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MAY 2018

Tolani

AZEEZ

THE MOST DISTINGUISHED WINNER OF 2018


CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL THE FINALISTS AND THE WINNERS FROM ZARS MEDIA, PROUD HOST OF TONIGHT'S CELEBRATIONS


Welcome All around the world, within a wide array of sectors, women continue to break down barriers and establish themselves as pivotal to the success of businesses and industries. Tonight we celebrated the diverse achievements of women working within the construction & engineering sectors. These incredible women are reaching new heights through hard work, dedication and innovative thinking. This year’s event received approximately 350 nominations. These awards are distinguished through the level of independence and authority with which each submission is reviewed. A panel of 61 of the most senior and respected executives within construction & engineering formed the judging team. Judging the WICE Awards, is a significant undertaking and so I would like to express heartfelt thanks to all of our 2018 judges for their time, support and invaluable efforts. I would also like to thank the speakers who gave of their valuable time at the WICE forum, engaging the finalists throughout the day in a variety of lively panel discussions. To our media partners, thank you for your support and commitment to the awards. We appreciate and value those partnerships. None of us, however, would be here this evening if it were not for the vision and enthusiasm of the companies that nominated their outstanding female employees. To all of the companies that nominated someone this year, thank you for showing your support of the incredible women within your organisations, and thank you for being part of the process to encourage more women to move into the construction and engineering sectors.

Find latest news about WICE AWARDS and share yout experience of the event at: LinkedIn: european-womenin-construction-&-engineering-awards Facebook: wiceawards Twitter: WICEAwards Google +: +Wiceawardseurope

www.wiceawards.com

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS MAGAZINE - MAY 2018 is published by Zars Media 8 Heathfield Court, Fleet, Hampshire GU51 5DX England, United Kingdom Tel.: 01252612025, info@wiceawards.com

Finally, congratulations to all of this year’s nominees, finalists and winners. Even if you weren’t shortlisted or did not win this year, we hope you have found the process interesting, challenging and worthwhile. Perhaps you’ll consider participating again in the future, or encourage colleagues to do so? Furthermore, we hope you have enjoyed a fabulous evening with colleagues and peers at the biggest and best Women In Construction & Engineering awards in the industry. Thank you for being part of the 2018 WICE Awards. We hope to see many of you again next year. AFI OFORI

Managing Director, Zars Media

Official Printer: HART PRESS

WICE Awards photographers:

www.hartpress.com

Nina Assam Studios Ltd

Design by: BRANDBEES

Paul Grace @pgracephoto

www.brandbees.com

@NinaAssamStudio

Ramis Karamatov @rms.mains @rms.portraits

On the Cover: TOLANI AZEEZ, THE MOST DISTINGUISHED WINNER OF 2018

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12 IN THIS MAGAZINE 6 — NOBODY TOLD ME I COULDN’T

8 — MORE GIRLS IN

THE ENGINEERING CAREER PIPELINE MAKES THE WORLD A BETTER PLACE

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10 — WOMEN ARE

THE THIRD WAVE OF CHANGE IN CONSTRUCTION

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32 — 2018 SPEAKERS 36 32 — 2018 FINALISTS WICE AWARDS 180 36 — 2018 WINNERS

140 — HOW GENDER EQUALITY CAN HELP FIX THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

12 —BIM WARRIORS:

146 — WHAT WOMEN CAN

14 — DO YOU HAVE

150 — UNDERSTANDING THE

ARE THEY READY TO DIGITISE CONSTRUCTION?

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28 — THE JUDGING PROCESS

THE RIGHT TEAM BEHIND YOU TO CONFRONT YOUR COMPANY’S FUTURE CHALLENGES?

24 — 2018 JUDGES

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AND CANNOT CONTROL ABOUT THEIR LEADERSHIP PRESENCE DIGITAL OPPORTUNITIES IN CONSTRUCTION

154 — WHAT WILL

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING PRACTICES LOOK LIKE IN 10-15 YEARS?


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Opening Keynote Speaker RACHEL SKINNER Executive Director & UK Head of Development, WSP Vice President, ICE

In 2020, Rachel Skinner will become not only one of the youngest Presidents of the Institution of Civil Engineers (ICE) in its 200 year history, but the second woman ever to take on the role. As a chartered engineer, Rachel paves the way for women in STEM as Head of Development at WSP. In 2016, Rachel was named as one of The Telegraph’s inaugural Top 50 Influential Women in Engineering and in 2017 she was named as “Most Distinguished Winner” and “Best Woman in Civil Engineering” at the European Women in Construction and Engineering Awards.

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Closing Keynote Speaker PETER OOSTERVEER Chief Executive Officer, Arcadis

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Peter Oosterveer holds a bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from the Noordelijke Hogeschool Leeuwarden. He joined Fluor Corporation in 1988 as Controls System Engineer and was assigned to several international projects, followed by general management roles, based out of The Netherlands. In 1999 he moved to Fluor's headquarters in California to run a major global change program. After the successful delivery of this program, he moved back to Europe to take the role of General Manager for Fluor in The Netherlands, and subsequently lead the Chemicals Group for Fluor Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. Having grown the Global Chemicals business, Mr. Oosterveer became President of the Energy and Chemicals group for Fluor globally, and a member of the Corporate Leadership Team. In 2014, he was appointed as Chief Operating Officer with Profit & Loss responsibility for the Commercial Operations of Fluor worldwide.

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Nobody Told Me

I Couldn’t By KATRINA DOWDING, Executive Vice President at Skanska

For my whole life, I can’t ever recall being told I couldn’t do something. Or maybe I just didn’t hear them. However, I realise that’s not everyone’s experience, so I don’t presume to represent half the population. Indeed, I view myself as very fortunate and I believe this experience has influenced my career journey.

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very woman – every person – is more than the person they are at work. As well as being an executive vice president, I’m a wife and a step mum, a triathlete and a feminist – one who is proactive about equal rights for everyone, across the world. A child of the 1970s, my early ambitions generally revolved around horses – riding them, being with them, working with them. I learned a lot about responsibility through my interests, specifically caring for others who are reliant on me, every day of the year. There were no boys in the stable yard – just girls, getting on with all the jobs that needed to be done. Although I didn’t know it at the time, I learned that I could

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do any of the things put in front of me, and so could the girls around me. This was reinforced by my two elder brothers who simply treated me like another brother with longer hair, and our parents, who treated us equally. I didn’t come across a male-dominated environment until I entered the world of work. I experienced equality from an early age and I believe that’s the kind of environment we need to create for women to succeed. When I started work as a trainee Quantity Surveyor in the 1980s, around me were authoritative female role models, from Margaret Thatcher to the Spice Girls in the 1990s. On site, however, there were still nude calendars in the canteen and social events at lap-dancing clubs.

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The extent of male domination was underlined by the fact that there was no ladies toilet on the first site where I worked, so I spent the first 18 months of my career going to the local petrol station down the road! I got my first job through persistence but, again, it didn’t cross my mind that I would fail or be affected by being female. I wrote to ten companies asking for a job and for them to pay for my college course – and pestered the one that responded until I got what I wanted! Five women and 60 men started the course. At the end, it was me and seven men who withstood the stamina test of studying for five years to get a degree, plus two more to get a RICS qualification.


Only 12 per cent of those in construction were female at that point. I worked on small projects where everyone had to understand everyone’s job and cover for each other which made for a great learning environment where there was more rivalry between engineers and surveyors than between men and women. I also had great bosses, mentors and sponsors during my early years, who were good advocates for me. We should reflect on that - it’s just as important to promote others as ourselves. "I also had great bosses, mentors and sponsors during my early years, who were good advocates for me. We should reflect on that - it’s just as important to promote others as ourselves." After reaching the role of commercial director, I moved into an operational role to gain experience before joining Skanska back in a commercial role, attracted by its values-based approach and opportunities in operational roles. I then completed a masters degree. By this time ethics in business had become far more prominent, but still only 15% of the construction industry was female. In 2006 I was appointed chair of Women in Construction. It was there that I learned never to judge others by your own experience. It was an opportunity to talk to lots of different women and learn about their experiences, some of which were really difficult. In 2012, I achieved my dream of running a business when I became a managing director and in 2017 I was appointed executive vice president, my current role. The relationship between diversity and inclusion and social responsibility has become more and more important throughout this entire time. It’s become evident that it’s not just important for women trying to make it in construction, but for the industry itself. This was highlighted when I visited the Chelsea Flower Show one year and found the mirrors in the toilet set too high, so no-one below six foot could

“Today, women make up 20% of the construction industry – which is an 8% rise over the last 30 years, and at this rate it will take 112 years to get to parity. We are moving in the right direction, but we need to move much, much faster. ” use them properly. It struck me that the man who had likely hung these mirrors did not represent the end users – and it made me think, how can we create buildings that serve everyone effectively if only 50% of the population are represented in its development? Diversity, with inclusion, is a powerful thing. It brings mixed thinking and different perspectives and this is more important than ever as we enter an age of modernisation and digitalisation and face a skills shortage that will only be magnified by the effects of Brexit. Today, women make up 20% of the construction industry – which is an 8% rise over the last 30 years, and at this rate it will take 112 years to get to parity. We are moving in the right direction, but we need to move much,

much faster. We need to make our industry more attractive to women, but we also need to inspire the next generation – by ensuring that primary school children understand that STEM subjects are an option they can explore. We need to build inclusive working environments that people of all backgrounds are attracted to join and want to stay in, and be strong, positive role models. So my message to anyone in the industry wondering what they can do to help achieve this is: don’t be shy. Think about how others see you and how you can leave your legacy. Feminism isn’t just for women and it’s not just senior figures who can make a difference – what can you do to help lead change?

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More Girls in the Engineering Career Pipeline Makes the World a Better Place By ANDREA WELKER, Associate dean for academic affairs & professor of civil and environmental engineering Villanova University College of Engineering This article was first published on WHYY https://whyy.org

In this increasingly complex world, we need everyone — women and men — to solve problems. We are at a pivotal moment in time as society recognizes the need for gender equity and the critical role that women must play in making the world a better place.

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adly, women are still underrepresented in many STEM professions and in STEM fields at many colleges and universities. When women enrol in STEM programs, they persist to graduation with few of them dropping out. Over time, the accumulation of discouragement keeps many girls from entering the pipeline. Lack of female role models, limited encouragement for girls to engage in math and science, and a lack of understanding about what engineers do and the impact they have in improving the quality of life for people worldwide are all impediments to young girls considering an education and a career in engineering. Institutions of higher education can serve as leaders in changing this dynamic with a multi-pronged approach that includes increasing the number of female faculty to serve as role models for students,

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implementing mentorship programs, and spearheading outreach programs designed to get girls in to the pipeline — and keep them there. Female faculty serve as crucial role models and mentors for girls in engineering; however, the national average for female engineering faculty is only 16 percent. At Villanova University’s College of Engineering, where I teach, leadership has committed to increasing our percentage of female faculty. Ten years ago, only 11 percent of our engineering faculty were women. In 2016, the university ranked 13th nationally with 27 percent of tenure-track faculty being female. Increasing the number of female faculty makes a clear difference in the enrolment of female students by normalizing the presence of women in engineering. Over the past 10 years the College of Engineering has increased its percentage of female students from 20 percent in 2006 to

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28 percent in 2016. We are striving for this percentage to match the university’s entire population, but in comparison with the national numbers for engineering graduates — 21 percent female in 2016 — we are proud to be moving in the right direction. When we’ve asked our female students what they like about our engineering program, they report “I feel normal, like I belong here.” In addition to mentorship from female faculty, connecting students with mentors outside the university can help them idealize their careers postgraduation. Based on recent research, we knew that young women respond better when paired with a female mentor. Fortunately, when searching for female mentors for a mandatory professional development program for engineering students, the response rate was outstanding. Almost 35 percent of our mentors are women, which enabled us to assign every female student to a female mentor.


Ultimately, for all of these efforts to make a difference, we need to increase the number of young women in the pipeline by reaching out to girls who may be interested in STEM but could use some encouragement and direction. Villanova’s outreach programs are exposing girls to the world of engineering at crucial times in the development of their academic interests. The goal is to fill the STEM pipeline with girls. If those girls choose a STEM major in college, any college, we should consider that a success.

“Increasing the number of female faculty makes a clear difference in the enrolment of female students by normalizing the presence of women in engineering.”

My first introduction to engineering was at a program geared toward seventh-grade girls held at Stevens Institute of Technology. While I did not attend Stevens for college, I would hope that they would consider me a successful graduate of their middleschool programming! When I started at Villanova in 1999, I was the first female faculty member in civil and environmental engineering; now women comprise seven out of the 15 tenured/tenure-track faculty. Last year, I assumed the role of associate dean for academic affairs in the College of Engineering, working closely with our four department chairs, two of whom are women, to ensure that everyone feels welcome in the college. Engineering is changing for the better. Some studies report that change for any group occurs when that group reaches a critical mass of 20 to 30 percent. We are nearing that tipping point where women no longer feel isolated or lonely. We want to make it “normal” for women to choose engineering. Outreach programs are effective in convincing girls that they belong in engineering. We need a full pipeline. The world is depending on it.

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Women Are the Third Wave of Change in Construction By JULIETTE STACEY, Chief Executive of Mabey Group

Women are the third wave of change sweeping over the construction industry. The accelerating pace of transformation in the industry means that the time has arrived for women to succeed in the sector.

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“Bringing more women into our sector, and ensuring they progress into more senior positions, will be essential if construction is to transform into a better and stronger sector.”

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here has never been a better time to be a woman working in the construction industry and it will only get better. Having successfully developed an unenviable reputation for poor working practices and resistance to change, the sector is now beginning to improve, and quickly. That improvement is driven by the overwhelming economic need to drive productivity and efficiency into the built environment. Which is why now is a good - no, great - time to be a woman working in construction. The necessary improvements can’t happen without construction’s men and women working in a better way, and together. I see three waves of change sweeping across the sector. Technology was the first wave to break, starting with digital engineering. The pace at which new technology is taken up has been accelerating fast. It took more than 70 years for landline telephones to reach maximum penetration, but less than 20 years for mobile phones to become ubiquitous. BIM (Building Information Modelling) is having a huge effect, changing how everyone in the supwply chain works together. Offsite, modular construction is a reality. 3-D printing, robotics, artificial intelligence and smart infrastructure monitoring are all here. We can expect these to be mainstream by 2030. The impact of technology on

construction is so fundamental that our future heroes of construction will no longer be found on site but behind a screen where they will be guiding everyone to get it right, first time, every time. The second wave concerns how the complex industry supply chain actually works together to get things done. Working practices have been so poor that it’s no wonder many skilled people chose not to return to our sector after the last recession, exacerbating to today’s skill shortage. Industry commentators are certain in their belief that the sector’s current business models are so broken that new ways of working will inevitably emerge. The impacts of technology and new business models are creating an environment that requires fresh thinking. Fresh thinking will make all the difference and this is why I see women as the third, and most essential, wave of change. Bringing more women into our sector, and ensuring they progress into more senior positions, will be essential if construction is to transform into a better and stronger sector. Physical strength will matter less in a world where algorithms, artificial intelligence, modular installation and robotics take the strain. What matters more is the ability to increase productivity by thinking creatively and working collaboratively. Our sector is very special. It creates buildings and infrastructure that last more than a lifetime, that you can point at and say, “I helped build that”.

There is now very little gender difference in the take up of and achievement in core STEM GCSE subjects, and engineering graduates are second only to medics in securing full-time jobs and earning good salaries. Increasingly, the world is realising that diversity in any organisation is an essential ingredient of success. We know that companies work more productively, safely and efficiently if they are gender diverse. We have a long way to go though. The UK construction sector has amongst the worst ratio or men to women at 87:13. Also, the UK has the lowest percentage of female engineering professionals in Europe at less than 10%, and the proportion of young women studying engineering and physics has remained virtually static since 2012. But at least we have started the journey and in five years’ time our industry’s approach to efficiency, automation, digital engineering, collaboration, quality construction, appropriate risk transfer and real collaboration will be recognisably embedded. The image of our sector, as being traditional and slow moving, will change rapidly. We will look back at how things worked 2018 and wonder how it could ever have been so. Encouraging more women to come in to the sector, confident that they can flourish and grow, is how we will unlock potential and start to challenge the world’s best at construction. Never has there been a better time to be a woman working in construction, and it can only get better.

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BIM warriors:

Are they ready to digitise construction? By PAUL NEWBY, Engineering Services Director at SES Engineering Services This article was first published in Construction News

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espite talk of a digital revolution across construction, there is an unavoidable paradox holding the workforce back.

Those who can transform the industry’s culture forever may have the skills and progressive attitude for change, but not the practical or leadership experience. Conversely, the older generation who do have practical and leadership experience are apathetic, sceptical or worse: cynical about digital innovation. As a result, the digital revolution is at least a generation away. Meanwhile there’s a large demographic that sits in the middle, watching to see which way the pendulum will swing: towards tradition or revolution.

BIM model of Taipei Pop Music Center TPMC Source: www.arup.com

While the BIM and digital construction world evolves and the government flip-flops over its declared ambitions, growing client demand and the ongoing skills shortage have seen the rise of ‘BIM warriors’, who often create as many problems as they solve.

What’s a BIM Warrior?

Maximising Our Potential

BIM warriors are those who, despite their tender years and lack of experience, have been unfairly burdened with the responsibility of solving the systemic problems and transformational challenges of moving to digital construction.

So what’s missing?

Usually highly motivated, confident and assured, these warriors form a big part of the solution. Primarily made up of the millennial generation, their ambition and skill are the keys to unlocking the industry from its current confines. Their mastery of social media creates innovative communication channels, while application software drives creativity through technology and innovation, and parametric thinking creates a culture of problem-solvers and solution-providers. Collaboration, the environment and social justice are important to this generation, and it’s this that will make the difference in the medium-to-long term as we shift towards a digital future.

Undoubtedly, great designers need the ability to communicate, influence and engineer solutions, all of which come from gaining experience of working on real projects with real people. Software proficiency is not enough; strategic influencing as well as analytical and critical thinking are skills that are learned over time. Lack of investment in training and development has blighted our industry for years. Now it has caught up and overtaken us. Developing skills through experience takes time to nurture and the school of hard knocks breeds resilience and tenacity. But there is good news. If we can also train and develop the more experienced workforce to use new software and create a culture of collaboration, integrated working and smart procurement, we can have our cake and eat it. And most importantly, we can give our customers what they really want. A shift in people’s mindsets about digital progression is coming, and the efficiency, cost reductions and time savings will soon be fully realised. But it’s not going to happen overnight. The concern is that this is a generational issue, and that until the next generation has gained the experience needed to lead the way, we will remain at a standstill.

