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ArtCenter College of Design Graduate Transportation Design Dynamic Living Studio 16 April 2018 zane liu

Copyright © Zane Liu


TABLE OF CONTENTS ABOUT

3

DEFINING THE OPPORTUNITY A. TARGET CUSTOMERS

4

B. VALUE PROPOSITION

5

C. MARKET SIZE

6

D. COMPETITORS & ALTERNATIVES

7

E. DIFFERENTIATORS

9

F. RISKS & CONSTRAINTS

10

G. OVERALL MVP BUSINESS GOAL

11

DESIGN PROCESS A. INITIAL RESEARCH

12

B. PRIMARY RESEARCH

13

C. CORE USER STORIES

15

D. POTENTIAL FEATURES

15

E. SUPER SYSTEM

18

F. CONCEPTS AND PROTOTYPES

19

WORKS CITED & REFERENCES

33

APPENDIX A. PERSONAS

34

B. SPIDER CHARTS

35

C. INTERVIEWS

35 !2


ABOUT Urban Rover is an autonomous home platform for the city professional. Rovers are a new mode of affordable urban housing, providing life's essentials in a comfortable yet mobile footprint, enabling you to be a city adventurer. Through a subscription based model that provides connectivity and home utilities, Urban Rover streamlines city living while providing a comfortable home in an autonomous vehicle uninhibited by expensive contracts and static addresses. Live dynamically and enjoy life’s essentials anywhere effortlessly.

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SECTION 1 DEFINING THE OPPORTUNITY A. TARGET CUSTOMERS Urban Professionals — Customer and User • •

Age: 22 - 35 Socio-economic background: Can range from young urban professionals or

• •

bachelors to working urban couples Geography: Dense urban neighborhoods of Los Angeles, CA Goal: Affordable housing in urban setting while providing modern comforts, accessibility, and flexibility

Behaviors and Personality: Urban professionals —especially those of younger age— are fast paced, tech savvy individuals with a focus towards their job and their social activities. These individuals are eager to discover new experiences, but are frustrated with the rising cost of city living. These users are motivated to remain in the city due to its thriving job market and more lively social opportunities. City Planner — Customer • • • •

Age: 40-60 Socio-economic background: City and local suburb policy makers Geography: Dense urban neighborhoods of Los Angeles, CA Goal: Creating affordable living options and reducing vehicle congestion Behaviors and Personality: City officials work towards providing for their constituents and improving upon their neighborhoods. The Greater Los Angeles area has a vibrant mix of citizens with varying needs. Officials are driven by these needs and are often immobilized by high costs or bureaucratic delays. As autonomy and AI come to consumers, policy makers seek to adapt to these new trends. In dense cities, there is an incentive to create new modes of affordable living.

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B. VALUE PROPOSITION For the Urban Professional The Problem: Cities are becoming key localities for employment and opportunities. Especially for young adults who are new to the job market, increasing numbers of professionals are moving to cities only to find that housing prices are unaffordable. A large proportion of income is spent on living or transportation, limiting the potential for individuals to invest in other experiences or essentials. Urban professionals are limited to living in expensive-tiny homes or are required to spend long hours in congested traffic to access their work. There is a need for cost-effective solutions to support an urban lifestyle. Propositions: • Deliver essential home utilities and modern comforts in the footprint of a standard large automotive vehicle • Reduce the need for extended commutes and a static address • Increase the discretionary income of the frugal, urban professional

For the City Planner The Problem: As market demand for housing in cities such as Los Angeles continue to rise, the cost for rent is growing rapidly beyond those of any previous generation.1 It is becoming increasingly difficult to find affordable housing. With rising housing prices, there is a need for new modes of affordable living for city constituents. Propositions: • Decrease the cost of living in cities • Provide a super system for safety, servicing, and utilities • Transform how van living is perceived in society

1

“Millennials: Fueling the Experience Economy.” Eventbrite. N.d. PDF. 17 Jan. 2018.

