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DEAR FRIENDS OF THE GALLERIES, 2020 was a year like no other. A devastating pandemic and an urgent racial justice movement reshaped the nation and world in a matter of months, and illuminated sweeping challenges that we must rise to meet. A year that divided us—physically and politically—also revealed the great complexity of our task in charting the path ahead. It solidified our commitment to presenting transformational stories with subtlety and care, in friendship and equitable partnership with visionary artists and curators. Our preparations for 2021 have been as much about reimagining the responsibilities and functions of an art gallery as planning individual exhibitions. As you discover what’s in store at Zane Bennett and form & concept in the following pages, pay attention to who we are working with and how they are involved. Our unofficial slogan has always been to “knock your socks off.” If we were to identify a charter, it would be to add new seats to the table—and perhaps upend it in the process. The one constant in our ever-changing landscape this past year? Your support. As the initial shutdown in March progressed through the summer months, we received countless communications from collectors, community members and longtime fans of the incredible artists we represent. Some of you expressed heartfelt thanks for our virtual curatorial efforts, while others shared simple words of cheer to keep doing what we were doing. You made our year! 2020 was a pivotal time for its earth-shaking and revelatory events. As the calendar turns, let’s approach the coming year with clarity and conviction. If 2020 underscored the need for foundational change—in the art community and far beyond—2021 can be the first step towards a better world. Sincerely, Sandy Zane, Owner Jordan Eddy, Director

ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART

zanebennettgallery.com | (505) 982-8111 | info@zanebennettgallery.com


THE CREW

SANDY ZANE, OWNER

JORDAN EDDY, DIRECTOR

Wears: J.Q. Nightshade

In his collection: Thais Mather

KYLEE ARAGON WALLIS, PRINTS

BRAD HART, EXHIBITIONS

In her collection: Hayal Pozanti

Wears: Robert Ebendorf

MARISSA FASSANO, MARKETING

OMAR PEDROZA, REGISTRAR

Wears: Kate Ruck

In his collection: Brett Kern

REBECCA BERNSTEIN, SALES

ISABELLA BEROUTSOS, SALES

In her collection: Danielle Orchard

On her wishlist: Lesley Dill

FORM & CONCEPT

formandconcept.center | (505) 780-8312 | info@formandconcept.center


THE 2021 SHOW LIST

FAMILY ROOM (JAN. 29–MAY 15) This functional and modular living room installation, designed by a national consortium of LGBTQ+ artists, is a stage for visual artworks and performances that examine queer domestic space and the chosen family. C. ALEX CLARK + DARCY ROSENBERGER (JAN. 29–APR. 2) ZANE BENNETT SPRING SHOW + CERAMIC SHOWCASE (FEB. 26–MAY 15) MATT MAGEE (FEB. 26–MAY 15)


THE 2021 SHOW LIST

NIKESHA BREEZE (APR. 26–JUNE 15) For her first major solo exhibition, the up-and-coming Taos artist weaves together immersive installation, sculpture, paintings, new media works and performances that explore ritual remembrance, reparation and reclamation. ZANE BENNETT SUMMER SHOW + FIBER SHOWCASE (MAY 28–JULY 31) PASCAL EMMER + TIGRE BAILANDO (MAY 28–JULY 31)


THE 2021 SHOW LIST

MODEL OF MOTIONS (MAY 15–AUG. 10) This mixed-media, multi-part installation references economic, cultural and ecological phenomena of the Silk Road, and the larger implications of globalization. Model of Motions is form & concept’s official satellite display for CURRENTS 2021. FORM & CONCEPT SUMMER SHOW (JUNE 25–JULY 31) MARTIN ALEXANDER SPRATLEN ETEM (JUNE 25–OCT. 16)


THE 2021 SHOW LIST

WE ARE THE SEEDS (AUG. 11–OCT. 16) We Are The Seeds is an arts festival that unites a community of Indigenous creatives in Santa Fe each August. For this companion exhibition, Seeds co-directors Tailinh Agoyo and Paula Mirabal build a dimensional narrative of the project’s inception and growth through stories of the artists who’ve contributed along the way. THAIS MATHER (AUG. 11–OCT. 16) BOOKS SHOWCASE (AUG. 11–NOV. 20)


THE 2021 SHOW LIST

SHE DANCES LIKE A BOMB (OCT. 29, 2021–JAN. 15, 2022) Artists Debra Baxter and Dawn Cerny curate this national group show of sculptors who are linked to Bard College’s prestigious studio arts program. She Dances unites a remarkable creative circle challenging the legacy of minimalism. DEBRA BAXTER (OCT. 29, 2021–JAN. 15, 2022)


Art shown by: Joyce Stolaroff, Armond Lara


MATT MAGEE Green Excavation, 2020 Lithograph 29.5 x 18.5 in (74.9 x 47 cm)


