics by the researcher through an online WhatsApp group on their smartphones in contrast to PapDJW group who were rather required to respond their teacher with almost one page individual entries regarding the same topics as the compared group.

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The Importance Of Integrating Didactical Methods And New Technologies Technology Showcase Friday, November 16th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Maren Pauli Lesson Nine GmbH/Babbel, Germany mpauli@babbel.com ABSTRACT The educational system has reached a new era for self-learners in which technology plays an increasingly prominent role. New technologies such as apps and online learning help people integrate language learning into their busy schedules, making it possible to learn whenever and wherever they want (e.g. on smartphones). But what are the challenges of creating a digital self-learning product? Big data and machine learning have been considered as problem solvers and some apps even claim to be able to eradicate didactical methods, promising learning success without them. But ultimately, people want to be able to talk to humans – not to machines. This is why Babbel puts didactics first; it will remain the gold standard for teaching languages. People should be able to communicate in real life with real people. In order to do so, Babbel integrates proven didactical methods and new technology. Instead of teaching abstract sentences, vocabulary and grammatical rules, the app teaches through real-life phrases and dialogues. Beginners start with typical greetings like, “Hello, how are you?” and gradually build up to practical sentences like, “How can I book a single room?” This method of learning through conversation teaches vocabulary and grammar both actively and passively. Babbel guides the brain to connect the dots by passively learning new information based on the dialogue’s context. This empowers you to actively use passively learned words, giving you the confidence to start talking right away. Another important method that combines technology, didactical methods and personal experience is the use of spaced repetition. To send information from the short-term to the long-term memory, Babbel reintroduces words the user has learned through six memory stages. The data-driven ‘Review Manager’ moves these words through different patterns that are spaced out, allowing the brain to optimally store new knowledge. A study has confirmed that it works. Researchers from the City University of New York assessed the efficacy of Babbel’s Spanish courses. Users need on average 21 hours of study in a two-month period to cover the requirements for one college semester of Spanish.

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The Individual Innovativeness Theory: A Framework For CALL Research Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Claudia Beatriz Monte Jorge Martins UTFPR, Brazil claudiab@utfpr.edu.br ABSTRACT Despite the ubiquity of technology in educational institutions, CALL is still an innovation in the language area in several contexts and for several language teachers in several parts of the world. One of the main theories that explains the process of change is Rogersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; (1995) Diffusion of Innovations theory. It is recognized as the most comprehensive work in the area and has been widely used as a theoretical framework in studies on the diffusion and adoption of innovations. Although applied linguistics is not among the major diffusion research disciplines, the CALL field has used it as its theoretical framework in a small number of studies. The theory consists of several sub-theories or interrelated theories. One of them is the Individual Innovativeness Theory. It states that some individuals are more innovative than others and will adopt an innovation earlier than the majority of the group. It is a relative dimension, a continuous variable that is partitioned into categories, essentially a conceptual design. According to it, there are five adopter categories: innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards. The objective of this presentation is to bring in the Individual Innovativeness Theory and show how it can be applied in CALL research, mainly to investigate teachers and their relationship and view of technology. The results of two studies will be reported. In one of them the theory was used to select participants for the qualitative phase of a mixed methods study that analysed the factors that determine CALL integration in foreign language (FL) university classrooms in Brazil. The other study described the technological profile of FL teachers from Modern Languages university courses of the state of ParanĂĄ, Brazil. Results showed that by focusing on the five adopter categories it is possible to establish new strategies to improve CALL integration and long-term planning. They provided a good starting-off point to understand teachers and their relationship with technology. The choice of the Individual Innovativeness Theory was an attempt to throw new light on the issue of CALL integration and it showed that this theory can provide a theoretical foundation for the CALL field.

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The Learning Potential Of Podcasting In A Mobile World Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Jaime Selwood Hiroshima University, Japan jselwood@hiroshima-u.ac.jp ABSTRACT Podcasting can be an inexpensive, beneficial and portable technology that offers language-learners, as well as students of other disciplines, the opportunity to access specially prepared authentic language content whenever and wherever it is convenient. Additionally, the huge growth in the number of mobile devices globally, particularly smartphones, has created a powerful opportunity for educators to exploit these high ownership levels for the benefit of the learning process, but without the need to incur expensive additional costs. The expansion of the mobile Internet also provides a potentially potent platform for podcasts to be efficiently accessed via mobile devices. Figures indicate that by the end of 2018 up to 55% of all global Internet access will be through mobiledevices. Additionally, with approximately 125,000 English language podcasts available to download, this partnership of podcasts and mobile devices can offer learners convenient access to authentic language learning materials. The presenter will introduce detailed analysis of ongoing research into the practical benefits and drawbacks of podcasting, specifically at the university level. The aim of this research was to observe the positives and negatives of using podcasts and mobile technology as an integral part of language-learning courses. Over a five-year period into the effectiveness of podcasts carried out by the presenter, detailed feedback indicates that 83% of students had a favourable disposition towards the use of podcasts as part of their learning process. Drawing on experience gained during the last six years of publishing a free weekly language-learning podcast; the presenter will highlight what is required and what should be avoided, when designing and publishing podcasts. By exploiting free, easy to use and multi-language mobile apps and computer technology the process of creating a highquality podcast does not need to be expensive or complicated. The presentation will include details of an ongoing synchronised learning course that shows how university students completed to high level of success a project to develop and publish their own educational podcasts. Finally, a step-by-step guide will be offered in the presentation that will detail useful mobile-technology that has the potential to be adapted by educators to fit different learning environments.

