Page 1

SPECIAL FEATURE: RECIPES AND ADVICE FOR GOING GLUTEN-FREE EASY FOOD ISSUE 139

• must-have cooking tips • Authentic recipes • Perfect pasta

BAKING WITH RHUBARB

MAY 2019

AUS $8.50 MAY 2019

R 44.90 (incl. VAT)

R 39.90 (incl. VAT)

UK £4.30

9 771649 425127

05

t#",*/(8*5)3)6#"3#t$00,*/(8*5)4&"40/"-"41"3"(64t)"/%:8&&,/*()5.&"-4t"65)&/5*$*5"-*"/3&$*1&4"/%5*14t(0*/((-65&/'3&&t*.13&44*7&%&44&354t1*;;"/*()5t

THE ITALIAN ISSUE

ROI €4.50 EF139_001_OFC_Cover.indd 1

SP

QUICK

AG

HE

TT

IW ITH PRA WNS , GA RLIC AND CHIL L I , P. 6 8

WEEKNIGHT RECIPES

Celebrity gues t ed

itor Italian chef, resta urateur and mentor to Jam Gennaro Contald ie Oliver, o shares his favourite recipes for Italian home cooking

26/04/2019 5:08 p.m.


Easy Food team

EDITOR Caroline Gray cgray@zahramediagroup.com t: +353 (0)1 255 7566 fave recipe: Spaghetti with prawns, garlic and chilli, p.68 EDITORIAL TEAM Recipe Editor Jocelyn Doyle jdoyle@zahramediagroup.com fave recipe: Coffee panna cotta, p.100 Digital Interns Michael Kealy foodintern@zahramediagroup.com Brooke Murphy foodteam@zahramediagroup.com Contributors Aoife Howard, Michael Fleming, Thomas Breathnach, Sarah Keogh and Heather Brady. DESIGN Rodrigo Maruso, Rory Maguire and Siobhán O’Riordan. PHOTOGRAPHY & FOOD STYLING Agnieszka Wypych, Pauline Smyth, Shannon Peare, Síomha Guiney, Sophie Barr and Kasia Ratajczak. Some images from Shutterstock.com. TEST KITCHEN Built by QK Living www.qkliving.ie ADVERTISING Sarah Currey scurrey@zahramediagroup.com fave recipe: Homemade lasagne, p.66 ADMINISTRATION Production Consultant Val Citron valeriecitron@gmail.com Circulation Manager John Dempsey jdempsey@zahramediagroup.com Accounts accounts@zahramediagroup.com Syndication Enquiries syndication@zahramediagroup.com BOARD OF DIRECTORS Managing Director Gina Miltiadou gmiltiadou@zahramediagroup.com fave recipe: Chicken and chorizo paella, p.117 Chief Executive John Mullins jmullins@zahramediagroup.com fave recipe: Hoisin pork duck noodles with mango, p.55

Welcome to the May issue of Easy Food!

ne Gennaro Contaldo giving editor caroli a pasta masterclass

A successful pasta dough!

We’re officially welcoming the summer with this issue by taking our tastebuds on a holiday to one of our favourite places — Italy! From authentic dishes that offer a true taste of Italy’s regions, p.70, to the tried-and-true pastas that are a mainstay on Irish dinner tables (p.64), Italian cuisine is one that has something for everyone and we’re only too delighted to celebrate it here. Be sure to also check out the desserts that are the perfect end note to an Italian meal, p.80, and test your Italian cooking IQ as we break down the dishes that might not be as Italian as you think, p.120. There is a real passion for food in Italy, and we couldn’t think of anyone to better embody this than the maestro of Italian cooking, Gennaro Contaldo. He was the man who taught Jamie Oliver all about Italian cooking and currently helps Jamie run his chain of restaurants, Jamie’s Italian. This is in between his own work as a cookbook author, television chef and food writer. When speaking to Gennaro about food, the word he uses more than any other is love — the two are inseparable for him; one cannot cook properly if there is not the love behind the meal. Flip to p.18 to check out our exclusive feature with some of Gennaro’s favourite recipes, his earliest Jamie memories and why he would never invite his family and friends to his dinner party! Rounding back to our green isle, we’re delving into the local seasonal staples that herald summer’s early bounty. Our gorgeous strawberry and rhubarb crumble tart, p.36, is the perfect baked treat, while our fresh recipes and tips for asparagus, p.32, will bring your summer table to life. Our test kitchen has been whipping up plenty of summery meringues this month, and resident food stylist Shannon is sharing her expert tips to help you achieve the same marvellous meringues, from p.125. Coeliac Awareness Week runs from 13-19th May this year and we’ve included plenty of recipes, expert advice and tips for living a gluten-free lifestyle from p.94. From seasonal Irish desserts to Italian cooking and plenty of quick and easy weeknight meals in between, we’re sure this issue of Easy Food will keep you happy in the kitchen all month!

x e n i l o r a C

Check out our other title... THE NEXT ISSUE...

The Summer Special is on sale June 8th!

Easy Food is published by Zahra Publishing Ltd ISSN 1649-4253

Ireland’s No.1 pregnancy & baby magazine ISSUE

48

Apr/May 2019

Expert Advice Just For You

Choosing Childcare Embarrassing must-read advice

PREGNANCY SYMPTOMS EXPLAINED

Relieve

COLIC YOUR BABY’S

Real life: Birth story baby diary &

SICK KIDS AND WORK

HOW TO COPE

Boost your toddler’s speech development

Magazines Ireland Publisher of theYear 2018/2015/2012

€2.90 – ROI

S... REAL MUM tions real solu

£2.70 – UK

no limits

tells us why Rhona Cullinan hold will never Down Syndrome Molly back her daughter

Magazines Ireland Annual of the Year 2013 JAMs Best Foodie Read 2013 Printed in the UK One year’s subscription to Easy Food is €60.00/£50.00

All rights, including moral rights, reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, without the prior permission in writing from the publisher, nor be otherwise circulated in any form of binding or cover other than that in which it is published. While our recipes have been tested by experts, sometimes recipes don’t work properly due to mismeasuring and different cooker performance. We advise readers to measure ingredients carefully and time their own bakes.The views expressed in this magazine are not those of the publisher. It is recommended that you consult your GP before following any kind of weight reduction, health or exercise programme. Articles and advertisements are for information only.They are not intended to replace medical care. Special thanks to all our guardian angels.

www.easyfood.ie

EF138_003_Ed's letter.indd 3

HOW TO CONTACT US Subscription enquiries: New and existing subscribers, any change of personal details or back issue enquiries call: IR: (01) 663 8851 or email info@soonerthanlater.com.

General enquiries:

Email us at editor@easyfood.ie or write to Easy Food, Zahra Media Group, 12 Prince of Wales Terrace, Quinsborough Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow.

Join us on:

Easy Food 3

26/04/2019 4:55 p.m.


MAY

CONTENTS

REGULARS 08 YOUR SAY Your comments, photos and questions

12 FOOD BITES News, products and cookbooks from the wonderful world of food

WHAT’S IN SEASON? 32 SPEAR ME NO DETAILS

Make the most of asparagus during its short and sweet season

LARDER LUCK 40 TINY TREATS Kids will love these treats for World Baking Day on May 17th!

