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MAY 2019


Congratilations From Zars Media, proud host of tonight's celebrations

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Welcome Thank you to everyone who participated in the 2019 WICE Awards. Each year I get the opportunity to speak with the judges, speakers and finalists. I know for many people here, working life in the 21st century often makes it impossible just to stop and breath. So, for the finalists, taking part in the WICE awards, I hope it has given them the opportunity to take stock and reflect on their careers and their life as a whole. We owe it to ourselves and each other to occasionally pause, take a moment to reflect and appreciate ourselves, our journey and our achievements. It can provide an invaluable sense of wellbeing and help us move forward positively to improve and develop as professionals and people. We need clarity of mind to focus, the courage to look within, to be honest and to develop the discipline to push past our automation mode. Hopefully, the process of the awards has encouraged the finalists to reflect, take stock, appreciate and enjoy all that has brought them to this point. I would like to thank the judges for their dedication, time, and energy during the 2019 awards. We would not be here this evening without their support. I would like to thank the speakers at this year’s WICE Summit. They have the important role of keeping the finalists engaged during the judging day through debates and discussions. I would especially like to thank Catherine Schalk who does an incredible job of moderating the panels and engaging the finalists and panellists. Find latest news about WICE AWARDS and share yout experience of the event at: LinkedIn: european-womenin-construction-&-engineering-awards Facebook: wiceawards Twitter: WICEAwards Google +: +Wiceawardseurope

To all the companies that keep nominating each year the incredible women in your teams; to the companies that nominated for the first time this year, thank you. And of course, congratulations to all nominees, finalists and winners Thank you for celebrating 2019 WICE awards with us, see you in 2020. AFI OFORI Managing Director, Zars Media

www.wiceawards.com

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS MAGAZINE - MAY 2019 is published by Zars Media 8 Heath eld Court Fleet, Hampshire GU51 5DX England Tel.: 01252612025 info@wisawards.com

Official Printer: HART PRESS

WICE Awards photographers:

www.hartpress.com

Paul Grace @pgracephoto Ramis Karamatov @rms.mains @rms.portraits

Design by: BRANDBEES www.brandbees.com

Naomi Gabrielle Photography www.naomigabrielle.co.uk

On the Cover: DISTINGUISHED WINNERS OF 2019: RONI SAVAGE AND TINA GUNNARSSON

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

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24 IN THIS MAGAZINE 6 — THE IMPORTANCE OF FEMALE-FIT WORKWEAR & PPE

10 — 10 INNOVATIVE

WOMEN WHO CHANGED THE HISTORY OF THE AEC INDUSTRY

22 — #METOO AND THE

IMPACT ON INDUSTRY

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24 — RELATING

NEUROSCIENCE TO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

SECTOR AI REVOLUTION IN 2019

42 — 2019 JUDGES 46 — THE JUDGING PROCESS

50 — 2019 SPEAKERS 36 — 2019 FINALISTS 52 — WICE AWARDS 2019 WINNERS

26 — STRESS

154 — 10 WAYS

29 — EMOTIONAL

156 — 4 CORNERSTONE

AND MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES IN CONSTRUCTION INTELLIGENCE (EQ): YOUR SECRET WEAPON AT WORK

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32 — CONSTRUCTION

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TO IMPROVE COMMUNICATION IN CONSTRUCTION SKILLS ENGINEERS NEED FOR THE FUTURE OF WORK


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164 176

164 — THE TRENDS THAT WILL INFLUENCE ARCHITECTURE IN 2019

176 — IS VIRTUAL

REALITY THE FUTURE OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY?

180 — 10 FUTURISTIC

TECHNOLOGIES THAT ARE CHANGING CONSTRUCTION

186 — ARE

CONSTRUCTION WORKER STEREOTYPES CAUSING A SKILL SHORTAGE?

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The Importance of Female-Fit Workwear & PPE By GLEN SMITH, Marketing Manager at WISE Worksafe Leading UK provider of workwear, uniform and PPE since 1977 www.wiseworksafe.com

For many organisations, corporate clothing and protective workwear is a key consideration. While there is an enormous choice in the types of garment and PPE available today, providing clothing that is truly fit for purpose and fits the wearer is important.

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rtificial intelligence and machine learning, cloud-based and quantum computing, additive manufacturing and nanofabrication, advanced automation and robotics—these disruptive technologies are already impacting every industry. Although concerns about job loss due to automation are not without merit, these technologies are also poised to open up entire new fields of study and employment never before conceived. In some industries and professions, a notable difference exists between the number of males and females employed in certain roles. Whilst women may dominate professions such as childcare and veterinary services, statistics show that women account for less than 15% of the construction workforce. Other sectors have a similar imbalance, and this can result in women’s requirements being treated as secondary.

Whilst these percentages are thoughtprovoking and may even be explainable, it must be acknowledged that no matter the ratio, women need to be catered for with suitable work clothing and PPE. At WISE Worksafe, our aim is to be at the forefront of ladies’ corporate uniform, workwear and PPE.

Why Women Need a Different Fit In almost every fashion retail store or web shop, there’s a clear distinction between menswear and womenswear. This may seem obvious, but there isn’t always the same attention to male and female specific work clothing, particularly where garments are designed for manual work. Female clothing is designed for the build of a woman’s body, and is typically fitted in areas such as the waist and chest to allow more comfort and an aesthetic fit. Some garments are made from stretch

fabric or are partially elasticated to provide flexibility and a more accurate fit. Many women already struggle to find a good fit in everyday clothing despite the choice available, so we’re not pretending there’s a silver bullet to the perfect female-fit workwear. However, one thing for sure is that providing ladies with men’s garments in smaller sizes just doesn’t cut it. Although workwear has purposes other than just looking good, this is no reason for it to be ill-fitting. This is not to say that female workers are consumed by their appearance, but looking and feeling smart is a basic expectation for any member of staff – male or female. People who feel uncomfortable or embarrassed about what they’re wearing will not perform as well and are less likely to remain in the job. They may even feel discriminated against, particularly if apparently little or no effort has been made by their employer to cater for their needs.

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The good news is that there are plenty of female garments available from WISE Worksafe. From corporate suitwear to functional workwear to women’s PPE, our ever-growing range is meeting the requirements of thousands of women in the workplace. There are even options for women during pregnancy, including specially designed high visibility maternity clothing.

Female-Fit and Branding Corporate uniform is provided and worn for several reasons but one of the key benefits is to promote a brand and portray a message of professionalism. A professional image among employees reflects directly on the company, and workers become a means by which brand values and expectations are established. This is a further reason why a good fit is essential. Ill-fitting clothes on women will look misshapen, messy 8

“A woman’s face is typically smaller than a man’s. As a result, safety eyewear and respirators may leave vulnerable gaps if there is not a close fit.”

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

or completely out of place. This can discredit the values that the company works hard to maintain. If female staff appear uncomfortable or untidy, the organisation or brand that provided the uniform is likely to be perceived as sloppy, low quality and cheap. Such clothing also indicates a lack of care from the company and a disregard for dressing their female staff appropriately, especially if the male staff are notably better dressed in well-fitted clothing.

Equal Consideration, Equal Goals Although women don’t currently make up a high proportion of those employed in construction and other blue-collar industries, steps are being made to address the imbalance through events such as the European Women In Construction and Engineering Awards.


Durability and Fit for Purpose Many roles in construction and other manual jobs involve hard physical work, so workwear needs to be robust, functional and built to a high standard. This is equally important as being a good fit, to ensure the garments are suitable for the role and can endure tough conditions. When ladies work garment options are limited, the seemingly conflicting requirements of fit, durability and safety legislation can be used as an excuse for sacrificing one or more of these. One size does not fit all and neither does one shape, especially if specific tasks require certain movements that could be inhibited by unsuitable workwear. However, the industry is evolving and needs to continue to do so, to meet the demands of a growing female workforce in these sectors. Going beyond a style that simply fits to become a style that also lasts and performs, ensures women’s workwear is crafted to appropriate industry standards and regulations.

Keeping Women Safe

This event is designed to find the most exemplary women within construction and engineering across Europe and to encourage companies to employ and train more women in these sectors. With more women entering maledominated industries, employers and suppliers need to embrace and adapt to these changes. WISE Worksafe has already made steps toward ensuring female-fit clothing becomes a normality rather than a novelty. If women can see that these sectors are becoming consciously aware of their challenges and are actively making a change, they may be encouraged to make it a career choice. Of course, there are issues faced by the industry other than workwear, but feeling confident and included in the workplace is a key step to getting more women into construction and other industrial sectors.

Safety at work is a top priority, and a key part of this is correctly fitting Personal Protective Equipment. For any work that involves a degree of risk to workers, it is the responsibility of the employer to provide employees with suitable PPE where necessary. In a previous article about the Gender PPE Gap, we discussed the issues women face when it comes to a lack of knowledge, product availability and general fit of PPE. Manufacturers and suppliers have been working together to combat this, such as V12’s specially designed ladies safety footwear. The V12 Challenger IGS ladies’ shoes and Intrepid IGS ladies’ boots are shaped for the female foot, which tends to be shorter and narrower than a typical male foot. Further product developments have also taken place, and at WISE Worksafe we are continuing to grow our product range in this area. Most hi-vis workwear is now available in female-fit, such as

vests, polo shirts, sweatshirts, softshell jackets, bodywarmers, waterproof jackets and trousers. A woman’s face is typically smaller than a man’s. As a result, safety eyewear and respirators may leave vulnerable gaps if there is not a close fit. The same applies for female hands. Loose gloves can lead to poor grip and excess material which compromises safety, so hand protection must be the correct size. As well as the safety aspect, comfort is also important. PPE which causes discomfort could discourage the wearer from using it. If suitable equipment is not made available for women, there is a high risk they will be inadequately protected.

Conclusion As we’ve discussed, finding uniform, workwear and PPE that fits women properly isn’t a luxury – it’s a requirement – and has benefits for the staff and the organisation they work for. The correct fit makes women look and feel professional, bolsters morale and productivity, and maintains the company image. It also ensures women in hazardous roles are suitably protected. Employees are far more likely to adhere to uniform and PPE policies if they have no reservations about the clothing and equipment provided. Female-fit workwear is also a step towards gender equality and helps women to feel they are cared for equally. This encourages female talent when recruiting and removes any stigmas about the ability of women in the workplace. Contact WISE Worksafe for further advice or browse our core range of corporate clothing and PPE online. If you can’t find what you’re looking for, please ask; our friendly, knowledgeable team are always happy to help. •

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Who Changed the History of the AEC Industry

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By SARAH LOREK, Lead Content Strategist, Trimble www.buildings.trimble.com @TheSarahLorek

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There’s no denying the fact that women are hugely underrepresented in the engineering field, as well as in wider STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) subjects and related careers. Much debate centers around the topic of how to encourage more women to enter these professions. Here are ten notable women who changed the history of the AEC industry. According to the Knowledge Center on catalyst.org, work experiences impact women’s decisions to leave Science, Engineering, and Technology careers. The research suggests that “almost one-third of women in the US (32%) and China (30%) intend to leave their SET jobs within a year, and these leave rates peak about 10 years into their careers.” Some of the reasons for leaving these jobs include isolation, ineffective feedback, and a lack of sponsors. Even though STEM fields have fewer women on boards than other industries, many female engineers have already done multitudes to advance the field.

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Julia Morgan (Jan 20, 1872 – Feb 2, 1957), architect and engineer

In 1898, Julia Morgan became the first woman admitted to the École de BeauxArts in Paris, widely regarded as the best school of architecture in the world. She returned to her California home and became the first woman licensed by the state to practice architecture. She was a leading proponent of the Arts and Crafts movement and

designed many buildings. Her YWCA buildings were institutions intended to serve women, but her most famous design was Hearst Castle, conceived for publisher William Randolph Hearst. Morgan supervised every aspect of the construction over the next 28 years, making her work a symbol of the utmost dedication to her career.

Julia is best known for her work on Hearst Castle in San Simeon, California.

Photo: Mercury News

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Janet Guthrie (Mar 7, 1938), aerospace engineer and racecar driver She graduated from the University of Michigan with a bachelor’s degree in physics and worked as a research and development engineer for American aircraft manufacturer Republic Aviation. The work she completed during that time contributed greatly to Project Apollo.

Photo: biography.com

Janet Guthrie is known for being one of the first female racecar drivers. She was the first woman to qualify for and compete in the prestigious Indianapolis 500 and the Daytona 500. But, before she started racing, she was an aerospace engineer who learned to fly while she was in her teens.

The work she completed during that time contributed greatly to Project Apollo.

Photo: NASA / nasa.gov

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Emily Roebling (Sep 23, 1843 – Feb 28, 1903), engineer

The Brooklyn Bridge is one of the most iconic engineering projects in America’s history. Washington Roebling was its Chief Engineer, but when he became seriously ill in 1872, his wife Emily stepped in. She had been taking notes of what needed to be completed before he passed, and when he died, she began overseeing the day-today supervision and management of the project. According to ASCE, she

learned about strength of materials, stress analysis, cable construction, and calculation of catenary curves. Every day, she went onsite to relay her husband’s instructions to workers and to answer questions. She kept records and was said to have represented her husband at social events. She was Chief Engineer in all but name, and the bridge — completed in 1883 — bears a plaque honoring Emily and her husband.

Brooklyn Bridge under construction, ca. 1873-1880. Source: Library of Congress

She is known for her contribution to the completion of the Brooklyn Bridge.

Professional Women Suffrage Parade, 1913. Source: New-York Historical Society Library

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Shortly before inventing Spread Spectrum technology, actress Hedy Lamarr supports Spencer Tracy in ‘I Take This Woman.’ Source: Courtesy Alexandra Dean

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Hedy Lamarr, born Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler (Nov 9, 1914 – Jan 19, 2000), inventor and film actress

Hedy Lamarr is renowned as a glamorous film star from the 1930s and 1940s, but few people are aware that she was also an avid inventor. At the beginning of World War II, she developed a radio guidance system aimed at

combating the threat of jamming by enemy forces. The US Navy didn’t adopt the technology until the 1960s, but the principles of her work live on in modern communications technology, including WiFi and Bluetooth.

Copy of U.S. patent for "Secret Communication System" Source: U.S. Patent Office

Principles of her work live on in modern communications technology, including WiFi and Bluetooth.

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Lillian Gilbreth (May 24, 1878 – Jan 2, 1972), psychologist and industrial engineer

Lillian Gilbreth combined the fields of psychology and industrial and mechanical engineering to pioneer work in time and motion studies, as well as ergonomics. Gilbreth is credited with many “firsts” in the field of engineering, including household appliance and kitchen designs. In 1965, when she was in her late 80s, she

became the first woman elected to the National Academy of Engineering. Due to her husband’s concern with the technicalities of worker efficiency, Gilbreth studied scientific management principles that are still used today. Now, she is known as the “Mother of Modern Management” and is recognized as the first true organizational psychologist.

Motion study photograph of a factory worker taken by Frank and Lillian Gilbreth, 1914

Gilbreth is credited with many “firsts” in the field of engineering, including household appliance and kitchen designs.

Lilian interviewed over 4,000 women to design the proper height for stoves, sinks, and other kitchen fixtures as she worked on improving kitchen designs

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Edith Clarke (Feb 10, 1883 – Oct 29, 1959), electrical engineer

E dith Clarke was an important figure in the field of electrical engineering. In 1921, she patented a graphing calculator used to solve power transmission line problems, and she was later involved in offering electrical engineering solutions

for dam building. She was the first woman to earn a Master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from MIT and went on to teach electrical engineering later in her career. Her inventions, including the graphing calculator, are still used today.

Page of the patent for the Clarke calculator

Edith was the first female electrical engineer and the first female professor of electrical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin.

Photo: U.S. Patent Office

She wrote Circuit Analysis of A-C Power Systems

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Helen Augusta Blanchard (Oct 25, 1840 – Jan 12, 1922), inventor

I f you’ve ever used a zigzag sewing machine, then you have Helen Augusta Blanchard to thank. Born to a wealthy Maine family in 1840, she put her technical knowledge and flair

for inventing to good use after her family lost its fortune. She filed 22 patents in total, many still relevant today, and the majority of which involved sewing machines.

One of Helen Blanchard's original zig-zag buttonhole sewing machines as seen at the Smithsonian

Pencil sharpener patent Photo: U.S. Patent Office

She filed 22 patents in total, many still relevant today, and the majority of which involved sewing machines. 18

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Early Sewing Machine


Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, Main Line Thru The Rockies Photo: Courtesy Drew Jackish

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Elsie Eaves (May 5, 1898 – Mar 27, 1983), engineer

In 1927, Elsie Eaves was the first woman to become a full member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). She was also a founding member of the American Association of Cost Engineers (now AACE International). During her notable career, she worked for the US Bureau of Public Roads, the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, and the Colorado State Highway Department.

Later, she became the manager of the Engineering News-Record’s Construction Economics Department and the manager of Business News. Eaves could even build databases— without using computers. Perhaps her most distinguished and notable success was her ability to use data collection and reporting to track trends and spending activities relevant to construction projects.

In 1927, she was the first woman admitted to full membership to the American Society of Civil Engineers. Nowdays Colorado State Highway Department

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Grace Hopper ( Dec 9, 1906 – Jan 1, 1992), computer scientist and Navy rear admiral

Grace Hopper was a pioneer of computer programming who worked on the Harvard Mark I, used by the US in World War II. She reached the rank of Rear Admiral in the US Navy, and was a senior mathematician at Eckert-Mauchly Computer Corporation. There, she worked with a team developing the UNIVAC I, which was the first known largescale electronic computer. When she announced a new programming language that used English words, she

was reportedly told that computers only understand arithmetic. In an explanation, Hopper states, “I decided data processors ought to be able to write their programs in English, and the computers would translate them into machine code. I could say ‘Subtract income tax from pay’ instead of trying to write that in octal code or using all kinds of symbols.” The new programming language, COBOL is one of the major languages still used in data processing today.

Photo: Courtesy of the Computer History Museum

Hopper believed that computers would someday be widely used and helped to make them more user friendly.

When she retired as a rear admiral at age 79, Hopper was the oldest serving officer in the U.S. Armed Forces.

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She worked alongside her husband, Lee de Forest, who invented the radio vacuum tube

Nora Stanton (Blatch DeForest) Barney and her daughter Rhoda Barney (Jenkins) are two generations of architects in Greenwich, Connecticut. Mother, Nora, used to be a civil engineer who built bridges and skyscrapers in New York City. Source: Eric Jenkins-Sahlin

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Nora Stanton (Sep 30, 1883 – Jan 18, 1971), civil engineer and architect

English-born engineer Nora Stanton would later become the first female member of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Born in Basingstoke in 1883, she moved to the US at a young age and became the first woman to graduate from Cornell University. She worked alongside her husband, Lee de Forest,

who invented the radio vacuum tube, before their divorce. Later, she worked as an engineer and chief draftsman at the Radley Steel Construction Company and as an engineer for the New York Public Service Commission. Stanton passed her love of the industry to her daughter, who later became an architect.

These women were indeed trailblazers of their days, but their passion and successes still live on in the AEC industry. As more women enter engineering career fields in the coming years, we’ll not only see them in executive roles, but we’ll witness a new age of innovations pioneered by women.

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By DR MARK MCBRIDE-WRIGHT CEng MIChemE, Founder, EqualEngineers, www.equalengineers.com

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The #MeToo campaign has become one of the largest movements for female equality in recent times. It has challenged the patriarchal-systems of industries which have been led by men for years, and has denoted a tipping-point where people will no longer suffer in silence.

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he movement is not restricted to issues faced by women. We have seen high-profile cases where men have also been affected, whether this be in entertainment, football or the church. The campaign represents a movement whereby the voice of one-person can lead to a fundamental shift in shaking up the power structures which exist. Bullying and harassment have no place in any workplace, or indeed anywhere in society. It is the role of an organisation to protect employee’s health, safety and wellbeing with a duty of care to ensure employees return home safe at night. It’s easier (relatively) for a company to focus on interventions which ensure the physical safety of individuals is protected, risks from hazards associated with the workplace. But what happens when the hazard is another person, or group of people?

Grievance and dismissal processes plays a role in exiting those not up to scratch in the performance management process. Can these processes be manipulated when there is a lack of diversity in an organisation? Do they disproportionately affect people from minority groups? And how often is a pay-out settlement used in constructive dismissal disputes to keep people quiet for voicing their real experiences? Is there confidence in whistleblowing arrangements? Where do we push for real progress rather than superficial progress? Men often feel disengaged from the focus on diversity and inclusion, which typically focuses on underrepresented groups in engineering (women; black & minority ethnic, lesbian, gay, bisexual & transgender; disabled candidates). A vacuum can oftentimes be created between the feeling of walking on egg shells for fear of offending, and political correctness. The fact remains, at the heart of it, it is a case of creating a culture where fairness, inclusion and respect is built into the heart of the organisations. Executive leaders and managers set the tone from the top, and outline what expectations are. This is the first step. But culture change happens across all levels, in every corner of the business, on-site and off-site. And each location will have its own sub-culture where micro-aggressions may be rife (or not). The key is to create an open and inclusive profession, where the central wellbeing of engineers is front and centre.

Organisations need to be open to having challenging conversations which could likely challenge the fundamental foundations of their business. But, with the head out of the sand, an organisation can move ahead, create an impactful culture change programme, and weed out people who negatively affect other employees. And organisations need to invest in the appropriate training for supporting employees who might come forward to disclose traumatic experiences from their past, or their present. This would include (but not limited to) mental health first aid training for people managers, HR teams. It is recommended to establish a team of mental health first aiders and make it known who they are, in the same vein as we do physical health and safety. Technology is becoming ever ingrained into how we live our everyday lives. With it comes risks of biases being baked into design if design teams delivering such technological advancements are homogenous and non-diverse. Diversity of thought and experience is really important when creating inclusive products, systems and processes. To achieve this, we need greater diversity at all levels, and we need a culture which will ensure all engineers and technologists thrive, with risks, hazards and barriers removed. It may seem like a vision of utopia, but with greater transparency and coming together as a collective like the #MeToo movement, then I believe it can be achieved. •

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Relating Neuroscience to the Built Environment This article was originally published by the CENTRE FOR DIGITAL BUILT BRITAIN www.cdbb.cam.ac.uk

Science is a tool that has helped commercial industries become more effective and productive. Its influence is everywhere – engineering, manufacturing, technology and athletics.