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Do You Have the Right Team Behind You to Confront Your Company’s

Future Challenges?

By RINA GOLDENBERG LYNCH, Founder, Voice At The Table www.voiceatthetable.com

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f you’re a CEO or a Managing Director of a team or a business, you will have noticed that things are changing. Fast. So fast that most of us are finding it hard to keep up. The amount of information being flung at us is nearly insurmountable. To such an extent that, in order for us to digest as much of it as possible, we dedicate an average of 3 seconds to any digital message (emails, tweets, blogs etc) before we decide whether it is going to capture our interest or end up in the ever-growing junk box. You will have noticed the louder voices of so-called minorities – women, Millennials, the politically-neglected – urging the incumbent regime and processes to change. You will have noticed technological advances – from the speed with which information is spread to the integration of artificial intelligence with human endeavours – that affect our daily interactions. The world is undoubtedly changing. Here are five concrete reasons to ask yourself whether you have the right people on your team to embrace those changes.

— Ever-Growing Complexity

The explosion of available knowledge and information nowadays makes it impossible for any one person – no matter how clever – to absorb it all. The sheer vastness of information and the advances that we have made in mathematics, science, genetics, medicine, etc. make any one person’s job to understand how that knowledge interacts in order to solve one problem far too complex for any one type of person. The need to solve complex problems infers a need for diversity. The only way that vast pools of knowledge in different disciplines can be leveraged to solve complex problems is by bringing together a group of individuals who hold vastly different types of information, experience and knowledge. Consider this example: In 2006, Netflix CEO Reed Hastings asked the public to help Netflix predict viewer film ratings. Netflix announced an open competition, rewarding anyone who outperforms their own Cinematch consumer film rating 16

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algorithm by at least 10% with $1 million. Various groups went to task. Among them, teams of mathematical whizzes, computer programmers, psychologists, engineers and data scientists. Each team did all it could to improve the algorithm. A couple of the teams achieved remarkable success by improving Cinematch’s accuracy by over 8%. But not any one single team was able to get any closer to the requisite 10% in order to win the grand prize. You can probably guess what happened next. The topperforming team realised that their knowledge alone was not going to be enough to crack this code and offered to collaborate with other teams that had vastly different experience and knowledge. The team of data scientists collaborated with a team of computer programmers and a team of psychologists. Each group, however intelligent, operated on a set of assumptions that defined its knowledge, blinded by a number of facts that were disguised by these assumptions. It is only when the teams came together and broadened their understanding of complex human behaviour that they were able to succeed. So, while, individually, each team had vast knowledge and understanding of their area of expertise, it was not until they combined the very different knowledge and experience that they were able to exceed the requisite 10% threshold.


“IQ itself is no longer sufficient to solve the problem - you need cognitive diversity, the different ways in which we interpret situations and solve problems.”

In today’s world, most business problems are complex. They are complicated by the fact that systems are at once different (depending on where in the world they might be located) and yet are connected through the power of technology. They are complicated by the sheer layers of possible outcomes. They are complicated by different tax structures, legal instruments and cultural behaviours in different jurisdictions. Even a business that works solely in one country will not be able to escape the every-growing complexity of our world because – no matter where we operate – we are digitally connected to each other and, as a result, influenced by everything that’s happening around us, be it in our community or on the other side of the world. While IQ is important, as the example demonstrates, IQ itself is no longer sufficient to solve the problem - you need cognitive diversity, the different ways in which we interpret situations and solve problems. Chances are, if you’re recruiting the most intelligent people out there, you’re recruiting a very similar type of thinker. In order to grow the diversity pool in your business, stop paying attention to old recruitment habits (including the level of someone’s intellect) and start thinking about how to get as diverse a pool of candidates as you can muster.

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Source: Brookings Institute, February 2017

Rising Global Middle Class

Increased Customer Sophistication

The world’s middle-class population growth has shifted from established market jurisdictions to those we consider as ‘emerging’. Our global middle-class population is estimated to grow from approximately 3 billion in 2015 to over 5 billion by 2030. Half of this growth is occurring in Asia (China and India) as well as other emerging markets, including Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

In this world that we now live in, where information about any given product or service is readily available, anyone who is looking for something specific, original or unique will be able to find it.

The explosion of the middle-class population presents the single biggest opportunity for most businesses. Yet to take advantage of those opportunities, a business must be finely calibrated to understand the complexities of those diverse emerging markets where the opportunities arise. Countries like China, Vietnam, India, South Africa and Nigeria (to name a few) are all culturally diverse, economically volatile and politically charged. To successfully navigate markets in those countries and to take advantage of opportunities in those markets, business must understand and be fluent in the cultural intricacies of those jurisdictions. Competition from local businesses is vast and local talent is scarce. So in order for any company to successfully engage in the market where opportunities arise, it will need to make space for a diverse employee base and build an environment which doesn’t just attract people from different backgrounds and experiences but is also able to retain them and, most importantly, allow them to contribute with those valuable differences that they bring to the table.

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This in turn makes it difficult for companies. Not only do businesses have to closely and fully understand their customers, they also need to be able to differentiate themselves from any other company that is providing a similar service or product. As competition increases, companies cannot afford not to fully empathise and connect with their customers. Brand loyalty is a thing of the past and may not even exist in the new emerging middle classes. To satisfy a fickle client-base, teams and leader must work harder, first to attract an employee base that reflects this nuanced and diverse demand and then to retain and harness its value. In order to do that, companies will require teams of people who reflect the diversity of their customer base. They will need to be closely connected to the customer and understand the nuances of individualised demands of millions of customers in order to deliver the requisite customer experience. In addition, these teams will need to improve their empathy skills in order to better understand what customers want and how they want to be treated. As empathy is the main component of an inclusive environment, and inclusive team and leader will be better placed to take advantage of the diversity existing in that team and of those demanding sophisticated customers with highly individualised requirements.


“Companies will need to be closely connected to the customer and understand the nuances of individualised demands of millions of customers in order to deliver the requisite customer experience. ”

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— Innovation and Creativity

Innovation is the name of the game for any company. In fact, of 1500 CEOs surveyed in recent years, 75% put innovation as a top 3 priority for their business. Irrespective of the nature of your business, keeping up and staying ahead might be the difference between a company that survives and a company that doesn’t. It will come as no surprise that the best way to innovate and create is to draw from a very diverse base. The wider you cast your net for new ideas, the better your chances for breakthrough innovation. Inviting and encouraging diverse thinking in your team is fundamental to any organisation that aims to garner new ideas. Leaders will need to become more self-aware in order to guard against groupthink in their midst and to ensure they aren’t blindsided by something that a more diverse environment would have identified as a risk or an opportunity. Those who understand the greater benefits of being supported by a diverse range of thinkers (and the sacrifices that one’s ego must make in order to tolerate and, in fact, welcome dissent) stand to gain the most. A team that is diverse and is routinely freely speaking its mind will be better placed to spot those rare opportunities, develop new ideas and prevent poorly thought-through decisions. 20

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“In fact, of 1500 CEOs surveyed in recent years, 75% put innovation as a top 3 priority for their business.”


— Change in Demographics and Talent

The world is becoming older, better educated and easier to transverse. In addition, the way people work and what they expect in return in terms of future opportunities, respect for life outside work and where and when they work has been undergoing a seismic shift. The world’s change in demographic is unprecedent and is on our doorstep. According to a number of sources that monitor and routinely predict demographics, by 2020 (at the latest), those older than 65 will outnumber those under the age of 5. In fact, it is predicted that, by 2050, the world’s population of those over 65 will represent 15.6% of the global population (up from 10% today) and those under the age of 5 only 7.2%. This will impact our workforce. In addition, higher education in developing countries is becoming more accessible, generating a highly-educated, highly mobile educated workers, looking for opportunities elsewhere. By way of example, it is estimated that, by 2030, China will generate more university graduates that the entire US workforce. By 2020, India is predicted to produce four times as many graduates as the United States. Given where the educated workforce will be coming from, companies will need to be able to attract a vastly different person – from every perspective – and demonstrate and ability to retain them. And when it comes to workplace expectations, the so-called Millennials (those born between 1980 and 1996) have a thing or two to say about this. Expected to represent 50% of the workforce in the UK (and 35% of the global workforce) by 2020, any business that chooses to ignore the demands of this generation does so at its perils. What are those demands, you ask? Generally speaking, Millennials have been seen to be the one generation that isn’t afraid to vote with their feet. An average stay for a Millennial at any given job is 18 months. Why do they leave? For better opportunities. Millennials, more so than other generations represented in the workforce find it ‘extremely important’ to have opportunities to learn and grow, to have good leaders and managers (defined by their own criteria including transparency, coaching, motivation and purpose), having an interest in the role and the type of work. They are not, necessarily, motivated by money alone. These massive shifts in demographics and attitude require a very different approach to harnessing talent. Being mindful of diversity and how to attract and retain it plays a major role in a company’s ability to win or lose the ‘war on talent’.

The question for you is, do you have the right team to tackle these changes and succeed as a business? Do you have the diversity that you need to embrace the changes and opportunities or does your team look predominantly like you and is therefore at risk of being blindsided? If you don't have the requisite diversity on your team, ask yourself what’s missing and how you can attract and retain it. If you’re willing and able to make a change to prepare your team and company, the time to act is now! THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Judges, the Judging Process and Speakers

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Alison Norrish Director, Infrastructure London, Arup

Chris Tyerman Managing Director Infrastructure, Interserve Construction

— Amanda Illing Chief Executive, Hardwicke

2018 Judges

— Anne Kemp Director BIM Strategy and Development, Atkins & Chair, UK BIM Alliance — Ashley Rees Vice President & General Manager, Fluor — Caroline Mayes Director, Head of Schools and Colleges, Stride Treglown — Casey Rutland UK Director of Digital, Royal HaskoningDHV

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

— Christina Jackson Technical Director, CH2M is now Jacobs — Clive Wotton Group Director, Engineering, Ricardo — Cristina Savian Women in BIM - Advance and Retain lead, Global Women in Tech executive board — David Evans Managing Director, The Diversity & Innovation Company


Marci Bonham Managing Director & General Manager, Hilti Ireland

Rachel Cook Practice Director, Atkins

Graeme Ormiston Project Delivery Director, Jacobs Energy, Chemicals and Resourcing

Rand Watkins Principal Project Engineer, Transport for London

Marianne Kilpatrick UK Director, Transport Advisory

— Rina Goldenberg Lynch CEO, Voice At The Table

Mark Jaggard SHEQ Director for Engie Regeneration

Ross Agnew Partner, Asset Management Advisory, KPMG

Helen Barrow Managing Director, Accenture — Hiro Aso Aviation & Transportation Practice Area Leader, Gensler — Ingrid Chauvet Director, RISE Consulting Structural Engineers — Jane Duncan RIBA, Immediate Past President — — David Savage Partner, Charles Russell Speechlys —

Jo Williams Partner Building Consultancy, Sanderson Weatherall —

Dawn Childs Group Engineering Director, Merlin Entertainments plc

Julie Umpleby Senior Project Surveyor, Willmott Dixon

Dr David Hancock Construction Director, Cabinet Office, Infrastructure and Projects Authority

Juliette Stacey Group Chief Executive Officer, Mabey

— Dr Louise Brooke-Smith Partner, Arcadis

Karin Mueller Executive coach, consultant, trainer, Liebfrog

Elaine Trimble Director, Urban Infrastructure, Siemens

Kate Cairns Founder, Cairns Consultancy & ICE Council Member

— Emily McDonald UK Structures Regional Director, BuroHappold Engineering — Francesca Berriman MBE CEO, Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists (CIAT)

— Katrina Dowding Executive Vice President, Skanska — Liz Brown Partner, CampbellReith

Fred Garner Sector Director – Rail, Taylor Woodrow

Madeleine Rawlins Principal Consultant, Mott MacDonald

Maria Pilfold Non-Executive Director, CITB

— Mark Reynolds Chief Executive of Mace — Marta de Sousa Property Developer, Broadcaster, Lux Reality — Mary Rose Griffiths Partner, Board Member, Gardiner & Theobald — Matthew Cova Managing Director, Kier Major Projects — Mike Cuthbert Partner, Head of Construction Advisory, Deloitte LLP — Niall Healy Managing Director, Healycornelius Design Consultancy — Nicholas Winter Director - Project Management Solutions EMEA CBRE GWS — Paula Chandler Senior Design Manager, Bouygues (U.K.) — Paula Walsh Director, Group Leader, Building Engineering London, Arup

judges

Gillian Horn Partner, Penoyre & Prasad

2018

— Sarah Davidson Director - Head of R&D, Gleeds Corporate Services — Sharon Duffy Head of Transport Infrastructure Engineering, Transport for London — Sharon Fasanya Managing Director, Facet Consulting — Simon Kirby Chief Operating Officer, Rolls-Royce — Sue Percy Chief Executive, Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation — Sue Sljivic Director, RSK — Tedroy Newell Founder & MD at Assess Renew Collaborate (ARC) — Teodoro Alvarez Fadón Global Head of Innovation, Ferrovial Agroman —

Thomas Edgcumbe Managing Director (UKCS Midlands & North), Balfour Beatty

Professor Denise Bower Professor of Engineering Project Management, School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds

Virginie Colaiuta Avocat a la Cour, Paris- France

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judges 2018 26

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2018

judges THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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The Judging Process The Judges A group of 61 senior executives from various industries were carefully selected as the evaluation panel of independent judges. Their objective was to review the nominations and interview each of the finalists.

Why An Interview With The Judges? A face-to-face interview allows the judges to further assess each finalist’s skills, achievements etc. The interview also complements their review of the submitted nomination forms.

The Judging Day The judges were organised into 20 groups; each group was made up of 3 judges and interviewed a number of finalists within their assigned categories. Nomination forms and any supporting documents were reviewed by the judges prior to a nominee being selected as a finalist. Each nomination was evaluated and scored out of a total of 5 points. The next stage of the process was a face to face interview with the judges.

The Finalists Time With The Judges This was an opportunity for the finalists to engage the judges by telling them the story of their success. Each judge awarded points across the same criteria. After the interview, all finalists answered one final question: “why they should win the award in their category?” to a separate panel of 3 judges. Each finalist’s overall score was the sum of the scores from the interview with the 3 judges for their category plus the scores from the other 3 judges on the final question. The finalist with the highest score in each category was selected as the winner in that category.

The Most Distinguished Winner Of 2018 This award is for the finalist who impressed the judges the most and scored the highest among all the finalists.

FAQs WHAT DO THE JUDGES EVALUATE? WHO ARE THE JUDGES? WHERE DO THEY COME FROM? Zars Media invites judges from countries all over Europe. Judges may be executives with social innovation expertise, business people, educators and university administrators and leading practitioners in the field.

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Judges will review all the entries within their assigned categories and give their scores as per the guidelines. This will include reviewing the nomination forms and any confidential supplemental documents and project information that is included in the application.

HOW DO YOU CHOOSE THE JUDGES?

IS THE JUDGING BY INVITATION ONLY, OR CAN I APPLY TO BE A JUDGE?

We usually look for executives with backgrounds relevant to the event and with more than 20 years’ experience. We actively recruit and also take suggestions from partners, mentors and past judges.

We recruit judges after screening their profiles using LinkedIn and other news sources. We are happy to consider suggestions. If you'd like to be considered, or suggest future judges, please email judges@wiceawards.com

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018


INTERESTED IN NOMINATING FOR 2019 THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS?

www.wiceawards.com

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the judging day 30

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26th

of april 2018 THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Speakers 32

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

— Abu Bundu-Kamara Global Diversity and Inclusion Leader, Boeing — Alex Naraian, President Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists — Angela Dapper RIBA Partner, Denton Corker Marshall — Catherine Schalk Executive Director and Founder, Inkwazi Kommunications


2018

speakers

— Cristina Lanz Azcarate Director and Co-Founder, atelier EURA — Dean Manning Managing Director, Structure Tone International — Diego Padilla Philipps WSP - Building Structures, UK — Dr Mark McBride-Wright Managing Director, EqualEngineers

— Gail Butt Personal Development Coach, True You Coaching — Kees van der Sande Director and Trustee, Formation Architects — Lesley Waud Director - Strategic Highways, Atkins — Margarita Germanos Senior Associate Director at NPS London

— Maria Coulter Construction Coach, NonExecutive Director, Construction Industry Council (CIC) — Marion Ellis Engagement Director at Countrywide Surveying Services, Women in Surveying UK — Melanie Barker Senior Project Manager, Transport For London

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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ARE YOU WIDITT?


COMING SOON

w w w.widittawards.com


The 2018 Finalists EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS 2018 IN NUMBERS

Approximately

350

NOMINATIONS

182

FINALISTS

28

WINNERS

1

DISTIGUISHED WINNER

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018


THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Architect

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018


"If I can leave you with anything I've learnt from this process it is that women should 'own their success more'...'be you and be proud to be you!" Hilary I’Anson

"As a woman working in a traditionally male-dominated industry, I have always looked to lead by example"

Kate Murphy

Katharine Richards

"I have never considered myself secondary and I don’t think any woman should. Tenacity, drive and desire to achieve can help you realise your goals no matter who you are or where you come from, barriers can be overcome"

"Acknowledging who I am, what my achievements are and where I want to go have enabled me to stand firmly as an architect" Mandy Franz

"What an amazing set of incredible women we have in this wonderful profession of construction, engineering and architecture. I can’t wait to see where we can take the future generations! Let’s get equality running through all levels and roles of our profession!"

"It has been a truly inspirational day, meeting so many female construction professionals and collectively celebrating our contribution to the built environment. I look forward to the future where the industry equally reflected the needs of all and the communities we live work and within"

Melanie Clear

Tania Love

"She won’t be dainty or timid. She will be proud and strong.” — G I A N N I VE R SACE

Natasha Brown

"I hope to be a role model for the young generation of women architects"

Raffaella Rospo

"I strongly believe in a collaborative approach between the different professions in the construction industry."