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C. MARKET SIZE Area of Interest — Los Angeles County, California Urban Population Estimate • 2017: 10,163,5072 • 2016: 10,150,5582 • 2015: 10,123,2482 (Los Angeles is the single most densely populated US area) Housing Unit Estimates • 2010: 1,413,995 dwellings3 Owner Occupied Housing Rate • 2012-2016: 36.6% 3 Median Gross Rent • 2012-2016: $1,241 per month 3 Median Household Income • 2012-2016: $51,536 3 Households • 2012-2016: 1,356,311 households 3 Persons Per Household • 2012-2016: 2.83 3 Mean Travel Time to Work (Ages 16 and over) • 2012-2016: 30.5 minutes 3

2

“Annual Estimates of the Resident Population.” United States Census Bureau. 1 Jul. 2017. Web. 3 Apr. 2018.

3

“Quick Facts Los Angeles City, California.” United States Census Bureau. 1 Jul. 2017. Web. 3 Apr. 2018.

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D. COMPETITORS & ALTERNATIVES TABLE 1. Comparative Chart of Competitive Landscape Against Core Urban Rover Features

TARGET MARKET VALUE PROPOSITION

• •

STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

SIMILARITIES

• •

DIFFERENCES

• •

MOBILE HOME

RENTAL HOME

LOW INCOME HOUSING

Travelers and dynamic residents

Urban or temporary residents

Low income families

Travel with your home Save money on hotels or rental services Provide many home essentials

Comparable low costs to home purchase Enables short term living in urban areas Communal space and building manager

Unconstrained by single location Existing community and bonds Reduces cost of living if used as permanent living space

Immense existing infrastructure Comfortable and familiar lifestyle Large number of choices in style, size, and area

Inflexible space with limited functionality RVs are too large for most urban areas Van life can be expensive to build

Expensive, rising rent in urban areas High demand and competition Poor investment of income long term

Dynamic location Reduces cost of living

Allows for short term living arrangements

Rent rates are not affected by market

Limited home features Larger footprint Less modularity in some cases

Existing utilities infrastructure Building manager

Dedicated space for low income families

Affordable homes in urban areas Dedicated space for low income families Rental rates are less affected by market Affordable rent rates in urban areas Dedicated spaces for lower income bracket Offers same amenities as most homes Lower-middle class does not fulfill the requirements Space is too small for families Low quality build

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As seen in Table 1, the traditional rental home is the most familiar and the largest competitor to the Urban Rover. It is the market leader because of its majority in market share, its familiarity to users, and the large existing infrastructure. Rental homes have strong “brand recognition” and maintain a level of trust with users with regards to reliable comfort, quality, and safety. Los Angeles has the fourth highest number of renters in the nation at fifty-five percent as seen below.4,5 Renter

Owner

1%

36%

Homeless

Other

9%

Urban Rover Market Potential

55%

Urban Rover separates itself from traditional mobile homes and rental homes by marketing the idea of a dynamically smart, autonomous and sustainably powered, urban vehicle system. By building upon traditional home mediums and bringing new functionality through a dedicated vehicle platform, Urban Rover intends to be more than just a place to live or to save on home costs. The Rover System is unlikely to replace traditional living in communities, but will enable an alternative, more flexible platform for many urban professionals.


4

“2017 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count Results.” Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. 2017. Web. 4 Apr. 2018.

5

Chiland, Elijah. “Los Angeles Has the Fourth-Highest Percentage of Renters in the Nation.” LA Curbed. 22 Feb. 2017. Web. 4 Apr. 2018.