Art shown by: Debra Baxter, Brett Kern, C. Alex Clark


CHRISTO Wrapped Statues, the Glyptothek (Munich), 1988 Serigraph with photo collage 35 x 27 in (88.9 x 68.6 cm)


THE 2021 SHOW LIST

ZANE BENNETT WOMEN IN PRINT (OCT. 29, 2021–JAN. 15, 2022) In a bold reframing of the 70-year resurgence of American printmaking, Women in Print presents a fresh array of protagonists. Curator Kylee Aragon Wallis unites artwork and stories from female founders, printers and artists who rescued the discipline and fought for broader recognition in the art world. METALS SHOWCASE (OCT. 29, 2021–JAN. 15, 2022) ERIN MICKELSON (OCT. 29, 2021–JAN. 15, 2022)


3 QUESTIONS WITH NIKESHA BREEZE 1. WHAT DID IT FEEL LIKE TO

BRING ALL OF YOUR PRACTICES TOGETHER—PAINTING, SCULPTURE, INSTALLATION, PERFORMANCE—FOR YOUR SHOW? It feels like a homecoming. Many of these ideas, images and beings have been in me for so long. The feeling of having them all together is like a family reunion. Each work is communicating its journey and story to the others, and they are working to tell one big story. It is exciting for me to see it too. I feel like a very proud mother. At the same time, I feel like a very grateful great, great grandchild.

2. HOW DID YOU DRAW FROM PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND

LARGER BODIES OF KNOWLEDGE TO APPROACH THESE THEMES OF BLACK REPARATION AND RECLAMATION? As a queer Black human on this planet, my personal experience is filled with unspoken truths. I am holding so much through the intergenerational influence and cellular inheritance of my ancestors, that sometimes it was as easy as slowing down enough to listen. The work flowed out of that listening. I am also a deep researcher, and was constantly referencing larger knowledge of history and Black theory to support my process.

3. YOU’VE EMBEDDED A GROUP EXHIBITION, TITLED HAND

TOOLS OF RESILIENCE AND FEATURING AFRICAN DIASPORIC AND INDIGENOUS ARTISTS, IN YOUR SOLO SHOW. WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO OFFER UP THAT SPACE? I am deeply interested in the minds, dreams and visions of Black and Indigenous artists. I wanted to invite those minds and artworks into the space as a way of honoring their knowledge, as well as the presence of the ancestors that each artist carries. To me it feels like it is a time, worldwide, where we all need to be thinking about how to craft the world we want to live in. In order to do that we need new tools.


3 QUESTIONS WITH DEBRA BAXTER 1. WHERE DID THE TITLE SHE

DANCES LIKE A BOMB COME FROM, AND HOW DID YOU SELECT ARTISTS? She Dances like a Bomb is a line from Emily Dickinson’s poem “The Soul has Bandaged moments.” It has to do with the power of women that might be underestimated, and that’s always stuck with me. I enlisted my old friend (and fellow Bard grad) Dawn Cerny for this all-woman sculptor exhibition because I have always loved her work and the way she thinks. She helped suggest some interesting sculptors who are using available or “unworthy” materials with rigor and pleasure.

2. YOUR LATEST SOLO EXHIBITION WILL ALSO BE ON VIEW,

ONE ROOM OVER FROM SHE DANCES. HAS THE GROUP SHOW INFLUENCED YOUR SOLO EFFORT? I loved the idea of putting my sculptor sisters next to my work. I am making several pieces for the group show that are much larger and more experimental. I don’t want to put my work in a box. I always want to push myself and experiment, and I can’t wait to see how the two shows will speak to each other and the stories they will tell about where I came from and where I am going.

3. CONGRATULATIONS ON GETTING THE JOAN MITCHELL

FOUNDATION AWARD LAST YEAR! HOW DID THAT FEEL AND WHAT ARE SOME OUTCOMES SINCE THEN? Receiving the Joan Mitchell Award was the biggest honor of my life. It changed how I think about myself and how others perceived me as an artist. I also wanted the award to support women and girls in our community and world. So, I gave time and money to organizations that focus on women and girls. Women are the backbone of our society. If we raise them up, it will help everyone, especially developing countries. It all feels like just the beginning of many amazing creative years to come.


3 QUESTIONS WITH SAMA ALSHAIBI 1. YOU MADE MODEL OF

MOTIONS WITH MICHAEL FADEL. COULD YOU TALK ABOUT THAT COLLABORATION PROCESS? Michael and I had been working closely together for years before we embarked on this joint collaboration. We were incredibly familiar with each other’s creative impulses and intellectual aspirations. We also share a similar familial history. Both of us were uprooted from the Middle Eastern countries in which we were born due to war. It was a natural evolution for us to create a project that eludes to the historic movement of goods and peoples across physical and metaphorical place.