Valeria Segovia

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"Consulting is drawing walkable patterns to innovative solutions where others simply see complexity" Chiara Pozzuoli

"I hope my nomination demonstrates to women from all walks of life that a career in construction is a challenging and hugely rewarding way to leave a positive legacy by improving people’s lives, society and our environment for the better"

Emma Fitzgerald

"Inspiring the next generation is my passion, by acting as a role model in the Built Environment I am helping students 'Design their own Future�

Emma Ferguson-Gould

"I am passionate about increasing the number of women in major project leadership" Lisa Kelvey

"This has been a thrilling journey to reflect back into who I am, what excites me, what I have achieved so far, and what we all can achieve together fighting along for a better, more inclusive and attractive construction industry"

"Truly privileged to be among such incredible and inspiring women, together, we will build a better tomorrow" Mariapia Angelino

Maya Naasani

"Non Desistas, Erit Victoria Erunt!" "Never Give Up, Success will be yours!"

Nitika Agrawal

Rebecca De Cicco

"When working in a maledominated industry, it is imperative to ensure there are ways to positively address the lack of diversity and I work hard to ensure this is addressed and to encourage young people to enter the construction industry."

"Asbestos is not a career I dreamed of, but I love my profession and work hard to make a difference. Companies employ me to achieve compliance, but I do my job to keep people safe." Suzanne Smith

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Consultant

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Contractor

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"In a world set on a course of equality, we shall all play a role in piloting the Construction industry and inspiring others to fill their sails on their professional journey to build the best crew that reflects the society we live in."

Anna Rozek

"I was very honoured and proud to be nominated by my Employer this year, who do a great job in supporting this initiative, which really does raise the profile of women in the industry" Anne Smales

Lynsey McNeilly

"The passion, drive and commitment which was visible at the interview day is the enthusiasm we need to make visible to those outside of construction, encourage more females to select a career in the industry. It is an honour to have been selected as a finalist, and such an exciting journey"

"To be the best you can be in your career, it is so important to enjoy what you do. Find your passion and then work will never be a chore."

"A good manager is never afraid to get their hands dirty."

Maria Butzki-Vogel

Michelle Mackey

Monika Slowikowska

"I came to the UK from Poland, speaking no English and with a big dream.”

Nuria Venero

"It was inspiring to see that there are increasingly more women fighting along in this industry and I hope that the day will soon come when our presence becomes so commonplace as to make it unnecessary to highlight our role in the field."

"Don’t wait for a change. Take the first step to start the journey and make sure that others join the challenge." Silvia Moreno

"WICE currently has no specific nomination to recognise ‘Quality’ but I believe that Quality is an important aspect in changing the image of construction in society." Zeynep Acar

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"One day there will be an abundance of female engineers in the workplace and the extraordinary of today will become the ordinary of tomorrow. “We can do it” will be replaced by “We did it”; our children’s children will wonder what all the fuss was about, and we will all recognise the part we played."

Eleanor Matthews

"This recognition means a lot to me. I feel honoured, but also bound to enthuse and inspire future engineers to give all they can and become beacons of the future."

"Being part of the 2018 WICE Awards has been such a great experience! It’s been inspirational to meet the other finalists from all around Europe and to reflect on the achievements we’ve all made!" Indi Wickramarachch

Jennifer-Leigh Oakham

"The best and most beautiful things in this world cannot be seen or even heard, but must be felt with the heart.” — HELEN KELLER

Joanna Komenda

Lucy Vereenooghe

"Having worked in the construction industry for over 20 years, on a wide range of projects, I know that engineering can offer varied, interesting and rewarding careers for everyone, regardless of gender, ethnicity or background"

"The pride of been in these awards gives me strength to continue fighting to get women's work recognized" Marian Ferguson

"We need more women in construction to help shape its future and change perceptions of the industry. More diversity and balance are crucial factors in its success and I am proud to be part of the change currently underway to address this.”

Marina Aras

"I thoroughly enjoyed the judging day. It was a great experience to meet so many diverse and interesting women and to be able to share my achievements and career milestones so far. It was truly an inspiring day." Mary-Ann Clarke

"You are more than capable, therefore dare the status quo and achieve greater heights" Omolola Taiwo

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Electrical & Mechanical Engineer

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

in Environment & Sustainability

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018


"Working in the construction industry has been such a rewarding career for me and I am determined to continue to encourage and nurture more of our upcoming young ladies to come and join us." Alison Cormack

"The best cure for imposter syndrome is to talk about your achievements and normalise that yes, you can do this. It’s not just for you – you never know who‘s listening and might feel that bit braver and bolder because they’ve seen someone like them do it too."

Anne Johnstone

Clare Hennessey

"It is my hope that my day to day project work inspires change amongst my clients in the construction and engineering sector, and in the same way I wish to inspire change in the people I interact with." Emily Ghedia

Fay Bull

"Construction is such an exciting industry to work in. It’s also an industry where women can play an important role to help create beautiful and useful places in which people, society and the environment thrive."

"I feel overwhelmed to have been shortlisted alongside such a talented group of professionals and I hope that highlighting the breadth and variety of roles in construction and engineering inspires the next generation to join this fabulous industry!"

Sarah Lewis

"The energy and drive of all of the amazing women I have met throughout this process are an inspiration and I am honoured to be amongst them. It is a real privilege to have been part of these awards celebrating the women who are driving forward the future of our industry.”

Olivia Waters

"Combining two of my passions, environment and construction, is a rewarding challenge. I am determined to make the difference in the industry, empowering women and contributing with my work every day to drive a change for a better environment tomorrow"

"Achievements in the delivery of infrastructure projects over the last few years have been phenomenal. These awards ensure that a vital legacy of these projects – the shared learning, the diversity of roles and the people involved – are celebrated."

Patricia Sempere

"Always have faith in yourself and don't be afraid to accept new challenges because that's where you'll find the best version of you." Shara Tomlins

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"I am thrilled about the growing diversity in construction and excited for what the future holds for Women in Construction and Engineering and the wider construction industry." Aisling Padden

"The passion to empower people to prevent injuries and fatalities drives everything I do, and if this also inspires other women in any industry, that is the icing on the cake."

"I was so delighted to be recognised for the impact that I have had on our industry. All the hard work has paid off. It is exciting to be named with all these successful woman. We are all winners!" Britta Wesseling

Fiona O'Donnell

Karen Godfrey

"The construction environment can be tough; having a positive impact on the safety, health and wellbeing of a large workforce is incredibly rewarding.”

"Construction is such a diverse and challenging industry to work in. The people, the hard work, the determination and the passion for what we do make it an industry like no other, and one that I hope to inspire other women to join.”

Jennifer Fitzgibbon

"It has been a privilege to be shortlisted for my work in keeping road workers and users safe, and to meet so many talented people excelling in their fields" Kate Carpenter "Very rarely do you step back and reflect on everything you have achieved in your career. These awards force you to do exactly that. It has been a rewarding and inspiring journey and I am extremely proud to have been part of it alongside so many other talented women in the industry."

"Health and Safety is a passion for me - I feel truly honoured to be a finalist in the WICE awards 2018. I hope I inspire more women to join the construction industry" Kelly Osborne

Lorraine Brown

"A successful legacy only comes about through inspiring the growth in others in order for them to recognise a glimpse of their potential they will encounter aspiring accountability to be empowered and self-driven.” “Your Success is my Success”

"Good health and safety isn’t about telling people they can’t, it’s about working with people to find the best way they can" Pam Sherwood

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Samantha Mepham


finalists 2018

Best Woman

in Health & Safety

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

in Highways

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018


"WICE 2018 has been a truly invigorating experience, meeting so many first class and successful women in our industry. WICE has reawakened my career aspirations, I truly believe the time is now, to motivate and empower talented individuals to dream and succeed."

Becky Jackson

"It was amazing and inspiring to see so many talented ladies, of all ages, together in one place"

"I work with a great team of people and am delighted to reflect their success in this Awards process." Dr Helen Bowkett

Helen Gregory

"If you try your best it should always be good enough"

Lynn Masterson

"I am determined to play my part in changing the perception of construction sites to attract and retain women in this field."

Louise McCann

"Be open to all opportunities as they arise and trust your personal judgement.” Maria Del Mar Delgado

"I was particularly proud to be an environmental expert in the best woman in highways category. Environmental assessment is a critical component of the design and construction of great highways schemes.”

"How great to be celebrating the diverse leadership in our industry. While we can each incite change, together we can be transformative." Rachael Bailey

Dr Rosie Hughes

Tamara Percy

"As an Environmental Specialist in the Highways Sector, when I drive along a road I had a hand in designing I think of it as my road, my tarmac, green verge or gullies, but it took thousands of people from so many technical areas to get to that point, and I am so happy to help bring that expertise together.”

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"The success of a woman is the inspiration for many other women."

Aura Baciu

"We all have the power to shape our industry and celebrating the achievements of women is a great way to improve the image of Construction and Engineering and to make it more attractive for future generations."

"A strong woman stands up for herself. A stronger woman stands up for everyone else.” — ANONYMOUS

Denise Wright

Elodie Ordines

"Only united together we will break the mould for future generations of Women in Construction and Engineering"

"I am so proud to have been nominated and represent Jacobs doing a job I love, amongst a group of such exceptional women"

Emma Pattison

Helen Critchley

"Construction allows me to indulge my passion for the built form and architecture, work in an environment where each day is different, that drives me to be solution focused and work with amazing and talented people."

"Whilst truly honoured to be shortlisted in this category, my ambition is to one day be recognised simply as a ‘Project Manager’ and not a Female Project Manager" Phoebe Leach

Rebecca Wade

"What better way to attract the right, diverse future talent to our profession than by promoting a positive image of successful and relatable role models in our industry leading their fields, through the WICE awards, by saying, ‘if I can, you can too!" Tolani Azeez

"In our industry, Leadership is about demonstrating capability and confidence, It is most definitely not and should never be about gender, as has been vindicated by all of the great candidates -male and female - at WICE awards”

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Vidhya Issac-Langford


finalists 2018

Best Woman

Project Manager

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Quantity Surveyor

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THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018


"As Roald Dahl once said “Somewhere inside all of us is the power to change the world” let’s all step forward as the leading people in the industry and make a difference, but let’s do this together." Alexandra Axford

"’Be Determined. Work hard. But most importantly Be Yourself."

Bryony Martin

"Having studied French and Italian, a career in construction was not the most obvious choice…but it has been everything I hoped for. It has given me variety, a way to challenge myself and an opportunity to have a positive impact on people’s lives.”

Fiona Cussen

Harriet Buffery

"I am passionate about my job and love talking about it to others in this great industry. We should always talk positively about one another and celebrate our achievements to empower the next generation."

"I had an incredible time at the Judging Day having had the opportunity to share my passion, determination and commitment to succeed. I hope to use my journey of success to encourage and inspire others, leading by example to where they want to be in life."

"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood” — MARIE C URIE

Joanna Mulcahy

Joyce Fernandes

"The WICE Awards day has exceeded my expectations. The other finalists and speakers were inspiring and this had given me renewed vigour to push myself further as a QS. I hope to inspire others as they have me."

"Good things do not come to those who wait, chase your dreams and make your own opportunities. You are in competition with no one but yourself" Sarah Culliford

Tammy Harrison-Round

Victoria Thompson

"I am truly honoured to be a part of this amazing WICE experience. The women I work with inspire me every day. I believe that change starts with you. So make a difference, work hard and lead by example. Be the change you want to see in others"

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"Creativity, collaboration and communication are as much a part of an engineer’s skillset as technical know-how and I’m proud that my talent as a creative problem-solver has led to such a fulfilling career in the construction industry!"

Amy Koerbel

"Being nominated for the WICE-AWARD lead me into many interesting and very useful discussions on the role of women in the industry.”

"Let’s lead by example to collectively create the industry we want to work in"

Dieneke Grimmelius

Eleanor Ball

"The WICE awards are a fantastic experience. As long as we continue to shine a light on our achievements we will be able to develop and retain a diverse talent in our industry" Gail Hunter

Jackie Heath

"The awards process has been fun, career-affirming and an opportunity to take stock of my personal development. It powerfully demonstrates how diverse and different our industry could become and will hopefully inspire others.”

Haidee Bacordio

"These awards have been a great experience and being part of a group of like-minded, successful women with such energy and determination to change things for the better has been incredibly inspiring." Julia Smithard

"I feel very proud to have been a finalist in the WICE Awards. It is inspiring to see that are increasingly more women engineers in the construction industry." María José Martín Fernández

Roma Agrawal

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"I hope that as I smile on every challenge I take on, I can encourage others and let them see that the industry is truly changing and that companies like Bouygues are supporting and promoting talent and not gender, and that sites are not of dictatorships but teamwork, and that construction can be a fantastic place to work and learn."

"Our industry is on the cusp of an exciting time with robotics and artificial intelligence starting to appear in our work. It’s vitally important that engineers reflect society to ensure these new technologies are used in a way that benefits us all."


finalists 2018

Best Woman

Structural Engineer

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finalists 2018

Best Young Woman

Engineer

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"As professionals in engineering and construction, we are all role models who can inspire others to join the profession by being engaging living examples, and by creating inclusive and equal opportunities for all" Dr Ozak Esu

"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has” — MA RGARET MEAD

Emma Bowes

Geetha Sathi

"WARRIOR OPTIMISTIC MAGNIFICENT EXUBERANT NEVER GIVE UP WOMEN is the embodiment of these words. Always dream BIG and follow your passion with perseverance."

"I look forward to the day when we don’t need to have specialist awards for women, when the amazing women of construction and engineering are winning all the industry wide awards." Imogen Graves

"Grateful to WICE for putting the spotlight on women's achievements in the construction and engineering industry, spreading the word about the inspiring work we're all part of and asking the tough questions regarding advancement toward gender equality in the workplace."

Liz Smith

"Gender balance within construction and engineering is essential to progress, to the benefit of society, the environment and the economy. The women on this page are all exemplars for what women in the industry bring to the table and I am proud to be part of this story.” Madalina Aghinitei

"Encouraging and empowering young people in your company is the best way to get them to thrive!"

"To design for a diverse world, we must start with a diverse workforce."

Pooja Dileeban

Sabrina Ihaddaden

"However hard we find it, we must keep shouting about our achievements in engineering and construction, and ask for more opportunities. The next generation needs our enthusiasm and inspiration!" Sophie McPhillips

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"It’s empowering to see so many great nominees for the awards, especially in the ‘Young Woman’ categories; we really are the next generation with the ability to drive change." Bridget McClellan

"I believe being a female in the construction industry is not a limiting factor. I hope to use this forum to promote the opportunities that exist in construction for all, if they are willing to embrace the industry"

"Potential is limited by your perception of your own ability, learn to believe in yourself and take every opportunity that arises.” Kate Wales

Kay Chizlett

"My future professional ambitions all lie within the construction and engineering industry, I strongly believe anything is achievable" Michaela Hall Elizabeth Lewis

"I love that our industry binds together so many talented people working in a broad range of roles to achieve a common goal, despite the fact that our individual pressures and journeys will be different along the way."

"I want to encourage women that they do not need to change who they are to be successful in a male dominated industry – why can’t I have New Civil Engineer and Vogue side by side on my coffee table?”

Olivia Burton

"“I wish” will get you nowhere, but you’d be amazed at what “I believe” can achieve."

"People can snatch things off your hands but cannot snatch anything away from your hard work’" Sabina Tayub

Steph Wicken

" You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose” — DR. SUESS

Victoria Taylor

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finalists 2018

Best Young Woman

in Construction

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Civil Engineer

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"Being a finalist for the WICE awards has been an unforgettable experience. Diversity brings new perspectives and women must be confident in our skills on achieving our professional goals. We should be recognised as equally valuable assets of the industry"

"I have thoroughly enjoyed the awards process meeting fantastic people. I used the nomination to reflect back on my career and prove the importance of role models to inspire, not only future generations and colleagues, but other women in the sector”

Almudena Diez Pascua

Arrate Losada

Hortense Colin

"I am left galvanised to do more to encourage young women into engineering and support those already in the industry following the Judging Day" Jessica Smith

"I love being an Engineer and it has been truly inspiring to be part of the WICE Award process. The Judging day was such a great day, really great fun and it was fantastic to meet so many other remarkable professionals working in the Construction and Engineering profession"

Meshi Taka

"I am really passionate and determined about my role as a Civil Engineer; my manta in life has always been “never give in, never give up”. Being myself has helped me gain the respect and approval of my team, so being a woman is no barrier to success"

"As a young girl I dreamed of becoming an engineer one day but growing up in a culture that put its value predominantly on male children to some it would have seemed a pipe dream. I was blessed to be surrounded with people that nurtured my passion and encouraged my dream and today that dream is my reality"

Sally Walters Sara Collado

"By being here I feel I have already won. It has been a great full of wonderful women. It has been great for listening and learning. Thank you so much”

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"Our Construction and Engineering industry is being increasingly disrupted from outside and from within. We have a choice to wait to be disrupted or we can embrace this digital transformation or skills, tools and behaviours and adopt better, digital ways of working for better customer outcomes."

Ann Woulfe

Ipek Kaymak

"The awards have been a great opportunity to meet inspirational people, reflect on my career and consider next steps. I cannot wait to put this positive energy into my work and supporting others in achieving their true potential.”

"Don’t go with the flow. Be the flow.” — E LI F S HA FA K

Elena Golovenko

"Taking time to stop and reflect on what I have achieved through this nomination and judging process has been very empowering and has made me even more determined to make a difference to the construction industry." Louise Dawes

"Even outside my work I follow my passion for innovation"

"Have the ambition to lean in to your career and run the world. Because the world needs you to change it.” — SHERYL SANDBERG

Lucy Abbott

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Oishi Deb


finalists 2018

Best Woman

in Digital Innovation

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Construction Planner

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"A woman can achieve anything if she makes the most of all the opportunities she can take, or make" Aarti Didi

"It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.”

"I am proud to have been nominated and to have reached the final of the WICE Awards. The preparation for the judging day has provided a rare opportunity for me to reflect on my achievements to date”

— LE O N A R D O DA VI N CI

Emma Geater

"I thoroughly enjoyed the judging day and the opportunity to spend time with so many knowledgeable, passionate and welcoming individuals. Everyone I spoke to was already a winner in their own right and I know we will all go on to achieve a great deal in our careers."

