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LISZT ACADEMY CONCERT MAGAZINE SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER 2018


Harmony. This is the word I see when I look up at the ceiling of the Grand Hall from the President’s Box, where I have had the honour of sitting for the last four years. Miksa Róth’s glass miracles bring the word to life in the stained-glass skylights. Being a musician, what immediately springs to mind when I think of the word is the theory of harmony. This theory, which concentrates on and conveys the complex rules of the structure and sequences of chords, is by no means an easy discipline, yet it underpins all compositions: without harmony there is no music. Musical formations are also based on harmony: the performers not only breathe life into the music that lives within them, but they can taste it themselves; they show to the audience the joy of creating harmony together. Harmony in turn infuses spirit into ensembles and choirs that have been working together for many years, but also into chamber music partners who join forces only for a single concert to create something completely unique for us. I am proud that we have again been able to compose an event schedule that will allow you to welcome old and new favourites in all genres. The Duo Koroliov interprets Kurtág’s Bach Transcriptions, and the pianist Boris Berezovsky this year entertains Budapest audiences with piano pieces written by Russian composers. Vilmos Szabadi and Gábor Farkas devote five concert evenings to Mozart’s entire oeuvre of violin-piano sonatas, and Emőke Baráth sings Schubert’s Lied cycle Winterreise in a singular production. We also welcome outstanding representatives from two different violinist generations: the young Dmitry vSinkovsky appears in two of his many personas – the countertenor who plays the violin extraordinarily well and the violinist who sings extraordinarily well – to perform concertos by Bach, Telemann and Tartini, while Giuliano Carmignola – who honours the Liszt Academy for the first time – enters the stage of the Grand Hall with compositions from Baroque masters. We also welcome Philippe Herreweghe and his magical early music ensemble, Collegium Vocale Gent. Within the framework of the event series kamara.hu, globally acclaimed performers are introduced to Hungarian audiences in perhaps the most splendid concert hall in Europe. This hall unites in harmony the beauty of the Art Nouveau building of the Liszt Academy, the profound symbolism of its ornamentation, and the spellbinding music performed within. Here harmony is not only heard but is also perceptible in all corners of the Grand Hall. Whenever I look up at the skylight, the world inscribed in it always causes me to wonder whether I – as an artist and as the president of the institution – fulfil the role assigned to me and whether I act according to my credo. The skylight is a symbolic mirror set before me, and the term ‘harmony’ goes far beyond its literal meaning: it also implies fulfilment, balance and potential. I invite you all, musicians and non-musicians alike, to face the question: Are we in harmony with our lives and with our souls, so that we may create magic? © ZOLTÁN TUBA

Dr. Andrea Vigh President of the Liszt Academy


Our everyday lives are more and more strongly determined by our smart phones that rest in our pockets or handbags. This small gadget, with its increasing and expanding intelligence, has turned into an essential source of information, a device for discovery and even a tool for interpersonal relationships. The rhythm of our lives – almost unnoticeably – is changing through it too, transforming and defining our habits and the pace of our lives. The smart phone promises an immediate response and non-stop access to entertainment. Using these smart devices, time becomes shorter; Wikipedia articles, brief descriptions, short videos and 15-minute science lectures satisfy our hunger for knowledge while we travel from one tram stop to the next or while we stand in a queue in a public office. Our daily lives become disassembled; there is too little time to complete a book, and listening to an entire composition normally exhausts the time we are willing or able to devote to it. We at the Liszt Academy appreciate the challenge we face when we ask our audiences to withdraw from their fastpaced lives. We must offer to our audiences the experience of slowing down, of going deeper, of focussing on and participating in singular and unrepeatable occasions that will, in a world of ephemeral events, last with us for a long time to come. In exchange for your time, that most valuable of commodities, we offer you joy. Shared musical experiences are infinitely more profound and more liberating than listening to music through a pair of headphones. It means much more because we dedicate our time to it; it is not literally background music while we do something else. The audience is also part of a live performance, as the quality of a concert is shaped by the harmony between the musicians and their listeners. At the Liszt Academy, all prerequisites are there for harmony to spring to life: we invite the top artists of our time to help us make the most of the experience of the ‘here and now’. Come, visit our concerts, switch off for two hours and be part of the joint process of creation! © TUBA ZOLTÁN

András Csonka Programme Director of the Liszt Academy 2


“There are no tricks or certain attitudes,” claims our very own worldwidecelebrated violinist Kristóf Baráti on the pages of the Concert Magazine. He is just one of the prestigious musicians who we asked to put their ideas about harmony into words, the musical and conceptual analysis of which is the focus of this issue. Artists and educators – among them Mischa Maisky and his daughter Lily; László Norbert Nemes, conductor of the New Liszt Ferenc Chamber Choir and Director of the Kodály Institute in Kecskemét; Katalin Komlós, professor emeritus, fortepianist and musicologist; and Szabolcs Benkő, Director of the Bartók Music Secondary School – all refer to the creation of harmony as one of the greatest challenges of our time, a concept which must also be cultivated and maintained in our interpersonal relationships. For musicians the concept of harmony is especially important, whether it be in a chamber music ensemble, or indeed in any other formation. Harmony implies unity and beauty, which can be best conveyed and demonstrated by music, even though there are music pieces that are not explicitly harmonious. One of the interviewed artists said that harmony is the foundation of all music, essential for the birth of any melody. Harmony unites musicians who play together and those who create art together; different generations would find it difficult to work with each other without finding beauty in the cooperation between young and more experienced artists. We create harmony with our past when we commemorate our great ancestors in music, among them two former presidents, Jenő Hubay and Ede Zathureczky, born 160 years ago and 115 years ago, respectively; we also pay tribute to Claude Debussy, who died exactly one hundred years ago, on 25 March, a date which also happens to be Bartók’s birthday. Harmony requires a high degree of emotional intelligence, and this in turn measures our desire to create harmony; an absence of harmony might be accompanied by loneliness, dispiritedness or pessimism. But music comes to our aid: it enchants, purifies and heals our soul, it gives us strength for the next day. Its impact is tangible, as the ancient and inherent desires of man and nature become manifest in it. I warmly recommend the most recent issue of the Concert Magazine of the Liszt Academy to you, which encompasses our musical and verbal euphony as well as the harmony of our ambitions and desires. © JÁNOS PHILIP

Júlia Torda Director of Communications of the Liszt Academy 3


TABLE OF CONTENTS

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1

GREETING FROM THE PRESIDENT

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SEPTEMBER PROGRAMME – CHRONOLOGY

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HARMONY BETWEEN COMPOSER AND PERFORMER: W. A. MOZART AND KRISTÓF BARÁTI

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OCTOBER PROGRAMME – CHRONOLOGY

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BARTÓK WITH FREEDOM – GYULA FEKETE ON THE COMPOSITION COMPETITION OF THE BARTÓK WORLD COMPETITION

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NOVEMBER PROGRAMME – CHRONOLOGY

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HARMONY OF DIVERSITY – INTERVIEW WITH THE DIRECTOR OF THE CAMERATA BERN, LOUIS DUPRAS

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DECEMBER PROGRAMME– CHRONOLOGY

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A RECURRING MOTIF: THE LUTE – ON THE ARTWORKS OF MIKSA RÓTH AT THE LISZT ACADEMY

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MAESTRO HUBAY

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SEPTEMBER CONCERT GUIDE

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OCTOBER CONCERT GUIDE

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PARITY – EXISTING IN HARMONY – INTERVIEW WITH MISCHA MAISKY & LILY MAISKY


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NOVEMBER CONCERT GUIDE IN GOOD HUMOUR AND IN HARMONY – INTERVIEW WITH PÉTER SÁRIK

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DECEMBER CONCERT GUIDE

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HARMONY BETWEEN ARTIST AND ARTWORK

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COOPERATION – WITH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE – DR SZABOLCS BENKŐ ON THE BARTÓK CONSERVATOIRE

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MUSIC MEANT FOR THE EARS

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‘FOUNDATIONS WE CAN BUILD UPON’ – KATALIN KOMLÓS’ VIEWS ON ACCORDANCE AND HARMONY

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EMOTIONAL CONNECTEDNESS IN THE CHOIR – INTERVIEW WITH THE CONDUCTOR OF THE NEW LISZT FERENC CHAMBER CHOIR

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COMPETITION OR NO COMPETITION? – ON THE ZATHURECZKY COMPETITION

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LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY

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TICKET MAP AND INFORMATION

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SPONSORS

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Concerts organized by Liszt Academy Concert Centre Hosted concert

SATURDAY 15 SEPTEMBER, 18.00 GRAND HALL

3RD INTERNATIONAL ÉVA MARTON SINGING COMPETITION FINAL Orchestra of the Hungarian State Opera Conductor: Balázs Kocsár

Classical Jazz Opera World / Folk Junior

Tickets: HUF 1 100, 1 500, 2 200, 2 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 50

JOSHUA ZONA

SATURDAY 1 SEPTEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

3RD INTERNATIONAL ÉVA MARTON SINGING COMPETITION GALA CONCERT Orchestra of the Hungarian State Opera Conductor: Balázs Kocsár

MÁV CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Sania Cheong (violin), Stefan Kropfitsch (cello), Mijung Koo (piano) MÁV Chamber Orchestra Conductor: Joshua Zona Tickets: HUF 1 500 Organizer: IMK – Verein für Internationale Musik- und Kulturförderung MONDAY 10 SEPTEMBER, 17:00 TUESDAY 11 SEPTEMBER, 14.00, 18.00 WEDNESDAY 12 SEPTEMBER, 14.00, 18.00 THURSDAY 13 SEPTEMBER, 15.00, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

3RD INTERNATIONAL ÉVA MARTON SINGING COMPETITION PRELIMINARIES AND SEMI-FINALS Tickets: Admission is free. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 50

Tickets: HUF 1 100, 1 500, 2 200, 2 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 17 in D minor, Op. 31/2 (‘The Tempest’) Brahms: Three Intermezzos, Op. 117 Kodály: Dances of Marosszék Schumann: Piano Quintet in E-flat major, Op. 44 Tamás Érdi (piano) Quatuor Hermès: Omer Bouchez, Elise Liu (violin), Yung-Hsin Chang (viola), Anthony Kondo (cello)

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Tickets: HUF 1 200, 2 200, 3 200, 4 200 Organizer: ‘Szól a szív…’ Foundation

MONDAY 17 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

WEDNESDAY 19 SEPTEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

HUNGARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

YANG SUNG-WON & ENRICO PACE RECITAL

Beethoven: Ah! perfido – concert aria, Op. 65 Beethoven: Triple Concerto in C major, Op. 56 Beethoven: Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Op. 67 (‘Fate’)

Liszt: Elegy No. 1 Liszt: Consolation No. 1 in E major Liszt: Consolation No. 4 in D-flat major Liszt: La Lugubre gondola Liszt: Consolation No. 3 in E major R. Strauss: Sonata for Cello and Piano in F major, Op. 6 Liszt: Romance oubliée Liszt: Die Zelle in Nonnenwerth Liszt: Consolation No. 6 in E major Chopin: Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor, Op. 65

Lilla Horti (soprano), Júlia Pusker (violin), Bence Bánkövi (cello), Zoltán Fejérvári (piano) Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Tamás Vásáry Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 500, 6 000, 7 000 Organizer: Hungarian Radio Art Groups LILLA HORTI

Mozart: Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat major, K. 364 Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 9. in E-flat major, K. 271 (‘Jeunehomme’) Haydn: Symphony No. 45 in F-sharp minor, Hob. I:45 (‘Farewell’)

TUESDAY 18 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

‘SZÓL A SZÍV…’ FOUNDATION/30

SUNDAY 16 SEPTEMBER , 19.30 GRAND HALL

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TAMÁS ÉRDI

CONCERT CHRONOLOGY SEPTEMBER

Yang Sung-Won (cello), Enrico Pace (piano) Tickets: Admission to the concert is free. Registration is required on the www. koreaikultura.hu website. Organizer: Korean Cultural Centre


TUESDAY 25 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Ádám Balogh (piano) Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductor: Máté Hámori

GYŐR PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA RACHMANINOV-BARTÓK

Ticket: HUF 1 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 51 MONDAY 24 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

THURSDAY 20 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

DANUBIA ORCHESTRA ÓBUDA Lutosławski: Concerto for Orchestra Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123 Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductor: Máté Hámori Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200, 3 800, 4 700 Organizer: Danubia Orchestra Óbuda FRIDAY 21 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

PÉTER SÁRIK TRIO X BARTÓK JAZZ ARRANGEMENTS OF BARTÓK’S PIECES Péter Sárik (piano), Tibor Fonay (bass guitar, double bass), Attila Gálfi (percussion) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizers: Liszt Academy Concert Centre, Péter Sárik Production Ltd. Page 51 SATURDAY 22 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

FESTIVE CONCERT OF THE SEMMELWEIS MEMORIAL YEAR Erkel: Bánk bán – overture Liszt: Piano Concerto in A major Mosonyi: Festive Music Brahms: Serenade No. 2 in A major, Op. 16

Purcell: The Fairy-Queen (excerpts) Purcell: Dido and Aeneas (excerpts) Britten: The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra: Variations and Fugue on a Theme of Henry Purcell, Op. 34 Britten: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Op. 64 (excerpts)

Dmitry Masleev (piano) Győr Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor: Kálmán Berkes Tickets: HUF 6 000, 8 000 Organizer: Győr Philharmonic Orchestra

Dame Emma Kirkby, Zita Szemere (soprano), Péter Bárány (countertenor), István Kovács (bass) Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Choir and Children’s Choir (choirmaster: Zoltán Pad and László Matos) Conductor: Howard Williams Tickets: HUF 2 800, 3 500, 5 000, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian Radio Art Groups HOWARD WILLIAMS

DANUBIA ORCHESTRA ÓBUDA

HUNGARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Glinka: Ruslan and Ludmilla – overture Rachmaninov: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123

IZABELLA SIMON & DÉNES VÁRJON

WEDNESDAY 26 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

THE PIANO TWICE IZABELLA SIMON & DÉNES VÁRJON Schumann: Six Pieces for Pedal Piano, Op. 56 (Debussy arrangement) Beethoven: Great Fugue, Op. 134 Mahler: Symphony No. 1 (arrangement for piano four hands by Bruno Walter) Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 52 7


FRIDAY 28 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

GILLES APAP & MÁV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

AMADINDA PRECUSSION GROUP

THURSDAY 27 SEPTEMBER, 19.00 GRAND HALL

CONCERTO BUDAPEST

Bartók: Rhapsody No. 1, BB 94b Bartók: Rhapsody No. 2, BB 96b Bernstein: Slava! – A Political Overture for Orchestra Grofé: Grand Canyon Suite

J. S. Bach–Berio: The Art of Fugue, BWV 1080 – Contrapunctus XIX J. S. Bach: Piano Concerto in G minor, BWV 1058 J. S. Bach: Piano Concerto in A major, BWV 1055 Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123 Dezső Ránki (piano) Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller

Gilles Apap (violin) MÁV Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Péter Csaba

Tickets: HUF 2 200, 3 100, 3 900, 4 800, 5 900 Organizer: Concerto Budapest

Tickets: HUF 4 500, 5 000, 5 500 Organizer: MÁV Symphony Orchestra

SATURDAY 29 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL JUDIT RAJK

CONCERTO BUDAPEST

FRIDAY 28 SEPTEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

HERE AND NOW JUDIT RAJK & BERLIN PHILHARMONIC CHAMBER SOLOISTS REMEMBRANCES, REMEMBRANCE NOISES Schnittke: Piano Quartet in A minor (after Mahler’s fragment) Wellesz: Geistliches Lied, Op. 23 György Kurtág: The Ligatura of Bálint Varga György Kurtág: S.K. Remembrance Noise (to the poems by Dezső Tandori), Op. 12 Mahler: Piano Quartet in A minor Borodin: Three Romances Schumann: Piano Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 47

J. S. Bach–Berio: The Art of Fugue, BWV 1080 – Contrapunctus XIX Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op. 58 Bartók: Concerto for Orchestra, BB 123

Aurél Holló – Zoltán Váczi: Our Beloved Masters / beFORe JOHN1 (world premiere)

Tickets: HUF 2 200, 3 100, 3 900, 4 800, 5 900 Organizer: Concerto Budapest

Amadinda Percussion Group Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller Tickets: HUF 1 500 Organizer: Concerto Budapest SUNDAY 30 SEPTEMBER, 11.00 GRAND HALL

UNDERSTANDABLE MUSIC DOHNÁNYI ORCHESTRA BUDAFOK THE MILESTONES OF MUSIC HISTORY

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Wagner: Tristan und Isolde – Prelude and Isolde’s Love Death DEZSŐ RÁNKI

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CONCERTO BUDAPEST – PREMIERE I

Dezső Ránki (piano) Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller

Judit Rajk (alto) Berlin Philharmonic Chamber Soloists: Cornelia Gartemann (violin), Naoko Shimizu (viola), Knut Weber (cello), Özgür Aydın (piano) Ticket: HUF 2 500 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

SATURDAY 29 SEPTEMBER, 22.00 GRAND HALL

Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok Moderator and conductor: Gábor Hollerung Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 200, 2 700, 3 200 Organizer: Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok


SUNDAY 30 SEPTEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

TALENT OBLIGES ATTILA SZTÁN TROMBONE CHAMBER RECITAL Berio: Sequenza V M. Haydn: Concerto for Two Trombones Berio: Sequenza X Ákos Zarándy: Trio Why-G Enescu: Légende Ránki: The Tales of Father Goose Csaba Tűzkő: Balkan Sonata – 3 rd movement Attila Sztán (trombone) Tamás Pálfalvi (trumpet), Zoltán Szőke (natural horn), Anna Jámbor, Bernadett Biczó (violin), Réka Baksai (viola), Flóra Matuska (cello), Krisztina Fejes (piano) In Medias Brass Quintet: Richárd Kresz, Tamás Pálfalvi (trumpet), János Benyus (horn), Attila Sztán (trombone), József Bazsinka Jr (tuba) Ticket: HUF 1 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 52

KRISTÓF BARÁTI

SUNDAY 30 SEPTEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

KRISTÓF BARÁTI & FRANZ LISZT CHAMBER ORCHESTRA J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041 J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042 Schubert: Rondo for Violin and Orchestra in A major, D. 438 Mendelssohn: String Symphony No. 10 in B minor Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 4 in A major, Op. 90 (‘Italian’) Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra (concertmaster: Péter Tfirst) Violin soloist and conductor: Kristóf Baráti Tickets: HUF 2 900, 4 200, 5 500, 6 900 Organizer: Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra

ATTILA SZTÁN

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3 RD I N T E R N A T I O N A L

PRESENTED BY

PreliminarIES I SOLTI HALL

10 SEPTEMBER (MONDAY), 17.00 11 SEPTEMBER (TUESDAY), 14.00 & 18.00 12 SEPTEMBER (WEDNESDAY), 14.00 & 18.00

Semi-final I SOLTI HALL

13 SEPTEMBER (THURSDAY), 15.00 & 19.00

Final I GRAND HALL

15 SEPTEMBER (SATURDAY), 18.00

Featuring: Orchestra of the Hungarian State Opera conducted by Balรกzs Kocsรกr

Award ceremony & Gala Concert I GRAND HALL 16 SEPTEMBER (SUNDAY), 19.30

Featuring: Orchestra of the Hungarian State Opera conducted by Balรกzs Kocsรกr

martoncompetition.hu


AN INTIMATE CONNECTION An intimate connection between composer and performer forms silently and invisibly over years and decades. Hard work is essential, while keen attention must be paid if a performer wants to project both their personality and their affection for the music in an interpretation that goes beyond the mere notes of the composition. The violin virtuoso Kristóf Baráti tells us about creating and experiencing harmony with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

Harmony with the composer and with the music. What are your thoughts on that? In my interpretation, harmony means balance. To enjoy myself as a performer it’s important to define what I would like to find in a musical composition and how I can reconcile this with my own disposition. I think in today’s individualistic culture, the personality of the artist is becoming more and more prominent, while observance towards the composers and their compositions is becoming less fashionable. Of course, there are exceptions; for example, familiarity with the classical style is essential in Mozart interpretations. Nonetheless, the performer must take care as even the most accomplished musicologists can never know exactly how a musical composition was played in its own day. I don’t think that the musicians of our time should necessarily follow the attitudes of those days. We can’t turn back time and ignore the 20th-century repertoire that lies behind us. We must consider all of this when we play Mozart. In your opinion, what is the essence of contemporary performing arts? Is it about its relationship to the past? I think the emotional and intellectual content found in musical compositions expresses human stories. Much has changed since the age of Mozart; however, our basic problems, our dramas and our feelings are the same. Music essentially aims to influence these emotions. Finding the climaxes, reaching the low points: this is the ground on which the concept of a performer can be built. In an interview in 2016 you described the performance of Mozart’s concertos as “tempting fate” and a “mission almost impossible”. Why did a musician considered to be one of the most accomplished interpreters of Mozart’s music in Hungary say that? Really? I don’t remember that. Three years ago I performed the complete concertos of Mozart with the New Hungarian Chamber Orchestra at the Kodály Centre in Pécs. There were two concerts and both of them were recorded. That was the context in which I used the words you quoted in your question. Recording live performances is not common today, but I like these kinds of challenges. The expression “mission almost impossible” referred to the hard and intense rehearsal period we had before the two concerts. Having said that, performing Mozart is always a challenge, because there are no weak points in his music. He created music from simple material, but he mixed the themes brilliantly and in such a virtuosic manner that it makes the connection of tunes almost invisible. Composers of his time wrote music according to a strict framework. Mozart surpassed them and was extremely creative in mixing melodies; many times one does not even realize when a former subordinate melody becomes a later theme. Mozart’s music has a delicate texture, and it really seemed hopeless to sum up such a large amount of musical material in such a short time. I think there is no comparable challenge in the whole European repertoire.

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Kristóf Baráti © ZOLTÁN ADRIÁN 13


Reviewing your thirty-year career, when do you think your personal relationship with Mozart began? And how did this relationship develop later? As with other composers, I got acquainted with Mozart as a child. I played the Violin Concertos Nos. 3 & 5 at a relatively young age. These pieces are technically easier yet still require the same level of instrumental knowledge and intonation technique as in a Sibelius concerto. Later it became more and more clear that I had to familiarize myself with his operas in order to fully understand Mozart’s music. His most important works are not the violin concertos: his operas can’t be surpassed. But as a violinist, I can’t allow myself to think of this; I must forget this hierarchy on stage. Can you mention a specific ‘Mozart experience’ in your life when you came to know the composer better? I remember the day when my mother took me to a performance of The Magic Flute, though I was not mature enough at the time to understand its symbolism. As in the case of great novels, the first encounter is not necessarily the most important one. In later stages of our life we understand these encounters better and begin to ask the right questions about a specific work. The CD recording of the complete violin concertos was such a significant ‘Mozart experience’ for me. After that, I sensed him differently and discovered other sides and paths of development in his music. Do you consider it important to identify yourself with the composer? In what ways do you embrace the personality and musicality of Mozart? Often you are not aware of your own soul; at the same time, I think it impossible to slip into someone else’s skin. Nonetheless, in my opinion, music does not always reflect its author’s state of mind. There are countless examples of how masterpieces have been created in very different circumstances. How much can I identify myself with the composer’s artistic and human side? These are two different questions. On the stage I look for my own associations and a full experience through them. But that can only be achieved if I let the music express my own emotions instead of planning ahead. It is not a question of whether it is easy or difficult to play a particular composition. The most important thing is to interpret music with all my soul. The performance of a composition is an abstract task; the listeners can hardly empathize with the performer. Yet composing is an even more abstract process. We, the performers, admire the composers and wonder where their inspiration came from. Just think about Mozart: it is almost unimaginable how such music came to his mind. What do you think gives the sensation of harmony in Mozart’s music? Which are the key elements that define his style? There are no tricks or specific attitudes that would help one answer this question. Every musician has their concept when they go on stage. In my opinion, when one plays Mozart, the most important thing is to firmly separate the characters he imagined and to create contrast in his music. Playing Mozart without colour can be really painful: it’s the death of his music. But it’s essentially a personal decision. You can’t really specify how the music of Mozart should be played. However, I would state that one must show the operatic character in his concertos and one must also be aware of those non-trivial musical forms which distinguish Mozart from his contemporaries. If you find these details, you can show something new to the audience. 14


If you had lived in the time of Mozart and you had known each other, what do you think your relationship would have been like? Would the Maestro have dedicated concertos for you? I would certainly go to the casino with him and persuade him to compose a violin concerto for me. He would probably set the bar high and write quite a difficult piece of music. And I would be very curious to see the moment he puts his musical thoughts to paper. It wouldn’t take more than twenty minutes. I would watch him and observe his state of mind; I wonder if I would be able to share his world with him. Finally, I would be very curious to see if another Mozart would appear, one that we are less familiar with. Let’s talk about the popular performance series at the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music called Complete Works Live. In 2018 you are headlining the series for the third time. What kind of experiences have you had, and what can the audience expect this year? The Complete Works Live series are great occasions to travel down the road together with the composer. On the first occasion I performed the complete partitas of Bach; then came the complete sonatas for piano and violin by Beethoven with pianist Klára Würtz. This year the audience will enjoy hearing Mozart’s five violin concertos, three solo works for violin, and the well-known Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat major with violist Máté Szűcs. After the CD recording in 2016, I told myself that I would rather not do that again for years because it is a huge investment of time, energy and effort. Now I am here again, and I have a good reason for that. The rehearsal period will be exciting because I haven’t worked with the Prague Philharmonic before. We will have rehearsals right before the concert with Máté Szűcs, who will be the guest soloist in the Sinfonia Concertante. It will be a short and intense rehearsal period, but I think of it as a challenge and a new opportunity to get to know Mozart even better. Anna Unger

Kristóf Baráti © ZOLTÁN ADRIÁN 15


CONCERT CHRONOLOGY OCTOBER

TUESDAY 2 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Purcell Choir, Orfeo Orchestra (on period instruments) Concertmaster: Simon Standage Conductor: György Vashegyi

KODÁLY PHILHARMONIC DEBRECEN RACHMANINOV 145 – A MASTER OF ROMANTICISM

Concerts organized by Liszt Academy Concert Centre Hosted concert

Tickets: HUF 1 990, 2 990, 3 990, 4 990 Organizers: Sysart Ltd., Orfeo Music Foundation

Rachmaninov: Isle of the Dead – symphonic poem, Op. 29 Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 Symphony No. 1 in D minor, Op. 13

Classical Jazz Opera World / Folk Junior

THURSDAY 4 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

MONDAY 1 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

INTERNATIONAL MUSIC DAY GALA CONCERT OF ESPECIALLY TALENTED VIOLINISTS Wieniawski: Violin Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 22 – 2 nd & 3 rd movements Paganini: Violin Concerto No. 1 in D major, Op. 6 – 3 rd movement Sarasate: Navarra Saint-Saëns: Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 28 Mozart: Adagio in E major, K. 261 Paganini: Violin Concerto No. 2 in B minor, Op. 7 – 3. Rondo à la clochette (‘La campanella’) Arias by Verdi and Tchaikovsky Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto, Op. 35 Zoltán Bácsy-Schwartz, Dániel Hodos, Vanessza Korb, Csongor Korossy-Khayll, Róbert Kuti, Norbert Rácz, Kristóf Tóth (violin) Featuring: Krisztián Szenthelyi (baritone) MÁV Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Miklós Szenthelyi Tickets: HUF 1 900, 3 900, 4 900, 7 900, 14 900 Organizer: Hungarian Virtuosi Artistic Ltd. 16

Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 700, 3 500, 4 900 Organizers: Kodály Philharmonic Orchestra Debrecen, Papageno WEDNESDAY 3 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

PURCELL CHOIR & ORFEO ORCHESTRA Johann Sebastian Bach: Ich hab in Gottes Herz und Sinn – cantata, BWV 92 Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz? – cantata, BWV 138 Siehe zu, daß deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei sei – cantata, BWV 179 Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes – cantata, BWV 76 Adriána Kalafszky, Katalin Szutrély (soprano), Eszter Balogh (alto), Péter Bárány (countertenor), Zoltán Megyesi (tenor), Ákos Borka, Lóránt Najbauer (bass)

COMPLETE WORKS LIVE MOZART VARIATIONS AND SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN/1 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Six Variations in G major on ‘Hélas, j’ai perdu mon amant’, K. 360 Variations in G major on ‘La be rgère Célimène’, K. 359 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 11. in E–flat major, K. 26 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 12 in G major, K. 27 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 13 in C major, K. 28 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 14 in D major, K. 29 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 15 in F major, K. 30 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 16 in B major, K. 31 Vilmos Szabadi (violin), Gábor Farkas (piano) Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Page 54 THURSDAY 4 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

DOHNÁNYI ORCHESTRA BUDAFOK Brahms: Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56a Liszt: Piano Concerto in A major Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 2 in C minor, Op. 17 (‘Little Russian’) GYÖRGY VASHEGYI

MIKLÓS SZENTHELYI

Marcell Szabó (piano) Kodály Philharmonic Orchestra Debrecen Conductor: Dániel Somogyi-Tóth

János Balázs (piano) Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok Conductor: Gábor Hollerung Tickets: HUF 3 000, 3 500, 4 000 Organizer: Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok


FRIDAY 5 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

CHAMBER MUSIC TUNED FOR GRAND HALL GIOVANNI GUZZO, MIKLÓS PERÉNYI & BALÁZS SZOKOLAY CHAMBER RECITAL

DMITRY SINKOVSKY & LA VOCE STRUMENTALE

Chopin: Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 8 Debussy: Nocturne and Scherzo for Cello and Piano Debussy: Sonata for Violin and Piano in D minor Debussy: Piano Trio in G major Chopin: Sonata for Violin and Piano in G minor, Op. 65 Giovanni Guzzo (violin), Miklós Perényi (cello), Balázs Szokolay (piano) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 54 SATURDAY 6 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

CAFe BUDAPEST – CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL JUBILEE GUITAR RECITAL OF THE KATONA TWINS FIFTY-FIFTY Zoltán Katona, Péter Katona (guitar) Organizer: Budapesti Festival and Tourism Centre SATURDAY 6 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

PURE BAROQUE DMITRY SINKOVSKY & LA VOCE STRUMENTALE J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041 Vivaldi: Concerto for Viola d’amore and Lute in D minor, RV 540 Vivaldi: Nisi Dominus, RV 608 Locatelli: Concerto Grosso in E-flat major, Op. 7/6 (‘Il Pianto d’Arianna’) Vivaldi: The Four Seasons – Winter, RV 297 Telemann: Musique de table, Part 2 – Concerto for Three Violins in F major, TWV 53:F1

SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ACOUSTIC, AUTHENTIC BARTÓK AND OTHERS IN VIENNA – SOLDIERS’ SONGS, 1918 JOINT EVENT WITH THE HUNGARIAN HERITAGE HOUSE Concert arrangements of marching songs by Béla Bartók, Zoltán Kodály and Emma Kodály Authentic folk songs from the Carpathian Basin.