42 NEW WAYS WITH PASTA SAUCES Tasty oil-, cream- and tomato-based sauces for that bowl of pasta

46 FROM THE BUTCHER’S BLOCK Local butcher Michael Fleming is feeling the need for speed

Asparagus loaf with ham, cheese and tomatoes

P.36 Rhubarb and strawberry crumble pie

P.34

WHAT’S FOR DINNER? 62 OH MY GOODNESS Aoife Howard creates a lighter, plant-based twist on an Italian classic

P.47

Quick sticky pork and cashew noodles 4 Easy Food

EF139_04-05_Contents.indd 4

MAY 2019

26/04/2019 4:17 p.m.


COOKING FOR FUN

MAKE IT HEALTHY!

80 LA DOLCE VITA

96 GLAMOUR SANS GLUTEN

You’ll be living the good life with these

Throwing a gluten-free dinner party

Italian-inspired desserts

has never been more delicious

84 EAT IRELAND Recipe Editor Jocelyn Doyle heads to

Lemon meringue tart

P.126

104 COELIAC-SAFE STAYCATIONS

Wicklow for a fabulous farmhouse blue

Travel writer Thomas Breathnach looks at the best gluten-free getaways

Homemade cannoli

around our emerald isle

P.83

Slow roast rosemary pork belly with celeriac and apple

P.99

KIDS’ KITCHEN

106 GLUTEN-FREE AND FABULOUS

88 COOK THE SEASON This month’s Home Ec expert shares

You won’t miss the gluten in these

reasons to cook for the seasons

delicious creations

114 10 FACTS ABOUT COELIAC DISEASE

91 EASY JUNIORS You can make this cool, fruity treat in under five minutes!

Nutritionist Sarah Keogh fills in the

From The Cover P.94 Our top tips for making your transition to a gluten-free diet

facts you may not know

116 DON’T CUT THE CARBS We explain why carbs are important and look at the gluten-free options you can still enjoy

GOING GLUTEN-FREE

P.36

RUBY BEAUTIES

Let seasonal rhubarb and strawberries shine in this easy dessert

P.50

WEEKLY MENU PLANNER

Keep it simple, keep it quick with our whole week’s worth of family meals

P.78

PICK A SIDE

Meat lovers’ pizza or strictlyvegetarian? Either way, your pizza night will be oh-so-delicious

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_04-05_Contents.indd 5

P.70

A TASTE OF ITALY

Take your tastebuds on a tour of Italy’s culinary landscape with these regional recipes

P.64

PASTA PERFECTION

Endlessly versatike and so quick to prepare, pasta is perfection on a plate

P.18

BUON APPETITO!

GennaroContaldogives us a masterclass in Italian cooking

FROM OUR KITCHEN TO YOURS 120 All the knowledge you need to become an expert in the kitchen

125 MERINGUE MAYHEM Food Stylist Shannon Peare delves into the world of meringue

Per Serving 312kcals, 7.1g fat (3.9g saturated), 57g carbs, 37.9g sugars, 5.9g protein, 0.7g fibre, 0.07g sodium

x Readers! Please take note that the nutritional information that appears underneath each recipe is only for one serving. The key for the buttons is in our recipe index on page 6. All Euro/GBP prices are converted at the time of going to print. Prices may vary.

Easy Food 5

26/04/2019 4:17 p.m.


RECIPE INDEX v

v MEAT

LF DF GF

x

v

LF DF GF

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

v Veggie lovers' pizza

79

t

Strawberry coulis

88

t

t

Cream of pea and asparagus soup

89

t

Gluten-free red onion tarte tatin

97

t

Gluten-free fluffy pancakes

110

t

t

t

Gennaro's tagliatelle Bolognese

24

t

t

Warm asparagus brunch salad

33

t

t

Asparagus loaf with ham, cheese and tomatoes

34

t

Quick sticky pork and cashew noodles

47

t

Spicy pork and vegetable fried rice

52

t

Cajun surf and turf pasta

54

t

Homemade lasagne

66

t

t

t

Rhubarb and strawberry crumble pie

36

t

t

t

t

Arancini (stuffed rice balls)

71

t

t

t

Dr. Oetker rainbow cupcakes

40

t

t

t

t

Coda alla vaccinara (braised oxtail stew)

75

t

t

t

t

Dr Oetker mini poptarts

41

t

t

t

t

Tortellini in brodo (stuffed pasta in broth)

77

t

t

t

Dark chocolate pastry plait

59

t

t

t

t

Meat-lovers' pizza

79

t

t

Torta alle nocciole (hazelnut cake)

76

t

t

t

t

Wicklow Blue fillet steaks with caramelised onions

85

t

t

Gluten-free peanut butter cookies

107

t

t

t

t

Slow roast rosemary pork belly with celeriac and apple

99

t

t

Gluten-free banoffee loaf

109

t

t

t

Chicken and chorizo paella

117

t

Adriana’s strawberry tiramisu

30

t

t

t

57

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

FISH AND SEAFOOD

t

Spaghetti with anchovies and crunchy crumbs

43

t

t

Spaghetti puttanesca

44

t

t

Espresso martini trifles

81

t

t

Easy salmon tacos with avocado gremolata

58

t

t

Biscotti and Nutella semifreddo

82

t

t

COVER RECIPE: Spaghetti with prawns, garlic and chilli

68

t

Homemade cannoli

83

t

t

Instant strawberry frozen yoghurt

92

t

Coffee panna cotta

100

t

Lemon meringue tart

126

t

t

t

Apple and raisin meringue tart

127

t

t

t

Millionaire shortbread tart

128

t

t

t

Patate, riso e cozze (potato, rice and mussel bake)

72

t

t

t

t

POULTRY Chicken saltimbocca with Fontina, prosciutto and sage

22

t

t

t

Roast chicken baps

53

t

t

t

Hoisin duck noodles with mango

55

t

t

Homemade popcorn chicken

56

t

Courgette carpaccio with pecorino, mint and pomegranate

26

t

Quick pizza with Sardinian crispy bread

28

t

Asparagus with lemon, tarragon and garlic

34

Asparagus and strawberry salad with avocado and herb

34

BBQ asparagus with ginger and soy Indulgent roasted garlic cream linguine

VEGETARIAN

t

t

t t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

34

t

t

t

t

42

t

t

t

Creamy mushroom pasta

42

t

t

t

Sun-dried tomato Mascarpone pasta

42

t

t

t

Mediterranean tomato and artichoke sauce

43

t

t

t

Spaghetti aglio e olio

43

t

t

t

Classic tomato and basil pasta

44

t

t

t

t

Fiery penne al’arrabbiatta

44

t

t

t

Goat’s cheese and mushroom Dutch baby

51

t

Vegan spaghetti and meatballs

62

t

Courgette and ricotta rigatoni

67

Strangalopreti (spinach and cheese bread dumplings) Homemade pizza dough No-cook pizza sauce

78

6 Easy Food

t

t

t t

t

t

t

t

t

t t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

74

t

t

t

78

t

t

t

t

t

t

t

t t

t

t t

t

DESSERTS Easy brownie custard trifles

t

t

t

BAKED GOODS

t

t t

t

x

t

t

t

t

t t t t

t t t t

t

t

t

t

v

Budget-Friendly

T

Freezable

J

Kid-Friendly

x

Dairy-Free

t

t

t

v

Vegetarian

LF

Low-Fat

DF

Diabetes-Friendly

GF

Gluten-Free

t

t

MAY 2019


4Z 

A sneak peek at what you’ll find in this issue

ViVa italia! Everyone loves Italian food, and we’ve gone hell for leather in this issue. We’ve been spending some time with Gennaro Contaldo — Jamie Oliver’s right hand man when it comes to his Jamie’s Italian restaurants — and he’s been sharing some of his favourite dishes, from p.18. Elsewhere, we’ve been exploring traditional recipes from some of Italy’s diverse regions (p.70), and finding out just how authentic some of our favourite dishes really are, p.120. Head to p.80 to finish off a great meal on a high note with our gorgeous Italian desserts.