Helene Lubineau

Nicola Ashworth

" Let´s work towards a day when we do not need an award just for women. That way, the construction industry can become more inclusive and diverse, and be recognized for all the positive opportunities it offers"

Pippa Ahlers

"I look forward to using my experience to promote the opportunities available for women in engineering” Teresa Berroa

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

in Construction Law

" I was thrilled to find out I was a finalist, but the real joy was meeting and speaking to so many passionate and inspiring people at the judging day. I am proud to work in an industry with so many bright, ambitious and genuinely lovely women" Catherine Piercy Carole Ditty "Business thrives when diversity thrives – Different voices and viewpoints help us to do business better together. My hope is to work hard to show young girls of the future that business does better with hard working, ambitious men AND women.”

"I feel really privileged to have been a finalist in this year’s WICE Awards. The wealth of female talent in our industry is both inspiring and encouraging” Hazel Smyth

" Happiness does not come from doing easy work but from the afterglow of satisfaction that comes after the achievement of a difficult task that demanded our best.”

" I put all I am into the smallest things I do” — FE R N A N D O PE S S OA

— T.I.RUBIN

Joanna Niedzielska

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Marina Margarida Alves Sobreira


"A key component in how I assess my continued personal career success is by the positive career influence I can provide to my fellow team members; supporting them in their personal career ambitions."

"The WICE awards are a credit to the industry in recognising and celebrating talent. It is a privilege and honour to be a finalist among such talented women.” Anna Simic

Chie Shimizu

"It is fantastic to see so many women being recognised for their contributions to the industry, and to see so many role models within engineering and construction, regardless of their gender.” Hannah Farrant Esther Halahan

"Never limit yourself because of others' limited imagination; never limit others because of your own limited imagination.”

"Today truly demonstrates how, “Courage calls to courage everywhere” — M I LLI CE N T FAWCE T T, S U F F R AGI ST

— MA E J EMISON

Marie Ayliffe

finalists 2018

Best Woman

in Tunnelling & Underground Construction

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finalists 2018

Best Young Woman

Architect

"We spend 87% of our lives inside buildings. How they are designed really affect how we feel, how we behave. Design is not just a visual thing. It’s a thought process. It’s a skill. Ultimately, design is a tool to enhance our humanity. It’s a frame for life” — IL SE C RAW FORD

"I hope to inspire others like myself to pursue a career in architecture and the construction industry" Alice Halligan

Nathalie Baxter

"Now is our time to be the leaders through changes in the industry. Encouraging young people to pursue a career in the construction industry and mentoring young talent is key to building the future of the industry.” Claire McAteer

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Carlotta Jansen

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"I was thrilled to hear the news that I had been shortlisted for 'Best Young Architect' as the WICE awards recognise that there is still work to be done throughout the industry to build a fair, balanced and fully inclusive working environment.”


"We spend 87% of our lives inside buildings. How they are designed really affect how we feel, how we behave. Design is not just a visual thing. It’s a thought process. It’s a skill. Ultimately, design is a tool to enhance our humanity. It’s a frame for life”

Amanda Baldwin

"The WICE awards are a key component of a drive to change equality for women and by championing the vital contributions women make to the industry. I very much enjoyed meeting the other women from such a variety of backgrounds and have rediscovered the value of my own self-worth through the process.”

— ILSE CRAWFORD

Ailín Lacey

"The WICE awards is amazing opportunity to highlight Women’s achievements in still very male dominated industry. I am proud and honoured to have been part of the awards and to have met some outstanding women.” Amelia Hawkins

"Success is something different to everyone and all of the women nominated are successful in their own right, being a finalist is a fantastic honour for us all, I am very proud to stand amongst all of these inspirational women.” Charlotte Handy

finalists 2018

Best Woman

Interior Designer

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finalists 2018

Best Woman

Facilities Manager

"I have a deep rooted belief that a Manager is only as good as those they work alongside”

Helen Lakey Tiffany Pantelli "I am truly honoured to have been part of this process and to have met so many inspiring, yet “down to earth” women who share a passion for the industry in which we work.” Karen Sleator

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"Construction and Facilities Management isn’t an industry just for men and the WICE awards are great at promoting this. I was fortunate enough have a nomination put forward and be shortlisted as a finalist”


Lucy Adshead

"If you are passionate about what you do, and you do it to the best of your ability then share it with others. The WICE awards are not only an opportunity to showcase your talents but also a chance to meet likeminded women in a supportive environment.”

Claire Harlow "The AEC sector is experiencing a digital revolution that is turning the whole industry upside down. Be prepared to deal with tonnes of data if you wish to survive the change.”

"I have met so many powerful and inspiring women through this process. The eye opener for me was when I realised I was one of them! We must all believe in ourselves and our abilities to succeed because we can!” Marina Villanueva Diaz

finalists 2018

Best Woman

Architectural Technologist

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"The 21st century is high time to stop differentiating between women and men working in the construction industry, but at the same time we cannot turn a blind eye to downright gender imparity. We have to constantly question and reflect on the status quo”

Susana Gozalo

"Enjoy every moment, work hard and be part of the change. The industry will become better with your input” Joanna Gieczewska

finalists 2018

Best Woman

Oil & Gas Engineer

Sophie Smith

"I believe that I have a responsibility as an experienced female property professional to promote women in the industry, I have done this throughout my career, both consciously and sub-consciously.” Sabrina Mackin 74

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"The success in attracting women to Construction and Engineering can only truly be measured over the long term by assessing the next generation’s career choices, through the hard work we are doing now. It requires the support of all of us to drive change collaboratively across the industry to ensure we attract and retain the very best talent”


finalists 2018

Best Woman

Rail Engineer

Sarah Cook

"I personally have experienced a wonderful career to date within an industry that is extremely diverse and which embraces change”

"I do believe our success is possible, when we are aware of our value and we make an effort as a team respecting each other in safe and effective way.” Renata Cichocka

finalists 2018

Best Woman

Building Surveyor THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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finalists 2018

Best Female

Mentor

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"I believe that being a mentor is about drawing together all the positive and negative experience that made you the successful person you are now, and all the people who helped you to believe in yourself, and channeling that into helping someone else do the same.”

Amelle Mestari

"I am very happy and honoured to have been nominated for the Best Female Mentor Award - I am so proud of my mentees and their achievements!” Corinne Ballarini

Ellen Halkon

"Collaborate To Survive”

Emma-Jane Houghton

" Preparing for the judging day I reflected on my achievements and on the individuals I have worked with and supported throughout my time with Wates and as a Mentor for the princess Trust and I feel I can truly say I have made a difference.”

Norma Odain-Hines

"I look forward to the near future when gender is not the prevalent topic and the focus is on individuals and their performance”

Leonor Victoria Pablos Fernandez

Rachel Bell

"I feel so lucky to have had the chance to be part of these awards! Events like this are such a wonderful opportunity to celebrate the achievements of women and highlight what a rewarding career the engineering and construction industries can provide.”

"Managing diversity as a key element to add value to an organization, is not only by developing and integrating gender or nationalities, but also trying to create a better culture of managing people.”

"It is increasingly understood that the role of women in the construction industry is absolutely vital to its future success. To be recognised for making a contribution towards that is a real honour.”

Sarah Penry

Samantha Hubbard

"Time is the most valuable thing you can give someone. By investing time to develop people, we are also investing and shaping our future”

"Receiving direct feedback from my mentees for the WICE nomination has been humbling and inspirational. Being part of WICE has convinced me even more that mentoring changes lives. It has become my way of life at work and is my way of making a difference to the world.”

Siu Mun Li

"I’ve enjoyed the experience of meeting so many inspiring fellow nominees and proud to be part of an industry that celebrates the successes of women in Construction and Engineering. I love mentoring and enjoy seeing my mentees mature and flourish in their careers.”

Sue Collins

Tamsin Wray-Williams

"Find a career you love, something you believe in, it will drive you to be the best that you can be, and remember the words of Mother Teresa “I alone cannot change the world, but I can cast a stone across the waters to create many ripples.””

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"I enjoy sharing knowledge and experiences with young engineers and empowering them to make a difference in the sector.” Darren Morris

"These awards have been a great experience for me. Mentoring is an essential part of a supportive culture where people can think and communicate more openly and creatively, and continue to push our industry forward.” Ed Cole

Jon Leach

"If I can help my mentees to be even just half as brilliant as the amazingly talented women I’ve met in this year’s WICE Awards, then I will be a proud mentor!”

"Working with people’s strengths helps to build their confidence and resilience, allowing them to shine against their peers. Seeing my mentees empowered to take on new challenges makes me very proud.” Marc Barone

"Reflecting upon my career and individuals whom I have witnessed their personal growth, has made me realise that the most important and certainly the most rewarding aspect of my role to date, is the development of those that I have had the pleasure to coach.”

"We have been working hard to implement and develop the best mentoring programme possible. To have our efforts recognised by WICE in these awards speaks volumes and makes me incredibly proud.”

"The mentoring, coaching and development of those who succeed us is our most important role as industry professionals. Without this the companies and organisations we represent will not succeed.”

"My role as mentor has been to signpost people to those incredible opportunities and to help to remove the barriers that limit people progressing.” Paul Bramwell

Paul Suthard

"One of my ambitions to see women succeed and be recognised and rewarded for their contribution to the construction and engineering industry” Philip Breese

Stephen Mogose

Richard Whitehead

Stuart Heaysman

"Seeing how much I had influenced my three testimonial contributors was a warming realisation that I had not previously appreciated - I thought I was just being ‘normal’ in my managerial style. Isn’t that how it should be anyway?”

"I am passionate about mentoring and nurturing promising talent from apprentice to senior management.” Vip Gandhi

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finalists 2018

Best Male

Mentor

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HELPING TO BUILD AND GROW

SUCCESSFUL GENERATIONS OF FUTURE BUSINESS LEADERS.

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The 2018 Winners The European Women In Construction & Engineering Awards once again attracted a very diverse group of nominees. This year nominations were received from all over Europe including Germany, Poland, Spain, Ireland, the UK and as far as Chile representing some of the leading and most innovative companies in construction and engineering today. After many hours reviewing nomination applications, and a full day of interviews, we are pleased to introduce you to the 2018 winners who are breaking down barriers and building new heights.

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2018 Best Woman Architect

Tania Love Director, FaulknerBrowns Architects

“I’m not good for a woman. I’m just good.”

M

y daughter (21) and son (17) were appalled at the notion of awards that recognise the achievements of women only. Their immediate response was, “are there MICE Awards too?” Proud of their contempt for something that on the face of it appeared discriminatory, I described to them the very real barriers that women face in a still predominantly male-dominated industry. In architecture, women now make up 49% of the intake to RIBA Part I courses; but only 26% of registered architects are women. So if the WICE Awards play a part in helping to retain women in the profession by promoting the achievements of female role models across the wider industry, then clearly they have a purpose. My kids got that, and are super-proud of my win! As am I. It’s a phenomenal accolade. A huge thankyou to all those who have educated, supported and mentored me along the way. Preparing for these awards took up many weekends and late nights. And soul-searching. But it was an enormously empowering process, and has introduced me to some inspirational figures along the way. It brought into sharp focus that no-one can “have it all” without making sacrifices and choices, men or women. We all have to juggle multiple responsibilities, and being ambitious in any pursuit, be it at home, in work, or at achieving other personal goals, should be seen as a positive quality in everyone. Women as well as men. I have been breaking down barriers and building new heights for 26 years in this industry. Often I have been the only woman in the room. It’s a privilege as an architect being able to affect change in the built environment, creating buildings and places for the diverse communities we live in.

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But our projects will be all the more rewarding, relevant and successful when the project teams more closely reflect the diversity of the communities we serve. Diversity (in the widest sense) in the industry is increasing, with team dynamics improving immeasurably as a result, but far too slowly. Moreover, businesses cannot afford to ignore the evidence that supports the economic benefits of gender equity and social diversity in the workplace. According to the most recent RIBA Business Benchmarking survey, the proportion of partners, directors and sole principals that are women is now 19%. If I can continue being a positive role model and mentor at work, in education, and in setting an example to my daughter and son too, then together with all other WICE Award finalists, maybe we can be part of a future (to quote Sheryl Sandberg – COO of Facebook) where there will be no female leaders. There will just be leaders.


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“I strongly believe that in order for us to design the Built Environment that we need a representative workforce for the environment we are designing for.” 86

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2018 Best Woman Consultant

Emma Fitzgerald Regional Director, AECOM

I

enjoyed the WICE nomination process as it gave me an opportunity to reflect on the journey I have come on since joining AECOM from the Ministry of Defence's Infrastructure Organisation a little over 6 years ago. I was already a Chartered Civil Engineer, but initially I felt that changing career after 10 years as a Civil Servant was a big leap, however I quickly settled into the business and enjoyed being part of a large firm, in a local regional office. Since then I have progressed quickly from Senior Project Manager to Regional Director and have enjoyed the challenges that working for one of the largest engineering consultancy companies brings. In fact it is testament to AECOM's working environment and support that they have 24 finalists for this year’s WICE awards. I am very honoured to have been nominated as Best Women Consultant and it feels very exciting to have won the category, especially against such exceptional women whom i have enjoyed networking with at the judging day and today's dinner. As my role within the company has changed, I have become more aware of the need to promote Women Engineers and to demonstrate that this is an awesome career choice. Where else can you engage with a client at the start of a project, to imagine what they want to achieve and them help them to deliver. Imagine it. Delivered.

winning awards and the feedback from Industry professionals is fantastic. I want to share the success of the Atrium Studio with other construction professionals across the sector so that similar schools could be built. We need to continue to promote this engaging industry to ensure that we obtain the best talent. I am looking forward to seeing an Atrium student being nominated for these awards in the future. I strongly believe that in order for us to design the Built Environment that we need a representative workforce for the environment we are designing for. I work in the Defence sector and the additional benefits I get from employing ex-military personnel as part of our design team, ensures that we speak the same language as our Client and they have confidence that we understand their requirements. The same goes for ensuring that we have a diverse workforce so that all Client's have confidence in us. To make that diverse workforce work for a company, inclusion is key; so that the team works together and harnesses the unique attributes that all members contribute with. Diversity also isn't just about the under-representation of Women in Engineering and I will use the opportunities that winning this award will give me to continue to promote a diverse workplace to young students and fellow business colleagues and peers.

Over the last 5 years I have had the privilege of being instrumental in the building of a new school in the southwest, the Atrium Studio, which is especially for students who want to follow a career in the Built Environment. As a voluntary member of the Industry Steering Group and then later as a Governor, occasional lecturer and Mentor, I have hugely enjoyed seeing the students develop and grow within a school that is passionate about their future. All areas of the school are aimed at improving the student’s knowledge of the sector; from Project Based Learning to Universal Beam sizes painted onto the exposed steelwork - from numerous integrated work experience placements to a state of the art BIM design studio. The school and the students are already

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2018 Best Woman Contractor

Monika Slowikowska Managing Director, Golden Houses Developments Ltd

“I am dedicated to perfection, and committed to solving problems and bringing out the best in my team.”

M

y achievements have been acknowledged with the Best Woman Contractor prize at the European Women In Construction & Engineering Awards, and this is a humbling, but very proud moment for me. I believe that better people make better businesses, and I combined this approach with my construction experience to start a successful company. I hope that this award means I can continue creating fantastic developments while mentoring other women in the field and helping them believe in their capabilities. Women bring a lot to construction. I am dedicated to perfection, and committed to solving problems and bringing out the best in my team. Balancing “soft” and “hard” skills, I develop and enhance the talent around me, while meticulously monitoring the progress of projects and fostering innovation by using neuroscience, emotional dexterity and Artificial Intelligence to improve processes and efficiency. I came to the UK from Poland, speaking no English and with a big dream. Drawing on my background in building and engineering, in 2012 I established Golden Houses Developments, a company with a set of values that include being respectful, developing strong relationships, and being fair and thorough with clients, the public and all members of our supply chains. Golden Houses Developments presents a new attitude in construction, one where conflict is resolved smoothly and the team’s energy is channelled into delivering superb work on time and on budget. I believe in inspiring my team to uphold the highest standards in everything that they do.

I also believe that full compliance with health and safety regulations is of the utmost importance, for the work, and to safeguard the well-being of all involved. I see my employees as valuable human beings who need a supportive environment and quality tools to complete tasks to the best of their ability, and I have developed a system to ensure employees are safe, satisfied and happy. I was elated to be nominated for this award, and winning is tangible recognition that Golden Houses Developments is a vital part of the industry's future. It is a victory for all women, and demonstrates the difference we can make, even though we only make up around 10 per cent of construction workers, and are paid around 10 per cent less than men for the same job. This win is recognition that the right culture and ethos, with skills in design and construction, is a potent and competitive combination.

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“I plan to use my win to continue to champion the role female engineers play in shaping the buildings and environment of the future.” 90

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2018 Best Woman Electrical & Mechanical Engineer

Marian Ferguson Partner, Energylab Consulting Ltd

T

o be a winner in the European Women in Construction and Engineering Awards is fantastic as the competition was so strong. I felt I had something to share and I am very proud that the judges recognised this. It is an honour to receive the recognition of Best Woman Electrical & Mechanical Engineer from my peers. There were many excellent candidates in my category from the UK and across Europe and we were all winners to get to the finals. It was encouraging to see so many women now involved in the building services engineering profession. When I began my career, role models were in short supply. The WICE awards were a perfect way to share my experience, allowing others to see what is possible. I have worked in the construction industry for nearly 35 years, coming from a young engineering graduate to now owning and running my own successful engineering design practice. Engineering consultancies owned and led by women are rare in the construction industry and I wanted others to see what is possible so they think ‘I can do this too!’

currently involved in with our professional institution, CIBSE, as part of their mentoring programme to help young engineers further their professional development and gain chartership. I have therefore found the whole awards experience incredibly rewarding and an extremely useful forum for helping make these changes. Meeting the fellow finalists on the judging day lallowed me to connect with like-minded people as well as inspiring me to go further as a positive role model. The WICE Forum also took place on judging day and was a great opportunity to network with other women in the industry. I reinforced some previous contacts and made some new friends too. While it is hard work to get to the final stages, I would definitely recommend others look at being involved in the awards next year. Many organisations have women that deserve recognition for the hard work they do and the contribution they make to the industry. Additionally, it is not just a process for large companies. There were many finalists from smaller companies, including my own, Energylab. I was the only participant from my company and I won!