Dmitry Sinkovsky (violin, countertenor) Maria Krestinskaya (viola d’amore), Luca Pianca (lute) La Voce Strumentale (artistic leader: Dmitry Sinkovsky) Tickets: HUF 3 700, 5 100, 6 500, 7 800, 8 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Editor: László Kelemen Assistant editor: Dániel Lipták Gergely Agócs (bagpipe, vocals), László Borbély, Ágota Lénárt (piano), Barnabás Kelemen, Gáspár Kelemen (violin), Anna Hideg (Ördöngösfüzes, Transylvania – vocals), László Türei Lengyel (Kalotaszeg, Transylvania – vocals), Andrea Navratil, Eszter Pál, Anna Sőregi (vocals), Péter Szabó (cello) Saint Ephraim Male Choir (artistic director: Tamás Bubnó) Band of the Hungarian State Folk Ensemble

Page 54 SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER, 11.00 SOLTI HALL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC CHURCHES, STARS, ANTHEMS FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS

Tickets: HUF 1 900 Organizers: Liszt Academy Concert Centre, Hungarian Heritage House Page 55

Tractus Stellae (Star Play) – liturgical play from the Middle Ages Márton Levente Horváth: Christe, redemptor omnium Schütz: Symphoniae Sacrae III – ‘Mein Sohn, warum hast du uns das getan’, SWV 401 Students of the Church Music Department and chamber orchestra comprising students of the Liszt Academy (professors: Zoltán Mizsei, Dóra Pétery, Judit Rajk, András Soós) Moderator: Dániel Mona Ticket: HUF 1 400 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 55 17


MONDAY 8 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

TUESDAY 9 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

THURSDAY 11 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

WORKSHOPS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER MUSIC AT A HIGH LEVEL CHAMBER MUSIC DEPARTMENT RECITAL

HUNGARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE RADIO ORCHESTRA

VOCAL MUSIC, SO CLOSE WINTERREISE – FROM A WOMAN'S PERSPECTIVE

J. S. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 Bartók: String Quartet No. 5, BB 110 Stravinsky: L’Histoire du soldat – suite Brahms: Piano Quartet No. 3 in C minor, Op. 60 Attila Falvay, Bálint Kruppa, Miranda Liu, Annamária Ott, Máté Soós, Kristóf Tóth (violin), Haruka Nagao, Boglárka Szűcs (viola), Ágnes Márkus, Judit Szabó, Máté Tomasz (cello), Andor Bóni (double bass), Ildikó Szabady (flute), Péter Balázs (clarinet), Gábor Csalog, Balázs Fülei, Márta Gulyás (piano) Tickets: HUF 1 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 56

Liszt: Appeal and the Hungarian National Anthem (after Ferenc Erkel and Béni Egressy) Dohnányi: Festive Overture, Op. 31 Liszt: Piano Concerto in E-flat major Bartók: Dance Suite, BB 86a Kodály: Budavári Te Deum

Ticket: HUF 3 500 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 2 800, 3 500, 5 000, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian Radio Art Groups

THURSDAY 11 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

WEDNESDAY 10 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

HERE AND NOW JÁNOS BÁLINT & SILESIAN QUARTET Christian Winther Christensen: String Quartet Pēteris Vasks: String Quartet No. 4 Toshio Hosokawa: Fragmente II Sofia Gubaidulina: Reflections on the Theme B-A-C-H Górecki: String Quartet No. 1, Op. 62 (‘Already it is Dusk’)

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Beethoven: Fantasia in G minor, Op. 77 Brahms: Four Piano Pieces, Op. 119 Schumann: Kreisleriana, Op. 16 Schubert: Piano Sonata No. 20 in A major, D. 959 László Borbély (piano) Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Page 57

HUNGARIAN NATIONAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA GREAT COMPOSERS Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15 Zemlinsky: Die Seejungfrau – symphonic poem Simon Trpčeski (piano) Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor: Andrey Boreyko Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 500, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra FRIDAY 12 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Page 56 LÁSZLÓ BORBÉLY

TUESDAY 9 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Emőke Baráth (soprano), Anastasia Razvalyaeva (harp) Director: Eszter Novák Screening: Zsolt Czakó Stage and costume designer: Edit Zeke

Dezső Ránki (piano) Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra and Choir (choirmaster: Zoltán Pad) Conductor: Tamás Vásáry, János Kovács

LÁSZLÓ BORBÉLY PIANO RECITAL

SILESIAN QUARTET

Schubert: Winterreise, D. 911

FOUR BY FOUR QUATUOR EBÈNE Beethoven: String Quartet No. 5 in A major, Op. 18/5 Brahms: String Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 51/1 Beethoven: String Quartet No. 16 in F major, Op. 135

János Bálint (flute) Silesian Quartet: Szymon Krzeszowiec, Arkadiusz Kubica (violin), Łukasz Syrnicki (viola), Piotr Janosik (cello)

Quatuor Ebène: Pierre Colombet, Gabriel Le Magadure (violin), Marie Chilemme (viola), Raphaël Merlin (cello)

Ticket: HUF 1 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 56

Tickets: HUF 2 800, 3 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 57


TUESDAY 16 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

E. Bernstein: The Magnificent Seven Ellington: New World A-Comin' Dvořák: Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 (‘From the New World’)

JAZZ IT! BRUSSELS JAZZ ORCHESTRA ‘WE HAVE A DREAM’ Tutu Puoane (vocals) Brussels Jazz Orchestra

Attila Juhász (piano) Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductor: Azis Sadikovic

Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900, 4 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 2 700, 3 500, 4 200, 4 900 Organizer: Danubia Orchestra Óbuda

Page 58

SATURDAY 20 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

FRIDAY 12 OCTOBER, 19.00 GRAND HALL

MÁV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA MAHLER RECITAL

BJO

MÁV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Mahler: Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen Mahler: Symphony No. 5 MÁV Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Péter Csaba Tickets: HUF 4 500, 5 000, 5 500 Organizer: MÁV Symphony Orchestra SATURDAY 13 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ZUGLÓ PHILHARMONICS Haydn: The Creation, Hob. XXI:2 Katalin Szutrély (soprano), Márton Komáromi (tenor), Lóránt Najbauer (bass) Purcell Choir Zugló Philharmonics Conductor: György Vashegyi Tickets: HUF 2 300, 2 500, 2 900 Organizer: Zugló Philharmonics SUNDAY 14 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

GALA CONCERT OF THE INTERNATIONAL HARP FESTIVAL MVM CONCERTS Andrea Vigh (harp)

CAFe BUDAPEST – CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL BERNSTEIN: TROUBLE IN TAHITI / GYULA FEKETE: ROMAN FEVER Bernstein: Trouble in Tahiti

WEDNESDAY 17 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

BÉLA DRAHOS, ANDREA VIGH & BUDAPEST STRINGS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Mozart: Flute Concerto No. 1 G major, K. 313 Mozart: Flute Concerto No. 2 D major, K. 314 Mozart: Concerto for Flute and Harp in C major, K. 299 Mozart: Andante in C major, K. 315 Andrea Vigh (harp) Budapest Strings Chamber Orchestra (concertmaster: János Pilz, artistic director: Károly Botvay) Flute soloist and conductor: Béla Drahos Tickets: HUF 2 800, 3 800, 4 800, 5 800 Organizer: Budapest Strings Chamber Orchestra

Sam: Marcell Bakonyi, Dinah: Andrea Meláth Trio: Estefanía Avilés (soprano), Róbert Erdős (tenor), Attila Erdős (baritone) Fekete Gyula: Roman Fever Ms Ashley: Andrea Meláth / Makiko Yoshida Ms Slade: Tünde Szabóki / Ayane Imai Costume designer: Lili Izsák Choreographer: Eszter Lázár Director: András Almási-Tóth Budapest Strings Chamber Orchestra Conductor: Péter Dobszay Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000 Organizers: CAFe Budapest Contemporary Arts Festival, Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 59 LEONARD BERNSTEIN

THURSDAY 18 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

DANUBIA ORCHESTRA ÓBUDA Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Organizers: Besszer Concert, Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 58

Cage: 4'33” Ives: The Unanswered Question Copland: The Tender Land – suite 3, The Promise of Living 19


SUNDAY 21 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

WEDNESDAY 24 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

CAFe BUDAPEST – CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL BERNSTEIN: TROUBLE IN TAHITI / GYULA FEKETE: ROMAN FEVER

CONSERVATOIRE CONCERTS STRINGS DEPARTMENT OF THE BARTÓK CONSERVATORY

EMŐKE BARÁTH

Bernstein: Trouble in Tahiti

SATURDAY 20 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

MASTERS OF VOCAL MUSIC PHILIPPE HERREWEGHE & ORCHESTRE DES CHAMPS-ÉLYSÉES Mozart: Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 (‘Jupiter’) Mozart: Requiem, K. 626 Emőke Baráth (soprano), Eva Zaïcik (mezzo-soprano), Maximilian Schmitt (tenor), Florian Boesch (bass) Collegium Vocale Gent Orchestre des Champs-Élysées Conductor: Philippe Herreweghe Tickets: HUF 4 800, 5 900, 7 600, 9 900, 10 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 59 SUNDAY 21 OCTOBER, 11.00 GRAND HALL

THE RENOVATED ORGAN AT THE LISZT ACADEMY PUBLIC FAMILY EVENT Balázs Szabó, László Fassang (organ) Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 60 20

Sam: Marcell Bakonyi, Dinah: Andrea Meláth Trio: Estefanía Avilés (soprano), Róbert Erdős (tenor), Attila Erdős (baritone) Gyula Fekete: Roman Fever Ms Ashley: Andrea Meláth / Makiko Yoshida Ms Slade: Tünde Szabóki / Ayane Imai Costume designer: Lili Izsák Choreographer: Eszter Lázár Director: András Almási-Tóth Budapest Strings Chamber Orchestra Conductor: Péter Dobszay Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000 Organizers: CAFe Budapest Contemporary Arts Festival, Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 59 MONDAY 22 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ORGAN INAUGURATION CONCERT Liszt: Prelude and Fugue for the B-A-C-H Theme Kodály: Laudes organi R. Stauss–Reger: Feierlicher Einzug der Ritter des Johanniterordens Zsigmond Szathmáry: Organ Concerto László Fassang, János Pálúr, István Ruppert, Balázs Szabó (organ) Alma Mater Choir of the Liszt Academy (choirmaster: Csaba Somos) Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra Conductors: Gergely Madaras, Csaba Somos Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 60

Mozart: Divertimento in D major, K. 136 Kreisler: Praeludium and Allegro in the Style of Pugnani Dvořák: Piano Trio No. 2 in G minor, Op. 26 – 3. Scherzo. Presto Dvořák: Terzetto in C major, Op. 74 – 4. Tema con variazioni. Poco adagio – Moderato – Molto allegro Bottesini: Variations on ‘Nel cor più non mi sento’ from Paisiello's La Molinara Sarasate: Caprice basque, Op. 24 Bartók: Fourty-Four Duos for Two Violins (excerpts), BB 104 Vieuxtemps: Fantasia appassionata, Op. 35 Boëllmann: Variations symphoniques, Op. 23 Bloch: Baal shem – 2. Nigun Wieniawski: Scherzo-tarantelle, Op. 16 Bartók: Romanian Folk Dances, BB 68 Featuring: Students of the Béla Bartók Secondary School of Music Ticket: HUF 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 60


KAROLINA CICHA

DUO KOROLIOV

Award winner soloists Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra (concertmaster: Péter Tfirst) Tickets: HUF 2 200, 2 900 Organizers: Franz Liszt Chamber Orchestra, Papageno SATURDAY 27 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

THE PIANO TWICE DUO KOROLIOV J. S. Bach – Evgeni Koroliov: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, BWV 582 (transcription for piano four hands) J. S. Bach – György Kurtág: Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 687 (transcription for piano four hands) J. S. Bach – György Kurtág: Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (Actus tragicus) – cantata, BWV 106 – Sonatina (transcription for piano four hands) J. S. Bach – György Kurtág: Trio Sonata No. 1 in E-flat major, BWV 525 – 1 st Movement Schubert: Fantasia in F minor, D. 940 Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring (arrangement for piano four hands by the composer) Evgeni Koroliov, Ljupka Hadzigeorgieva (piano) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 61 SATURDAY 27 OCTOBER, 18.00 SOLTI HALL

EARLY EVENING BAROQUE WITH THE FRANZ LISZT CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Purcell: Abdelazar Suite Baroque violin concerto with the award winners of the Ilona Fehér Violin Competition Vivaldi: Concerto for Three Violins in F major, RV 551 Händel: Concerto Grosso in F major, HWV 327

E. F. Dall’Abaco: Concerti à quattro da chiesa, Op. 2 – Concerto No. 1 in D minor Avison: Concerti Grossi after Domenico Scarlatti, Op. 6 – Concerto No. 6 in D major J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Violins in D minor, BWV 1043 B. Marcello: Sinfonia in D major from the Oratorio Joaz J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041 J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042 Giuliano Carmignola (violin) Concerto Köln Mayumi Hirasaki (artistic director, violin) Tickets: HUF 3 700, 5 100, 6 500, 7 800, 8 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 61 GIULIANO CARMIGNOLA

THURSDAY 25 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

PURE BAROQUE GIULIANO CARMIGNOLA & CONCERTO KÖLN

SUNDAY 28 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

ACOUSTIC, AUTHENTIC KAROLINA CICHA SACRED MUSIC ‘O Tiebie radujetsia’ – ancient Slavonic religious chant ‘Idzie mój Pan’ – Polish Catholic chant Elazar Azikri: Jedid nefesh – Jewish chant Heinrich von Frauenlob: Ei ich sach in dem trone – ancient German Protestant chant Rumi: Ba man sanama – Sufi chant Franciszek Karpinski: Kiedy ranne wstają zorze – Catholic chant ‘Strannik ’ – Orthodox Christian chant ‘Snirele perele’ – Yiddish chant Psalm 136 – Catholic version Abd al-Muttalib: Salam aleikum – Islamic chant Psalm 136 – Orthodox Christian version Karolina Cicha (vocals, accordion, keyboards, looper, drum machine), Elżbieta Rojek (vocals, harmonium, dance) Featuring: Karolina Matuszkiewicz (vocals, folk string instruments: fiddle from Płock, suka bilgorajska, kamancze, cobza) Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 62 21


TUESDAY 30 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

PRELUDES RECITAL BY KEYBOARD STUDENTS OF THE DOCTORAL SCHOOL/1

TRANSCRIPTIONS RECITAL BY KEYBOARD STUDENTS OF THE DOCTORAL SCHOOL/2

Scriabin: Five Preludes, Op. 74 J. S. Bach: Six Little Preludes, BWV 933-938 Mompou: Twelve Preludes (excerpts) Gershwin: Three Preludes Debussy: Préludes (excerpts) Chopin: Twenty-Four Preludes, Op. 28

György Kurtág: Seven Bach Chorales (transcriptions for piano four hands) Bartók–Kocsis: Two Pictures (arrangement for two pianos) Stravinsky: Two Movements from The Rite of Spring (version for two pianos) Grieg: Transcriptions of Original Songs, Op. 52 – 2. Det forste mote ( The First Meeting), 6. Gamlemor ( The Old Mother) R. Schumann–C. Schumann: Transcriptions of Songs (excerpts) Chopin–Liszt: Seven Polish Songs – 2. Spring, 3. The Ring, 4. Merrymaking Rossi–Bartók: Tre correnti Frescobaldi–Bartók: Toccata quinta sopra i pedali Della Ciaia–Bartók: Canzone Donizetti–Zabel: Solo from the opera Lucia di Lammermoor Mouquet: La flûte de Pan, Op. 15 Franck: Prelude, Fugue and Variation, Op. 18

Keyboard students of the Doctoral School Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Doctoral School Page 62 MONDAY 29 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

MEDIC ORCHESTRA Liszt: Les Préludes – symphonic poem R. Strauss: Four Last Songs Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3 in C minor, Op. 78 (‘Organ’) Polina Pasztircsák (soprano), László Fassang (organ) Medic Orchestra Conductor: Gergely Dubóczky Tickets: HUF 1 700, 2 200, 3 000, 4 900 Organizer: Kaleidofon

Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Doctoral School Page 63 TUESDAY 30 OCTOBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

HUNGARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Varvara Nepomnyashchaya (piano) Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Tamás Vásáry

22

WEDNESDAY 31 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

TALENT OBLIGES GERGELY DEVICH CELLO RECITAL Ravel: Piano Trio in A minor Chopin: Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor, Op. 65 Kodály: Duo for Violin and Cello, Op. 7

Keyboard students of the Doctoral School

Beethoven: Overture to Collin’s Coriolan, Op. 62 Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op. 37 Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 B-flat major, Op. 60

MEDIC ORCHESTRA

GERGELY DEVICH

MONDAY 29 OCTOBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 500, 6 000, 7 000 Organizer: Hungarian Radio Art Group

Gergely Devich (cello) Mária Kovalszki (piano) Éva Osztrosits (violin) Ticket: HUF 1 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 63


International composition Competition PRESENTED BY LISZT ACADEMY, BUDAPEST APPLICATION DEADLINE: 31 AUGUST award ceremony and gala 25 november BARTOKWORLDCOMPETITION.HU


BARTÓK WITH FREEDOM

GYULA FEKETE © ZOLTÁN TUBA 24

‘I tried to tune into the music coming from the collective Eastern European psyche.’ Perhaps this was the quality that enabled Cosima Soulez-Larivirère to be victorious in the first part of the Bartók World Competition and Festival, which was organised for violinists in 2017. The three-round competition performed in the public spotlight brought great acclaim both to the Liszt Academy and to the performers themselves. This year the event series will celebrate its second birthday, but this time, most of the contest will be held in the background: the compositions submitted by the applicants will first be shortlisted by a pre-jury consisting of five teachers from the Composition Department of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music; the selected entries will then go on to be assessed by prestigious international jury members. Not until the closing gala concert will the audience have the opportunity to listen to the outcome of the preceding eight months of hard labour, in the form of the award-winning piano pieces from the composition round of the Bartók World Competition, which are to be performed by the most outstanding pianists of the Hungarian music scene. The composer Gyula Fekete will be a member of both juries. According to the artistic director of this year’s competition round, the gala concert will be a momentous event not only in the life of the Liszt Academy but also on the entire Hungarian music scene. There are various competitions bearing Bartók’s name both in Hungary and abroad, but at the Liszt Academy, we wished to establish a contest series which presents Bartók’s genius in its multifaceted forms while, at the same time, connecting him clearly to Hungary and to the Liszt Academy. When people hear Bartók’s name, what ought to come to their minds is Hungary and the Liszt Academy, places where he was active as an academic, as a student and as a performing artist, and where many of his works were introduced to the stage. The competition was the brainchild of Dr Andrea Vigh, president of the institution, and was designed to draw the world’s attention to Bartók at this time, when the property rights of his instrumental works expire and enter into the public domain, to be accessed, performed and adapted free of charge by anyone. The Bartók World Competition and Festival is not a single event but rather a continual event series, a competition sequence, if you like. Every second year, instrumental soloists or formations pit their talents against one another, with competitions focusing on Bartók’s compositions written for the piano, the violin or for string quartets, as it these forms that play the most significant roles in his oeuvre. The years in between provide composers with the opportunity to compete and to establish some of the compulsory repertoire for the following year’s instrumental competition. This year’s contest has been announced on every media channel available for the composers of the world to see and use, including international composers’ websites and the largest music universities of


the world: we seek to reach as many composers as possible with the announcement of the competition. It is a great honour for us that we have managed to recruit significant international jury members and composers to our cause, people who are at the forefront of contemporary music. Their presence will lend prestige to both the Hungarian music scene and the Liszt Academy itself. The list of the highly distinguished jurors – composers Tomas Adès, Chaya Czernowin and Unsuk Chin, as well pianist Andrei Korobeinikov – will hold special attraction for the global community of composers. On a personal note, I feel extremely privileged to be part of this jury. We invite our audience to the gala concert in November when we introduce the finalists of the contest. This event is open to everyone: to lovers of piano music as well as to all those who are open to contemporary music and who wish to become familiar with the highest-quality piano pieces of our time.

BÉLA BARTÓK © LISZT ACADEMY / LIBRARY 25


CONCERT CHRONOLOGY NOVEMBER

SARAH CHANG

SATURDAY 3 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

CONCERTO BUDAPEST Concerts organized by Liszt Academy Concert Centre Hosted concert

Barber: Adagio for Strings, Op. 11 Dvořák: Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 Schubert: Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944

Classical Jazz Opera World / Folk Junior

Tickets: HUF 2 200, 3 100, 3 900, 4 800, 5 900 Organizer: Concerto Budapest

THURSDAY 1 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

HUNGARIAN NATIONAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA EVERLASTING LIGHT

MONDAY 5 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

GYŐR PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

ISABELLE FAUST

ANTONÍN DVOŘÁK

Isabelle Faust (violin) Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller

SUNDAY 4 NOVEMBER, 11.00 SOLTI HALL

Dvořák: Requiem, Op. 89

GALA CONCERT OF THE NATIONAL EDE ZATHURECZKY VIOLIN COMPETITION

Gabriella Balga (soprano), Bernadett Wiedemann (alto), Tomáš Juhás (tenor), István Kovács (bass) Hungarian National Choir (choirmaster: Csaba Somos) Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor: Zsolt Hamar

Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47 Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 in E minor, Op. 64 Sarah Chang (violin) Győr Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor: Kálmán Berkes Tickets: HUF 6 000, 8 000 Organizer: Győr Philharmonic Orchestra TUESDAY 6 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

LÁSZLÓ BARANYAY PIANO RECITAL J. S. Bach: ‘Schafe können sicher weiden’ – aria from the cantata Was mir behagt, ist nur die muntre Jagd! Bartók: Romanian Christmas Songs, BB 67 Bartók: Out of Doors, BB 89 Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110 Schubert: Piano Sonata No. 18 in G major, D. 894 László Baranyay (piano)

Page 68 Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 500, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra FRIDAY 2 NOVEMBER, 19.00 GRAND HALL

MÁV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Verdi: Requiem Women’s Choir of the Budapest Studio Choir, Honvéd Male Choir, MÁV Symphony Orchestra Tickets: HUF 4 500, 5 000, 5 500 Organizer: MÁV Symphony Orchestra 26

SUNDAY 4 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

CONCERTO BUDAPEST Barber: Adagio for Strings, Op. 11 Dvořák: Violin Concerto in A minor, Op. 53 Schubert: Symphony No. 9 in C major, D. 944 Isabelle Faust (violin) Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller Tickets: HUF 2 200, 3 100, 3 900, 4 800, 5 900 Organizer: Concerto Budapest

Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 68 TUESDAY 6 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ORGAN INAUGURATION CHRISTOPH BOSSERT ORGAN RECITAL Vivaldi-J. S. Bach: Concerto for Organ in A minor, BWV 593 J. S. Bach: Fantasia in C major, BWV 573 (excerpt) J. S. Bach: Fantasia in C major, BWV 573 (with additions of Christoph Bossert)


Schubert: Piano Sonata No. 16 in A minor, D. 845 – 1 st & 2 nd movements (arrangement by Christoph Bossert) Mendelssohn: Prelude and Fugue for Piano No. 1 in E minor, Op. 35/1 (arrangement by Christoph Bossert) Reger: Organ Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 60 – 1. Improvisation Reger: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme – choral fantasy, Op. 52/2

THURSDAY 8 NOVEMBER, 19.45 GRAND HALL

Boris Berezovsky (piano)

BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Tickets: HUF 4 000, 5 000, 6 000, 8 000, 10 000, 12 000 Organizers: Besszer Concert, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Christoph Bossert (organ)

Dávid Bereczky (horn) Budapest Festival Orchestra Conductor: Gábor Takács-Nagy

GÁBOR FARKAS, VILMOS SZABADI

Page 68

Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 7 100, 11 800 Organizer: Budapest Festival Orchestra FRIDAY 9 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

ANJA LECHNER & PABLO MARQUEZ BUDAPEST INTERNATIONAL GUITAR FESTIVAL 2018 Anja Lechner (cello), Pablo Marquez (guitar) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 600, 3 500 Organizer: Eötvös Music Foundation

THURSDAY 8 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

FRIDAY 9 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

COMPLETE WORKS LIVE MOZART VARIATIONS AND SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN/2

BORIS BEREZOVSKY PIANO RECITAL MVM CONCERTS – THE PIANO

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 17 in C major, K. 296 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 18 in G major, K. 301 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 19 in E-flat major, K. 302 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 20 in C major, K. 303 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 21 E minor, K. 304 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 22 in A major, K. 305

Balakirev: Two Mazurkas Balakirev: Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor Balakirev: Nocturne No. 1 in B-flat minor Balakirev: Scherzo No. 3 in F-sharp major Balakirev: Islamey Lyadov: Barcarolle, Op. 44 Lyadov: Mazurka Lyadov: Four Preludes, Op. 13 Rachmaninov: Thirteen Preludes, Op. 32 (excerpts) Scriabin: Eight Etudes, Op. 42 (excerpts) Scriabin: Three Etudes, Op. 65 Scriabin: Sonata No. 5, Op. 53 Stravinsky: Three Movements from the Ballet Petrushka

Vilmos Szabadi (violin), Gábor Farkas (piano) Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 69

Page 69 SATURDAY 10 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

ANABEL MONTESINOS & MARCO TAMAYO BUDAPEST INTERNATIONAL GUITAR FESTIVAL 2018 Anabel Montesinos, Marco Tamayo (guitar) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 600, 3 500 Organizer: Eötvös Music Foundation SATURDAY 10 NOVEMBER, 19.45 GRAND HALL

BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA Mozart: Symphony No. 32 in G major, K. 318 R. Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 1 in E-flat major, Op. 11 Haydn: L’isola disabitata – overture, Hob. XXVIII:9 Haydn: Symphony No. 52 in C minor, Hob. I:52 Dávid Bereczky (horn) Budapest Festival Orchestra Conductor: Gábor Takács-Nagy Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 7 100, 11 800 Organizer: Budapest Festival Orchestra GÁBOR TAKÁCS-NAGY

Tickets: HUF 900, 1 600, 2 200, 2 900, 3 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Mozart: Symphony No. 32 in G major, K. 318 R. Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 1 in E-flat major, Op. 11 Haydn: L’isola disabitata – overture, Hob. XXVIII:9 Haydn: Symphony No. 52 in C minor, Hob. I:52

27


MONDAY 12 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

TUESDAY 13 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

COMPOSITION PROJECT BY THE LISZT ACADEMY AND GUILDHALL SCHOOL OF MUSIC & DRAMA

HUNGARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA TAMÁS VÁSÁRY CONVERSATION CONCERTS

SUNDAY 11 NOVEMBER, 11.00 SOLTI HALL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC PEOPLES, RITES, MEN FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS

Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Songs from the past from arabic, Greek, Roman, Russian, Georgian and other lands László Sáry: Psalm Canon

Page 70

Saint Ephraim Male Choir (artistic director: Tamás Bubnó) Moderator: Dániel Mona

VOCAL MUSIC, SO CLOSE SLAVONIC SONGS AND POPULAR OPERA ARIAS LUCYNA JARZĄBEK

Page 70 SUNDAY 11 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

BEIJING GUITAR DUO BUDAPEST INTERNATIONAL GUITAR FESTIVAL 2018 Beijing Guitar Duo: Meng Su, Yameng Wang (guitar) Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 900, 3 900, 4 900 Organizer: Eötvös Music Foundation

Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian Radio Art Groups

TUESDAY 13 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Slavonic songs from Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Szymanowski, and opera arias from Moniuszko, Gounod, Dvořák, Mozart, Massenet, Menotti and Puccini Lucyna Jarząbek (soprano) Featuring: László Boldizsár (tenor), Anna Lasek-Starzec (piano)

WEDNESDAY 14 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Ticket: HUF 1 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

CONCERTO ARMONICO C. P. E. BACH 230

Page 70

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: Symphony in D major, Wq 176 Flute Concerto in D major, Wq 13 Sonatina in C major, Wq 106 Harpsichord Concerto in G minor, Wq 32

LUCYNA JARZĄBEK

Ticket: HUF 1 400 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Tamás Vásáry

TAMÁS VÁSÁRY

Featuring: students of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music

János Bálint (flute) Concerto Armonico Budapest (concertmaster: Gábor Homoki, artistic director: Miklós Spányi) Tickets: HUF 2 900, 3 500 Organizers: Liszt Academy Concert Centre, Concerto Armonico Budapest

BEIJING GUITAR DUO

28

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GERGELY MÉNESI

Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Zoltán Megyesi (tenor), Viviane Hagner, Alexander Janiczek (violin), Thomas Demenga, Rafael Rosenfeld (cello), Gabriella Pivon (flute), Heinz Holliger (oboe), Reto Bieri, Csaba Klenyán (clarinet), György Lakatos (bassoon), Zoltán Szőke (horn), Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) String Orchestra of the Liszt Academy (conductor: Heinz Holliger)

Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 72

Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Kodály: Dances of Marosszék Gyula Fekete: Cello Concerto Debussy: Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune Debussy: La Mer Barnabás Baranyai (cello) Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Gergely Ménesi Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 71 THURSDAY 15 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/1 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Beethoven: Clarinet Trio in B-flat major, Op. 11 Ligeti: Six Bagatelles Beethoven: Twenty-Five Scottish Songs, Op. 108 (excerpts) Haydn: Piano Trio No. 25 in G major, Hob. XV:25 Heinz Holliger: Rechant Bartók: Divertimento, BB 118

MARY ELLEN WOODSIDE RAFAEL ROSENFELD

MASTERS OF THE ORCHESTRA GERGELY MÉNESI & LISZT ACADEMY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ZAK 143

Page 72 THURSDAY 15 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

CONCERT ON THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF DEBUSSY MVM CONCERTS - DEBUSSY 100

FRIDAY 16 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune Debussy: Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp Debussy: Deux danses Debussy: Works for two pianos and piano four hands

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/2 THE GLASS BEAD GAME

Andrea Vigh (harp), Edit Klukon, Dezső Ránki (piano) and others ANDREA VIGH

WEDNESDAY 14 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Doráti: Duo Concertante Veress: Sonatina Brahms: Piano Trio No. 3 in C minor, Op. 101 Heinz Holliger: „COncErto“– collage Brahms: Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Viviane Hagner (violin), Ditta Rohmann (cello), Heinz Holliger (english horn), Reto Bieri, Csaba Klenyán (clarinet), György Lakatos (bassoon), Roman Rabinovich, Dénes Várjon (piano) Merel Quartet: Mary Ellen Woodside, Edouard Mätzener (violin), Alessandro D’Amico (viola), Rafael Rosenfeld (cello) Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 72 29


DÉNES VÁRJON

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER, 11.00 CUPOLA HALL

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER, 18.30 AUDITORIUM

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY GOLDIPEGS AND THE THREE CELLOS THE GLASS BEAD GAME

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MUSIC AND VISUALITY THE GLASS BEAD GAME Roman Rabinovich’s programme – music and visuality

Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Izabella Simon and the artists of the kamara.hu Editor-host: Izabella Simon

Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Diana Cohen (violin), Roman Rabinovich (piano)