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E. DIFFERENTIATORS What Urban Rover Uniquely Offers Autonomous Urban Rover’s core is an autonomous drive system. Along with a dual induction electric drivetrain, this provides the large platform necessary to fit the entire home system within an urban vehicle footprint. Automation decreases the risk of human error and enables self-servicing with the larger Rover Super System. Autonomy is an enabler of reliability, safety, and convenience for users. Modularity Whereas contemporary mobile home vehicles require substantial size and costs to enable a modular interior, Urban Rover is built from the ground up for personalization and interior customization. By integrating common home essentials within the vehicle and simplifying utilities, Urban Rover is able to maximize the livable space for social and personal use. Convenience The Rover System works by combining and partnering home and community features into a single subscription model. This is important in providing the convenience of moving to a new home platform and leveraging available ecosystems. Where traditional homes require separate fees and subscriptions for rent, parking, internet connectivity, utilities, and memberships —such as a gym — the Rover System simplifies this process into a single service. Safety Providing safety and comfort is an essential component to a home. Urban Rover aims to deliver a level of privacy and safety beyond that of any traditional home or mobile home. Biometrics and auto-tinting glass serves to safeguard user privacy whereas autonomy enables Urban Rover to be alert and mobile for suspicious activity. The Rover System utilizes encrypted anonymous data to prevent and avoid precarious areas. 


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F. RISKS & CONSTRAINTS TABLE 2. Urban Rover Risk Probabilities and Impacts with Actionable Plan

RISK

DESCRIPTION •

Unfamiliar to mobile life

Market rate of rent in cities drop

Legislation blocks mobile living in urban areas

New modes of rapid transport such as Hyperloop Minimalism trend and experience trend ends

Cost of living drops in cities Rent rates are controlled or drop Home rent demand drops Laws limit parking on streets Laws block use of mobile homes

IMPACT

ACTIONABLE PLAN •

High

High

Low

Medium

High

High

Autonomous technology fails

Users scared of living from vehicle Users believe vehicle space is insufficient

PROBABLE

Autonomous technology is not safe for use Technology betrays trust of users with failure New technology undercuts travel time and costs

Desire for material items increases Movement to localize travel

Medium

High

• •

Medium

Medium

Medium

Medium

Stress the familiarity of system features Highlight subscription service to familiarize users Media and market experience and mobility features Highlight subscription service to familiarize users Lobby to advocate for alternative living modes Proactively discuss use of affordable living vehicles Dedicate a legal team to research legal barriers Invest resources during discovery to test and ensure reliability Create a customer support community and service Lower early expectations Locate other areas to apply and invest technology Test MVP and modify business model if necessary Showcase interior space Create a user friendly test space and service Highlight urban functions

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G. OVERALL MVP BUSINESS GOAL The primary business goal of Urban Rover is to create a new market sector for dynamic living while drawing customers away from the existing near-monopoly of the sessile home market. To date, the mobile living model is a niche concept utilized mostly for travel and leisure with a smaller growing category of van life living individuals. It will take a jump in technological advancements with regards to autonomous vehicles in addition to a large investment of resources, but the core goal of the product is to disrupt a market and grow a platform for a rapidly needed change in cost of living for urban areas. In order to market and commercialize the product, the technology needs to engage users and to be demonstrated in a location that has existing population concerns, high livability costs, and a need for alternative affordable living.  

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SECTION 2 DESIGN PROCESS A. INITIAL RESEARCH Brief and Opportunity The Dynamic Living Project was presented with the prompt to seamlessly integrate life and work in busy cities by utilizing the incoming availability of autonomous vehicles. It is important to note that the target user group was directed to be for those individuals who seek a non-fixed lifestyle by choice, and not by monetary needs. Background Research In order to better understand the prompt and discover potential users, secondary trend research was conducted. Citing research in urban planning and population, the Greater Los Angeles area was chosen as the geographic epicenter for the project in order to control the scope of users and understand local legislation.6 Los Angeles is a prime example of a dense urban area in need of new living opportunities as it is the single densest US city and the fourth highest in home renters.2,4 Data indicates that rent is rising quicker than ever and that the millennial generation is being hit most by this change.1,7 There is a trend known as “van-life” in Southern California of individuals moving out of their sessile homes to living out of vehicles and RVs. Preliminary research elucidated the urban professional’s desire for a simpler lifestyle in an effort to maximize on life experiences rather than material needs. Urban professionals spend a majority of their days at work and often numerous more hours to commute to work. However, there is a continued desire to remain in city areas due to its greater job opportunities and more upbeat lifestyle.8,9 ,10 6

“Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) 85.02 - Vehicle Dwelling.” City of Los Angeles. 2018. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

7

Fry, Richard. “Americans Are Moving At Historically Low Rates (…).” Pew Research Clinic. 13 Feb. 2017. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

8

Brinlee, Chris Jr. “How To Live Out Of Your Car.” Outside. 30 Nov. 2016. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

9

The Office Hobo. “I Choose To Live In My Car In L.A.” LA Weekly. 29 July 2014. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

10

Sommerfeld, Lorraine. “More People Are Choosing to Live In Their Cars. Could You Do It?” The Globe and Mail. 26 Mar. 2017. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

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B. PRIMARY RESEARCH Interview Premise To learn about the market and its potential users, interviews were conducted with two categories of individuals: urban professionals and present van life citizens. Over thirty individuals were interviewed about their present lifestyles, their home needs, their expenses, and their pain points. In Tables 3 and 4 are summarized customer needs and opportunities based on the two categories. TABLE 3. Customer Needs of Urban Professionals

CUSTOMER NEEDS

OPPORTUNITIES •

FRUGAL

• • •

LOCALITY

• • •

SOCIAL GATHERING

• • •

JUST WORKS

• • •

SAFETY

• •

Provide competitive pricing against current rent Minimize maintenance fees Ensure insurance coverage Enable vehicle to fit within urban spaces Reduces commuting needs or time Still provides the basic mobilities of urban automobiles Offer space for smaller social events and significant others Allow for privacy in smaller footprint Community of similar users to escape negative social stigmas Provide all necessary home utilities such as sanitation, kitchen, and connectivity Reliable system that minimizes user needs to be handy Simplify payment structure with single purchase plan Utilize technology to prevent break ins or provide safety comfort Use a super system to discover safe parking neighborhoods Reliable technology to use vehicle space while autonomous

Observations and Interpretations A key finding from interviewing urban professionals was their optimism towards van life and their strong desire to spend for such a service. While initial predictions placed subscription fees around $1000 per month, urban professionals indicated their desire to spend up to their current rent rates —up to $3000— for the convenience of mobile living so long as necessary home essentials were provided. 


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TABLE 4. Customer Needs of Present Van Life Citizens

CUSTOMER NEEDS

OPPORTUNITIES •

EASE OF PARKING

• •

SPACE

• • •

ADAPTABILITY

• •

PRIVACY

• • •

SIMPLE MAINTENANCE

• •

Discover locations for overnight parking Enable self-leveling to park in more locations Find locations with amenities such as charging and food Dedicated space for secondary vehicles Reduce wasted space of today’s amalgamation of parts Interior could be more modular for different occasions Provide more home utilities and better insulation Manage interior and insulation for better climate control Allow for privacy in smaller footprint Provide open window space but also improve privacy Reduce or remove need to find craftsman for updates Easier to clean interior surface materials Ensure electric charge for longer periods of time

Note: Interviews were conducted independently, over the phone, and at the San Diego van life meet up. For more see Appendix. 


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C. CORE USER STORIES The Urban Rover ecosystem provides urbanites the opportunity to maintain a dynamic and upbeat lifestyle without spending the traditionally expensive fees of city living. By creating an autonomous vehicle home that fits into the urban landscape of a city, urbanites and community leaders can engage in a lifestyle that maximizes experience and engages a new, more sustainable living format. 1. As an urban professional, I want to establish a career in a city while maintaining a social life without spending extraneously on cost of living. 2. As a city planner, I want to deliver the best community life to all of my constituents while meeting the cost and legal needs of the city government.