I have been using this success to reach out to others and show what is achievable in our profession. I plan to use my win to continue to champion the role female engineers play in shaping the buildings and environment of the future. Diversity and balance are essential for a successful team and the construction industry is addressing this, but there is still much to do. Changing perceptions of women in engineering and construction is essential if we are to tackle the skills shortage in our industry and the lack of diversity within organisations. I will use this win as a further platform to raise the profile of women in our industry and encourage more young women to not only choose engineering as a career but to be proactive in their career development. It will underpin the work I am

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“With my two young girls at home, I hope I provide a positive and inspiring role model for women in this industry, who like me, are juggling the demands of family and professional life.”

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2018 Best Woman in Environment & Sustainability

Sarah Lewis Associate Architect, Hamson Barron Smith

I

was delighted to find out I was a finalist in the Environment and Sustainability category of these awards. Having just given birth to my second daughter in January, I was at home with my young girls when I heard the news. The first thing I did on hearing the news was to read about the other finalists across the various categories and I was immediately profoundly proud to be amongst these women. My next thought was, logistics, being on maternity leave at the moment I am home with my four month old and two year old. I am lucky to have a very supportive husband who instantly offered his services to cover any childcare to allow me to attend the presentation day and award night. I feel immensely proud to have been nominated by Hamson Barron Smith for this award, never mind to have made it to the list of finalists and to have gone on to win my category is quite overwhelming. Winning this award will provide a platform from which I hope to be even more effective in bringing about meaningful change within the construction industry. I relish the opportunity that this accolade will provide for me to further support and promote the many talented women within our industry. With my two young girls at home, I hope I provide a positive and inspiring role model for women in this industry, who like me, are juggling the demands of family and professional life. I intend to continue to advance both the standing of women in construction and to promote sustainable and environmentally ambitious agendas. I look forward to acting as an ambassador for this award, helping to continue to raise its profile for WICE and the aims of this amazing organisation.

being part of these awards has been a very fun activity to work around my family life at home with my girls. I hope that them seeing me both as a mother and a successful architect will inspire them to feel empowered to pursue their interests and be engaged members of society throughout all their life stages. These awards are an amazing opportunity for companies to celebrate the women within their organisations and I would strongly recommend Hamson Barron Smith to nominate again next year. I like to think that by the time my two daughters are starting their own professional lives we will live in society where there is no gender pay gap and the concept of the glass ceiling has been well and truly broken, but in the meantime I strongly believe in the importance of celebrating the inspiring women within our industry and see these awards as an essential part of this agenda. I feel it is incredibly important that companies recognise all of the talented people within their organisations and these awards are a wonderful way to celebrate the successes of the women driving forward the construction and engineering industries.

Taking part in these awards has been exhilarating, I wrote my second book when I was on maternity leave with my first daughter, this time around I promised I would take it easier, but

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2018 Best Woman in Health & Safety

Karen Godfrey Senior SHE Adviser, Morgan Sindall Construction and Infrastructure

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ow – where do I start?! I was so excited to know whether or not I’d made it to the shortlist for the Best Woman in Health and Safety Award for Women in Construction and Engineering 2018 – I stayed up until midnight to find out! I then received several messages from my boss who was also too excited to sleep! The more I prepared for the judging day and the more advice I sought from previous winners in Morgan Sindall about their experiences of the process, the more excited and nervous I became. The judging day was probably one of the most nerveracking yet enjoyable and empowering experiences of my career so far! To be in a room with so many other likeminded women was really amazing and the speakers who engaged us during the forum made the day even more memorable. I aim to be one of the key speakers at such an exciting and inspiring event in the future where I can share my positive experiences and help support other females looking to take the next step in their career. I am so proud to have won Best Woman in Health and Safety. This is a real opportunity for me to use the WICE platform and the prestige of the award to help drive the agenda for women in construction in the North to the same success as we see in London and the South. I will continue to encourage the next generation into the construction industry through my role as STEM Ambassador and use my WICE success to target fellow females who may not have even considered a career in the one of the most challenging yet enjoyable industries out there. I will secure a SHE Apprentice within the Construction

North business in the next 12 months which will be a great starting point for the further development of my profession. Whether a winner of your category or a finalist, the whole process allows you to reflect on your career and to recognise your achievements and successes while measuring how far you’ve come. The WICE awards process has helped me to realise how much of a role model I can be to others in the industry, particularly women and be proud of the health and safety professional I have become. I’m not the first woman from Morgan Sindall to win a WICE Award and I’m sure I won’t be the last. Simply nominating employees for such a reputable award is a huge thank you to them for the hard work and commitment that they show to the company and the industry. What better way to support the development of your employees than facilitating national and European recognition for a job well done! What would I say to those companies who are still thinking of nominating in 2019…..what are you waiting for?!

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2018 Best Woman in Highways

Louise McCann General Manager, KierWSP

“I plan to use my WICE award to draw attention at STEM and other events to showcase the fabulous work undertaken by female engineers.�

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he day that the finalists were announced was a busy one for me but when I saw the email title in my inbox I had to stop and take a deep breath before I opened it. I was nervous and excited and really hoping that I had got through. When I read the good news I wanted to punch the air however I was controlled although I was much more exuberant that night at home! I took a screen shot of the finalist page on the website and was delighted to share with my nominator, managers and the colleagues who had supported me. It was a brilliant feeling and I floated through the rest of the day. I am very proud to work in the highways sector so it is wonderful and very humbling to have won in this category. The other finalists are beacons in our arena and I really did not expect to achieve this award against such stiff competition. The whole experience of participating in the WICE awards has been enjoyable throughout. The hard work and preparation ahead of judging day is important if somewhat nerve-wracking. On the judging day itself I thought that the seminars were well-planned and the speakers were very thought provoking and interesting. Meeting the other inspirational finalists from across Europe was great fun and their achievements often left me in awe.

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I plan to use my WICE award to draw attention at STEM and other events to showcase the fabulous work undertaken by female engineers. I have also already signed up to be a mentor to others. I would definitely recommend entering the WICE awards to others in my company and beyond as it has been an exciting learning experience for me and a unique opportunity to see the breadth of construction and engineering. This event is an important part of celebrating the strength and diversity of our industry so I hope there will even more nominees in 2019 who can benefit.


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2018 Best Woman Project Manager & Most Distinguished Winner of 2018

Tolani Azeez General Manager Sub-Saharan Africa, Fluor

“What matters to professionals, clients, managers, trainees and team members is that the person is capable of delivering the work.”

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have worked really hard for the last 20 years as part of some exemplary project management teams, who deliver international oil and gas projects all over the world. For 20 years I have spent most of my days in meetings with men, living in construction camps (often in the desert) and managing predominantly male teams. All good, but hard work. Hearing about WICE was a welcome surprise. It was also a credible acknowledgement of the capabilities of women to work and succeed within the construction and engineering industry. It was even more of a surprise to see 180 friendly capable professional women in the same room on the Judging Day. Finalists who also fully appreciated receiving a goodie bag full of luxury toiletries. Nevertheless, the evidence is right here: we are putting aside our unconscious bias and it doesn’t matter whether a construction manager is male or female. What matters to professionals, clients, managers, trainees and team members is that the person is capable of delivering the work. That has nothing to do with gender.

initiatives such as WICE, the faster we will lower the barriers to entry, change the demographics and diversify the talent within the industry. And that can only be of benefit to everyone in the industry, to everyone who depends on the engineering and construction industry and for everyone who has participated in WICE this year.

The more we can encourage our industry and the companies that we work with to accept this concept and to support

Thank you for allowing me an opportunity to participate in and to support WICE.

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2018 Best Woman Quantity Surveyor

Bryony Martin Director, AECOM

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n hearing that I had been successful in reaching the finals of this year’s women in construction and engineering awards I immediately contacted my colleagues and family to share the good news. I have such fantastic support in everything I do; from early on in my career my managers have given me increasing responsibility and opportunities which have allowed me to demonstrate my capability, develop myself, and positively impact the business I work for, as well as the wider construction industry. My family has been a constant support through all of my studies and career so far – needless to say, they were thrilled for me! To have won the Best Woman Quantity Surveyor award is a great honour and privilege; it is such recognition in a category of strong and talented women and from an organisation, WICE, which obviously works tirelessly to promote the good work of women in construction and engineering. It is rewarding to think that the esteemed judges have seen something in my story which impressed them and which they think is worthy of this recognition. The win is a great opportunity for me to raise my profile within my business and within the wider construction industry and to raise awareness of the successes of women working in the industry. It will also allow me to share my experience with more and more women and encourage them to talk about their own journey. In continuing my work with schools, I also want to be able to speak to those who have not yet started out in their careers, show them an example of what can be done and dispel some of the myths and misconceptions about the industry. This, I hope, will go some way to addressing the skills gap in the built environment sector. I have really enjoyed the awards process: it is not very often that I get to take a step back and consider my progression and all the aspects of my journey so far, from working on some of my favourite projects, to being chosen as a brand ambassador for my firm, to shaping others’ development

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through training and mentoring. The presentation for the judging day was also a great opportunity to explain in more detail to successful senior leaders of the industry about some of the challenges and highlights in my career so far as well as the reasoning behind the choices I have made and what drives me. I have been thrilled to receive such complimentary and heart-warming comments from my clients and colleagues as testimonials used in my application. Obtaining feedback about my contribution is a useful way to make sure I am having a positive impact on colleagues and adding value for the initiatives I am involved with. I would strongly advise AECOM to nominate women in the awards of 2019 and the years to come, as this is a great way to raise the company’s profile as well as to support a celebration of the achievements of theirs and other firms' female employees. For companies thinking of submitting entries next year, I would say that the support network for your nominees is so important to their having a positive experience of the awards process. Encouraging finalists to enjoy the experience and celebrate getting to the final of the competition is also significant – it is a fantastic achievement and something to celebrate, not only on a personal level, but also in the campaign for diversity.


“I have been thrilled to receive such complimentary and heart-warming comments from my clients and colleagues as testimonials used in my application.” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Best Woman Structural Engineer

Jackie Heath Project Director, Ramboll

“Winning this award means celebrating my work on existing structures and highlights the crucial contribution that structural engineers play in a diverse range of projects.�

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he whole WICE award process has been enlightening and rewarding. Just being nominated by a senior manager in Ramboll was encouraging and made me feel valued.

Hearing I had reached the final was amazing. I was surprised at how far and wide the news travelled among colleagues, friends, former colleagues and clients. Even my fourteen-year-old god-daughter, an aspiring architect, texted me! Everyone was so supportive. The judging day was interesting and provided a refreshing opportunity to network with other women construction professionals. It is unbelievable to have won this award and is an achievement of which I am really proud since it recognises all aspects of my career to date. I apply my skills and experience as a structural engineer to saving, conserving and enhancing historic buildings and infrastructure. Winning this award means celebrating my work on existing structures and highlights the crucial contribution that structural engineers play in a diverse range of projects.

This award will be a springboard, enabling me to inspire and motivate more women engineers, in particular those interested in adapting historic structures for a sustainable future. I will certainly be encouraging other women at Ramboll to enter next year. This competition is challenging, fun and career-affirming, and is unlike anything in which I have participated previously.

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2018 Best Young Woman Engineer

Liz Smith Project Engineer, Fluor

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ike a lot of Engineers, I am very much an introvert and don’t like to shout about my achievements. Having my company, Fluor, nominate me for this award was therefore a new experience, and a welcome one. One of the panel sessions at the WICE Awards judging day was about mentorship and sponsorship, and how we can utilise these roles to help us advance and grow. Being nominated for this award, getting through to the finals and eventually winning is a product of the support of both my mentors and sponsors, and for that I am extremely grateful. I have spent my 5 year career to date working within the nuclear industry, both in decommissioning and new build. This industry is unique in terms of presenting key political, technical and social issues that must be overcome to facilitate progress. It is also unique in having some of the greatest levels of gender imbalance of any of the sectors that make up the industry, something that I have been keenly aware of and fighting to improve since starting work. Winning the “best young woman engineer” category is something I am incredibly proud to have achieved. I will commit to fighting my introverted nature and use this award as a platform on which to encourage women within my organisation and society into the nuclear industry. Within nuclear, diversity of thought and the innovation that this brings is essential to solving some of the unprecedented and ‘one of a kind’ challenges that exist. A more diverse workforce and the different perspectives and skills that this delivers will bring benefits, in order to drive industry objectives and goals and serve customers better. Promoting the achievements of women within this industry, through initiatives such as the WICE Awards, is therefore critical.

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Women within construction and engineering generally face a particular set of challenges, some of which make it a difficult industry to remain committed to. However, the rewards that this industry enable in terms of providing opportunities to contribute to society and protect and enhance the environment make these challenges worth facing head on. An award like this only serves to validate and celebrate the value of my contribution to the industry to date, and spur me on to keep working hard and using my voice. I would encourage all companies to nominate those they think deserve recognition for their contribution - even a nomination that doesn’t result in progression through to the finals is a vote of thanks and confidence that serves to advance the WICE vision. Without celebrating women in the industry, and making a big deal about those who stand out as industry leaders, the gender imbalance will remain, to the detriment of us all.


“A more diverse workforce and the different perspectives and skills that this delivers will bring benefits, in order to drive industry objectives and goals and serve customers better.” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Best Young Woman in Construction

Michaela Hall Construction Manager, Mace

“I want to be a positive example of what women can achieve and a role model for those just starting out in their careers in the industry.”

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hen I was told that I had been nominated for this award I was incredibly honoured but admittedly overwhelmed. I work with some amazing women which made it all the more gratifying that I had been deemed a suitable candidate by senior members of our business. There was a small part of me that kept thinking that all I do is go into work every day, to do a job that I love and give it my all, is that not what everyone does? It was not until I began writing down my achievements as part of the next stage of the process that I realised that I am actually a worthy recipient of this award as I have achieved some amazing things in my career so far. One of the first things I did when I heard I had been selected as a finalist was to tell my family and friends the good news. They have given me invaluable support throughout my career, especially my Dad, who stayed up until midnight to check the results and knew that I was finalist before I did! I also rushed into work to tell my line manager, and the person who saw something in me when I first started working with him, and has inspired me to develop my career and to never take no for an answer. For companies considering nominating women for this award in 2019 I would definitely recommend it. It has felt amazing to be told by my company that they think I am worthy of being the Best Young Woman in Construction; and for this

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sentiment to then be reciprocated by the esteemed panel judges and to win this award is truly remarkable, a real boost to both my confidence and my career. I have met some amazing women throughout this process and I am so grateful for the platform and exposure that it has given me. I want to be a positive example of what women can achieve and a role model for those just starting out in their careers in the industry. I want to encourage women that they do not need to change who they are to be successful in a male dominated industry – why can’t I have New Civil Engineer and Vogue side by side on my coffee table? I can have it all, winning this award has gone a long way to prove that to me, and it can for others too.


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2018 Best Woman Civil Engineer

Sara Collado Project Manager, Ferrovial Agroman

“I look forward to the day when we won’t need to be judged as women, but rather, as engineers.”

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felt so proud when I heard I had been shortlisted for the 2018 WICE Awards. I went running to share the news with my family. They were all very excited and my daughter was so happy just saying “you are going to win”. I was honoured to be in the company of great women who are all accomplished civil engineers in our sector, such talented women! It has been such a great experience coming to London and enjoying the company of wonderful and inspiring women that after a 14-hour flight from Santiago de Chile although exhausted I was very excited. The preparation for the judging day helped me personally to understand where I am now and where I want to be in future. I can’t believe I have won and just want to share this with my family who have been so patient, mainly with my daughter and my son; because I expect to be a role model to them, hoping they can see in my experiences how possible it is to work hard while being a devoted mother and wife. I also want to share this award with my managers who have always been gender blind towards my dedication and performance; and with my company Ferrovial Agroman Chile, who have supported me and given me this opportunity.

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Next year I plan to support other women within the company by nominating them to have this experience and opportunity as well. It’s an enriching experience and a great opportunity to meet different ways of living in the world of construction. I think that, in a way, it has changed my life in that I feel more willing than ever to be involved with women’s empowerment programs. I look forward to the day when we won’t need to be judged as women, but rather, as engineers.


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2018 Best Woman in Digital Innovation

Ipek Kaymak Senior Engineer, AECOM

“Tolerance and open-mindedness should be the norm and we should aim to improve ourselves and the world around us with every opportunity.”

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am so honoured to be nominated for the Best Woman in Digital Innovation category. I was delighted to find out I was a finalist and am so thankful to my managers and colleagues for recognising me with such a nomination. I believe that in a world of self-driving cars and speakers that can teach us how to cook lasagna, global water security shouldn’t be a dream. Female leaders shouldn’t be a dream. Tolerance and open-mindedness should be the norm and we should aim to improve ourselves and the world around us with every opportunity. We shouldn’t be shy to express ourselves for who we are and the stereotypes in place preventing us from reaching our goals should be eliminated. Being part of this event, I met countless driven women who feel the same as me and fight to make the world a fairer place. This was very inspiring and I was lucky to have had the chance to hear about some of the amazing achievements women in the field of construction and engineering have accomplished. I cannot express how thankful I am to have

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won this award and I hope that such events inspire young people to pursue their passions and not feel constrained to preconceived ideas. Being an engineer is such a rewarding career and knowing that my work contributes to the betterment of society is priceless.


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2018 Best Woman Construction Planner

Pippa Ahlers Lead Planner, Costain

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hen I heard I was shortlisted as a finalist I shared the news with my friends and family, followed closely by my colleagues and especially my line manager, Mark Paulding who has been very supportive of my career aspirations. I was overwhelmed to be selected but as the news sunk in I quickly got to work on preparing for the judging day and thinking about the opportunities that being a winner might bring. I am so proud to have received this award. Although it’s my name that was called out in the awards ceremony, I have been part of a diverse team over the past few years and it’s with their support I have been able to grow into my role and further my career. Having been through the entire process this year and come away as the winner it has given me an amazing opportunity to promote the effort and achievements of women, not just in the industry but within Costain as well. It was my mechanical engineer grandfather who inspired me to become an engineer. As a child, I remember watching the construction of a local bypass and being fascinated. I knew that I wanted to study civil engineering and work in the construction industry from a young age. I was lucky to have my grandfather as a role model, but that’s not so for everyone. Many young people need inspiration to choose a career and as a role model I am very keen to promote the construction industry and engineering in schools to help correct the misconceptions of younger generations. Winning this award and the connections I have made in the WICE network have created a great platform from which I can inspire future generations. Preparing for the judging day has allowed me to pause and reflect on the highlights of my career and look at all good

things I am doing which I do as second nature. Taking part in the awards has also allowed me to seek feedback from my managers, peers and clients, which has been a worthwhile experience in my personal development. Although quite daunting to start with, the judging day was very inspiring. It was an excellent opportunity to network with so many other female professionals, sharing experiences and advice, much of which I am looking forward to applying when I’m back at work. As the only Costain nominee this year, in 2019 I will be encouraging my colleagues to nominate other women in the company and I will be using my experience to support the nominees through to the judging day. Costain has done so much work in the past year with their gender networks to broaden equality, diversity and inclusion and it’s great that I can play a part in that change. I think it’s a terrific opportunity to show recognition to the other professionals I work with. The WICE awards are an excellent way of demonstrating to the younger generation what can be achieved by entering the engineering and construction industry.