Ticket: HUF 1 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Selection from the winter feast music of the lithurgical year Gregorian hymns, antiphons and mass movements, early polyphonic music Arrangements of Advent and Christmas chants by Du Fay, Josquin, Stoltzer, Porta, Lassus, Palestrina and G. Gabrieli Movements from the Anna Hansen Schuman codex of Bratislava Chorale transcriptions by Praetorius, Schein and Scheidt Two choir pieces from Advent and Christmas with instrument accompaniment by Benedek Istvánffy Organ cycles by L. Couperin, Reger, Tournemire, Messiaen and Dupré (excerpts) Tamás Bódiss, Pál Enyedi, Márton Levente Horváth, György Merczel, János Mezei, Zoltán Mizsei, Dóra Pétery, Judit Rajk, András Soós (professors of the department) Choir comprising current and former, students of the Church Music Department, Chamber Orchestra comprising current and former students of the Liszt Academy Ticket: HUF 1 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 73 30

Page 73

Ticket: HUF 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 74

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER, 17.00 CUPOLA HALL

ROMAN RABINOVICH

WORKSHOPS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MUSIC OF THE WINTER CELEBRATION RECITAL BY THE CHURCH MUSIC DEPARTMENT

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/3 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Helena Winkelman: The Clock Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Reto Bieri (clarinet), Alexander Janiczek (violin), Dénes Várjon (piano) Merel Quartet: Mary Ellen Woodside, Edouard Mätzener (violin), Alessandro D’Amico (viola), Rafael Rosenfeld (cello) Ticket: HUF 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 74 RETO BIERI

FRIDAY 16 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/4 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Haydn: String Quartet No. 27 in D major, Hob. III:34 Veress: Hommage à Paul Klee Beethoven: Variations in G major on Wenzel Müller’s Theme ‘Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu’, Op. 121a Kurtág: Signs, Games, Messages – In Nomine - all’ongherese; Einen Augenblick lang; ...ein Brief aus der Ferne an Ursula Schumann: Piano Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 47


Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900, 4 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 74 SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER, 11.00 GRAND HALL

UNDERSTANDABLE MUSIC DOHNÁNYI ORCHESTRA BUDAFOK THE MILESTONES OF MUSIC HISTORY J. S. Bach: Jesu meine Freude – motet, BWV 227 Purcell Choir (choirmaster: György Vashegyi) Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok Moderator and conductor: Gábor Hollerung

VIVIANE HAGNER

Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Alexander Janiczek, Anthony Marwood (violin), Jürg Dähler (viola), Rohmann Ditta (cello), Heinz Holliger (oboe, english horn), Roman Rabinovich, Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) Merel Quartet: Mary Ellen Woodside, Edouard Mätzener (violin), Alessandro D’Amico (viola), Rafael Rosenfeld (cello) String Orchestra of the Liszt Academy (conductor: Heinz Holliger) SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER, 15.30 SOLTI HALL

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/5 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Schubert: Piano Trio Movement in E-flat major, D. 897 (‘Notturno’) Schubert: Schwanengesang, D. 957 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Zoltán Megyesi (tenor), Viviane Hagner (violin), Ditta Rohmann (cello), Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano)

SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/6 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Debussy: Sonata for flute, viola and harp Mozart: Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat major, K. 493 Liszt: Orpheus – symphonic poem (arrangement by Camille Saint-Saëns) Ravel: Chansons madécasses Fauré: Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Lúcia Megyesi Schwartz (mezzosoprano), Viviane Hagner, Andrea Hallam, Anthony Marwood (violin), Jürg Dähler (viola), Thomas Demenga (cello), Gabriella Pivon (flute), Andrea Vigh (harp), Roman Rabinovich, vIzabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 76 ANTHONY MARWOOD

Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 75

PURCELL CHOIR & ORFEO ORCHESTRA

Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 200, 2 700, 3 200 Organizer: Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok

SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER, 17.00 CAFE

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY BETWEEN THE FOUR OF US – CONVERSATION ON FILM, LITERATURE AND MUSIC THE GLASS BEAD GAME Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Guests: Ildikó Enyedi and Wilhelm Droste Participating: Anthony Marwood (violin) Ticket: HUF 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 75

SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

DOHNÁNYI ORCHESTRA BUDAFOK András Gábor Virágh: Sinfonietta Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 9 in E-flat major, K. 271 (‘Jeunehomme’) Prokofiev: Symphony No. 7 in C-sharp minor, Op. 131 31


Diána Fuchs (piano) Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok Conductor: Guido Mancusi

THURSDAY 22 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Tickets: HUF 3 000, 3 500, 4 000 Organizer: Dohnányi Orchestra Budafok

Rautavaara: Symphony No. 7 (‘Angel of Light’) Liszt: Symphony to Dante’s Divine Comedy (‘Dante Symphony’)

SATURDAY 24 NOVEMBER, 15.30 GRAND HALL

DANUBIA ORCHESTRA ÓBUDA

ZUGLÓ PHILHARMONICS MEMORIAL CONCERT ON THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF JÓZSEF ZÁBORSZKY Sibelius: Finlandia – tone poem, Op. 26 Sibelius: Violin Concerto in D minor, Op. 47 József Záborszky: Litania pro pace Liszt: Les Préludes – symphonic poem

Pro Musica Girls Choir Nyíregyháza (choirmaster: Dénes Szabó) Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductor: Balázs Kocsár Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200, 3 800, 4 700 Organizer: Danubia Orchestra Óbuda

ENDRE HEGEDŰS

Tickets: HUF 2 300, 2 500, 2 900 Organizer: Zugló Philharmonics

ARVO PÄRT

SATURDAY 24 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

SUNDAY 20 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Chopin: Variations in D major on a Theme of Moore Polonaise No. 1 in C-sharp minor, Op. 26/1 Polonaise No. 3 in A major, Op. 40/1 Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66 (Fantaisie-impromptu’) Waltz No. 7 in C-sharp minor, Op. 64/2 Waltz No. 6 in D-flat major, Op. 64/1 (‘Minute’) Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor, Op. 31 Rondo in C major for Two Pianos, Op. 73 Nocturne No. 1 in B-flat minor, Op. 9/1 Nocturne No. 2 in E-flat major, Op. 9/2 Scherzo No. 3 C-sharp minor, Op. 39 Three Mazurkas, Op. 59 Fantasy in F minor, Op. 49

Arvo Pärt: Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten Adam’s Lament Salve Regina Te Deum

Endre Hegedűs, Katalin Hegedűs (piano)

Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 000, 3 500 Organizer: Stúdió Liszt Ltd. 32

FRIDAY 23 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

TALLINN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA & ESTONIAN PHILHARMONIC CHAMBER CHOIR ARVO PÄRT

JAZZ IT! MIKLÓS LUKÁCS-CIMBIOSIS TRIO & RICARDO IZQUIERDO Miklós Lukács (cimbalom), György Orbán (double bass), István Baló (percussion) Ricardo Izquierdo (saxophone) Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 76

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir Tallinn Chamber Orchestra Conductor: Tõnu Kaljuste

Page 76

CIMBIOSIS TRIO

ENDRE HEGEDŰS CHOPIN RECITAL ‘IT WAS AS CLEAN AS A TEARDROP’

Katariina Záborszky (violin) Veronika Geszthy (soprano), András Molnár (tenor), István Berczelly (bass) King St Stephen Oratorio Choir Zugló Philharmonics Conductor: Kálmán Záborszky


PIERRE HANTAÏ

ANDREAS STAIER

TUESDAY 27 NOVEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

BLACK AND WHITE COLOURS ANDREAS STAIER FORTEPIANO RECITAL Mozart: Fantasia in C minor, K. 475 Haydn: Keyboard Sonata No. 59 in E-flat major, Hob. XVI:49 Beethoven: Six bagatelles, Op. 126 Schubert: Impromptu in C minor, D. 899/1 Schubert: Impromptu in A-flat major, D. 935/2 Schubert: Six moments musicaux, D. 780 Andreas Staier (fortepiano) Tickets: HUF 2 200, 2 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

BARTÓK WORLD COMPETITION & FESTIVAL – COMPOSITION COMPETITION AWARD CEREMONY & GALA CONCERT Ticket: HUF 1 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 77 MONDAY 26 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

BUDAPEST PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY ORCHESTRA BFTZ 165 Erkel: Hunyadi László – overture A. Kraft: Cello Concerto in C major, Op. 4 Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2 in C-sharp minor Kodály: Dances of Galánta Mussorgsky: Pictures at an Exhibition István Várdai (cello) Budapest Philharmonic Society Orchestra Conductors: Ádám Medveczky, Gergely Madaras Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 300, 4 100, 4 900 Organizer: Budapest Philharmonic Society Orchestra

Page 77 TUESDAY 27 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

HUNGARIAN RADIO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Weber: Oberon – overture Schumann: Cello Concerto in A minor, Op. 129 Brahms: Symphony No. 2 in D major, Op. 73 Miklós Perényi (cello) Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Carlo Montanaro

PURE BAROQUE BORBÁLA DOBOZY, PIERRE HANTAÏ & AURA MUSICALE J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C minor, BWV 1060 J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C major, BWV 1061 J. S. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C minor, BWV 1062 Borbála Dobozy, Pierre Hantaï (harpsichord), Noémi Győri (flute), László Paulik (violin) Aura Musicale (artistic director: Balázs Máté) Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 78

Tickets: HUF 2 800, 3 500, 5 000, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra DÉNES VÁRJON

SUNDAY 25 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

MONDAY 29 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

FRIDAY 30 NOVEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

DÉNES VÁRJON PIANO RECITAL MVM CONCERTS – THE PIANO J. S. Bach: Partita No. 3 in A minor, BWV 827 Brahms: Six Piano Pieces, Op. 118 Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major, Op. 106 (‘Hammerklavier’) Dénes Várjon (piano) Tickets: HUF 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000, 8 000 Organizers: Besszer Concert, Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 78 33


THE HARMONY OF DIVERSITY Camerata Bern has worked with guest soloists of the likes of Jean-Pierre Rampal, Gidon Kremer, Maurice André, Vadim Repin, Heinz Holliger, and András Schiff. As the ensemble began their rehearsal with guest soloist Balázs Fülei for the concert the next day at Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music, we continued to explore the museum together, and under a portrait of Liszt we found an appropriate place to talk.

CAMERATA BERN 34

You lived the life of a full-time musician for a long time. Have you ever performed in concert with Camerata Bern as a flautist? I didn’t play with the ensemble, but I worked with some of its members in chamber concerts or taught them in music schools. However, from the early nineties I became more and more interested in management and started to work with a Baroque ensemble. In 2006 Camerata Bern enquired whether I would like to work with them because they were dissatisfied with their director. Understandably, they sought somebody they had known for a long time. You took over a world-renowned ensemble, which was founded in 1962. In what ways do you think Camerata Bern has differed from those other ensembles which were also founded by students and which split a few years later when they ran out of steam? The founder members were very talented musicians; all of them were the students of the violinist Max Rostal, who taught in Bern in those days. Even now we have a violinist in the ensemble who was a student of his.


So, they were very talented. I also think there was a bit of luck involved, but it was mainly due to the success and the recognition they earned so soon after their formation. Just four years after their founding, they were invited on a 20-week tour around the world. Incidentally, Sándor Végh’s quartet was on its own tour following the same route at the same time, but they set off in the opposite direction. The two ensembles finally met in New Zealand. You mean this rapid success boosted their collective energies? Indeed, it gave them a great boost. In the early ’70s they got many fantastic record deals, such as with Deutsche Grammophon, and they also gave numerous performances. Around that time Camerata Bern rediscovered the long-forgotten 17 th-century Czech composer Jan Dismas Zelenka and made several records of his works. This was a kind of musical revolution given that nobody knew the composer’s music, and it gave fresh impetus to the ensemble. Then came the Füri era. Thomas Füri, also a student of Rostal, joined the ensemble as a second violinist in 1967. Eleven years later he became the concertmaster and artistic director of the camerata and worked with them until 1993. His influence was elemental, and many regard this time as Camerata Bern’s golden age. Tours and recordings followed one another, most of them being of Baroque music; they performed the concertos of Tartini, Geminiani and, of course, Bach, for the most part with Heinz Holliger. At the same time, they were engaged with contem­ porary music too, and many contemporary composers wrote pieces for Camerata Bern, including Sándor Veress. The ensemble has always been characterized by the diversity of the repertoire. And now you have broadened it further to several theatrical performances… I’m convinced that we need to leave the concert halls as much as we can, and we must transcend the traditional frameworks of our work. When we first took part in such a project – a dance performance with the Bern Municipal Theatre – we didn’t have a plan or a printed programme, we just played parts from pieces by Tartini, Martinů, Penderecki and Silvestrov. The music was jumbled, and the audience didn’t know exactly what we were playing – but they enjoyed it! Then we were asked to play Baroque music, mostly by Corelli and Vivaldi, in another dance performance. The third joint production with the theatre was an opera, Monteverdi’s Orfeo, three years ago. And you had another theatre premiere a few weeks ago. This play evokes a strange conversation between well-known figures of the 20th century. Yes, the rehearsals started this spring. The title of the play is The Formula, or the Invention of the 20 th Century. It’s about an imaginary meeting between Einstein, Paul Klee, Lenin and the Swiss writer Robert Walser at the Bern Central Station in 1905 – by the way this meeting could have happened in reality. The premiere was in March, and the music is by the German composer Torsten Rasch.

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You mentioned that you willingly perform in unusual venues. Would you care to mention some? In Dresden we played in the glass hall of a car factory. We could look through the glass walls from the stage and see the cars ready for assembly. Two years ago we gave a concert in Basel in a large joinery where furniture is made for department stores. In March we performed again at a rather unusual venue, the Bern Museum of Natural History. The music was Peter and the Wolf by Prokofiev but the story had been rewritten. The title of the play was Alarm at the Hospital of Animals. Our musicians played in a large hall amid stuffed animals. Earlier this year you gave another unusual performance called War and Chips. What do these two things have to do with each other? In the performance there was an actor sitting on the stage, eating chips and watching war reports on the television. All of the music played in the performance was related to a certain war in history. First, we played a piece by Heinrich Ignaz Franz Biber which was composed during the Thirty Years’ War. That was mixed with George Crumb’s piece titled Black Angels, which was composed as a response to the Vietnam War. In other words, we mixed Baroque music with a contemporary piece from the 1970s. Then we played Honegger’s Symphony No. 2, which reflects the horrors of the Second World War. Finally, we played the Violin Concerto in A major by Mozart, which evokes the Ottoman wars. We played these pieces one after the other for one and a half hours without interruption. The audience didn’t have a chance to applaud. It was a joint project with Patricia Kopatchinskaya, who had come up with this concept. From this autumn Patricia Kopatchinskaya will also be the new artistic director of Camerata Bern. Yes, and again a new chapter begins in the ensemble’s history. Gabriella Bokor

AT THE CAMERATA BERN CONCERT ON 8 FEBRUARY 2018 © GÁBOR VALUSKA 36


YOU CAN BE OUR STUDENT AS WELL! If you are a student at any school, you can get into our concerts for just HUF 500. Show us a valid student ID card and you can purchase a HUF 500 student ticket one hour before the concert for vacant seats and standing places in the 2nd floor student gallery of the Grand Hall. Only one student ticket can be purchased per student ID card for each performance.


Concerts organized by Liszt Academy Concert Centre Hosted concert Classical Jazz Opera World / Folk Junior

Cantemus Mixed Choir, Cantemus Children’s Choir, Pro Musica Children’s Choir Instrument players of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music Conductors: Dénes Szabó, Soma Szabó Ticket: HUF 1 200 Organizers: Cantemus Mixed Choir, Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 86 SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

TALENT OBLIGES BALÁZS DEMÉNY PIANO RECITAL

SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER, 10.30 GRAND HALL

SECRETS OF MUSIC ’SAVE AS’ OR BARTÓK’S MUSIC NOWADAYS Anima Musicae Chamber Orchestra (artistic director: László G. Horváth) Dezső Oláh Trio: Dezső Oláh (piano), Péter Oláh (double bass), András Pecek Lakatos (percussion)

J. S. Bach: ‘Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland’ – cantata, BWV 61 Kuhnau: Magnificat J. S. Bach: ‘Was willst du dich betrüben’ – cantata, BWV 107 J. S. Bach: Magnificat, BWV 243 Purcell Choir, Orfeo Orchestra (on period instruments) Conductor: György Vashegyi Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 87 MONDAY 3 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

JAZZ IT! FERENC SNÉTBERGER & KELLER QUARTET

Page 86 SUNDAY 2 DECEMBER, 11.00 SOLTI HALL

SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER, 18.00 GRAND HALL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC BELIEVERS, COLOURS, RHYTHMS FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS

Miklós Kocsár: Works for Children’s Choir to the poems by Imre Csanádi. Three Pieces for Children’s Choir to Poems by Sándor Kányádi Seven Pieces for Women’s Choir to Poems by László Nagy Csodafiú szarvas (Miracle-Son Stag) – to the poem by László Nagy Folk prayers from the collection of Zsuzsanna Erdélyi Jubilate Deo

PURCELL CHOIR & ORFEO ORCHESTRA ADVENT & MAGNIFICAT IN ST THOMAS’ CHURCH – BACH & KUHNAU

Balázs Demény (piano)

Tickets: HUF 2 500 Organizer: Filharmónia Hungary

FESTIVE CONCERT FOR THE 85TH BIRTHDAY OF MIKLÓS KOCSÁR

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Attila Demény: Ten Piano Pieces Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109 Schumann: Fantasie in C major, Op. 17 Liszt: Bagatelle ohne Tonart Ligeti: Etudes – 13. L’escalier du Diable

SUNDAY 2 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Spirituals, gospels and songs of George Gershwin Jazz And More Vocal Ensemble Júlia Karosi Quartet: Júlia Karosi (vocals), Áron Tálas (piano), Ádám Bögöthy (double bass), Bendegúz Varga (percussion) Moderator: Dániel Mona Ticket: HUF 1 400 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

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Ferenc Snétberger (guitar) Keller Quartet: András Keller, Zsófia Környei (violin), Zoltán Gál (viola), Judit Szabó (cello) Tickets: HUF 2 900, 4 100, 5 200, 6 500 Organizers: Liszt Academy Concert Centre, a-s promotion Page 87 FERENC SNÉTBERGER

CONCERT CHRONOLOGY DECEMBER


DITTA ROHMANN

Chamber Orchestra comprising 1st- and 2nd-year bachelor's degree students at the Liszt Academy Conductor: Péter Kováts Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Medtner: Tale in E minor, Op. 34/2 Medtner: Danza silvestra, Op. 38/7 Medtner: Alla reminiscenza, Op. 38/8 Medtner: Danza festiva, Op. 38/3 Glinka-Balakirev: Fantasia on Themes from Glinka’s A Life for the Tsar Tchaikovsky-Pletnev: The Sleeping Beauty suite, Op. 66 István Lajkó (piano)

Page 88 Tickets: HUF 2 200, 2 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

THURSDAY 6 DECEMBER, 19.00 GRAND HALL

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MÁV SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Kodály: Cello Sonata, Op. 8 Ligeti: Cello Sonata Péter Eötvös: Two Poems to Polly György Kurtág: Signs, Games and Messages (excerpts) Barnabás Dukay: A hit mindenhatóságának keresztútja (instrumental monody) Barnabás Dukay: Láttam Uramat a szívem szemével (instrumental monody) J. M. C. Dall’Abaco: Eleven Capriccios (excerpts)

Alexander Ghindin (piano) MÁV Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Yury Tkachenko Tickets: HUF 4 500, 5 000, 5 500 Organizer: MÁV Symphony Orchestra

LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT BY 1ST- AND 2ND-YEAR BACHELOR'S DEGREE STUDENTS Tchaikovsky: Serenade in C major, Op. 48 Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21

J. S. Bach: Piano Concerto No. 3 in D major, BWV 1054 Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21 Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74 (‘Pathétique’) Dénes Várjon (piano) Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller Tickets: HUF 2 200, 3 100, 3 900, 4 800, 5 900 Organizer: Concerto Budapest

JAZZ IT! KÁROLY BINDER (PIANO)

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

WEDNESDAY 5 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

CONCERTO BUDAPEST

SATURDAY 8 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Ditta Rohmann (cello)

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FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

Károly Binder (piano) FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

BLACK AND WHITE COLOURS ISTVÁN LAJKÓ PIANO RECITAL Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in C major, Op. 87/1 Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in a minor, Op. 87/2 Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in D major, Op. 87/5 Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in D-flat major, Op. 87/15 Medtner: Tale in E minor, Op. 14/2 (March of the Paladin)

Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 89 KÁROLY BINDER

HERE AND NOW DITTA ROHMANN

ISTVÁN LAJKÓ

TUESDAY 4 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

Prokofiev: Lieutenant Kijé – suite, 4. Troika Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Op. 18 Tchaikovsky: The Nutcracker (excerpts)

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MARK SIMPSON

SUNDAY 9 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

RAINBOW AND ABYSS CONCERT ON THE 110TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF OLIVIER MESSIAEN Messiaen: Preludes Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps Lisa Romain (violin), Horia Dumitrache (clarinet), Tamás Zétényi (cello), László Borbély (piano) Ticket: HUF 1 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

CONTEMPORARY ENSEMBLE OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MARK SIMPSON COMPOSER’S EVENING

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Works by Mark Simpson THE MONUMENT OF MESSIAEN

ANDRÁS KELLER & DÉNES VÁRJON

TUESDAY 11 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

SATURDAY 8 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

CONCERTO BUDAPEST J. S. Bach: Piano Concerto No. 3 in D major, BWV 1054 Chopin: Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21 Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74 (‘Pathétique')

Featuring: students of the Liszt Academy of Music Conductor: Mark Simpson Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Dénes Várjon (piano) Concerto Budapest Conductor: András Keller Tickets: HUF 2 200, 3 100, 3 900, 4 800, 5 900 Organizer: Concerto Budapest SATURDAY 8 DECEMBER, 22.00 GRAND HALL

CONCERTO BUDAPEST – PREMIERE II. WORKS BY ZOLTÁN JENEY Zoltán Jeney: Alef – Hommage à Schönberg (world premiere) Zoltán Jeney: Chinese Temple (world premiere) Concerto Budapest Conductor: Zoltán Rácz Tickets: HUF 1 000 Organizer: Concerto Budapest 40

MONDAY 10 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT OF 3RD-YEAR BACHELOR'S DEGREE STUDENTS Mendelssohn: The Hebrides – overture, Op. 26 Dvořák: Mazurka in E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 49 Haydn: Symphony No. 88 in G major, Hob. I:88 Máté Soós (violin) Chamber Orchestra comprising 3rd-year bachelor's degree students at the Liszt Academy Conductor: Gergely Ménesi

Page 90 WEDNESDAY 12 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

COMPLETE WORKS LIVE MOZART VARIATIONS AND SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN/3 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 23 in D major, K. 306 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 24 in F major, K. 376 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 25 in F major, K. 377 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 26 in B-flat major, K. 378

Tickets: Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Vilmos Szabadi (violin), Gábor Farkas (piano)

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Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre


DANUBIA ORCHESTRA ÓBUDA Roland Szentpáli: La folia Schönberg: Variations for Orchestra, Op. 31 Rachmaninov: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43 Lutosławski: Variations on a Theme by Paganini

Caplet: Viens! Une flûte invisible soupire… Satie: Je te veux Satie: La diva de l’Empire Delibes: Le rossignol

FRIDAY 14 DECEMBER, 19.45 SATURDAY 15 DECEMBER, 19.45 GRAND HALL

Mira Farkas (harp), Kata Scheuring (flute) Featuring: Eszter Zemlényi (vocals)

Hasse: Larinda e Vanesio – intermezzo in three parts Geminiani: Concerto Grosso No. 12 in D minor (‘La Follia') Torelli: Concerto Grosso in G minor, Op. 8/6 (‘Christmas Concerto’)

BUDAPEST FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

KARITA MATTILA

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József Balog (piano) Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductor: Gábor Káli Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200, 3 800, 4 700 Organizer: Danubia Orchestra Óbuda THURSDAY 13 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

TALENT OBLIGES MIRA FARKAS AND KATA SCHEURING CHAMBER RECITAL

THURSDAY 13 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

KATA SCHEURING

Fauré: Clair de lune, Op. 46/2 Debussy: Beau soir Debussy: Romance – Silence ineffable Debussy: Deux romances – 2. Les cloches Debussy: Paysage sentimental Debussy: Romance – Voici que le printemps Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un Faune Massenet: Elégie Debussy: Suite bergamasque – No. 3 Clair de lune Debussy: Arabesque Russel: Deux poèmes de Ronsard, Op. 26 Satie: Gnossiennes Nos. 1, 3 & 5

Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 7 100, 11 800 Organizer: Budapest Festival Orchestra

HUNGARIAN NATIONAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA LIFE AND DEATH Haydn: La fedeltà premiata – overture, Hob. Ia:11 Beethoven: Ah, perfido! – concert aria, Op. 65 Schumann: Overture, Scherzo and Finale, Op. 52 Wagner: Tristan und Isolde – Prelude and Isolde’s Love Death R. Strauss: Tod und Verklärung – tone poem, Op. 24 Karita Mattila (soprano) Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra Conductor: Zsolt Hamar Tickets: HUF 3 000, 4 500, 6 000 Organizer: Hungarian National Philharmonic Orchestra THURSDAY 14 DECEMBER, 19.00 SOLTI HALL

MIRA FARKAS

Yeree Suh (soprano), Fulvio Bettini (baritone) Budapest Festival Orchestra Artistic director and concertmaster: Midori Seiler Baroque gestures: Sigrid T’Hooft

MIDORI SEILER

WEDNESDAY 12 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

BARTÓK PLUS OPERA FESTIVAL OPERA COMPOSITION COMPETITION FINAL Tickets: HUF 500 Organizer: Miskolc Opera Festival Nonprofit Ltd.

SUNDAY 16 DECEMBER, 11.00 SOLTI HALL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC GONGS, SAILS, SCREWS FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS Gamelan music (Central Java) Debussy: Estampes – 1. Pagodes Debussy: Préludes, Series 1 – 2. Voiles Cage: Sonatas and interludes – Sonata V Surya Kencana A (gamelan instruments) Marcell Szabó (piano) Moderator: Dániel Mona Tickets: HUF 1 400 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 91 41


FRIDAY 21 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

SUNDAY 16 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ORGAN INAUGURATION BALÁZS SZABÓ ORGAN RECITAL HOMMAGE À ANTALFFY

Works for children’s choir, men’s choir and mixed choir by Kodály Cantemus Children’s Choir (choirmaster: Dénes Szabó) Honvéd Male Choir (choirmaster: Kálmán Strausz) Alma Mater Choir (choirmaster: Csaba Somos) Tickets: HUF 1 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 92

BÁLINT KRUPPA

THURSDAY 20 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

MVM CHRISTMAS CONCERT JÁNOS BALÁZS AND ANDREA VIGH CHAMBER RECITAL

ALMA MATER CHOIR

WEDNESDAY 19 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

MASTERS OF THE ORCHESTRA GÁBOR TAKÁCS-NAGY & LISZT ACADEMY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Mozart: Symphony No. 35 in D major, K. 385, (‘Haffner’) Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major, K. 216 Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 (‘Pastoral’) Bálint Kruppa (violin) Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Gábor Takács-Nagy

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J. S. Bach–Busoni: Prelude and Fugue in D major, BWV 532 Mozart: Twelve Variations in C major on 'Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman’, K. 265 Händel: Chaconne in C major, HWV 484 Glinka: Nocturne in E-flat major Chopin: Impromptu in A-flat major, Op. 29 Chopin: Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66 (‘Fantaisie-impromptu’) Liszt: Consolation in D-flat major Debussy: Arabesque in E major Durand: Valse in E-flat major Tchaikovsky–János Balázs: The Nutcracker – paraphrase Tournier: Au matin Salzedo: Chanson dans la Nuit J. Strauss Jr.–Cziffra: Die Fledermaus – paraphrase Andrea Vigh (harp), János Balázs (piano)

Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre

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J. S. Bach: Toccata, adagio and fugue in C major, BWV 564 Liszt: Ave Maria d’Arcadelt Antalffy-Zsiross: Intermezzo Reger: Monologe, Op. 63 – 7. Ave Maria Szendy: Pièces Antiques, Op. 16 – 2. Air (arrangement by Dezső Antalf f y-Zsiross) M. E. Bossi: Canzoncina a Maria Vergine, Op. 113/3 M. E. Bossi: Scherzo in G minor, Op. 49/2 Antalffy-Zsiross: Scène-Pastorale Antalffy-Zsiross: Madonna Antalffy-Zsiross: Four Organ Pieces Reger: Choralphantasie ‘Wie schön leucht uns der Morgenstern’, Op. 40/1 Balázs Szabó (organ) Tickets: HUF 900, 1 600, 2 200, 2 900, 3 600 Organizer: Liszt Academy Concert Centre Page 93 BALÁZS SZABÓ

KODÁLY 136


GÁBOR PRESSER

THURSDAY 27 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ESSZENCIA EXTRAORDINARY YEAR-CLOSING FOLK MUSIC CONCERT Members of the orchestra: Róbert Lakatos (classic violin, viola), Kálmán Balogh (cimbalom), Gergő Kováts (saxophone), Tamás Kunos (folk viola), András Bognár (double bass) Guest artists: János Csík (folk singing, folk violin), István ‘Szalonna’ Pál (folk violin), András Berecz, Hanga Borbála Kacsó (folk singing)

MONDAY 31 DECEMBER, 22.45 GRAND HALL

Tickets: HUF 1 900, 3 100, 4 300, 5 400 Organizers: Esszencia, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

AMADINDA PERCUSSION GROUP & GÁBOR PRESSER NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT

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Gábor Presser (piano, vocals) Amadinda Percussion Group: Károly Bojtos, Aurél Holló, Zoltán Rácz, Zoltán Váczi (percussion) Tickets: HUF 9 000, 10 000, 12 500, 15 000, 17 500 Organizer: Unisono L. P.

ESSZENCIA

SUNDAY 30 DECEMBER, 19.30 GRAND HALL

ÓDZ 25 – BIRTHDAY GALA CONCERT Erkel: Hunyadi László – overture Saint-Saëns: Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 61 Gershwin: An American in Paris Mussorgsky–Ravel: Pictures at an Exhibition Barnabás Kelemen (violin) Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductors: Máté Hámori, Domonkos Héja, István Silló Host: András Batta Tickets: HUF 3 500, 4 700, 5 300, 6 500 Organizer: Danubia Orchestra Óbuda 43


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THE LEAD DESIGN THAT SPLITS THE WINDOW INTO SECTIONS IS ESPECIALLY BEAUTIFUL © JUDIT MARJAI


A RECURRING MOTIF: THE LUTE Beauty, rhythm, poetry, imagination, melody, harmony – these are the inscriptions on the stained-glass windows of the Grand Hall of the Liszt Academy. The highly unique skylights were designed by Miksa Róth, similarly to all other windows and doors with glass inserts. According to the art historian and Róth-expert, Katalin Gellér, the artist showed quite a moderate face in this work.