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The Pleasure Of Authorship In Designing CALL Materials: How To Make It Happen Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Vilson J. Leffa Universidade Católica de Pelotas, Brazil leffav@gmail.com André Firpo Beviláqua Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil andre.firpo@gmail.com Alan Ricardo Costa Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Brazil alan.dan.ricardo@gmail.com Vanessa Ribas Fialho Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Brazil vanessafialho@gmail.com ABSTRACT The literature on why teachers should design their own teaching materials has typically listed as advantages, not found on off-the-shelf materials, some aspects such as the ability of responding to contextualization, student needs, personalization and timeliness. One aspect, which has not been emphasized by the literature, and which we suspect has a strong effect on the sustainability of teacher-prepared materials, is the pleasure teachers may derive from designing their own resources. To check that out, we collected data from three online courses on the production of Open Educational Resources (OERs), taught between 2015 and 2017 to 85 teachers of English and Spanish as a foreign language from various parts of Brazil. The assembled corpus of 597 pages included comments posted by teachers on their own experience in preparing the materials, their opinions of other teachers’ materials, calls for help and spontaneous assistance on how to solve logistic problems in preparing the activities. The approach to analyze the corpus follows the clue-based method, as proposed by Ginzburg, in which we looked for words and expressions that could suggest signs of authoring pleasure, including examples such as “I loved it.”, “It’s addicting.”, “I did it!”. After some incursions into the corpus, attempting different classifications of lexical groupings, we ended up with four categories, which, in our opinion, were accountable for the unequivocal emergence of pleasure in designing CALL materials: (1) discovering OERs, (2) feeling empowered by the authoring tool, (3) developing mass collaboration and (4) reaching self-realization. The idea of an open educational approach in which teachers could store their materials in a public repository and share them to be used by other teachers, waving them with the possibility of saving some of their limited time, seemed to have a special appeal for them. Some suggestions on how to organize training courses on materials design are also advanced, centered on the following directives, which will be explained in detail in our presentation: (1) don’t talk about the objectives, demonstrate them; (2) create a balance between competitiveness and collaboration; and (3) provide for the epic win.

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The Role Of ELT+IT In Promoting Global Collaboration And Networking Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Victor Hugo Rojas Bautista UNMSM & UNE, Peru vrojasb@unmsm.edu.pe ABSTRACT Teachers are expected to facilitate learning and make learning meaningful to individual learners rather than just to provide knowledge and language skills. Recent researches of innovative learning technologies have provided new challenges to teaching professional development, at the same time, have set more demands on teachers to be prepared for using these technologies in their dayly teaching tasks. This talk will show how Information Technology has brought new opportunities for teacher development. Nowadays, the Net is full of websites, web tools, and networks for promoting international collaboration and networking in education; in this regard, we will focus on how ELT + IT offers a wide range of options from formal courses to self- professional development. In addition, we will reflect on the future of technologies applied to language teacher development.

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The Scrolling Cloze Test As A Measurement Tool Research & Development Friday, November 16th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Thomas Robb Kyoto Sangyo University, Japan trobb@cc.kyoto-su.ac.jp ABSTRACT The Scrolling Cloze activity displays text on the screen at a steady pace with some words replaced with blanks. Colored buttons on the screen matching the color of the blank, display the selection possibilities. Students need to select the appropriate word before the blank disappears from the screen. They are scored for both time taken and accuracy of choice. The activity has been used to measure improvement in overall language ability, as a quick placement test, as well as a simple, yet challenging language practice activity for students. The content is configurable by the instructor. The activity is browser-based so works on any mobile device as well as desktop computers. The original activity was funded by a Ministry grant in order to assess how well students could predict coming words based on their current knowledge of the language but quickly found a use as a relatively accurate vehicle for placement at reading levels.

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The Use Of A Mobile Application To Raise Vocabulary Awareness In Academic Contexts Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Juan Daniel Molina Farfán Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Chile jmolina@ucsc.cl Marcelo Careaga Butter Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Chile mcareaga@ucsc.cl ABSTRACT Learning vocabulary is essential to acquire a second language (L2) (Nation, 2001, Schmitt, 2008). It is more relevant when it comes to students of a pedagogical training program that teaches that L2. The objective of this work is to present a mixed pedagogical model to favor lexical learning in English using Duolingo. The use of this application has been investigated based on the translation for the learning of a language (García, 2013) and as a complement in the curriculum (Munday, 2016). This model considers the principles of knowledge management to strengthen autonomous, collaborative and ubiquitous learning in students of English pedagogy at a Chilean university. Digital technologies inside and outside the classroom can be a contribution to strengthen lexical learning at the student's pace. Learning vocabulary with a mobile application such as Duolingo opposes acquisition-oriented methods in efficiency studies (Krashen, 2014). The results of research on perception of the application suggest that including Duolingo in the classroom strengthens and dynamizes the learning of vocabulary. The model installs new strategies to interact with the technologies in the context of learning an L2 (Contreras, Molina et al, 2016).

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The Use Of Academic Corpora In Pre-Service Teacher Education Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 09:30 End Time (Part 1): 11:00 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 13:00 Edificio CFRD Room PC3 Juan Daniel Molina Farfán Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Chile jmolina@ucsc.cl María Graciela Badilla Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Chile mbadilla@ucsc.cl ABSTRACT The aim of this pre-conference worshop is to present different free online resources to improve Collaborative Academic Writing using a series of lexical tools that will raise academic vocabulary awareness in university students. It provides teacher trainer with new ideas to teach academic vocabulary in the 21st century classroom. From the lexical perspective and the studies done in the field of corpus linguistics, the audience is provided with the research base to support vocabulary teaching in the new virtual contexts. It also gives the participants the opportunity to explore online resources as well as some practical tips and activities to teach vocabulary items and collocations. The session is divided into three modules: Module 1 The importance of teaching vocabulary, which presents the research base on vocabulary acquisition (Cobb, 2010; Lewis, 2003; Nation, 2013; Ur, 1996). Module 2 Teaching vocabulary in the 21st century. It considers the skills both the students and teachers must have during the digital or media age. Module 3 Practical ideas to teach vocabulary items or collocations. It suggests some free online resources, hands-on activities, to teach vocabulary and collocations. Handouts will be given to each participant. The different tasks and activities are suggested in order to increase lexical awareness, word list practice and vocabulary acquisition through the use of online resources. At the end of the session, the participants should upload and share his or her proposals to teach vocabulary items in a 21st century classroom.