Arancini p71

Homemade cannoli p83

From the garden Asparagus’ short season kicks off this month, so make the most of it with our tasty ideas from p.32. Likewise, we’re happy to see the return of rhubarb, p.36, and you’ll definitely want to make our crumble-topped pie. If you’re on the hunt for some meat-free meals, check out our veggie-lovers’ pizza on p.79, have a go at Aoife Howard’s bean-based spaghetti dish (p.63), or try something different with our mushroom and goat’s cheese Dutch baby, p.51.

Coffee panna cotta p100

Pasta PerFection Not only is pasta an intrinsic part of Italian cuisine, but it’s also one of the cornerstones of quick, affordable home cooking, which is just one of the many reasons we love it. If you find that your pasta is sometimes soggy or undercooked, or your sauces don’t come together as they should, this is the issue for you: we’re here to prove that it’s easy to get your pasta right every time. Head to p.130 for the straightforward rules you need to follow; to p.64 for some of our favourite ways to enjoy it; and to p.42 for quick and easy sauce suggestions.

Spaghetti with prawns, garlic and chilli p68

Homemade lasagne p66

Warm asparagus brunch salad p33

Tortellini in brodo p77

no gluten, no Problem

Rhubarb and strawberry crumble pie p36

Going gluten-free is easier than ever with our bumper feature on coeliac-friendly foods. Learn the basics from p.94; throw a gluten-free dinner party with ease, p.96; keep beautiful baked goods in your life, p.106; read why carbs are still important, p.116; and flip to p.104 to discover Ireland’s best staycation spots for those living free from gluten.

Gluten-free red onion tarte tatin p97 www.easyfood.ie

Slow roast rosemary pork Gluten-free banoffee loaf belly with celeriac and p109 apple mash p99

Goat’s cheese and mushroom Dutch baby p51 Easy Food 7


your say

We love hearing about what you’re up to in the kitchen, so send on your comments, questions and cooking tales!

March

“We just made this month’s blondie brownie. Yum! I’m a big fan of your magazine and have bought it for years.”

– Emma Hayes

competition winners 3 x €40 vouchers for Handsome Burger Elaine Fahy Norita Duggan

“My mum and I absolutely love your magazine!”

Allison Thomas

– Orla Carr

“I was searching for a recipe my mum loves from your magazine and seem to have lost it. It was a chicken dish with Guinness sauce and a whiskey sauce with stuffed Savoy cabbage – a St. Patrick’s Day dish from a good few years back. You wouldn’t happen to have it still would you?” – Rebecca O'Sullivan “No worries at all! We’ll have a look through our archives here and I’ll let you know in the next day or two if we’ve found it.” – Team Easy Food "That’s it! I literally can’t thank you enough the family is obsessed with it. You are so good. We love the magazine and always get it.” – Rebecca O'Sullivan

“Looks like @firehousebread guest editing of @easyfoodmag went down a storm.” – @MaryMc_31

8 Easy Food

Love Easy Food magazine, but struggle to pick it up in the shops? No bother – you can now purchase a copy online with Issuu! Visit www.issuu.com for more details.

1 x €150 voucher for The Kitchen Whisk Peter Nowlan

1 x Russell Hobbs Eclipse set Christine Doheny

1 x six-course tasting lunch at Glovers Alley Claire Beegan

Egg muffins for lunch! #leftovers @easyfoodmag.” – @rachel.kelly “Perfect!” – @MaryMc_31

MAY 2019


letters and comments

“I root my fresh herbs in water before potting up. That way I always have a fresh supply.” – Marg Barlow

“I always make my own apple pies — they’re better than anything you can buy.” – Marg Barlow

Our banoffee bites recipe proved very popular… “Love, love, love.” – Sharon Dumpleton “Mmmmmmm delish.” – Lorraine Dumpleton Kennedy  “They look really naughty but nice.” – Sue Taylor

We asked, you answered… What’s your favourite cookbook?

“Clodagh McKenna Homemade – an old one but a lovely book.” – @the_superfood_makery “Mary Berry.” – @deafdeirdre

“Pinch of Nom.” – @avrilgill

“Mary Berry’s and Nigella’s latest books. I also love Chef Adrian.” – @joulesbennett

“Cheeky Treats by Liam Charles is really fun and creative, or Neven’s Complete Family Cookbook.” – @sweetandmeatblog

Insta story time “Where’s Mary Berry? Nigella too!” – @joulesbennett

"Hairy Bikers' Chicken and Egg." – @aifricwalsh

“Nordic Bakery Cookbook.” – @chelle78murphy

"How do I apply?.” – @winifredgallagher “We love them too! Mary Berry’s Baking Bible is literally our bible. This is just a small selection of the books we love.” – @easyfoodmag

“Where’s Mary Berry? Nigella too!” – @joulesbennett

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 9


The Insta posts you loved the most This month, you’ve been baking up a storm with our brown bread recipe.

You loved these carrot cake squares from our April cover.

“Looking forward to making these.” – @pamsmith241

“Forever fave.” – @gastrogays

“Looking forward to making these.” – @pamsmith241

“This looks so delicious.”

This salted caramel trifle had everyone drooling…

– @city_chic_lifestyle

“Looks delicious!”

“Yummmm.” – @sueyonkers

– @prima_covent_garden

Meet the Taste Team Nicola Naessens

“I live in Tagoat, Wexford with my husband and our five children. I run a food and lifestyle blog, www.simplyhomemadeblog.com, where I share not only recipes but lots of other stuff too. I love baking and try to bake most of our own bread and lunchbox snacks, though it isn’t always possible as family life is so busy. Last year I started my own business selling baked goods, Simply Homemade Bakes."

Would you like to road-test new recipes and products for Easy Food? Get in touch with Jocelyn at jdoyle@zahramediagroup.com to get involved and join our TasteTeam.

Niamh Foskin

says, “I am married to Bryan and we live in Kilkenny with two mad dogs. I spend a lot of my time thinking about food: what I’m going to cook, and when I’m going to eat it! When I get home from work, I love cooking as a way of relaxing and de-stressing. I enjoy trying new recipes, and my goal this year is to eat as largely a plant-based diet as I can and cut down on meat consumption.”

Contact us Easy Food Magazine @easyfoodmag @easyfoodmag 10 Easy Food

Niamh Cleary

says, “My name is Niamh. I am a new Mum to our seven-month old baby boy, Bobby. I work as a GP and I am back to work now after maternity leave. I am passionate about healthy eating, cooking and keeping fit. I follow a plant-based diet most of the time, but not strictly. Breakfast is my favourite meal of the day and I always make overnight oats to keep me going on my long days at work.”

MAY 2019


evoke a reaction with the new Rose Gold collection from Morphy Richards

Also available in:

The Evoke Collection is available from all leading electrical retailers nationwide. To find your local retailer and to view the entire range of Morphy Richards products, please visit www.morphyrichards.ie find us on facebook

Morphy Richards is part of the Irish owned Glen Dimplex Group.