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2018 Best Woman in Construction Law

Carole Ditty Director, Head of Legal, Bouygues UK

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was delighted to be shortlisted as one of the finalists for the Best Woman in Construction Law category of the WICE Awards. Indeed, being nominated for the awards was already a great achievement for me and a really encouraging vote of confidence in the work I am doing as part of Bouygues UK.

I would like to thank Oliver Campbell (Linkcity Deputy Development Director) for putting me forward for these awards and our Chairman, Fabienne Viala and Cathy Stewart (Cathy Stewart Associates) for their strong support for my nomination. I was extremely proud to be one of 14 finalists representing Bouygues UK, Linkcity and Bouygues Energies and Services at this year’s WICE Awards. The level of interest and involvement in the awards programme clearly demonstrates the importance placed within our companies of supporting and encouraging our strong female talent. Winning this award is amazing and a strong endorsement for the work that I have been doing within Bouygues UK and the sector more widely. Taking part in the awards programme was an excellent opportunity to reflect on the work that I do in my role as Legal Director and to focus my mind on how I can do more to support female colleagues to flourish in the construction and engineering industry. I am fortunate to hold a senior position within Bouygues UK and feel very much supported and encouraged in my role. I have seen my role develop significantly over the past few years and am very grateful to my Chairman and the Bouygues UK Board for the opportunities given to me to chair our Women’s Network (Welink UK), to act as Board sponsor for CSR and to get more involved in diversity and inclusion initiatives within our business. I have also gained a lot from my involvement in the Women in Property Student Awards Programme, where Bouygues UK is one of the national sponsors. With my position in Bouygues UK comes a responsibility and I feel a strong sense of duty to be a role model and ambassador for women both inside our companies and the industry more widely. I have benefitted greatly from the support and confidence of colleagues. I want to ensure that all women working in our business feel that same level of support and encouragement. Winning this award has made me even more determined to achieve that, especially for my female colleagues working on our construction sites. Taking part in the awards has been a very rewarding experience. It has been inspiring and encouraging to meet

so many talented and committed female colleagues who play such an active role in our great industry. The judging day was a fantastic opportunity to network with many amazing women and men who do so much to promote and contribute to our sector – they are all winners in my book. We heard from a number of excellent panel speakers on the judging day. The key messages to believe in yourself, to be yourself and to recognise that each finalist is a role model for our sector, will stay with me. I would certainly encourage Bouygues to continue its involvement in the WICE Awards programme. This is our second year of participation and the boost in confidence and recognition that it gives to each nominee is priceless. Gender diversity in our industry has long been an area of focus and never more so than today with the Gender Pay Gap Reporting requirements. Like many construction companies we have a lot of work to do to reduce the gender pay gap. There are not always quick fixes to address all the issues around encouraging women to join our sector and nurturing the pipeline of female talent in our businesses. However, awards programmes such as WICE is one very tangible way in which we can all demonstrate support and encouragement for female talent. So many female colleagues have told me how valued they have felt to be nominated for the WICE Awards and the incredible boost in confidence that it has given them. I would encourage all businesses in our sector to recognise that participating in the WICE Awards and other industry awards programmes can go a long way to help our female employees to feel valued and supported. This is an excellent way to show that businesses recognise and promote the wealth of female talent that they hold.

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2018 Best Woman In Tunnelling & Underground Construction

Esther Halahan Lead Tunnel Engineer, Transport for London

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felt very privileged and proud to have been nominated for best woman in tunnelling and underground construction; it is a big achievement to be recognised for the work that you do. My career in tunnelling started nearly 20 years ago and I have been fortunate to work with some very talented and experienced people. I have had many opportunities in my career, working on projects in the UK and abroad, and with roles working for a consultant, a contractor and a client. On being selected as a finalist, and then as the 2018 winner of the tunnelling and underground construction category, I thought of the many fantastic people who have been so fundamental to me being where I am today. There are a lot of people to say thank you to! The preparation for the event was a superb exercise in self reflection, something that put me outside my comfort zone in some ways, but in other ways was a wonderful journey of cementing in my mind how pleased I am to be in this industry. How do I convey who I am, why I ended up in this career, and what I have done to date in just 10 minutes? And then in just one minute?! The finalist day enabled a precious pause away from the day job to talk about shared experiences of being a woman in construction and what we can do to improve diversity issues we have all thought about and discussed but not had the space to develop thinking on such a grand scale. The panel discussions were insightful and covered a wide range of topics but one theme particularly resonated with me – the big variation in the work being carried out on increasing diversity among companies and sectors in construction. The discussion on gender equality is very prominent in TfL and I am lucky to be part of this. There has been a huge increase in

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the number of women in industry over the last 20 years, and although there is still a way to go, we should recognise all the efforts to date than have gone into making this change. It is so important in life to follow what you enjoy and, in engineering, I have found both the complex, technical challenges I relish and doing something that can better society. We must ensure the path to engineering is open, visible and available for more people to follow, and with fewer obstacles in the way. This is where we need to get to if our industry is not to miss out on the huge talent pool of the future. In winning this award, and with the increased exposure within TfL and the industry it will bring, I hope to inspire more women and girls to follow a similar path. I always look to show that being a woman in civil engineering can be the norm, not the exception, and to challenge expectations of what can be achieved and the roles women can have in the engineering sector.


“I always look to show that being a woman in civil engineering can be the norm, not the exception” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Best Young Woman Architect

Nathalie Baxter Architect, FaulknerBrowns Architects

“It is important to me that female practitioners are not publicised or identified as ‘Female Architects’ but as ‘Architects’ in their own right.”

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hen I heard the news I had been selected as a finalist in the “Best Young Woman Architect” category, I anxiously scrolled through the WICE website to see if my colleagues who were nominated for other categories were also shortlisted. To my delight, all four of us had made it! In a practice where the Partnership consists of ten males with no historic record of female representation in senior management positions, to have four female employees shortlisted was a highly significant achievement in itself. It is evidence that the practice takes gender equality seriously and fully supports their female employees by helping them progress and encouraging them reach their potential alongside their male equivalents. However, this is an industry wide issue as the architectural profession has a deficit of females at the top. Furthermore, the recent Women in Architecture survey published by the AJ, highlights women in senior positions are paid considerably less – all a little disheartening for an ambitious newly qualified Architect. The industry context I’ve inherited has rendered my success at the WICE awards all the more important. It represents a time of change in which women are coming to the forefront and a new generation of recently qualified Architects present a more balanced demographic, not only in terms of gender but ethnicity, sexuality and social background. I have shared the awards process with three female employees and this has significantly enriched the experience. In preparation for the judging day and whilst travelling to the awards, we have discussed the challenges, opportunities, frustrations and accomplishments we’ve encountered throughout our time in education and practice.

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We’ve debated topical issues such as mental health and wellbeing in the workplace, the gender pay gap, balancing maternity/paternity leave and even considered at one point whether a female only award was, in some way, an act of positive discrimination. Reviewing these themes from the perspective of four women at varying stages of their careers demonstrated that significant progress has been made in the industry in the last 20 years, providing more equal opportunities for all. Consequently, it is important to me that female practitioners are not publicised or identified as ‘Female Architects’ but as ‘Architects’ in their own right, and I hope my contributions to date will go some way towards changing that representation. I will use the award for “Best Young Woman Architect”, along with my role as chair of the Young Architectural Practitioners Forum (YAPF), as a platform from which to promote this important objective whilst working in mixed teams to produce great architecture!


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2018 Best Woman Interior Designer

Amanda Baldwin Senior Associate, Design Director Interiors, Gensler

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he WICE awards are more than just an awards programme for women in the construction industry; it represents a sea change towards the larger goal of becoming an equal society.

This year marks the centenary of the suffrage campaign securing the right to vote for the first women in the UK. Over the past 100 years we’ve come a long way, but there is still more to be done to drive equality for women in the construction industry. The WICE awards are a key component of that change and by championing the vital contributions women make to the industry, it provides a platform for the value of role models. These women encourage other women to unlock their full potential – regardless of their sector. Working in a maledominated industry is never easy, but women have unique characteristics that we should embrace. We’re critical thinkers who are empathetic, selfless and passionate, all stereotypically feminine and all the foundations of a great leader. With these characteristics anything is possible. Being made a finalist filled me with a sense of pride on a personal and professional level, signifying not just what I’ve achieved on my life journey but it also sends a message to others who are experiencing similar challenges. Coming from a less than privileged background, I have had to work hard to create the career I have today. I had to strive to get the qualifications I needed to be a designer, being the first woman in my family to get their O-levels, A-levels and a degree, as well as balancing my responsibilities as a mother. Although this is not unique to me or in fact to women they are still formidable challenges. The process of preparing for the judging day was both eyeopening and insightful. It is not often that you get a chance to look at yourself and your achievements. Frequently we

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can forget what we can offer; how much we mentor or take for granted our achievements and successes. The process allowed me to revisit my life and career almost as a voyeur looking in from the outside. It has certainly helped me to both see and celebrate what I have to offer. It also reminded me that as women, we often underestimate our capabilities and worth and it may be one of the things that hold us back in career progression. Maybe it’s time for us to be more confident about our achievements. The judging day was really engaging not least because of the diverse bunch of women I got to meet, but also how supportive all the attendees were towards one another. The energy was electric with a constant flow of lectures, interspersed with personal interviews. Including a very personal and emotional account from one of the female speakers who had left construction, to start her own business coaching women in the construction industry; after what was sadly a less than perfect experience. I am happy that the experience of women is improving, but long for the day were experiences like this and gender inequality are a thing of the past.


“As women, we often underestimate our capabilities and worth and it may be one of the things that hold us back in career progression.”

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2018 Best Woman Facilities Manager

Tiffany Pantelli General Manager, Bouygues Energies & Services

“Being selected as a winner has reiterated to me that Construction and Facilities Management isn’t an industry just for men, women do have an equal part to play.”

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eing nominated was great but finding out I was a finalist was even better. I immediately told everyone in the office and sent a thank you message to my director who put my nomination forward. I spent the next few days sharing the news with my family and friends. Some work days are challenging and it can take some time to wind down once you leave the office but on the day the finalists were announced all I can remember was it was a good day no matter what else had happened. I am a little embarrassed to admit that I had never heard of the WICE Awards before and after I’d come down from the excitement of finding out I was a finalist I started to do some research into previous winners. I was very impressed to find out that Bouygues had previous winners and I immediately contacted them to find out what lay ahead. To be a finalist amongst other successful women in such a diverse group I thought was rewarding enough but when they announced I was the winner in the Best Woman Facilities Manager category I cannot describe the feeling of joy, I was both proud of myself and the company that I am part of. I’ll be honest there was a split second when I questioned whether it really was my name they called out……..that could have been embarrassing! Being selected as a winner has reiterated to me that Construction and Facilities Management isn’t an industry just for men, women do have an equal part to play. I felt fortunate enough have been nominated and to be shortlisted as a finalist, and then honoured to be made a winner. I hope that this will show other women out there that there are great opportunities for us in Construction and Facilities Management. This award has prompted me to become more actively involved in supporting women within my industry and

I’ve already requested to be considered to join the Bouygues WeLink Committee. The aim of the committee is to raise young women’s awareness within Bouygues Construction. Taking part in the awards was a brilliant experience from start to finish. When taking the time to complete the nomination questionnaire it gave me time to reflect on my achievements within the industry. Many of us are probably guilty of taking for granted the accomplishments of what of we and our teams do on a day to day basis. The judging day was a great opportunity to meet like-minded women from all aspects of the industry and gave me the opportunity to think of the role and influence a woman has in the wider world. The nominations are a great opportunity for a company to recognise outstanding individuals. I would strongly recommend any company to submit nominations for 2019, at first it seemed like a daunting experience but seeing it through from start to finish it couldn’t have been anything but. Everyone was so friendly and supportive, the judging day was very relaxed and interesting. The whole experience will be a highlight in my career and winning will be something I will never forget.

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2018 Best Woman Architectural Technologist

Claire Harlow Senior Architectural Technologist, FaulknerBrowns Architects

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t 8.30am on the 29th March, I opened my email inbox to find an email from the organisers announcing the finalists of the WICE awards. I couldn’t open it quickly enough! As I scrolled down the page I instantly saw my colleagues Hilary I’Anson and Tania Love who had been nominated for Best Woman Architect and Nathalie Baxter, for Best Woman Young Architect. Soon enough, I was half way through the list and my category still hadn’t appeared. I began to think that I hadn’t made it, but all of a sudden – there I was! My photograph was staring back at me! I had to blink a few times to make sure that it really was me, then the feeling of elation set in. Not being able to contain my excitement I ran to the other side of the office towards Jackie Gardner, the woman who had supported me along the process and who had encouraged me to believe in myself – to tell her that I was a finalist! She couldn’t contain her excitement either as we have each other a great big hug! From then on, I couldn’t stop smiling for the rest of the day. I was thrilled! Winning the award for Best Woman Architectural Technologist is fantastic, I can hardly believe it! To receive such recognition for my hard work over the years and against some tough competition is the best feeling. The award really has given me the confidence and motivation to persevere no matter what challenge is thrown at me in the future – I am sure there will be many! All I need to do is remind myself what I have accomplished throughout this process. Having worked in a male dominated industry for nearly 10 years now, I’ve had to overcome 1 or 2 challenges. As such, I believe that I can particularly relate to younger women

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starting out who may be experiencing the same issues. I will continue to support, encourage and inspire the young architectural technologists both male and female within my workplace via a mentoring scheme that I am currently involved in. I will also continue to promote women in the construction industry through school career days and other such events. I am going to use this award to demonstrate to those already in / thinking about a career in construction, that they can succeed no matter what, just as I have. The WICE awards process has been fantastic. It has also been immensely rewarding to hear how my colleagues and clients regard my work. Some of the comments I received as part of the initial application were so kind and very flattering. It felt good to know that I had already made such a positive impact on the industry, both personally and professionally. At judging day, I met so many powerful women who have inspired me beyond words to achieve bigger and better. I have learnt that there are so many opportunities in the world that are there to be taken! The process has given me that boost of confidence I needed to believe in myself and my abilities. It has made me realise that I’m not half bad after all! I believe that any company that has a talented woman in their team, should nominate them for a WICE award. As a minority, our efforts should be recognised which in turn, should raise awareness and challenge the preconceptions of women within the construction and engineering industries. My advice for any company considering submitting a nomination in the future is – just do it! It is a truly fantastic experience for all involved. I for one am privileged to have been a part of it.


“The award really has given me the confidence and motivation to persevere no matter what challenge is thrown at me in the future – I am sure there will be many!” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Best Woman Rail Engineer

Susana Gozalo Director of Operations, Jacobs

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hen I found out I had been selected as a finalist for the WICE awards I was overjoyed to make it this far. I was having breakfast with my mum and dad and my mum told me: “what so now you have won?” “No mum” - I explained – “This is where the hard work starts. Now there is the judging day where I will have to present to three industry judges, and do a one-minute elevator speech about why I should win the award”. “Don’t worry” – my mum said – “Work hard and you will win”. This is testament to my mum, who had it harder than me, but who opened a wider world of opportunities for me making me believe anything was possible. With a simple sentence my mum showed me the path to winning. In the meantime, I was already busy thinking about all the things I needed to prepare and how I was going to fit them around my day job. Thankfully my husband, David, who knows me better than anyone, brought me back to reality and told me to enjoy and savour the moment. So I was able to say – I am proud to be a finalist!! I cannot begin to explain what it means to have won the Best Woman Rail Engineer Award. I am elated. Going into the rail industry is something I had not planned at all, until one day the wold of rail hooked me and now there is no escape. We contribute to the economy and to the daily lives of so many people with the work we do every day. The rail industry is slowly ‘opening up’ and becoming more diverse and inclusive for women; although sometimes I can feel a bit lonely following the road less travelled, but this is where I want to be and where I feel like work is not work – it is something that I love doing. I am delighted that all the hard work, perseverance and doing what I do with passion has been rewarded with this accolade. I am really honoured and humbled to have been chosen by the industry’s experts and by my peers among such an incredible pool of female rail engineering talent. I won’s lie, fitting this in around my day job as the Design Senior Project Manager on the HS2 Main Works Civils project has been tremendously challenging, but I was motivated

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to take part and engage in this WICE experience. It has allowed me time to reflect on my professional life; what I have achieved, how much effort I have put into it and how outsiders can change the industry from the inside. This award gives me a wider opportunity to continue promoting women in construction and engineering and particularly in the rail industry. Not only because it fosters innovation, or because it makes economic sense but because it is the right thing to do. In the wake of the publication of the Government’s Gender Pay Gap Requirements, these awards provide us with the platform to voice that the industry should be open to the wider pool of talent because it is the right thing to do. I will absolutely continue to promote the WICE awards within my company and continue to work with and mentor the next generation of women in the rail industry; celebrating their achievements and rewarding their talents. Companies should promote the talent of the women they have working in their companies, mentor them and guide them through the process of the WICE awards. This will be a fantastic opportunity to showcase all the values of the company. I am grateful to my mentors, peers and industry sponsors who have, with their references, coaching and support allowed me to get here. This is an award and a moment that I will cherish for the rest of my life.