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rom artificial intelligence and machine learning to materiality, science is breaking barriers to innovation. Even art, which is often seen as divorced from science, is experiencing a scientific renaissance. However, one industry that is lacking in the benefits of scientific rigour is the built environment – specifically the design of buildings and cities. For the last 15 years neuroscientists have been studying how the physical world shapes our cognition and wellbeing. The information and research is outstanding; from understanding how artificial light impacts circadian rhythms, to how the brain navigates streets, to correlating urban stressors like pollution and noise to mental illness. It is widely acknowledged that buildings and cities can have a fundamental affect on people. Take the identification of Sick Building Syndrome (SBS) in the 1980s as one example. SBS is a series of symptoms caused by poorly constructed buildings presenting a symptomatology including nausea, fatigue, headaches, lack of concentration, stress and even low staff morale. This symptomatology goes beyond someone not liking a

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building; it shows that buildings can have a profound effect on our physical and mental health. Despite years of scholarship on the relationship between the built environment and our wellbeing, mental health is often treated as an after thought to city planning and design. So, why has the built environment not experienced vast improvements? I believe it is due to the lack of science in this sector – there are no human-based metrics to help guide the design and construction of buildings. This is where cognitive neuroscience can be introduced; it can help ask better questions about the relationship between the human and the physical world. It can also create a methodology of approaching building to enhance wellbeing, such as creating schools that are sensorially orchestrated for learning and teaching. The only tools we currently have are the intuition of architects and the efficiency models of engineers, which are both devoid of human data and knowledge. Well-respected architect and theorist Juhani Pallasmaa has been referencing neuroscience in his work for many years. He argues: "the current promise of neuroscience is to valorise the qualities in our environments, which have so far been


adequacy. In other words, is a space adequate for working, collaborating, resting or innovating? This approach would not only give us buildings that are truly supportive of human life but offer an economic reason to push science into the built environment. Imagine being able to tell an asset owner that their building is not supportive of productivity; how might that affect their bottom line?

neglected or left to the individual designer’s sensitivity and creative intuition." Some architects and engineers possess, through practice, study, and observation, a distinguishable instinct about how to create a good building. However, buildings are not simply about housing people in a well-designed and efficient structure. As Pallasmaa says, buildings "house our minds, memories, desires and dreams". So, it makes sense that architects and others in the built environment turn to science to help them understand how people interact, communicate, feel, learn, and heal. For example, why do certain buildings inspire some people whilst intimidating others? Why can we concentrate in one space but not in another? What is the relationship between artificial light exposure and long-term stress? Are plants inside buildings just an aesthetic, or do they have calming elements? What amount of light is better for sustained attention required to get through a long task? If we look at buildings as places where people experience life, have conversations, solve complex problems, heal, learn, or discover new innovations, we can start a conversation about

“So, it makes sense that architects and others in the built environment turn to science to help them understand how people interact, communicate, feel, learn and heal”

Using neuroscience in the built environment does come with a caveat. The science is still at an infancy and we need better tools to study people in real-time to provide probability models of affect. We need to chart how physical elements affect people through the course of a day, weeks and years in reallife environments. And neuroscience should never be used in a reductive manner – there is little to be gained from observing that the amygdala area of the brain lights up when presented with a red wall versus a yellow one and deciding that yellow walls are better for people. Neuroscience already has vast historical data we can mine to provide us with the opportunity to make design and construction decisions using human data rather than just intuition.

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Stress and Mental Health Issues in Construction By DARREN HOCKLEY, MD of eLearning provider DeltaNet International. www.delta-net.com

@DeltaNetInt

With long hours, demanding workloads and projects that are often short-term and far from home, it’s no surprise that construction is a high-risk industry for workplace stress

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hen stress and associated mental health struggles aren’t handled

can spiral out of control – with tragic consequences in the worst cases. Sadly, suicide rates for construction workers are up to three times higher than average. More than half of the people working in the industry reported experiencing mental health issues. Due to the stigma that still surrounds mental health, a large proportion felt unable to tell their employer that they were struggling. For those who take time away from work for mental health reasons, it can sometimes be tempting to blame the time away on another problem and avoid the conversation entirely. Clearly, the scale of the problem is huge. Tackling it will require action from all levels of the industry, and in many ways, the conversation on this issue has only recently begun. However, there are some concrete steps that employers and individual workers alike can take to mitigate stress and encourage better mental health.

Ending the stigma It’s vital to create a culture where employees feel comfortable discussing their mental health and accessing help if they need it. Letting workers know where they can go for support is key. This can be communicated through company emails, individual conversations with line managers, meetings, and flyers with the relevant information being left in communal areas on site. Employers should take into account the fact that not all workers will feel comfortable raising the alarm with their direct manager, whereas for others this will be the best avenue to getting help. Listening to your workers and addressing their specific needs is very important.

Some of the early signs of work-related stress are:

Sleep issues, leading to problems with functioning the next day.

Frequent health problems such as stomach upsets, chest pains or headaches.

Many people would feel comfortable discussing physical injuries with their colleagues but would shy away from discussing stress, anxiety or depression. Social support is an important step in recovery from mental health struggles and maintaining good mental health, so simply creating an environment where this is discussed as openly as a cold or a broken leg is supportive in itself. Work colleagues will generally be keen to support their friends when they’re struggling, and even asking “how are you?” or inviting a new colleague to join them at lunch can

Providing support and knowing the signs Training workers and managers in stress management is a good way of

Changes in personality, such as social withdrawal or loss of interest in enjoyable activities.

helping them to spot the early signs of mental health problems in themselves and their colleagues. Because of the stigma surrounding mental health, people sometimes feel ashamed of what they’re going through or assume they can just “snap out of it” and handle it themselves. Unfortunately, these attitudes can often lead to their conditions worsening. One practical way that employers in construction can help is by providing pleasant designated areas for breaks and encouraging people to take all of the breaks they’re entitled to. If space allows, there should be a mixture of highly social areas for workers to mingle in, and quiet areas away from site noise so people have places to

productivity so it’s a positive choice for both employees and their employers.

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The physical environment can have a surprisingly powerful effect on mental health. Small changes such as putting plants in the break rooms, allowing more natural light in or redecorating in “calming colours” such as green and blue can all help create a positive atmosphere at minimal cost to the employer.

Taking control mental health problems, it can often feel overwhelming, as if they have no control over what’s happening to them. Asking for help from the right channels is the most important step. However, there are actions people can take that might ease their symptoms or give them something to focus on while they wait for access to the best treatment and services. Though none of these will magically cure severe stress-related disorders or clinical depression – and they are not a substitute for required medical care – many people have found them helpful for coping with their conditions. For stress that is caused by a particular aspect of their job, employees can 74 28

“Many people would feel comfortable discussing physical injuries with their colleagues but would shy away from discussing stress, anxiety or depression.” look at ways to minimise it or avoid it. Knowing what triggers high stress levels is helpful. It might be that it’s possible to work on projects that don’t for some of the time. Employers should be willing to make accommodations where possible. Work stress can often spill over family time and friendships. For that reason, free time is especially important during periods of high stress. Unfortunately, more than half of construction workers report

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doing “little to nothing” to manage their stress, citing a lack of time to pursue stress-relieving activities; neglecting to find space in people’s lives for relaxation can lead to illness and burnout, however, so they should be prioritised as highly as possible. Quality time with loved ones can be extremely helpful, as can spending time in natural surroundings by taking long walks, jogging or camping. Taking up a hobby can be a great way to distract from work pressures. Whether it’s joining a sports team, learning a new language or playing an instrument, new activities are great for recharging from day to day pressures and meeting new people. The “safety” side of health and safety has seen some excellent advances in the construction sector in recent decades. The health and wellbeing side of the picture has sometimes been ignored in comparison, and changing this requires major, ongoing change. There are plenty of ways employers can protect their workers from the dangers of high stress, anxiety and depression, and many steps workers can take to protect themselves and their colleagues.


Emotional Intelligence (EQ): Your Secret Weapon at Work By RINA GOLDENBERG LYNCH, CEO, Voice At The Table

What would you say if I told you that EQ is as important – if not more so – as IQ? Would you agree? Vehemently disagree? Long gone are the days of the power-hungry boss who showed no emotional insight or empathy. Think Gordon Gekko in Wall Street or Miranda Priestly in The Devil Wears Prada. In fact, according to the World Economic Forum, Emotional Intelligence is ranked is the 6th of ten most important skills to have in order to thrive in the workplace of the future. Why? How? Read on.

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Emotional Intelligence is made up of five categories: SELF-AWARENESS The ability to recognise personal emotions, emotional triggers, and limitations. A healthy sense of self-awareness makes it easier to understand one’s strengths and weaknesses, how one’s words and actions affect others and learn from feedback and mistakes. SELF-REGULATION The ability to manage emotions so they do not have a negative effect. Self-regulation allows one to maturely reveal emotions, expressing them when needed, with control and restraint. MOTIVATION An inner drive that comes from the personal joy experienced after an accomplishment. Motivation doesn’t come from money and title but more meaningful, inner ambition. Motivation also builds resilience and optimism in the face of a disappointment or a challenge.

What is it? Emotional Intelligence refers to our ability to understand our own emotions and actions, our ability to regulate how we react to others and how to relate to people from a wide range of backgrounds. The term Emotional Intelligence or EQ was coined in 1990 by American psychologists and later popularised by Daniel Goleman (also known as the father of EQ).

How does it help our leaders at work? EQ is particularly important for aspiring leaders, as leaders must have the ability to create a work environment that motivates people and makes them feel relevant and respected. Leaders with high EQ use their social skills to nurture rapport and trust with team members; they tend to view people as individuals, recognising their individual abilities, backgrounds and personalities; they connect with employees and genuinely share in their successes as well as their challenges and concerns. These abilities can be particularly important when an unpopular decision needs to be made at work, such as making redundancies. An emotionally-intelligent leader will be able to keep the team cohesive through tough times and control their own impulses in the event of a conflict, by viewing the situation from all perspectives and by seeking a mutually-beneficial solution.

EMPATHY The ability to recognise, understand, and experience the emotions of another person. The ability to have compassion and understanding of human nature allows one to provide a great service and respond to others’ concerns. SOCIAL SKILLS The ability to interact and negotiate with others in order to find the best way to meet the needs of each person. A person with social skills is able to quickly build rapport and trust. They avoid power struggles, enjoy the company of others and respect those around them.

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What about other benefits for employees? There are a number of work-related benefits to developing your own EQ:

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PEOPLE WITH HIGH EQ ARE BETTER AT MOTIVATING THEMSELVES Because they are able ‘selfregulate’, they have higher levels of motivation, lower rates of procrastination, higher selfconfidence and ability to focus on attaining longer-term goals.

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EQ CAN HELP WITH MENTAL WELLBEING EMOTIONALLY INTELLIGENT PEOPLE GO FURTHER IN THEIR CAREERS Not only are people with high EQ better at managing themselves in getting along with others, they also stand out when it comes to promotions and stretch opportunities.

2 Can EQ be learned?

“An emotionallyintelligent leader will be able to keep the team cohesive through tough times and control their own impulses in the event of a conflict, by viewing the situation from all perspectives and by seeking a mutuallybeneficial solution.”

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We can improve our EQ with training and practice. By paying attention and changing small things in the way we behave can make us more emotionally intelligent. We can, for instance, improve our self-awareness by paying attention to how we’re feeling at any given moment throughout the day. Notice how what you’re feeling impact on how you respond to situations and people. Reflect on how that impacts on your decisions and interactions with others. We can also become better at selfregulation by paying attention to how we communicate with others – do we tend to be agitated by others’ views, become impatient when they talk or become annoyed? Think of ways you can deal with these negative feelings, recognising them as weaknesses and

People with higher EQ tend to be happier and more positive; they’re better at acknowledging other view points which helps prevent and resolve conflict, reducing the potential of stress-related ill-health.

actively trying to replace them with positive perspectives. Asking yourself how you would react in a similar situation often makes it easier to see the other’s point of view. We can practice listening – actually hearing what people are saying and feeling, not just waiting for our turn to speak. Try listening attentively, with interest and curiosity and without interruption. Ask questions to seek more clarity and to show you understand. There are many other ways in which we can practice becoming more emotionally – intelligent, including attending training on the subject, reading books about it and practicing new small habits each day. This, in turn, will make us a more fulfilled person, a more motivated employee, a more capable leader and build a betterperforming organisation. Who knew?

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Construction Sector AI Revolution in 2019 By GENIEBELT (SOON TO BE LETSBUILD) https://geniebelt.com https://www.letsbuild.com

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rtificial Intelligence increases its power in different sectors. Furthermore, that kind of technologies is more reachable. The manufacturing sector is using AI technologies in the core of production for quality control, shortening design time, reducing materials waste, improving production reuse and performing predictive maintenance. What about the construction sector? In the construction sector, the technology level is always lower than in the manufacturing sector. But, AI is different from all other technologies. If you have the data, you can start to see the benefits of AI technologies without any extra effort.

2019 is a Critical Year to Gain Competitive Advantage

This article based on the experience of Botmore Technology which is working on AI and ML Technologies on the construction site. THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

Profitability of the construction sector is going down globally. In addition to that productivity, quality is drastically low respect to the manufacturing sector. So the early adapters for AI technologies in construction sector can gain a competitive advantage to increase their profit margins. WHICH TECHNOLOGIES WILL CHANGE THE SECTOR: •

AI-powered image processing

Machine learning

Natural language processing

Data-driven solutions

Robotics

BIM management


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Machine Learning You can use ML in different areas in construction management such as image recognition, problem-solving, digital assistants, workflow and schedule optimization. In the first step, you need to collect data in a construction project. Main data sources of a project include Design, Machinery, Employee, Contracts, Planning Tools, ERP, Specifications, and Handbooks. Of course, the number of these sources may change depending on the project.

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about construction activity, resource quantity, weather conditions, schedule information easily can be used to make ML-based predictions or warnings. You can see a diagram for ML powered prediction system for piling works.

After collecting data in a central database, you can crunch this data for several purposes. If you ask proper questions, ML algorithms can find data-driven answers to those questions.

Another example is issue management. As you know, there a lot of issues are recorded in the construction site using different tools. ML algorithms can learn this process to evaluate the priority of these issues and make suggestions about possible solutions. You can increase the number of that kind of examples. The key is to have data to feed ML algorithms and asking the right question about your project.

You can use ML algorithms in different construction workflows such as scheduling, quality check, safety management, issue tracking, resource and design management. For example, data

In 2019 we will see more tool using ML algorithms in construction project management and this help to increase productivity in a construction site.

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Data, Data, Data... You can use ML in different areas in construction management sAll technology companies are talking about the value of data. The first step in data management is the digitalization of construction management. Traditional construction project management solutions create separate data silos. Moreover, data flow isn’t real-time and continuous. Hence, all collected data can’t create expected additional value in a construction project. So, you should create a central database for your project and company. This central database system creates an opportunity to use ML (Machine Learning) and BI (Business Intelligence) technologies. In a summary, you need data, but the most important things are %100 digitalization and create a unified data management system. After satisfying those conditions, you can start to think about how you will design construction workflow models.

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From Data to Knowledge We are using ML algorithms and BI techniques to reach knowledge from data. For this purpose, we must filter the targeted data and refine it through different processes. We need to capture the patterns that can answer the questions related to the project by doing data mining. And we should extract meaningful information from the data by working on these results. In summary, we must transform the data into knowledge. Otherwise, we’ve wasted valuable data we collected.

Algorithms Can Be a Solution! The construction site has chaotic conditions. Weather, subcontractor decisions, material usage, machinery management, safety problems directly affect the success of a project. In these chaotic conditions, the experience of engineers plays an important role. We can trust our experienced team but algorithms can be your the most experienced consultant in the construction site. Of course, we don’t replace human experience with AI. But AI algorithms can be a decision support system to increase quality and productivity.

Pros of Algorithms

Cons of Algorithms

With proper data, they can create solid decision support.

Your algorithm learns from your data, so it is a competitive advantage for your company.

Who is responsible? This is the key question because if an algorithm makes mistake, nobody takes responsibility.

You can find unpredictable patterns in your data set and using this pattern your predictions and precautions can be better.

Biased data collection. If your data isn’t distributed properly, your algorithms can start to make systematic mistakes.

You should test your algorithms for different conditions.

You may need new specialists in your company about data science, data mining and AI.

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You can protect your know-how with your algorithms. It will be independent of your employees.

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Digital Assistants Can Be Your Next Coworker

NLP (Natural Language Processing) as a subtopic of ML has been trying to create communication skills of Artificial Intelligence applications. In other words, an AI agent can understand human expression using NLP technologies. Siri and Google Assistant are the most popular AI agents using NLP. Nowadays, NLP technologies are developed significantly. So you can use AI agents in your construction projects. As you know in a construction site engineers spend a lot of time on coordination. Moreover, data transfer from the construction site is a vital problem. Answer of all those problems can a construction assistant A digital assistant can answer technical and project related questions. It can ask questions to capture progress data. Furthermore, it can be a proper interface for warnings, predictions and workflow optimizations. THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

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AI Powered Robotics sector with 3 D printers, robotic arms, robots making some activities on construction site such as bricklaying, carrying material, making installations of prefabric components. All these robots are using ML So an increase in robotic technology will be related to the success of R&D activities in AI-powered construction solutions. Especially developed countries have to use robotic solutions to compete with developing countries which have low manhour rate. Otherwise, developed countries will lose their global competitiveness in the construction sector.

MX3 D Bridge, Amsterdam Photo: MX3 D

AI Powered Image Processing In a construction project, site teams have been taking pictures and videos on daily basis. This pictures and videos are already used for reporting purposes. But AI is transforming these pictures and videos to data. Using ML algorithms, your pictures and videos can be analyzed automatically and you can reach related pictures and warning whenever you need. Generally, we call them “smart tags” and they allow for a better system to categorize and search your photos. Furthermore, you can use images and videos to follow the construction progress in the construction. You can compare BIM with construction images or videos and using this comparison you can create AI-powered suggestion systems.

Detecting a ladder on a construction jobsite Photo: Image courtesy of ENR

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As you know, it isn’t easy to follow activities in the chaotic atmosphere of a construction site. Hence, we will see more case study about AI-powered image and video processing in 2 0 1 9 .


Photo: Siemens

AI Powered Design

The design is one of the most important parts of construction production. Especially, Building Information Modeling (BIM) has played a vital role in not only increasing design quality but also creating an opportunity for proper management of design data. BIM reached a level of maturity in 2 0 1 8. So, everybody started to ask what can be done with this design data. If you have that kind of data you can use, ML algorithms can •

You can make automatic design checks

You can make fast constructability analysis

You can optimize your design with respect to cost or

Of course, you can increase the number of those examples. As a summary, if you look BIM as a data silo, you can start to use this data as an input for AI models.

Why 2019? In 2 0 1 9 , AI technologies are more accessible. Machine learning libraries, infrastructure create opportunities for new product development. Furthermore, technologies like BIM (Building Information Modeling) reached maturity and sector started to ask more detailed questions about the benefits of new technology solutions.

In addition to that profit margins in the sector is going down. Hence companies are trying to find new solutions to increase productivity. That’s why; a lot of construction company started to work on R&D activities.

On the other hand, in 2 0 1 8 there is a lot of new investment in construction technology start-ups. So, in 2 0 1 9 , the number of new technology start-ups in the construction sector will increase. And this situation will create a new ecosystem in the construction technology area.

expectations in the construction sector. So, this year, AI, robotics and data management will be more popular in the construction sector. Sector experts will start to compare best practices in manufacturing with the construction sector.

At least but not last, the industry 4 .0 trend in the

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Women in Construction & Engineering Awards 2019 The Judges / The Judging Process / WICE Summit Speakers

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The Judges —

Alastair Smyth

Dean Manning

Engineering Director J. Murphy & Sons

Managing Director, Structure Tone International

Alex Flach Construction and R&M Director, Whitbread

Alison Wring Director, AECOM

Amanda Fisher Managing Director Facilities Management, Defence and Justice, Amey

— Bridget Bartlett Chairman, Advisory committee Construction & Built Environment Education

Caroline Buckingham Principal, Caroline Buckingham Architects and RIBA Vice President, Practice and Profession

Caroline Mayes Director, Stride Treglown

Amanda Illing

Chief Executive, Hardwicke

Casey Rutland

Deborah Sims Senior Lecturer, Civil Engineering Department, University of Greenwich

Dr Deborah Pullen Executive Director, BRE Trust

Dr Louise Brooke-Smith Partner, Arcadis

Dr Rosa Schiano-Phan

UK Director of Digital, Royal HaskoningDHV

Principal Lecturer in Architecture & Environmental Design, University of Westminster

Andrew Henderson

Country Market Director, UK Buildings, Ramboll

Christina Brown

Dr Sarah Prichard

HR Director – UK Construction Services, Balfour Beatty

Andrew Mooney Project Director, Costain Andy Mitchell CBE, CEO, Thames Tideway Tunnel

Christina Jackson

Andy Mitchell CBE

CEO, Thames Tideway Tunnel

Dan Platten, Health

Anusha Shah

Founder & CEO Plan for Earth, Chair, Thames Estuary Partnership

David Evans

Benita Mehra

Director of Strategic Assets & Property, London Ambulance Service

David Savage

Technical Director, Ground Engineering, Jacobs

Safety & Security Director, Skanska Costain Strabag JV

Managing Director, The Diversity & Innovation Co.

Partner, Charles Russell Speechlys

Dawn Childs Group Engineering Director, Merlin Entertainments

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UK Managing Director, BuroHappold Engineering

Elaine Lewis Managing Director, Cadventure, Non-Exec Director, UK BIM Alliance

Elizabeth Brown Partner, CampbellReith

Elizabeth Rickard Finance Director & Chief Engineer, Highwire

Emma Head Safety and Assurance Director, HS2

Faith Wainwright MBE Director, Skills and Knowledge, Arup


the judges THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

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the judges 44

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019


Fred Garner

Paula Chandler

Sector Director – Rail, Taylor Woodrow

Senior Design Manager, Bouygues (U.K.)