D. POTENTIAL FEATURES TABLE 5. Urban Rover Vehicle Potential Features Roadmap

FEATURE

DESCRIPTION •

Autonomous

• • •

EV Drivetrain

• • •

Automation

• • •

Smart Suspension

• • •

Stacked Natural Ventilation

• • •

Custom Full Size Sofa Bed

• •

Level 5 self driving Destination drop off and self pick up Overnight traveling to wake up to the next destination Dual induction motors with 4 wheel steering Minimize drivetrain to maximize interior space Fast and high density charge for urban driving Works with Super System to enable self refueling Smaller space enables self cleaning through UV lights Intelligently personalizes space based on user data Self levels for perfect interior orientation no matter the terrain Raises vehicle during the night for extended privacy Provides level road side entry Maintains interior temperature using pressure differences Low to no energy used to sustain climate control Temperature variations naturally with outdoors Bed is fit for a maximum 7 feet high individual Slightly wider custom full size mattress During day acts as lounge sofa

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Combo shower and toilet space with quality materials Space becomes steam room using atomized shower head Water is recycled as grey water for other use

Full Fridge

Kitchen provides near full sized fridge and freezer.

Trash Compactor

Eliminates odors and reduces trash space from 6 to 1

Improves headspace and enables users to set surrounding windows to opaque while maintaining a connection to environment

Provides safe cooking counter without fear of burns and fire Entire wood counter top acts as large induction top Pans and cookware can be placed anywhere along the surface

Bathroom

Panoramic Glass Roofline

Induction Cooktop

• • •

Softbox Smart Lighting

AI Smart Assistant

• • •

Modular Ottomans

• • •

Jet Adjusted Faucets

Thin HVAC Ventilation and Kitchen Vent Modular Desks

• • • • • •

Magnetized Counter

Smart Glass •

Wireless and Induction Charging

• •

Built In OLED Computer

• •

EV Folding Bike

• •

Creates ambient lighting without losing lumens Lights shift and flow during vehicle movement to reduce motion sickness. Research by University of Michigan Provide a smart home experience with connectivity to the cloud All home functions can be accessed while away Voice command functions in home Biometrics ensure safety and locked entry Ottomans provide customizable seating or benches inside Each ottoman acts as storage space Dual jet systems change fluid flow team match vehicle momentum during drives Uses Dyson system for air drying to reduce need for paper and towels which take space HVAC system is hidden away with thin vents Insulation of vehicle allows space to maintain temperatures HVAC behind kitchen counter becomes cooking vacuum vent Dual desks can be stowed away or brought up dependent on use With both desks, surface area becomes a large craftsman space All counters spaces and tables are magnetized Custom utensils and accessories will ensure objects adhere to surfaces during drives All glass surfaces are embedded with electrochromatic tint and opacity changing surfaces Enables privacy with a simple voice request Induction charging and true wireless charging all around vehicle Eliminates need for outlets and deep wiring Transparent OLED screens are embedded into glass Connects to cloud and powered by vehicle’s AI chipset Turns any glass surface into a screen or computer Custom EV folding bike is stowed beneath doorway Provides secondary vehicle use

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Grey Water Filtering System Nebia Shower and Steamer Dishwasher Cabinet

• • • • • • •

External Storage

3D Sink

• •

• • •

Hydroponics Garden

• • •

Beam Forming Atmos Surround System Compact Comforter Set

Enables reuse of scarcely used water such as sink and shower Grey water is filtered for hydroponics, dishwasher, and toilet Atomizes water to conserve 70% of water during showers Transforms into a steam room heater Combines the dishwasher and cabinet into singular space High temperature system reduces amount of water used Trunk space available Enables space to be used as mailbox system Vehicle can automate package pick up while ensuring privacy of interior space Three stacked plates allow sink to be utilized more efficiently Cookware storage and chopping board Grow small in house plants and herbs Utilizes grey water for fuel Works with just water and nutrient packets Perfects sound reproduction and directs pinpoint sound to individuals inside Auto noise cancels exterior noise and minimizes sound leakage to bed area if desired Comforter is quickly stuffed into sofa pillow for cleaner space