“Work is not work – it is something that I love doing”

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2018 Best Woman Oil & Gas Engineer

Sarah Cook Executive Project Director, Fluor

“To see so many highly talented females be recognised for their efforts in succeeding as a minority was extremely motivating and it encouraged me to embrace the recognition.�

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ever wanting to draw attention to myself I was somewhat apprehensive about being nominated for an award which in essence was for doing my job. With emotions ranging from being proud to being embarrassed I reviewed the plethora of candidates and considered that they too must be experiencing the same feelings. But to see so many highly talented females be recognised for their efforts in succeeding as a minority was extremely motivating and it encouraged me to embrace the recognition. I was further impressed by the interactions during the Judging day where I met some of the most unassuming individuals that have faced challenges head on and become stronger and more successful as a result. It was also encouraging to meet so many young females who are expanding the potential for the future in order to pave the way for others to follow.

I personally have experienced a wonderful career to date within an industry that is extremely diverse and which embraces change, and I hope through this award I can inspire others to take the leap of faith and join a fantastic industry.

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2018 Best Woman Building Surveyor

Sophie Smith Building Surveyor, Atkins

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eing nominated for the WICE Best Woman Building Surveyor Award, is alone an incredible honour, especially amongst such strong and inspiring women. Finding out I had been selected as a finalist was simply incredible and it was lovely walking into the office to a team of smiling faces and congratulations. It felt like many years of hard work and passion had come together, and to be honest, I haven’t stopped smiling since. To win this award is a dream come true and this means everything to me! I am very proud to have been recognised in such a prestigious way by leaders in the industry as an ambassador for women and my profession. I never could have even dreamt of this honour when I first entered the industry as an 18-year-old apprentice, feeling like I didn’t quite fit in. I am a proud and dedicated Building Surveyor and want to pave the way for many others to enjoy a rich, creative and rewarding career. I’ve always had an instinctive ability to find ways of creating positive energy to help break down any barriers ahead of me and I believe that it’s imperative that women in construction take the lead to bring in new solutions to problems which might prevent more women joining the profession. That’s why I investigated developing more female friendly PPE. It’s not something we can do on our own, but there are some great professionals in the industry we can collaborate with to help make things happen, should the need be there. I will continue to work hard for change and encourage others to join me, leading the way for women by getting the message out there. We must all support inclusivity in our industry by making our workplace an environment where everyone can ‘fit in’ and challenge those who do not. I will strive to open the debate through various avenues to provide opportunities to educate and discuss in honesty, the challenges faced by women in construction and engineering. We can make a significant impact when we work together, to speak directly to those who will influence young people’s decisions. For me, taking part in the WICE awards has opened the doors to a wide network of ambassadors and role models. Let us be strong and accessible, to engage young people in their

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career choices and get the very best talent into our industry. Nothing worth having comes easy and preparing for the judging day was no small feat, but the whole experience has challenged me and pushed me out of my comfort zone, which in turn has led to big reward. I have gained confidence, met new people and I have felt at home amongst a rich assortment of professionals in the industry with a joint vision of a bright future. I am privileged to work for Atkins and have enjoyed this tremendous finalist experience with three other colleagues from different disciplines in the business. I would absolutely recommend my company and others to nominate colleagues in next year’s awards, as it is an excellent opportunity to help shape the future of the industry, develop someone’s career and others around them. I believe all of the finalists and their companies, will benefit from the longstanding platform this opportunity provides. I feel uplifted to be working in our innovative, captivating and prominent industry and together we are an unbeatable force. The success in attracting diversity women to Construction and Engineering can only truly be measured over the long term by assessing the next generation’s career choices, through the hard work we are doing now, so let’s be positive and curious. It requires the support of all of us to drive change collaboratively across the industry to ensure we attract and retain the very best talent.


“We must all support inclusivity in our industry by making our workplace an environment where everyone can ‘fit in’ and challenge those who do not.” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2018 Best Female Mentor

Sarah Penry Principal, Ramboll

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am delighted to receive this award. Mentoring, I believe, is about building confidence in others so that they can realise their full potential.

As a senior consultant for over 20 years advising clients on complex environmental issues I have been faced with many difficult situations. This has given me the experience to help my colleagues deal with similar challenges, not by just telling them what to do but by talking it through and helping them to figure it out for themselves. Reading the testimonials from mentees when Ramboll nominated me for the WICE award showed me further how individuals feel that they have benefited from my mentoring. Increased confidence, achieving promotions at work and greater skills at handling difficult conversations were common themes in the testimonials. This has inspired me. The judging day for the selection of the Best Female Mentor dealt with the main issues facing mentors of not only how to build confidence but also resilience and initiative in mentees. No one is going to perform well if they do not feel confident. Resilience too is required as those we are dealing with are not always going to behave as we would hope. There will always be set backs to confront. The discussion on resilience reminded me of a meeting that happened quite early on in my career. I was the only female, 20-30 years younger than everyone else, and my role was to represent the client on environmental matters. Part way through the meeting, when I was asking for more work to be done and outlining deficiencies (probably not very tactfully), someone turned to me in front of the whole group and asked quite aggressively “are you qualified to be advising on this?”. Thinking on my feet I replied “it doesn’t matter whether I’m qualified, the fact is the client is relying on my advice”. I left the meeting trying not to show I was shaking and feeling ashamed at my retort, but it did help build my resilience.

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The mentoring role play for the final part of the judging day demonstrated aptly that being a mentor is no easy task. It requires experience, patience, someone able to listen rather than judge. Olga, a professional coach, played a member of staff who turned out to have quite a lot of issues. We each picked a note out of a hat, handed it to her, she read the situation and off we went – 3 minutes of live mentoring in front of the group. Olga raised issues such as: “I never speak at management meetings, everyone else is so confident” and “I want to be promoted but my line manager doesn’t seem to notice me”. The questions were serious but there was support in the room as we each in turn tried to make headway with our troubled mentee. We waded in there with our questions back – “why do you think that happens?”, “what steps could you take?” - but Olga was very good at deflecting with “I don’t know”, a common answer in real life. I encouraged her to believe in the possibility that she could feel good in management meetings and not overwhelmed. For me this award reinforces my desire to grow my mentoring role at work, to help people grow personally and professionally and to change lives. Thank you WICE.


“It doesn’t matter whether I’m qualified, the fact is the client is relying on my advice.” THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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“I am especially keen to promote mentoring as a powerful tool to support diversity and equality, helping individuals to achieve their full potential irrespective of gender or ethnicity.” 134

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2018 Best Male Mentor

Ed Cole Director of Operations, Jacobs

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he first thing I did upon hearing I had been selected as a finalist was to thank my own mentor at Jacobs who had nominated me, and my mentees who had supported my submission. My passion for mentoring stems from having had some fabulous mentors myself, and from being amazed by the skills and enthusiasm of my own mentees so, for me, being a finalist was as much a credit to them as it was to me. I am absolutely thrilled to have won. I believe that helping others succeed in their work and careers is a key measure of success for us all, so to have won as Best Male Mentor means a huge amount to me. I plan to use my win to promote the benefits of mentoring more widely, and encourage more people to become mentors or mentees. I am especially keen to promote mentoring as a powerful tool to support diversity and equality, helping individuals to achieve their full potential irrespective of gender or ethnicity. Taking part in the awards has been a fabulous experience from start to finish. The organisers have done a brilliant job, and I’ve been so impressed by the high quality of all the outstanding candidates I have met. It felt somewhat odd to be one of only around a dozen men out of 200 finalists, but it reminded me that those are the kind of ratios (in reverse) that many women experience in engineering every day. That has reinforced for me the opportunity that exists to use mentoring to even out the gender disparity that persists in engineering, especially at more senior levels of the profession.

I would absolutely encourage Jacobs and any other companies to nominate women for the 2019 awards. It is a fantastic way of recognising and rewarding talent. It also helps to send a clear signal out to the wider industry about the attitudes and cultures within that business. Many others will feel, as I do, that they want to work for a progressive, and dynamic company that values their employees for the skills they have and the contributions they can make, no matter who they are. Jacobs, and the other companies who have entered candidates for these awards, have sent out a clear signal about their culture and aspirations around diversity and equality – that’s a powerful tool for staff recruitment and retention, and bodes well for the future of our industry!

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2018 Lifetime Achievement in Construction

Sue Kershaw MD, KPMG

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started my career with Taylor Woodrow on Heysham Power Station, then the biggest construction site in Europe. This was initially daunting, as the site agent was an ex-military policeman who said, on my first day ‘I don’t like women and I like women engineers even less’. Luckily, most of the other staff members and operatives were normal, helpful and accommodating! I became chartered in 3 years and worked for Whitby Bird in London, designing intricate structures, before moving to Bangkok with Hyder working on elevated expressways. This was a wonderful experience, as my contract allowed me to explore SE Asia whilst I was there, and I managed to spend some significant time in Malaysia, Singapore, Penang and Japan. I returned to the UK and I worked on Canary Wharf Jubilee Line Station, from the initial design through to the commissioning in time for the Millennium. This was a really tough deadline, only achieved by grindingly hard work and extreme patience in dealing both with the Contractor and the commissioning authorities. After this, I worked for the London Development Agency at the Royal Docks. This was difficult but rewarding to be able to help people realise they needed to take ownership of their projects, budgets and programmes. I then joined the Strategic Rail Authority (SRA) as Assistant Director of London Rail Projects. This entailed working across all of the stakeholder organisations eg Transport for London (TfL), Network Rail (NR), London Underground (LU) at a programme

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level to ensure integrated delivery. After the demise of the SRA, I moved with my biggest project at the time, the East London Line, to TfL, where I also went on to head up their Centre of Excellence for Project Management, and delivering the ‘oversight’ reporting function of the £10bn portfolio for the Commissioner. I then joined the Olympic Delivery Authority as Head of Programme Management and spent 7 years developing and delivering the integrated public transport for the game. I was promoted to Deputy Director in 2011. The award winning team delivered far in excess of all aspirations and returned £100m back to the Treasury coffers. I then became Director of Programme Management at Grosvenor, tasked with leading and improving the project management skills of the organisation, in readiness for delivery of the four mega projects it has to deliver over the next 10 years. This was followed by joining CH2M as their Director of Rail, Europe, then moved to KPMG to Head up the UK infrastructure Project Management Practice, and to progressively assure the health of the HS2 Project on behalf of government. I have always strived to achieve better diversity and inclusion in the construction Industry, and have mentored and coached younger women and helped them succeed. I am proud to be a civil engineer and programme manager, and one that has worked as a client, contractor and consultant and I am inspired about what our industry has achieved over the last 30 years, and the fantastic, tangible legacy it is leaving in its wake.


2018 Lifetime Achievement in Engineering

Natalie McIldowie Divisional Director, Jacobs

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arth Day 1990: it was a hot Indiana spring, and I was a sixteen-year-old determined to be a unique and thoughtful individual. I went to an Earth Day celebration and fell in love with the idea of protecting natural resources. I especially coveted the festival tee-shirts and how well the colours complimented my prized Gap denim jeans, worn loose and rolled up at the ankle. My friends and I founded the Seattle Society, an environmental after school club that spent a lot of time pulling staples out of paper with bare hands to make it ready for recycling. Two years later when I was considering universities (I enjoyed journalism yet was obsessed with calculus proofs), I went to a Women in Engineering open day at Purdue and watched a video about engineers creating clean water systems in developing countries. I was sold – I wanted to be an engineer. When I finished my civil/environmental engineering degree I got on an airplane to England to make sandwiches at a café in London, dance with abandon at gigs and clubs and enjoy the taste of dry cider. I lived an environmentally sustainable lifestyle on very little money, and met the Englishman I would later marry. My first job as a project engineer in Indiana was for a oneman-band with bald eagle posters and inspirational quotes about patriotism hanging in the office. He made me listen to cassette tapes of motivational speakers that equated successful selling to serving God. I drove a pickup truck to site, told contractors what to do, collected and delivered a lot of samples, wrote technical reports and handed them to clients. I also got dressed up wearing jewellery my mom gave me and tried to sell environmental services to banks – some of them gave me work. I left after late paychecks became the norm.

I moved to a bigger city and spent 5 years as the chief environmental engineer responsible for design, procurement and build of mobile groundwater and soil remediation systems. I managed client relationships and a team of operation and maintenance technicians. Working for a family-owned company was one of the best experiences of my life – to this day I laugh out loud at our inside jokes. I think I still have tear stains from my leaving do. For fourteen years I have enjoyed a tremendous career with Jacobs in the UK. The flagship Avenue project gave me the opportunity to manage engineering design teams, project finances, and gain exposure to the diversity of a complex project. Notably, I worked closely with regulatory stakeholders to develop a strategy for sustainable reuse of 2 million cubic metres of soil through selective recovery and on-site treatment. Then I had a baby girl called Alex and she is forever the light of my life. As a project manager, I was trusted to deliver to time, budget and quality for a variety of clients in multiple infrastructure sectors. I joined a bid team and together we won the biggest water utilities framework in the history of the UK business. The female Head of Engineering at United Utilities brought me in to lead the Environment and Sustainability team through a difficult period of reorganisation and business change. I still have a great relationship with the people in the team 2 years after I finished in the role. I led the customer and stakeholder engagement to support the business case for an unprecedented water supply resilience scheme. I am passionate about behavioural safety, relationships with clients and colleagues and am a positive mental health champion. I made the right choice of career.

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Congratulations FROM ZARS MEDIA, PROUD ORGANISER OF THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION AND ENGINEERING AWARDS 2018

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How

Gender Equality Can Help Fix the Construction Industry By DR ALICE MONCASTER, Senior Lecturer in Engineering, the Open University, MARTHA DILLON, Graduate Civil Engineer This article was based on research funded by the Equilibrium Network (www.equilibrium-network.com) and was first published in the Conversation.

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he government-commissioned Farmer Review warned in 2016 that the UK construction industry was “facing challenges that have not been seen before”. In no uncertain terms, it called for major industry-wide change. The “overwhelming risks” foreseen in the review sadly seem to have come to pass. Major contractor Carillion’s collapse comes shortly after an autumn in which UK construction activity fell at its fastest pace in five years. Studies have found that Brexit could cost the industry £10 billion, while the 2017 government industrial strategy was widely denounced as inadequate to generate real change. Of the many issues Farmer highlighted, the industry’s resistance to modernisation, along with the “ticking time bomb” that is the ever-widening skills shortage, stand out. The government’s Working Futures report into the future of the country’s labour market predicts hundreds of thousands of vacancies in skilled technical, professional and managerial roles by the early 2020s. One obvious solution is to increase the number of women in the construction industry.

The Worst Gender Balance

The construction sector has the worst gender balance of any, with the UK lagging behind the rest of Europe. Less than 1% of its 800,000 construction and building trades workers are women, and even when you add architects, planners and surveyors it only rises to 18%:

Dillon and Moncaster | Data adapted from ONS figures

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Of course, both industry and government have considered this issue. But attempts as far back as the WISE campaign of the 1980s to encourage more girls to consider careers in construction just haven’t worked. While more women are entering the sector, they are leaving just as quickly. The net result is that numbers of women in construction roles have remained more or less static for at least a decade:

WISE launch on 17th January 1984 / www.wisecampaign.org.uk In 1984 the Engineering Council collaborated with the Equal Opportunities Commission to launch the Women into Science and Engineering (WISE) year. Spearheaded by Baroness Beryl Platt, Chair of the Equal Opportunities Commission at the time, the initiative intended to highlight the career opportunities for girls and women in science and engineering professions.

Female representation in the UK construction industry. [1] Equality and Human Rights Commission, for the UK Construction Sector [2] Architects Registration Board includes equality and diversity questions for new admissions [3] 25% female representation on UK FTSE 100 boards. Dillon and Moncaster

The blame is repeatedly levied at parents, teachers and careers advisers, and women having children. While the data is simply unavailable for women in the building trades, recent Department for Education figures suggest an alternative reason. Just five years after graduation, long before starting a family, women engineers and architects are already being paid less than their male counterparts. The lack of career progression that this suggests increases with age, with the number of women in senior positions dwindling to a miniscule proportion. With such inequality of pay, matched by inequality of treatment, it is no wonder they don’t stay.

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Bad for Women, Bad for Business A group of senior industry women believe that not only is this bad for women, it is bad for business. They set up the Equilibrium Network, which funded some of our research looking into whether having women in senior positions boosts business financial performance.

Institution of Civil Engineers members by age. Martha Dillon

We started by analysing major international and crossindustry studies, all of which indicate that there is a clear correlation between a greater number of women on boards and company financial performance. We then looked in the academic literature for evidence of causation, in order to predict whether this trend might hold true for the construction sector. We found three explanations to suggest this is the case. First, having more women on the boards of companies improves the operation of the boards themselves. They provide a greater range of perspectives and insights, more closely representing companies’ demographically diverse stakeholders, as well as improving collaborative teamwork. Second, having women at senior levels reduces the leaky pipeline lower down companies. Senior women provide role models and mentoring, and a more positive working environment. Also, they are more likely to promote other women, as they are more likely to recognise their skills. All of these lead to better retention and satisfaction of skilled employees for the company. Diverse teams have also been repeatedly shown to be better performing and more 144

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innovative, and so having more women at all levels is also good for team performance. Finally, better gender diversity at board level improves the image of companies – with both the public and with investors. This helps to boost sales and market performance. As the construction sector suffers from an extremely poor public image, we believe this impact would be particularly positive for construction firms. Our study also revealed an acute lack of gender data specific to the construction sector. It was based instead on large studies that crossed different sectors and smaller academic studies of a few niche areas or individual companies. This absence of any measurement of gender inequality can only have contributed to the lack of progress in this area. The new president of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Robert Mair, used his inaugural speech to call on his profession to transform infrastructure and transform lives. It is a statement for which the Carillion crisis serves as a violent example. Our research suggests that in order to do this we first need to transform our outdated industry. Promoting women to senior levels is essential for this to happen.


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Skills4Stem Ltd. +44 (0) 1234 245534 www.skills4stem.co.uk THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018 145 /Skills4Stem /skills4stem /skills4stem


Y

ou may have a leadership title, or tremendous leadership potential, but that in itself doesn’t give you leadership presence.

These are typical comments I hear when asked to coach an up-andcoming female whose career has stalled:

What Women Can and Cannot Control About Their Leadership Presence By CAROL KINSEY GOMAN, PH.D., an international keynote speaker, leadership presence coach, and author of The Silent Language of Leaders: How Body Language Can Help - or Hurt How You Lead.