Gary Elliott

Louise Ward

Rand Watkins

Founder & Chief Executive, Elliott Wood Partnership

HSEQ Director, Siemens Mobility

Associate Director, Atkins

Hanif Kara

Lucy Howard

Rina Goldenberg Lynch

Design Director - AKT II, Professor in Practice Harvard GSD

Director, Turner & Townsend Infrastructure

CEO, Voice At The Table

Marci Bonham

Roberta Downey

Managing Director, Accenture

Managing Director Insulated Panels (IRE) & FSEL Europe, Kingspan

Partner, Hogan Lovells International

Jacqui Kennedy

Marianne Kilpatrick

Commercial Director, Major Projects, VolkerRail

Practice Director Transport Consulting & Advisory, SNC-Lavalin Atkins Transport Consulting & Advisory

Helen Barrow

James Stewart Vice Chair, KPMG UK

Jane Duncan OBE Principal, Jane Duncan Architects & Interiors, RIBA Past President, ABS President

Mark Jaggard Divisional SHEQ Director Places & Communities, ENGIE – UK & Ireland

Sarah Davidson Associate Professor, The University of Nottingham

Sharon Fasanya Managing Director, Facet Consulting

Simon Kirby Associate Senior Adviser, Nichols Group

Martin Lacey

Sue Percy

Managing Director, WestGlen

Chief Executive, CIHT

Karin Mueller

Mary Rose Griffiths

Director, Liebfrog

Partner, Board Member, Gardiner & Theobald

Kath Moore MBE

Matthew Cova

Managing Director, Women Into Construction CIC

Managing Director, Kier Construction

Katharine Blankley

Mike Hickson

Interior Design Director, BDP

Programme Director, HS2

Lesha Chetty

Mustafa Al-Rikabi

Managing Director, Ankura

Divisional Director, Hurley Palmer Flatt

Linda Hausmanis

Neesha Gopal

Chief Executive Officer, Institute of Workplace and Facilities Management

Regional Director, Façade Engineering (UK and Europe)

Niall Healy

Sylvia Churba Director, Churba Engineering

Ted Newell Founder & MD, Assess Renew Collaborate (ARC)

Teresa Borsuk Senior Partner, Pollard Thomas Edwards

Thomas Edgcumbe Managing Director ( UKCS North and Midlands), Balfour Beatty

Victoria Hills Chief Executive, Royal Town Planning Institute

Managing Director, healycornelius design consultancy

Nicola Hindle Managing Director, Consulting and Rail, Amey

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The Judging Process The Judges A group of 69 senior executives from various industries were carefully selected as the evaluation panel of independent judges. Their objective was to review the nominations and interview each of the finalists.

Why An Interview With The Judges? A face-to-face interview allows the judges to further assess each finalist’s skills, achievements etc. The interview also complements their review of the submitted nomination forms.

The Judging Day The judges were organised into 22 groups; each group was made up of 3 judges and interviewed a number of finalists within their assigned categories. Nomination forms and any supporting documents were reviewed by the judges prior to a nominee being selected as a finalist. Each nomination was evaluated and scored out of a total of 5 points. The next stage of the process was a face to face interview with the judges.

The Finalists Time With The Judges This was an opportunity for the finalists to engage the judges by telling them the story of their success. Each judge awarded points across the same criteria. After the interview, all finalists answered one final question: “why they should win the award in their category?” to a separate panel of 3 judges. Each finalist’s overall score was the sum of the scores from the interview with the 3 judges for their category plus the scores from the other 3 judges on the final question. The finalist with the highest score in each category was selected as the winner in that category.

The Most Distinguished Winner Of 2019 This award is for the finalist who impressed the judges the most and scored the highest among all the finalists.

FAQs WHAT DO THE JUDGES EVALUATE? WHO ARE THE JUDGES? WHERE DO THEY COME FROM? Zars Media invites judges from countries all over Europe. Judges may be executives with social innovation expertise, business people, educators and university administrators and leading practitioners in the field.

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Judges will review all the entries within their assigned categories and give their scores as per the guidelines. This will include reviewing the nomination forms and any confidential supplemental documents and project information that is included in the application.

HOW DO YOU CHOOSE THE JUDGES?

IS THE JUDGING BY INVITATION ONLY, OR CAN I APPLY TO BE A JUDGE?

We usually look for executives with backgrounds relevant to the event and with more than 20 years’ experience. We actively recruit and also take suggestions from partners, mentors and past judges.

We recruit judges after screening their profiles using LinkedIn and other news sources. We are happy to consider suggestions. If you'd like to be considered, or suggest future judges, please email judges@wiceawards.com

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019


INTERESTED IN NOMINATING FOR 2020 THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS?

www.wiceawards.com

THE EUROPEAN EUROPEAN WOMEN WOMEN IN IN CONSTRUCTION CONSTRUCTION && ENGINEERING ENGINEERING AWARDS AWARDS >> >> MAY MAY 2018 2018 2019 THE

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the judging day 48

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— Alex Naraian President, CIAT

WICE Summit

Speakers

Bobby Chatterjee Managing Director, FTI Consulting

Carol Massay CEO, EasyBuild

Catherine Schalk - Moderator Executive Director and Founder, Inkwazi Kommunications

Cristina Lanz-Azcarate Director & Co-Founder, atelier EURA, LDN & SE Chair NAWIC UK & Ireland

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— David Evans Managing Director, The Diversity & Innovation Co.

David Picton

Dr Clara Seeger (PhD) Founder, Enlightened Leaders

Dr Marianna Kopsida Product Applications Engineer, Trimble

Communication & Negotiation Strategist and Coach

Founder, Pride Road

Liz Kentish

Melanie Lilley

Lisa Raynes

Founder and Managing Director, Hengist Inspired

Managing Director, Kentish & Co

Rina Goldenberg Lynch

Maria Coulter The Construction Coach

Marian Ferguson

Occupational Health Operations Manager, HSES, Balfour Beatty

Robert Cheeseman

Partner, Energylab Consulting

Sandi Rhys-Jones OBE

Public Affairs and Mentoring, Women in Property

Marion Ellis Managing Director, BlueBox Partners

Sophie Smith

Karin Mueller

Director, Liebfrog

CEO UK & Ireland, Arcadis

Mark Cowlard

CEO, Voice At The Table

Building Surveyor, Infrastructure UK & Europe, Atkins

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Meet the Finalists CONGRATILATIONS from Zars Media proud organizer of European Women in Construction and Engineering Awards 2019

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CLAIRE FENWICK — BEST WOMAN LAND SURVEYOR

ALLISON BURZA — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR

“Together we can shape the future. I love my job and am excited to see where technology will take the geomatics profession and hope that I can inspire the next generation to join us and lead the way.”

“Leadership means recognising that even though we might not have all the answers, we must still recognise the need for change. I hope the WICE Awards can help us along that path.”

EMMA WILTSHIRE — BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW “I believe that everyone should love their job and if you love your job and put your whole heart into it you will succeed.”

AGATHE LE MOING — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “The WICE awards give women the opportunity to show how proud they are to work in the Construction and the Engineering industries and I was honoured to be one of them.”

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DIMITRA VOUKIA — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER

ANDREA SARA MARTÍNEZ MAROTO — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER “The WICE nomination has already been an award in itself as well as an unforgettable experience. I would like to be an inspiration for other women engineers to get into the Rail industry.”

“Engineering can be a very challenging but at the same time deeply rewarding profession. It is truly inspiring to see so many different women talking with the same passion about it!”


AMELIA CARMAN — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION

BARBARA DIXON — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGIST

“With the continuous advances in sustainable technology and digital innovation, it is such an exciting time to be building a career within the construction industry.”

“Work Hard….and be nice to people.”

AMY KAM — BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER “As within society, we need women to make the construction and engineering world perfect. I truly believe that in the construction industry we are ‘stronger together’.”

ELEANOR SILLERICO — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “Tunneling is my passion! Although it is a challenging industry, I enjoy every moment I spend working in tunnels and working with tunnellers both male and female.”

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ANA PALACIOS — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS

BIANCA REES — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

“I love my career and my job, and if I had to choose what to be when I grow up again, I would undoubtedly choose Civil Engineering.”

“Working in construction provides a great opportunity to drive sustainable solutions in order to reduce the effects of climate change, the challenge is great, but the rewards are immeasurably greater.”

BETHAN HELLINGS — BEST WOMAN INTERIOR DESIGNER

CAROLINE RAYNOR — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR

“The whole process pushed me completely out of my comfort zone. Now, I can confidently say that I am proud of myself and my achievements. It’s a very empowering thing.”

“Construction is an amazing, challenging, inspiring and unique environment and I would recommend it to everyone as a career regardless of gender.”

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EVA LINNELL CAMINO CIMADEVILLA — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “There is still much work to be done to achieve real gender equality in the construction sector and I hope that future generations will be able to enjoy it. I feel very proud of being part of this change.”

— BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “I would never have done half of these things without a bit of encouragement. This industry needs us so take a chance, and over the years you will build a strong foundation for success.”


CLAIRE SCRIMGEOUR

CARRON FREENEY — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER

— BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY

“I’ve always been proud to be a chemical engineer working on some of the largest and most complex projects in the world. I’ve never seen a limit to what I or other women can achieve.”

“Raising mental health awareness, getting people talking, educating and reducing the stigma all have a positive impact which will help reduce the terrible statistics we see in the construction industry.”

ELIZABETH BIGGINS

AMBER SHAFFI

— BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

— BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT “Question everything, disrupt and innovate are the new waves of change in construction, who said construction is boring?”

ALEX GILES — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “Innovation leaders are made not born; every one of us has the ability to change the world.”

“Whatever your view of construction I can only speak from experience. At Kier I have found people of integrity and kindness who have constantly helped me dare to step over the boundary lines of what I thought I could achieve.”

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LAURA TYLKE — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR

CORA KWIATKOWSKI — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT

“It was a privilege to be amongst so many inspirational and talented women on judging day, promoting women in construction and engineering.”

“It lies within all our responsibility to create an industry where striving for excellence in design, adding value and promoting diversity doesn’t have a gender.”

BRYONY COOMBS — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION

EMMA HALE — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION

“My aim is to inspire other women to join and thrive within the industry that I love. If I can make my business and our industry just a tiny bit better, so others can succeed, I’ll have done what I set out to do.”

“It’s great to see women as leaders in the industry becoming the norm, and I hope I can help inspire others to join us.”

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CHLOE HAND

ASH QURAISHI — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “I feel extremely privileged to be chosen as a finalist for such a prestigious award that recognises and values women that work hard and greatly contribute to the industry.”

— BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT “I believe in making your own opportunities through your own actions”


AMY KWOK — BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER

ELITE SHER

“It is an honour to be shortlisted. Preparing for the WICE Awards is fantastic way to take a step back and think about what we have achieved.”

“We are at an exciting moment in the AEC industry where we are no longer just consumers of software, but we are also creating software in order to shape our future, which I hope will be disruptive and diverse.”

— BEST WOMAN SOFTWARE ENGINEER

KATHRYN DAVIES ELOHOR HURLEY-SIMISTER ANNE DUGDALE — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER “I saw the shortlist and thought, I’m in good company here.”

— BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER “The value of doing the right thing for the right reason is never truly lost on results. I am grateful to have crossed paths with the remarkable people who encourage me to strive for the best.”

— BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW “I truly believe that the construction industry works best when diverse talent is supported in a working environment which encourages and enables, and hard work and ambition is rewarded.”

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LAURA SOLER MUROLAS — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR

GILL KERNICK — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

“We should start holding a mirror up to ourselves and start asking some uncomfortable questions about our own leadership... Perhaps then we will begin to learn.”

BRYONY GOLDSMITH — BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT

ELLIE WILSON — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “I dream that one day, with the help of all the talented women in the construction industry, supportive employers like Balfour Beatty and awards such as WICE, that my 2-yearold niece will no longer view this as a male industry.”

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“It’s a really exciting time to be in the industry, I’m passionate about what I do, to me that’s more than just the ‘day job’. I aspire to be a visible woman, a team player and a leader.”

EMMA RADOWICZ — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “It has been truly inspiring to hear the journeys and experiences of the other nominees and how we are collectively shaping our teams, organisations and industry.”


CATHERINE TORON — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “Fight for the things that you care about but do it in a way that will lead others to join you.” - Ruth Bader Ginsburg

LAURA SALEH-TASSAN — BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “If you talk about it, it’s a dream, if you envision it, it’s possible, but if you schedule it, it’s real. ” - A.Robbins

CARMEN VILCHES GONZALEZ CLAIRE BROUGH — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “Working in a non-traditional role, social sustainability has always been a challenge; but I am passionate about creating opportunities and changing the face of our future workforce.”

— BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “I feel the construction industry as a second skin that needs to be nurtured and cared for. It’s what I am, what I do and the most visible part of me.”

EMILY MARNER — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “There is no failure except in failing to try. Failure is the only high road to success. Keep on trying, it is better to be a has-been than a never will be. If you try you might, if you don’t you won’t.”

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HANNAH SCHAAPKENS — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER “Having this event shows and celebrates progress for gender balance in our industry, The women I have met have been amazing and are what makes this event and working in this industry so special.”

ELENA MORAL — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER “Engineering is fascinating, so we must ensure that women take part and enjoy the wide variety of great and interesting possibilities that it offers.”

CONSTANCE DESENFANT — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT

CAROLINA FRADEJAS UFANO — BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER “I look forward to a future (world) where professional awards do not depend on gender but proactivity.”

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“Forget that this task of planet-saving is not possible in the time required. Don’t be put off by people who know what is not possible. Do what needs to be done and check to see if it was impossible only after you are done.” - Paul Hawken

GAIL HUNTER — BEST WOMAN STRUCTURAL ENGINEER “Believe in yourself and say yes to the opportunities that come your way. It can open up so many possibilities in your career.”


ÉTÁIN NEARY — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION

BARBORA HALLAMSKALOVA — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER

“Working in a maledominated industry does not diminish our femininity. I’d like to encourage other young women in construction to be self-assured, confident in their abilities and comfortable sharing their opinions.”

ECE CAKIR AIDAN — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT “Progress in this industry is not a linear path to the top, but an expanding multidisciplinary circle of inspirational colleagues.”

“Have your cake and eat it…any day… anytime!”

MING YAN ANNA LAU — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR “Being a Civil Engineer and a Quantity Surveyor has allowed me to find areas of work that sparks my passion. Honoured to be a WICE finalist, through the process I have met many inspirational women with the same passion!”

LAURA WALKER — BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW “Trying to be a man is a waste of a woman” - Coco Chanel

GIULIA LANCELLOTTA — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “Although it’s a male dominated industry, I never thought that being a woman would limit my possibilities. I always reach out for new opportunities and follow my passions.”

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DR EVA GKENAKOU — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

FAYE CLAMP — BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT

“My aim is to weave sustainability into daily decision making as it’s about changing systems and mind sets”

“I have reflected on my achievements and been invigorated by the passion and commitment to diversity in our industry. I hope rising talent is inspired to join us in shaping the future for the better.”

JACKIE HALL — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “I know I am positively promoting the industry I love and changing perceptions for generations to come.”

EMUESIRI OKORO — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “Being recognised for my contribution to the engineering and construction industry is simply amazing but what’s even more amazing is our collective success as accomplished female professionals in the industry and how far we have come in the strive for equality and inclusivity.”

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LEEN SAEB — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “I believe every woman has the power within her that shines out when in the right environment and supported by those who seek success. The sector is certainly moving towards success by the efforts of these hardworking women.”


LESLEY CAMPTON — BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER

EILEEN LONGWORTH — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “I believe that the barriers to achieving the success we want and deserve in the construction industry have been lifted… I am living my dream.”

“Bored with your everyday job? Then you are not in Civil Engineering. Every day as a Civil Engineer brings new challenges and adventures.”

MARIA MAMOURA — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION

MARIA DEL PILAR FITZPATRICK — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR “I feel accepted in the industry as a woman who has had to learn on the job. This is something I have been able to do with the help and support of Balfour Beatty, in a culture which promotes learning and development.”

“Along with my team, we might not always have the best answer, but I am sure we will always have the best question to challenge the status quo of the established industry.”

DEIRDRE MCGINN — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “In 2019, we continue to lose talented women from our industry, which we simply can’t afford. WICE is an incredible force to address this by showcasing outstanding female role models and breaking down the barriers for the future women of our industry.”

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JUSTINA JOB

GEMMA PEIRÓ LOPEZ — BEST WOMAN LAND SURVEYOR “There is always so much more for us to learn and achieve. Never stop believing this.”

— BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT “Never be afraid to shine or share your knowledge with others; you never know who you might end up inspiring.”

MO O’CONNELL — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR

KATY HICKS — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION “I am proud to be a young woman in construction and the WICE awards have given me the opportunity explore further the positive changes in diversity.”

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“I know I am positively promoting the industry I love and changing perceptions for generations to come.”

MACARENA N MARTÌN — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “Don’t let others’ preconceived ideas limit your potential. These awards are a great way of giving visibility to many talented women already breaking the stereotypes of the industry.”


EMILY HUSBAND

CLAIRE SHACKLEY

— BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER

— BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER

“It is important for engineers to be inspiring future generations to follow in our footsteps, and I believe workforce diversity is key to driving improvements in the rail industry.”

What would happen if we encouraged all women to be a little more ambitious? I think the world would change.” – Reece Witherspoon

JAMI CRESSER-BROWN — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT “I am having the most fun being an architect since I started working 8 years ago. I am excited to be one of the many amazing women who are shaping a new version of the architecture profession.”

HELEN ASTON — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER “Gender diversity is so important in engineering and celebrating the success of women is a great way to encourage the next generation of female engineers.”

CARMELINA FUGACCIA — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “It doesn’t matter who you are, where you come from, or what industry … the ability to thrive begins within you”

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KATE CARPENTER — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “I am proud to support those joining and rising in our profession, regardless of gender; background, or any other factor, so that diverse design communities can respect diverse user communities.”

MARIA MORENO HERRERO — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR

FARHEEN AHMED — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “Never give up, voice your opinion and don’t work in silos as communication plays a big role in promoting yourself and for successful delivery of work. Always be optimistic and try to keep a work life balance.”

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EMILY AGUS — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us.” - J.R.R. Tolkien

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

“I am a witness of the achievements that other women have made in this world and it motivates me and pushes me further to keep learning and contributing to increase diversity awareness.”

EMILY GUEST — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “I love what I do. I feel so fortunate to work in an industry where you can solve a problem, design the solution, then bring it to life!”


LOUISE COLLEY — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “I really believe that leading and building teams of diverse individuals and empowering them to bring something unique to a project produces results.”

EVA MILLS — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER

VICKY ERNST — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “Be yourself. Be confident in your abilities, be confident in who you are and be confident in being different. It is all about the changes you will make.”

HOLLY NEWMAN — BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT “We owe it to ourselves and our colleagues to make every working day challenging, motivating and most importantly enjoyable.”

LIZ RAWLINSON

“I am proud of the dual passions I have for engineering and creating a diverse workplace. What we do every day is amazing. It’s fantastic to celebrate that!”

— BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “I’ve been lucky enough to work with people who appreciate my unique skills and the difference I bring to the team, which has made me proud to be a minority. I hope to be a part of creating that same environment for others and to welcome diversity in all its forms into the industry.”

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CIDALIA HOOKWAY — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “Be yourself, because everyone else is taken!”

LISA CATRIN MCATEER — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER “Working in Balfour Beatty’s Rail business is an exciting environment to carve a successful career as a woman. Every step each one of us makes is a step in the right direction for future generations to follow.”

KAHEE PARK — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT

HELEN DRYDEN — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER “Let us choose for ourselves our path in life” - Emilie du Chatelet

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“My journey through WICE has made me realised how important each individual, and their respective roles are, with the amazing people that I am surrounded by today. We are an amazing team!”

MARJORIE GREVELING — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “Being a female Tunnel design manager for a team which is 95% male is special. Hopefully WICE will contribute so one day the gender divide will be balanced.”


MANDY OSBORNE — BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER “Winning isn’t just about coming first, it’s about performing better than your own self every next time.”

LINA SODERBERG — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION “You have to accept whatever comes and the only important thing is that you meet it with courage and with the best that you have to give” - Eleanor Roosevelt

SAMANTHA GREER — BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW

RACHEL GALLINAGH

KELLY KALAMARA — BEST WOMAN STRUCTURAL ENGINEER “Meeting all these women who have distinguished themselves in such a challenging industry has inspired me to take on new challenges and continue the hard work so I can leave my mark in engineering.”

— BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR

“Working in partnership to deliver change in equality.”

“Anyone, regardless of gender or background can achieve a successful and fulfilling career in Construction and Engineering as I have.”

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NAOMI BRACE — BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “I was absolutely thrilled to discover I had been shortlisted for a WICE award. The process allowed some rare time for self-reflection and has inspired me to consider other contributions I would like to make in future.”

LYNDSAY SMITH — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “I am immensely pleased that diversity is now finally recognised as a powerful tool in the development of high performing and successful teams.”

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JULIA SKEETE — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “I would urge reflection on the following, our success will depend on our demonstrated ability to sustain through all levels of management.”

KATHLEEN HARRISON — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “I was never told growing up that I couldn’t do anything because I was a girl, and I don’t see why I should think that now that I’m a woman working in the construction industry. If you’re good enough, gender doesn’t matter.”

MARTYNA DUGMORE — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR “The only person who can set your limits is yourself.”


JENNIE HARRISON — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “What a great opportunity to celebrate women working today in construction and engineering, as well as inspiring the next generation. Congratulations to all the finalists!”

JO WRAITH — BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT “Empowering others and striving to authentically role model my values with my colleagues, my clients, my charity and within my personal life has always been really important to me.”

KATHERINE FROST — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “I am delighted to have met so many successful women who are inspiring the next generation of girls to choose rewarding, professional careers in our industry.”

KATY KEMBLE — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “I have been really inspired by the other women I have met on this journey and have enjoyed sharing my enthusiasm for my technical specialism in geomorphology.”

ELIZABETH KAVANAGH — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “I am delighted to be a Finalist for the Digital Innovation award, not least because I now consider myself a Digital Innovator! Even more so because I focus on the oftenoverlooked people side of digital transformation.”

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ROCIO ALLENDE RUTH MCKELLAR — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR “To be a WICE finalist has been an absolute honour. It’s been great to engage with and be inspired by fellow women in the industry.”

— BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER “If we all agree generate better solutions, why is it not obvious to everyone that to improve our industry we need to be more diverse?”

SOPHIA BURTON KARYN WILLIAMS — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGIST “Being selected and standing alongside our excellent female role models has been such a privilege.”

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— BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW “It was clear from the judging day that all of us can, and will, make the ensure that women lead the way in construction!”


MARIA STRATIGAKI — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER

MONIKA TOMANA

“Never desire success. Always dream of your own personal and professional fulfilment, which are built on passion,

— BEST WOMAN IN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “Stop thinking whether you can achieve your professional goals. Start thinking how best to achieve them.”

KONSTANTINA LAZARIDOU — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT

LYNDSEY CURTIS — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION “It is a great honour to have been selected by my company amongst so many inspiring women in the industry. This has really shaped my career, making me feel empowered; and is something that I will always remember.”

MARY JOSEPH

“There is a lot more to get done to achieve sustainability excellence in the UK’s construction industry but gradual small and larger steps across various aspects of the sector are leading the way. ”

— BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “I strive to be a positive role model and have been fortunate enough to work alongside people who believe”

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KUSUM TRIKHA — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “My mission is to accelerate momentum towards the equality of women across the globe: a sustainable world needs equality.”