Architects greatly enjoyed working with him, as he could marvellously tune into the style and design of all kinds of buildings. Clearly, he did not mean to overload the main building of the Liszt Academy with ornaments: the stained-glass windows of the Liszt Academy have a more geometric and stylised design than the richly decorated environment would vouch for. For this reason, the windows are not examples of Art Nouveau but rather of the Viennese Art Deco, which seems to have exerted quite a big influence on Róth. He might have even used the motif book of an important Viennese workshop, as the motifs of the windows do bear resemblance to those displayed in the book. It is rather conspicuous that the windows are as translucent as possible. In other words, the design is quite ethereal and uses only few colours. The lead pattern, however, constructing a design by introducing lead lines splitting the window pane into sections is especially beautiful. The flower motifs in the upper sections are stylised and moderate in colour: the prevailing colours are green, pale beige and yellow. The glass inserts in the doors have more vivid colours, and the forms definitely bear the hallmark of Art Nouveau. The acid-etched glass panels of the doors on the first floor are framed with arched, richly ornamented borders. The skylights are also stained-glass windows with pressed glass beads. As the artist Miksa Róth took into consideration that the hall would mainly be used in the evening, he planned spots also for the light bulbs behind the panes so that the design could be visible even if there was no external light cast on them. On all other windows there is a single consistent motif present: the lute. As it keeps returning in the interior ornamentation, I presume that the various designers working on the edifice had deliberated on how to harmonise the diversity so characteristic of the interior design of the Liszt Academy. Although there is no evidence that they had actual consultation meetings, I am convinced that they did discuss the concept and reviewed, even revised each other’s plans. Through the diversity of styles, they created harmony, which can still be admired today and whose impact has exerted fascination with generations of concert audiences up to the present day..

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MAESTRO HUBAY 160 years ago, one of the most outstanding representatives of Hunga­ rian music Jenő Hubay (1858–1937) was born. The anniversary provides us with the opportunity to breathe new life into his legend and to celebrate a musician whose career was connected at major moments to Ferenc Liszt and the Liszt Academy. His father, Károly Huber, was a conductor and lead violinist at the National Theatre and a violin teacher at the Nemzeti Zenede (National Conservatoire). Unsurprisingly, his son had the opportunity to participate from an early age in the flamboyant musical life of the capital. The young Hubay was to regard the premiere in 1865 of The Legend of Saint Elizabeth, conducted by Liszt himself, as one of the most significant experiences of his life. In the literal sense of the word he could not become a disciple of Liszt, as from the very beginning Jenő Hubay decided to master the violin rather than the piano. Nevertheless, the time they spent playing together meant more to him than any kind of academic training. (Together Liszt and Hubay performed all of Beethoven’s violin sonatas, including the Violin Sonata No. 9 – Kreutzer Sonata – a number of times in public.) Until his death Hubay looked upon Liszt as his master, and it was partly due to Hubay insistence that the institution established by Liszt was named after its former president in 1925.

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In the beginning Jenő Hubay was tutored by his father and later by József Joachim at the Berlin Academy. Heeding the advice of Liszt, he tried his fortunes in Paris, where he soon gained fame. It was here that he took the more Hungarian sounding name Hubay. He formed a partnership with the pianist Károly Aggházy, and together they reaped success in the salons and concert halls of Western Europe. In Paris he made friends with Henri Vieuxtemps, who appreciated that in this ingenious young man lay his artistic inheritor. He had all his compositions played by Hubay, while he gave him valuable instructions for their performance, affording Hubay a first-hand introduction into the French-Belgian violin tradition. In 1882, when he was no more than twenty-three years old, he was nominated head of department at the Conservatoire in Brussels, succeeding Vieuxtemps and Wieniawski. In contemporary Europe this was considered one of the most prestigious positions for a violinist. We will never know how things might have turned out had Hubay stayed in Brussels till the end of his life. It is highly probable that he would now be regarded as a critical figure in Western music. There he would not have suffered attacks for his conservative tastes; and after World War II his name would not have been erased from the public’s memory due to his connections with the aristocracy. (He was married to the countess Róza Cebrian, and a title of nobility was conferred on him by the king in 1907.) In 1885 Hubay’s father, Károly, unexpectedly passed away, and Liszt made a face-to-face visit to Hubay, requesting him to take over his father’s position in the violin department, which had been established just one and a half years earlier at the Conservatory. Pragmatic argument seems unlikely to provide an answer for Hubay’s return to assume a far less propitious position in Hungary. Besides his love for his native land, it was the presence of Liszt that encouraged his decision. Regrettably, by the time he commenced teaching in Budapest, the great master had also breathed his last. Hubay was in charge of managing the violin studies at the Conservatory for 50 years from 1886 until 1936. Throughout these decades he methodically built up his school almost from scratch. As by the turn of the century the number of disciples studying the violin exceeded one hundred, he recruited former students of his to help prepare novices for their ‘academic’ courses. From 1915 Hubay served as director of the institute for 15 years, just as Joachim had in Berlin. He taught viola and chamber music, and – in an additional parallel with Joachim – he presided over the orchestra of the academy, thereby assuming a pioneering role in the instruction of orchestral play. Hubay created something that is, besides gypsy music, perhaps Hungary’s sole world-famous export to the world of music: it is thanks to him that the Hungarian school of violin came into existence.


Among Hubay’s many diverse and significant pursuits, this must be regarded as the most momentous one. Hubay’s surname was considered as a genuine universal brand in the first half of the 20 th century. Only Lipót Auer’s and Otakar Ševčik’s schools – respectively in St. Petersburg and Prague-Vienna – were on a par with his own. A young violinist writing in his résumé “a student of Hubay’s” could feel like having entered the ante-room of success, and start their career pinning their hopes on this badge. Young artists streamed to Budapest in order to undergo a final polishing of their skills by the Hungarian master, or at least to be blessed with the opportunity of a couple of auditions in the legendary white hall of the Hubay palace. Around the beginning of the 1930s, Yehudi Menuhin and Ruggiero Ricci also appeared here, proudly announcing it in their youthful prospectuses. The case of Jan Kubelík, a world celebrity violinist around the turn of the century, is pregnant with implication: the great artist sent his own children to study with Hubay, being convinced that nothing could better serve their progress. Many of those who finished their studies under Hubay’s guidance became lead violinists at the most prestigious European orchestras, and it was also they who later took up teaching careers at the Liszt Academy: figures like Rezső Kemény, Gyula Mambrinyi, Géza Kresz, Rezső Lentz, and Gusztáv Szerémi. Worldwide recognition was brought about by the emergence of three child prodigies, Stefi Geyer in 1902, Ferenc Vecsey in 1904, József Szigeti in 1906, each of whom completed their studies under Hubay’s supervision. Later they were followed by a multitude of brilliant artists, like Jelly Arányi, Imre Waldbauer, Emil Telmányi, János Temesváry, János Koncz, István Pártos and Erna Rubinstein. Jenő Ormándy, who graduated in 1917, became world renowned as a conductor. Zoltán Székely, Ilona Fehér, Ede Zathureczky, Ede Gertler, Tibor Serly, Tivadar Országh, Ödön Pártos, László Szerdahelyi, László Szentgyörgyi and György Garay graduated in the 1920s. Dénes Koromzay, Sándor Végh, Lóránt Fenyves, Gabriella Lengyel and Róbert Virovai were among the last of the Hubay students whose graduation concerts were conducted by the master himself, in May 1936. For his school-founding art within the realm of the violin, Hubay was awarded the Hungarian Heritage Prize in December 1917. Today we recognise that Hubay left behind a significant composer’s oeuvre. His virtuosic pieces for the violin and his French and Hungarian songs were frequently performed as part of the repertoire in contemporary salons and concert halls, and in addition to these he also composed choral works, symphonies, and operas. The Violin Maker of Cremona has been staged in over seventy theatres worldwide, reaching as far as America. In the 1920s and 1930s his symphonies Petőfi and Dante brought him success, together with his operas The Mask and Anna Karenina. The latter was performed several dozen times in Braunschweig, Germany, before being restaged in the 2017–2018 season in Bern. HUBAY WITH JÓZSEF SZIGETI © LISZT ACADEMY / LIBRARY

László Gombos 49


MONDAY 10 SEPTEMBER 2018, 17.00 TUESDAY 11 SEPTEMBER 2018, 14.00, 18.00 WEDNESDAY 12 SEPTEMBER 2018, 14.00, 18.00 THURSDAY 13 SEPTEMBER 2018, 15.00, 19.00

SATURDAY 15 SEPTEMBER 2018, 18.00

SUNDAY 16 SEPTEMBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

3RD INTERNATIONAL ÉVA MARTON SINGING COMPETITION FINAL 3RD INTERNATIONAL ÉVA MARTON SINGING COMPETITION PRELIMINARIES AND SEMI-FINALS

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Orchestra of the Hungarian State Opera Conductor: Balázs Kocsár

Éva Marton has not only been an inspiring role model for the world’s young opera singers since 2014, but the name of this great Hungarian soprano is also associated with an almost unique opportunity for gifted artists at the dawn of their careers. This September the vocal competition that bears the name of the professor emerita, former head of department and pride of the Liszt Academy, brings young singers to Budapest for the third time. They arrive not only with opera arias but – as is now tradition – Liszt songs, too. With a jury that includes the cream of international opera life sitting alongside Éva Marton, the stakes for contestants are once again high: not only do their performances determine their placings in the competition, but the winners may also very likely be launched on a global pathway to success. A factor also not to be overlooked is the prize money on offer: the best singer in the competition walks away with €15,000 plus the Grand Prix accolade.

“You have to give gifted young artists wings to fly.” This is how, in an interview prior to the 2nd International Éva Marton Singing Competition, the eponym of the competition expressed herself; and without any exaggeration, this magnificent undertaking by the Liszt Academy provides this very opportunity. After all, the two previous winners of the Grand Prix, Hungarian Szilvia Vörös and Belarusian Alexander Roslavets, saw their respective careers soar immediately following their victories. The mezzosoprano not only has regular roles in performances at the Budapest Opera, but she has sung alongside Placido Domingo and Anna Netrebko, while the bass from Belarus will debut at the New York Metropolitan Opera next February. Thus, the stakes are high and the opportunities unbounded. Anyone interested in knowing who stands a good chance of being among the leading figures of international opera in the next few years would do well to pay close attention to the final of the 3rd International Éva Marton Singing Competition.

Admission is free. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 100, 1 500, 2 200, 2 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

3RD INTERNATIONAL ÉVA MARTON SINGING COMPETITION GALA CONCERT Orchestra of the Hungarian State Opera Conductor: Balázs Kocsár The contest is over, the decisions of the jury and the audience have been reached, and we know which singer has won the €15,000 Grand Prix, as well as those who have collected the other prizes on offer. By the evening of 16 September, the tension vital for competition performance will have slackened – and it’s now time to celebrate! The most talented of the young artists we met and admired over the course of the previous few days once again take to the main stage of the Liszt Academy for the 3rd International Éva Marton Singing Competition Gala production. The Liszt Academy, where so many great artistic careers have been launched, will almost certainly become a landmark venue in the careers of a number of future opera stars. So the mood of unbridled celebration and good cheer will be paired with expectations in the minds of many: where and in what roles will we one day see again the winners of the 2018 Marton competition? Tickets: HUF 1 100, 1 500, 2 200, 2 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


FRIDAY 21 SEPTEMBER 2018, 19.30

SATURDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

PÉTER SÁRIK TRIO X BARTÓK JAZZ ARRANGEMENTS OF BARTÓK’S PIECES Péter Sárik (piano), Tibor Fonay (bass guitar, double bass), Attila Gálfi (percussion) It’s been nearly two decades since Péter Sárik burst into the firmament of Hungarian music life like a comet. His career since then has continued on its steep upward trajectory, as illustrated by the hugely popular concerts, the prizes and great recordings of his own trio, founded in 2007 and reorganized in 2012. It’s easy to fall under the spell of the music of the Péter Sárik Trio. Their immaculate playing and a repertoire based on modern mainstream standards but which also spans a broad scale of genres is combined with what are certainly the formation’s greatest virtues: an extraordinarily positive aura and sheer entertainment value. The trio’s clear, experiential, smart yet welcoming music shapes into a fine listening experience for jazz buffs, the profession and even the average music fan just getting to grips with the genre. Material included in this evening’s concert is a continuation of the concept of their hit album released in 2016 which processed works by Beethoven and which was also presented on stage at the Liszt Academy. However, this time around the music is not based on the Viennese master but the concert instead showcases pieces by Béla Bartók. Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre, Péter Sárik Production Ltd.

FESTIVE CONCERT OF THE SEMMELWEIS MEMORIAL YEAR Erkel: Bánk bán – overture Liszt: Piano Concerto in A major Mosonyi: Festive Music Brahms: Serenade No. 2 in A major, Op. 16 Ádám Balogh (piano) Danubia Orchestra Óbuda Conductor: Máté Hámori Danubia Orchestra Óbuda, renowned for their youthfulness, dynamism and creativity, are a permanent and popular feature on the Hungarian concert scene. Founded by Domonkos Héja in 1993, the orchestra picked up the title ‘National Youth Orchestra’ between 2001 and 2003. In the years since then, the ensemble have worked with many great Hungarian and foreign guest conductors, and in 2013 conductor Máté Hámori took over the artistic direction. He also conducts the Semmelweis Memorial Year concert, in which the Danubia Orchestra Óbuda – ably supported by young pianist Ádám Balogh – perform four works by composers who lived contemporaneously with physician Ignác Semmelweis. Ferenc Erkel’s Bánk bán overture is followed by the Liszt Piano Concerto in A major, then after the break we have Mosonyi’s Festive Music and the evening rounds off with the Serenade in A major by Brahms.

ÁDÁM BALOGH © BALÁZS BERGICS

Ticket: HUF 1 600 Presented byLiszt Academy Concert Centre 51


WEDNESDAY 26 SEPTEMBER 2018, 19.30

FRIDAY 28 SEPTEMBER 2018, 19.00

SUNDAY 30 SEPTEMBER 2018, 19.00

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

HERE AND NOW JUDIT RAJK & BERLIN PHILHARMONIC CHAMBER SOLOISTS REMEMBRANCES, REMEMBRANCE NOISES THE PIANO TWICE IZABELLA SIMON & DÉNES VÁRJON Schumann: Six Pieces for Pedal Piano, Op. 56 (arrangement by Claude Debussy) Beethoven: Great Fugue, Op. 134 Mahler: Symphony No. 1 (arrangement by Bruno Walter)

Schnittke: Piano Quartet in A minor (after Mahler’s fragment) Wellesz: Geistliches Lied, Op. 23 György Kurtág: The Ligatura of Bálint Varga György Kurtág: S. K. Remembrance Noise (to poems by Dezső Tandori), Op. 12 Mahler: Piano Quartet in A minor Borodin: Three Romances Schumann: Piano Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 47

Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) Perfect harmony: This recital by Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon opens with the Six Pieces for Pedal Piano written by Schumann, which the composer and his wife put together in the course of combined counterpoint studies for the unusual instrument developed for practicing organ works. Later on, Debussy prepared an arrangement allowing the work to be performed in concert halls in double piano form. Beethoven wrote the version of the Great Fugue for four hands at his publisher’s request, and due to its difficulty it not only poses a great challenge for the string quartet playing the original piece but also for the pianists. Then there is a real curiosity in this concert with Mahler’s Symphony No. 1 in the four-hand arrangement by Bruno Walter , someone who had a close personal relationship with the composer. It evokes the orchestral parts while revealing a new side to the work. Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 52

Judit Rajk (alto) Berlin Philharmonic Chamber Soloists: Cornelia Gartemann (violin), Naoko Shimizu (viola), Knut Weber (cello), Özgür Aydın (piano)

TALENT OBLIGES ATTILA SZTÁN TROMBONE CHAMBER RECITAL Berio: Sequenza V M. Haydn: Concerto for Two Trombones Berio: Sequenza X Ákos Zarándy: Trio Why-G Enescu: Légende Ránki: The Tales of Father Goose Csaba Tűzkő: Balkan Sonata – 3 rd movement Attila Sztán (trombone) Tamás Pálfalvi (trumpet), Zoltán Szőke (natural horn), Anna Jámbor, Bernadett Biczó (violin), Réka Baksai Réka (viola), Flóra Matuska (cello), Krisztina Fejes (piano) In Medias Brass Quintet: Richárd Kresz, Tamás Pálfalvi (trumpet), János Benyus (horn), Attila Sztán (trombone), József Bazsinka Jr (tuba)

The piano quartet fragment written by Gustav Mahler came to light many decades after the death of the composer and became an integral part of the concert repertoire virtually overnight. Only the opening movement of the piece, which Mahler had planned to have several movements, was ever completed: Mahler sketched out just 24 bars of the continuation. More than a century later, this fragment attracted the interest of Alfred Schnittke. Since there was no opportunity to supplement or reconstruct the piece, Schnittke set about creating a new composition around the tentative shoots of the Mahler movement. György Kurtág’s song cycle S. K. Remembrance Noise, written for vocals and violin, examines in an ironic and philosophical way the traps inherent in remembering.

The first half of the concert features two pieces from Sequenza, an experimental series by Luciano Berio. The concert is not only for the ears but the eyes, too, because besides instrumental virtuosity, theatrical choreography is also an integral part of the works. The premiere of Trio Why-G by Ákos Zarándy is followed by Légende by Enescu, and this in turn makes way for humour in the shape of György Ránki’s striking parody The Tales of Father Goose. An extract from the sonata of Csaba Tűzkő inspired by jazz and Balkan folk music closes the concert. Both as soloist and as member of his chamber ensembles, Attila Sztán is a familiar face at top concert venues globally and on the podiums of international competitions. He currently plays with Concerto Budapest and Budapest Festival Orchestra.

Ticket: HUF 2 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


CHORAL CONCERTS DISCUSSION ABOUT EDUCATING TALENTED STUDENTS

FILM SCREENING

CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS

STUDENTS OF THE BARTÓK KONZI MUSIC HISTORY PERFORMANCE

GROUP ACTIVITIES FOR KIDS

STUDENTS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY

CHAMBER CONCERTS

DOCTORAL STUDENTS SOLO CONCERTS

SPECIALLY GIFTED STUDENTS

CLASSES OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, WITH VILMOS SZABADI, KÁLMÁN DRÁFI AND ANDREA MELÁTH

TALENT DAY

WORKSHOP SECRETS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS, PIANO CONCERTS PLAYED BY THE STUDENTS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY OF MUSIC

10.02.2019


THURSDAY 4 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

FRIDAY 5 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

SATURDAY 6 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

COMPLETE WORKS LIVE MOZART VARIATIONS AND SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN/1 Mozart: Six Variations in G major on ‘Hélas, j’ai perdu mon amant’, K. 360 Mozart: Variations in G major on ‘La bergère Célimène’, K. 359 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 11 in E-flat major, K. 26 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 12 in G major, K. 27 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 13 in C major, K. 28 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 14 in D major, K. 29 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 15 in F major, K. 30 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 16 in B major, K. 31 Vilmos Szabadi (violin), Gábor Farkas (piano) Mozart became involved with the genre at an early age even by his own standards: his father notated Mozart’s first four sonatas in Paris between 1762 and 1764, when Mozart was between the ages of 6 and 8. These were followed by the ‘Opus III’, comprising six works published in London in 1765, then the ‘Opus IV’ (K. 26–31), containing half a dozen sonatas and published in The Hague in 1766, and here performed in concert in one of the Complete Works Live series. The recital also includes two works for piano and violin of a similar structural composition but which are from much later in Mozart’s life. Both of these variations date from June 1781 and are based on ariettas by Antoine Albanèse. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 54

PURE BAROQUE DMITRY SINKOVSKY & LA VOCE STRUMENTALE CHAMBER MUSIC TUNED FOR GRAND HALL GIOVANNI GUZZO, MIKLÓS PERÉNYI & BALÁZS SZOKOLAY CHAMBER RECITAL Chopin: Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 8 Debussy: Nocturne and Scherzo for Cello and Piano Debussy: Sonata for Violin and Piano in D minor Debussy: Piano Trio in G major Chopin: Sonata for Violin and Piano in G minor, Op. 65 Giovanni Guzzo (violin), Miklós Perényi (cello), Balázs Szokolay (piano)

J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041 Vivaldi: Concerto for Viola d’amore and Lute in D minor, RV 540 Vivaldi: Nisi Dominus, RV 608 Locatelli: Concerto Grosso in E-flat major, Op. 6 (‘Il Pianto d’Arianna’) Vivaldi: The Four Seasons – Winter, RV 297 Telemann: Musique de table, Part 2 – Concerto for Three Violins in F major, TWV 53:F1 Dmitry Sinkovsky (violin, countertenor) Maria Krestinskaya (viola d'amore), Luca Pianca (lute) La Voce Strumentale (artistic director: Dmitry Sinkovsky)

Compositions by two remarkable composers of the age of Romanticism and early Modernity are placed together and complement one another in fascinating ways. Fryderyk Chopin was born in Warsaw but spent most of his life in France. His work is at least as representative of the world of Parisian salon music as it is of the Polish national colours. The situation is reversed in the case of Frenchman Claude Debussy, with characteristic music motifs of other countries and regions frequently appearing as exotic touches in his compositions. Chopin composed virtually exclusively for the piano. In his mind, chamber music was a mere diversion and his chamber pieces are a rarity on the concert podium. It is the task of Giovanni Guzzo, Miklós Perényi and Balázs Szokolay to perform these Chopin rarities, alongside almost all of Debussy’s chamber works that employ the cello.

There are countless contemporary reports of Italian star violinists active in the first half of the 18th century, illustrating what an astonishing impact this new kind of instrumental virtuosity had on audiences of the day. Dmitry Sinkovsky, one of the most exciting Russian violinists of the early 21st century, not only plays Baroque masterworks in a manner and on an instrument faithful to the 18th century, but his stage presence is likely just as spellbinding as that of his Italian forerunners living in the 1700s. And the parallels do not end there: Sinkovsky not only plays the violin but he actively pursues other branches of music – he has already revealed his fine singing abilities at a Budapest concert – on top of which he teaches, as did Antonio Vivaldi, whose works we also hear at this recital. La Voce Strumentale comprises his fellow teachers and students from Moscow.

Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 3 700, 5 100, 6 500, 7 800, 8 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER 2018, 11.00

SUNDAY 7 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC CHURCHES, STARS, ANTHEMS FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS

ACOUSTIC, AUTHENTIC BARTÓK AND OTHERS IN VIENNA – SOLDIERS’ SONGS, 1918 JOINT EVENT WITH THE HUNGARIAN HERITAGE HOUSE

Tractus Stellae (Star Play) – liturgical play from the Middle Ages Márton Levente Horváth: Christe, redemptor omnium Schütz: Symphoniae Sacrae III – ‘Mein Sohn, warum hast du uns das getan’, SWV 401 Students of the Church Department and chamber orchestra comprising students of the Liszt Academy (professors: Zoltán Mizsei, Dóra Pétery, Judit Rajk, András Soós) Moderator: Dániel Mona Strange instruments, singing and clapping nuns, unusual polyphony and Latin masses set to music: the Liszt Kidz Academy samples all these this autumn – as well as, of course, examining what impact these have had on our favourite composers – as we launch a brand-new series called Divine Music. Our journey starts out from home, so in the first episode of the series we travel across to Western Europe. There is a separate course at the Liszt Academy for those who would like to be active participants in the musical world of Christian ceremonies: this is the Church Music Department. Students of the faculty, accompanied by the university’s instrumental students, present how the story of the ‘Three Kings’ was related with music in the Middle Ages, how a Baroque composer went about writing church music, and what sort of tools a modern composer uses when approaching these ancient musical traditions. Ticket: HUF 1 400 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Concert arrangements of marching songs by Béla Bartók, Zoltán Kodály and Emma Kodály Authentic folk songs from the Carpathian Basin Editor: László Kelemen Assistant editor: Dániel Lipták Gergely Agócs (bagpipe, vocals), László Borbély, Ágota Lénárt (piano), Barnabás Kelemen, Gáspár Kelemen (violin), Anna Hideg (Ördöngösfüzes, Transylvania – vocals), László Türei Lengyel (Kalotaszeg, Transylvania – vocals), Andrea Navratil, Eszter Pál, Anna Sőregi (vocals), Péter Szabó (cello) Saint Ephraim Male Choir (artistic director: Tamás Bubnó) Band of the Hungarian State Folk Ensemble The concert organized jointly with the Hungarian Heritage House presents a programme concept that, according to the original plans, was to have been realized in Budapest in the final year of World War I. The background was a concert in Vienna in January 1918 that featured old and new military recruitment songs of the peoples of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Following the huge success of the production, the plan was to repeat the concert in Budapest. However, history intervened and the concert was scrapped. Now, 100 years later, the time is ripe to revive the concert that Bartók planned. Programme highlights include folk music arrangements by Béla Bartók, Zoltán Kodály and Mrs Zoltán Kodályné Emma Sándor.

SAINT EPHRAIM MALE CHOIR © DOMONKOS ORBÁN

Tickets: HUF 1 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre, Hungarian Heritage House 55


MONDAY 8 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

TUESDAY 9 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

WEDNESDAY 10 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL

HERE AND NOW JÁNOS BÁLINT & SILESIAN QUARTET WORKSHOPS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER MUSIC AT A HIGH LEVEL CHAMBER MUSIC DEPARTMENT RECITAL

Christian Winther Christensen: String Quartet Pēteris Vasks: String Quartet No. 4 Toshio Hosokawa: Fragmente II Sofia Gubaidulina: Reflections on the Theme B-A-C-H Górecki: String Quartet No. 1, Op. 62 (‘Already it is Dusk’)

LÁSZLÓ BORBÉLY PIANO RECITAL

János Bálint (flute) Silesian Quartet: Szymon Krzeszowiec, Arkadiusz Kubica (violin), Łukasz Syrnicki (viola), Piotr Janosik (cello)

Beethoven: Fantasia in G minor, Op. 77 Brahms: Four Piano Pieces, Op. 119 Schumann: Kreisleriana, Op. 16 Schubert: Piano Sonata No. 20 in A major, D. 959 László Borbély (piano)

At this concert spotlighting the work of the The Liszt Academy Chamber Music Department we find both students and their masters amongst the performing artists. The imposing keyboard part of Johann Sebastian Bach’s 5th Brandenburg Concerto is performed by Gábor Csalog and Ildikó Szabady, special prize winner at the 2014 National Chamber Music Competition in Szeged. Béla Bartók’s String Quartet No. 5 and a suite compiled from Igor Stravinsky’s work The Soldier’s Tale provide a flavour of 20th-century chamber music, while the Piano Quartet in C minor by Johannes Brahms is the evening’s representative of Romanticism. The former and current heads of department, Márta Gulyás and Balázs Fülei respectively, also take their place on the stage.

Forty years ago, students of the Szymanowski Academy established the Silesian String Quartet. In the decades since, they have become one of the foremost ensembles in Polish contemporary music. Nearly 200 of the quartet’s repertoire of more than 300 compositions were written by 20thcentury composers. The number of world premieres associated with the formation – whether string quartets or specially compiled chamber works – exceeds 100. Asides from the Toshio Hosokawa work for flute and string quartet, exclusively works written for string quartet are performed in the Solti Chamber Hall, from such classical masters as Gubaidulina, Górecki and Vasks. The new generation is represented by the Danish Christian Winther Christensen; international critics reckon that he is one of few who has truly discovered their own musical ‘tongue’. “Of course, I am influenced by the older generation since it is them I have immersed myself in. I know all of Lachenmann’s and Ligeti’s works, but what I am really inspired by now is my own generation,” the composer said.

Tickets: HUF 1 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 1 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

J. S. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 Bartók: String Quartet No. 5, BB 110 Stravinsky: Histoire du soldat – suite Brahms: Piano Quartet No. 3 in C minor, Op. 60 Attila Falvay, Éva Osztrosits, Miranda Liu, Annamária Ott, Máté Soós, Kristóf Tóth (violin), Haruka Nagao, Boglárka Szűcs (viola), Ágnes Márkus, Judit Szabó, Máté Tomasz (cello), Andor Bóni (double bass), Ildikó Szabady (flute), Péter Balázs (clarinet), Gábor Csalog, Balázs Fülei, Márta Gulyás (piano)

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It is symbolic that László Borbély, one of the most promising figures on the young Hungarian pianist scene, opens his solo recital with a musical rarity, a Beethoven opus capturing perhaps one of the maestro’s finest improvizations. The evening’s programme may also be considered a sampler of 19th-century piano music from various genres, since from the period between the Fantasia in G minor, which dates from the early 1800s, and the final piano works created by Brahms in the 1890s there is the opportunity to hear Schumann’s similarly fantasia-like cycle plus a late sonata by Schubert that, as with his 9th Symphony, is of heavenly length and is most uplifting. The progressive László Borbély, who boasts an incredibly wide repertoire, always devotes enormous attention to the pairing of works, and this recital is no exception: hearing the music of these four pianist-composers places their remarkable compositions in a new light; moreover, correlations that have remained hidden until now are also revealed.


THURSDAY 11 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

FRIDAY 12 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

FOUR BY FOUR QUATUOR EBÈNE VOCAL MUSIC, SO CLOSE WINTERREISE – FROM A WOMAN'S PERSPECTIVE

Beethoven: String Quartet No. 5 in A major, Op. 18/5 Brahms: String Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 51/1 Beethoven: String Quartet No. 16 in F major, Op. 135

Schubert: Winterreise, D. 911

Quatuor Ebène: Pierre Colombet, Gabriel Le Magadure (violin), Marie Chilemme (viola), Raphaël Merlin (cello)

Emőke Baráth (soprano), Anastasia Razvalyaeva (harp) Director: Eszter Novák Screening: Zsolt Czakó Stage and costume designer: Edit Zeke In 1827, one year before his death, Schubert composed the song cycle Winterreise to the poems of Wilhelm Müller. The work, which is immersed in tragic overtones, was originally written for tenor with piano accompaniment, although it is not unusual to hear it performed by baritones or basses, too. Despite its melancholy, it is a popular piece that has been performed in several different versions in Budapest over the past few years, including arrangements for symphony orchestra as well as original tenor versions, but until now never for female voice. On this evening, one of Hungary’s most eminent singers, the highly acclaimed Emőke Baráth, undertakes the task of performing this late Schubert masterpiece. The instrumental accompaniment is similarly novel: instead of the piano, harpist Anastasia Razvalyaeva accompanies the singer. Under the direction of Eszter Novák, the cycle, which is largely known as a male drama, is now staged from an authentically female perspective.

Members of the French Quatuor Ebène took lessons from Gábor Takács-Nagy, Eberhald Feltz and György Kurtág before they went on to win the ARD Competition in 2004. Further proof of their talent came in 2009 when the BBC Music Magazine voted them ‘Newcomer of the Year’, and Gramophone rated their album of string quartets by French composers ‘Recording of the Year’. They are at home in many different styles, classical, contemporary or even jazz, although they have gone for a traditional programme for this Liszt Academy appearance. A film shot in 2017 shows how many arguments and rehearsals, how much practice and passion go into each and every extraordinarily successful concert. The film, simply titled ‘4’, also crystallizes the musical creed of the four men, although not long after the premiere it became clear that the apparently legendary unity of the ensemble was divisible after all; for this concert, string quartets by Beethoven and Brahms are played together with Marie Chilemme, violist, in the final performance of the Four by Four season ticket series.