FOOD BITES The 13th annual Burren Slow Food Festival, organised by Slow Food Clare, will bring together food and drinks producers, chefs and writers for a weekend of talks, demonstrations and popup dinners celebrating and exploring the theme of seaweed in Lisdoonvarna, West Clare, from the 10th-12th May. “We are encouraging guests to ‘Taste the Atlantic’ by showcasing some of the best seaweed producers and welcoming some of the biggest and most innovative names in Irish cooking who are doing really interesting things with this versatile product,” says Birgitta Hedin-Curtin, founder member of Slow Food Clare and Chairperson of the Burren Slow Food Festival. For more information and a full schedule of the weekend visit www.slowfoodclare.com. slowfoodclare

Time for tonic

Jamu is an ancient Indonesian health tonic dating back over 4,000 years. Clovisse Ferguson and Ruth Calder-Potts (whose parents own and run Gubbeen Farm and Highbank Orchards, respectively) have teamed up to make Ireland’s first Jamu, a spicy infusion of organic fresh turmeric, tamarind, ginger, lemongrass, citrus, cinnamon, black pepper and Atlantic sea salt, with a small touch of honey to bring balance to the otherwise strong flavour profile. Hailed as a superfood, turmeric has become increasing well-known for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Each 500ml bottle of Jamu contains 3,700mg of turmeric. Enjoy as a shot, add to smoothies or juices or top up with sparkling water for a refreshing drink. For more information, visit www.mutonics.ie.

12 Easy Food

Be your own barista Starbucks fanatics can now indulge in caféstyle bevvies at home as Nestlé’s new range of Starbucks products becomes available in major supermarkets nationwide. The range includes the first-ever Starbucks capsules developed for Nespresso and Nescafé Dolce Gusto machines in a selection of classic beverages such as

Americano, Latte Macchiato, Caramel Macchiato and Cappuccino, as well as signature ground blends and single-origin coffees. All products are made from 100% high-quality Arabica coffee, ethically sourced from farmers in the world’s premier coffee growing regions.

MAY 2019


Grate heights The cheese-obsessed will love this clever and stylish Parmesan cheese lamp from The lamp is not made from a real cheese, but does have the same details and 43cm diameter of a wheel of authentic Parmesan. RRP €275 with worldwide shipping available. @parmesancheeselamp ParmesanCheeseLamp

Walk this way Coeliac Awareness Week will take place from 13th–19th May this year, and is sponsored by Promise Gluten Free. During the week, coeliac disease sufferers are planning to walk around Ireland twice to raise awareness for the estimated 7,300 children who have the condition but remain undiagnosed. The Coeliac Society of Ireland says around 20% of the 36,500 undiagnosed people in Ireland are aged under 14, based on

EU norms. The Society has enlisted its army of 3,600 members for a sponsored walk during Coeliac Awareness Week, in order to raise awareness of this issue. They plan to walk or run 2-5km, making the total at least 7,314km, one kilometre for every undiagnosed child. All funds raised will go towards a new Food List app for Coeliac Society members. For details on how to get involved, visit www.coeliac.ie/walk.

Sláinte!

Fans of Irish cream liqueur will be queuing to try new Five Farms Irish Cream Liqueur, made from fully traceable cream sourced from five family-owned Co. Cork farms and blended with 10% premium triple-distilled Irish Whiskey within 48 hours of collection. It has already been awarded the very prestigious Chairman’s Trophy at the 2018 Ultimate Spirits Challenge, where it earned the highest marks an Irish Cream Liqueur has ever received. Available exclusively in SuperValu stores and online nationwide. www.easyfood.ie

EF139_12-13_Food_Bites.indd 13

Summer livin’ Dublin’s eco-friendly Iveagh Garden Hotel has launched a few menu highlights in the resident Elle’s Bar that we’re itching to try this summer, including a new vegan menu, a “Low-Cal” beverage list, Bottomless Pancakes Brunch and a seasonal summer menu, plus a new Botanical Garden Terrace where customers can enjoy al fresco cocktails and brunch. The Iveagh Garden Hotel is Europe's first sustainable hotel, meaning it generates its own electricity, heating and cooling needs through sustainable energy sources. For more information, visit www.iveaghgardenhotel.ie.

Easy Food 13

26/04/2019 3:43 p.m.


Cookbook CORNER

Simple Spice: 120 Easy Indian Recipes with Just 10 Spices By Cyrus Todiwala Published by Mitchell Beazley €17.55/£15 If you love Indian food but, like many of us, you're intimidated by the thoughts of making it at home, then look no further. Realising that many home cooks are put off at the sheer number of spices involved in traditional Indian fare, Todiwala has focused on just 10 versatile and easy-to-find spices and used them to create 120 recipes in this clever little gem. We’re lusting over the chicken biryani; venison kebabs; the hot pepper chicken tikka; spiced potato patties with garlic chutney; Keralanstyle crab with coconut; the spiced shepherd’s pie; the roasted cauliflower pakoras; the brined belly of pork with cashew nuts and spinach; and the saffron and cardamom crème brulée. We’re also completely fascinated by the baked savoury doughnuts with prawns, chorizo and cheese — sign us up.

The Doctor’s Kitchen

The Little Swedish Kitchen

By Dr. Rupy Aujla Published by Thorsons €19.90/£16.99

By Rachel Khoo Published by Michael Joseph €23.40/£20

We’re wary of cookbooks that claim to cure illnesses of any kind, but we’re firm believers that good health begins in your shopping basket and in your kitchen. In this book, Dr Aujla lays out the principles of a healthy diet: eat whole, colourful, mostly plant-based foods, including quality fats and lots of fibre, and treat meat and fish as luxuries rather than staples. It’s full of solid, sensible advice for a way of eating that’s sustainable in the long term, and we love Dr Aujla’s counsel to “step away from the scales,” and eat for pleasure as well as overall wellbeing. That’s easy when the recipes are this appealing: start the day with a one-pan Cajun scramble; nibble on citrus and pineapple Asian salad; quickly whip up harissa beans and greens; dig into a Spanish chickpea stew; savour a bowl of aromatic Vietnamese pho; or treat a sweet tooth with coconut bananas and maple cream. We feel like our best selves already.

This is a lovely one for anyone interested in learning more about Scandinavian food. Khoo walks the reader through the seasons, beginning with a springtime of Swedish crispbreads; horseradish and cheese dumplings; spring nettle and chicken pie; and cod with asparagus and smashed egg. Summer sees savoury pancakes; hot smoked salmon salad; smashed potatoes with a herby green sauce; and a gorgeous one-pot dish of chicken, peas, corn and potatoes — as well as a gas little anecdote about a canine cake thief! In autumn, cosy up with pearl barley mushroom risotto, apple and cheese spelt buns and — perhaps inevitably — meatballs. Finally, as the days darken again, Khoo welcomes winter with black pudding buns; stewed spinach eggs; beef stew and the decadent Jansson’s temptation. The photos are stunning, the recipes achievable and her passion for eating (almost!) matches our own.

How to Eat a Peach By Diana Henry Published by Mitchell Beazley €29.25/£25 Diana Henry’s latest offering is a compilation of the menus she’s been collecting since she was 16, inspired by season, occasion and places she loves. Part cookbook, part memoir and filled with beautiful images, we were sucked into this one from the start, and loved the stories and scenesetting as much as the recipes. With dishes like Turkish coffee ice cream; crab, tomato and saffron tart; crostini with crushed broad beans and nduja; slow-roast duck legs with sweet-sour plums; Cheddar, onion and spinach tart; and the white peaches in chilled moscato from which the book garnered its title, we’d accept an invitation to Henry’s house in a heartbeat.