RACHEL BELL — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “My mantra of #standtall is all about taking a deep breath and just going for it, especially if the ‘it’ is outside of your comfort zone. Get stuck in – the construction industry has something for us all.”

NOTA NIKOLAKOPOULOU — BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “I want the construction world to be a place that my authority, decisions and plans will not be questioned and rejected just

KATHRYN MACOY — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “I am honoured to have been part of the WICE Awards and having the opportunity to meet so many impressive and inspirational women who are changing the perception of our industry.”

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PAMELA SHERWOOD — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR

JO DRYDEN — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS

“Leadership has nothing to do with rank but everything to do with showing people they are powerful. Through continuous transitioning I envisage being a better Change Agent tomorrow than I was today.”

“Adapt to situations, embrace change and don’t lose focus on the destination, even if the journey changes course!”

KAVITA KUMARI — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “My journey so far has been enjoyable yet challenging.”

EMMA HOOPER — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “We need to value our information, change our mindsets, our contracts and our processes. Only then will we realise the real benefits from digitisation. #resetconstruction.”

LISA FORDE — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “Working as a woman in construction has enabled me to become both a member and a leader of many diverse, talented and passionate teams.”

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GRETTA STARKS

VESPER TUCKER

FIONA JONES

CLEMENTINE GUILLET

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR

“My passion for mentoring others is born out of my gratitude to those who have mentored me.”

“Embrace feeling uncomfortable, in order to keep growing.”

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR “I didn’t realise how inspired I would be mentoring those at the start of their career on days when it feels like gender issues in construction remain very, very real time spent with my younger colleagues reminds me that change is coming.”

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR “We are all the masters of our own destiny but the support and encouragement from key people through the years has motivated me to strive for more than I thought possible.”

ALISON GRAHAM — BEST FEMALE MENTOR

ISABEL CASHMAN — BEST FEMALE MENTOR “Diversity in the Construction Industry will enable standards to be challenged, allowing buildings to be more inclusive and meet the needs of everyone within society.”

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“As a mentor my approach is based on an adapted proverb “Give a person a fish and you feed them for the day; teach them to fish and you feed them for a life time.” - Anon

KATE CORRIGAN — BEST FEMALE MENTOR “Enabling everyone to truly be themselves is the key to fostering talent and empowering us all to realise our full potential. Only when we do this will we see the results true diversity and


SARAH WILKES

ALEX LAWRENCE

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR

HEATHER WILLIAMS

“I feel privilege to be associated with such a talented, inspiring group of people. Diversity comes in many forms. The WICE Awards reinforce why we should celebrate our individuality and remember we are changing our industry together.”

“Our industry shapes societies for all. Inspiring and helping people to flourish through mentoring is a privilege and a hugely fulfilling part of my life.”

— BEST FEMALE MENTOR “Everyone is valuable. Every voice has something to say.”

SARAH MORGAN — BEST FEMALE MENTOR “Through my life several mentors have made a real progress and given generously of their time and experience. I now I take pleasure from recognising potential in my mentees and seeing them flourish.”

EMMA COOPER — BEST FEMALE MENTOR “I’m really proud to have been nominated; I feel this is a reflection of the mentoring support I’ve received throughout my own career and validates the approach we take at Hampshire County Council to nurture the next generation of engineers.”

CHLOE TUCKNOTT — BEST FEMALE MENTOR

YASEMIN KOLOGLU — BEST FEMALE MENTOR “We must learn to turn judgement into curiosity in order to achieve equality and diversity in our lives.”

“I love to help people see that nothing is out of reach, and that they can achieve dreams bigger and brighter than they’d imagined possible.”

LAURA MARKESON — BEST FEMALE MENTOR “I owe so much of my career success and fulfilment to the mentors that have supported me along the way. It is an absolute pleasure to be able to give back that same invaluable support to my mentees.”

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CHRISTIAN MILLS — BEST MALE MENTOR

SAM LUKE — BEST MALE MENTOR “I currently formally mentor 10 people, 8 of whom are women and for me it’s an absolute pleasure to be able to help, encourage and challenge them to unleash the potential they have and to see them develop into formidable leaders themselves.”

“I am proud of the successes the Women I mentor have achieved and honoured to be nominated for the WICE awards. It’s been great to meet other nominees and hear their Mentoring experiences.”

DAVID ELLIS — BEST MALE MENTOR

DAVID MURRAY — BEST MALE MENTOR “I never really considered myself as a Mentor rather as a facilitator to allow talent to be utilised to its recognise and employ their own talent gives me great satisfaction.”

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“Being nominated in the WICE Best Male Mentor category has been a hugely rewarding process. Most of all, the kind comments from my mentees will last long in my memory and are testimony to the joint benefits and mutual respect we have from working together.”


MARCUS WOOD — BEST MALE MENTOR

JOHN KIRKBY — BEST MALE MENTOR

STUART MARCHAND — BEST MALE MENTOR

“I hope that my mentoring provides the bridge to support individuals in reaching their ambitions, recognising that some require more supporting structure, is all part of mentoring.”

“I have worked with some great people during my career in construction, from a diverse variety of backgrounds.”

“I am lucky to work in part of the construction sector (town planning and environmental) that has a good gender balance and working with women as my line managers for nearly half of my career has enriched my work life immensely.”

NICK MCGOUGH — BEST MALE MENTOR

VISHWAS PAHARIYA — BEST MALE MENTOR “I believe in holistic mentoring, not losing the sight of long-term direction while exploring the short to medium term goals and keeping the expected core behaviours at the heart of the process.”

“I have an incredibly talented team at Weston Williamson + Partners of which over 60% are women architects, making the learning process through the WICE Awards invaluable and really highlighting the importance of great mentorship in ensuring a diverse and healthy profession.”

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KOSAR AKRAM — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER

MALGORZATA GRABOS — BEST WOMAN LAND SURVEYOR

“Obstacles are synthetic. What is not, is potential. Our safety boots can be as small as size 3/4 but we walk on the reinforcement bars as leaders.”

“Always do your best in whatever you do” - My Mum

VICTORIA TYSON — BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW

SAMANTHA HUBBARD

“There are some amazing opportunities if we are brave enough to reach for them.”

— Best Woman Quantity Surveyor “Dream big, work hard and give yourself the opportunity to excel. Be resilient, be confidant and above all stay determined”

MEGAN CHURCHER — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION “You can do anything as long as you have the passion, the drive, the focus, and the support.” - Sabrina Bryan

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NICOLA SEARLE — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “Never be afraid of life’s obstacles, use them as stepping-stones to achieve your goals.”

VICTORIA WILLIAMSON — BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER “Opportunity does not knock, it presents itself when you beat down the door” - Kyle Chandler

KATE MURPHY — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT “These awards are a great way of shining a spotlight on the immense contribution women professionals make to the construction industry.”

MARTHA NILES — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER

REBECCA COATES — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “I hope events like the WICE awards will continue to encourage the next generation of females in construction, and those of us lucky enough to be finalists pass on our experiences.”

“The way in which we think of ourselves has everything to do with the how our world sees us and how we see ourselves successfully acknowledged by the world” - Arlene Rankin

MELISSA GASKINS — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT “It’s only at events like this that allow you to evaluate your journey and see how far you have come. I believe this is important to challenge your own perception of yourself in order to grow as a person.”

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MARZIA BOLPAGNI — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION

KAREN DAVIES

“Digital Innovation is for all. Yes, you included!”

— BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “This is an invaluable gathering of collaborative professional women construction & engineering, for now and future generations. ”

SHAUNA YOUNG SARAH POPOOLA — BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR “A lot of women in history have paved the way for women to succeed in life and in the workplace.”

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— BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “By challenging the way we think, behave and organise ourselves we have had a positive impact on the industry.”

RHONA MARSLAND — BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “To meet the demand of 21st century engineering challenges we need to harness all our resources, and woman are a significant part of the answer to global engineering problems.”


LOIS BERTIE — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “A career in Project Management is hugely rewarding and exciting and I am delighted to have enjoyed the challenges and opportunities that it has brought.”

LORNA BYRNE — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “The awards process has been a challenging experience due to being out of my comfort zone but rewarding at the same time as I got to reflect on all that I’ve achieved throughout my career and I’ve met some inspiring women.”

LAURA COOK KIMBERLEY DEWHIRST — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR “I want my career to inspire others to know that they too can pursue a rewarding career in engineering, regardless of gender.”

KIRSTY AYRES — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “We can no longer shy away from wellbeing in the workplace. People who are happy and valued in their roles will be more likely to stay and new people will be more attracted to join our industry.”

— BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “The variety and excitement of Engineering is enhanced by the participation of people from all backgrounds from around the world.”

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MOLLY EVANS — BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER

MIRANDA MCCABE

“The path to success is getting the best out of people. Mentorship, diversity, equality is the future of construction and engineering.”

— BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT “Growth doesn’t always happen through addition or multiplication. Moreover, sustainable growth only occurs when we recognise and celebrate our existing capabilities and potential.”

LOUISE HETHERINGTON — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER

SARAH JACKSON — BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR “I live by the mantra ‘no regrets’. If I think about it, then I have to do it.”

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“Engineering and construction are fantastic industries to work in and they’re open for everyone. We just need to open the door and let people in.”

STACEY SMITH — BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER “For me personally, FM is not just my career, but my passion, and I hope my passion encourages others within the industry to strive for more.”


RANIA KAADAN — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION “We never know how high we are till we are called to rise. And then if we are true to plan our statures touch the skies.” - Emily Dickinson.”

MARIANNA CARCANO — BEST WOMAN LAND SURVEYOR “If you are not moving forward, you are falling back” Sam Waterston.”

REGINA TUMBLEPOT — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION

the future!” Charlotte Despard, Namesake of our TBM”

SAMANTHA DEAN — BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT “Success isn’t just about what you accomplish in your life; it’s about what you inspire others to do.”

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MAEVE KENNY — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “Together, we are the pathway to success, and we are the leaders in the change we want to see within the construction industry.”

SARAH LOUGHREY LAURA DUNLOP — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “The construction industry is a fast paced, changing and challenging industry to work in. Being part of the change and helping others to be excited to work in it is a privilege.”

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— BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER “I am a civil engineer who happens to be female. I hope the other nominees and I can inspire future generations of civil engineers and that they can celebrate their successes as equals regardless of their gender.”

VICKI HOLMES — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “I absolutely believe precision and clear communication are the keys to successful digital innovation, and that’s what I push for day in, day out.”


KATHERINE JACKSON — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “An industry that better reflects society will be better equipped to solve the diverse global issues the world is facing; which is why I am committed to increasing diversity in the profession.”

RACHEL GILLOTT — BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT “The WICE aim of enticing women into, and creating role models in our industry aligns very much with my personal values and opening up young minds to the possibilities and opportunities is key to improving our industry.”

RHIANNA ROSE — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “I hope that by my positive actions I can encourage people, from all walks of life, into our wonderful profession. Only when engineering is truly accessible to all will there be full equality, inclusion and diversity.”

MINA HASMAN — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “The WICE Awards stand for ‘breaking down barriers and building new heights’ which are essential to futureproofing our industry and creating a resilient, collective and inclusive environment for the next generations to thrive on.”

ZOE MOSS — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT “I approach every day the same way – when I get up every morning and put my feet on the ground… I want even the devil to think ‘oh crap she’s up!”

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SUZANNE MOORE — BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER “Never stop challenging yourself or others, to achieve the best outcome”

STACEY LOWE SALLYANNE LEWIS — BEST WOMAN STRUCTURAL ENGINEER “Never be afraid to challenge; your opinion is as worthy as everyone else’s.”

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— BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR “I love our industry and I have a passion and the drive to make it the number one choice, I want to help attract the best of the best and I want us to outperform all what we have previously succeeded to do.”


REBECCA TIPPER — BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION “I am privileged to be included in an event that recognises pioneering individuals. Ability doesn’t discriminate. The future will be built by talent, no matter what the gender.”

SOTIRIA MINTZOLI — BEST WOMAN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION “If you really want to achieve something, just do your best and it will eventually happen. Always aim high!”

SOFIA ATHANASSIOU — BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS “Trust your instinct. Follow your passion. Challenge bias.”

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TINA GUNNARSSON — BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER

RONI SAVAGE — BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT

“Engineering is a fantastic tool for creating positive impact in the world around us.”

“50% of the UK population is female, yet only 10% of the Engineering & Construction workforce is female I am determined, to be a part of the change that our industry so desperately requires”

ZOE PRICE — BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

KATRINA KOSTIC SAMEN

VICTORIA HEATH — BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY “I am passionate about Construction Health and Safety and feel very proud to have grown up in the industry.”

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— BEST WOMAN INTERIOR DESIGNER “I am passionate about designing workplaces and communities for occupiers in the built environment, and to continue to be a role model promoting a more diverse and inclusive profession for both men and women in the construction industry.”

“I am a passionate advocate for women in construction, providing encouragement to join and thrive in our exciting industry.”


VICTORIA VILLANÚA — BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION “I wanted to bring digital innovation through technology and BIM to our construction sites. Being a finalist is a great recognition of my work and has made me even more determined to continue working on it.”

ZOE HASEMAN — BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY “We have an important opportunity to make

ZOE STEVENS

NEERA KUKADIA — BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER “I don’t know many female engineers, but the few I do know, are some of the most inspiring engineers I have ever met. I feel so fortunate to be a part of this industry and I cannot wait to see what impact I can make on it.”

— BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR “I feared a career change in my forties was a leap too far, but with determination and the right support and encouragement I’ve succeeded in a way I never thought possible.”

What we do is vital to delivering the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals and now is the time to influence how we make that happen.”

SAMMIE POPE — BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER “I am excited for what the WICE awards could look like in ten or twenty years after seeing the enthusiasm for the industry at the summit.”

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The 2019 Winners

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BEST WOMAN IN BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Leen Saeb

Bid Manager, Asite Solutions

I was so excited when I read at 3:00 am in the morning that I was selected as a finalist in Business Development category. I was also thrilled to see how everyone was supportive and happy for me. A newspaper in my country Syria, interviewed me to understand the selection process and learn more about WICE. It was a chance to talk about women in engineering and construction awards and encourage such initiatives to support women in the Middle East. It feels amazing to win the Business Development category. I believe it is my duty now to continue being a role model for young men and women in the industry. Business development is not about responding to bids and RFIs; it is about creating a long-lasting relationship with our clients, exceeding their expectations and creating value for money for each project we are involved in; and these are the main concepts we should expand in the sector. The construction and engineering industry are in continuous change because right now somewhere two people are exchanging ideas and creating new concepts on how to improve the sector and its business processes. We, as engineers have a mission to continually grow this industry. I’m planning to use my win to raise awareness in Europe and the Middle East to support young girls to become

scientists and engineers. Engineering is a main pillar to shape the future and it is certainly more balanced and coherent when both women and men engineers are engaged in the process. This starts from home when girls are encouraged to innovate and learn. I’m also planning to use my win to help the younger generation in my company and within the sector. It is an investment when we work on peoples’ skills and capabilities; that is when we are able to win businesses more than ever. This happens by teaching the younger generation entering the sector now and helping them adapt and overcome challenges they may face. It is when we empower each other, we can make a powerful environment for all to work and innovate. It has been an exciting experience taking part of the awards. It is very enriching to meet all these hard working and intelligent women from all around the sector where we had a chance to learn from each other and support one another. I wish we are at this time of life where we don’t have to compete against each other as women but compete against each other as engineers and all are equal. I advise all companies for next year to recognise the skills they have in their workplace and nominate them for WICE. The world is moving towards technology and digitalisation, and engineering is the tool for that. It is my duty as an engineer and as female leader to utilise my skills and my education to be part of this future. I would like to thank my country Syria that laid the foundation for me which I am only building on now, to the UK that opened a world of opportunities for me, to my parents who have always been there for me, to Asite; the workplace that feels like home and to Craig for his love and support.

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BEST WOMAN CIVIL ENGINEER AND A DISTINGUISHED WINNER

Tina Gunnarsson Temporary Works Engineer, Balfour Beatty

they can do 50% of the role, they will apply. Women will read the same job description, and only if they can do each and every single task that is listed, they will apply. This resonated deeply with me. I wondered if I had been missing out on 50% of opportunities by simply not considering them as opportunities that I was capable of saying yes to. So go for those opportunities.

What an incredible category to live up to. Every woman I met at the WICE Award Summit deserves an award. To have so much talent, enthusiasm and passion for construction in a single room is absolutely incredible. It is an honour to have the opportunity to meet so many inspiring people in one place. As a woman in engineering and construction, it is sometimes difficult to remember that you are in the company of female engineering talent. The WICE awards are a great reminder that we are in it together. My parents were the first I shared the news with after finding out I had been shortlisted. They have been incredibly supportive from the very first moment I decided to pursue engineering - despite not really understanding what I actually do, beyond ‘digging holes in the ground and filling them with concrete’. Winning this award provides affirmation that I made the right career choice – a decision I still sometimes question when my technical competence as a young female engineer is questioned. Many female engineers I have spoken to want the same thing - to be treated equally, and be given opportunities based on merit, not gender. My parents taught me to always say yes to an opportunity. The trouble is, opportunities are rarely just given to you. A lot of the time you have to create your own opportunities. I was once told that as a broad generalisation, men will read a job description, and if

Engineering is a fantastic tool for creating positive impact in the world around us. The highlight of my career to date has been working with the charity Bridges to Prosperity. I had the opportunity to travel to Rwanda to build a footbridge to provide a safe year-round crossing for 4300 people to access schools, hospitals and markets. It provided safe access to education for 800 children. Being able to use my engineering skills to create direct positive impact was an amazing, humbling and eye-opening experience. Your opportunities might look slightly different. They might look similar. I want to thank everyone who helped make Minigo footbridge a reality and everyone at Balfour Beatty who has empowered me to grow and develop professionally. Thank you to all the fantastic people who have supported me, believed in me and created opportunities for me along the way. I now aspire to create opportunities for others. To nominate, encourage and empower the people around me, and open up new avenues for them. I believe everyone is capable of making a change for the better; you just need a little bit of enthusiasm. I am by no means the best woman civil engineer. But I will always aspire to be. The definition of best will change and grow as I do, and I hope to take everyone along on this journey with me.

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BEST WOMAN CONSULTANT AND A DISTINGUISHED WINNER

Roni Savage Managing Director, Jomas Associates

The WICE finalist process, afforded me the opportunity to celebrate my achievements, and also, that of other females, within an industry, where we make up only 10% of the workforce. I spend some of my time speaking at schools and community events, showcasing the rewards of working in construction, and the benefits of challenging the status quo. As CEO of Jomas Associates, an award-winning Engineering and Environmental Consultancy that I started in 2009, I am proud to be listed amongst the top suppliers to the construction industry. Being a WICE ‘Best Woman Consultant’ finalist has been an extremely humbling experience. I have spent my career working in an industry served predominantly by men, traversing challenges and enjoying opportunities, not coming across many others who looked anything like me. This lack of diversity in the industry, became even more prevalent as I rose to senior positions, becoming Associate Director of one of the UK’s largest Engineering Consultancies, before starting Jomas. A pleasant surprise lay in store for me when I attended the WICE finalist day. I met with a room full of over 200 women trailblazers, all working in the construction and engineering industry. It was a refreshing experience, sharing stories which were not too dissimilar. It was an inspirational and uplifting event.

I thoroughly enjoy working within the fastpaced construction industry, and I look forward to using this award as a platform to further promote diversity and inclusion, and to continue to inspire the next generation to consider a career in the industry. As a Chartered Engineering Geologist, I am fortunate to enjoy a successful career in the construction industry, and to have built a business which focuses on high quality delivery, and client satisfaction. I am excited about the opportunity this gives me to continue to be a role model to others, particularly the female engineers who work for Jomas, as well as my wider network of mentees. I am determined to raise the profile of construction related careers as a rewarding prospect, to enable more diverse future generations. It would be a delight to have more of Jomas female engineers as finalists for future awards.

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BEST WOMAN CONTRACTOR

Caroline Raynor Work Package Manager & Principal Archaeologist, Costain

I am incredibly lucky that my role in construction combines two of my greatest passions; archaeology and engineering. To be recognised as Best Woman Contractor 2019 is an exceptional accolade and I am pleased beyond words to represent both my team and my company. I am most excited that this represents positive affirmation of the acceptance of the relationship between archaeology and construction. Particularly in major infrastructure projects and the value that the alignment of these disciplines brings in terms of efficiency, safety, innovation, engagement and outreach. I love my job in construction and am proof that the roles within the industry are changing to encompass an ever widening interdisciplinary outlook. I graduated from the University of Liverpool with a BA Honours Degree in Near Eastern Archaeology and arrived in my present role via a most unconventional route… before I joined my present employer I was working as a landscape surveyor in Iraq. I did not imagine that this unique pathway would lead me to an award winning role. My current project allows me to act as a bridge between the world of construction and the world of commercial and research archaeology, while making clear and defined commercial and engineering decisions regarding the way the works are conducted. I started out with a very specific vision regarding how I would utilise my role as Project Manager and Principal Archaeologist to incorporate innovation into the works. This included the drive to procure and deliver safe and environmentally sustainable solutions across a broad sphere of activities. Sustainability has been at the forefront of my work. Utilising the first all-electric non-umbilical 1.7 tonne JCB’s to market, as well as electric telehandlers, electric wheelbarrows and electric dumpers has created a bench mark in sustainability, which is key

to work in a busy inner-city area. It has also allowed a safer more efficient working environment where manual handling has been dramatically reduced and efficiency increased by a factor of five. Pre-planning and early design ensured that all of these items could be successfully accommodated and deployed with charging points being designed into the roof supports for the encapsulation structure. A successful grant application for a bespoke digital recording app has led to the benchmark development of a paper-free archaeological excavation saving thousands of pieces of paper and inefficient archiving time and costs. Having a 46% female workforce also gave me cause to review certain design and procurement avenues including the way in which we established our welfare and supporting services. Designing a site which is utilised by an almost equal number of women in the workforce has been an educating and exciting experience and allowed us to explore and consider all aspects of what it means to be a woman in construction from PPE to work stations in the labs and on-site welfare facilities. A key part of promoting and helping women to excel in construction is to plan, shape and design a workplace which is supportive of a female workforce. Working with an exceptional construction, engineering and archaeological team to deliver these works has been the greatest of privileges. So many facets of our work are unique – from the design of the encapsulation structure (big tent!) to the work with the human remains in the burial ground – all of it has been driven by ensuring that care, dignity and respect are the watchwords for the work. However, the care, dignity and respect does not stop with the attention given to those buried within the burial ground. I believe that one of the key drivers for the work has been to ensure that the team treat each other with the same care, dignity and respect. I encourage them to cherish each other’s differences and help to nurture existing skills, values and knowledge while learning from each other and the broader interdisciplinary site teams. Diversity and interdisciplinary thinking is the key to changing our working environment for the better and I am proud and excited to be delivering a project which has these values at it’s very core.