Ticket: HUF 3 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 2 800, 3 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

QUATUOR EBÈNE © JULIEN MIGNOT

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SUNDAY 14 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

TUESDAY 16 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

JAZZ IT! BRUSSELS JAZZ ORCHESTRA ‘WE HAVE A DREAM’ Tutu Puoane (vocals) Brussels Jazz Orchestra

This year marks the 20th International Harp Festival, a celebration which continues to attract to Hungary the best harpists in the world. As part of this annual programme, which has been held since 1999, top foreign artists such as Marielle Nordmann, Jana Boušková, Maria Graf and Columbian jazz harpist Edmar Castaneda have appeared on stage, though the event also provides a platform for Hungarian musicians, too. As Andrea Vigh, founder and artistic director of the festival, accurately put it, thanks to the master classes, concerts and instrument exhibitions, the festival has developed into a professional meeting and international rendezvous for harp instrumentalists. The series of programmes starting on 5 October concludes with a gala concert in the Grand Hall of the Liszt Academy.

The 1960s was a decade of struggle for civil rights. Martin Luther King, the symbol of this era, was assassinated exactly 50 years ago in 1968, and this tragedy inspired Frank Vaganée and Tutu Puoane, who as a South African lived through the injustices of the apartheid system herself, to put together a special jazz programme themed on human rights. Towards the end of the 1960s, many American actors, musicians and other celebrities tried in their own way to participate in civil rights battles. In pop, the lyrics to soul songs proved to be effective weapons; but let us not forget that there were also highly politicized works in the genre of jazz, most often instrumental – just consider Charles Mingus and his composition Fable of Faubus. Vaganée and Puoane have hand-picked classic protest songs from Nina Simone through Joni Mitchell to Stevie Wonder. These old songs are given a modern instrumentalization by the Brussels Jazz Orchestra, yet their message remains constant: we are all made equal.

Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Presented by Besszer Concert, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900, 4 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

GALA CONCERT OF THE INTERNATIONAL HARP FESTIVAL MVM CONCERTS Andrea Vigh (harp)

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BRUSSELS JAZZ ORCHESTRA © MARCO MERTENS


SATURDAY 20 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00 SUNDAY 21 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

SATURDAY 20 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL CAFE BUDAPEST – CONTEMPORARY ARTS FESTIVAL BERNSTEIN: TROUBLE IN TAHITI / GYULA FEKETE: ROMAN FEVER Bernstein: Trouble in Tahiti Sam: Marcell Bakonyi, Dinah: Andrea Meláth Trio: Estefanía Avilés (soprano), Róbert Erdős (tenor), Attila Erdős (baritone) Gyula Fekete: Roman Fever Ms Ashley: Andrea Meláth / Makiko Yoshida Ms Slade: Tünde Szabóki / Ayane Imai Costume designer: Lili Izsák Choreographer: Eszter Lázár Director: András Almási-Tóth Budapest Strings Chamber Orchestra Conductor: Péter Dobszay

MASTERS OF VOCAL MUSIC PHILIPPE HERREWEGHE & ORCHESTRE DES CHAMPSÉLYSÉES Mozart: Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551 (‘Jupiter’) Mozart: Requiem, K. 626 Emőke Baráth (soprano), Eva Zaïcik (mezzo-soprano), Maximilian Schmitt (tenor), Florian Boesch (bass) Collegium Vocale Gent Orchestre des Champs-Élysées Conductor: Philippe Herreweghe

The single-act Trouble in Tahiti is one of Bernstein’s earliest and darkest stage works, and the only one for which he penned the libretto. This minidrama with just two players describes an ordinary everyday situation – the decline of a marriage – with bitter irony and with an intensity that remains fierce to this day. The chamber opera Roman Fever by Gyula Fekete, also a mini-drama with two roles, opens with the careless chatter of two middle-aged ladies who consider their lives settled and satisfactory, yet the recall of a few details from the past makes a pleasant afternoon tea in Rome increasingly tense. What impact does a historic love triangle, two sides of which are now sitting facing each other, have on the present? And what consequences might there be if the former roles in the triangle are only clarified afterwards?

Count Franz Walsegg-Stuppach and his mysterious ‘grey messenger’ are two well-known figures in Mozart legend and key players in the story of the creation of his Requiem. The work the aristocrat commissioned, which took on a fatal cult-like character on the death of Mozart, is conducted here by Philippe Herreweghe and performed in the company of another seminal Mozart piece, the Jupiter symphony. Herreweghe, a great pioneer of historically informed performances, and Collegium Vocale Gent, his marvellous historical performance ensemble founded some half a century ago, are joined by the Parisian Orchestre des Champs-Élysées, who have themselves functioned under the guidance of the Belgian artist since 2010. Herreweghe is complemented on this occasion by Emőke Baráth, the young Hungarian soprano much sought-after in the world of early music and opera, who ranks highly in the pantheon of vocal soloists for the immortal Requiem.

Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000 Presented by CAFe Budapest Contemporary Arts Festival, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 4 800, 5 900, 7 600, 9 900, 10 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

PHILIPPE HERREWEGHE

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SUNRDAY 21 OCTOBER 2018, 11.00

MONDAY 22 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

WEDNESDAY 24 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL CONSERVATOIRE CONCERTS STRINGS DEPARTMENT OF THE BARTÓK CONSERVATORY

ORGAN INAUGURATION CONCERT THE RENOVATED ORGAN AT THE LISZT ACADEMY PUBLIC FAMILY EVENT

Liszt: Prelude and Fugue for the B-A-C-H Theme Kodály: Laudes organi R. Strauss–Reger: Feierlicher Einzug der Ritter des Johanniterordens Zsigmond Szathmáry: Organ Concerto

Balázs Szabó, László Fassang (organ) What is a register? How do the organ’s pipes pipe? And why pipes anyway? These and similar questions can be posed at the Liszt Academy’s family day, when all are welcome to see the restored organ from close up. And proficient answers to all questions will certainly be forthcoming, given that top experts are on hand to help: teachers of the Liszt Academy, organists who took part in the decade-long project and thanks to whom we have today the Voit organ in all its original glory, risen phoenix-like from the ashes. The concert organ of the Grand Hall first sounded 111 years ago, on 15 May 1907. In the century since then, the façade of the organ has become a symbol of Hungarian music life. It was constructed at the same time as the building of the music academy on Liszt Ferenc Square, and it debuted at the ceremonial inauguration of the school. On the preceding day of the official inauguration concert, that is, 21 October, families are invited to learn more about this magnificent and historically important instrument. Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 60

László Fassang, János Pálúr, István Ruppert, Balázs Szabó (organ) Alma Mater Choir of the Liszt Academy (choirmaster: Csaba Somos) Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra Conductors: Gergely Madaras, Csaba Somos The Liszt Academy’s restored organ, made in 1907 and the same age as the Art Nouveau building in which it is housed, can once again be seen and heard in all its former glory from autumn 2018. A decision on the reconstruction of the original organ was taken by the academy in 2010, with the inauguration taking place on 22 October 2018, the anniversary of the birth of Ferenc Liszt. This evening provides the audience with four works employing the organ; this queen of instruments is accompanied by either orchestra or choir. There is also a contemporary piece in the programme, with renowned organist-composer Zsigmond Szathmáry having written a symphonic organ concerto especially for the occasion. The rebuilt organ is played by four excellent Hungarian organists: László Fassang, János Pálúr, István Ruppert and Balázs Szabó. Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Mozart: Divertimento in D major, K. 136 Kreisler: Praeludium and Allegro in the Style of Pugnani Dvořák: Piano Trio No. 2 in G minor, Op. 26 – 3. Scherzo. Presto Dvořák: Terzetto in C major, Op. 74 – 4. Tema con variazioni. Poco adagio – Moderato – Molto allegro Bottesini: Variations on ‘Nel cor più non mi sento’ from Paisiello's La Molinara Sarasate: Caprice basque, Op. 24 Bartók: Fourty-Four Duos for Two Violins (excerpts), BB 104 Vieuxtemps: Fantasia appassionata, Op. 35 Boëllmann: Variations symphoniques, Op. 23 Bloch: Baal shem – 2. Nigun Wieniawski: Scherzo-tarantelle, Op. 16 Bartók: Romanian Folk Dances, BB 68 Featuring: Students of the Bartók Béla Secondary School of Music The Bartók Music Secondary School of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music is Hungary’s oldest music high school. In 1840 the school had 75 students, while just 10 years later there were 200, as sections devoted to the piano, violin, cello, flute and clarinet were added to the original singing, composition and choral departments. Currently the ‘Konzi’ has more than 350 students, with young people hoping to pursue a career in music studying in 23 faculties. Teachers not only communicate their expertise at the highest level but also share their own experiences as performance artists to inspire their students and teach them what it is like to be an artist and how best to perform on stage. Ticket: HUF 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


THURSDAY 25 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

SATURDAY 27 OCTOBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

THE PIANO TWICE DUO KOROLIOV J. S. Bach – Evgeni Koroliov: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, BWV 582 (transcription for piano four hands) J. S. Bach – György Kurtág: Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir, BWV 687 (transcription for piano four hands) J. S. Bach – György Kurtág: Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (Actus tragicus) – cantata, BWV 106 – Sonatina (transcription for piano four hands) J. S. Bach – György Kurtág: Trio Sonata No. 1 in E-flat major, BWV 525 – 1st Movement Schubert: Fantasia in F minor, D. 940 Stravinsky: The Rite of Spring (arrangement for piano four hands by the composer)

PURE BAROQUE GIULIANO CARMIGNOLA & CONCERTO KÖLN E. F. Dall’Abaco: Concerti à quattro da chiesa, Op. 2 – Concerto No. 1 in D minor Avison: Concerti Grossi after Domenico Scarlatti, Op. 6 – Concerto No. 6 in D major J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Violins in D minor, BWV 1043 B. Marcello: Sinfonia in D major from the Oratorio Joaz J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041 J. S. Bach: Violin Concerto in E major, BWV 1042 Giuliano Carmignola (violin) Concerto Köln Mayumi Hirasaki (artistic director, violin)

Evgeni Koroliov met his duo partner, Macedonian Ljupka Hadzigeorgieva, in Moscow when they both studied at the conservatory. The working relationship of the two started extremely fruitfully when they won a prize at the Belgrade Jeunesses Musicales Competition in 1977, while just a few years later they proved to be a sensation at the Leningrad Duo Festival, walking away with both the jury and audience first prizes. In 2000, the duo, who are equally committed to modern music, attended the Yekaterinburg International Duo Festival where they were awarded the prize for the best interpretation of 20th century music by the association of Russian composers. They recorded an album from the Bach arrangements by György Kurtág in 2011.

Italian culture has fertilized German culture on numerous occasions throughout history: masterpieces by German geniuses of the late Baroque, in particular those by Johann Sebastian Bach, could not have come about without the influence of contemporary Italian music. Indeed, Bach’s first biographer, Johann Nikolaus Forkel, made this very point in the early 19th century. The Thuringian composer’s concertos for one and two violins lie at the heart of this concert given by Giuliano Carmignola, who hails from the Veneto region, and the Rhine-based Concerto Köln. These compositions transplant the instrumental concerto model developed by Antonio Vivaldi to a German environment. And while the compositions might be viewed as typical representatives of the ‘grandiose’ and ‘venerable’ German style, Carmignola’s Bach interpretations are famed for being impudently Italian, light and jolly.

Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 3 700, 5 100, 6 500, 7 800, 8 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Evgeni Koroliov, Ljupka Hadzigeorgieva (piano)

GIULIANO CARMIGNOLA © ANNA CARMIGNOLA

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SUNDAY 28 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

MONDAY 29 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

ACOUSTIC, AUTHENTIC KAROLINA CICHA SACRED MUSIC ‘O Tiebie radujetsia’ – ancient Slavonic religious chant ‘Idzie mój Pan’ – Polish Catholic chant Elazar Azikri: Jedid nefesh – Jewish chant Heinrich von Frauenlob: Ei ich sach in dem trone – ancient German Protestant chant Rumi: Ba man sanama – Sufi chant Franciszek Karpinski: Kiedy ranne wstają zorze – Catholic chant ‘Strannik’ – Orthodox Christian chant ‘Snirele perele’ – Yiddish chant Psalm 136 – Catholic verison Abd al-Muttalib: Salam aleikum – Islamic chant Psalm 136 – Orthodox Christian version Karolina Cicha (vocals, accordion, keyboards, looper, drum machine), Elżbieta Rojek (vocals, harmonium, dance) Featuring: Karolina Matuszkiewicz (vocals, folk string instruments: fiddle from Płock, suka bilgorajska, kamancze, cobza)

KAROLINA CICHA © LÁSZLÓ MUDRA

Polish singer and instrumentalist Karolina Cicha is one of the leading performance artists of her generation. In 2013 critics noted a return to her roots when she explored the music tradition of the Podlachia region, from where she hails. The result was the album 9 Languages, evoking languages and melodies of Central Europe. At this concert, Cicha presents an exciting new project: she performs sacred music from all parts of the world, spanning over a thousand years. Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

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PRELUDES RECITAL BY KEYBOARD STUDENTS OF THE DOCTORAL SCHOOL/1 Scriabin: Five Preludes, Op. 74 J. S. Bach: Six Little Preludes, BWV 933-938 Mompou: Twelve Preludes (excerpts) Gershwin: Three Preludes Debussy: Préludes (excerpts) Chopin: Twenty-Four Preludes, Op. 28 Keyboard students of the Doctoral School Performance artists at the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music may work towards the award of a doctorate, the so-called DLA (Doctor of Liberal Arts). For this recital, it is the turn of keyboard students of the Liszt Academy Doctoral School to take to the stage of the Solti Chamber Hall, when they perform various preludes from music literature. But what is a prelude? In a nutshell, it is a short piece of music. In the Baroque period preludes preceded longer series of movements, while in Romanticism the prelude became a character piece in its own right. Bach wrote several of these series and this concert features his Six Little Preludes. Naturally, two other giants of the genre in Chopin and Debussy could not be omitted: both composed two volumes of preludes, each with unusual poetic titles. Also included are three lesser-known series: preludes by the American Gershwin, the Russian Scriabin, and the CatalanSpaniard Federico Mompou. Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Doctoral School


TUESDAY 30 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

WEDNESDAY 31 OCTOBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

TRANSCRIPTIONS RECITAL BY KEYBOARD STUDENTS OF THE DOCTORAL SCHOOL/2 György Kurtág: Seven Bach Chorales (transcriptions for piano four hands) Bartók–Kocsis: Two Pictures (arrangement for two pianos) Stravinsky: Two Movements from The Rite of Spring (version for two pianos) Grieg: Transcriptions of Original Songs, Op. 52 – 2. Det forste mote (The First Meeting), 6. Gamlemor (The Old Mother) R. Schumann–C. Schumann: Transcriptions of Songs (excerpts) Chopin–Liszt: Seven Polish Songs – 2. Spring, 3. The Ring, 4. Merrymaking Rossi–Bartók: Tre correnti Frescobaldi–Bartók: Toccata quinta sopra i pedali Della Ciaia–Bartók: Canzone Donizetti–Zabel: Solo from the opera Lucia di Lammermoor Mouquet: La flûte de Pan, Op. 15 Franck: Prelude, Fugue and Variation, Op. 18 Keyboard students of the Doctoral School This concert introduces students of the Doctoral School of the Liszt Academy. They play famous and lesser-known arrangements on two instruments, the piano and the harp. There are ‘songs’ – orchestral works without vocalists – on two pianos. Ferenc Liszt transcribed for piano songs with Polish lyrics from Chopin, and Clara Schumann. When still in his twenties, Zoltán Kocsis made a double-piano version of an early Bartók orchestral work Two Pictures. However, Bartók is presented not only as a ‘source’ but arranger, too: in the 1920s, he rewrote several Baroque keyboard works for piano. Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Doctoral School

TALENT OBLIGES GERGELY DEVICH CELLO RECITAL Ravel: Piano Trio in A minor Chopin: Sonata for Cello and Piano in G minor, Op. 65 Kodály: Duo for Violin and Cello, Op. 7 Gergely Devich (cello), Mária Kovalszki (piano), Éva Osztrosits (violin) Gergely Devich is next in line to introduce himself in this series of concerts featuring gifted young artists. Despite his youth, this most promising cellist has piled success on success: after conquering the podiums of national elementary competitions, in 2014 he represented Hungary at Eurovision Young Musicians, where he came third having given the most outstanding performance by a Hungarian ever. He brings precious gems of the genre to this Liszt Academy concert. The piano trio of Maurice Ravel (1914) is perhaps the finest chamber work by the composer. The harmonic innovations and rhythmic structures that are borrowed from exotic music cultures guarantee a remarkable musical experience. Chopin’s late cello sonata is a noteworthy example of the Romantic period. Kodály’s Duo for Violin and Cello was created in the shadow of World War I, and the pervading sense of heroism blended with resignation is due in part to this cataclysmic event.

GERGELY DEVICH © LÁSZLÓ MUDRA

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 63


PARITY

– EXISTING IN HARMONY

Mischa Maisky is not one to lose his nerve. Just 20 minutes before ascending the stage with his daughter, the pair granted me a laid-back 15-minute interview. The most legendary cellist of our age, who turned 70 this year, stopped over in Budapest on another leg of his jubilee concert tour to stage a recital of unparalleled success with his friends and eldest child, Lily. I enquired about how they harmonize with one another, both in family life and on stage.

To discover and then to preserve our inner harmony is perhaps more complicated these days than it has ever been. How do you interpret this in your own cases? What does this concept mean to you as musicians and as private citizens? Lily: It holds a number of meanings for me. I find it invaluable when it comes to interpersonal relationships; however, for us musicians it has extra­ordinary importance. Be it chamber music or indeed any genre, you could say that the very foundation of music is harmony, without which there is no tune. Yet, despite this, I also think that it is very easy to lose it, to stumble to the left or the right, and so keeping the balance is a grand challenge in itself. Mischa: I agree with Lily in this regard. In my opinion, one of the most important and difficult challenges in life is to find the balance between our professional and private lives. Besides all the travelling and concert tours, I am the father of six children. Lily is thirty years old while my youngest daughter is just three. It is no easy job to harmonize my roles, but I try to do my best. Mischa, it is impossible to think of you without your cello, while Lily appears to be at one with the piano. What are your relationships to your respective instruments? How do you harmonize with your instruments? Mischa: I can say that my relationship with my cello is harmonious. Last November was the 44th anniversary of me first holding it in my hands. I am lucky and I rejoice that I came upon my instrument: I could never wish for anything else. Nevertheless, I believe that striving for perfection has its inauspicious aspects too, especially when you have already fulfilled all you were aiming for but cannot slow down: you just keep chasing after more and more. You should be happy with what you have got. Lily: Pianists are not blessed with such an intimate relationship with their instrument as they must adapt to the piano provided for the occasion. Yet, this is also a sort of challenge, as sometimes I come across a fantastic instrument and we immediately fall into harmony, while on other occasions, you have to work hard to find accord. Notwithstanding, I am happy to be a pianist. Tonight, father and daughter give a joint performance at the Liszt Academy. It is quite unusual these days in the world of music that family members play together at concerts; however, you do so regularly. How do you preserve the harmony between yourselves? Mischa: We relate most naturally to each other as musicians and as family members. Lily and I have been playing together for almost thirteen years, and we have also done so in a family trio with my son Sascha ever since their early childhood. We have already played the trios by Rachmaninov,

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MISCHA MAISKY & LILY MAISKY © ISTVÁN FAZEKAS

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Shostakovich and Tchaikovsky that we perform at the Liszt Academy tonight. We are often on the road together and maybe it’s unusual but we have always succeeded in maintaining a good relationship. True, one shouldn’t deny that it is not always without difficulties: there are debates now and then. All in all, I do regard myself a lucky chap playing together with my children. This has been the dream of my life and it has been fulfilled. Lily: We children have had our good share of luck too. For many families it is not easy to work together, because parents wish to constantly teach their kids, and usually this does not lead anywhere. With us, things turned out differently. Mischa: There is often a fine line between instruction and discipline. When Sascha was small I tried to teach him, and recently I have been helping my younger son; but I confess it is not easy at times. Lily, do you regard your father as your equal or as a mentor when on stage? Lily: After so many years I regard him as a partner when playing together. Of course, when we started it was rather different. I was seventeen and going to school. Whenever I was learning a new piece, I tried to garner as much information from my father’s vast knowledge and experience as possible; he always had something to say about the piece in question. Besides, I suppose every child or adolescent believes they know everything already and needs no advice. As years go by, they recognize how many things they can learn from older and more experienced artists. I am happy to have realized this and taken advantage of the opportunity with my father. Anna Unger

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MISCHA MAISKY AND DAUGHTER LILY CAPTURED AT THE INTERVIEW © ISTVÁN FAZEKAS


ENTRY IN THE GUEST BOOK OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MISCHA MAISKY (2 FEBRUARY 2018) 67


SUNDAY 4 NOVEMBER 2018, 11.00

TUESDAY 6 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

TUESDAY 6 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL ORGAN INAUGURATION CHRISTOPH BOSSERT ORGAN RECITAL

LÁSZLÓ BARANYAY PIANO RECITAL

GALA CONCERT OF THE NATIONAL EDE ZATHURECZKY VIOLIN COMPETITION “I do not teach students to play the violin, I teach them to play music,” once said Ede Zathureczky, the world-famous violinist, who was born 115 years ago. The remarkable performer who, throughout his career, dedicated enormous attention to contemporary music, and who held the post of director of the Liszt Academy between 1943 and 1957, was not just a famous virtuoso. As a student of Jenő Hubay, he represented a performance artist approach that always emphasized the beauty of the sound, a delicate fluency of bow action, and a profound musicality of interpretation. This eponymous competition honouring the pedagogical heritage of Zathureczky reaches its 20th year. Organized every five years, the competition remains faithful to his spirit. The event’s primary aim is not for competitors to present an inflexible selection determined by their future career expectations, but rather to provide an opportunity to showcase gifted students from the very youngest to those on the threshold of graduation. Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 68

J. S. Bach: ‘Schafe können sicher weiden’ – aria from the cantata Was mir behagt, ist nur die muntre Jagd! Bartók: Romanian Christmas Songs, BB 67 Bartók: Out of Doors, BB 89 Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 31 in A-flat major, Op. 110 Schubert: Piano Sonata No. 18 in G major, D. 894 László Baranyay (piano) Bach, Bartók and Beethoven works ring out in the first half of László Baranyay’s recital. The concert opens with an arrangement of an aria from the so-called Hunting Cantata, and this is followed by Bartók transcriptions of Romanian Christmas melodies and five movements from the Out of Doors series, including the famous Night Music inspired by the sounds of nature. Then comes Beethoven’s penultimate sonata, the third movement of which has a fascinating, integrated structure: the fugue is introduced by an instrumental recitativo and an arioso evoking a Bach Passion, and then in the wake of the repeated arioso the calque version of the fugue leads to the concluding section. The second half of the recital is devoted to the fourmovement G major sonata of Schubert, written in 1826. This was the last sonata to appear in print in the composer’s lifetime. Robert Schumann felt that this was the most perfect of Schubert’s sonatas and Sviatoslav Richter also picked this as his favourite. Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Vivaldi–J. S. Bach: Concerto for Organ in A minor, BWV 593 J. S. Bach: Fantasia in C major, BWV 573 (excerpt) J. S. Bach: Fantasia in C major, BWV 573 (with additions of Christoph Bossert) Schubert: Piano Sonata No. 16 in A minor, D. 845 – 1 st & 2 nd movements (arrangement by Christoph Bossert) Mendelssohn: Prelude and Fugue for Piano No. 1 in E minor, Op. 35/1 (arrangement by Christoph Bossert) Reger: Organ Sonata No. 2 in D minor, Op. 60 – 1. Improvisation Reger: Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme – choral fantasy, Op. 52/2 Christoph Bossert (organ) This concert is clearly a celebration not only for the Liszt Academy but for all of Hungarian music life since it witnesses the return to its original, pristine condition – after many decades – of the organ in the Grand Hall, which was installed in 1907. The organ, manufactured by the distinguished Voit and Sons workshop, feels most ‘at home’ in the German Romantic repertoire, the very same repertoire of which professor of Würzburg College Christoph Bossert is a renowned proponent. The 61-yearold German artist is not only a proficient performer of the organ music of Max Reger, who worked around the turn of the 19th century, but he is also active as a composer. Indeed, in this programme highlighting Baroque and Romantic masterpieces there is also a chance to hear some of Bossert’s fine arrangements. Tickets: HUF 900, 1 600, 2 200, 2 900, 3 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


THURSDAY 8 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

FRIDAY 9 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL BORIS BEREZOVSKY PIANO RECITAL MVM CONCERTS – THE PIANO

COMPLETE WORKS LIVE MOZART VARIATIONS AND SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN/2 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 17 in C major, K. 296 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 18 in G major, K. 301 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 19 in E-flat major, K. 302 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 20 in C major, K. 303 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 21 E minor, K. 304 Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 22 in A major, K. 305 Vilmos Szabadi (violin), Gábor Farkas (piano)

Balakirev: Two Mazurkas Balakirev: Scherzo No. 2 in B-flat minor Balakirev: Nocturne No. 1 in B-flat minor Balakirev: Scherzo No. 3 in F-sharp major Balakirev: Islamey Lyadov: Barcarolle, Op. 44 Lyadov: Mazurka Lyadov: Four Preludes, Op. 13 Rachmaninov: Thirteen Preludes, Op. 32 (excerpts) Scriabin: Eight Etudes, Op. 42 (excerpts) Scriabin: Three Etudes, Op. 65 Scriabin: Sonata No. 5, Op. 53 Stravinsky: Three Movements from the Ballet Petrushka Boris Berezovsky (piano)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composed his first piano and violin sonatas during an extended trip he took with his father and sister between 1763 and 1766. He only returned to the duo sonata genre, matching strings with keyboard, over a decade later in 1777–1778, again while travelling. The only threemovement work, sonata No. 17, featured in this the second concert of the Complete Works Live series, was completed by Mozart in Mannheim in March 1788. Two-movement sonatas Nos. 18–20, originating in Munich in autumn 1777 and Mannheim in spring 1778, were published in Paris with a dedication to Maria Elisabeth, Electress Palatine, which is why they are known as the ‘Palatine sonatas’. The similarly two-part 21st sonata, composed in Paris, is Mozart’s only work keyed in E minor. In contrast, the first movement of the 22nd sonata, penned as Mozart was on his way home, is one of his most joyous pieces of music. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Boris Berezovsky’s recital could reasonably be subtitled ‘Extracts from the History of Russian Music’. The first part of the programme rounds off with Rachmaninov’s preludes series. After the break, we enjoy six etudes and the single-movement Sonata No. 5 by Scriabin, who was born just one year before Rachmaninov yet had a far shorter life – although his career was arguably more dramatic. The Scriabin sonata marks a watershed in his oeuvre: his music had still not split away from traditional tonality – it is keyed in F-sharp major – but there are hints of something new within. The concert closes with Petrushka written by a youthful Stravinsky. Debuting to huge acclaim in Paris in 1911, the piece is a sort of cross-section of a ballet: after passing through an introductory scene, we immediately find ourselves in the Russian dance.

BORIS BEREZOVSKY

Tickets: HUF 4 000, 5 000, 6 000, 8 000, 10 000, 12 000 Presented by Besszer Concert, Liszt Academy Concert Centre 69


SUNDAY 11 NOVEMBER 2018, 11.00

MONDAY 12 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

TUESDAY 13 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC PEOPLES, RITES, MEN FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS Songs from the past from arabic, Greek, Roman, Russian, Georgian and other lands László Sáry: Psalm Canon Saint Ephraim Male Choir (artistic director: Tamás Bubnó) Moderator: Dániel Mona Strange instruments, singing and clapping nuns, unusual polyphony and Latin masses set to music: the Liszt Kidz Academy samples all these this autumn – as well as, of course, examining what impact these have had on our favourite composers. In the second concert in the Divine Music series we travel east, but more significantly, we journey back in time – right to Antiquity. We explore many kinds of ceremony from Arab to Roman liturgy, as well as expressions of Orthodox and Byzantine ritual that are at first sight somewhat startling. Of course, these are all illustrated with music. And who would be better to perform these than members of the famous St Ephraim Male Choir, founded in 2002, who were the first non-Slav ensemble to triumph at an international Orthodox church festival. But a warning to all those who suffer from travel sickness: one moment we are in ancient Byzantium, and the next we find ourselves amidst contemporary Hungarian music! Ticket: HUF 1 400 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 70

VOCAL MUSIC, SO CLOSE SLAVONIC SONGS AND POPULAR OPERA ARIAS LUCYNA JARZĄBEK COMPOSITION PROJECT BY THE LISZT ACADEMY AND GUILDHALL SCHOOL OF MUSIC & DRAMA Featuring: students of the Liszt Academy of Music Currents, the joint collaboration of the music academies of Budapest and Vienna, has been making a significant contribution to the enhancement of international contemporary music discourse since 2015. On each occasion, the two institutions – with the involvement of a third partner and concentrating on a specific topic – organize symposiums, concerts and workshops. In past years, composers have arrived from Prague, Riga and Helsinki, and themes have covered such issues as the contemporary aspects of folk music, and opportunities for the utilization of the double bass, the bassoon and the guitar. This year, in place of the Viennese faculty, the distinguished Guildhall School of Music & Drama is involved in the collaboration. The name may sound familiar to domestic audiences because musicians from the London school debuted in Hungary during the 2016 Opera Exam Festival. This year, the focus of the joint concert is chamber music and the string trio genre. Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Slavonic songs from Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov, Szymanowski, and opera arias from Moniuszko, Gounod, Dvořák, Mozart, Massenet, Menotti and Puccini Lucyna Jarząbek (soprano) Featuring: Boldizsár László (tenor), Anna Lasek-Starzec (piano) This concert programme, which comprises two halves of very different genres and moods, is made whole by the featured artists. The richness of the programme promises to be a real travel experience in both time and space. The Slavonic songs of the first part of the evening are as yet not well known in Hungary but are gaining in popularity. This recital offers a glimpse into the world of Russian and Polish Romanticism: the romance-inspired works of Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov and Moniuszko are complemented by the remarkable songs of Szymanowski. The second half is a selection of the most popular opera arias. After the intimate atmosphere of the first part of the programme, here the focus is on exploring the limits of vocal capabilities. Lucyna Jarząbek came to the attention of Budapest audiences – and won their adoration – at the 2nd International Éva Marton Singing Competition. In the second part of the concert her partner will be the renowned Hungarian tenor, Boldizsár László. Ticket: HUF 1 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


WEDNESDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

WEDNESDAY 14 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL

CONCERTO ARMONICO C. P. E. BACH 230

THE MASTERS OF THE ORCHESTRA GERGELY MÉNESI & LISZT ACADEMY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ZAK 143

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: Symphony in D major, Wq 176 Flute Concerto in D major, Wq 13 Sonatina in C major, Wq 106 Harpsichord Concerto in G minor, Wq 32 János Bálint (flute) Concerto Armonico Budapest (concertmaster: Gábor Homoki, artistic director: Miklós Spányi)

CONCERTO ARMONICO

There is no knowing what it was like being the son of Johann Sebastian Bach and working in the same profession as his legendary father. Whatever the case, we can say that Carl Philip Emmanuel Bach must have made his father proud, becoming the most important German composer of the second half of the 18th century, with more than 1000 works to his name in a career spanning 60 years. There are few more proficient performers of the composer’s works than Miklós Spányi and Concerto Armonico. It is sufficient to mention that, with the assistance of Swedish BIS Records, they recorded all C. P. E. Bach’s keyboard concertos, in the process winning themselves a Hungarian Gramofon Prize. Miklós Spányi is the founding artistic director of the early music ensemble, which was established in 1983 from students of the Liszt Academy. Current members of the group are freshly graduated Liszt Academy students, led by Gábor Homoki. Alongside Miklós Spányi, flutist János Bálint makes an appearance as soloist. Tickets: HUF 2 900, 3 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre, Concerto Armonico Budapest

Kodály: Dances of Marosszék Gyula Fekete: Cello Concerto Debussy: Prélude à l'après-midi d'un faune Debussy: La Mer Barnabás Baranyai (cello) Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Gergely Ménesi This recital takes us from an early folk music source right up to ethereal, picturesque music. Kodály’s orchestral work Dances of Marosszék draws perhaps most deeply from folk music traditions. The personality and brilliance of Kodály has induced contemporary composers to write works. Gyula Fekete, the Erkel and Bartók-Pásztory Prize-winning composer, wrote his Cello Concerto for the opening concert of the Bartók Plusz Opera Festival. The cello was chosen because Kodály himself was a cellist. Barnabás Baranyai, winner of numerous domestic and international competitions as well as a Junior Prima laureate, takes the solo part. The ethereal is represented by two masterpieces from Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune and La Mer, which reflects a masterful harmony of scents, murmurs and silence. This symphonic poem consisting of three invoked pictures depicting the many facets of water rounds off the evening to perfection. Gergely Ménesi conducts the Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra.

Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 71


THURSDAY 15 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

THURSDAY 15 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

FRIDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/1 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Beethoven: Clarinet Trio in B-flat major, Op. 11 Ligeti: Six Bagatelles Beethoven: Twenty-Five Scottish Songs, Op. 108 (excerpts) Haydn: Piano Trio No. 25 in G major, Hob. XV:25 Heinz Holliger: Rechant Bartók: Divertimento, BB 118 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Zoltán Megyesi (tenor), Viviane Hagner, Alexander Janiczek (violin), Thomas Demenga, Rafael Rosenfeld (cello), Gabriella Pivon (flute), Heinz Holliger (oboe), Reto Bieri, Csaba Klenyán (clarinet), György Lakatos (bassoon), Zoltán Szőke (horn), Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) String Orchestra of the Liszt Academy (conductor: Heinz Holliger) This year, the four-day kamara.hu festival revolves around Hermann Hesse’s The Glass Bead Game, thus the opening concert has multiple associations with the novel: the first concert features works by Beethoven and his teacher, Haydn, as well as Béla Bartók and Ligeti and Holliger, students of Bartók disciple Sándor Veress. Holliger – as conductor and chamber musician – is a frequent partner of the festival’s artistic directors, pianists Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon. And similarly to Hesse, so the opening concert has numerous links to Switzerland: several Swiss artists take to the stage. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 72

CONCERT ON THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF DEBUSSY MVM CONCERTS - DEBUSSY 100 Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune Debussy: Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp Debussy: Deux danses Debussy: Works for two pianos and piano four hands Andrea Vigh (harp), Edit Klukon, Dezső Ránki (piano) and others In a letter dated December 1916, Debussy wrote: “Not everyone can write ‘great music’ – it is still not clear what the expression means – but everyone must strive for this.” He bore this objective in mind throughout his life. Whether he was talking about art with sarcastic precision, aloof taciturnity or specifically defining himself as a French creator, his taste-shaping and style-creating music was always original, fresh, thoughtprovoking and inscrutable. On the centenary of his death, world-famous harpist and president of the Liszt Academy, Andrea Vigh, and the superb pianist couple Edit Klukon and Dezső Ránki have selected from Debussy’s rich oeuvre in order to prove – through this perfectly honed and sensitive chamber recital – the words of Kodály, who bade farewell to the great Frenchman in the journal Nyugat in March 1918: “Now, through him, we begin to understand why Mozart was so praised when his taste was mentioned with such emphasis. […] The path that he started out on leads towards freedom and beauty.” Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/2 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Doráti: Duo Concertante Veress: Sonatina Brahms: Piano Trio No. 3 in C minor, Op. 101 Heinz Holliger: COncErto – collage Brahms: Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Viviane Hagner (violin), Ditta Rohmann (cello), Heinz Holliger (english horn), Reto Bieri, Csaba Klenyán (clarinet), György Lakatos (bassoon), Roman Rabinovich, Dénes Várjon (piano) Merel Quartet: Mary Ellen Woodside, Edouard Mätzener (violin), Alessandro D’Amico (viola), Rafael Rosenfeld (cello) For the second of the festival’s concerts, once again the spotlight is on Switzerland and the pairing of master-student that is so characteristic of Hesse and his novel The Glass Bead Game. Heinz Holliger and Dénes Várjon perform the featured work by Antal Doráti, who died in Switzerland. Whereas Holliger has been a sort of master figure in the lives of the festival’s artistic directors, he himself was once a student when he studied composition under Sándor Veress, naturally in Switzerland. The interesting thing about the Brahms trio, composed in Hofstetten, Switzerland, is that the composer himself was soloist at the Budapest premiere, playing with Jenő Hubay and Dávid Popper. The fact that the performers of the Holliger work are all from Switzerland will come as no surprise at all. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


FRIDAY 16 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2018, 11.00

GRAND HALL

CUPOLA HALL

WORKSHOPS OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MUSIC OF THE WINTER CELEBRATION RECITAL BY THE CHURCH MUSIC DEPARTMENT Selection from the winter feast music of the lithurgical year: gregorian hymns, antiphons and mass movements, early polyphonic music. Arrangements of Advent and Christmas chants by Du Fay, Josquin, Stoltzer, Porta, Lassus, Palestrina and G. Gabrieli Movements from the Anna Hansen Schuman codex of Bratislava. Chorale transcriptions by Praetorius, Schein and Scheidt. Two choir pieces from Advent and Christmas with instrument accompaniment by Benedek Istvánffy. Organ cycles by L. Couperin, Reger, Tournemire, Messiaen and Dupré (excerpts)

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY GOLDIPEGS AND THE THREE CELLOS THE GLASS BEAD GAME Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Izabella Simon and the artists of the kamara.hu Editor-host: Izabella Simon

The various faculties of the university are showcased in the Workshops of the Liszt Academy series. On this occasion the Church Music Department performs music for the winter festive season, Advent, Christmas and Epiphany. The programme is ecumenical: there is both Catholic and Protestant church music, as well as vocal and purely instrumental pieces. Naturally, the concert includes not only international but also Hungarian church music in the form of two works by the 18th-century Hungarian composer Benedek Istvánffy.

A particular sensitivity and feeling for children, carefully planned tales, precisely selected works of music performed to the highest standard, great performers: these are the hallmarks of the children’s programmes of Izabella Simon. This year, the closing story in a trilogy is served up at the popular kamara.hu event: in the wake of Little Red Violin (and the Big Evil Cello) and Cinderella, the tale of Goldipegs and the Three Cellos rounds off the series created to the libretto of multifaceted cellist Isserlis Steven and the music of Oscar winner Anne Dudley. The arrangement of Goldilocks and the Three Bears is performed by musicians of the festival and students of the Liszt Academy. The involvement of the fellow arts plays a particular role at the concert this time around, as in the festival’s leading thread appearing in The Glass Bead Game. In addition to compering the programme, Izabella Simon once again examines a theme: the magical world of games brought to life by music.

Ticket: HUF 1 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 1 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tamás Bódiss, Pál Enyedi, Márton Levente Horváth, György Merczel, János Mezei, Zoltán Mizsei, Dóra Pétery, Judit Rajk, András Soós (professors of the department) Choir comprising current and former students of the Church Music Department Chamber Orchestra comprising current and former students of the Liszt Academy

IZABELLA SIMON © MISI KONDELLA

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SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2018, 17.00

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2018, 18.30

SATURDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

CUPOLA HALL

AUDITORIUM

GRAND HALL KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/4 THE GLASS BEAD GAME

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/3 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Helena Winkelman: The Clock Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps

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Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Reto Bieri (clarinet), Alexander Janiczek (violin), Dénes Várjon (piano) Merel Quartet: Mary Ellen Woodside, Edouard Mätzener (violin), Alessandro D’Amico (viola), Rafael Rosenfeld (cello)

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MUSIC AND VISUALITY THE GLASS BEAD GAME

Q.: What is the connection between the works by Helena Winkelman and Olivier Messiaen? A.: Time. The Swiss-Dutch composer set Shakespeare’s 12th sonnet to music and titled it The Clock. The poem examines the passage of time from the ticking of the seconds through nature’s decline to the inevitability of death. Winkelman's string quartet was written for the Merel Quartet, and premiered at the Engelberg Chamber Music Festival. The standout moment of the performance was when alongside the musical imitations, the actual church bell of this picturesque town started to toll, ruthlessly reminding all of the passage of time. Time is also present in Messiaen’s quartet written and performed while a war prisoner in 1941, although instead of the passing of time the focus is on perfection. In its spirituality, the work, which is completely divorced from worldly things, has an affinity with the Order, the secretive brotherhood of Hesse’s The Glass Bead Game.

Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Diana Cohen (violin), Roman Rabinovich (piano)

Ticket: HUF 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Roman Rabinovich’s programme – music and visuality

Just as we see in the novel The Glass Bead Game by Hesse, in which science, art and religion combine, so it is not unusual to find in real life various skills and gifts. This year’s kamara.hu showcases many such multidimensional artists and composers. Just as Hesse was not only an author but a fine painter, too, so Messiaen harmonized music with religion in a special dimension: and Ligeti, with his remarkable mathematical sense, integrated fields of science with music. At this unconventional event of the 2018 festival, pianist Roman Rabinovich presents his two passions at a single audio-visual concert: while playing alongside his wife, violinist Diana Cohen, his own animations and pictures tell a story connected to the works being performed.

Haydn: String Quartet No. 27 in D major, Hob. III:34 Veress: Hommage à Paul Klee Beethoven: Variations in G major on Wenzel Müller’s Theme ‘Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu’, Op. 121a Kurtág: Signs, Games, Messages – In Nomine all’ongherese; Einen Augenblick lang; ...ein Brief aus der Ferne an Ursula Schumann: Piano Quartet in E-flat major, Op. 47 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Alexander Janiczek, Anthony Marwood (violin), Jürg Dähler (viola), Ditta Rohmann (cello), Heinz Holliger (oboe, english horn), Roman Rabinovich, Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) Merel Quartet: Mary Ellen Woodside, Edouard Mätzener (violin), Alessandro D’Amico (viola), Rafael Rosenfeld (cello) String Orchestra of the Liszt Academy (conductor: Heinz Holliger) One of the principal intentions of artistic directors Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon is clearly apparent in the programme: to perform many different kinds of classical music in the company of modern works. In this programme, it is worth paying particular attention to the name of Paul Klee, who features in the Veress work. The Schumann creation is on the programme for a good reason: in opposition to ‘musical philistines’, the composer established his imaginary society, the so-called League of David, the requirements of which – purity and perfection – are echoed in the elite of The Glass Bead Game. Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900, 4 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2018, 15.30

SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2018, 17.00

SOLTI TEREM

CAFE

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/5 THE GLASS BEAD GAME Schubert: Piano Trio Movement in E-flat major, D. 897 (‘Notturno’) Schubert: Schwanengesang, D. 957 Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Zoltán Megyesi (tenor), Viviane Hagner (violin), Ditta Rohmann (cello), Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) “At that time I had found an old volume of music at my piano teacher’s. It was a volume of songs by Franz Schubert, and it exerted a strong attraction upon me. (…) In my leisure hours I gave myself up to the ecstasy of discovery. Up to that time I had not known Schubert at all, and I was totally captivated by him,” says Josef Knecht, protagonist of Hesse’s The Glass Bead Game. This excerpt explains the dominant role played by Schubert at the Sunday afternoon concert of kamara.hu. Crowning achievements and final works of several creative oeuvres are present at the festival, and this goes for the Hesse novel as well. Franz Schubert composed the Notturno in the year before his death, and despite its neglect it is a significant work. Swan Song (or as it is better known, Schwanengesang) was the composer’s final work, only published a few months after his death. Performance of the collection continues the kamara.hu tradition of popularizing lieder. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY BETWEEN THE FOUR OF US – CONVERSATION ON FILM, LITERATURE AND MUSIC THE GLASS BEAD GAME Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Guests: Ildikó Enyedi and Wilhelm Droste Participating: Anthony Marwood (violin) It is well worthwhile, not to mention fascinating, to talk about the relationship between music and literature in literary works, even when music is so obviously present in a work such as The Glass Bead Game. After all, the protagonist, Josef Knecht, is actually a musician. The musicality of a literary text can be revealed in many different ways, not to mention that this musicality means different things to different authors and readers. During kamara.hu’s music and literature chat, Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon put these questions and other matters connected to Hesse’s masterpiece to their guests, Ildikó Enyedi film director and Wilhelm Droste literary translator. British violinist Anthony Marwood provides musical accompaniment.

ILDIKÓ ENYEDI © ZSOLT MÉSZÁROS

Ticket: HUF 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 75


SUNDAY 18 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

FRIDAY 23 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

SATURDAY 24 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

KAMARA.HU – CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL OF THE LISZT ACADEMY KAMARA.HU/6 THE GLASS BEAD GAME

TALLINN CHAMBER ORCHESTRA & ESTONIAN PHILHARMONIC CHAMBER CHOIR ARVO PÄRT

Debussy: Sonata for flute, viola and harp Mozart: Piano Quartet No. 2 in E-flat major, K. 493 Liszt: Orpheus – symphonic poem (arrangement by Camille Saint-Saëns) Ravel: Chansons madécasses Fauré: Piano Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 15

Arvo Pärt: Cantus in Memoriam Benjamin Britten Adam's Lament Salve Regina Te Deum

Artistic directors of the festival: Izabella Simon and Dénes Várjon Lúcia Megyesi Schwartz (mezzo-soprano), Viviane Hagner, Andrea Hallam, Anthony Marwood (violin), Jürg Dähler (viola), Thomas Demenga (cello), Gabriella Pivon (flute), Andrea Vigh (harp), Roman Rabinovich, Izabella Simon, Dénes Várjon (piano) The closing concert of kamara.hu adds much that is new to what has gone before. Shifting the focus from Switzerland towards France, this programme features works by Debussy, Ravel and Fauré, among others. Gabriel Fauré taught Ravel, who was inspired by the music of Debussy, despite there being an element of rivalry between the two. The latter’s sonata was the last completed piece of his oeuvre, and which is also a recurrent motif of the festival. Ferenc Liszt is indirectly associated with the three of them because his works had a significant impact on French composition. His symphonic poem Orpheus ties in to the spiritual world of The Glass Bead Game, on top of which the hero of ancient Greece is the teacher of medicine and writing, that is science and an art. The music of masonic lodge member Mozart refers to the Freemasonry that appears in the Hesse novel. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre 76

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir Tallinn Chamber Orchestra Conductor: Tõnu Kaljuste The oeuvre of one of the greatest figures of contemporary composition, 83-year-old Arvo Pärt, is gaining ever more ground in Hungary, yet until now there have been few events of our music halls devoting themselves to his art in a concert employing an entire, large-scale performance apparatus. This, however, is the case here. And what is more, the Liszt Academy is playing host to what could be considered the most authentic Pärt performers there are, in the shapes of the Tallinn Chamber Orchestra and Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir, the head of which – and conductor of this recital – is Tõnu Kaljuste. The four compositions on show represent different creative periods of the composer: Cantus in memoriam Benjamin Britten (1977) is representative of the new compositional process developed during this time and is one of the first of the 'tintinnabuli' style, Te Deum derives from the 1980s, while Salve Regina (2001) and Adam’s Lament (2009) are two of the composer’s later works. Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

JAZZ IT! MIKLÓS LUKÁCS – CIMBIOSIS TRIO & RICARDO IZQUIERDO Miklós Lukács (cimbalom), György Orbán (double bass), István Baló (percussion) Ricardo Izquierdo (saxophone) Popular and much sought-after cimbalom player Miklós Lukács formed his own trio along with bassist György Orbán and drummer István Baló in 2013. Although the presence of a cimbalom makes the formation something of a rarity, the trio’s singular aim is to bring forth music in which the composed and improvised elements imperceptibly flow into one another. The emphasis is on the musical dialogue between the three players: accompanying instrumentalists – in the classical sense – are not shunted into the background but they also help shape the formation as soloists in themselves, reacting to the cimbalom melodies. The end result is that the ensemble’s music lives and breathes; it is impulsive and passionate, like the water of a river in which one can discover surprising depths beneath the surface current. The repertoire for this evening’s concert comprises material from the trio’s two albums, Cimbiózis and Budapest Anzix. A speciality of the recital is the appearance of Cubanborn, French-resident guest artist Ricardo Izquierdo on saxophone. Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


SUNDAY 25 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

TUESDAY 27 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.00

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

BLACK AND WHITE COLOURS ANDREAS STAIER FORTEPIANO RECITAL

BARTÓK WORLD COMPETITION & FESTIVAL – COMPOSITION COMPETITION AWARD CEREMONY & GALA CONCERT

Mozart: Fantasia in C minor, K. 475 Haydn: Keyboard Sonata No. 59 in E-flat major, Hob. XVI:49 Beethoven: Six bagatelles, Op. 126 Schubert: Impromptu in C minor, D. 899/1 Schubert: Impromptu in A-flat major, D. 935/2 Schubert: Six moments musicaux, D. 780

This is the day when all is revealed. We are now in the second year of the Bartók World Competition and Festival; this year, it is the ‘battle’ of the composers. The global reputation of the event was cemented with the huge success of the 2017 violin competition, thus the composer contest announced in March attracted a large number of young entrants from all over the world. The members of the jury represent perhaps the single greatest attraction for applicants, and in this respect the Bartók World Competition and Festival is once again a leading force: among the biggest names in contemporary composition, Thomas Adès, Chaya Czernowin and Unsuk Chin have all agreed to work together with Gyula Fekete, head of the Liszt Academy composition department. Andrei Korobeinikov is similarly involved, but as a pianist he has a different take on the submitted works: do they provide an opening for pianists to genuinely showcase their musicality and virtuosity? Our most excellent pianist colleagues János Balázs, Balázs Fülei and Dénes Várjon perform the prize-winning works for piano at the gala concert.

Andreas Staier (fortepiano)

Ticket: HUF 1 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 2 200, 2 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

In March 1979, only a decade after the initial experiments, the first fortepiano recital was arranged at the Liszt Academy. The concert ruffled feathers among the cognoscenti and generated diametrically opposing opinions from the critics. This was a rather strange reception, given that what had happened was nothing more than Malcolm Bilson playing an instrument well known by composers of the late 18th, early 19th century yet. What was unusual for us at that time was that Bilson took full account of historical sources in his performance. Nearly 40 years later, ahead of the Liszt Academy appearance of Andreas Staier, perhaps there is no longer need to prove that the fortepiano (an early hammer piano) differs from today’s concert piano in the same important characteristics as the harpsichord, even though the method of sounding is in principle identical. Thus its revival was not the extension of the search for curiosities to later works but rather an inspiring, productive experiment. The fortepiano subsequently won a place in mainstream concert life.

ANDREAS STAIER © JOSEP MOLINA

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THURSDAY 29 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

FRIDAY 30 NOVEMBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL DÉNES VÁRJON PIANO RECITAL MVM CONCERTS – THE PIANO

PURE BAROQUE BORBÁLA DOBOZY, PIERRE HANTAÏ & AURA MUSICALE J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C minor, BWV 1060 J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C major, BWV 1061 J. S. Bach: Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D major, BWV 1050 J. S. Bach: Concerto for Two Harpsichords in C minor, BWV 1062

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Dénes Várjon (piano)

‘In its time, the clavecin was rarely smuggled onto the concert podium; this thin-sounding tool was a specialized chamber instrument, used solely in chambers, that is to say, in rooms.‘ Much has changed since Béla Bartók’s 1912 article ‘Performing works written for harpsichord’. The Liszt Academy has been teaching harpsichord as a major since 1970. The senior lecturer in the department is Borbála Dobozy, who along with harpsichordist Pierre Hantaï and Aura Musicale, put on a joint recital in November focusing on Johann Sebastian Bach’s concertos for double harpsichord. It is known that in the 1730s Bach transcribed for himself and his sons these rarely performed compositions from his earlier works for Collegium Musicum assemblies held in Café Zimmermann in Leipzig. In addition, there is a performance of the Brandenburg concerto No. 5.

Dénes Várjon has put together a programme of works by masters all beginning with the letter B: after Bach comes Brahms, then Beethoven. The Partita in A minor is one of the few Bach creations that appeared in print during the master’s lifetime. It is a suite in seven movements, starting with a Fantasia, then after customary stylized dance movements – Allemande, Courante, Sarabande – there is a Burlesque and Scherzo, concluding with a virtuoso Gigue. The audience can then enjoy six Brahms compositions from his later life. The third movement in the series, collected together as Opus 118, is titled Ballade, the fifth Romanze, while the other movements are each called Intermezzo. The second half of the concert is given over to Beethoven’s B flat major sonata, Opus 106. At the time it was written in 1819 it was rated as the most demanding work in piano literature. The opening movement has a grandiose sonata structure, the second movement is, like the 9th symphony, a scherzo, while the third is a slow movement in F-sharp minor that seems to predate the world of Chopin. The closing movement is a lengthy fugue with a remarkable introduction in which the composer did not even write bars for quite a while.

Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000, 8 000 Presented by Besszer Concert, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Borbála Dobozy, Pierre Hantaï (harpsichord) Noémi Győri (flute), László Paulik (violin) Aura Musicale (artistic director: Balázs Máté)

BORBÁLA DOBOZY © PÉTER BALGA

J. S. Bach: Partita No. 3 in A minor, BWV 827 Brahms: Six Piano Pieces, Op. 118 Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 29 in B-flat major, Op. 106 (‘Hammerklavier’)


IN GOOD HUMOUR AND IN HARMONY What makes a jazz musician popular? Many say that they should play with taste and fire, that they should be innovative and be aware of the unique musical traditions of the genre. It is essential that they be capable of communicating with the other musicians, and, of course, it also helps if they have mastered the playing of their instrument. There are, however, fundamental, non-musical factors that are also rather important: personal aura and attitude. These are mentioned less often when talking about the performance of jazz, and both are virtually impossible to teach at school. How can we connect with the audience and with our fellow-musicians beyond the actual musical part? These were the questions I asked the profoundly gifted and charismatic jazz pianist Péter Sárik, who is always welcomed by audiences with exuberant enthusiasm both as the head of his trio and as a collaborating musician in other productions.

Judging from your shows, it seems you connect with your audiences very well. How does it feel to be the lead figure in a band? Last year was the 10 th anniversary of my founding of the Trio. When I established the group, I longed for my own group of fellow musicians with whom I could make a real team and achieve great things. I had quite consciously prepared myself for being the lead performer: in 2008 I stopped participating in music sessions and quit my teaching job in order to put all my energies into my band. I have a natural urge to be in close contact with my audience. I feel good if they feel good, and I treat the audiences of our concerts with sincerity and friendship. But this, of course, must also be learnt. Our concert at Müpa in 2012 represented the turning point. Back then, I was so nervous that between the pieces I said words I had written down and learned by heart. Today I chat and joke with the audience spontaneously. For this, I’ve had to work a lot on myself. Does this role hold a special challenge to you? The head of a band is always under much more pressure than its members. What I require from my team is simply to come prepared to rehearsals and concerts and to be loyal to me. I also want them to discuss any problems they have with me first. Apart from these things, they have nothing else to do: I am responsible for all other things, which is often an enormous burden. Would you describe yourself as more of an introverted or extroverted person? I am perhaps both at the same time: I love striking up conversations with random unknown people, even in the street. I also feel at home on the stage. From the perspective of the audience, it may seem that I’m always smiling and that I am absolutely open, but I let only a few people come beyond a certain internal line. This is why jazz proves to be a great choice for me: even the most famous jazz musicians of the world can stroll about in the city centre without being recognised. I wouldn’t be able to cope with all the attention a successful pop music artist gets. I guess that for an introverted artist a life full of travelling and stage performances might be overwhelming. What’s your take on this? There is some truth in what you are saying, but I doubt that it is the travelling or the performances that cause these artists their problems; rather it is their inability to manage or ‘sell themselves’. If an artist wants to be successful, they have to gain control over their own fate. Beyond practising and preparing ourselves musically, we also need to become marketing experts and business people to some extent. This might see humiliating or appalling to some musicians, as they think – and justifiably so – that this shouldn’t be their job, and so they wait for the world to 81


discover them. But this discovery happens relatively rarely. In my experience, it is not ‘showbiz’ that consumes their soul, but the lack of success and the feeling of being overlooked. This is how these people turn into misunderstood artists, which is a real tragedy, as excellent musicians remain unknown for ever simply because they can’t or won’t adjust their ways to the new era. Today, though, it is much easier than it was ten years ago: you can reach hundreds of thousands with a few clicks of your computer mouse, and if someone is really original, extraordinary, then they can become known all over the world virtually within minutes. By the way, if we read the biography of any great composer, we’ll see that their lives were full of snags and difficulties, and no matter how pure their heart was, they had to overcome these obstacles.

‘FOR ME, IT IS CRUCIAL TO BE HARMONY WITH THE PERSON I MAKE MUSIC WITH’

Besides stage presence, what other qualities can create harmony between the band and their audience? It takes quite a few things: a team consisting of excellent musicians, who love doing what they do, who have their own unique personalities, who complement, are fond of and respect one another, who are uninhibited in a good sense, that is, they are able to be free, make music and play with each other on the stage with a child-like joy, and who of course put meaning, thought and feeling in what they do. If these factors are present, success is certain: the audience will love them. But if a group has no charisma or energy, then no matter for how many decades they practise for or how many university degrees they earn, no magic will happen. In jazz there are hardly any pre-composed segments that you could cling onto, behind which you could hide: the miracle is born spontaneously or not at all. Do you find it important that jazz musicians learn how to develop stage presence and connect with the audience? In my opinion, the task that we all have is to get to know and come to love ourselves, so that by liberating ourselves from our constraining inhibitions and our negative, self-destructive thoughts, we can live proudly with our personalities. Schools too ought to guide their students – musicians and non-musicians – in this direction. If someone has reached this level, they will radiate harmony, and no matter how they behave, they will be natural and authentic, and the audience will appreciate them. They will also then find a way to connect with the audience, with or without words. What type of band leader do you consider yourself to be? How do you search for harmony within the Trio? No band – indeed no enterprise – can function well without firm leadership. You need a boss who has a vision of the joint future, who coordinates and 82


PÉTER SÁRIK © LÁSZLÓ ARANY TÓTH 83


takes responsibility for all. At the same time, it is important that the members feel that it is their band, too. They must all feel that their personal presence is essential, and that they all share the goals of the band. I want my band members to feel good about themselves, to feel no constraints or pressure. Of course, it can happen that someone wants to explore new directions or that they still feel inhibited to some degree. In this case, you must bid them farewell, as it is not worth forcing them to change. Do you bring ready-made composition and orchestration ideas to your band members or rather only fragments that you complete together? I normally orchestrate the pieces on my computer at home; I prepare the composition model for the bass and the drum. Then I put this on sheet music, and I send this nearly finished work to the guys. This is the starting point for the rehearsal, after which each one of us adds his own ideas. At our concerts we never play the same piece the same way twice, and as we develop, so do our old songs. What do you think a musician can do to work harmoniously with others? It is as easy as pie, yet only few manage it: practise, learn new things, come prepared to rehearsals and concerts, be on time and be honest. If you are kind and fun to be with, even passionate about what you do, you’ll have so much work that you’ll have to make your phone number unlisted so that you have a bit of peace and quiet sometimes. These qualities are all about respect for your fellow-musicians. If we observe these, we will be able to work efficiently, in a good atmosphere and in harmony. Have you ever had bad experiences with other musicians, in the sense of not finding a common denominator? Yes, I have, but fortunately, not too often. And the few cases that I have had have been regrettable. In these situations, you have a miserable time on stage and can hardly wait till the end of your suffering. For me, it is crucial to be in harmony with the person I make music with beyond the professional level. If this doesn’t work out with someone, I will not collaborate with them for a long time. I have often been criticised for not being more tolerant, more easy-going, but I cannot change this. I am more sensitive to people’s personalities than most, and I feel uncomfortable if I’m not in harmony with someone. This obviously does not mean that those who I cannot get on with are bad people, it just means that we don’t make a good match. This is why I can’t work with anyone simply because of some shared interest. This has created a few problems in my career, but it is the only way I can feel comfortable and content. You seem to be a positive and balanced person on stage and off. Have these qualities contributed to your success? Musical success is not necessarily linked to balance or happiness. The history of jazz is full of tragic fates and broken lives. Many successful and world-famous musicians have been lonely and unhappy people outside their ‘stage life’. Unfortunately, depression, alcoholism or drug abuse are quite common phenomena with artists, as we are much more sensitive than others, and there are some who can only endure their existence in this way. By no means do I want to judge anyone; I have no way of knowing the weight of the burden people have to carry. I only cross my 84


fingers for them to find a better way, as it is awful to see miraculously gifted people lost and unable to follow the course open to them, either in their art or in their private lives, and sometimes both. I have worked hard for my balance and my positive outlook on life, and this pursuit of becoming a better, more positive and freer person is an ongoing process. It is painful to face your fears and overcome the shadows of your past, but it is worth it in the end. I believe that it is possible to experience both highs and lows in art even if you are happy and balanced. Fortunately, there are lots of good examples of this, and this can fill all of us with hope. György Szentgallay

SÁRIK PÉTER TRIO © CSABA AKNAY

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SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER 2018, 18.00

SATURDAY 1 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SUNDAY 2 DECEMBER 2018, 11.00

GRAND HALL

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

FESTIVE CONCERT FOR THE 85TH BIRTHDAY OF MIKLÓS KOCSÁR Miklós Kocsár: Works for Children’s Choir to the poems by Imre Csanádi Three Pieces for Children’s Choir to Poems by Sándor Kányádi Seven Pieces for Women’s Choir to Poems by László Nagy Csodafiú szarvas (Miracle-Son Stag) – to the poem by László Nagy Folk prayers from the collection of Zsuzsanna Erdélyi Jubilate Deo

Attila Demény: Ten Piano Pieces Beethoven: Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major, Op. 109 Schumann: Fantasie in C major, Op. 17 Liszt: Bagatelle ohne Tonart Ligeti: Etudes – 13. L’escalier du Diable

Spirituals, gospels and songs of George Gershwin

Balázs Demény (piano)

Jazz And More Vocal Ensemble Júlia Karosi Quartet: Júlia Karosi (vocals), Áron Tálas (piano), Ádám Bögöthy (double bass), Bendegúz Varga (percussion) Moderator: Dániel Mona

Miklós Kocsár began music studies in the city of his birth, Debrecen. He proved to be a superb pianist; the Debrecen Csokonai Theatre employed him as a pianist and accordionist the year he left school, he became interested in jazz and also studied composition. His teachers at the Liszt Academy include such luminaries of Hungarian music as Ferenc Farkas, Lajos Bárdos, Pál Járdányi and András Szöllősy. From 1972 he taught composition at the Bartók Music Secondary School. Kocsár is a double Erkel Prize winner, he has also won the Bartók–Pásztory Prize, a Kossuth Prize, and the Order of the Cross of the Republic of Hungary. In 1992 he was a founding member of the Hungarian Academy of Arts and has been a full member since 2011. The Liszt Academy pays tribute to the 85-year-old master with this commemorative concert.