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E. SUPER SYSTEM TABLE 6. Urban Rover Super System Potential Features Roadmap

FEATURE

DESCRIPTION

Works with existing charging infrastructure Vehicle self drives to charge stations during users work times Fast charging system

Partner with local laundry mats to deliver laundry

Works with USPS, Amazon, UPS, and FedEx to locate for deliveries Vehicle can also self pick up packages at source facility

CHARGE LAUNDRY MAIL GYM

• • • •

PARKING • •

COMMUNITY

• • •

SAFETY

• •

SATELLITE

MICROGRID

Partner with gyms for easy access to gyms Vehicle can reach gyms on wake up Partner with garages and parking spaces for free overnight parking or parking incorporated into subscription Community provides reviews of spaces and locations Create social community for group gatherings Social events can occur for van lifers Build up existing community Rover Network can provide safety data based on real time events Rovers can work together to prevent disturbances Vehicles will automatically drive away when disturbances occur

Potential incoming of satellite internet will enable vehicles to be connected anywhere at high speeds

During off times, vehicles can connect to local grids to act as battery packs Microgrids help manage city electricity levels while charging vehicles

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F. CONCEPTS AND PROTOTYPES Design Methodology The design and layout of the Urban Rover interior and exterior is based on core design principles built upon user needs and the need to solve existing pain points. The potential features were dimensioned based on existing product sizes and tested within various iterations of external dimensions. In order to sustain and operate in an city environment, the Urban Rover needs to fit within street lanes, it must have the ability to park in city spaces, and the Rover must have a turning radius fit for small city streets. Table 7 showcases the key form and function needs. TABLE 7. Must Have Form and Function Needs

FORM Attractive, unobtrusive appearance to reduce unwanted attention • Small city fitting footprint • Simple and familiar interfaces • Home-like interior with vehicle-like exterior • Appearance that avoids stereotypes and negative stigmas of van life •

FUNCTION Easy to use interior space Operate-able by people of any age • Ability to personalize space • Provide open space and privacy • Ample space for one and at most two residents within vehicle • •

Scaled Layouts On the following pages are graphical layouts of all the desired potential features to scale. This layout was used to iteratively test various vehicle sizes and potential interior designs in order to discover the best suited package design that enables maximum livable space while providing all the necessary user comforts. Three full scale tape mock ups were then built using these dimensions to user test the real-world scaled space.

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5’

2.25’

2’

2’

D1.67’

(1.25’ H) FLEXIBLE 66 GALLONS FOR ~1-1.5 WEEKS

(1’ H)

1’

5’

1.5’ 6.75’

1.3’

STOABLE TABLE

3’

(TESLA RATIOS)

12’

HYDROPONICS GARDEN

0.67’ 2.3’

ROADTREK AGILE

19.5’

1.5’ 1.5’

ACTOR

4’

3D SINK

(1’ H) 2X DUAL 2’INDUCTION MOTORS

5.8’

BATTERY PACK (TESLA RATIOS)

DISHWASHER - CABINET 1.5’ (2.5’ H) HEAT EXCHANGER 1.3’ (1’ H) 2’ 1 inch = 1’ 8.3 feet 1.5’

INDUCTION 2 TOP 2’ WHEEL WELLS 1.17’H) (1.75’

1.58’ 2.6’

12’

6.75’

ROADTREK AGILE (9.5’ H)

19.5’

PEDESTAL WASHER (1.17’ H)

2.25’

1.5’ TRASH COMPACTOR

1.8’

(2.8’ H)

4’

2X DUAL INDUCTION MOTORS

2.25’

urban rover

1.5’

1.5

(9.5’ H)

ASHER

ONS

(2.8’ H)

2.25’

BATTERY PACK

1.75’

1.5’ TRASH COMPACTOR

1.8’

MICROWAVE-OVEN 5.8’ 1.75’

(1.17’ H)