14 Easy Food

MAY 2019


products

ESPRESSO YOURSELF Get your caffeine fix in style with these cool coffee accessories

Spreadable coffee www.firebox.com €11.70/£9.99 Coffee to grow – grow your own coffee plant www.firebox.com €11.99/£10.25 Coffee press pot Flying Tiger Copenhagen stores nationwide €15/£12.80 Classic espresso coffee pot red www.rexlondon.com €16.95/£14.45

Coffee filter Flying Tiger Copenhagen stores nationwide €4/£3.50

Krups 'Essenza' mini coffee machine with Aeroccino Harvey Norman €159/£135.80

La Cafetière set of two grey gun metal glass coffee cups www.debenhams.ie €24.50/£20.90

Typhoon Typhoon Living copper lid tea, coffee and sugar set www.littlewoodsireland.ie €28.99/£24.75

Swan coffee maker www.littlewoodsireland.ie €28.99/£24.75

Nescaf Dolce Gusto Colors black coffee machine with travel kit by De'Longhi www.debenhams.ie €70/£59.75

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 15


products

ESPRESSO YOURSELF Get your caffeine fix in style with these cool coffee accessories

Spreadable coffee marmalade www.firebox.com €11.70/£9.99

Coffee to grow – grow your own coffee plant www.firebox.com €11.99/£10.25 Coffee press pot Flying Tiger Copenhagen stores nationwide €15/£12.80 Classic espresso coffee pot red www.rexlondon.com €16.95/£14.45

Coffee filter mug Flying Tiger Copenhagen stores nationwide €4/£3.50

Krups 'Essenza' mini coffee machine with Aeroccino Harvey Norman €159/£135.80

La Cafetière set of two grey gun metal glass coffee cups www.debenhams.ie €24.50/£20.90

Typhoon Typhoon Living copper lid tea, coffee and sugar set www.littlewoodsireland.ie €28.99/£24.75

Swan coffee maker www.littlewoodsireland.ie €28.99/£24.75

Nescaf Dolce Gusto Colors black coffee machine with travel kit by De'Longhi www.debenhams.ie €70/£59.75

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_015_Products.indd 15

Easy Food 15

26/04/2019 3:45 p.m.


POSTAL ENTRIES

COMPETITIONS

Follo w the rele vant instructio ns on how to ente r for each com peti tion and post your entry to: Easy Food , 12 Prin ce of Wale s Terr Quin sborough Road , Bray, Co. Wickace, Don ’t forg et to indi cate wha t com low. peti you are ente ring and incl ude all tion your cont act deta ils.

WIN A FAMILY BREAK AT THE CORK INTERNATIONAL HOTEL

E

njoy a summer break to Cork at the fourstar Cork International Hotel for you and your family! The multi award-winning Cork International Hotel is consistently ranked in the top three Cork hotels on TripAdvisor and is the ideal location for your accommodation needs, whether you are looking for a hotel close to the airport, the city centre or even on the doorstep of the Wild Atlantic Way.

For a chance to win two nights’ B&B and dinner on one evening for a family of four at the Cork International Hotel, email your contact details and the answer to the question below to competitions@easyfood.ie with CORK in the subject line: The Cork International Hotel has how many guest rooms? A. 120 B. 135 C. 145

All of the 145 rooms are designed with guests in mind. From large comfortable beds with complimentary super-speed WiFi, guests can rest in the knowledge that a perfect night’s sleep awaits them. There’s plenty to do at this very special hotel, with amenities ranging from a fitness room, children’s playroom, Cinema Room, the New Yorker Bar and the Atlantic Restaurant. With its location close to Cork city, the Cork International Hotel is an ideal location for your summer family break to “Pure Cork”, or as a launching point as you embark on a tour of the Wild Atlantic Way or Ireland’s Ancient East.

www.CorkInternationalHotel.com @corkinternationalairporthotel @no1corkhotel @corkinternationalhotel Terms and conditions apply. Competition closes 7th June.

16 Easy Food

MAY 2019


competitions

Win a range of Irish crockery!

I

WIN AN OVERNIGHT IN CLAYTON CHARLEMONT WITH DINNER & COCKTAILS IN LOCKSIDE BAR/SOCIAL

rish-owned Gourmet Food Parlour Restaurant and Catering Group have created a range of charming crockery that marries their values of tradition and great flavour, bringing a hint of their restaurants into your own home.

Designed by managing director Lorraine Heskin and the team in GFP, the bespoke set is inspired by original drawings around the inception of the restaurant chain, 13 years ago. The pieces are infused with soft tones and feature Gourmet Food Parlour’s signature pale blue background, along with quirky and unique nods to the restaurant's style. The hand-painted collection was manufactured by Shannonbridge Pottery, a family-run business in County Offaly. The suite of crockery can be purchased separately at www.gourmetfoodparlour.com or in any of the restaurants. For a chance to win a selection from the beautiful crockery collection from Gourmet Food Parlour, email your contact details and the answer to the question below to competitions@easyfood.ie with GOURMET FOOD PARLOUR in the subject line. True or false: the pottery range is manufactured by Shannonbridge Pottery? A. TRUE B. FALSE

Located on the banks of Dublin’s Grand Canal, 10 minutes from Grafton Street, Lockside Bar/Social is the ideal spot to soak up Dublin's lively summer atmosphere. Lockside Bar/Social is part of the new Clayton Hotel Charlemont, adding to the social buzz around the Grand Canal Dock area. Guests can enjoy signature dishes and small plates designed and prepared by head chef Anil Roy and his skilled culinary team. In addition to the delicious food menu, the team of talented mixologists at Lockside Bar/Social is on hand to prepare a range of exciting cocktails or recommend specially selected wines from their extensive drinks list, which also includes a wine flight concept. For a chance to win an overnight stay for two at Clayton Hotel Charlemont including breakfast and an evening meal in Lockside Bar/Social, email your contact details and the answer to the question below to competitions@easyfood.ie with LOCKSIDE in the subject line: Lockside Bar/Social and Clayton Hotel Charlemont are situated along which Dublin canal? A. Royal Canal B. Grand Canal C. River Liffey

Terms and conditions apply. Competition closes 7th June. Lockside Bar/Social Clayton Hotel Charlemont Charlemont Street Dublin 2 www.claytonhotelcharlemont.com/lockside-bar-social www.claytonhotelcharlemont.com Terms and conditions apply. Dinner includes five small plates and two cocktails for two people to share. Competition closes 7th June.