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“It isn’t that she couldn’t do the next job. It’s that no one on the executive team sees her that way.” “She has a great track record, but she doesn’t look like a leader.” “She’s warm and friendly, but she doesn’t have the gravitas we are looking for in a senior position.” Leadership presence is not an attribute automatically assigned to you because of your business results. It isn’t necessarily reflective of your true qualities and potential. Instead, it depends entirely on how others evaluate you. Being perceived as a leader when interacting with customers, peers, or executives, is the essence of leadership presence. Women face unique challenges when it comes to being perceived as leaders. They may even add to these challenges by buying into to the “Imposter Syndrome,” or using body language that appears submissive, or waiting for others to recognize and reward their achievements.


You can’t avoid making an impression on others, but you can control the kind of impression you make. Or can you? Here are three situations where you have absolutely no control over some aspects — and total control over others:

1. Making a Great First Impression

WHAT YOU CAN’T CONTROL:

People pick up your attitude instantly. Before you turn to greet someone, or enter an office for a business interview, or step onstage to make a presentation, make a conscious choice about the attitude you want to embody.

Other people’s biases, prejudices, and negative past experiences with someone you resemble.

ADJUST YOUR ATTITUDE

WHAT YOU CAN CONTROL:

It takes less than seven seconds for people to assess your power, confidence, competence, warmth, and empathy. Here are seven ways to make your first impression a positive one:

Pull your shoulders back and hold your head high. This is a posture of confidence and self-esteem.

STAND TALL

— SMILE A smile is an invitation, a sign of welcome. It says, “I'm friendly and approachable.”

— MAKE EYE CONTACT Looking at someone's eyes transmits energy and indicates interest and openness. (To improve your eye contact, make a practice of noticing the eye colour of everyone you meet.)

— RAISE YOUR EYEBROWS Open your eyes slightly more than normal to simulate the “eyebrow flash” that is the universal signal of recognition and acknowledgement.

— LEAN IN SLIGHTLY Leaning forward shows you're engaged and interested. But be respectful of the other person's space. That means, in most business situations, staying about two feet away.

— SHAKE HANDS Research shows it takes an average of three hours of continuous interaction to develop the same level of rapport that you can get with a single handshake. (Just make sure you have a nice firm grip, as your partner will “read” your level of confidence from the quality of your handshake.) THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2018

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2. Projecting Authority and Power WHAT YOU CAN’T CONTROL: Gender stereotyping — that (primarily) subconscious preference for females to be seen as nurturing, rather than powerful. WHAT YOU CAN CONTROL: There are two sets of signals that people look for in leaders: Power/Authority/Status and Warmth/Empathy/ Likeability. Women usually get high scores in the warmth category, but may lose ground when it comes to projecting authority and power. When you are feeling sure of yourself and your message, you automatically display signs of authority and power. What interferes with this natural process is the Imposter Syndrome — the inability of women (more than of their male counterparts) to internalize accomplishments, resulting in the fear of being exposed as a "fraud". And that insecurity is often displayed non-verbally. To build your intrinsic self-confidence, try recording your small wins in a success journal (on a daily basis - perhaps right before you go to bed) and watch how this act of awareness boosts your self-esteem. Also, notice what your body is saying. Women tend to condense their bodies, keeping elbows tucked in close to their sides, tightly crossing their legs, stacking their materials in small, neat piles, and contracting their bodies to take up as little space as possible. When you sit in a manner that makes you looks smaller, it also minimizes your look of authority.

On the other hand, power and authority are non-verbally demonstrated through a command of height and space. When you sit up straight, claim space by hooking an arm over the back of your chair and spreading out your belongings, you appear to be more assured. While standing with your feet close together makes you look hesitant or unsure of what you are saying, widening your stance, relaxing your knees and centring your weight in your lower body give you a “solid” and confident look.

Easy Technique

um h u m.

The quality of your voice can also be a deciding factor in how you are perceived. Speakers with higherpitched voices are judged to be less powerful and more nervous than speakers with lower pitched voices. One easy technique I learned from a speech therapist is to put your lips together and say, “Um hum, um hum, um hum.” Doing so relaxes your jaw and throat, allowing your voice to find its optimal pitch.

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Remember: You don’t have to choose between warmth and power. You can remain likeable and still project more authority simply by exhibiting these subtle nonverbal cues.


3. Being a Serious Contender for That Senior Position WHAT YOU CAN’T CONTROL: Favouritism or a “boy’s club” mentality. WHAT YOU CAN CONTROL: Sharpen up your presentation skills. You impact and influence an audience best when your messages are clear, compelling and brief. Simplicity isn’t just a “nice to have” communication technique. It’s a necessity for being perceived as a leader. A good tip is to ask yourself: “In 10 words or less, what is my key message?” If you can’t state it succinctly to yourself, you are not ready to communicate it to others. I also advise using the “newspaper format” of stating that key message (the headline) upfront. Sometimes the smallest word choice can have a big impact. Use words that carry a sense of ownership and self-reliance. Say “I won’t” (which indicates you have decided not to do something) rather than “I can’t” (which implies you don’t have the skills or talents for the task). Say “I choose to,” not “I have to.” Just as important as it is to use self-assured phrases, it is equally important to eliminate qualifiers, fillers, and minimizers. People will judge you as lacking conviction if you use qualifiers such as: To the best of my knowledge . . . I could be wrong . . . This may not be a good idea but… Fillers like “um” and “uh” make you seem unprepared and uncertain. (BTW: Many fillers can be eliminated if you just pause between thoughts.) And minimize your use of minimizers – eliminating words like: “Maybe, “sort of,” “kind of,” “somewhat” – if you want to sound confident.

As important as they are, doing a great job and communicating well are only the prerequisites for being considered for a senior-level promotion. One savvy female executive stated it this way: “It’s not enough to be a legend in your own mind.” You need to make others aware of your talents and accomplishments. You need to broaden and deepen your network and look for mentors and sponsors who will guide and help promote you. Research with senior leaders in Silicon Valley found that the top criterion for promotion was visibility. Are the executives in your company aware of your talents and job performance? If not, you need to increase your visibility by volunteering for key projects, offering to give presentations, publicizing your team’s accomplishments, and taking an active part in your professional association. You don’t have total control over other people’s perception of you, but you may have more control than you think.

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Understanding the Digital Opportunities in Construction By DANIEL CASHMORE, Lawyer in the construction and engineering disputes team at international legal practice Osborne Clarke.

The construction sector has traditionally been relatively slow to invest in research and development. Digital technologies provide new tools and techniques that are set to fundamentally reshape the industry for years to come. Is now the time to look again at R&D programs to embrace valuable digital opportunities? What new risks arise from their use?

The Future Landscape Today In very simple terms, the opportunities present themselves in one of three broad categories: Firstly, knowledge management encompasses the collection and analysis of electronically generated data, typical examples being the use and increasing sophistication of BIM and tracking of plant, materials and labor. Secondly, efficient construction includes the improvements or changes to the construction process itself with examples in the market today including off-site manufacture, 3D printing and automation of plant. Thirdly, whole life support covers the use

of incorporation of technology into the development as a whole, from inception to demolition and re-use. Typical examples are detailed monitoring of the use of buildings to increase energy efficiency, and technology as an enabler for adaptation of space to meet changing needs of users. Without a doubt however, the greatest opportunities come not in focusing on any one of these areas or any one type of technology, but in bringing all of the different individual pieces of technology together to provide a holistic solution. This decreases risk through knowledge management, increases output and profitability through efficient construction and provides agility and adaptability through whole life support.

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Knowledge Management Opportunities and Risks The volume of data being produced in preparing for and carrying out construction operation is increasing if not exponentially then at a very rapid rate, which is a great opportunity for contractors. The use of the data being generated through smart wearable devices, tracking labour and plant and site investigation and progress reporting by high definition daily drone flight, feeding in to an integrated

BIM model which incorporates not only design by time and cost implications has huge potential. The data generated can lead to swift factual resolution of design and construction clashes; manage early warning of possible problems on site; automatically generate measurement and payment notices to properly reflect work carried out in any given period. If one of the perennial problems in construction is cash flow through the supply chain, imagine an automated process with accurate measure of work, quality and effort required enabling an automated weekly payment cycle. The data being

BIM model of Manchester Central Library Source: www.ryderarchitecture.com

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generated and the technology available now could achieve this. There are two key risk areas around the growth of knowledge management; analytics and retention. In terms of analytics, the vast quantity of data being produced, or capable of being produced is only relevant and can only generate an opportunity if sufficiently sophisticated and reliable tools exist to hone and refine that data to a useable form. Assuming that hurdle can be cleared, the risk remains for errors in the analytics and how non-binary problems and issues are resolved. Turning to retention, the more data collected and kept the higher the likelihood that one will trespass into data protection issues or assumptions of corporate knowledge of events because the systems put in place by the company have captured and then retained the data. Imagine a drone overflying a road project alongside a residential estate, the private properties are not relevant to the project but could easily generate data protection issues for perhaps people sunbathing in their back garden or, at the other end of the spectrum, illegal activity being carried out on the site. Information and data are not knowledge but the risk is that they can lead to a presumption of knowledge you never in fact had.


“Whole life support covers the use of incorporation of technology into the development as a whole, from inception to demolition and re-use.� Efficient Construction Opportunities and Risks There is a real and imminent skills shortage in the construction industry, particularly in the UK but on a global basis as well. That shortage could be met with automated production methods from 3D printing to autonomous construction vehicles. Automating the process adds a further opportunity to more effectively implement just in time materials ordering so that there is no longer a need for site space to be used up retaining a stockpile of materials - a real issue in the continuingly urbanised construction projects in the developed world. Outside the urban environment, the opportunities remain as longer lead times on materials can be actively managed more effectively. There are two key risks to highlight here. First, automation can reduce agility during the construction phase. Change can be difficult to implement once a process has started. The second risk is very much based around flaws or errors in the process.

Are these properly design or design coordination issues, construction issues, software issues, programming issues or something else? A clear matrix of responsibilities will be needed to manage that risk.

Whole Life Support Opportunities and Risks

market, particularly in IT and telecoms sectors, can the construction industry really sit back and not invest? The risk of not grabbing the opportunities is obsolescence as newer more agile companies develop better more market friendly and investible products for the built environment at a better margin enabling the upward spiral of improvement.

Joined-up Digital Delivery The ultimate goal is to improve across all three of the areas highlighted above. Finding the tipping point at which adoption and implementation of technology becomes not only selfjustifying and self-sustaining but is the driver for growth and development for the industry.

Delivering a whole life project that "interacts" with its environment and is adaptable to the changing needs of business is a key driver for the Real Estate Sector as highlighted in our new 'Future proof real estate - is the property sector ready for the 2020s?'report. Reducing whole life costs and building in agility and flexibility in use, from the construction phase, must be the starting point needed to enable re-investment in more R&D improvements.

There are many macro challenges facing the industry today - from skills shortages to unsustainable profit margins to a drive to reduce construction cost and standardize approaches. Technology is not a panacea and neither is it a wholly risk-free solution of part of a solution to the changing needs of the industry. It is however a step which is inevitable and one to take positively and with one's eyes open so not be dragged along or blind run in any direction that seems shiny and new.

The biggest risk here is cost driven. Who provides the initial funding for bringing all of this together or do we have to accept a long slow process of attrition? With other disruptors in the

As we have seen in just about every market where digitalization has taken hold; from professional services to heavy engineering - standing still means getting overtaken.

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What Will Structural Engineering Practices Look Like in 10-15 Years? By BEN LINDEN, Graduate Structural Engineer

As engineers, the next 10-15 years will pose some of the greatest challenges that our profession has ever faced. But these challenges also present us with an opportunity to create a different way of designing that can help us deal with those challenges. In 1992, former IStructE president Professor Edmund Happold said "Engineering is the improvement of nature for mankind's needs. It constructs a new nature, a super nature between mankind and the original nature." (IStructE, 2017) . As the needs of the world around us change we need to adapt to new ideas, problems and solutions. As technology advances, more opportunities arise that can benefit society and make our lives easier and make our way of living more efficient and sustainable. The challenge for us structural engineers will be to figure out how to implement these ideas in the best way. There are three key topics that will change the way we design in the coming decades. These are: Energy, A growing population, Technology.

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1

2

3

Energy As the demand for sustainable energy increases, more and more projects will require a solution to the energy crisis that is built into the structure and does not have to rely on improvements to the surrounding infrastructure. Be that some simple solar panels on the roof, or a more complex CHP plant in the basement. Versatile structures will be required to accommodate the equipment that will enable cities to become self-sufficient. Cities will one day consume only things that they have produced, this idea has been proposed previously and will have the impact of vastly reducing transportation and waste costs (Fab.City, 2017). To fully implement this, all of our food could one day be produced in our cities. For example, some farming in cities is already taking place (Cycloponics, 2018) which proves it can become a reality. The most complex problems are often solved with radical solutions and radical solutions are already being proposed to make urban farming a reality such as the floating farm (Floatingfarm, 2018) and the installation

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of an urban farm in a building via the use of a shipping container (AlescaLife, 2018). Radical solutions will mean that structural engineers have to be more versatile in their design, veering away from strict codes and become more experimental. Structures are being proposed that have never been built before, it will be a challenging time for us but an exciting one too. As new technologies emerge for producing energy from sustainable sources, the structures will need to be adaptable to suit. If solar panels on a roof need to be upgraded, the structure should have been designed so that this can be done in an efficient manner. This may already be happening as it is likely that many who have had solar panels installed will look to replace them with new, more aesthetically pleasing, higher tech solutions such as the Tesla solar roof tiles (Tesla, 2018) . In a decades time it should be commonplace to be trying to futureproof designs from a sustainability point of view. This will transform the way we think about service loads on a structure.

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1 - Floating Farm Photo: www.floatingfarm.nl

2 - Rooftop Farm Photo: www.rooftoprepublic.com

3 - Farm in a Shipping Container Photo: www.alescalife.com

4 - Underground Farm Photo: www.cycloponics.co

5 - Tesla CEO Elon Musk shows a Tesla solar roof cell Photo: Tesla Motors


4

5

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Overcrowding Our structures will not just need to be adaptable to new sustainable technologies. Modular structures are becoming more and more common and could be a way to solve the problem of overcrowding in cities. To put this problem into perspective it has been said that for everyone in the world to have an appropriate home by 2025, we need to build one billion homes before then (ElDeeb, 2017a). The issue with crowded cities does not necessarily have to be such a problem. It can be used as a catalyst for change in the industry and may lead to more design that can be easily modified to adjust to new demand. Examples of successful modular projects can be seen around the world (Sisson, 2017) and building structures like this has already been achieved in projects such as 461 Dean in Japan which was built as offsite rooms and simply snapped to form the finished structure on site

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(Berg, 2017). At the moment however, these are unique projects whereas in 10 years’ time they should form part of a structural engineer’s skillset and something that we should be comfortable with. We also have to think about why people are choosing to live where they are and why some areas are much more expensive than others. An initiative in California looked at this recently and concluded that the areas surrounding major transport hubs needed to house more people. The result was a bill that aimed to lower height restrictions on structures within a certain catchment of the station (Grabar, 2018). If bills such as this are successful this may mean that there are many more high-rise housing structures which will bring about its own set of challenges that can be dealt with by utilising the ever-increasing technological capabilities that aid us in design.

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Modular Residential Tower (109 metres hight) in Brooklyn, NY Photo: SHoP Architects


MX3D Bridge, Amsterdam

Technology

Photo: MX3D

As structural engineers we were one of the first professions to adopt computers when they were changing the world (V&A, 2016) , in the coming age we have to keep ourselves at the forefront. In recent years there has been a huge influx of technology that is 'smart' and it looks very likely that this will continue. For example, the humble road is no longer just tarmac, instead it is loaded with sensors that will make transport systems more efficient; saving time, money and energy. This means that not only should we be providing the capacity for our structures to be smart, but we should also be actively looking into new ideas and research. It isn't just the sensors that need

to be smart, our structures do too. The shift to smart cities may create a whole new job role for us to liaise with. Smart City co-ordinators are emerging (ElDeeb, 2017b) and may be commonplace in design practices to assist with making our structures more efficient. As automation becomes more common place and the need to be confident in a machines ability to travel independently increases, the tolerance that we build to may be reduced in an effort for the outside world to better represent laboratory conditions. The advances in the precast industry may make this easier to deal with however it will always be a challenge. A potential

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"Office of the Future" 3D Printed Building In Dubai Photo: Dubai Future Foundation

solution to this is to utilise the rapidly developing 3D printing industry. 3D printing has come on leaps and bounds in the last 10 years and it looks set to go even further. The landscape of the profession could be significantly changed if it were possible to prefabricate structures by printing them. A team in Stuttgart were recently able to entirely construct a pavilion by using drones (Gibson, 2017) and a team in Dubai have built fully functional offices the same way (Sisson, 2016). The first 3D printed functioning bridge is being built this year in Amsterdam (MX3D, 2018) and is a sure sign that structural engineers could soon be designing elements to print rather than pour. There have not been many buzzwords used more frequently than the word “blockchain� in the past year however there may also be benefits 160

in the technology for us structural engineers. In 2016 Arup designed and constructed The Circular Building out of reusable parts. As part of this they used QR codes to identify where to install sections of the structure. In order to increase the efficiency and security of an idea such as this, blockchain technology could be used as opposed to QR codes. With natural resources becoming more and more scarce, it is also possible that we will turn to blockchain to alleviate this crisis too. Blockchain technology allows for secure and ultra-fast transactions. As we are in an industry that uses a huge amount of paper from drawings to contracts, applying blockchain technology as a means of sending information would make the industry not only more sustainable but could also improve the security of commercially sensitive information.

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Conclusion We must be open to many different ideas and ways of thinking. As we are partly dealing with the problems of past designers, we should also be thinking of how we can ease those issues for the designers of the future. Can we make our materials more durable? Can we enable our materials to be recycled more easily? Can we reduce our energy consumption at all project stages? Can our buildings be more efficient? As 1977 IStructE president Peter Dunican said "Structural engineering is not only concerned with the conception of structural systems, their calculation, construction and stability, but it is equally concerned with service; service to the community, ensuring that our society is adequately informed about what we can do for it" (IStructE, 2018). The problems in the next 10 years give us the opportunity to create solutions that enable us to provide that service.


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25th September 2018 25th January 2019 21st March 2019

AWARDS DINNER

23rd May 2019

JUDGING DAY

FINALISTS ANNOUNCED

NOMINATIONS CLOSE

NOMINATIONS OPEN

25th April 2019

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS 2019 PRELIMINARY TIMELINE

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