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The Use Of Academic Corpora In Pre-Service Teacher Education Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 13:00 Edificio CFRD Room PC3 Juan Daniel Molina Farfán Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Chile jmolina@ucsc.cl María Graciela Badilla Universidad Católica de la Santísima Concepción, Chile mbadilla@ucsc.cl ABSTRACT The aim of this pre-conference worshop is to present different free online resources to improve Collaborative Academic Writing using a series of lexical tools that will raise academic vocabulary awareness in university students. It provides teacher trainer with new ideas to teach academic vocabulary in the 21st century classroom. From the lexical perspective and the studies done in the field of corpus linguistics, the audience is provided with the research base to support vocabulary teaching in the new virtual contexts. It also gives the participants the opportunity to explore online resources as well as some practical tips and activities to teach vocabulary items and collocations. The session is divided into three modules: Module 1 The importance of teaching vocabulary, which presents the research base on vocabulary acquisition (Cobb, 2010; Lewis, 2003; Nation, 2013; Ur, 1996). Module 2 Teaching vocabulary in the 21st century. It considers the skills both the students and teachers must have during the digital or media age. Module 3 Practical ideas to teach vocabulary items or collocations. It suggests some free online resources, hands-on activities, to teach vocabulary and collocations. Handouts will be given to each participant. The different tasks and activities are suggested in order to increase lexical awareness, word list practice and vocabulary acquisition through the use of online resources. At the end of the session, the participants should upload and share his or her proposals to teach vocabulary items in a 21st century classroom.

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The Use Of Database In The Conventional Classrooms Of Spanish Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 10:15 End Time: 10:45 Edificio CFRD, Room PC1 Takeshi Kakihara Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan tkakihara@kwansei.ac.jp Kenichi Kamiya Osaka Institut of Technology, Japan kmyken1@gmail.com ABSTRACT In this presentation, the authors explain the situation of teaching Spanish at Japanese universities and points out its characteristics and problems. Then, the authors propose as a solution, the use of tools developed by this investigation group in a traditional classroom setting. In many Japanese universities, Spanish is offered as one of the second foreign language subjects. Although the classroom environment differs from university to university, in many cases, Spanish is taught according to a conventional teacher-centered pedagogy in a classroom size of 30 to 50 students. Therefore, the method that is often adopted is grammar-translation. However, this method used for large size classes can discourage student participation. Furthermore, due to lack of time, teachers tend to concentrate on explaining grammar structures and verb conjugations. To prevent classes from becoming monotonous and boring, and to encourage students to participate actively in such circumstances, the use of simple digital tools can be very effective. Memorizing verb conjugations is one of the difficult goals for students who learn Spanish as a foreign language, but it is also an inevitable step. To minimize the study load of the students and to keep their attention, we have developed a tool that can be easily used in a conventional classroom. As not all foreign language teachers have sufficient computer skills and many classrooms do not have state-of-the-art equipment, first, we developed a simple computer program to show conjugation tables and conjugated verb forms at random. This program uses a database saved in a Microsoft Excel file to which a teacher can add any verb and conjugations that he or she wants. So, a teacher can use this program as auxiliary material for a conventional textbook. Some other tools, such as one that generates multiple-choice questions from the contents of the database, and which also can be used in a traditional classroom, will be demonstrated in this presentation. Finally, the impression of the teachers and students will be shared.

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The Use Of ICTs As A Resource For Teacher Training Program In A Brazilian Context Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Jaime Baeza, Edificio Empreudec Paula Graciano Pereira Instituto Federal de Goiás - IFG, Brazil paula.pereira@ifg.edu.br ABSTRACT This study aims to present a teaching project developed as part of a program called 'Applied Technologies to Teaching and Learning’ at the Federal Institute of Goiás (IFG), Brazil. The project stands on the integration of ICT in the training of language teachers, through the design and application of webquest, a methodology that enables the use of resources from the internet itself as well as the integration of friendly applications such as hot potatoes, kahoot and surveymonkey. The study was conducted from 2016 to 2018, with undergraduation students from a Teacher Training Portuguese Course at IFG and it was sustained on sociocultural theory (ANTÓN, DICAMILLA, 1999, FIGUEIREDO, 2006, ROMMETVIET, 1985; VYGOTSKY, 1998) and studies that deal with the use of media resources in the context of language teaching and learning, especially the fact that interactions mediated by technological tools are seen as opportunities for socialization and linguistic production (ARAÚJO, 2013, CHINNERY, 2014, LEFFA, 2006, OLIVEIRA, 2013, PAIVA 2001a, 2001b, 2001c, WARSCHAUER, 1996). As the project proposal, students had to create a virtual class from introduction to conclusion on a topic chosen by them and to insert on it multimodal virtual tools. Afterwards, they had to apply the site to a class of high school students to validate the teaching practice allied to the use of ICTs. The results of the study show that students held positive attitudes toward the use of ICTs as teaching and learning resources. The design of the site amplifies student’s autonomy and the sense of security in the use of ICTs in their future teaching practice. The webquests classes produced showed a variety of web tools and their applications were positive among high school students, those of which revealed have little presence of ICTs in their classes. This fact collaborates to the importance of insertion of ICT in the context of teacher training so that the future teacher will have the knowledge and motivation to insert them in their pedagogical practice.