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BEST WOMAN IN DIGITAL INNOVATION

Vicky Ernst Head of Innovation Transformation, Arcadis

sharing my experiences with other candidates as they consider their submissions next year.

I was delighted when I was informed that I had won the 2019 WICE Best Woman in Digital Innovation award, and ecstatic to know I was amongst some other great Arcadis finalists! I joined them in promoting the great news on social media. I also called a close friend and former colleague, who is an industry role model for me. Winning means so much as it’s the culmination of my efforts and a celebration of the last 25 years of my career. I’m proud to be recognised for making a difference to people’s lives through and promoting the importance of digital innovation in our industry. As a WICE winner, I want to encourage other women, both at Arcadis and across the industry, to be confident and seek out opportunities to be recognized for the great work that they do. I hope I can be of some inspiration to those who wouldn’t usually put themselves forward for an award. We are all focused on deliverables, but I would encourage colleagues to take the time to reflect and be proud of their achievements and those of their teams. I look forward to coaching and

Taking part in the WICE awards this year has been wonderful, if intense at times! Preparing for my presentation and the judging panel alongside my day-to-day work required me to focus, step back and reflect upon what I have achieved during my career. The judging day was a great opportunity to network and share learnings with other people in the industry. The WICE awards shine a light on the people who work in the world of construction and engineering, which has historically been underrepresented by women. I strongly encourage you all to apply to these and other industry awards, so we as women can stand strong and embrace our achievements, meet like-minded peers and strive to be our best selves. My advice for any company considering submissions for the 2020 WICE awards would be to make sure that there is support for all nominees. Individuals need practical as well as personal support, as the process can take time. Nominees may need to juggle normal work and the submission process, without feeling like they have let anyone down or neglected any area of their work. I would also suggest that we celebrate those people not usually in the spotlight, mixing up the opportunity for recognition.

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BEST WOMAN ELECTRICAL & MECHANICAL ENGINEER

Eva Mills Associate Director, Hydrock

finding common ground, then working collaboratively to leverage those differences is what will drive change, and the awards night provides us with a perfect opportunity to rejoice.

I had to take a deep breath before opening the announcement email. After I’d completed my initial submission, I’d thrown myself back into project delivery, so it took some time for the news I was a finalist to sink in. Once it did, I had to overcome my natural instinct to not tell anyone! Seeing delighted reactions of others, from my children to the Hydrock board to old clients, I began to get a sense of excitement and pride. Preparing for the judging process required much soul searching and I’ve had to challenge myself to think about what’s really important. Actually, winning the award made me feel as if I was back on top of the Petronas Towers, when I was literally standing on top of the world! My fellow finalists are extremely talented individuals with a huge amount of experience who also deserve recognition. Meeting people from such diverse roles across the industry on the judging day was fantastic. I looked round the room at the end of the day and found it quite emotional to realise how crucial our combined experience and knowledge is to the industry. Just being shortlisted has spurred me on to continue helping other women within the industry. We need to be holistic in our approach – it’s not just about the engineers, but about the opportunities for support staff across all departments, who are often our unsung heroines. Acknowledging our differences,

Initially, I was overwhelmed just to have been nominated. I’ve subsequently found the process to be very empowering and will definitely encourage others to participate. Reading the quotes people have supplied about me and my way of working has been a real eye opener and confidence boost. I’m particularly touched by the endorsements from clients and colleagues on my collaborative work ethos and championing of inclusivity. This reflection on my career, coupled with a recent promotion, has reignited my ambition. I now feel like the best in my career is yet to come and that I have so much more to offer. In an industry where we are facing a recruitment crisis, we all need to have faith in our abilities. Whether you win or not, the WICE awards take you through a process which gives you valuable time to focus on where you’ve come from and where you want to go next. I am now a divisional director leading over 100 engineers at Hydrock. I know that inspires our younger female engineers and hopefully encourages school girls, including my daughter, to believe in themselves, work hard and know anything is possible. Winning this award has encouraged me to stand taller, to continue thinking big and to be brave. There is more I still want to achieve. I’m extremely proud to be part of a group of women who have contributed to incredible advances in engineering and construction. Together, I’m sure we can build to new heights.

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BEST WOMAN IN ENVIRONMENT & SUSTAINABILITY

Katy Kemble Principal Geomorphologist, Jacobs

I found out I was a finalist from an excited colleague who had been following WICE on LinkedIn and had come over to congratulate me. After a little confusion and disbelief on my part, I was overwhelmed with pride to have made it through to be a finalist for the Environment and Sustainability category. For me, my career and the other initiatives I am involved in outside of work are something I enjoy doing. I have a real passion for geomorphology and developing the environment and sustainability industry. I was therefore grateful to have been nominated, let alone make it to be a finalist. I am so proud to have actually won my category and I can only thank my family, friends and colleagues for the support throughout my journey so far. I have the aim now to take this further and use my winning this award as a platform to empower and encourage others to be a part of this community. Meeting the incredible women and men at both the judging day and again at the award ceremony has made me realise how diverse and supportive this industry is as a whole. I think the awards and the people being nominated are testament to how far we want to strive to develop, promote each other and move the industry forward.

The experience of taking part in these awards has been rewarding from the offset. It initially opened a forum within my company as several of us were shortlisted as finalist. This enabled me to meet some incredible people from very different areas in Jacobs. Being able to share this with them and gain support has been key over the past few months. The panel discussions organised throughout the judging day brought up some important issues and helped facilitate discussions. The drumming session at the end then brought us together and dispelled the apprehensions and nerves from the day - it is not often you get to make loads of noise at a corporate event! The judging day also created an opportunity to meet and network with a diverse range of professionals. I really enjoyed hearing the different perspectives, exchanging thoughts and forging new relationships. I hope we as a collective can continue to pull this community together now that the awards are over for another year. I would strongly recommend taking part in the WICE awards for 2020 to any company or individual considering nominating a colleague. It has provided me with a great opportunity and I am very grateful to those in my team who put me forward. It is also nice to get recognition in such a competitive industry, providing an opportunity to celebrate the success of the individuals. I hope the future events are as successful as 2019. I also hope that any future nominees take as much from this as I have, and, get to experience that feeling of confusion and disbelief that they made it through and actually could stand a chance at winning such an award.

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BEST WOMAN IN HEALTH & SAFETY

Kate Carpenter Divisional Director, Jacobs

that development of a representative and highlyskilled workforce, in technical roles and as mentors, delivering excellent projects that benefit society. They also inspire those continuing to ensure that the most competent people reach their potential in our industry and encourage the next generation do the same. I am fortunate to have a role that enables me to contribute to road worker and road user safety across the UK. To be nominated for this award was the icing on the cake, and I was delighted to see my name among so many outstanding professionals across diverse roles. These awards raise the profile of highly skilled professionals delivering excellence in their projects and it was great to meet so many of them at the judging day. It is important that we are role models for the coming generation of women in construction in engineering, showing how fulfilling and rewarding it can be. I am proud to have supported women and men fulfilling their potential, getting professionally qualified regardless of background and route to the profession, and being recognised for their competence regardless of gender. Engineering and construction are services that must meet the needs of end users: of a school or factory, road or industrial facility. From machine controls that are intuitive and usable, to bus stops that are accessible to parents with small children or frail elderly passengers, the needs of users should drive specification and design. A diverse workforce – by all dimensions including gender, class, age and ethnicity – is more likely to understand and meet the needs of those users than the narrow unrepresentative industry of decades past. These awards celebrate

The judging day was intense, and presenting to a panel of highly recognised experts could have been intimidating but the judges immediately put me at ease and the presentation and interview were enjoyable. I was inspired by the excellent speakers from coaching to neuroscience, and equally to meet so many interesting professionals in their fields and discuss our role in delivering projects for public benefit. I have made new friends in similar and different roles, and shared ideas for how we can maximise the benefits we get from and contribute to our work in construction and engineering. I recommend it to anyone – both to nominate colleagues, and individuals in clients, suppliers and mentors for their role in the profession and to grab the opportunity if nominated. It’s instructive to capture what you do and why, and your ambition - for your own future benefit and to share with others what is possible. We should be advocates for the immense satisfaction that careers in engineering and construction can bring and the awards help to share that achievement. To organisations thinking of nominating their employees, and for anyone nominated, I recommend that you grab the opportunity – to show that as employers and individuals you embody what a diverse and empowering organisation looks like in an industry that offers great job satisfaction.

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BEST WOMAN IN HIGHWAYS

Sofia Athanassiou Commercial Director, Balfour Beatty Investments-Connect Plus (M25)

Receiving the news of making the finalist shortlist for the WICE awards was a hugely exciting and proud moment for me in a week that, like every week on the M25 DBFO, was busy with balancing stakeholders’ priorities, building relationships, contributing to meetings and workshops and leading teams towards achieving our strategic objectives. It was not until during the school run a couple of days later when an inspirational message for the students written on my daughter’s school wall helped me reflect on what the nomination truly meant for me: ‘CONNECT, LEARN, GIVE’. Suddenly, my career journey flashed before my eyes: engineering, construction and the transport sector have opened up all these avenues for me, offering a stimulating and rewarding career. CONNECT – Connecting communities through transport infrastructure; but also connecting me with the remarkable and diverse professionals that I have been fortunate enough to collaborate with. The comments made following my WICE finalist announcement by so many current and past colleagues and partners were humbling and a wonderful reminder of the many teams I have worked with and led. I will always cherish the memories of the successes we have celebrated together and the challenges we have overcome and learnt from. LEARN - I have had the privilege of working in advisory, business development and project delivery, developing breadth of expertise as well as leadership skills. The construction and engineering sector has provided endless opportunities to feed my enthusiasm for life-long learning, personal development and the development of high performing teams. I feel lucky to work for Balfour Beatty, a company that embeds professional growth and development of talent in its working culture.

GIVE - I am grateful for the opportunities that Balfour Beatty has given me to play a role in providing significant infrastructure and social value for communities across the UK; and also to provide leadership in some of the key areas that are supporting our industry to transform. These include the development and embedment of innovative commercial models that bring a cultural step-change in how we collaborate, as well as initiatives that target the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental health challenges. I’ve worked hard and with passion to enjoy successes and to overcome challenges. However, I’ve also been lucky to have been born to parents who were both engineers and to have grown up, prior to moving to the UK, in a country where engineering is recognised as a prestigious and respected profession. It fills me with sadness when every so often, at school career fairs, I meet young people, and in particular young women, who, due to misconceptions and misleading stereotypes, have discounted engineering as a career option before they have understood and fully considered it: a door to a potentially exciting and fulfilling future shut without a peek through. Let’s open it and encourage others to follow! Winning the Best Woman in Highways award is a huge honour and privilege. I was shortlisted as a finalist alongside some remarkable and distinguished colleagues with inspiring careers and significant contributions made to our industry. I am grateful for my role models, mentors, managers and peers who have supported me to get this far – in all organisations I have worked for and in my personal life. I will use the kudos this award brings to be a more visible role model for diversity and inclusion, to promote the construction and engineering sectors as an attractive career for all and to continue challenging bias in all its forms. The experience of the WICE summit and awards has fed my passion for personal development, for transforming the construction industry and for delivering high-quality infrastructure for generations to come.

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BEST WOMAN PROJECT MANAGER

Kathryn Macoy Senior Project Manager, Transport For London

I nervously awaited the email announcing the finalists for the WICE Awards and was so excited and proud to have been selected to attend the judging day. Having found out the news and sharing it with my family I spent the whole day beaming and trying to contain my excitement! To be recognised by my organisation with a nomination for the awards was a great feeling, and to have been selected as a finalist felt like a real achievement! Winning the Best Woman Project Manager is such a privilege and I’m really overwhelmed at having been recognised for the contribution I have made to the industry to date. I love my job, it’s challenging, varied and very rewarding and I hope that winning this award helps to show what opportunities there are for women in my organisation, in rail and in construction and engineering projects.

The experience of the WICE Awards has been exciting, challenging, nerve-wracking and enjoyable all at once! Through the WICE Awards I have met so many impressive and inspiring people, from the finalists in my own organisation, to the people who have given their own time to support my application and the many people that I met on the judging day. One thing I will continue to strive for over my career is greater diversity in the industry. I plan to use this experience to further my involvement in supporting women in rail, construction and engineering and as a platform to further my contributions to STEM events to show the opportunities that our industry offers to a diverse group of people. The WICE Awards are a great way for organisations to celebrate the talent and success of the women in their teams and I couldn’t recommend the WICE Awards enough for supporting and highlighting the contribution of women in our industry and celebrating the success of women in construction and engineering.

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BEST WOMAN QUANTITY SURVEYOR

Sarah Jackson Commercial Manager, nmcn PLC

I was absolutely thrilled to see my photo and name amongst the other successful women in my category. By 7 am the following morning I had already received congratulations from the Board of Directors within my company, which felt fantastic. I’ve also had support from colleagues all over the business and the support was very much appreciated. I felt the thrilling responsibility of being able to use this prestigious award to raise not only the profile of my company but also women within my sector. My family and friends were all proud of my achievement and have been there during my rehearsals!! It’s incredible that all my hard work and determination throughout my career has been recognised and rewarded. To win the award for Best Woman Quantity Surveyor is such an honour and I will ensure I use it as a platform to promote the wonderful industry we all work in. I feel an immense sense of pride that having a steadfast approach to doing the right thing and doing it well, for a greater purpose other than myself, can have an impactful effect on others. It’s amazing how an award like this can really galvanise such touching support from colleagues across the company. I am part of a generation that is breaking barriers for marginalised groups, and it’s brilliant to be having an impact on this movement. With the award by my side, it provides me with the opportunity to defy those invisible boundaries and be an inspiration for my generation and the next. I recognise what I have achieved and can’t

wait to inspire others to fulfil their own potential. I have already discussed participation in the company’s Positive Impact 2025 strategy – one of which focuses wholly on Communities. Through this, I can offer counsel, lend my expertise and inspire the pupils at the schools I’ll visit, as well as the men and women prisons we already work with, as part of our ex-offender programme. It’s wonderful that by me winning the award, it will benefit so many others. The awards process has been great to give me some time to reflect on my career and everything I have achieved to date. In my industry, women aren’t particularly good at congratulating themselves, but I can walk away from the process with my head held high knowing, and acknowledging, all of my achievements and where it has got me to today. I’ll hopefully be one of many women who will be open in acknowledging their successes! It’s great that such a platform exists to be able to do so. I can only look forward now to everything that will come. The judging day itself was an incredible experience. I’ve never witnessed so many women in one room, all of whom were supportive and encouraging, it really was so empowering. It was a nerve-wracking experience, but one I enjoyed. The talks throughout the day were extremely useful and I’m grateful for the opportunity to listen to the talent within our wonderful industry. It was so rewarding to be nominated and to be acknowledged for my contributions to the company’s success. From the experience I’ve had in the Women In Construction & Engineering judging process, I would advise my company, nmcn Plc, to nominate other women for next years’ awards. There are lots of women I work with daily that are deserving of being put forward and offered the same opportunity for their achievements to be amplified in such a public and celebratory way.

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BEST WOMAN RAIL ENGINEER

Elena Moral Project Portfolio Director, TALGO

Being the winner of the Best Woman Rail Engineer award is a great honor and privilege for me. I am really happy and proud that all my hard work has been rewarded with this recognition, considering the incredible group of talented and committed female engineers who work in our great industry. I would like to pay tribute especially to Carlos de Palacio (President of TALGO) and the rest of my colleagues, for their strong support during this process. And mainly, I would like to mention my family, as they have been a key support through all my studies, professional career and of course, my personal life. To be honest, I was delighted to be shortlisted as one of the finalists for the Best Woman in Rail of the WICE Awards. I really enjoyed the process as it provided me the opportunity to take a step back and evaluate my professional progression and the achievements that I obtained, something that our day to day doesn’t allow us to do. The judging day was a fantastic opportunity to explain and share my development in detail with successful senior leaders of the industry and to network with many amazing and outstanding women in construction and engineering. Additionally, the excellent panel of speakers during all the judging day provided us a really inspiring and encouraging set of messages.

I have worked for the last 17 years in the rail industry, focusing my career in high speed rolling stock development. Since 2012 and during 7 years, I leaded the Haramain High Speed Project in Saudi Arabia, which is probably the biggest challenge of the railway industry in the recent years. We faced huge challenges, with enormous technical (temperatures higher than 50 degrees and a big concentration of sand and dust) and management complexity (14 companies as part of the Spanish Consortium and a client with a different culture and standards), but with no doubt, what I am most proud of is that I have overcome certain ideological prejudices due to the fact of being a woman and the maximum responsible of the project in a cultural environment such as Saudi Arabia is. I managed to earn the respect and the trust of the client and my colleagues. Because what I consider really important is our knowledge, professionalism, perseverance, respect for the colleagues and the client, and a results-oriented management mentality. And as Tolani Azeed (the Most Distinguished Winner in WICE 2018) said, “what matters to professionals, clients, managers, trainees and team members is that the person is capable of delivering the work. That has nothing to do with gender”. This award gives me the opportunity to continue promoting women in construction and engineering, particularly in the rail industry. Engineering is fascinating, so we must ensure that women take part and enjoy the wide variety of great and interesting possibilities that it offers. And because women represent half of the world population, we can’t afford that all this talent does not benefit the humanity progress.

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BEST YOUNG WOMAN ENGINEER

Louise Hetherington Structural Engineer, Atkins

The construction industry has an image problem. A quick internet search shows multiple images of men in hard hats surrounded by cranes and reinforcement. And dirt. Lots of dirt. What is doesn’t show is the diversity in people, and the diversity in thought. And even more so, everyone within the images is smiling. Which is contradictory to the statistic which highlights the amount of people suffering from mental health problems in the construction industry is double the national level. But things are changing. Being a winner of a WICE Award reassures me there truly is a shift in the industry in its attitudes towards mental health, diversity and inclusion. Since graduating in 2016, I have worked hard to promote wellbeing in the industry and this award confirms that I am working with a much wider team to make this a reality. This win will enable me to promote wellbeing on a much wider platform, through the connections I have made at the summit as well as through the publicity this prestigious award brings. It will enable me to show that anyone can enter this industry and have a successful career, regardless of where you come from or the personal mountains you may climb. It also shows that the industry is listening. The statistics surrounding poor mental health in the industry are worrying, but by presenting this award to an advocate for mental health wellbeing, one message is clear. And that is that we are starting to take a stand and right our wrongs to ensure no one has to suffer alone.

Further, the WICE Awards are a fantastic to highlight we do have diverse people within our industry. We may all stand here, similar to one another. All women. But we’re not the same; we have different experiences, backgrounds, ethnicities and most importantly opinions. As a collective we may be “just women” but as a group we’re powerful and we’re changing the industry one step at a time. I am incredibly fortunate that throughout the WICE Award process I have had the opportunity to meet some fantastic women who have inspired me to continue along my journey with more enthusiasm. The whole experience has been truly humbling and being alongside such incredible role models is driving me to push forward with my aim of levelling the field within engineering, not just surrounding mental health wellbeing but also diversity and inclusion; promoting this amazing sector to all. I would have no hesitations in recommending the awards to both my own company and others. As an engineer, I don’t typically celebrate my successes, choosing to push them aside to tackle the next challenge I face. However, this award has allowed me to have the time and space to see how far I’ve come and in doing so, it has shone a light on the next steps of my career. I am truly grateful for this opportunity and have had incredible support from my colleagues and role models since finding out I was shortlisted. Whilst the introvert in me wants to shy away from the limelight, it has helped me spread my message even further than I have before and I will continue to do so having been named the “Best Young Woman Engineer”.

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BEST YOUNG WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION

Rania Kaadan Technical Consultant, Invennt

With God’s will, my family’s guidance, friend’s support, and Invennt’s belief in me, it is with great honour that my achievements have been acknowledged with the “Best Young Woman in Construction” award at the European Women in Construction and Engineering Awards. An experience I have thoroughly enjoyed, especially as it gave me an opportunity to reflect on both my academic and professional journey going over from Syria to Saudi Arabia to the UK. I want to dedicate this award to the memory of my late father, Dr. Sameh Kaadan; who always believed in my ability and encouraged me to aim high. You are gone but your belief in me has made this journey possible. And to the support, love, and care of my mother, Hasna Albarazi, and my siblings who have always guided me and kept me motivated to achieve my goals. I also extend my sincere appreciation and gratitude to my dear friends, co-workers, and team members at Invennt Ltd, without their help, this honour would not have been possible.

Whilst we should cheer the news that the construction industry is putting more effort to include women, we must also recognise that we still lag behind other industries in this area. Incentives such as the WICE Awards, serve to be of high importance to validate and celebrate the value of women’s contributions to the industry and encourage them to work harder and take pride in their success. Moreover, encourage women to be themselves even when found in a male-dominated industry and professional environment. From this platform, I hope to continue to encourage and inspire women to maintain perseverance, resilience, and agility to lead and drive positive change. Moreover, I will personally continue to spread awareness and provide knowledge on digitizing the construction industry and integrating Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning into Construction; through being an occasional speaker at industry events and soon deploying my personal research. Winning the WICE Award has definitely proved that everyone can challenge expectations of what can be achieved and the roles we can have in the industry, regardless of our age, gender, or background.

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BEST YOUNG WOMAN ARCHITECT

Miranda McCabe Architect, Stride Treglown

That first indication that my company had nominated me for this award remains one of the most gratifying moments of my short career so far. The resulting high quickly faltered on the sudden realisation that I might need to justify quite why I could be Best Young Woman Architect amongst a field of phenomenal women, that is happily only growing by the day, alongside our equally talented male colleagues. The process has prompted a great deal of soul searching to begin to answer that question, and this in itself has proved to be hugely beneficial. It’s enabled me to step back and realise the diversity of approach that I am able to have in my career. As architects, we are able to wear a great many number of hats and, particularly in this changing market, we must consistently reassess these hats and see which might need placing back on the stand or, adding to the line-up. And it became very apparent to me, in the midst of completing my nominee duties, that discovering I was dyslexic relatively late in my academic career was an enormous turning point for me, for the better, in creating my wardrobe of hats. There are an equivalent amount of female and male dyslexics in the world, and a huge number of us are diagnosed later in life. Within this group of people, female dyslexics are often diagnosed later than their male counterparts. Learning methods become essential crutches to many dyslexics – myself included. Unfortunately, late diagnosis means many students are unable to flourish in their chosen area, without these stabilisers.