2. YOUR WORK INCORPORATES MECHANICAL ELEMENTS AND A

VIDEO INSTALLATION. HOW DOES THIS CONNECT TO THE WORK’S CONCEPTUAL THRUST? Both mechanical sculpture and video provide meaning through time. We wanted to foreground the elasticity of time itself. We converged a reading of climate change as one breaking down the historic routes of the Silk Road through the video performance of a protagonist rowing across the barren desert, and through the precarious qualities of a mechanical machinery rocking a wooden boat, undulating the displaced gypsum sand as both cargo and metaphor.

3. MODEL OF MOTIONS IS OUR FEATURED ARTWORK FOR THE 2021

CURRENTS NEW MEDIA FESTIVAL. WHAT EXCITES YOU ABOUT A PROJECT LIKE THIS? I understand the festival as an encounter of international and regional dialogue through an interdisciplinary and technological lens. We are eager to share Model of Motions through this framework, as our installation was founded on the historical intertwining of cultures, communities and commodities.


3 QUESTIONS WITH TAILINH AGOYO 1. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE

THE SPIRIT OF THE WE ARE THE SEEDS FESTIVAL, AND YOUR PHILOSOPHY AS A CO-DIRECTOR? Seeds has always provided a safe space to come together and celebrate the beauty and diversity of Indigenous art and culture, our communities and each other. Whether it’s dancing at the social, laughing at the stories being told onstage, visiting with friends and relatives, being visually nourished by art, or eating the yummiest food at our community dinner, participants and visitors leave feeling connected.

2. WHAT ARE SOME ELEMENTS OF THE FESTIVAL THAT YOU WANT

TO EVOKE IN THE GROUP SHOW YOU’RE PLANNING WITH CODIRECTOR PAULA MIRABAL? We love this opportunity to highlight the journey and to share what makes us, us. And by “us” we mean the artists we work with, our team and volunteers, our relatives, and the community that has been instrumental in our growth and success. Joy, celebration, connectedness, trust, heartwork, beauty, freedom, gratitude. We look forward to sharing all these elements of Seeds—those which make us human and those which make us whole.

3. WHAT ARE SOME POSITIVE RIPPLE EFFECTS THAT YOU’VE SEEN

SINCE THE FIRST SEEDS FESTIVAL IN 2017? Over the years, artists have made connections that have increased their visibility. People from all over share how they appreciate the work we do and how much they’ve learned about Indigenous people today. Our work centers joy and we love seeing others follow that framework too. Indigenous peoples have been through so much. We’ve survived and we’re THRIVING. To be able to focus on joy and goodness is necessary. And we’re making that happen every day.


ABOUT THE GALLERIES FORM & CONCEPT form & concept gallery challenges the perceived distinctions between art, craft and design. We dispute the historic use of these terms to divide artists and rank material culture. Our programming acts as a conversation between many converging disciplines, harnessing the power of contemporary creative practice to shatter entrenched narratives. form & concept mounts exhibitions of regional and international art. We engage the community through educational initiatives including workshops, lectures and artist residencies. FIND US ONLINE: formandconcept.center AND IN YOUR FEED: instagram.com/formandconcept CONTACT BY PHONE: (505) 780-8312 AND BY EMAIL: info@formandconcept.center

ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART Founded in 2005, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art exhibits editioned artworks by postwar and contemporary masters, including Jim Dine, Olafur Eliasson, Helen Frankethaler, Sam Gilliam, Anish Kapoor, Wangechi Mutu, Robert Rauschenberg, Bridget Riley and Frank Stella, among many others. With over a decade of art market expertise, Zane Bennett acquires, sells and consigns artworks on an international scale. FIND US ONLINE: zanebennettgallery.com AND IN YOUR FEED: instagram.com/zanebennettgallery CONTACT BY PHONE: (505) 982-8111 AND BY EMAIL: info@zanebennettgallery.com


SPECIAL THANKS: Mark Wallis, staff and artist portrait illustrator Shelby Criswell, cover and show list illustrator Artists interviewed: Nikesha Breeze, Debra Baxter, Sama Alshaibi & Tailinh Agoyo Artwork photography: Byron Flesher Catalog design: Marissa Fassano Printer: Santa Fe New Mexican Š Zane Bennett Galleries, LLC.


FORM & CONCEPT | ZANE BENNETT CONTEMPORARY ART 435 South Guadalupe Street Santa Fe, NM 87501

Profile for Zane Bennett Contemporary Art

2021 Galleries Catalog  

form & concept and Zane Bennett Contemporary Art presents the 2021 exhibition schedule, including exclusive interviews with contemporary art...

2021 Galleries Catalog  

form & concept and Zane Bennett Contemporary Art presents the 2021 exhibition schedule, including exclusive interviews with contemporary art...

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