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The Use Of Soramimi For Native Like English Pronunciation In Japanese Students Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Ryo Hajika Ritsumeikan University, Japan is0274hf@ed.ritsumei.ac.jp Ryosuke Yamanishi Ritsumeikan University, Japan ryama@media.ritsumei.ac.jp Jeremy White Ritsumeikan University, Japan jwhite@fc.ritsumei.ac.jp ABSTRACT Listening to music in a foreign language is one way we can acquire the language informally. However, when listening to music in a foreign language, misunderstandings of the lyrics due to similar sounds in our native language can often take place. This phenomenon is known as soramimi and can in fact be used as a means for teaching native like English pronunciation to Japanese English language learners. In this presentation, the speakers will describe the results and discuss the potential of soramimi in training Japanese students to speak English more naturally based on the collection of 160 pairs of words or phrases with phonetic interchangeability. A computer program was developed by the researchers to verify the English phrases which were more phonetically similar to their corresponding soramimi phrase in Japanese than its “Katakana-English” phrase, the common phonetic pronunciation used for English spoken by Japanese. This was done by comparing the phrases to the Levenshtein distance and the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA). The presenters will illustrate that the average of the Levenshtein distance between English phrases and soramimi phrases were 10 to 30 percent smaller than the ones between English phrases and Katakana-English phrases. After conducting a t-test, the researchers were able to confirm that there were significant differences between the two and show that soramimi phrases are more likely to be similar to native English pronunciation than Katakana-English. Normalization and variance of the calculated Levenshtein distance showed that soramimi phrases are more closely related compared to “Katakana-English” phrases. The presentation will go on to demonstrate how this research can be used to teach more native like English pronunciation to Japanese learners of English by presenting a selection of examples to the audience. The presentation will conclude with a discussion on how this research could be implemented at a class level using computer based and mobile applications.

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The Use Of Whatsapp To Learn English In The Amazon Poster Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Walkyria Magno E Silva Federal University of Pará, Brazil walkyriamagno@gmail.com Allana Lima Federal University of Pará, Brazil allanalima44@hotmail.com Jean Roberto Luz da Silva Federal University of Pará, Brazil roberto.jean.silva@gmail.com ABSTRACT The use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) as smartphones, tablets, as well as netbooks - has been part of our daily routine. This fact has been taken into consideration in education through a strand of ICTs and it is called Mobile Learning. This approach refers to the use of ICTs to learn in different places and time by learners. According to Oliveira et al (2014), Mobile Learning in language learning enhances learners’ autonomy, mobility, and flexibility. Based on that, this article aims to report the preliminary findings of a work in progress which is an innovative Mobile Learning experience using the WhatsApp application as a tool to create a virtual learning environment for twenty-nine (29) English learners from the Federal University of Pará (FUP). The project, which is called “English in the Palm of your Hand”, is linked to the Autonomous Learning Support Base (ALSB), the FUP’s language learning self-access center. This preliminary research experience lasted a month and it provided activities covering the four language skills each week by using digital materials and exploring all the WhatsApp resources such as videos, texts, messages, images, audios and files. A questionnaire and an interview with open-response items were administered in order to collect learners’ impressions considering the activities proposed, the digital materials available, the activity management, as well as the potential of the App to provide language learning. This study has been carried out on the perspective of the qualitative paradigm. Results show that the use of WhatsApp in a mobile learning experience has the potential to increase learners’ motivation and autonomy anywhere and anytime. Learners reported that it provided them a single opportunity to practice English on their own time since many of them have busy schedules. The main shortcoming reported by the learners show that a more careful pedagogical planning and course management should be taken into consideration in order to provide an effective learning experience.

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Towards A Framework For Flipped Language Learning And Teaching Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:45 End Time: 16:15 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias EconĂłmicas y Administrativas Yuping Wang Griffith University, Australia nanhua.chen@yahoo.com.au ABSTRACT Many language programs across the tertiary sector are facing a dire situation with low enrolment, low retention and high cost of delivery. The time consuming and resource intensive nature of language learning and teaching has long been recognized. While TELL has had a major impact on L2 acquisition in the last 30 years, its potential has been inhibited by the lack of a systems approach to fundamentally change how a language is learnt and taught. This can be best exemplified by the fact that most research and practices have focused on the use of a particular technology to solve a particular problem (such as using a listening APP to improve listening skills). In the time of technological advances, a fundamental change in our approach to language learning and teaching is called for to make them more effective, efficient and costeffective. This research answers this call by developing and evaluating a framework that maximises both in-class and outof-class language learning in a technology supported multimodal environment. A Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) approach (Waldrop, 1992) will guide the design of the framework as a whole, and the flipped classroom approach (Tucker, 2012; Chen et al., 2014) will inform the development of the guidelines for two key elements in the framework: course design and learning support design. A CAS approach views blended learning as an integrated system with all components interacting to constantly invigorate the system as a whole. In such a system, learning in each environment - face-to-face and online â&#x20AC;&#x201C; interacts with, informs and supports that in the other, in a dynamic manner. A strong emphasis on student learning support, especially outside class support characterizes this framework, as, in this framework, effective learning outside class underpins quality and successful in-class learning. This framework was applied to our teaching and evaluated by the students learning Mandarin as a L2 at an Australian university. A range of data was collected to investigate studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; learning performance and perspectives of their learning in flipped classrooms. Findings from this research will also help refine the proposed framework and advance our understanding of the flipped classroom model.

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Towards A New Task Design Model: A Research-Based Approach For Telecollaboration And Beyond. Research Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 12:00 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Jozef Colpaert Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium jozef.colpaert@uantwerpen.be ABSTRACT Two relatively recent phenomena in the world of language learning and teaching have been generating modest but noticeable waves in the CALL field: Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) and Telecollaboration (TC). This presentation will first briefly remind participants how TBLT (Ellis, Van den Branden) has grown into a proper organization (www.tblt.org). González-Lloret & Ortega (2014) first edited a volume on technology-mediated TBLT, which indirectly led the conference ‘CALL and Task Design’ (Tarragona) in 2015. The author will discuss two problems associated with TBLT. First, most attention goes to the task execution process. Little attention goes to the process of conceptualizing task ideas. Secondly, there are no models for increasing the mental acceptability of tasks in the minds of the students. TC has also grown into a discipline with its own organisation (UniCollaboration), authors (O’Dowd, Belz, Dooly) and projects (INTENT, TECOLA). The author will discuss two problems associated with TC. First, there is no clear view of the specific affordances of TC. Secondly, TC is coping with a complex interplay of disciplines and needs a transdisciplinary approach. In the CALL field the combinations of TBLT and TC are not frequent and if they occur, the proposed tasks are not original and motivating enough to exploit the full potential of TC. The first attempts to explore the problem revealed significant incomprehension and even resistance in the teachers’ minds regarding the mental acceptability of tasks for language learners. The current research project, partly with the Erasmus+ project TECOLA, developed a research-based and applicable model for task design in telecollaboration. The research design was based on an exploration of relevant models and theories (UDL, Bloom’s digital taxonomy, SAMR, Dörnyei & Ushioda’s L2 SELF model, Self-Determination Theory, ARCS, TPACK, TAM ) on the one hand, and qualitative research in terms of surveys, focus groups, training events and observations on the other. This contribution will present the recently developed and tested task design model as a hypothesis to be validated worldwide, and its underlying methodological framework.