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 17


Buon appetito! Italian chef, author and restaurateur Gennaro Contaldo gives us a master class in Italian cooking

18 Easy Food

MAY 2019


guest editor Gennaro Contaldo

S

tanding in Jamie’s Italian Restaurant in Dundrum, there’s no missing when Gennaro Contaldo has entered the room. In an instant, an unmistakeable “Hello! Welcome, everyone! What a day!” booms from the entry way as Gennaro walks in, arms raised and eager to welcome us to a small pastamaking masterclass. The diners in the restaurant are beaming at the sight of Jamie Oliver’s mentor, and Gennaro makes a point to visit the tables, making sure this Wednesday lunch break is one to remember. With more than 50 years of experience as a chef, cookbook author, television personality and champion of Italian cooking, Gennaro Contaldo lives and breathes good food. He was the man Jamie Oliver sought out early in his career when his post-culinary-school mission was to learn how to make the absolute best pasta. Gennaro took Jamie under his wing and has been his right-hand man ever since, co-founding and overseeing Jamie’s Italian Restaurants. The restaurants feature only the highest quality ingredients through a menu that offers a true taste of Italy. Taking inspiration from the “Italian table” — where people relax, share and enjoy each other’s company — the menu showcases plenty of antipasti and nibbles for sharing, as well as comforting bowls of pasta, fresh salads and grills. Born in Minori on the Amalfi Coast, Gennaro’s Italian spirit shines through; his unabashed passion for cooking, eating and sharing delicious food makes us want to find the nearest fork and take a greedy bite out of whatever’s on his plate. Sure, any time he crescendos to his trademark “Why I am cooking so gooood?!”, we’re sold! Gennaro treated us to an intimate masterclass on how to make homemade pasta, then sat down to chat about his take on home cooking, what makes Italian food so delicious and why he wouldn’t invite his family and friends to his dinner party!

You were one of Jamie Oliver’s mentors from his earliest days as a chef and continute to be a close friend and business partner. How did this relationship begin? Jamie came to London to learn how to improve his cooking, to work in a restaurant kitchen. After about a year, he was asked what kind of cuisine do you want to work with? He replied, I’d like to learn how to cook Italian. He was told by a man named

www.easyfood.ie

Recipes and cookbook images from Fast Cook Italian By Gennaro Contaldo Published by Pavilion Books Images by Kim Lightbody €25/£20

Marco that there were only two people who could teach him how to cook proper Italian food, make fresh pasta, how to make sauce… “one is my father, and the other is Gennaro Contaldo.” I was working as a chef at my friend Antonio Carluccio’s Neal Street Restaurant in London, and one morning I heard a knock on the door for kitchen deliveries. I had been there since about 3am at this stage, so had wanted to ignore the knocking, but I went to answer it and was greeted by a very young man — he said he was looking for a job there. I invited him in, offered him a coffee — I was surprised when he said he’d take a cappuccino, as I wasn’t sure if he was even old enough to drink

coffee! I asked what he was able to cook, and he said everything. The only job we had going was for a pastry chef, so I gave him the chef’s shirt and trousers, and he started that morning. He was brilliant at everything he did and I started to realise that, no matter what I was working on, he was always right behind me. I took him under my wing and he was working early in the morning, late at night, rarely taking a day off — after a while, I thought he had learned all he could from me, so I encouraged him to travel, learn more from other kitchens, grow as a chef. He did that and eventually started doing the video series and programmes. I was always involved and continue to be today!

Easy Food 19


20 Easy Food

MAY 2019


guest editor Gennaro Contaldo

What is it about Italian food that brings people together? Italians express ourselves through food! No matter what kind of gathering it is, if there’s food around, it is going to be the main conversation. Maybe it’s a serious business meeting and you’re talking money; someone takes a bite of pasta and then, ‘This pasta is quite good, who made it? Where is this from?’ The food is always the talking point! In Italy, food is more than something to eat; it is about history, territory, the stories behind where it came from, and we are interested in knowing all of this. What inspires you to cook? Whenever I travel, I always find someone or a place that inspires me. I’ve been in the kitchen since the age of 10; my father was a great cook, my mother and sister were also very good. When I was filming in Italy recently with Jamie for “Jamie Cooks Italy” and we wanted to find the best inspiration for Italian cooking, we knew where to go — the nonnas (grandmothers). Oh my god, they are 94 years old, but they’re showing us how to cook again! They teach us how to cook simply, how not to rush and how with a bit of love and passion you can cook anything. It was amazing and I learned so much from them, almost more in two years of filming with them than I did in 50 years of cooking! You have to make yourself open to learning — this is how you stay open to being inspired.

www.easyfood.ie

What are some of the common mistakes people make when cooking pasta? When people rush it — yes, you want to get the meal ready quickly, but you have to be slow. It’s all about the right marriage of timing when your pasta comes together — the sauce has been simmering, the pasta cooks quickly, the ingredients are fresh… it is simple, but it can be perfect. Be proud of the food you’re making and give it the love it deserves. You work alongside Jamie to manage the Jamie’s Italian Restaurants across Ireland and the UK. How do these restaurants echo the Itailan cooking and culture you grew up with? At Jamie’s Italian, we use the best of everything to make our food — the best organic eggs, the best flour, the best semolina flour all go into our pasta, and the same is true for the rest of our menu. This is what Italian cooking is all about — the best ingredients make the best food! The chefs here are marvellous — there is a young chef in Jamie’s Italian Restaurant in Dundrum; he is from Vietnam and he tells me that he loves working here, he loves cooking, that he can’t wait to come into the kitchen here every day. This is passion! What can home cooks to do replicate this at home? The chefs here have the love and passion for cooking that you need for Italian food, but

they also need to understand why we use that flour, those eggs, everything… most of all, they have to give everything lots of love! We are born to eat, three times a day, so we should all give food the respect and love it deserves. Understand that food is not just fuel; food is about history, about culture, about tradition, about territory. When you put all this together, you give the food the love and respect it deserves, like us chefs do… it’s very Italian! Anyone can be taught how to cook, but you must try and share the passion for food; this is what people will remember and it will make you feel proud to give this part of yourself and your passion to someone else. What would you make for a dinner party for your friends and family? Ha! I wouldn’t want to be there! With my friends and my family, they’ll tell me off! Everyone is the expert! My sister, she complains; my friend, he says to me, ‘I’m going to show you the way I used to do it…’ Everyone wants to make their own, which is good! They have love for the food too! The best time of the year for cooking, for me, is the end of the summer — everything is fresh and you can cook with nearly anything: fish, vegetable, wild foods, you name it. When it comes to Christmas, we keep it simple and my wife does the cooking — and I don’t interfere!

Easy Food 21


Saltimbocca di pollo (Chicken saltimbocca with Fontina, prosciutto and sage) Serves 4 “Named for its irresistible taste – saltimbocca literally translates as ‘jump in the mouth’ – this classic Roman speciality has become a popular meat dish all over the world. Originally made with veal, it can also be made with pork or chicken. Don’t season the chicken, as you get saltiness from the prosciutto and tasty deliciousness from the sage and oozing Fontina. Serve with boiled potatoes and steamed greens for a delicious lunch or dinner.” 350g chicken fillets, thinly sliced to obtain 8 slices (you can ask your butcher to do this for you) 8 large sage leaves 50g Fontina, cut into 8 thin slices 8 slices of prosciutto (Parma ham), about 125g in total 50g butter 50ml white wine 1 Place the chicken slices on a board (the slices should be no more than 5mm thick – if necessary, flatten with a meat mallet). Place a sage leaf in the middle of each one, followed by a slice of Fontina and top with a slice of prosciutto, making sure the prosciutto covers the cheese. If your chicken slices are small, fold the prosciutto so that you have a double layer. Secure the ingredients in place with cocktail sticks to ensure nothing falls off. 2 Melt 30g of the butter in a large frying pan set over a medium heat. Add the saltimbocca, chicken-side down, and cook for two minutes, or until sealed. Turn them over and cook for a further two minutes. Turn them over again, increase the heat to high, add the white wine and cook for one minute. Remove the chicken and place on a serving dish. 3 Add the remaining butter to the frying pan and cook for about 30 seconds, until creamy. Pour the buttery sauce over the chicken and serve immediately.