Balázs Demény is in concert with a truly imposing programme. Miniatures titled Ten Piano Pieces - written by the pianist’s father, Attila Demény, are followed by a late Beethoven work, the Piano Sonata No. 30 in E major. The latter work is worthy of attention for its remarkable form, its dream-like evocation in the overture and the poetically beautiful variation movement. Schumann’s yearning for Clara Wieck is embodied in his C major Fantasia. In this piece rich in allusions, the composer quotes from the song cycle by Beethoven To the Distant Beloved, openly manifesting his feelings for Wieck. The concert closes with two brilliant works: Liszt’s devilishly virtuoso Bagatelle sans tonalité and György Ligeti’s biographically-inspired elementary etude. Balázs Demény was winner of the 2013 Carl Filtsch, 2015 Hans von Bülow and 2017 Île de France international piano competitions.

Strange instruments, singing and clapping nuns, unusual polyphony and Latin masses set to music: the Liszt Kidz Academy samples all these this autumn – as well as, of course, examining what impact these have had on our favourite composers – in our brand-new series called Divine Music. The third concert of the series heads for distant lands: America, to be precise. The style everyone knows from the film Sister Act (gospels, spirituals) is recreated in the Solti Hall, as we explore how exactly it is possible to turn towards God with this music. The Hungarian vocal ensemble Jazz And More is our guide on this journey. And if that is not enough to make everyone feel heavenly, songs by Gershwin, which are heavily inspired by lighter genres, are the cream on the jazz cake. The fantastic vocalist Júlia Karosi and her group, founded in 2009, play excerpts from their recently released album.

Tickets: HUF 1 200 Presented by Cantemus Mixed Choir, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 1 400 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Cantemus Mixed Choir, Cantemus Children’s Choir, Pro Musica Children’s Choir Students of the Liszt Academy of Music Conductor: Dénes Szabó, Soma Szabó

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TALENT OBLIGES BALÁZS DEMÉNY PIANO RECITAL

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC BELIEVERS, COLOURS, RHYTHMS FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS


SUNDAY 2 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

MONDAY 3 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

PURCELL CHOIR & ORFEO ORCHESTRA ADVENT & MAGNIFICAT IN ST THOMAS’ CHURCH – BACH & KUHNAU J. S. Bach: Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland – cantata, BWV 61 Kuhnau: Magnificat J. S. Bach: Was willst du dich betrüben – cantata, BWV 107 J. S. Bach: Magnificat, BWV 243 Purcell Choir, Orfeo Orchestra (on period instruments) Conductor: György Vashegyi

PURCELL CHOIR & ORFEO ORCHESTRA © LÁSZLÓ MUDRA

In 1723 the Christmas season was the first major religious festival offering the 38-year-old Bach the opportunity to reveal to the entire congregation his extraordinary skills as composer and conductor. For the first Advent Sunday of 1723, there was a performance of Nun komm der Heiden Heiland, a cantata he had written nine years earlier; on the second day of Christmas a completely new Bach work, the Magnificat, still at this point in E-flat major and – in keeping with local tradition – furnished with Christmas movements, resounded in the foremost church in Leipzig. Both in form and structure Bach’s 1724 cantata that begins with Was willst du dich betrüben resembles his own Magnificat, while in genre terms it resembles more closely the Magnificat composed by the outstanding polymath Johann Kuhnau (1660–1722), Bach’s immediate predecessor as Thomaskantor. Tickets: HUF 1 400, 2 100, 3 500, 4 900, 5 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

JAZZ IT! FERENC SNÉTBERGER & KELLER QUARTET Ferenc Snétberger (guitar) Keller Quartet: András Keller, Zsófia Környei (violin), Zoltán Gál (viola), Judit Szabó (cello) Guitarist Ferenc Snétberger, who burst onto the music scene in the late 1980s with Trio Stendhal, is a true European creative genius. Besides being a composer and soloist, he also regularly involves himself with matters close to his heart. He is associated not only with the unique Felsőörs camp, which teaches Roma youth about music, but also with the work In Memory of My People, for guitar and full orchestra, which is dedicated to the innocent Roma killed during the Porajmos Holocaust. This work has been performed in many countries, as well as at the New York headquarters of the UN. The Italy premiere in 2003 was conducted by András Keller, who gained fame as leader of his eponymous string quartet, since which time the two have collaborated professionally on several further occasions. This time the Keller Quartet accompany Snétberger in concert. Snétberger’s guitar playing, which lies on the borderline of classical music and jazz, and the professionalism of the string quartet are a unified force in a performance that every serious music fan must be witness to. Tickets: HUF 2 900, 4 100, 5 200, 6 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre, a-s promotion 87


TUESDAY 4 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

WEDNESDAY 5 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

HERE AND NOW DITTA ROHMANN Kodály: Cello Sonata, Op. 8 Ligeti: Cello Sonata Péter Eötvös: Two Poems to Polly György Kurtág: Signs, Games and Messages (excerpts) Barnabás Dukay: A hit mindenhatóságának keresztútja (instrumental monody) Barnabás Dukay: Láttam Uramat a szívem szemével (instrumental monody) J. M. C. Dall’Abaco: Eleven Capriccios (excerpts)

LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT BY 1ST- AND 2ND-YEAR BACHELOR'S DEGREE STUDENTS Tchaikovsky: Serenade in C major, Op. 48 Beethoven: Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21

Ditta Rohmann (cello)

DITTA ROHMANN © GÁBOR VALUSKA

The solo cello canon is by no means restricted to those few composers and works that regularly feature at concerts, in recordings or on the radio. In the 20th century the instrument’s repertoire was enhanced with so-called classical works, such as solo sonatas by Kodály and Ligeti; however, we must also not forget other creative figures living earlier ‘in the shadow of Bach’ who endowed the cello with superb compositions. One of these was the extremely long-lived cellist and composer Joseph Maria Clément dall’Abaco (1710–1805), a contemporary of Vivaldi, Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. And there have been modern figures, too, proof of which is provided in this concert by Ditta Rohmann. As far as she is concerned, there is no such thing as old and new, or a demarcation between classical and experimental, since she approaches each and every piece in the spirit of discovery, curiosity and recreation. Ticket: HUF 1 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

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Chamber Orchestra comprising 1st- and 2nd-year bachelor’s degree students at the Liszt Academy Conductor: Péter Kováts The Liszt Academy functions as both a university and a concert centre, and these two profiles mutually reinforce each other, with students being able to take part in study projects that also end up being enjoyed by the general public. The institution instructs not only soloists but also orchestral musicians, so some prominence is given to symphony and chamber orchestra projects. First-year students pursue a one-year string orchestra course: tonight’s performance is their concert. Professors of both the Chamber Music Department and Music Theory Department took part in the training, arming these youthful musicians with practical and theoretical knowledge. Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


FRIDAY 7 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SATURDAY 8 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SUNDAY 9 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

BLACK AND WHITE COLOURS ISTVÁN LAJKÓ PIANO RECITAL Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in C major, Op. 87/1 Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in A minor, Op. 87/2 Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in D major, Op. 87/5 Shostakovich: Prelude and Fugue in D-flat major, Op. 87/15 Medtner: Tale in E minor, Op. 14/2 (March of the Paladin) Medtner: Tale in E minor, Op. 34/2 Medtner: Danza silvestra, Op. 38/7 Medtner: Alla reminiscenza, Op. 38/8 Medtner: Danza festiva, Op. 38/3 Glinka-Balakirev: Fantasia on Themes from Glinka’s A Life for the Tsar Tchaikovsky-Pletnev: The Sleeping Beauty suite, Op. 66

RAINBOW AND ABYSS CONCERT ON THE 110TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BIRTH OF OLIVIER MESSIAEN Messiaen: Preludes Messiaen: Quatuor pour la fin du temps

JAZZ IT! KÁROLY BINDER SOLO CONCERT Károly Binder (piano)

Lisa Romain (violin), Horia Dumitrache (clarinet), Tamás Zétényi (cello), László Borbély (piano)

In 2007 István Lajkó graduated with distinction in his piano studies from the Liszt Academy of Music, where he was a student of Sándor Falvai and Balázs Szokolay. He has taken podium places at many Hungarian and international competitions. In 2008, he was chosen as soloist for the New Masters on Tour concert series of the International Holland Music Sessions, and in 2010 he collected the Junior Príma Prize. He has been a guest artist in several countries. For this recital, István Lajkó unveils several rarely heard masterworks by 19th and 20th century Russian composers. Shostakovich’s ground-breaking preludes and fugues as well as Nikolai Medtner’s character pieces fit happily alongside the Romanticism of Balakirev and Tchaikovsky.

Anyone who follows European jazz will certainly know the name Károly Binder. The head of the Liszt Academy Jazz Department is undoubtedly one of the most colourful personalities on the domestic scene, an artist whose successful career has been marked by countless concerts, nearly 100 albums, dozens of film and theatre commissions, and a whole display cabinet of elite prizes. Binder’s style has been influenced not only by the jazz greats but by Béla Bartók and Hungarian folk music. At the same time he has tried to shape his own identity as a creative artist, and when teaching this is the message he transmits to his students. His performance style is unique to say the least: his technical repertoire encompasses the preparation of pianos and the percussive use of the instrument, while his compositions span many genres, from the borders of classical music through modern minimalism to mainstream jazz. Although Binder is also famed as a composer, by his own admission the solo piano is his favourite pursuit, so this recital holds much promise indeed.

Rainbow and Abyss: this is the surprisingly paradoxical and yet apposite title of this chamber recital held in tribute to Olivier Messiaen, who was born 110 years ago. Messiaen himself included odd titles in the two eight-movement works presented here. The first is Preludes for piano, completed by the composer when he was just 20 years old and which is regarded as his first mature work. We find eccentricity in such titles as The Dove, which the composer associated with the colours orange and violet, and Song of Ecstasy in a Sad Landscape, in which grey, mauve, Prussian blue and silver dominate. The movements of the quartet, which was written while the composer was interned in the Görlitz prisoner of war camp in 1941, are similarly inventive and full of fantasy. Here, the fourth movement is Abyss of the Birds, while the word ‘rainbow’ appears in the lengthy title given to the seventh. The prisoners found a piano, violin, clarinet and cello in the camp, so the deeply religious Messiaen grabbed the opportunity to write music of consolation in praise of God for his 5,000 fellow inmates.

Tickets: HUF 2 200, 2 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 900, 2 500 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Ticket: HUF 1 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

István Lajkó (piano)

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MONDAY 10 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

TUESDAY 11 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

WEDNESDAY 12 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

LISZT ACADEMY CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT OF 3RD-YEAR BACHELOR'S DEGREE STUDENTS

CONTEMPORARY ENSEMBLE OF THE LISZT ACADEMY MARK SIMPSON COMPOSER’S EVENING

Mendelssohn: The Hebrides – overture, Op. 26 Dvořák: Mazurka in E minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 49 Haydn: Symphony No. 88 in G major, Hob. I:88

Works by Mark Simpson

Máté Soós (violin) Chamber Orchestra comprising 3rd-year bachelor's degree students at the Liszt Academy Conductor: Gergely Ménesi

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Featuring: students of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music Conductor: Mark Simpson

Liszt Academy students prepare themselves not only for careers as soloists but also for working as part of an orchestra. This recital showcases the chamber ensemble, which comprises third-year students. The conductor is Gergely Ménesi, who has led the university symphony ensemble since 2013. The violin solo is played by a most promising artist, Máté Soós, who has been a Liszt Academy student for close on a decade since he was accepted into the School for Exceptional Young Talents at the age of just 13. We hear the youthful violinist in Dvořák’s Mazurka in E minor. The programme also features Haydn’s Symphony in G major and Mendelssohn’s Hebrides concert overture. The young Mendelssohn visited the Scottish Hebrides in 1829, where he toured Fingal’s Cave, which is located on one of the archipelago’s uninhabited islands. The cave, which can only be approached from the sea, is formed between basalt columns and takes its name from a literary figure, the father of the fictitious Celtic bard Ossian.

For the most part, the solo repertoire, chamber music and symphony orchestra practice lie at the core of the studies pursued by instrumental students of the Liszt Academy. In addition, special emphasis is devoted to teaching the various period styles, including the contemporary music course during which students gain an awareness of 20th- and 21stcenturycomposers and their techniques. Practical classes focus on the art of a particular composer, style or nation; this programme of works by Mark Simpson allows a glimpse into this workshop approach. The British composer and clarinettist was born in Liverpool in 1988, and at the age of 17 he was the first person to win the BBC Young Musician competition and the BBC Proms/Guardian Young Composer competition in the same year. In 2015, he received a 4-year tenure as Composer in Association with the BBC Philharmonic, in addition to which he constantly tours the world’s concert halls as a clarinet soloist. Works performed at the composer’s evening in the Liszt Academy are taught to students by Mark Simpson himself, while the artist appears at the concert both as conductor and soloist.

Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Free tickets can be obtained from the ticket office at the Liszt Academy one month before the concert. Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

COMPLETE WORKS LIVE MOZART VARIATIONS AND SONATAS FOR PIANO AND VIOLIN/3 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 23 in D major, K. 306 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 24 in F major, K. 376 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 25 in F major, K. 377 Mozart: Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 26 in B-flat major, K. 378 Vilmos Szabadi (violin), Gábor Farkas (piano) The violin-piano pairing has been one of the most utilized duos from the Rococo to the present day, with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart writing no fewer than 36 works in this format. With his piano-violin sonatas, the composer, who was born in Salzburg but spent the second half of his life in Vienna, fashioned a bridge between the structural mode popular in early Classicism, in which the violin virtually had a subordinate role, and mature Viennese Classicism, which afforded equality between the two instruments. Sonatas featuring here in the third Complete Works Live recital represent the intermediate stage in this evolution. Amongst the sonatas, which were published in Vienna in 1781, there is still an early work that treated the violin as merely a ‘second string’, alongside a sonata that considers the two instruments as being of equal worth. The first sonata of the evening was forged out of material from a violin-piano double concerto that remained unfinished. Tickets: HUF 2 500, 3 200 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


THURSDAY 13 DECEMBER 2018, 19.00

SUNDAY 16 DECEMBER 2018, 11.00

SOLTI HALL

SOLTI HALL

TALENT OBLIGES MIRA FARKAS AND KATA SCHEURING CHAMBER RECITAL Fauré: Clair de lune, Op. 46/2 Debussy: Beau soir Debussy: Romance – Silence ineffable Debussy: Deux romances – 2. Les cloches Debussy: Paysage sentimental Debussy: Romance – Voici que le printemps Debussy: Prélude à l’après-midi d’un Faune Massenet: Elégie Debussy: Suite bergamasque – 3. Clair de lune Debussy: Arabesque Russel: Deux poèmes de Ronsard, Op. 26 Satie: Gnossiennes Nos. 1, 3 & 5 Caplet: Viens! Une flûte invisible soupire… Satie: Je te veux Satie: La diva de l’Empire Delibes: Le rossignol

LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY – DIVINE MUSIC GONGS, SAILS, SCREWS FOR 10–15-YEAR-OLDS Gamelan music (Central Java) Debussy: Estampes – 1. Pagodes Debussy: Préludes, Series 1 – 2. Voiles Cage: Sonatas and interludes – Sonata V Surya Kencana A (gamelan instruments) Marcell Szabó (piano) Moderator: Dániel Mona

Kata Scheuring, Mira Farkas and Eszter Zemlényi put on an inimitable French soiree. During the programme you will hear famous pieces by the greats of modern French music alongside chamber music specialities which, although rarely heard in concert, are by no means inferior in terms of quality: Debussy’s popular Claire de Lune is joined by the Fauré work written for exactly the same poem, while after Massenet’s hugely popular Elégie comes Satie’s entrancing cabaret songs. Aside from the songs, there is a strong connection between music and writing in the aforementioned Debussy work for piano, as well as in Prélude à l’aprèsmidi d’un Faune, which was inspired by a Mallarmé poem.

Strange instruments, singing and clapping nuns, unusual polyphony and Latin masses set to music: the Liszt Kidz Academy samples all these this autumn – as well as, of course, examining what impact these have had on our favourite composers. The series Divine Music winds up its travels in the land of the exotic: Indonesia. There will be plenty to talk about: the origin of the word ‘gamelan’, the unusual instruments of the musical ensemble and their unfamiliar and – at least to the European ear – ‘untuned’ sounds. We explore Javanese music and the slendro scale through the music of a formation going by the name of Surya Kencana A. In the blink of an eye we will understand why gamelan had such an influence on Debussy, who encountered this culture at the world expo of 1889. Pianist Marcell Szabó also reveals what a ‘prepared piano’ means and how it sounds.

Ticket: HUF 1 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 400 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Mira Farkas (harp), Kata Scheuring (flute) Featuring: Eszter Zemlényi (soprano)

MARCELL SZABÓ © GÁBOR VALUSKA

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SUNDAY 16 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

WEDNESDAY 19 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

THURSDAY 20 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

KODÁLY 136

MASTERS OF THE ORCHESTRA GÁBOR TAKÁCS-NAGY & LISZT ACADEMY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Zoltán Kodály: Vízkereszt (Epiphany); Ave Maria; 150. Genfi zsoltár (Geneva Psalm cl); Villő (The Straw Guy); Lengyel László (King László’s Men or Magyars and Germans); Táncnóta (Dancing Song); Angyalok és pásztorok (The Angels and the Shepherds); Nemzeti dal (National Song); Huszt (The Ruins); Rab hazának fia (The Son of an Enslaved Country); Élet vagy halál (Life or Death); Karádi nóták (Songs from Karád); Sirató ének (Dirge); Liszt Ferenchez (Ode to Liszt); Laudes organi

Bálint Kruppa (violin) Liszt Academy Symphony Orchestra Conductor: Gábor Takács-Nagy

Zoltán Kodály is one of a select group of composers whose names have become symbolic on several fronts during their lifetime. Even in the 1930s, his birthday was commemorated as a festival of music by his students. With its December concerts, the Liszt Academy is continuing the tradition started by these followers; naturally, these are organized on the 16th of the month, the anniversary of the birth of the composer. The programme is always changing; in the past there years has been a choral concert, a contemporary composers’ evening, a performance of chamber works, as well as the performance of larger-scale pieces such as Psalmus Hungaricus. Of course, in this spirit of tradition it would be impossible to leave out celebratory compositions showcasing the Kodály heritage: here children’s, men’s and mixed choral works are respectively performed.

‘Classics in the Hands of Masters’. This could equally be the title of this recital. World-famous violinist-conductor Gábor Takács-Nagy, holder of the Bartók-Pásztory Prize, offers a taste of the music of the Viennese classics. The solo in Mozart’s Violin Concerto in G major is taken by Bálint Kruppa, Hungarian violinist and founder of the Kruppa String Quartet. The diversity of the work’s movements and tempos, its unique and self-confident style, make it an obvious contender for one of Mozart’s most popular violin concertos. The music of Mozart is also represented in his symphony nicknamed ‘Haffner’. The four-movement work, which launches with a daring and dynamic opening theme, not only evokes the world of Viennese serenades but also, in the finale, there are reminders of Osmin’s aria from the opera The Abduction from the Seraglio. The closing piece of the concert is Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 in F major, the famous ‘Pastoral’, one of the composer’s pieces of programme music. At the debut of the work that symphonically depicts nature in all its glory, the composer actually appended the title 'Recollections of Rural Life'.

Tickets: HUF 1 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Tickets: HUF 1 200, 1 700, 2 800, 3 900 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

Cantemus Children’s Choir (choirmaster: Dénes Szabó), Hungarian Army Male Chorus (choirmaster: Kálmán Strausz), Alma Mater Choir (choirmaster: Csaba Somos)

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Mozart: Symphony No. 35 in D major, K. 385, (‘Haffner’) Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 3 in G Major, K. 216 Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 in F major, Op. 68 (‘Pastoral’)

MVM CHRISTMAS CONCERT JÁNOS BALÁZS AND ANDREA VIGH CHAMBER RECITAL J. S. Bach–Busoni: Prelude and Fugue in D major, BWV 532 Mozart: Twelve Variations in C major on ’Ah, vous dirai-je, Maman’, K. 265 Händel: Chaconne in C major, HWV 484 Glinka: Nocturne in E-flat major Chopin: Impromptu in A-flat major, Op. 29 Chopin: Impromptu in C-sharp minor, Op. 66 (‘Fantaisie-impromptu’) Liszt: Consolation in D-flat major Debussy: Arabesque in E major Durand: Valse in E-flat major Tchaikovsky–János Balázs: The Nutcracker – paraphrase Tournier: Au matin Salzedo: Chanson dans la Nuit J. Strauss Jr.–Cziffra: Die Fledermaus – paraphrase Andrea Vigh (harp), János Balázs (piano) The MVM Concerts series originally started with the aim of bringing world-famous pianists to appear in front of Budapest audiences. Today concertgoers enjoy also instrumentpresentation concerts, programmes picked from the Gödöllő International Harp Festival, and even recitals by Junior Prima Prize young artists. This year the concerts are crowned by a special event focusing on two instruments, the harp and the piano. The former is played by Liszt Prizelaureate Andrea Vigh, president of the Liszt Academy and head of department teaching harpist students, while the piano is ably ‘steered’ by Junior Prima and Liszt Prize-pianist János Balázs, artistic director of the Cziffra Festival. Tickets: HUF 1 500, 2 000, 3 000, 4 000, 5 000, 6 000 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre


FRIDAY 21 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

THURSDAY 27 DECEMBER 2018, 19.30

GRAND HALL

GRAND HALL

ORGAN INAUGURATION BALÁZS SZABÓ ORGAN RECITAL HOMMAGE À ANTALFFY J. S. Bach: Toccata, adagio and fugue in C major, BWV 564 Liszt: Ave Maria d’Arcadelt Antalffy-Zsiross: Intermezzo Reger: Monologe, Op. 63 – 7. Ave Maria Szendy: Pièces Antiques, Op. 16 – 2. Air (arrangement by Dezső Antalffy-Zsiross) M. E. Bossi: Canzoncina a Maria Vergine, Op. 113/3 M. E. Bossi: Scherzo in G minor, Op. 49/2 Antalffy-Zsiross: Scène-Pastorale Antalffy-Zsiross: Madonna Antalffy-Zsiross: Four Organ Pieces Reger: Choralphantasie ’Wie schön leucht uns der Morgenstern’, Op. 40/1 Balázs Szabó (organ) Although we may not physically travel back in time, we can do so musically, with the faithfully restored Voit organ of the Grand Hall astonishing audiences again from this autumn. The remarkable pipes are again as they were in the early 20th century, as are the very structure of the organ and its tone. Balázs Szabó, one of the most dedicated members of the young organist generation and an active organ specialist, has hand-picked works for this recital on the original Liszt Academy organ. Balázs Szabó, who oversaw the reconstruction of the instrument, researched the tonal compositions used by Antalffy-Zsiross, a contemporary of Bartók, from old sheet music. The programme features numerous works that are rarely played these days but which perfectly evoke the period prior to World War I, that is, the world of the 1907 organ of the Liszt Academy. Tickets: HUF 900, 1 600, 2 200, 2 900, 3 600 Presented by Liszt Academy Concert Centre

ESSZENCIA EXTRAORDINARY YEAR-CLOSING FOLK MUSIC CONCERT Members of the orchestra: Róbert Lakatos (classic violin, viola), Kálmán Balogh (cimbalom), Gergő Kováts (saxophone), Tamás Kunos (folk viola), András Bognár (double bass) Guest artists: János Csík (folk singing, folk violin), István ‘Szalonna’ Pál (folk violin), András Berecz, Hanga Borbála Kacsó (folk singing) The Esszencia Production is the meeting of experienced, mature musicians. The purpose of their joint music-making is to experience the unity through which they create an inner harmony unique to them alone. Esszencia cannot be compared with other ensembles playing traditional folk music. Jazz, classical and folk music, elderly and youthful, old and new, male and female, happy and sad, traditional and progressive all exist together and alongside each other in a most natural way. By embracing the openness required for this, they are capable of adding an authentic and characteristically Hungarian ‘essence’ to the sounds of the world coming from within them. In this concert they reach back to their roots and, while retaining their characteristic music, they turn the spotlight on folk music melodies. Tickets: HUF 1 900, 3 100, 4 300, 5 400 Presented by Esszencia, Liszt Academy Concert Centre

ESSZENCIA © ESSZENCIA PRODUCTION


HARMONY BETWEEN ARTIST AND ARTWORK

LÁSZLÓ LAKATOS MASTER INSTRUMENT MAKER 94


PAINTER KATARZYNA KARPOWICZ © GÁBOR MURAY 95


COOPERATION – WITH EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE When you open the gate with ITS huge copper doorknob it feels as if you have entered another universe. The roar of the street is left outside; instead notes of the violin and piano and scales on the flute fill the space with a curious riot of sound, as if one were listening to some avant-garde musical composition. There is no need to ask the receptionist to check that you have arrived at the right destination: this is certainly the Bartók Conservatory, or more precisely, the Bartók Béla Secondary School of Music, Instrument Making and Repair.

Mr Director, the din of practising is audible from next door but you seem undisturbed… Well, of course I do not mind it – replies Dr Szabolcs Benkő, director of the Bartók Conservatory – most of the time I take no notice at all. Once in a while, when I hear a kid struggling with some unsuitable practice, I think about interrupting and telling them that there are simpler and easier methods. Yet, in the end I never do so. It would be pointless to weigh in. Such matters concern the student and the teacher of the subject. These are one-to-one lessons. Such tutoring requires a special harmony, doesn’t it? The implementation of individual instruction is a long-standing tradition in Hungarian music schools. It makes it far easier to discover talents and then promote their progress on an individual basis. This is certainly one of the reasons why we have such a wealth of musical talents in our tiny country. Education which is tailored to the individual is an excellent approach, but it requires significant resources as it is certainly rather expensive and time-consuming. The second pillar of our artistic tuition, and one that is prevalent in the reformist approach to education, is that teachers should strive to teach their students to use their knowledge appropriately. We do not teach a piece of music in class, as this can be learnt from the script and practised at home. Rather, the aim of the classes is to fine-tune its playing and discover the best way to practise it for the next lesson. So, this is the essence of your artistic education? Yes, each student is dealt with individually by the instructor of their major subject. The musical piece is carefully selected to match his or her character and preparedness. The tutor has great freedom within the framework of the curriculum. It also benefits us, as we do not need to be sitting and listening to the same piece played, for example, by each and every violin student at the examination. That would be rather a torment!

DR. SZABOLCS BENKŐ © GÁBOR VALUSKA 96

What about the harmony between the Liszt Academy and the Bartók Conservatory? I am happy to say that our cooperation is excellent. The Liszt Academy is our benefactor, meaning that there is never any need to haggle about financial matters. The issues between us are purely professional, like the reforms of theoretical education and the organizing of joint concerts. Since last year we have staged our own concerts at the Liszt Academy. These ’conservatory concerts’ are a great initiative from a number of aspects. They give kids the chance to display their talents. Their parents can come along to support them, and we teachers can meet with them as


well, otherwise teachers and parents only see each other when there is some issue to be addressed. These concerts provide the opportunity to build a different type of relationship between parents and teachers. We are grateful for the fact that the Grand Hall, besides belonging to an institute of learning, is one of the most wonderful concert venues in the world, one that we are entitled to use as our own for a couple of evenings. And I should add with some pride that our children perform to full houses as, despite their tender age, they offer an evening of genuine artistic accomplishment. Is it possible to teach the principles of harmony and cooperation? Rather it is imparted by experience. Harmony requires high levels of empathy. Sometimes, let me admit, we find that even with a band that has been together for years the personal relationships between band members can get worse and not better. Yet, despite this, the sonority they produce can sound ever more mature. Examples like this demonstrate that it is possible to separate human and artistic aspects. When an artist, under the spell of inspiration, concentrates on nothing other than the music, all other things lose their importance. You switch off life’s hassles when you listen to music intently, don’t you? This is even more so when you are playing it. Our students see this and this becomes their template for study. In a family, a child is not only influenced by what they are told but also by the model provided by his or her parents. This is equally the case with our own instructors: the primary model each of our students look to is the teacher of their main subject. When I watch how one of our students behaves, how they move and how they present themselves, I can often figure out who their teacher is. Such is the impact of individual tutoring, especially between the receptive ages of 14 and 18. This is something that we capitalize on. Whenever I would like to bring something out in a student I first turn to the instructor of their major subject, and only then to their class tutor. There is another level to our training, one which takes place when the student watches their teacher on stage. I am especially happy when the teacher is able to demonstrate the essence of their subject on stage, as this demonstrably enhances the progress of her students. This is one of the major criteria when we select who to invite to join our teaching roll. Our teachers are first rate – there are more than 140 colleagues working together – and the reason for such a large number is the necessity of individual education. How much time is left for your own cello playing? Unfortunately, very little. I know that I am a manager, but it would still be great to have more time for practising and performing. But nowadays I rarely have opportunity to practise, and even then, I do not make much noise about it. Ágnes Mester

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ENTRY IN THE GUEST BOOK OF The LISZT ACADEMY LILY MAISKY, (2 FEBRUARY 2018) 98


Üzlet első kézből.

Keresse az újságárusoknál!


MUSIC MEANT FOR THE EARS One hundred years ago on 25th March, the very day Claude Debussy passed away, Béla Bartók was celebrating his 37 th birthday. A couple of weeks later the periodical ‘Esztendő’, owned by Lajos Hatvany, asked Bartók to assess the works of the French composer. He summed up his analysis thus: “The significance of Debussy is unquestionably revealed by the impact that he exercised – in the best possible meaning of the word – on the young generation of musicians, both abroad and in our own country. Whether this impact will prevail and evolve into further progress is impossible to predict. However, one thing is for sure, his compositions will not lose colour because he pooled great value in them.”