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Understanding Online Self-Regulated Learning From A Sociocultural Perspective: The Case Of Eight High-Achieving EFL Learners Research Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Humanidades y Arte Mengya Gao Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China Lili Wang Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China wanglili.wl@qq.com Chunping Zheng Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China zhengchunping@bupt.edu.cn ABSTRACT Exploring individual differences (IDs) has been recognized as a pivotal research perspective for attaining a better understanding of language learners. Although substantial studies have explored successful language learners’ learning strategies, studies on high-achieving English language learners’ self-regulation were still largely underrepresented. Particularly, research focusing on skilled English language learners’ strategic use of online self-regulation is still lacking in the field of second-language acquisition (SLA). Drawing on the sociocultural theory and the self-regulated learning theory, this study investigates the features of eight high-achieving students’ online self-regulated learning with a focus on how they strategically improve their English listening and speaking through online learning. Participants were English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners of different majors at a comprehensive university in northern China. Qualitative data were collected from multiple sources, including interviews, log profiles for online EFL learning, and students’ essays. Using sociocultural theory to interpret these data, similarities between the eight expert EFL learners were revealed. All these eight expert online self-regulated EFL learners made clear plans for their future personal development and set appropriate goals prior to the process of online learning. These high achievers were also good at using online resources to assist their EFL learning and had strong willpower to manage their time and learning environments efficiently. When they encountered challenges and fatigue during the process of online learning, they were flexible to make adaptions and were skillful at employing proper resources for assisting their EFL learning. They also established their own self-evaluation criteria and sought help from peers and teachers actively to overcome obstacles when learning online. The results inform the development of pedagogical schemes to enhance EFL learners’ listening and speaking proficiency through online selfregulated learning.

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Using CALL To Design A Self-Access Listening Course On Moodle Reflective Practice Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio 105, Facultad de Ingeniería Claudia Spataro Facultad de Lenguas. Univerisdad Nacional de Córdoba, Argentina claudiaspataro@hotmail.com ABSTRACT This work aims at showing how a small-scale action research project was carried out at the School of Languages, National University of Cordoba (UNC), to design, implement and test self-access listening activities on Moodle 2.3. for intermediate EFL students. This project was prompted by the constant need for further listening practice experienced by the university students of the course English Language I at the School of Languages, the lack of substantial research in successful listening activities and ICT and L2 listening (Vandergrift, 2011) and the need to ground CALL in instructed SLA theories (Chapelle, 2005). In fact, as stated by the main specialists in L2 listening (Field 2008; Flowerdew and Miller, 2005; Lynch, 2009; Ur 1984; Wilson, 2008), listening is considered the most difficult skill to learn because of its temporal nature, the complexity of the listening processes and the special features of spoken language. Unfortunately, listening is a skill that is mainly evaluated in the form of true/false, matching or multiple-choice but rarely taught in class. This traditional approach has lately been challenged by a Process Approach which aims at progressively guiding ESL/EFL learners into the different skills, strategies and processes needed for different types of listening (Cauldwell, 2013; Field, 2008; Flowerdew & Miller, 2005; Vandergrift, 2011). This small-scale action research used CALL to design, implement and evaluate some of the main tenets and listening activities suggested by the Process Approach. Five listening sessions were designed in the VLE of the course English Language I, a first year core subject for undergraduate students doing their degrees in English Language Teaching, Translation and Research at the School of Languages (U.N.C.). The project was initially part of the author’s MA Dissertation at the University of Leeds in 2013, the sessions were slightly changed over the years according to the results of the project and they are still available and implemented through the VLE showing how, by using grounded L2 listening theories, CALL can aid the design and implementation of self-access successful listening activities.

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Using Podcasts To Improve Students’ English Language Skills Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Joe Lauer Hiroshima University, Japan lauer@hiroshima-u.ac.jp ABSTRACT This presentation will explain how English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers around the world use podcasts to improve their students’ skills. Earlier this year a comprehensive review of the literature identified two widely-used pedagogical approaches. 1) Some teachers have students listen to popular podcasts outside of class, and then in class the students do various speaking and writing activities using the vocabulary and topics in the podcasts. 2) Other teachers have students create their own podcasts. Each of these techniques will be explained in detail. Thus, this is a very practical presentation, offering tips for teachers on how to use podcasts. At the end of the Power Point talk there will be a five-to-ten-minute question-and-answer period. For the last 10 years the presenter has engaged in a lot of research regarding the effectiveness of using podcasts in EFL classes. For example, in 2016 the presenter was the lead author in a published longitudinal study entitled, “Which Are More Effective in English Conversation Classrooms: Textbooks or Podcasts?” (Hiroshima Studies in Language and Language Education, pp. 129-140). It was found that Japanese university freshmen, after listening to a lot of podcasts over one semester, significantly improved their listening scores on tests, their spoken fluency (number of words uttered in recorded 3-minute conversations), and /l/ pronunciations (a renowned difficulty for Japanese learners of English). During the 10-year period, the presenter has also been producing a weekly podcast called “Hiroshima University’s English Podcast.” Aimed especially at EFL learners in Japan, it is free, available worldwide at iTunes store, and includes different types of podcasts depending on the abilities and interests of the students. There are about 5,000 listeners per week.