Per Serving 360kcals, 22.2g fat (11.2g saturated), 1g carbs (0.3g sugars), 35.2g protein, 0g fibre, 0.624g sodium

22 Easy Food

MAY 2019


guest editor Gennaro Contaldo

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 23


Try a taste of Gennaro’s Italy at Jamie’s Italian Dundrum Dundrum Town Centre Dundrum, Dublin 16 www.jamieoliver.com/italian/ireland (01) 298 0600

Gennaro’s tagliatelle Bolognese Serves 4 1 onion 1 carrot 1 celery 2 tbsp olive oil 125g tomato purée 60ml red wine 30g higher-welfare pancetta 250g quality minced beef 250g minced higher-welfare pork shoulder and belly 30g mortadella (no nuts) 2 x 400g tins of plum tomatoes 380g tagliatelle 4 sprigs of fresh flat-leaf parsley Extra-virgin olive oil Parmesan, grated

24 Easy Food

1 Peel and finely chop the onion and carrot, then trim and finely chop the celery. 2 Heat two tablespoons of olive oil in a large pan over a medium heat, add the chopped vegetables and cook gently for 10 minutes, or until softened. 3 Stir in the tomato purée and cook for five minutes, then pour in the wine and allow it to bubble away until reduced by half. 4 Finely chop the pancetta, then add it to another large pan over a medium heat with the minced meat. Cook for five minutes, or until browned all over, breaking it up with a wooden spoon – don’t overdo it too much at this point. 5 Add the browned meat to the softened vegetables. Chop and add the mortadella, then stir well. 6 Tip in the tomatoes, breaking them up with a spoon, then cook for 2-3 hours over a low heat, or until softened and the sauce is

thickened and reduced. Season to taste. 7 Cook the tagliatelle in a large pan of boiling salted water according to the packet instructions until almost al dente – it’ll continue cooking in the sauce so it’s important you don’t overdo it. 8 Reserving a cupful of the cooking water, drain and add the pasta to the Bolognese sauce. Toss well and cook for a further two minutes, adding a splash of the cooking water if needed. 9 Finely chop and stir through the parsley leaves, then serve with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a good grating of Parmesan.

Per Serving 855kcals, 37.5g fat (11.1g saturated), 72.1g carbs (14g sugars), 55.5g protein, 6.6g fibre, 0.522g sodium

MAY 2019


guest editor Gennaro Contaldo

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 25


Carpaccio di zucchini (Courgette carpaccio with pecorino, mint and pomegranate) Serves 4 “Courgettes are so versatile and, when used raw, make a lovely starter or side salad. Make sure you use very fresh courgettes and slice them as thinly as you can. Ready-to-use pomegranate seeds are widely available in supermarkets all year round and not only look great, but also make a nutritious addition to this simple, delicious dish.� 2 courgettes 4 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil 2 tbsp white wine vinegar

26 Easy Food

1 garlic clove, very finely chopped 1 tbsp fresh mint, finely chopped, plus a few extra leaves for garnish Sea salt, to taste 50g pomegranate seeds 30g Pecorino, shaved 1 Using a vegetable peeler or a mandolin, slice thin slivers of courgette lengthways and set aside. 2 Combine the olive oil, white wine vinegar, garlic and chopped mint, with some salt to

taste, and whisk for a minute or so, until the mixture thickens slightly. 3 Dip the courgette slices in the dressing, then arrange on a serving plate. 4 Pour over the remaining dressing, scatter over pomegranate seeds and Pecorino

Per Serving 185kcals, 17.2g fat (3.5g saturated), 5.9g carbs (2.8g sugars), 4.4g protein, 1.3g fibre, 0.26g sodium

MAY 2019


guest editor Gennaro Contaldo

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 27


Pizza veloce al pane carasau (Quick pizza with Sardinian crispy bread) Makes 2 large pizzas “Pane carasau, also known as carta di musica, is a crispy, unleavened flatbread, which was made for Sardinian shepherds to take with them to the mountains to eat during their working day. Its crispiness makes it a light alternative to bread, and its long shelf life makes it an ideal storecupboard ingredient. You can find it in your local Italian deli. This quick, pizza-type recipe makes a great snack when time is precious or for when impromptu guests appear. The addition of potatoes makes it quite filling, but you could use any of your favourite pizza toppings. When serving, I find a sharp pair of kitchen scissors the best tool to cut it with, as the bread is quite crispy.” 600g potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced Sea salt 1 red onion, finely sliced Pinch of oregano 100g cherry tomatoes, quartered Extra-virgin olive oil, for drizzling 2 large pane carasau (from your local Italian deli) 100g Mozzarella, roughly chopped 1 Preheat the oven to 200˚C/180°C fan/gas mark 6. 2 Place the sliced potatoes in a saucepan of salted boiling water and cook for 5-6 minutes, until tender, but not falling apart. Drain well, taking care not to break them. 3 Meanwhile, prepare the other ingredients. Combine the sliced onion in a bowl with a little seasoning of salt and oregano. Mix the tomatoes in a bowl with a little salt and a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil. 4 Place each pane carasau on a large flat baking tray and drizzle each with a little extravirgin olive oil. Place the sliced potatoes on top, followed by some onions, Mozzarella and tomatoes, finishing off with another drizzle of olive oil. Place in the hot oven for 6-8 minutes, until the Mozzarella has melted, and serve immediately. Per Serving 678kcals, 25g fat (5.6g saturated), 97.8g carbs (10.1g sugars), 22.1g protein, 11g fibre, 0.965g sodium

28 Easy Food

MAY 2019


guest editor Gennaro Contaldo

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_018-030_Guest editor.indd 29

Easy Food 29

26/04/2019 5:14 p.m.


Tiramisu alle fragile di Adriana K!/&+f001/4"//61&/*&02L Serves 6 “Light and summery, this is my sister’s tiramisu recipe that she often makes for family occasions. It’s perfect for kids, as it contains no coffee (and the alcohol is optional!) but is packed with lots of healthy fruit. You can serve it immediately or make it in advance and store in the fridge, if you prefer.” 700g strawberries, hulled Juice and zest of 1 lemon 1 tbsp limoncello liqueur (optional) 4 tbsp, plus 80g caster sugar 4 egg yolks 200g Mascarpone 250ml thickened double cream 300g savoiardi sponge fingers (ladyfinger biscuits) 100g mixed berries Fresh mint (optional) 1 Roughly chop 500g of the strawberries and combine with the lemon juice, limoncello (if using) and the four tablespoons of sugar. Cover with cling film and place in the fridge while you prepare the creamy filling. 2 Whisk the egg yolks and the remaining 80g of sugar until light and creamy. Add the Mascarpone and continue to whisk until well amalgamated and creamy. Stir in the double cream and mix well with a spoon. Place in the fridge while you prepare the sauce. 3 Take the macerated strawberries out of the fridge and blend until smooth. 4 Line a deep serving dish or trifle bowl with a little of the creamy mixture. Dip the savoiardi into the strawberry sauce and arrange over the top of the creamy mixture. Spread more of the creamy mixture over the sponge fingers and continue making layers like this, until you have finished all the ingredients, ending with a cream layer. Decorate the top with the remaining whole strawberries, the mixed berries and a few sprigs of fresh mint if you have it. 5 You can serve immediately, if wished, or pop it back in the fridge until you are ready. Per Serving 560kcals, 25.7g fat (13.6g saturated), 73.5g carbs (46.9g sugars), 11.9g protein, 4.7g fibre, 0.088g sodium