2.25’

WATER TANKS

1.5’

PEDESTAL WASHER

2.6’

2X WHEELS

5’

6.75’

1.17’

CHASSIS (1.8’ H)

1.8’

INDUCTION 2 TOP

2’

GOCYCLE GS EBIKE 2.7’

S GARDEN

(2.5’ H)

BATHROOM

.95’

TABLE

DISHWASHER - CABINET

1.5’

4’

OP

(1’ H)

(TWIN XL 3.3’ W)

6.67’

- CABINET

3D SINK

1.5’

QUEEN SIZE BED

HEAT EXCHANGER

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6.75’ 6.75’

FRONT

19.5’ REAR

19.5’

FRONT

REAR Window

9-9.6’ Window NOTES • Fold down desk and windows as computer • More storage underneath bed-sofa • Toilet and shower NOTES 1 inch = 4.15 feet •FRONT Fold down desk and windows as computer • More storage underneath bed-sofa • Toilet and shower

Trunk Entry

Trunk

Trunk

Entry FIGURE 1. Top Views of Drivetrain and Interior of Larger Rover Concept

19.5’

Entry

1 inch = 4.15 feet

top view

urban rover REAR

top view

urban rover

Window Trunk

NOTES • 7.35’ Headspace • 3.4’ H Countertop • Opt half fridge for microwave-oven • Opt trunk for pedestal washer 1 inch = 4.15 feet

Entry FIGURE 2. Side View of Larger Rover Concept

side view

urban rover !21


6.75’ 6.75’

FRONT

16’ REAR

16’

FRONT

REAR

Window

8-8.6’

Entry

Window

NOTES • Fold down desk and windows as computer • More storage underneath bed-sofa • Toilet Only

NOTES FRONT 1• inch = 4.15desk feet and windows as computer Fold down • More storage underneath bed-sofa • Toilet Only

Entry FIGURE 3. Top Views of Drivetrain and Interior of Mini Rover Concept

16’

Entry

top view mini rover REAR top view mini rover

1 inch = 4.15 feet

OTES .35’ Headspace .4’ H Countertop Can opt smaller fridge for add on microwave-oven

1 inch = 4.15 feet

Window

Entry FIGURE 4. Side View of Mini Rover Concept

side view

mini rover !22


Concept Sketches Various exterior and interior features were conceptualized through sketches, iterating on form and function. Interior concepts were radically different variations of the same features whereas exterior concepts were based on creating visual variations which fulfilled the basic form needs as specified in Table 7. By maintaining a simple quadrilateral interior form, it enables the optimum use of interior space which allows for a relatable home-like interior and maximum headspace.

 

FIGURE 5. From Top to Bottom: Hatch Opening, Targa Soft Top, and Dual Jet Faucet

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FIGURE 6. From Top to Bottom: Modular Ottomans, Ways to Channel Rainwater, and Murphy Bed Storage

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FIGURE 7. From Top to Bottom: Stacked Natural Ventilation Vents, Modular Desks, EV Storage, and Retractable Roof Concept

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FIGURE 8. Exterior Form Concepts

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FIGURE 9. Larger Rover Layout Concept

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FIGURE 10. Larger Rover Modular Desks

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FIGURE 11. Varied Sized Rover Concepts in Comparison to Major Competitors

Concept Selection

FIGURE 12. Partial Image of Full Scale Tape Mock Up

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The final selected layout was a variation and amalgamation of both the larger and mini Rover concepts. User walk throughs and tests helped to showcase the happy medium in form factor. While larger vehicles provided the space necessary for larger social gatherings, the size would also make it more difficult to fit into urban parking spaces. The mini rover sought minimalism but required the elimination of certain home utilities that were still desirable to users. Therefore a middle ground was selected with a size in between the mini and large Rovers. The selected layout maintains all the home essentials of the larger rover and ample space for a wheel chair to operate, but removes the addition of a third modular desk and any excess space between vehicle components.  