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Using Technology To Enhance English Language Learning Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 09:30 End Time (Part 1): 11:00 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 13:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Ignacio Andrés Ulloa Contreras Universidad de Concepción, Chile iulloa@udec.cl Ariadna Estefanía Pinto Avilez Universidad de Concepción, Chile aripinto@udec.cl ABSTRACT The UdeC English Online programme of the University of Concepción is implemented in a blended learning model for communicative language learning (Bañados, 2002; 2004; 2005; 2006; 2007; 2008). This programme aims to develop integrated linguistic skills with an online platform as the backbone of this model, supported by a series of different elements which combine learners’ independent work on the online platform, face-to-face EFL classes taught by teachers of English language who also tutor students’ online work, and intercultural communication classes with native speakers of English. As teachers of English who work directly with technological tools, providing an immediate feedback on students’ learning and comprehension of a subject is extremely important, because it gives them a clear view on how to improve students’ learning progress. That is why, complementing students’ independent work on the UdeC English Online platform, different technological tools have been used to serve as an aid for both collecting real-time data on students’ understanding of a subject matter, and for creating a more motivating learning environment that includes innovative online and offline technological tools. This pre-conference workshop has the purpose of presenting attendees with five technological tools to enhance English language learning. These tools are used at the UdeC English Online Program as an aid for supporting the acquisition of English as a second language in a CALL based B-learning environment. The technological tools chosen for the workshop are: Clickers, GoSoapBox, Kahoot!, PollEverywhere and Plickers. Each tool is presented in a contextualized manner, representing a real activity which UdeC English Online students have to work on throughout the first module of English for basic users. At the end of this workshop, attendees are expected to design an activity in which at least two of the previous mentioned tools are used.

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Using Technology To Enhance English Language Learning Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time: 11:30 End Time: 13:00 Auditorio Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Administrativas Ignacio Andrés Ulloa Contreras Universidad de Concepción, Chile iulloa@udec.cl Ariadna Estefanía Pinto Avilez Universidad de Concepción, Chile aripinto@udec.cl ABSTRACT The UdeC English Online programme of the University of Concepción is implemented in a blended learning model for communicative language learning (Bañados, 2002; 2004; 2005; 2006; 2007; 2008). This programme aims to develop integrated linguistic skills with an online platform as the backbone of this model, supported by a series of different elements which combine learners’ independent work on the online platform, face-to-face EFL classes taught by teachers of English language who also tutor students’ online work, and intercultural communication classes with native speakers of English. As teachers of English who work directly with technological tools, providing an immediate feedback on students’ learning and comprehension of a subject is extremely important, because it gives them a clear view on how to improve students’ learning progress. That is why, complementing students’ independent work on the UdeC English Online platform, different technological tools have been used to serve as an aid for both collecting real-time data on students’ understanding of a subject matter, and for creating a more motivating learning environment that includes innovative online and offline technological tools. This pre-conference workshop has the purpose of presenting attendees with five technological tools to enhance English language learning. These tools are used at the UdeC English Online Program as an aid for supporting the acquisition of English as a second language in a CALL based B-learning environment. The technological tools chosen for the workshop are: Clickers, GoSoapBox, Kahoot!, PollEverywhere and Plickers. Each tool is presented in a contextualized manner, representing a real activity which UdeC English Online students have to work on throughout the first module of English for basic users. At the end of this workshop, attendees are expected to design an activity in which at least two of the previous mentioned tools are used.

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Using WhatsApp For Teaching French As Foreign Language Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Daniel Kwang Guan Chan National University of Singapore, Singapore daniel.chan@nus.edu.sg ABSTRACT Learning a foreign language in an environment where this language is not used can be a real challenge for many reasons: the limited weekly time in the classroom with a teacher, the lack of opportunities to put the learning into practice between courses, the need to wait for the next course to clear up doubts, and the difficulty of finding reliable and / or appropriate answers to their doubts online. To counter these problems, the WhatsApp messenger has been introduced as an extension of a French as a foreign language course, through which students can communicate with their teacher and with each other at any time and at any place, and thus ensure the continuity of their ubiquitous learning. This instant messenger, already well known to students who use it on a daily basis, has many potentialities that promote interaction in real time, in (and on) the foreign language. In particular, it allows the teacher to correct or comment on the written and oral productions of students, on the one hand, and students to find almost instantly the answer to their questions, on the other hand. After a presentation of the potentialities of this technology as well as some examples of interaction with this mobile application, we will analyze the students' evaluation of this communication tool - through surveys - highlighting the advantages and the limitations or disadvantages noted by students, as well as the considerations to be taken into account in the future implementations of this technological tool in the service of learning a foreign language.

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Video Design And Use To Prepare Language Learners For Workplace Contexts Research & Development Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Auditorio 105, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Le Thi Hong Vo University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam levth@ueh.edu.vn Ayman Nassif University of Portsmouth, Great Britain ayman.nassif@port.ac.uk ABSTRACT When the number of companies and organizations conducting their business internationally and transnationally is increasing, there is a perceived need to be able to communicate in English for business purposes. The need requires graduates not only communicative strategies such as how to make requests, directives or write business email but also cultural behaviors for international communication. It raises the importance of English learning tailored to the workplace needs of graduates. This paper explores how video can be designed and used to contribute to develop the language and communication skills and support learners to understand cultural behaviors to build up and maintain relationships which are necessary for successful interaction in business. In order for these purposes, I developed two videos for use by Business English language students at the University of Economic Ho Chi minh City Vietnam. First, to form a theoretical framework for the project, I was drawn to Shermanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (2003) idea that authentic video can contribute to learning in various areas relating to some aspects of communicative competences identified. Culture is one of the area where video can provide either a visual context for production of language or particular settings and relevant body language, which stimulate workplace environment. Mishan (2005) considers video in materials development which can support to achieve a genuine communicative purpose. She provides guidance on using video for a number of classroom activities. Second, text-driven approach (Tomlinson, 2003) is the principled approach to the use of the videos outlined in the study. The engagement is the centre of the approach, which has been identified as a willing investment of energy of the learners to experiencing the learning materials. The extent to which learners preparing to the workplace contexts see the videos designed as relevant to what they will be doing at the workplace is the key for the engagement. This will be illustrated in this paper. Third, the videos were done in collaboration with companies, who make comments and suggestions. From these, I will highlight that video design and use can help learners with communicative skills and cultural behaviors to meet the workplace needs of graduates.