My work leading Stride Treglown’s involvement with the Open City initiatives, Architecture in Schools and Open House Families speaks of my desire to use this win to further assist prospective students of architecture in finding their own bespoke learning methods. Alongside this, there is an ownership that schools of architecture need to take upon themselves in allowing for adaptability in learning. This in turn can foster the success of those that may be undiagnosed with dyslexia, or similar, to create their own learning mechanisms. In line with these necessary developments, the growing RIBA apprenticeship scheme needs to be truly celebrated for allowing junior architects to follow a different path towards accreditation, which may be more suited to them. I am hopeful that, through having the privilege to win this award, I will be able to assist in nurturing these on-going projects further. It is with this passion for learning and celebrating the potential of others that I hope to continue working towards my other passion: building a Creative Re Use studio in Stride Treglown. This studio will be nurtured by these values, emphasising on growing and building from within. These fundamentals can be wrapped up into the bundle of embracing the opportunities that are available to us. And this is no more prevalent than in our existing stock of built heritage. We are facing a potential crossroads in the route to sustainability in the construction world and, for me, it seems that the leading path would be to conserve, preserve and enhance that which we already have. Quickly all these ideas and passions become cyclical, and the WICE Awards have allowed me to see this in a clearer fashion. We must enhance an awareness of each of these areas, the talent that is growing and conserve the talent or buildings that we already have.

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BEST WOMAN IN TUNNELLING & UNDERGROUND CONSTRUCTION

Eleanor Sillerico Senior Tunnel Engineer, Mott MacDonald

my company that trusted in me. I also felt glad to know that this event is celebrated to acknowledge the remarkable work and contribution of women to the tunnelling and underground construction industry.

Throughout my career, I had the privilege to work in enormous tunnelling projects (i.e. Crossrail, HS2, and Hydropower Projects) in different countries around the world managing predominant male teams on site. This was fun but hard work as it cost me blood, sweat and tears to gain their trust and respect but also it was rewarding because once I had them on my side, I enjoyed real teamwork. I felt very honoured and humbled to know that I have been shortlisted as one of the finalists in the Best Women in Tunnelling and Underground Construction Category. I am so passionate about tunnelling and both being a finalist and 2019 winner meant the world for me. I immediately felt a deep feeling of gratefulness to God, to my parents, my family and the people within

My win is proof that whenever you do something with joy and accountability you get rewarded. I will use this exposure to inspire women and young women in the industry to achieve their full potential irrespective of cultural background, age or race. I look forward to facing the challenges that the exciting tunnelling industry will bring to me and as a Tunnel lady engineer, I know I am capable to keep contributing towards its growth. Tunnelling is my passion! Although it is a challenging industry, I enjoy every moment I spend working in tunnels and working with tunnellers both male and female. I am convinced that through hard work together with teamwork any goal in life especially when it comes to underground structures design and construction can be successfully achieved.

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BEST WOMAN FACILITIES MANAGER

Stacey Smith Portfolio Director, Macro

Air Line and what a unique environment it is for the FM industry. I have tried to use the interest of that to share my learning’s and experience, but I certainly will even more so now. Being nominated for Best Woman in Facilities Management was incredible enough, finding out I was a finalist was fantastic but to be announced as the winner, I am unbelievably honoured. Working for Mace Group I knew of the Women in Construction and Engineering Awards but I am embarrassed to admit that I didn’t know it had a Facilities Management category! It was immediately great to see FM being recognised. I was delighted at being nominated by Macro’s Director of Operations so to be picked to have shown a contribution to the industry is an amazing achievement in itself. Going through the process of becoming a WICE winner allowed me to spend time reflecting on what it is I have done and my achievements to date, not something many of us are very good at ordinarily. The experience has made me realise that I do have something to shout about! Spending time writing about myself, I become aware that I have had the opportunity to talk about such an interesting topic in the Emirates

For any companies thinking about nominating individuals – do it! It’s an amazing experience but also great recognition for the hard work, dedication and commitment they put in. Just taking part in the awards meant that I got to meet lots of fantastic people across all industries and it was a great chance to network with hundreds of women across the Construction, Engineering and Facilities Management industry. Sharing experiences and continuing to learn from others. From start to finish, everyone I encountered was extremely supportive and lovely to work alongside. I’m not going to say the Judging Day wasn’t nerve racking because it was but it only builds on the achievements to date and helps with any future progression. Everyone is in the same boat and the support from the others and cheer leading amongst the tables was great! The whole experience is definitely one to be remembered and I am immensely proud to be part of it.

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BEST WOMAN IN CONSTRUCTION LAW

Victoria Tyson Director, Corbett & Co

The process requires self-reflection; time to consider your successes, achievements, failures and challenges. This is a daunting exercise but also extremely rewarding. It is probably something that we should all do more often.

I was delighted to be selected as a finalist in the 2019 ‘European Women in Construction & Engineering Awards’. I should like to thank Edward Corbett for nominating me for the Best Woman in Construction Law category, and Andrew Tweeddale, Giorgiana Tecuci and Nick Culatto for supporting my application.

It is crucial that women in construction and engineering are given the tools with which to carve out their own paths without boundaries. There are some amazing opportunities if we are brave enough to reach for them. Mentors are essential to support women of any age or rank and leading by example is key. Mrs Anne Galbraith CBE was my first mentor, suggesting that I supplement my construction degree with law and giving me the confidence to ‘give it a go’. I cannot thank her enough.

I had not heard of the WICE Awards until I was nominated, and I have never seen so many women actively involved in construction and engineering in one place until I attended the WICE Summit. It was truly inspirational and motivating. As expected, there was a strong presence from the big names in the industry who are taking great strides in developing and implementing programmes to support women, but smaller companies like my own where women may feel especially isolated were also very much welcomed. We were treated to some excellent presentations over the course of the day, curiosity and integrity being the key take-home points. I would not hesitate in recommending the WICE Awards to everyone.

Winning Best Woman in Construction Law is fantastic. There was some formidable competition. The Award carries with it a responsibility to promote the valuable role of women within the built environment. Having worked hard over the past 20 years to build my construction law career, I now find myself well placed to give a little back and support the next generation. In particular, I am passionate about increasing the number of female adjudicators and arbitrators and this Award will bolster my credibility and help to raise my voice. The Technology and Construction Court has gender parity so there can be no excuse. I am pleased to say that at Corbett & Co we lead by example – 50% of the Board of Directors is female.

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BEST WOMAN CONSTRUCTION PLANNER

Rocio Allende Planning Manager, Kier Construction

room.’ I remained quiet waiting for the penny to drop. It finally did, his expression changed from annoyance to puzzlement to realisation and finally, to his credit, embarrassment. ‘Unless you are here for the project meeting, of course.’ I don’t blame him, the truth of the matter is that back then this might have been the first time he came across a woman attending one of these meetings. Now nobody would make that mistake. I have always wanted to work in construction. As a little girl I remember my friends wanting to be things like teachers or nurses; I wanted to be a bricklayer. For me building things always felt like the only worthwhile endeavour a human being could have. I was fortunate enough to have parents that encouraged me. They never really made me aware of the fact that most bricklayers are not women. I believe that had they had a different, perhaps more traditional, attitude towards what occupations are suitable for women, things would have turned out very differently. It is because of this reason that I believe we have to be good role models for girls and young women and help them feel like there is nothing unusual about a woman in construction. I have been in in the construction industry now for 20 years and it is amazing to see how things have changed. When I first started there were hardly any women in the room; particularly there were hardly any women in leadership positions. I remember early in my career I was early for a project meeting. I was already waiting in the room when one of the directors walked in. He looked at me and said, ‘you are in the wrong

The judging day for the competition was a fantastic experience. I was inspired to meet so many so many high caliber construction professionals from all over Europe. Seeing so many amazing women did highlight for me the progress we have made over these past 20 years. It motivates me to work even harder on the project I’m carrying out within Kier to promote diversity and inclusion. We stand to lose a lot of talent if we cannot galvanise a new generation of people from all sorts of backgrounds to join our industry. Just to be nominated for this award is a huge honour, as it means that my work has been recognised and appreciated within Kier. I’m very grateful to have been chosen to become a finalist. I have never been fond of being in the spotlight, but I realise that this competition will increase my visibility as a role model. This is very gratifying to me as it gives me the opportunity to do for other girls and young women what nobody was able to do for me: show that it is possible to be a respected professional in a field that has been traditionally male-dominated.

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BEST WOMAN ARCHITECT

Kate Murphy Partner, Foster + Partners

Hearing that I had been nominated for the Architect of the Year award filled me with immense pride and genuine excitement – just being part of the shortlist felt like a great achievement to me. Now, having been chosen as a winner from amongst this amazing group of inspirational women I am left deeply humbled. It has been an amazing experience to have met so many other women professionals from the industry who face similar challenges, and have overcome them to be where they are today. During the judging day, I was struck by the wealth of talent in the industry – all of us were there because we had excelled in our respective fields. Being a woman was almost a non-issue. For me, these awards are a recognition of the immense contribution women make to the

construction industry, which has traditionally been – and still is – male-dominated. While awards like these are signs that things are changing for the better, there still remains a long way to go. I would strongly advise all practices – big and small – to nominate their best women representatives in the future because it helps raise awareness, as well as allows the nominees to set an example for other young women aspiring to be part of the industry. The award is not just a personal achievement, because as we all know, building projects are always a team effort. I have received tremendous support from my colleagues at Foster + Partners throughout my time there, and in some ways, it is the excellent support structure at the practice that has allowed me to rise to where I am in the industry today. I hope this award can encourage more women to stay in the construction industry, which has provided me with some of the most intensely rewarding experiences of my life.

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BEST WOMAN INTERIOR DESIGNER

Katrina Kostic Samen Managing Partner, KKS Strategy

The WICE Awards are an important part of the process to recognise the hard work undertaken by women in a predominantly male-dominated workplace. Whilst the gender balance is still unequal in the construction industry, we must support a change for future equality. The awards process encourages more women to come forward and share their stories and hopefully become mentors for a future generation. I am not sure we can ‘have it all’ but we can nurture and support others to improve the experience for everyone. The process of the awards, and being in the company of so many accomplished and energetic women, was a tremendous experience. I was honoured to be a finalist and immediately shared the news I had won Best Woman Interior Architect with my family and colleagues, both of whom are integral to my life throughout this journey. I feel we all share in the accolade this award brings and I will be encouraging other members of my team to submit future nominations and to enjoy the process. Early in my career I had two young children whilst travelling for work and building a career. It was hard for women then; this is before paternity leave and women at work felt the need to prove that they could be the same as men in the workplace. I understand the challenges and compromises working mothers make and in my own office I try to be as flexible as possible, recognising we are human, and at certain times in our work life we need different kinds of support and balance. KKS is a female-led practice and many of us have raised children whilst working;

I understand the hardship and sacrifices that have to be made to succeed. Our support can come in various forms: it can be flexible work hours, time to go on courses and workshops and/or sharing stories. I encourage individuals to succeed, I don’t give women preferential treatment, I just recognise we all have different pressures at different times and I take the long view. We all benefit from a much more nurturing workplace and an environment that supports and recognises the needs of each individual. Mentoring and confidence building is a cornerstone of KKS’s aim to raise the profiles of professional women. Nurturing talent for the future is vital for any business to succeed and the workforce to flourish. As the current president of the BCO (British Council for Offices) I have recently created a mentorship programme for senior BCO members to mentor BCO NextGen members, who are the under 35s in our industry. I am passionate about supporting individuals to maximise their potential - both men and women. I have also spent my presidency focusing on supporting women in our industry. The BCO female membership has risen from 4% to 20% in the past year and as a further push, I have asked each BCO committee to include at least three female members to encourage balanced representation at decisionmaking level. This is a start – not an end! It is clear that although changes have been occurring for women in in the built environment profession, there is still a huge amount to be done. Women make up only around 13% of the overall workforce in property and construction. We must be better at creating conditions to attract, support and retain more women, whilst not alienating the male population. United as a diverse and integrated industry will go a long way to providing a more creative, sustainable and enjoyable work/life sector in construction and engineering.

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BEST WOMAN STRUCTURAL ENGINEER

Sallyanne Lewis Associate Director, BuroHappold

support was particularly special at the award dinner when I was congratulated on my win, and I am looking forward to developing the friendships and contacts I made through this process. Recruiting and retaining diversity within the construction industry is essential to enrich engineering practices, but also to reflect the diversity of the clients we work with. The WICE Awards is an excellent vehicle towards this and I am so proud to be part of something that not only recognises women’s contribution to construction and engineering, but also celebrates it without apology. The WICE awards has been a really great experience for me, although I cannot pretend it has not been hard work - and a little nerve-wracking along the way. However, to misquote Theodore Roosevelt, “Nothing is worth doing unless it means effort”. The awards have given me three main areas of opportunity: developing a female network, being introduced to panel experts and taking time to self-evaluate. I met many inspiring women finalists at the judging day. I was awed by what people are achieving, but (also felt a great sense of support and comradeship - with a little healthy competition thrown in to keep us all sharp. It was great to swap stories and realise how much we all had in common, both at work and in family life. This

Listening to the panel discussions on the judging day was incredibly rewarding. It felt like the sessions flew by. I am definitely going to be investigating neuroscience in the workplace and reading more about the very inspiring Sandi Rhys-Jones. I found it really helpful to hear from successful women and men in the industry about how they have navigated their way to success. It was interesting to hear that it isn’t always a straight path, but that the challenges can make it more interesting and open up alternative opportunities. In the future, I would hope to become one of those panel members. However, I think the most rewarding part of the WICE Awards has been taking the time to evaluate myself. Like everyone, I lead a busy life and often jump from one challenge to another without taking the time to step back. This process has forced me to do just that, and I am grateful. By reflecting on my achievements to date, I’ve realised how much I have achieved both in my career and outside. It has allowed me to assess where I am and what I would like to change. Most importantly, it has made me think deeply about where I want to go, what I would like to do and how I would like to get there. I don’t have all the answers yet, but I know that one of my priorities is going to be looking at how to help and inspire future engineers.

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BEST WOMAN LAND SURVEYOR

Claire Fenwick Managing Director, Spatial Dimensions

After I discovered I had been shortlisted as a Finalist, I shared the news with my colleagues at Spatial Dimensions, of who many had helped and supported my nomination. Huge thanks to all of them for their continuous support. I was up against some tough competition of outstanding female talent, all of which worked for some of the largest surveying companies in Europe. I doubted my chances of winning but looked forward to helping promote land surveying as a profession as it often gets underrepresented and needs to be promoted loudly. After University, I took some time out to travel the world before committing to a professional career. My overall and ongoing ambition became to visit every country on planet earth! I loved being outdoors, meeting new people from different cultures and navigating myself around faraway lands. Returning to the UK, I still had a huge sense of adventure and loved being challenged. I have always been a good problem solver but still didn’t know what I wanted to do. I started searching for jobs that would fulfil my criteria and for the first time researched a career in land surveying. It seemed to tick all the right boxes, but I knew little about it and would have to retrain. I thought I would give it a try and that’s simply where my journey began. Technology has gripped the construction industry and land surveying has been at the forefront of this. So, did I make the correct career choice? There have been moments when I have been freezing cold, working outside in the pouring rain, wading through a river or returning home filthy, after a long day measuring buildings on a construction site. I have pondered if a daily smart outfit and a pair of high heels in a permanent office job would have been a more sensible decision and suited me better. Each time I remember all the adventures I’ve had along the way

and have absolutely no regrets. I have travelled the width and breadth of the country as well as worked overseas. My job has taken me behind the scenes at theatres, hotels, hospitals, airports, art galleries, underground tunnels/caves, yachts, churches, banks and political embassy’s. I have so many stories to tell and so many clever people to thank for their help and most of them are men. It still seems unimaginable that 15 years later I would be standing on stage collecting this esteemed award for European Women In Construction and Engineering - Land Surveyor of the year. What an incredible moment and huge life achievement. It really did take my breath away and I am honoured to win. As a profession, we have a huge skills shortage as well as a gender gap. I plan to use the status of this prestigious award to continue to do my work in schools and colleges with an aim to encourage and guide young talented people, to also choose land surveying. Alongside The Survey Association where I trained to be a land surveyor, I intend to promote this award and encourage land surveying companies to recognise the hard work of their female colleagues. Let us lead from the front and show the younger generation that our industry is exciting and recognises achievement and rewards it. Being involved in this year’s WICE Awards was fantastic. The judging day itself was both exhilarating and nerve-racking. It’s a significant event which is superbly well organised and a whole lot of fun. The speakers on the day were motivating and informative about current industry topics. It is rather unusual in our industry to get hundreds of incredible women in one room, who collectively have achieved so much. To anyone thinking of entering or nominating, I would wholehearted recommend getting involved next year. The submission and judging process is rigorous but fair and makes you take a step back from your everyday duties and look at your career and achievements to date. That alone is a worthwhile and rewarding exercise.

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BEST WOMAN SOFTWARE ENGINEER

Elite Sher

Director (Head of XR and Interaction), Bryden Wood

I was humbled and delighted to find out I was a finalist in the Software Engineer category of the WICE awards. Having background in both Architectural design and software engineering, I feel that diverse, multidisciplinary skills should be celebrated and I’m happy to see that our industry is starting to recognise this. I am very proud to have been nominated by Bryden Wood for this award and I think it is a recognition of what we have built together within our Creative Technologies team. I value the diversity in our group and believe that it directly contributes to our ability to push the boundaries of software and digital technology in an open, supportive and creative work environment. We all respect each other’s skills and backgrounds and are absolutely focused on working together to reach our goals.

For the past few years I have organised and participated in various public events, trying to bridge the gap between technology and the built environment industries and show how these two industries can not only co-exist but also share the knowledge and experiences with each other. I believe that winning this award will provide me a platform to be even more effective in creating this meaningful change in the industry. I intend to continue and advance both the significance of bringing technology into the AEC industry, as well as creating diverse environments that will encourage multidisciplinary teams. Preparing for the presentation day, I had the chance to look back at my work so far, see how much has been achieved and get motivated of how much more there is to do. It was also a great opportunity to meet colleagues from the industry that has done such an amazing work and celebrate the diversity together. I feel honoured to win this award and hope this will help to shape a future which will be both disruptive and diverse.

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BEST WOMAN ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGIST

Karyn Williams Senior Associate Technologist, Stride Treglown

I am beyond proud and honoured to have been recognised in this way alongside such fantastic role models within Construction & Engineering. Finding out I had been shortlisted was an incredible moment. To then find out I was only one of two finalists in our category was a total surprise! Winning the accolade of WICE Best Woman Architectural Technologist 2019 brings with it such a huge sense of achievement and I am delighted. Starting my career nearly 20 years ago, unsure of where I was heading or what the future held for me, seems like only yesterday. Our small team of four people were focussed on delivering high quality bespoke designs centred entirely around the people involved. This early passion for delivering good quality around a people-centric focus remains at the heart of everything I do today. It’s been quite a journey with the usual ups and downs along the way, but the rewards for me have always outweighed the challenges. I have experienced the fragility of the construction industry and shared in the successes it brings too, yet this journey is what builds your strength of character and humility along the way. My focus has consistently been about meeting the challenges you face head on and overcoming them collectively as one team.

I have been blessed and am incredibly grateful for the amount of support given to me by my colleagues, friends and family. They have consistently believed in me and always encouraged me to believe that anything is possible. I have also been incredibly lucky to have met and worked with some fantastically talented people over the years whose guidance has shaped me into the person I am today. Juggling a family and a full-time career hasn’t always been an easy balance to master. To have success in both you need to ensure you are able to invest 100% of your energy, attention and presence in that exact moment. Whether it’s making an Easter bonnet for a school performance or running a pre-contract meeting, ensuring your attention is valuable to those around you is essential. I’m delighted to see that there is now much more flexibility, pastoral support, open discussion and improved benefits for working parents today. This can only make combining a career and a family so much easier than it has been previously. I must acknowledge that any achievements I have experienced have been as a direct result of my husband’s unfailing love, support and patience. He’s been incredible, working hard in the background supporting our young family and always pushing me to overcome the impossible. My career wouldn’t have been as fulfilling if I hadn’t had someone to share the journey with. Architecture is such a fantastic career full of opportunity, creativity, quality and passion and I hope that the WICE awards inspire others to believe that you can have it all.

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BEST FEMALE MENTOR

Alex Lawrence Talent and Inclusion Director, Ramboll

construction errors, difficult characters and eventually litigation. It was described as “character building” at the time by a colleague which I remember as an unhelpful comment at the time. The company put its faith in me however and I saw only one way to move forward – face the difficulties head on, find solutions and learn. I look back now and see how much the industry has changed over the years. I am delighted to have been presented with this award. It is an honour to be recognised by both my colleagues and the wider industry for the positive influence that I have had. Mentoring for me is about helping others fulfil their potential and it plays an important part in our industry and beyond. I have over 20 years’ experience in the construction industry as a structural engineer and have held senior leadership roles within Ramboll. I have recently taken on a new role to focus on talent development, diversity and inclusion. This benefits from a unique combination of my experience in engineering, operations and leadership roles and a passion for understanding people’s needs and helping them develop. I have been privileged to see a career in engineering as my future from a very early age and have been supported throughout my studies and professional life by all those I have met. I have a wealth of experience that has helped build my confidence and resilience but now allows me to support and mentor others effectively. I want others to benefit from my experience and I mentor people both within and outside Ramboll, typically about leadership and career progression. Looking back at the defining moments of my career to date, my first project was probably instrumental in learning how to cope with difficult situations and to build resilience. It was a complex project and I was given a lot of responsibility for someone straight out of university. The design phase was exciting – this was what I had been studying for. The site phase however was a challenge with delays, technical problems,

From the start of the application process, the WICE awards are a fantastic opportunity to personally reflect on your career and influence, something that rarely happens when you are heavily involved in mentoring and focussing on others. It was inspiring to meet the other finalists on the judging day, hear their thoughts on mentoring and to share ideas about mentoring in our respective organisations. Whilst it was a competitive situation, it was also a supportive environment – due in no small part to the experience and characters of those involved, showing how our industry can work together. The first round of judging was a critique of confidence, resilience and initiative. Each finalist got their chance to explain what these themes meant to them - we all agreed that they are closely linked and interrelated. We all approached the live mentoring with trepidation, but all nominees enthusiastically stood up to take part one by one. We each had to pick a random problem from a bag, pass it to our mentee volunteer who then read out the situation. The issues posed all related to confidence, resilience and initiative and we had 3 minutes to mentor them. Open questions were often met with “I don’t know” and it was a challenge to continue asking open questions to allow the mentee to begin to find a way forward themselves rather than jumping into the silence with answers and solutions. The WICE Awards help raise the profile of female engineers and the construction industry and provides role models to inspire future generations. I wholeheartedly recommend supporting the WICE Awards next year.