FIGURE 13. Final Urban Rover Side and Top Views

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Modeling and VR Prototyping Using the dimensioned final layout, a computer aided model was created and iterated upon in PTC Creo. The CAD began with purely rectangular forms utilizing the boxed dimensions before more realistic shapes and interior components were then added. This model was finally brought into Unity VR where animations and virtual environment experiences were created. Experience a mobile version of the VR on your phone or computer.

FIGURE 14. From Top to Bottom: Early CAD Model and Near Final CAD Model

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FIGURE 15. Urban Rover VRED Renders

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WORKS CITED 1

“Millennials: Fueling the Experience Economy.” Eventbrite. N.d. PDF. 17 Jan. 2018.

2

“Annual Estimates of the Resident Population.” United States Census Bureau. 1 Jul. 2017. Web. 3 Apr. 2018.

3

“Quick Facts Los Angeles City, California.” United States Census Bureau. 1 Jul. 2017. Web. 3 Apr. 2018.

4

“2017 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count Results.” Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority. 2017. Web. 4 Apr. 2018.

5

Chiland, Elijah. “Los Angeles Has the Fourth-Highest Percentage of Renters in the Nation.” LA Curbed. 22 Feb. 2017. Web. 4 Apr. 2018.

6

“Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) 85.02 - Vehicle Dwelling.” City of Los Angeles. 2018. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

7

Fry, Richard. “Americans Are Moving At Historically Low Rates (…).” Pew Research Clinic. 13 Feb. 2017. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

8

Brinlee, Chris Jr. “How To Live Out Of Your Car.” Outside. 30 Nov. 2016. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

9

The Office Hobo. “I Choose To Live In My Car In L.A.” LA Weekly. 29 July 2014. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

10

Sommerfeld, Lorraine. “More People Are Choosing to Live In Their Cars. Could You Do It?” The Globe and Mail. 26 Mar. 2017. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

REFERENCES Guest Greta. “New Patented System Could Prevent Motion Sickness While Riding Self-Driving Cars.” University of Michigan. 17 Jan. 2018. Web. 19 Jan. 2018. Holland, Gale. “Homeless People Face L.A. Crackdown On Living In Cars.” LA Times. 24 Jan. 2017. Web. 17 Jan. 2018. “Natural Ventilation.” Green Building Technology. 2007. Web. 25 Feb. 2018. Steve. “Choosing To Be Homeless: How I’d Live Without My Car.” ThinkSaveRetire. 25 July 2016. Web. 17 Jan. 2018. Valentino, Paul. “Living In A Car In LA: 6 Reasons That’s Not A Good Idea.” Acting Plan. N.d. Web. 17 Jan. 2018. “Why It’s Becoming Cool To Live In Your Car (…).” The Christian Science Monitor. N.d. Web. 17 Jan. 2018.

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APPENDIX A. PERSONAS

Gage T. Books Tribeca, New York City 26 Years Old

Gage is the product manager of a global consumer foods company. While he spends weekdays leading the company’s technology division, he takes every opportunity to travel during his off time. Gage is an avid outdoorsman and audiophile, spending many hours sailing and exploring music catalogs. Persona

urban rover

Danielle Jin San Diego, California 32 Years Old

Danielle is a marketing manager for a local pharmaceutical in San Diego. While she has a permanent residence, her work requires traveling for sales pitches. Danielle chooses to live in her van during these trips, but maintains a simple space that is easy to manage. She loves the mobility, but desires to separate van life from sessile home life. urban rover

Persona !34


B. SPIDER CHARTS

Dynamic

Self-Sustaining

Adaptibility

urban rover

Simplicity

Number/Size

Spider Chart

C. INTERVIEWS Some interviews are anonymized and made available on Google Sheets. See more ›


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Copyright © Zane Liu

Urban Rover Business Model (Spring 2018)  
Urban Rover Business Model (Spring 2018)  

ArtCenter, Spring 2018. Dynamic Living Studio

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