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Vietnam's Mother Tongue Based–Bilingual Education For Ethnic Minority Children Poster Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Hanh Nguyen Thi Bich Tong Lenh High School, Vietnam hanhnguyenqn86@gmail.com ABSTRACT In Vietnam education, disparities still remain with those from remote areas and those from ethnic minority groups. One fact is that the minority students mainly use their mother tongue to communicate inside their families and community. However, the main language of instruction in schools is Vietnamese and all ethnic minority children have no choice to receive instruction in Vietnamese as other Kinh students. This has impacted negatively on the process of learning of these children during their first years at school, creating a "language barrier" for many minority students because many of them are not good at communicating in Vietnamese, or even some of them are able to speak a little Vietnamese. It is clear that the starting point of qualified Vietnamese for schooling of ethnic students are much lower than that of Kinh children. This obviously makes challenges in applying the current national curriculum for both ethnic learners as well as their teachers. As a result, to support ethnic minority students in Viet Nam to have access to quality learning opportunities, the Ministry of Education and Training (MOET) has been undertaking Action Research on Mother Tongue Based-Bilingual Education (MTBBE) with the support of UNICEF since 2008 in three provinces - Lao Cai, Gia Lai and Tra Vinh - with three respective ethnic minority languages, namely HMong, Jrai and Khmer. This program is hoped to be easier and more efficient for ethnic students in Vietnam to read and write in Vietnamese – the language officially used in national schools and business. The writing, therefore, aims to analyze the program of MTBBE for ethnic minority students in Vietnam, mainly based on related secondary data and the theoretical framework in “Foundation of bilingual education and bilingualism” of Baker (2011, 5thed).

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Voice Recording Assignments On Facebook Reflective Practice Friday, November 16th Start Time: 12:15 End Time: 12:45 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Mari Yamauchi Chiba University of Commerce, Japan yamauchi.mari@gmail.com ABSTRACT Many Japanese learners of English have little confidence about their pronunciation, which is likely due to their previous lack of pronunciation practice, and also to their desire to sound like native speakers. The students who take the presenter’s phonetics class at a university tend to share those characteristics. In the class, they are explicitly taught to recognize the differences between English and Japanese sound systems, with a focus on selected areas of intelligibility problems for Japanese speakers, and they are encouraged or forced to try using their articulators to mimic the target phrases, followed by feedback on intelligibility of their English and advice on the use of articulators. The explicit instruction and plenty of practice in class alone could make a big difference in their phonological awareness. To make a bigger difference by adding more opportunities to practice and get feedback, the presenter set up weekly voice recording assignments using a Facebook group. During the course, the participants practiced the assigned phrases repeatedly before sharing their recording, listened to their peers’ recordings, and saw individual feedback and advice on intelligibility, both to themselves and to their peers. The Facebook recording assignments worked nicely to provide more opportunities for them to practice, receive necessary feedback and advice, and get exposed to different “accents”. After the 15-week course, they were more phonologically aware and more confident in spoken English, as they found themselves better at listening comprehension tasks. Facebook was selected as the platform because it allowed the teacher to easily set up a closed group. Aso, compared to other tools (to be discussed in the presentation), Facebook was more mobile-friendly and easier to use for sharing recordings and feedback, without having to worry about technical problems participants might face. The presentation describes how the Facebook assignments were implemented, what English features were targeted, and what feedback was given to facilitate learning. It also discusses how Facebook helped make all these activities easier for the teacher and the students, despite some disadvantages of using a non-educational tool for teaching.

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Weblogs In An Esp Context: Exploring Students´ Perceptions And The Impact On Students´ Web Literacy Skills Poster Friday, November 16th Start Time: 13:00 End Time: 15:00 Empreudec Parking Lot Tent Susana Diaz Universidad Andrés Bello, Chile susana.diaz.merino@gmail.com Dánisa Salinas Universidad Andrés Bello, Chile danisa.salinas@unab.cl ABSTRACT This study aims to investigate ESP students´ perceptions of the use of weblogs for English language learning and it explores ESP learners' web literacy skills when working with interactive weblogs. The participants are four undergraduate Industrial Maintenance students at a technical institute in Chile. The instruments used to collect data were four: a preliminary questionnaire at an initial stage, observations and self-recordings during the implementation and a semi structured interview after the implementation stage. From the data obtained and analyzed by a qualitative methodology, the study found that ESP students generally perceived the use of weblogs for English language learning as an effective tool, which facilitated sharing ideas, students´ interaction and collaborative work in an online learning community. Weblogs allowed students to efficiently use web literacy skills such as web searching, reading, selecting and evaluating, emerging, several web strategies to locate useful information about ESP content for technicians. Keywords: students’ perceptions, English for specific purposes, blogs, web literacy skills.

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What Are You APP To? Spicing Up Your Classes Workshop Tuesday, November 13th Start Time (Part 1): 09:30 End Time (Part 1): 11:00 COFFEE BREAK Start Time (Part 2): 11:30 End Time (Part 2): 13:00 Edificio CFRD Multimedia Room Juan Guillermo Cuevas Lepe Universidad Bernardo O'Higgins, Chile juan.cuevas@ubo.cl ABSTRACT With the advent of mobile technologies, lots of apps and online resources have been integrated into the field of language teaching in recent years. Teachers and students can actively participate in polls, storytelling projects, digital magazine design, QR codes treasure hunts, etc. Nowadays, most educational apps have their online versions which allows us to develop teaching-learning experiences using all kinds of devices. In this presentation, we will explore some fun apps and online resources to implement challenging and meaningful activities to spice up our classes and promote learning. Bring your devices!