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BEST MALE MENTOR

Vishwas Pahariya Rail Infrastructure Director (South), Arcadis

I have previously shied away from pursuing individual awards, and I am so glad to have made this step. On the morning the announcements were due, I felt nervous and tried to delay the inevitable, despite my fingers itching to check my emails. I summoned the courage to check my emails, and I saw the congratulations message from one of my mentees! My family were the first to know that I had made it through as one of the finalists. Their active support and help were one of the reasons behind my success. I personally thanked Irum, who was behind my nomination, Astrid, my line manager, as well as Zoe, my coach. I am proud to have the opportunity to be working with these great women, whom I immensely admire and respect for their professionalism. All the mentors nominated by colleagues, mentees or organisations are winners. It recognises the fact that we are making a positive difference in the life and career of our mentees. I am thrilled to have won this award and it is one of the key accolades of my career thus far. Being the eldest of five brothers, I give credit to my parents and grandparents who shaped and helped me to develop my natural mentoring skills from a young age. My siblings could not escape from being my early mentees. According to the Women’s Engineering Society, only 11% of the engineering workforce is female. The encouraging part, however, is that more than 84% are either happy or extremely happy with their career choice. This award has given me the fantastic opportunity to be a male ambassador and to help promote engineering as a career of choice among females as well as to support

the development and progression of those who do choose this as their career. The awards process is a catalyst to bring like-minded professionals together and has given us a precious opportunity to use the power of collectiveness to act as role models so that we can help to improve the gender balance and diversity within an industry dominated by males. Within Arcadis UK, we are fully committed to tackling the gender imbalance across our workforce and to create a great workplace for women to excel. With this in mind, we have defined a shared goal of 30% representation of women at senior job levels by the end of 2021. Personally, I am committing to drive this at individual team level to make them more balanced. It’s been a fantastic experience from the very first day of being nominated to this proud moment of receiving an award. The nomination process for this award has helped me to reflect and articulate on the power of mentoring, my own approach and style and how I have been able to influence the professional and personal lives of several people during the 23 years of my career. The judging day was an invaluable experience for me. Being with a cohort of both male and female mentor finalists gave us the chance to learn from each other and refine our own individual approach. I have been consciously promoting the nomination of women for various awards. From one female WICE finalist from my team in 2018 to four in 2019, and sixteen overall finalists from Arcadis reflects the significant commitment we have made as a business to promote women in engineering and construction. This is a fantastic way to recognise, reward and celebrate the talent. This whole experience has further reinforced the notion that ‘mentoring is just the right thing to do.’

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Louise Hardy BSc CEngBSc CEng FICE CMgr CCMI FWES HonFAPM Non-Executive Board Member, Crest Nicholson

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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN CONSTRUCTION

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have previously shied away from pursuing individual Whilst studying science and maths A levels I was inspired to enter the civil engineering profession through the promotion of Women in Science and Engineering in the late 1980s. It was still a rare job for a woman but I have found it to be a rewarding career that can make a real difference to people’s lives and truly benefit humankind. I have seen how challenging it can be for women in engineering but also how much the industry needs skilled and motivated engineers to meet the infrastructure challenges of the future. I am a passionate civil engineer and after graduating with a first class honours degree I specialised in the delivery of complex nationally significant infrastructure projects, including the London2012 Olympics, High Speed 1, Jubilee Line Extension and Transylvanian Motorway. My work on such projects earned me a place on the ‘Top 50 Women of Influence in Engineering’ list published by the Women’s Engineering Society in 2016.

“I have seen how challenging it can be for women in engineering but also how much the industry needs skilled and motivated engineers to meet the infrastructure challenges of the future.” My favourite and most notable role was as Infrastructure Director for the Delivery Partner to the Olympic Delivery Authority for the design and construction of the London 2012 Olympic Park where, for 6years, I managed the successful delivery of £2billion worth of critical infrastructure; including 2million cubic metres of earthworks, 300km of utilities; 15km of roads and bridges as well as the beautiful park landscaping, all of which facilitated an amazing Games as well as regenerating a contaminated and derelict part of East London. Always up for a challenge, having handed over the Olympic park in 2012 two weeks later I gave birth to twin girls!

Life’s changes and challenges often shape the direction of one’s career and after the death of my partner in 2015, leaving me to bring up our young daughters alone, I began building a non-executive director portfolio combined with my voluntary activity, which includes FTSE250 board roles as well as public sector positions in the housing sector. I am a board member of both the Ebbsfleet Development Corporation, creating a new garden city, and the North West Cambridge Development where a new academic community is emerging. I also sit on 3 FTSE250 boards; Sirius Minerals which is building the first mine in the UK for 40years to exploit the world’s largest and highest grade Polyhalite (fertiliser) deposit located in Yorkshire, creating thousands of job and boosting the economy; and Crest Nicholson, the house builder, where I utilise my mix of technical/commercial/innovation skills to help create new efficient construction methods. This has seen us complete test houses built in Off Site Manufactured steel frames and launch new optimised house types in 2018. I am also on the main board of Polypipe Ltd, a leading manufacturer of plastic piping and building products for the construction industry specialising in sustainable solutions. I love the variety of my career portfolio, especially working as a Stemnet ambassador. In the last 5 years I have talked to 1000s of school children to inspire the next generation of engineers; given lectures and talks on programme and project management to 20 different institutions and universities and written and featured in many articles at both local and national level to promote careers in STEM. I was honoured in 2018 to be elected as the Institution of Civil Engineer’s Chair of Fellowship Panel and have been exploring processes to increase applications from fellowship calibre women. Recently, with my daughters as assistants, I have created and delivered a series of interactive building exercises to Brownie and Rainbow Packs handing out ‘Girls Go Engineering’ badges that I have designed and funded. It is certainly energising and rewarding to generate excitement about engineering in youngsters! After all, some of them will be creating the built environment of the future.

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Catriona Schmolke BSc MPhil CEng FIMO3 CGeol FGS FREng Senior Vice President Jacobs

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LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN ENGINEERING

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’m often asked why I chose to be an engineer? Simple response – I didn’t! August 1980, I was standing in Admissions at Strathclyde University during ‘clearing’ and desperate to get into any degree course so I didn’t have to go back to school! 36 years later I would be asked to join the Royal Academy of Engineers as one of only 5 female Fellows in Scotland and receive the honour from HRH Prince Philip. Who knew? Thinking back to the 1980’s, it was all shoulder pads, blue eyeshadow and DALLAS was the must-watch TV soap; 30 years on I’m spending half of my time in Dallas, as a Senior Vice President for Jacobs, Forbes Most Admired Engineering Company. Strathclyde granted me a place to study Engineering Geology, one of two females in a class of 16. Despite being told I’d probably fail first year (don’t you love those motivational speeches), I thrived and graduated BSc with

business development. I thoroughly enjoyed working in different market sectors such as Water, Infrastructure and Nuclear and can boast that I led the sale of the largest Capital Investment Partnership Program in the UK Water industry in 2007. It was a huge and rewarding learning curve, fantastic memories of our team comradery, delivering a winning solution and delighting the Client. Throughout my career I have been blessed with wonderful colleagues. Collaborating with each other in a respectful and thoughtful manner is the key to profitable growth for any company. I always maintain that happy motivated people achieve great things – look after the people and they look after the business. Who doesn’t want to work in an environment where everyone belongs and can thrive? Though not always the case, I recall with a smile a Client’s project manager who said he “was not going to listen to a wee slip of a lass from north of the border”. Idiot!

“Promotion to Senior Vice President in Jacobs in 2016 was beyond my aspirations. Being selected for a global role; 51 countries and 75,000 employees, was a long way from where my career began. ” honours, going onto complete a MPhil in Civil Engineering. My area of expertise was hard rock mining and tunnels. Over the years I spent a lot time on site, I loved it, except when it was freezing and there were no toilets close by. Thank you to the lady in the Leadhills Village, who whilst we were drilling a borehole in her garden, let me use her toilet and gave me a hot cup of tea! Each time I stepped out to have my babies, I worked flexibly and I learned quickly how to integrate work and family life. After my second baby I had post-natal depression and for a while I thought my life had stopped. With support, surprising even myself, I found a way through. Ten years later I was prepared when it happened again after the birth of my third daughter. 15 years ago, I changed my career path within Jacobs and moved into

Promotion to Senior Vice President in Jacobs in 2016 was beyond my aspirations. Being selected for a global role; 51 countries and 75,000 employees, was a long way from where my career began. I have accountability for health, safety, environment, sustainability, security, resilience, quality and procurement and it involves significant travel. Highlights so far have been a trip to the Gobi Desert in Mongolia, behind the scenes access to the Capitol building in Washington D.C. and to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center where Jacobs is assembling the next Mars manned space vehicle. It is a wonderful time to be an engineer, so many world challenges, ripe for innovators, and improvement. My role - to offer my experience unconditionally by way of inspiration, through STEM, maternity mentoring, mental health awareness or just taking the time to care. Exciting times.

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Devices and Technology

It is important to use up-to-date digital solutions which allow you to communicate with the other members of the team regardless of the type of device you are using.

Reinforce to ensure better understanding.

10 Ideas to Improve Communication

in the Construction Industry By GENIEBELT (SOON TO BE LETSBUILD) https://geniebelt.com https://www.letsbuild.com

Anybody familiar with construction will agree: communication can either be a major issue construction industry in several areas, with a variety of negative consequences on the overall construction process and results. It can negatively impact the project’s timetable, the quality of the end result, the legal aspect, the set budget and even people’s safety. jargon or misused terms, or incomplete drawings and documents. Diversity also lead to confusion and mistakes. Even two people speaking the same

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semantics and interpretation. With all these variables possibly pen and paper or outdated technology are simply not good enough.

Correct written communication, avoid slang, keep it direct, simple and legible.

Chain of Command Establish clear lines of communication and chain of command for messages and information. 154

Clear and Concise

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Quality and Upgrades Use document software that tracks revisions in all stages of the project and with all stakeholders.

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07 08 09

Encourage Feedback

Whether we’re talking about architects, contractors, or construction workers, all stakeholder’s feedback matters. Make sure the feedback is understood both ways and follow-up on it.

Continuous Training

Organize continuous training on new equipment, software, apps, safety features and regulations and best project management

Connections

Ensure the proper connections and functioning networks are available even in very remote sites.

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Bilingualism

Identify if second or third languages are necessary and how it will be used specifically in safety and logistics.

Qualified Crew Selecting qualified contractors and workers makes communication the whole team.

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By WWW.ENGINEERING.COM

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The job market has changed a lot in the past decade, and today it’s changing faster than ever. With the growing influence of the impending fourth industrial revolution, new disruptive technologies will continue to alter the employment landscape — especially for the engineers at the epicenter of this shift.

A

rtificial intelligence and machine learning, cloud-based and quantum computing, additive manufacturing and nanofabrication, advanced automation and robotics—these disruptive technologies are already impacting every industry. Although concerns about job loss due to automation are not without merit, these technologies are also poised to open up entire new fields of study and employment never before conceived.

“This is the best time for people who have the right skills and right education, because there are tremendous opportunities,” said Nick Van Dam, global chief learning officer at McKinsey & Co. “It’s also the worst time in history for people with ordinary skills and education.” Devin Fidler, research director at the Institute for the Future, also predicted, “As basic automation and machine learning move toward becoming commodities, uniquely human skills will become more valuable.”

As many as seven million jobs across the US could disappear over the next decade, according to research by Nick Van Dam, global chief learning officer at McKinsey & Co. These positions will be replaced by significantly fewer jobs requiring more highly skilled workers. According to one technology funding organization surveyed in a Pew Internet report: “The jobs of the future will not need large numbers of workers with a fixed set of skills—most things that we can train large numbers of workers for, we will also be able to train computers to do better.” The already technical positions in engineering-related fields are both the most likely to see changes, and to continue requiring new candidates within existing and emerging fields. Many of the jobs in 2020 and beyond will be in fields and technologies that didn’t exist a decade ago as anything more than a spark in someone’s imagination. Autonomous transportation specialist, technology advocate, augmented reality developer, or human-technology integration specialist; these are just a few of the possible future careers that are just beginning to emerge and will be widely available in the decade to come. 158

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The World Economic Forum found there are 10 critical job skills that will be in demand for the future job market of Industry 4.0. Four of these skills will be particularly relevant to the high-tech economy: 1. Complex Problem Solving 2. Critical Thinking 3. Creativity 4. People Management. Luckily, these are skills essential to being a great engineer, so now is the time to polish them up so that you will be ready for the future of work.


— Complex Problem Solving — Problem solving is the core of engineering: find a problem, break it down to understand it, and then apply existing knowledge to create a system, device or process that solves it. This makes problem solving the most important ability engineers will need for their future career. Through education and experience, engineers learn how to approach and solve many different kinds of problems. These include: FIXING SOMETHING THAT IS BROKEN Engineers frequently take something that is broken, damaged or flawed, and not only determine why it failed in the first place, but also figure out how to repair or redesign it to avoid the same problems in the future.

“For now, computers do an excellent job with very well-defined activities, such as optimizing trucking routes, but humans still need to determine the proper goals, interpret results, or provide common sense checks for solutions” — McKINSEY

can affect countless others. Engineers consider and understand every aspect of a situation or process in order to introduce efficiencies, whether that means saving weight on an aerospace structural component or shaving half a second off a machine’s cycle time.

IMPROVING PERFORMANCE AND EFFICIENCY

As McKinsey describes it, “The hardest activities to automate with currently available technologies are those that involve managing and developing people (9 percent automation potential) or that apply expertise to decision making, planning, or creative work (18 percent). These activities, often characterized as knowledge work, can be as varied as coding software, creating menus, or writing promotional materials. For now, computers do an excellent job with very well-defined activities, such as optimizing trucking routes, but humans still need to determine the proper goals, interpret results, or provide common-sense checks for solutions.”

The design and manufacturing that goes into every process and piece of equipment is part of a web of relationships and influence that means a change in one aspect of a system

These are all components of problemsolving, which means engineers with good problem-solving skills will be in a strong position for leadership and innovation in the future of work.

EXAMINING AND ADDRESSING RISK AND SAFETY A core precept of all engineering disciplines is a responsibility for public safety when designing and building. When it comes to problem solving, engineers examine past trends and perform root cause analyses in order to anticipate and prevent future failures, or at least mitigate their impact.

COMPLEX PROBLEMS WILL NEED COMPLEX SOLUTIONS The engineering jobs of the future will need people who can identify problems and design fixes for the existing public infrastructure, manufacturing equipment and other systems which will continue to need maintenance and repairs to avoid failures. But beyond merely fixing the old, these engineers will be responsible for designing and building entirely new things—autonomous traffic management, smart factories and Internet of Things (IoT) enabled systems. Engineers with advanced problem-solving skills will be needed for assessing the risks and rewards of new technology and its effect on cities, people and the environment. That’s not to mention all the new problems that will arise from the integration of new technology into existing businesses and processes. Ethics will take on even greater importance, as more people will be exposed to, involved with and affected by technology than ever before, and it is the job of the engineer to keep these people safe.

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— Critical Thinking — Critical thinking involves analyzing a concept or situation with the aim of reaching valid, sound and objective conclusions. Strong critical thinking skills take practice, as it’s easy to make decisions “uncritically” based on one’s own interests, biases and emotions, rather than the facts. Engineers are taught to be critical thinkers, not only to solve technical problems but to ensure the ethical performance of their duties. This approach to interacting with a problem ensures that the engineer has all the information about a problem that they need in order to solve it. Most companies, projects and teams that engineers are involved with include a wide variety of people and their abilities, and engineers with good critical thinking skills are able to take in all the disparate information from team members, and understand both the individual technical details, as well as the overall big picture. When it comes to narrowing down to one solution out of many, engineers’ critical thinking skills enable them to analyze each potential solution in order to determine which is the ethical and effective choice. THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX — BEFORE YOU KNOW WHAT THE BOX IS How do you solve a problem you’ve never seen before? The future will be full of these problems; each new

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change and new technology will create situations no one has ever anticipated. Critical thinking will be what enables engineers to learn about and understand these problems so they can apply their renowned problemsolving skills. Changes to the workplace will also increase the need for skilled critical thinkers. Traditionally, the workplace involved experienced individuals with one specialty working in one domain, and somewhere down the line everything would be brought together into a final product—one which most of the people working on it might not even see. In the future, workplaces are expected to be more collaborative. Diverse teams will collaborate to tackle all aspects of an entire problem, with each of them bringing their own set of skills to the table. Engineers will need to be able to think critically when working in this kind of team in order to take in all team member’s contributions and analyze them to develop the best solution. “As an employer, critical thinking is the No. 1 skill I want in a job candidate. I need employees who can evaluate problems and develop solutions quickly, without constant supervision and direction. Such an employee is much more valuable to my company than someone who can’t operate independently, someone who (like a machine) relies on established rules and processes,” writes Ernie Bray, a Six Sigma Black Belt and leader of ACD.

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“In the future, workplaces are expected to be more collaborative. Diverse teams will collaborate to tackle all aspects of an entire problem, with each of them bringing their own set of skills to the table.”

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— Creativity — Since their work often revolves around numbers and facts, engineers are often mistaken to be lacking creativity. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Creativity is the ability to make, invent or produce something new, rather than imitating something that already exists. Yes, often times engineers are building off something else, but the creative label still applies as they look for new methods and processes to solve problems cheaper, faster and better. Engineers are exceptionally creative, and this creativity is the reason engineers dream up innovations and solutions to all kinds of problems. They are the ones to ask, “What if?” and truly come up with something that has never been seen before. Employers value creativity because creative people are the flexible thinkers who can not only find new solutions for new problems, but new ways to motivate, new opportunities for business operations and relationships, anticipate what customers will want to know before the questions is asked, and be willing to pursue independent or additional education and training. 162

“Machines may take over the number crunching and technical drawing, the data analysis and the tedious, repetitive tasks — but they will not be able to think creatively in the same way as a human.” It’s a given that the most successful engineers are also the most creative, and while having a solid grasp on your core technical skills is of course necessary, it is creativity that enables engineers to apply all this knowledge in new and exciting ways. “The skills needed to succeed in today’s world and the future are curiosity, creativity, taking initiative, multidisciplinary thinking and empathy. These skills, interestingly, are the skills specific to human beings that machines and robots cannot do, and you can be taught to strengthen these skills through education. I look forward to seeing innovative live and online programs that can teach these at scale,” stated Tiffany Shlain, founder of the Webby Awards. ADAPTING AND INNOVATING IN CREATIVE NEW WAYS So, what will make creativity such a valuable skill for future engineering jobs? With all the changes to technology, society and individuals that we can already see coming, as well as those we haven’t yet anticipated, creativity will be the key as engineers will have to not only respond to the existing

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problems, but also to think “outside the box” and identify new problems before they arise. Machines may take over the number crunching and technical drawing, the data analysis and the tedious, repetitive tasks—but they will not be able to think creatively in the same way as a human. The new industrial revolution will bring a ton of new technology, new products and new ways of working, so creativity will be an essential skill to be able to see the best ways to use all these assets, and to adapt to each new technological change. “The most important skill is a meta-skill: the ability to adapt to changes,” stated Carlton Pu, professor and junior chair in software at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “As the rate of technological innovation intensifies, the workforce of the future will need to adapt to new technology and new markets. The people who can adapt the best (and fastest) will win. This view means that any given set of skills will become obsolete quickly as innovations change the various economic sectors: precision agriculture, manufacturing 4.0, precision medicine, just to name a few.”


— People Management and Emotional Intelligence — There’s a common misconception that if you’re an engineer, then you aren’t a “people person,” but being able to work for, with and in charge of others is a trait shared by every successful engineer. Teamwork is often the focus of this job skill, since the most engineering projects and workplaces involve collaboration with other people. While the has been some movement towards remote and decentralized employment, as evidenced by the gig economy and digital meeting spaces, the bulk of engineering work still involves face-to-face human interaction. Engineers not only work closely with their own co-workers and teammates, they must also be able to easily work with engineers and non-technical staff from other companies and organizations. Those who excel at managing people are better positioned to take on leadership roles and oversee entire projects or companies, keeping all their employees working together like the proverbial welloiled machine. The fact that engineers are excellent collaborators means that, when combined with their technical knowledge, engineers will be the ideal choice to lead the future workforce. THE HUMAN TOUCH IS STILL REQUIRED Teams and projects in the future engineering workplace are likely to have far fewer people and many more machines, which will make personnel management and coordination skills all the more vital. Teams of a few people will oversee a collection of AIs, smart or autonomous robots and data analysis software systems, the inter-personal coordination will be overseen by these human team leaders. A human touch will still be needed for things like leadership, deliberation and debate, conflict resolution and ethical considerations for decision making. “Skills of writing, speaking and making videos are important, but fundamental skills of critical thinking, community building, teamwork, deliberation and dialogue, and conflict resolution will be powerful,” said Ben Shneiderman, professor of computer science at the University of Maryland. “A mindset of

persistence and the necessary passion to succeed are also critical.” Human team leaders and managers also have the ability to motivate and inspire others — something that’s difficult to envision an AI doing—even a charming one. “The skills necessary at the higher echelons will include especially the ability to efficiently network, manage public relations, display intercultural sensitivity, marketing and generally [what is called] ‘emotional intelligence’,” said Simon Gottschalk, a professor of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The trend for remote and decentralized work is also expected to continue,

to the need for technical training that will rise along with the increase in technology being used in the workplace and across the country. Employees will need to be trained to use AIs and machine learning software, technicians and line workers will need to learn to maintain and repair robots and other forms of automation. They will also be essential to integration of new technologies and helping companies and their employees to get over the hesitation and uncertainty that often comes along with technological change. Since engineers understand both the technical elements and the effects, as well as the human factors involved, they can explain both how the new tech works and how it will benefit the company and its employees in the long term.