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DEBUSSY © LISZT ACADEMY / LIBRARY

That is to say, Bartók differentiated between the artistic oeuvre and its impact, and while he was confident about the intrinsic value of the work, he was less convinced about its lasting effect on future generations. Only a few days after the release of Bartók’s review Kodály’s own obituary of Debussy was published in the April issue of Nyugat. It also divided his oeuvre and its effect. Yet Kodály took a diametrically opposite view to Bartók: ‘It is possible that Debussy’s music will for a long time or even forever remain marginal. It is possible that he has left behind less value than inspiration. Perhaps his didactic influence surpasses the oeuvre itself. His compass is showing the direction towards refined art of high order.’ The opposing views offered by the two most outstanding Hungarian musicians of the early 20th century about the significance of Debussy, who undoubtedly exerted massive influence on both of them, reveal as much about Bartók and Kodály themselves as about the greatness of the French master. These days Debussy’s music enjoys more popularity than ever before. Deutsche Grammophon published twenty-two CDs and two DVDs covering his entire oeuvre on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of Debussy’s death, while great publishing rival Warner released thirty-three CDs containing an even more ‘complete’ oeuvre, adding reconstructions of fragmented compositions, juvenile works and transcripts, in fact, practically every note jotted down by the master. In leaving behind compositions to ‘breathe’, Debussy’s power to influence remains substantial. While it was the mature Debussy of Pelléas that Bartók and Kodály regarded as their essential motivation, Debussy’s late works have provided a fountain of inspiration for younger generations. Pierre Boulez was spellbound by the collage-type drafting and constantly varying form of Jeux, the master’s last symphonic composition, a non-conforming music for ballet. In the case of György Ligeti, the composer’s last pieces for the piano, the piano études written in 1915, provided the direct stimulus for the composition of his own piano studies. Debussy belongs to the category of late bloomers. Had his life reached its end at, say, the age of thirty-one, like Schubert’s, he would be merely regarded as a talented representative of his generation, one who in at least some of his songs displayed a unique gift for composition. Yet something phenomenal did take place around 1893 when Debussy reached his thirties. From around the time of his Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, which was inspired by one of Mallarmé’s poems, Debussy emerged with his very own voice, a tone never to be mistaken for anyone else’s. Traces of it had surely existed years before in his compositions but had until then remained unrecognised. This unique Debussy style was nourished by a number of sources. One such source is Javanese music, which he became acquainted with at the 1893 Paris World Fair. It provided him with the same inspiration as the discovery of Hungarian folk music did to Bartók and Kodály. “Javanese music preserves such counterpoint,” enthused Debussy in one of his articles, “to which that of Palestrina compares like a naive child’s play. If we are listening unprejudiced to the grace of their percussions, we


must admit that our own is no more than the barbarian pandemonium of some travelling circus.” Another cornerstone in the building of Debussy’s style is the music of 19 th-century Russia. The tonal parade of Rimsky-Korsakov’s orchestra taught him as much as the economic, refined and archaic-sounding music of Mussorgsky. “His compositions are made up of consecutive small stoke of the brush, which are bound together by some mysterious connection and the breathtaking competence of his insight,” claimed Debussy about Mussorgsky, although it can be argued that his own composition style also lives up to this statement. Moreover, there is a component in Debussy’s style of French Baroque music, which he rediscovered around the end of the 19th century. As well as having value in its own right, the music of Rameau and Couperin offered Debussy, in the same way as did the music of the Russian composers and Javanese gamelan, a route of escape from the fatal embrace of German composition. Like many of his young contemporaries, Debussy was initially enthusiastic about Wagnerian music. However, unlike the others, he subsequently became deeply disillusioned by it. His mature compositions do display traces of Wagnerian influence, yet he was struggling to combat this influence in most of his works. Even so, his music is not that of denial. It was precisely by wrestling the philosophically overburdened Wagnerian music that Debussy came across the primordial idea that perhaps best explains his enduring popularity – and one which many continue to forget even today – namely, as he claims in a report in 1909: “We are too busy writing music for the paper, yet music is meant for the ears.” Gergely Fazekas

DEBUSSY ON THE PIANO IN THE SALON OF ERNEST CHAUSSON © LISZT ACADEMY / LIBRARY

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‘FOUNDATIONS WE CAN BUILD UPON’ Life can be busy for someone who is a performer, teacher and researcher at the same time. But the highly esteemed fortepianist and musicologist Katalin Komlós, emeritus professor at the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music, has found the balance between the different roles in her career. Here she tells us about the harmony in her life.

Over the decades of your career as a teacher and performer you have consciously or unconsciously been at the service of harmony. Perhaps there are no coincidences in life. A few years ago I was asked to give a lecture at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences at a conference focusing on the concept of harmony. I duly wrote my speech but eventually the conference was cancelled. I was going to talk about the finest expression of harmony, which in my opinion is music itself. Harmony means unity, coherence and beauty. In music this can be heard directly. I planned to start my lecture with a piece from The Magic Flute, because for me Mozart’s music is the very essence of harmony. Do you think harmony can be perceived at its best in Mozart’s music? Mozart’s or Schubert’s music can best express the harmony we strive for. Dealing with music is wonderful because I can experience harmony on a daily basis. Even if not all music is harmonious… As a teacher you have achieved a lot; your former and present students speak fondly of you. How have you managed to find harmony with your students and in your relationships in general? As I grow older, I see how fundamentally important it is in how you get on with others around you. I consider myself very lucky: I have wonderful parents, and I inherited from them a good nature which allows me to love almost everyone, and this is very important in teaching as well. It is at least as important as the ‘professional’ part of education. Whenever I bump into my past students, the thing they mention most often isn’t "how much we learnt from you" but "how much you used to love us". This seems to be their overriding memory of me. Or, "we never forget that lesson when we sang parts of Mozart’s Requiem". It was not a particularly wonderful performance, but we created it together, and that experience is still working. It is my belief that music and musical experience should be the centre of everything, and we should find joy in it. If we think about the concept of harmony in a broader sense, how do you think music and the other arts create harmony between members of society? The world is becoming more and more sensationalistic, and unfortunately this is also affecting music. If we continue with everything becoming more superficial, it is all about flashiness and no longer about internal peace and harmony. This is far removed from the harmony we are talking about right now. I do not know how we can recapture real harmony in its universal sense; it is up to the mindset of whole world. It’s certainly something we should strive for.

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You are spending your forty-fifth year at the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music, conducting research in music studies, nurturing a lot of intense relationships, and there is always a smile on your face. What helps you to have harmony in your daily routines? My faith in God and my family background are essential to me. I come from a large and secure family, and I have the impression that a safe family background is exceptional nowadays. It is harder to find harmony if we lack secure reference points in our lives. For me, the years I spent in my hometown of Sopron were a lifelong grounding and established balance within me. I am grateful to have a foundation I can still build upon. I wish for everyone to experience this in their lives. Anna Unger

KATALIN KOMLÓS © ISTVÁN FAZEKAS

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CONCERTS AT THE OLD MUSIC ACADEMY LISZT MUSEUM MATINÉE AND EVENING CONCERTS 1 SEPTEMBER 11.00 Camilo Delgado Diaz (vocals), Niall Kinsella (piano) 8 SEPTEMBER 11.00 Judit Nagy (flute) 15 SEPTEMBER 11.00 Ferenc Kerek (piano) and his students 22 SEPTEMBER 11.00 Mauro and Angela Tortorelli (piano, violin) 29 SEPTEMBER 11.00 Zsuzsanna Császár (piano) 6 OCTOBER 11.00 Maurizio d'Alessandro (clarinet), Balázs Fülei (piano) 13 OCTOBER 11.00 Katalin Halmai (vocals) and her students 19 OCTOBER 18.00 Fülöp Ránki (piano) 20 OCTOBER 11.00 Péter Kiss (piano) 20 OCTOBER 16.00 Ingrid Kertesi (vocals), Csaba Király (piano) 20 OCTOBER 19.00 László Borbély (piano) 27 OCTOBER 11.00 Borbála Dobozy (harpsichord) 3 NOVEMBER 11.00 Davide Tura (piano) 10 NOVEMBER 11.00 Enikő Lőte (piano) 17 NOVEMBER 11.00 Szilvia Elek (harpsichord) 24 NOVEMBER 11.00 Anna Falvai (piano) 1 DECEMBER 11.00 Miklós Környei (guitar), András Szalai (cimbalom) 8 DECEMBER 11.00 Attila Ambrózy (bassoon) and his chamber partners 15 DECEMBER 11.00 Judit Gábos (piano) and her friends 22 DECEMBER 11.00 Anastasia Razvalyaeva (harp) 29 DECEMBER 11.00 Péter Nagy (piano)

Location: Old Liszt Academy of Music, tickets: HUF 2 000 Ft (students and concessions tickets: HUF 1 000)

WORLD-CLASS PERFORMERS EXCLUSIVE CONCERTS CULTURE AS A GIFT! ADMISSION TO THE WORLD OF MUSIC With the Gift Card of the Liszt Academy, you may come to the events organised by the Liszt Academy Concert Centre The Gift Card is valid for 12 months from the date of top-up.


„PLEASE DON’T SEND ANY MORE SHEET MUSIC!”

SELECTION OF THE FINEST SHEET MUSIC FROM THE LISZT BEQUEST FROM 11 MAY 2018

ORGANIZER AND VENUE: LISZT FERENC MEMORIAL MUSEUM & RESEARCH CENTRE 1064 BUDAPEST, VÖRÖSMARTY UTCA 35. WWW.LISZTMUSEUM.HU


LISZT FERENC MEMORIAL MUSEUM AND LISZT RESEARCH CENTRE Tha museum is open during the whole year except for Sundays and holidays. We can arrange guided tours for pre-announced groups in several languages. HUF 12.000 (max. 25 persons/group, to be announced previously). • Audioguides are available in 14 languages

VÖRÖSMARTY STREET 35, 1064 BUDAPEST OPEN: MO - FR: 10 – 18 SATURDAY: 09 – 17 WWW.LISZTMUSEUM.HU

• Students (International Students’ Card) and seniors: HUF 1000, (EU citizens only!) • Exceptional opening hours may be requested. We charge double prices for the entrance fee and the guided tour. • Concert tickets/Combined tickets: – Concert ticket: HUF 2000 – Students (International Students’ Card) – Combined ticket (for visiting the Museum – Combined ticket for students and seniors:


p a l i p a n s e Ingyen magazin i t e h s ĂŠ

v d e k e n e z

! s i k e n k elő


EMOTIONAL CONNECTEDNESS IN THE CHOIR László Norbert Nemes, director of the New Liszt Ferenc Chamber Choir, knows the sensation that he shares with so many others in Hungary: when someone adds their own voice to the harmony, this choir member becomes part of a sublime, majestic unity.

I attended a music primary then a music secondary school, so singing with others was a daily routine for me. When I was accepted to the Liszt Academy, Professor István Párkai asked me to sing in the Liszt Ferenc Chamber Choir. It was a great honour for me, as well as an excellent opportunity to work on choral compositions that require high technical singing skills and are thus beyond the scope of an amateur choir. At the same time, it was professionally very rewarding to sing with much more experienced singers who had graduated from the Liszt Academy but were still members of the ensemble. Do you mean that choir singers do teach one another, too? In a community, there are always stronger and more experienced members who pull up the others. In children’s choirs, this is even more the case. The older children are so much stronger in many skills that it is an absolute necessity that mentors support their younger peers. I experienced this to a great extent when I worked for many years as the conductor of the Hungarian Radio Children's Choir. Although the members change every year, as 8th-grade pupils leave and are replaced by much less skilled 5th-grade children, the choir still sounds the same. How is this possible? One component is certainly the personality of the choir conductor themself, since they embody a certain level of musical standard, a certain artistic concept, with which the ensemble is shaped every single day, from year to year. Existing members of the choir have already adopted this mindset, and newcomers must respond to it virtually straightaway. Children tune into this automatically and instinctively; but this also happens with adults: if the Berliner Philharmoniker gets a new concertmaster, that traditional sound which was formed over decades and which is the hallmark of the orchestra will not change, even if its members change from one year to the next. The Liszt Ferenc Chamber Choir has a sound that reflects the creativity and the personalities of the singers and their director. At the same time, the relationships between the musicians is also ‘audible’ in the music made by an ensemble. We can often sense that musicians love what they do, but sometimes we feel that the performance is kind of okay but nothing special.

108

LÁSZLÓ NORBERT NEMES © GÁBOR VALUSKA

Or it is also possible that we hear they love what they do but not each other? Yes, this can also be the case, but no-one can love everyone to the same extent, nor should they be asked to. What you can learn in a choir or an orchestra, however, is mutual acceptance and respect. I believe that this depends on how we feel in our everyday lives, whether we notice if someone has a problem, whether we stand by others in need, and whether we accept


opinions and viewpoints that we do not necessary agree with. Kodály wrote quite exhaustively on this matter. He stated that by singing in a choir we can acquire skills that may be of use to us in other relationships as well, for instance, in finding a shared path towards a unified sound. We must become able to work alongside the others and to recognise if the other person is more important than us. This is what creates unity, which is the source of harmony. What does the choirmaster need to do to establish this unity in their choir? No art can be created without emotional and intellectual unity in the ensemble. I believe that to achieve this we must be fond of and respect those we work with, both as choir members and even more so for me, as the director of the choir. This may sound clichéd, but we cannot instinctively like everyone in the same way or to the same degree, as choir or orchestra members will have different personalities. Nevertheless, we should get to know and accept each other, and even if it does not come to us naturally, we should strive to learn to like each other. My experience, especially with the children’s choir, is that when we are working hard to learn a piece with painstaking thoroughness, to implement all small dynamic markings and to interpret the composition with stylistic authenticity, none of this makes real sense unless there is a very special emotional bond between us, both during the rehearsals and during the concert itself. I have particularly fond memories of those performances in which this bond was established, as this is the kind of atmosphere in which all participants feel valuable and important. I have always learnt a lot from my fellow musicians, from the children, as well as the highly experienced, professional musicians who sing in the New Liszt Ferenc Chamber Choir. They are my partners; I can achieve absolutely nothing without them. And if we cooperate, our joyful joint efforts can bring about marvellous artistic accomplishments. Without this harmony, though, I cannot envisage an artistically authentic production. Don’t you sometimes feel like singing along? Of course, I do! And I do sometimes sing along, as I really enjoy experiencing the choir from the inside. We have been welcoming international guest conductors for quite some years, and while they are at work I, of course, join the ensemble. It is a wonderful feeling! Ágnes Mester

109


COMPETITION OR NO COMPETITION? Ede Zathureczky, one of the most significant Hungarian violinists of the 20 th century and former president of the Liszt Academy, was born 115 years ago. This legendary performer and academic, STUDENT OF JENŐ HUBAY AND CHAMBER MUSIC PARTNER OF BARTÓK, died in 1959, but his legacy still has a profound impact on the everyday life of the music university. Besides looking after his pedagogical heritage, the Liszt Academy also pays tribute to his memory with a contest whose essence – according to Eszter Perényi, professor emerita of the university – is by no means a competition.

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ZATHURECZKY’S TEACHER WAS THE EXCEPTIONAL JENŐ HUBAY © LISZT ACADEMY / LIBRARY

In October the Liszt Academy again hosts the National Ede Zathureczky Violin Competition. What history lies behind this event? The competition has quite a long history. The initiative came from Ede Zathureczky’s widow, who donated a Ruggieri violin and a Sartory bow to the Liszt Academy back in the 1980s. Every four years, the instrument and bow go to the violinist who graduated from the Liszt Academy and received the top grade from all the judges at his or her graduation concert. This is an internal competition. The National Ede Zathureczky Violin Competition, however, is something different: it was launched 20 years ago, in 1998, and takes place every five years. I am personally connected to Zathureczky – my father, professor at the Liszt Academy, was good friends with him, so much so that it was he who commissioned from the painter living next to us Zathureczky’s portrait that now hangs on the wall of the conference room, but I was also on good terms with Mrs Zathureczky – so it was quite natural that I would inherit the honour of preserving Zathureczky’s legacy from Dénes Kovács, who himself used to be a student of the maestro. Obviously, it was Zathureczky’s personality as an artist and his commitment to contemporary works that inspired us to determine that the competition repertoire should contain a contemporary piece alongside other slower and virtuoso compositions. This year, the competition takes place in the autumn break, and the awards ceremony and gala will be held on 4 November. Is Zathureczky’s legacy as an educator and musician still perceptible in the way Hungarian violinists play their instrument? I am often asked this question abroad, too. Zathureczky was a student of Hubay, who was in turn a student of the great Hungarian-born violinist Joseph Joachim, friend of Brahms, so their performance style unites features of the German, French and Belgian schools, in addition to Gypsy musical traditions. For them, it was always the beauty of the produced sound that mattered, and this should be rich and strong, coupled with extraordinarily light bowing. All over the world, the hallmark of Hubay’s school of violin playing, with representatives like Stefi Geyer, Ferenc Vecsey and Jelly Arányi, was the sensitive, bright sound. This imaginative and personal performance style has been conserved not only in Zathureczky’s recordings but also in the way violin playing is taught: these characteristics can be seen in Dénes Kovács just as much as György Pauk. The growing number of international contests and their impact on musical careers, however, do not help preserve local traditions. Unfortunately, at these competitions, stamina and flawless, perfect performance prevails over musical originality. The traditions of the Hungarian school of violin playing have not disappeared; however, these days they are almost inevitably pushed into the background. One must also remember that with just a few clicks of the computer mouse, any interpretation of a piece is


accessible online: concert and CD recordings are available to anyone in seconds, and while this is wonderful on the one hand, it does pose the risk of imitation, resulting in strange, shallow and sterile music skills. Can the National Zathureczky Violin Competition avoid these traps? We hope so. This is a contest that doesn’t focus on appearance or formalities but purely on music. It has only one round, and there is no preliminary selection process. The applicants are put in four age groups from the youngest to graduating Liszt Academy students, and we try to encourage all candidates with various types of certificates of appreciation. There are about a hundred applicants on average, and judging from our experiences, everyone benefits from participating. The winners of the first Zathureczky Competition were Ernő Kállai and Ádám Banda. The latter is a member of the academic staff at the Liszt Academy today. Péter Tornyai came second in 1998; he is the composer of the Ede Variations, which is the compulsory piece for the 2nd age group. Other increasingly important figures of the Hungarian music scene, like László G. Horváth and Bálint Kruppa, debuted in this contest as children. The repertoire is student friendly, and the most important thing that matters is violin skills. I would much rather call it a gathering of talent than a competition. It is a marvellous experience to look at the violinists ranging from eight years old right up to the age of graduation. Zsuzsanna Rákai

ESZTER PERÉNYI, CURATOR OF THE EVENTS FOR THE 2018 HUBAY AND ZATHURECZKY MEMORIAL YEARS, STANDING NEXT TO HUBAY’S VIOLIN CABINET © ISTVÁN FAZEKAS 111


ENTRY IN THE GUEST BOOK OF LISZT ACADEMY ITMAR GOLAN & JANINE JANSEN, (2 FEBRUARY 2018) 112


SEASON TICKETS 2018/19

FANTASY, MELODY, HARMONY

ZENEAKADEMIA.HU/EN/SEASON-TICKETS

TABEA ZIMMERMANN

EMŐKE BARÁTH/IL POMO D’ORO

GÁBOR BOLDOCZKI

GABRIELI CONSORT

PHILIPPE HERREWEGHE

DÉNES VÁRJON

CONCERTO KÖLN

DMITRY SINKOVSKY


LISZT KIDZ ACADEMY Every child is born with music in them. There is not a single infant who would not be stirred by the music of Mozart or Bach. Or maybe WellHello, depending on what they hear at home. Understandably, the youth programmes of the Liszt Academy are not intended to acquaint young and old with the values of pop culture, but instead with the three worlds of music that define the academy’s teaching and concert life: classical music, folk music and jazz.

Some drum on strange objects, other clap vivaciously while singing buoyant songs, again others render hymns in a unique polyphony. Does anybody know how behave properly in a church? They all do! But as many languages and gods, as many musical styles and costumes. The most recent series of the Liszt Kidz Academy will venture into this forest of many colours and traditions – guides, storm lanterns and victuals are provided. During the four events of the Divine Music series, we will have a glimpse into the rites of distant regions, and after having heard what musical treasures are kept in the various cultures, we will also learn what happens when classical composers are inspired by these ancient tunes. By the end of these matinee concerts, we will also understand how the terms in the concert titles are all interrelated. The concerts of the series can be visited individually or also with a season ticket subscription. For more details, please see the programme pages of our Concert Magazine. Season tickets cost HUF 4 500. What certainly has not changed, however - to use solemn terms–, is our creed. We still believe that music is no sheer entertainment but something that teaches us to understand the essence of our humanity. This is why we cannot start early enough to learn about it and to become familiar with it. In the autumn season of 2018, from 10am on Saturdays, the Liszt Academy will again hold Liszt Kidz introductory group sessions for primary school pupils in the Main Building of the Liszt Academy at Liszt Ferenc Square. In addition to this, on one Saturday each month, double Jazz Playground sessions are held starting from 10am and 11:30am, where children between from 6 to 15 can participate. Parents may not attend these events but are welcome at the dress rehearsal of the Grand Hall evening concert (should the performers not object). Introductory music sessions – Ticket price: 900 HUF Jazz Playground sessions – Ticket price: 1 200 HUF (Tickets are to be purchased only for the children attending the Introductory music and Jazz Playground sessions.) More information: zeneakademia.hu/en/junior1 www.facebook.com/lisztkukacokakademiaja/

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MUSIC LABYRINTH GUIDED TOURS AT THE LISZT ACADEMY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL CLASSES 30-minute tour around the world’s most magical building. Nooks and crannies, mini concert, LEGO Liszt Academy.

Details and applications: zeneakademia.hu/en/junior


TICKET MAP GRAND HALL

CHOIR LEFT 10 – 19

Information on the seating arrangement of the Grand Hall and ticket categories for a given performance are available upon online ticket purchase.

RIGHT 19 – 10

30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 39 38 37 36 35 34 33 32 31 30 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

V IV III II I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 1

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

BALCONY LEFT

1 – 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

M1 M2 M3

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1 M3 M2 M1

RIGHT 12 – 1

LEFT 1 – 12

7 6

7

6

7

4

5

1

3 2 1

4 3 2 1 5 4 3 2 1 6 5 4 3 2 1 6

LEFT 9– 1

116

2

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 1

2 3 4 5 6 6 5 4 3 2

1

I II III IV V VI

CENTRE-LEFT CENTRE-RIGHT 1–7 1– 7

CENTRE BALCONY

6

6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 5 4 3 2 1

5

I II III IV V VI

1

2

3

4

1 2 3 4

7

5 5

3

5

6

7

6

9 8

4

8 9

STALLS

6 5 7 1 2 3 4 6 5 1 2 3 4 6 5 1 2 3 4

RIGHT 1–9

12 – 1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

BALCONY RIGHT

1

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

24 – 13

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

1

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

1

1

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13

1

1

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1

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12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

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24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

1

1

I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX X XI XII XIII XIV XV XVI XVII XVIII

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

1

V VI III II I

1

24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13

ONSTAGE SEATS: 80 SEATS

24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13

13 – 24

STAGE


TICKET MAP SOLTI HALL CONTACT, VISITOR INFORMATION

TICKETING

LISZT FERENC ACADEMY OF MUSIC 1061 Budapest, Liszt Ferenc tér 8. Central phone number: (+36 1) 462-4600 Customers can address their inquiries to kozonsegkapcsolat@zeneakademia.hu and by phone at (+36 1) 462 4680.

The ticket office of the Liszt Academy Concert Centre operates adjacent to the main entrance of the Liszt Academy at Liszt Ferenc tér 8. AThe regular opening hours of the ticket office are daily from 10am to 6pm. Besides the regular hours, the ticket office also operates during concerts ZENEAKADÉMIA until the end of the first intermission. In the case of concerts starting KONCERTKÖZPONT at 10am or before, the ticket office opens half an hour prior to the performance. SAJÁT SZERVEZÉSÉBEN. Ticket office contact details: Phone: (+36 1) 321-0690 / Email: jegy@zeneakademia.hu The staff of the ticket office will be pleased to help with any of your questions or inquires related to concert tickets. Further information on ticketing is available on the website of the Liszt Academy.

STAGE A

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

A

B

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

B

I

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

I

II

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

II

III

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

III

IV

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

IV

V

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

V

VI

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

VI

VII 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

VII

VIII 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

VIII

IX

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

IX

X

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

X

XI

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

XI

XII 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

XII

XIII 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

XIII

1 2 3 3 2 1

XIV

Last-minute tickets are sold for 500 HUF with a valid student ID in the hour preceding the performances held in the Grand Hall or the Solti Hall.

LISZT ACADEMY OPENING HOURS, GUIDED TOURS Come and visit the singularly beautiful Art Nouveau main building of the Liszt Academy! For individual visitors, guided tours are held in Hungarian from 1.30pm on Fridays and Sundays. English language guided tours take place daily from 1.30pm Tours last for approximately 50 minutes, and can be completed by a 10-15 minutes mini concert performed by students of the Liszt Academy. No previous registration is necessary; tickets for guided tours and mini concerts can be purchased right before the tours. Tours for groups are to be booked in advance with guiding in English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, Russian, Finnish, Czech, Slovakian, Romanian and Japanese. Minimum group size: 12, maximum group size: 35. For tour booking, appointments, further information and partnership with travel agencies. Contact: turizmus@zeneakademia.hu Ticket prices: Guided tours in Hungarian: 1 500 HUF Guided tours in other languages: 2 900 HUF Mini concerts (optional): 600 HUF

XIV M3 M2 M1

M1 M2 M3 LEFT 1–7

RIGHT 7–1

Students with valid student IDs, senior citizens over 65 (with valid pensioners’ card) are entitled to a 50% discount. The above prices also include the 27% VAT.

STALLS

ACCESS

12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

0

14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

1

14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

1

14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

1

8 7 6 5 4 3

2 1

1

8 7 6 5 4 3

2 1

1

LEFT 1–7

RIGHT 8–1

BALCONY

The Liszt Academy's audience can park for a discounted price just two corners away from Liszt Ferenc tér at the automated parking garage at Akácfa utca 60. The coupon entitling to one hour of free parking can be acquired at the Academy’s ticket office on presenting the parking ticket and the concert ticket on the concert's day, latest by the end of the first interval. Wheelchair-accessible entrance of the building is on Király utca. 117


IMPRESSUM CONCERT MAGAZINE CONTRIBUTORS:

PUBLISHER: Dr. Andrea Vigh, President of the Liszt Academy

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Júlia Torda, Liszt Academy Communication Director

SPECIALIST EDITOR: Márta Katona, music historian

EDITORS: Júlia Bársony-Belicza, music historian, member of the Liszt Academy Communications and Media Contents Development Directorate Lívia Hajdú, music historian

COPY EDITOR: Andrew Symons

PUBLICATION MANAGER: Erzsébet Issekutz

LAYOUT: Allison Advertising Ltd. Gergő Cuba

PRINT PRODUCTION:: High Voltage Ltd.

Júlia Bársony-Belicza – music historian, member of the Liszt Academy Communications and Media Contents Development Directorate Gabriella Bokor – journalist Gábor Bóka – music reviewer, teacher at King St Stephen Secondary School Mátyás Bolya – folk musician, folk music researcher, lecturer at the Liszt Academy, assistant research fellow in the Institute for Musicology at the Research Centre for the Humanities in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Elek Martin – student in the Musicology Department, employee of the Institute for Musicology at the Research Centre for the Humanities in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Gergely Fazekas – associate professor of the Musicology Department of the Liszt Academy of Music László Gombos – music historian Rudolf Gusztin – music historian, student of the Doctoral School of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music, assistant research fellow in the Institute for Musicology at the Research Centre for the Humanities in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Erzsébet Issekutz – senior member of the Liszt Academy Communications and Media Contents Development Directorate Ferenc László – journalist, music reviewer, cultural historian critic Péter Merényi – student in the Musicology Department Ágnes Mester – member of the Liszt Academy Communications and Media Contents Development Directorate Orsolya Mészáros – journalist Eszter Mikusi – music historian Szabolcs Molnár – music historian, teacher at the Bartók Béla Music Secondary School Dániel Mona – music historian Zsombor Németh – music historian, researcher in the Institute for Musicology at the Research Centre for the Humanities in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Viktória Ozsvárt – music historian, student of the Doctoral School of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Music, assistant research fellow in the Institute for Musicology at the Research Centre for the Humanities in the Hungarian Academy of Sciences György Szentgallay – jazz bass guitarist, composer, journalist Zsuzsanna Rákai – music historian, teacher at the Bartók Music Secondary School Anna Unger – member of the Liszt Academy Communications and Media Contents Development Directorate Várkonyi Tamás – music historian, senior editor at the music magazine Gramofon

PRINTING: Keskeny és Társai 2001 Ltd. Published by the Communications Directorate of the Liszt Academy in 3 000 copies. The organizer retains the right to modify programmes.

FINALIZED: 31 May 2018

ARCHIVE AND CONCERT PHOTOS, ARTIST PORTRAITS: Zoltán Adrián, Csaba Aknay, László Arany Tóth, Sándor Benkő, Balázs Bergics, Georgia Bertazzi, Marco Borggreve, Mihály Borsos, Balázs Böröcz, Felix Broede, Anna Carmignola, Veronika Clark, Szilvia Csibi, György Darabos, Esszencia Produkció, István Fazekas, Andrea Felvégi, Barbara Frommann, József Hajdú, Michiel Hendryckx, Ottó Kaiser, Misi Kondella, Timm Kölln, Péter Lugosi, Ildikó Magócsi, Judit Marjai, Marco Mertens, Serban Mestecaneanu, Zsolt Mészáros, Julien Mignot, Réka Mikes, Josep Molina, László Mudra, Gábor Muray, Szabolcs Németh, Domonkos Orbán, Wasin Prasertlap, János Philip, Łukasz Rajchert, Zsófia Raffay, Zoltán Somfai, Lenke Szilágyi, Kinga Taukert, Zoltán Tuba, Gábor Valuska, József Wágner Csapó


GUIDED TOURS • Guided tours in English for individual visitors (50 min.) every day at 1.30 PM • Adult ticket: HUF 2 900 + HUF 600 (with ticket for mini-concert) • With student identity card, concession card and for visitors over 65 years: HUF 1 750 • No registration needed. • Ticket purchase (also for concerts): Liszt Academy Ticket Office (1061 Budapest, 8 Liszt Ferenc square)


SUPPORTER OF THE LISZT ACADEMY

Ministry of Human Capacities

PARTNERS OF THE UNIVERSITY


“ # OLVASÁSRA AJÁNLJUK ITTHON / NAGYVILÁG / GAZDASÁG / SPORT / TÉVÉ / KULTÚRA / FILMKLUB TUDOMÁNY / TECH / AUTÓ / UTAZÁS / TÁFELSPICC / FOTÓ / VIDEÓ / JOG

A MEGKERÜLHETETLEN HÍRFORRÁS


Liszt Academy Concert Magazine 2018/2  
Liszt Academy Concert Magazine 2018/2  
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