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What Is The Desirable Dictionary Interface To EFL Learners? Reflective Practice Wednesday, November 14th Start Time: 15:00 End Time: 15:30 Auditorio Salvador Galvez, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Toshiko Koyama Osaka Ohtani University, Japan mtkoyama@osaka-ohtani.ac.jp ABSTRACT The present study examined how the differences in screen sizes between a smartphone dictionary and a tablet one affected their look-up behavior and learning effect. The study was carried out at a university in Japan. The participants, who were heavy smartphone users, were 36 undergraduate students whose English proficiency levels ranged from intermediate to false beginners. In the first session of the study, they were assigned a word definition and a reading comprehension tasks with the two types of dictionaries respectively. The time they needed for the tasks, the numbers of their lookups, and the quiz scores were compared. After the first session, they answered the questionnaire about each dictionary interface. In the second session, which was held on a week after the first session, a recognition test was conducted to investigate how much the looked-up words were retained. Also, the participants were interviewed for their impressions and comments on each dictionary interface. The collected data were analyzed based on their proficiency accordingly. The results showed that although no significant differences were found in both the numbers of lookups and the time they needed to complete the tasks, the rate of the recognition test was slightly different. Pedagogical implications will be made based on the findings.

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WhatsApp As A Support For The Development Of Deaf Portuguese Learners’ Autonomy In Language Advising Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 16:30 End Time: 17:00 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Eder Barbosa Cruz Universidade Federal do Pará, Brazil ebarbosacruz@hotmail.com ABSTRACT Language advising (LA) is a modality of accompanying language learners, which aims at leading them to a reflection on their own learning in order to make them more autonomous. Mynard (2012) presents a model for LA based on three interconnected axes: dialogue, tools and context. Magno e Silva, Sá e Matos and Rabelo (2015) sought in the theoretical contribution of the Complexity Paradigm the subsidies to show that LA in the model of Mynard (2012) benefits from an approach with the Complex Adaptive Systems Theory (MORIN, 2010, LARSEN-FREEMAN and CAMERON 2008). We have worked on the framework of the expansion of this model of LA to meet deaf learners of Portuguese language and who communicate through a sign language and found out that LA can be an autonomy nurturing of deaf students in the Portuguese acquisition process. We are also searching for new tools that can be used in LA for deaf learners in order to improve both their autonomous behavior and their learning of Portuguese. We have observed that WhatsApp could be useful in this context since it can provide a real use of Portuguese language and encourage autonomous behavior. The purpose of this paper is to show how WhatsApp can support the development of deaf Portuguese learners’ autonomy in Language Advising. To this end, we carried out a case study with deaf learners of the Research Project “Ensino de Língua Portuguesa para surdos: Complexidade, Autonomia e Aconselhamento Linguageiro” at Federal University of Pará, in Belém, Brazil. For the data collection, advising sessions with deaf Portuguese learners and Portuguese classes for deaf were filmed. The results showed that the use of WhatsApp can favor the practice of advising with these learners, foster their autonomy and improve their learning of Portuguese.

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WhatsApp In Foreign Language Learning And Teaching From A Complexity Thinking Perspectivity Research Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 17:15 End Time: 17:45 Auditorio Facultad de Veterinaria Shirlene Bemfica Oliveira Instituto Federal de Minas Gerais (IFMG ), Brazil shirlene.o@ifmg.edu.br ABSTRACT This paper presentation describes a research based on a practical educational methodological approach in foreign language education at secondary schools in Brazil. Our aim is to understand and interpret the use of WhatsApp as a potential tool for learning and teaching English as a foreign language (EFL). The investigation is based on Complexity Thinking (DAVIS & SUMARA, 2006; MORIN, 1990, 2007; MASON, 2008) that can be useful toward studying particular sorts of phenomena in the new age of mobile learning technology. In this study, several instructional activities are proposed for students in the language classroom in order to promote collaboration, knowledge construction, autonomy, interaction, motivation and meaningful language practice with authentic sources from digital media of Web 2.0. The written and oral students interactions are used to understand the nature of WhatsApp in EFL, as well as its potenciality and flaws as a helpful communicative tool. The analysis were adapted from phenomenological investigation view (VAN MANEN, 1990), supported by Vygotskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Social Interactionism theoretical framework (2007) and Collaborative writing perspectives (SWAIN, 2000; STORCH 2011, DOBAO, 2012). The first findings show positive contributions in the use of WhatsApp for EFL students concerning language acquisition, interactivity, autonomy, motivation, about collaborative construction of knowledge.

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Why Should We Use Database Software Instead Of Powerpoint? Technology Showcase Thursday, November 15th Start Time: 18:00 End Time: 18:30 Auditorio 106, Facultad de IngenierĂ­a Kenichi Kamiya Osaka Institute of Technology, Japan kmyken1@gmail.com Takeshi Kakihara Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan kakiharatakeshi@gmail.com ABSTRACT For ubiquitous language learning, we need to pay more attention to the power of database software, instead of the slide files made with PowerPoint. Using database software, all what teachers should do is to store sentences, phrases, or words only one time. The data will be shown in various layouts. This means teachers and students can use them in various ways. Database software can store data and layout separately. We may also use scripts for navigating slide-looking pages. We do not have to prepare all the slide pages to show to students beforehand. Rather, we can branch off from the prepared way to another upon the atmosphere in the classroom. Using software such as PowerPoint for slide presenting, needs much more pages to do the same thing. We need to make slide files beforehand. This situation could be called "One Source One Use," however, if we use database software, it will be "One Source Multiple Use." Imagine that a teacher has to pick up from separate slide files to compile slides for the coming class. This would be a time-consuming work. Using database software, the authors recently developed a tool for learning expressions of Spanish language in natural settings. It includes more than 100 sentences with speech voices recorded in Spain. Teachers can show a variety of replies to each sentence in the classroom, and students can learn these patterns by themselves outside the classroom beforehand or afterwards. Since the tool contains translations in Japanese for the moment, it will be used mainly for Japanese students. The tool is developed using FileMaker, database software. The files made with this software can be executable on any iOS devices, such as iPad, on FileMaker Go, a free app. The screen size is optimized for current iPad mini and iPad. We hope to discuss advantages and disadvantages of software using database for ubiquitous language learning.

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Program Book Guide WorldCALL  

5th WorldCALL Conference 2018 Concepción - Chile

Program Book Guide WorldCALL  

5th WorldCALL Conference 2018 Concepción - Chile