“Skills of writing, speaking and making videos are important, but fundamental skills of critical thinking, community building, teamwork, deliberation and dialogue, and conflict resolution will be powerful”

meaning the personal touch will be even more important as you need to manage teams who could be located anywhere in the world, with much of the interaction occurring digitally. At least until we have picture-perfect, true-to-life digital avatar in a virtual meeting space, a human’s emotional intelligence will still be needed to parse out body language, tone, context and subtext of communication through video and written text. “The most important skills to have in life are gained through interpersonal experiences,” writes Frank Elavsky, data and policy analyst at Acumen. “These skills are imperative to focus on, as the future is in danger of losing these skillsets from the workforce. Many people have gained these skills without any kind of formal schooling, but with the growing emphasis on virtual and digital mediums of production, education and commerce, people will have less and less exposure to other humans in person and other human perspectives.” Engineers with strong people management skills will also be essential

POLISH UP ON YOUR FUTURE SKILLS Let’s assume you’re not retiring tomorrow. That being the case, you will want to make sure you’re as employable as possible for the new economy. The key will be ensuring you have the right skills that will be in high demand over the next 10 to 20 years. Most of these are “soft skills,” which may not be the first thing that comes to mind in connection with engineering. However, engineers have a highly developed roster of these soft skills; and more importantly, these skills will be what sets you apart from the crowd, and will be what you can offer that a robot, for example, can not. So, if you know already have these skills, polish them up. If you don’t think you’re quite up to par, consider getting ahead of the pack by finding opportunities through your current job, or through a professional development program, to get these skills into top shape. •

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The Trends that Will Influence Architecture in 2019 By POLA MORA Head of Community & Partnerships, ArchDaily www.archdaily.com

Over 130 million users discovered new references, materials, and tools in 2018 alone, infusing their practice of architecture with the means to improve the quality of life for our cities and built spaces. As users demonstrated certain affinities and/or demonstrated greater interest in particular topics, these emerged as trends. Below, we present the trends that will influence urban and architectural discussions in 2019, with the year-over-year growth rates (YoY) that compare to the statistics of searches from 2017 to 2018. THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019

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Batipin Flat / studioWOK Photo: Federico Villa

Ways of Living: Greater Interest in Small Scale Homes

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The Tiny Houses (+ 7 5 % YoY) concept emerged strongly at the beginning of 2 01 8 . Whether it is a movement in response to ideological or financial situations, architects have become more involved in the development of practical and innovative solutions for small spaces. We can also include the interest for- living in dense urban centers, leading to the challenge of designing basic housing programs for spaces under 40 m2 . (Searches related to Small Apartments increased by 12 1% in 2 01 8 ).transform the way we think about service loads on a structure.

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11 4 Public Housing Units / Sauquet Arquitectes i Associats Photo: Jordi Surroca

Inclusive Architecture: First-Rate Design for Diverse Populations 02 /

Accessibility (+ 1 08 % YoY), Universal Design (+ 11 6 %) and Inclusive Architecture (+ 1 32 %) were some of the most searched concepts on ArchDaily in 2 01 8 . In previous years the focus was mostly on architecture for children and reduced mobility, whereas this year we saw more searches related to Architecture for the Elderly (+ 7 8 % YoY) and Mental Health + 1 01% YoY; Space Psychology + 2 1 0% YoY) and visual impairments (Architecture for the Blind + 2 5 0% YoY).

Construction Industry: The Digital Future of Infrastructure

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Work within Construction Sites (+ 37 8 % YoY) is changing rapidly due to the implementation of new technologies that influence of BIM systems (+ 5 0% YoY), modular construction (+ 7 5 % YoY) and prefabrication (+ 9 9 % YoY) allow for the Site (+ 2 00% YoY). Meanwhile, 3D printing (+ 7 0% YoY), Automation (+ 11 8 % YoY) and Artificial Intelligence (+ 2 34% YoY) make us think, without astonishment, of a future in which construction sites will be free of humans. Umea University Develops Low-Cost, Flexible 3D Printer Photo: LinnĂŠa Therese Dimitriou

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1 00 Classrooms for Refugee Children / Emergency Architecture & Human Rights Photo: Martina Rubino

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The Middle-East: Underrepresented Territories in Evidence 04 /

Accessibility (+ 1 08 % YoY), Universal Design (+ 1 1 6 %) and Inclusive Architecture (+ 1 3 2 %) were some of the most searched concepts on ArchDaily in 2 01 8 . In previous years the focus was mostly on architecture for children and reduced mobility, whereas this year we saw more searches related to Architecture for the Elderly (+ 7 8 % YoY) and Mental Health + 1 01 % YoY; Space Psychology + 2 1 0% YoY) and visual impairments (Architecture for the Blind + 2 5 0% YoY).

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Denise Scott Brown in front of The Strip, Las Vegas, NV, US, 1 9 6 6 Photo: Courtesy of Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates Inc.

Gender Equality: A Major, Ongoing Moment of Public Debate

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Architecture is inextricably linked to the social and political contexts in which it resides and as the participation and visibility of women was ever more strongly positioned in public debate, searches linked to Gender Equality (+ 2 4 4 % YoY) and Women in Architecture (+ 70 %) in ArchDaily throughout 2 0 1 8 increased considerably. The discussion of Gender (+ 1 2 8% YoY) in recent years has openly incorporated the concept of sexual identity, which in a way has had an impact on the field of architecture, increasing the amount of searches for the term Transgender (+ 9 5 % YoY) in our search engine.

Transport: Increase in Speed and Comfort of Urban Trajectories 06 /

Interest in matters related to Public Transport (+ 2 0 6 % YoY) and Mobility (+ 1 4 3 % YoY) increased over those related to private means of transport. The main points of interest were mainly self-driving cars (+ 1 6 0 % YoY) and electric cars (+ 177% YoY).

Tram stop in Alicante / Subarquitectura Photo: Courtesy of Subarquitectura

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Qunli Stormwater Wetland Park / Turenscape Photo: Courtesy of Turenscape

Urban Design and Resource Management: Greener and More Collective Cities

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Natural resources such as water (Water Management + 84 % YoY) and soil have taken center stage in urban discussions, and the concept of Landscape Urbanism (+ 1 0 3 % YoY) is positioned firmly amongst them. Permaculture (+ 1 0 1% YoY) is positioned as a system of design principles that originate from the agricultural, social, political and economic fields. From this, other movements also emerge, such as Urban Farming (+ 6 0 % YoY) and Urban Agriculture (+ 84 % YoY), as well as the recovery of Public Spaces (+ 9 9 % YoY) through Activations (+ 2 2 6 % YoY) managed by the Community (+ 76 % YoY) itself.

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The House of the Future: Robotics and Automation for Domestic Life

The Apartment of the Future R&D Laboratory / NArchitekTURA

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Photo: Jakub Certowicz

Just as we saw increasing interest in emerging practices in Latin America (+ 1 0 3 .82% YoY) in the last two years, in 20 1 8 we also saw an increase in searches related to the Middle East (+ 1 24 % YoY). The conflict in Syria (+ 9 3 % YoY) placed architects’ focus on Rebuilding (+ 1 0 2% YoY). In addition, global events peaked the interest of architects due to the magnitude of the structures involved. Both the city of Dubai (+ 1 0 4 % YoY), which will be the host of World Expo 20 20 , and Qatar (+ 220 % YoY), which will host the next soccer 20 22 World Cup, increased considerably in search queries. Hashim Sarkis (+ 23 6 % YoY), the Lebanese architect who was appointed curator of the Architecture Exhibition for the next Venice Biennial (20 20 ), was one of the most searched persons during 20 1 8.

Renewable Energy and Environmental Awareness: New energy to face Climate Change

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We already know that Environmental Awareness (+ 3 22%) and Climate Change (+ 1 1 5 %) are concerns

Net Zero Energy House / Lifethings Photo: Kyungsub Shin

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emissions caused by the life cycle of any completed building, renewable energy (+ 3 0 0 % YoY) plays an important role in the debate, with emerging architectural models that not only work based on renewable energy sources, but that are also capable of generating new energy. The concept of the Powerhouse (+ 77% YoY) and “Energy Positive” buildings (+ 6 5 % YoY) arise, which, during their operational phase, generate more energy than what was used during their construction; or “ZeroEnergy” (+ 6 1 % YoY) and “Net Zero” (+ 4 9 % YoY) houses, which produce more energy than they consume, to achieve appropriate comfort levels.


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Is Virtual Reality the Future of the Construction Industry? The demand for construction has never been greater. Even though it’s a very diverse industry, it’s one of the leading industry sectors in the UK. But that doesn’t mean it’s at its best.

By (Construction Software) Ltd By EasyBuild EASYBUILD www.easybuilduk.com (CONSTRUCTION SOFTWARE) LTD, www.easybuilduk.com

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onstruction workers face problems on a daily basis, including reduction in skilled workers, criticism for the amount of waste, levels of performance and productivity. Not to mention the fast growth of technology that companies need to keep on top of. Digitalisation of the construction industry is happening now, but can virtual reality make a positive difference? Virtual reality was originally introduced for the ultimate gaming experience. Users put on a headset and are fully immersed inside a simulated environment, being able to interact in

a 3D world in the game of their choice. These flew off the shelves and are still very popular today. It has become apparent that virtual reality is not only good in the entertainment sector, but can also benefit industries such as medicine, architecture and construction. The use of virtual reality in construction has many benefits and is predicted to thrive in the industry, along with other innovative technology, proving fundamental to a company's operational needs. Utilising modern technology can help expand your business, as well as improving training, efficiency and productivity.

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Photo: For Construction Pros

Collaboration By using up-to-date technology like virtual reality, people from all over the world will be able to easily and effectively collaborate on projects. No more faxing or bad photocopies of designs. Everything can be accessed instantaneously using virtual reality. It allows everyone who needs to work on the designs to do so from anywhere in the world, view all other aspects of the project in a realistic environment and in turn lead a high performing team. Virtual reality can not only be used to view the end project, but can also be utilised to create virtual conference rooms and meetings for you and your team. This can help save time and money on labour costs, travel expenses and different resourcing costs to design the project. Virtual reality can not only help collaboration within your team, but also with external Stakeholders and parties interested in the project.

Enhanced training programmes When starting any new job or college course, you are forced to sit through a number of onboard demonstrations and dull powerpoint presentations. With the use of virtual reality, training programmes in the construction industry can be enhanced and made more engaging and effective.

Photo: rumii

By putting students in a realistic environment using virtual reality, they can really see how things work, identify real-life safety risks and learn practical skills before entering the world of construction.

Increased demand for skills With the current shortage of skills in the construction industry amongst millennials, using new technology like virtual reality and construction software can really spark an interest in working in the industry. Today’s young people have grown up with technology and are painted a poor image of the construction industry. In fact, the construction industry has a diverse range of jobs and skills such as architecture, project management, carpentry and many more trades that can be extremely profitable. These are all the specialist skills that are currently in demand. With the pairing of new, innovative technology, such as virtual reality, youngsters may take another look into a career in the construction industry, bridging the gap in the current skills shortage. 178 82

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Better user experience Being able to offer your customers a virtual tour of their finished project will put your company at the forefront of the construction industry. Virtual reality systems create a

better experience for the customer, allowing them to view the finished design and imagine them in their new home or building, before it’s been built. This can ensure they are happy will the design, how it looks and how it sizes in real life. It also allows the you and the customer to make any changes that may improve the finish project and foresee any problems before spending lots of money.

Photo: Local-X 360 Virtual Tours

It provides customers with realistic expectations, especially with more complex and demanding projects. In creating the design, you can ensure everything fits how it is meant to, make any suggestions by showing the customer how it will look and provide a more accurate quote.

It’s no secret that waste is one of the biggest challenges and criticisms the construction industry faces. Virtual reality systems can help the future of the construction industry and reduce the amount of waste produced. By creating more accurate designs and having early visibility of problems, using virtual reality can significantly reduce the waste that projects produce because they haven’t had to throw away materials that were the wrong size or restart projects due to a flaw in the designs. By utilising modern design technology, it also reduces the amount of paper waste on a project site.

Photo: MATT Architecture: Rapid model making with 3D printing

Reduce waste

Design faster and more precise When designing the end product, using virtual reality for your project design can increase efficiency and accuracy. By using 3D designs and soon to be 3D printing, you and other workers will be able to easily create your designs quickly using up-to-date technology, and also identify any inefficiencies. This is because everything will be built to scale, rather than limited by the size of your notebook or computer screen. In some projects, errors arise after building has commenced. In a virtual reality design, you are more visible to things that don’t work. In turn this will save you a lot of time and money, reducing the number of projects required to come to a halt and spending more money trying to resolve the problems that are not usually foreseen. By adopting modern technology, you can really increase productivity in the workplace.

Digitalisation of the construction industry is happening now, and fast. New opportunities to address problems such as collaboration, shortage of skills and productivity is at our fingertips with the rapid growth of technology. Adopting virtual reality technology and other essential software for the construction industry will help put companies at the forefront of the industry and increase reliable outcomes for customers. Are you investing time and money in the best technology for your business?

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10 Futuristic Technologies That are Changing Construction

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Lead Architect: Carlos R. Gomez M.Arch – AIA International Associate

It’s no secret that technology is revolutionising literally every aspect of modern day life. The construction industry, continually being updated and upgraded with the latest technology, is one such example of this. Technology in construction comes with devising innovative new ways of constructing and whilst the changing future of construction is largely unknown, there are some construction technology trends that are paving the way for certain futuristic construction technology. So, what can we definitely expect the future to hold for construction? Here’s ten futuristic construction technologies of the future for you to have a gander at.

Bamboo Skyscraper

By GENIEBELT (SOON TO BE LETSBUILD) https://geniebelt.com https://www.letsbuild.com


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01 / Self-healing

Concrete

Millions of pounds are invested in maintaining, fixing and restoring roads, buildings, tunnels and bridges annually. This is because all concrete eventually cracks and needs to be restored. Self healing concrete would add years to a building’s life and be an enormous help time-wise and financially. The science behind this technological marvel shows itself when water enters a crack. This reactivates the bacteria that was mixed in during the mixing process. When the bacteria is activated, it excretes calcite which then heals the crack.

02 / Transparent

Aluminium

Transparent aluminium is a bullet-proof new state of matter that is almost as strong as steel. Despite its herculean strength, it looks like glass which is four times weaker and shatters easily. Transparent aluminium is a new material and a see-through metal that is just breaking through the construction industry and adds a futuristic feel to buildings. This new material is such advanced construction technology that it is made out of aluminium oxynitride (AION) and is created through the use of laser technology.

03 / Aerogel

Insulation

Sometimes known as ‘frozen smoke’, aerogel is semi-transparent and is produced by removing the liquid from a gel, leaving behind the silica structure which is 90% air. Despite being almost weightless, aerogel holds its shape and can be used to create thin sheets of aerogel fabric. Aerogel fabric is beginning to be used within the construction industry, due to its incredible insulation properties. Aerogel insulation makes it extremely difficult for heat or cold to pass through and has up to four times the power of fibreglass or foam insulation. 182

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Robotic Swarm Construction

Developed by researchers at Harvard, robotic swarm construction was designed based on how termites work. Termites work together like a ‘swarm’ and construction robotics are programmed to work together in this manner. Four-wheeled robots are programmed in each instance to build a certain design and come with sensors to detect the presence of other robots, so that they can work together.

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3D Printed Houses

3D printed houses are a glimpse into the future of construction. 3D printing homes will involve creating parts off-site and constructing the building on another occasion. It was pioneered by Apis Cor and based on San Francisco recently proved that they can 3D-print walls out of concrete in a relatively short space of time. The ‘printer’, which is similar in look to a small-scale crane, sets layers of concrete mixtures. 3D printed homes could be a great solution for quickly covering the housing needs of people who have been affected by physical disasters such as tsunamis, hurricanes and earthquakes or for those in poverty.

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06 / Smart

Roads

Also known as smart highways, smart roads are the future of transport and involve using sensors and IoT technology to make driving safer and greener. They give drivers real-time information regarding traffic information (congestion and parking availability for example) and weather conditions. This innovative technology can generate energy, charging electric vehicles on the move, as well as for street lights.

07 / Bamboo

Cities

Bamboo cities are cities made from innovative modular bamboo structures that interlock. It’s a form of sustainable construction and a renewable resource that is stronger than steel and more resilient than concrete. The purpose is to hold a new community in the trees and as the number of inhabitants increases, the structure will extend to accommodate this. As the structure extends to accommodate the number of people, it grows in strength. Modular structures are incredibly scalable and can grow in any direction, making it perfect for a city in the trees. Another added bonus – they can resist earthquake tremors due to bamboo’s high flexibility.

08 / Smart

Bricks

Smart bricks are modular connecting bricks and are similar to ‘Lego.’ Made out of high strength concrete and developed by ‘Kite Bricks’, smart bricks are versatile and come with substantial thermal energy control and a reduction in construction costs. As they are modularly designed, they are easy to connect and have space for insulation, electricity and plumbing.

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09 / Vertical

Cities

Vertical cities may soon become reality as the world’s population grows and land increasingly becomes scarce. They are tetris-like buildings of towers for thousands of people to inhabit. Supporting an blooming population, vertical cities are a space-saving solution to preserve land for food, nature and production.

10 / Pollution

Fighting Buildings

Also known as ‘vertical forests’, they are high-rise forest buildings designed to tackle air pollution. Pollution fighting buildings will be home to over 1,000 trees and 2,500 shrubs to absorb pollution in the air and to help filter it to make the air cleaner. Trees are highly productive in absorbing carbon dioxide, making this a cost-effective construction innovation.

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Are Construction Worker Stereotypes Causing a Skill Shortage? By SARAH LOREK, Lead Content Strategist, Trimble www.buildings.trimble.com @TheSarahLorek

The demand for construction is growing much faster than the number of skilled workers, and the industry is facing a skill shortage like never before. So why aren’t more students interested in construction? Could construction worker stereotypes be to blame for the skill shortage? In this article, we’ll review how construction workers are often stereotyped, why the stereotypes could be causing the skill shortage, and, at the heart of it all, who these workers really are.

— The Stereotypical Construction Worker — In an article, “Three Myths of Construction Workers: ‘Why we are not Second-Class Citizens’,” Forrest Sim outlines three common myths about construction workers. He notes Myth #2 as “Construction workers are just dumb brutes who only know how to swing a hammer.” Sims rejects this stereotype, saying his team consists of engineers, designers, and workers with degrees and educations of all levels. He adds that, as construction workers, his team is detail-oriented, creative, motivated, hardworking, and even innovative. Sim writes, “We don’t construct because we can’t do

anything else—we construct because we are so capable of building excellence.” The industry is a choice for many—not a last resort option. Another stereotype that Sim discusses is that construction workers are disrespectful towards women. Back in 2016, a viral shot of a construction worker taking a selfie with Kate Middleton surfaced, causing uproar in media outlets across the globe. The shot shows construction worker, Sam Wayne, holding up his phone for a selfie while Kate and William walked by a construction site. The speculation by the media was that the workers were catcalling Princess Kate. In an interview, Wayne explained that the workers showed respect towards Kate,

Selfie taken by Sam Wayne of Kate Middleton and Prince William / Facebook

and added that he was amused that the media was so caught up in a stereotype about builders and scaffolders, rather than the Middleton’s visit. Speculation aside, if anything, this is evidence that the stereotypes of construction workers are still going strong. So why do they exist in the first place? What is the source of this stigma?

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— Problems Facing the Construction Workforce —

— A Brief History of Construction Trades — Construction work has been the responsibility of people of various backgrounds for centuries. In the 19th century, the German-Speaking Framer’s Union in New York was at the forefront of growing communities, along with a growing Irish and Italian immigrant population at the turn of the 20th century. Historically, the immigrant construction workforce was willing to work for much a much lower wage than US-born workers, causing some people to think of them as second-class citizens. Could this be the root of the “dumb brute” stereotype that Sim noted in his article? Construction workers have played a critical role in building the foundation for America and other countries alike. Their skills have been some of the most invaluable in building civilizations and driving economies across the globe. But still, problems facing the workforce persist.

1. TECHNOLOGY IS ADVANCING FASTER THAN THE INDUSTRY

“Among all civilian jobs in 2016 requiring different strength levels, 45.5% of construction and extraction occupations required heavy physical strength at work” — BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Lunch atop a Skyscraper (New York Construction Workers Lunching on a Crossbeam), 1932

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As time goes by, technology is advancing faster than the industry can keep up. This means that while workers are busy building...new hardware, software, and processes like BIM (Building Information Modeling) are being created to make jobs faster and more efficient. 2. LACK OF INTEREST IN THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY In the heat of increased demand for buildings, construction firms are missing out on educating students and encouraging interest from potential workers. Architecture and design are increasingly more appealing than construction to aspiring industry professionals, but even then, hiring a qualified detailer or design professional remains a huge challenge.


Miron’s Build Like a Girl program encourages young women to learn about construction trades through hands-on projects at temporary job sites. Photo: Courtesy Miron Construction

Getting involved in construction takes time, effort, interest, and a particular set of skills that aren’t easy to obtain. Most construction and extraction careers require on-the-job training and apprenticeships, and the physical demands of these professions are immense. So what about the stereotypes mentioned above? Could they to blame for a lack of interest in the industry?

— Who They Really Are — The construction industry is made up of men and women with skills ranging from management to trigonometry to design to human resources. This is one of the fastest growing industries out there, and yet finding skilled workers is still a huge challenge. Not only that, the physical demands of the trade are immense. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, among all civilian jobs in 2016 requiring different strength levels, 45.5% of construction and extraction occupations required heavy physical strength at work (the most strength

required for all civilian occupations). Workers know this about their profession and feel the burden of hard physical work each day. Construction workers chose a trade that involves backbreaking labor, long hours, and sometimes unpredictable (and seemingly impossible) project schedules. In addition, they’ve worked to obtain specific skill sets that are becoming much like a lost art. How can we change the stereotypes, educate the public on the reality and importance of construction workers, and encourage future generations to pursue careers in the field?

— Changing the Stereotype — Until we change the stereotype, it will be difficult to find skilled workers to help complete jobs in time and on budget. However, there are ways that thought leaders and innovators are working to change things for the better. There have also been efforts to encourage women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) and other predominantly male fields.

With less than nine percent of the workforce consisting of women, this demographic would wildly improve the state of the industry and decrease the skill shortage. Companies who invest in educating future generations are seeing huge returns on their investment. Providing free licenses to colleges, writing curriculums, or visiting schools are ways companies are helping make this happen. The more students that are interested in construction early on, the stronger our economy will be in the future. Construction firms who adopt the latest technology have the potential to attract an innovative professional audience. BIM (Building Information Modeling) is becoming the norm across the world, and these new processes and best practices are paving the way for efficiencies throughout every stage of the construction process. The few construction firms who have started to adopt the latest tech trends are seeing the biggest return on investment, positioning themselves far above the less-evolved competition. This will also attract younger generations, females, and workers who want to stop the construction stereotype. •

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25th September 2019 28th January 2020 24th March 2020

AWARDS DINNER

21st May 2020

JUDGING DAY

FINALISTS ANNOUNCED

NOMINATIONS CLOSE

NOMINATIONS OPEN

23rd April 2020

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS 2020 PRELIMINARY TIMELINE

For more information about The European Women In Construction & Engineering Awards visit our website www.wiceawards.com or contact Skye Seymour skye.seymour@wiceawards.com 192

THE EUROPEAN WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION & ENGINEERING AWARDS >> MAY 2019 *Dates are a subject to change

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