30 Easy Food

MAY 2019


What's in season? EASY RECIPES USING THE BEST OF THIS MONTH'S FRESH, SEASONAL INGREDIENTS

32-38

IN THIS SECTION

SPEAR ME NO DETAILS, p32

Make the most of asparagus during its short and sweet season

www.easyfood.ie

RUBY BEAUTIES, p36

Let seasonal rhubarb and strawberries shine in this easy dessert

Easy Food 31


Spear me no details

Make the most of asparagus during its short and sweet season

In season: April to July Asparagus loves‌ lS&JS/+S)(+$S'S(' lS , lS!"$' lS%&(' lS/--+ asparagus How to trim lS!, ear with one Hold each sp end. Bend lS"%% hand at each e woody end lS++ (' gently until th will naturally lS+%"S snaps off; it ht place. snap at the rig lS &(' lS+1', lS+ lS /,-+

32 Easy Food

MAY 2019


what’s in season? asparagus

Warm asparagus brunch salad Serves 4

Niamh Cleary says, “I made the recipe with my husband, so we reduced the quantities to serve for two rather than four. It was really tasty and fresh! The recipe was straightforward and easy to follow. I’d maybe swap in Italian salad mix in place of the rocket, but that is just a personal preference.”

500g asparagus spears, trimmed 4 ripe tomatoes, halved 3 tbsp olive oil Salt and black pepper 12 slices smoked pancetta or smoked streaky bacon 12 baby potatoes, halved 1 tbsp red wine vinegar 1 tsp honey 1 tsp Dijon mustard 100g rocket 4 eggs, poached 1 Preheat the oven to 200˚C/180˚C fan/gas mark 6. Arrange the asparagus and tomato halves in a single layer on a rimmed baking tray. Drizzle over one tablespoon of the olive oil and season with salt and pepper.

www.easyfood.ie

2 Roll each slice of pancetta up into a spiral and nestle these in amongst the vegetables. 3 Bake for 20 minutes until the tomatoes are soft and the pancetta is crisp. 4 In the meantime, cook the potatoes in a pan of boiling salted water for 10 minutes or until fork tender. 5 In a jug, combine the remaining olive oil with the vinegar, honey, mustard and some salt and pepper. Whisk until well combined. Pour half of the dressing into a bowl and add the rocket. Toss to coat, then divide amongst serving plates. 6 Drain the potatoes and allow to steam dry for 2-3 minutes. Gently toss them in the remaining dressing. 7 Place the potatoes, asparagus and pancetta over the rocket. Top each portion with a poached egg and serve. Per Serving 579kcals, 19.5g fat (7.5g saturated), 47.8g carbs (10.5g sugars), 32.5g protein, 10g fibre, 1.044g sodium

x

Easy Food 33


Asparagus loaf with ham, cheese and tomatoes Makes 1 loaf

250g asparagus spears, chopped into quarters 200g self-raising flour 2 tbsp chives, snipped Salt and black pepper 3 large eggs, beaten 80ml milk 80ml olive oil, plus extra for greasing 1 tbsp Dijon mustard 80g sun-dried tomatoes, roughly chopped 100g cooked ham, roughly chopped 100g mature Cheddar, grated 1 Preheat the oven to 190˚C/170˚C/gas mark 5. Grease and line the base of a 900g loaf tin with parchment paper. 2 Bring a pan of salted water to a boil over a high heat. Add the asparagus and cook for two minutes. Drain and transfer to a bowl of

iced water. Allow to cool, then remove and pat completely dry with kitchen paper. 3 In a large bowl, combine the flour, chives and some salt and pepper. In a jug, whisk together the eggs, milk, oil and mustard. 4 Make a well in the centre of the flour mixture. Gradually add the egg mixture, beating it in to form a smooth batter. 5 Set aside three of the asparagus tips to decorate. Stir the remaining asparagus pieces into the batter, along with the tomatoes, ham and three quarters of the Cheddar. 6 Pour the batter into the prepared loaf tin, then sprinkle with the reserved Cheddar and place the reserved asparagus tips on top. 7 Bake for 40-45 minutes until golden and crusty on top. Allow to cool in the tin for 10 minutes, then transfer to a wire rack and allow to cool. Per slice 181kcals, 10g fat (2.1g saturated), 16.1g carbs (0.9g sugars), 7.6g protein, 1.4g fibre, 0.223g sodium

A bit on the side Asparagus with lemon, tarragon and garlic Serves 4 Bring a large pot of water to a boil over a high heat. Add 500g trimmed asparagus and cook for three minutes, then drain. In a small bowl, whisk together 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, 1 tbsp lemon juice, 1 tsp grated lemon zest, 1 tbsp chopped fresh tarragon, 1 crushed garlic clove, 1 very finely chopped shallot, ½ tsp Dijon mustard and some salt and pepper. Arrange the asparagus on a platter, drizzle over the tarragon mixture and toss to coat. Asparagus and strawberry salad with avocado and herb dressing Serves 4 Bring a large pot of water to a boil over a high heat. Add 600g trimmed asparagus and cook for three minutes. Drain and transfer to a bowl of iced water. Allow to cool, then remove and pat dry. In a food processor, combine 1 ripe avocado, 240ml buttermilk, a handful of fresh basil leaves, 50g crumbled goat’s cheese, 1 tbsp lemon juice and ½ tsp sugar. Whizz until smooth, then season to taste. Place 200g mixed leaves on a platter and arrange the asparagus on top. Add 150g hulled, chopped strawberries, drizzle with the avocado dressing and finish with some fresh basil leaves and a generous crack of black pepper. BBQ asparagus with ginger and soy Serves 4 Trim 20 asparagus stalks. Place five next to one another and push one soaked wooden skewer through all five, just below the tips, and another 2cm from the bottom. Set aside and repeat with the remaining stalks to form four ‘rafts’ in total. In a bowl, combine 2 tbsp sesame oil, 1 tbsp soy sauce, 2 crushed garlic cloves, 1 tbsp grated fresh ginger and ½ tsp black pepper. Brush this mixture over both sides of the asparagus and cook on a barbecue (or on a griddle pan over a high heat) for 4-5 minutes per side until lightly charred. Sprinkle with sesame seeds to serve.

34 Easy Food

MAY 2019


. . . E T S A T E R MO ... E C I O H ORE C

E R MO

M

! F E BE

Inisvale IR IS H DIC E D B E E F 400g

FOR DELICIOUS BEEF RECIPES

LIDL.IE/BEEF

D SLOW COOKEOLE BEEF CASSER OND A B Y C A T R IO N

REDM


Ruby beauties Let seasonal rhubarb and strawberries shine in this easy dessert

Rhubarb and strawberry crumble pie Serves 8-10

For the pastry: 450g plain flour 1 tsp sugar 200g cold butter, cubed 1 tbsp cold water For the topping: 60g plain flour 30g oats 75g light brown sugar ½ tsp ground ginger ¼ tsp salt 1 tsp orange zest 125g unsalted butter, melted and cooled

For the filling: 250g sugar 45g cornflour 1 tsp salt 750g strawberries, destemmed, cored and thickly sliced 750g rhubarb, trimmed and sliced 1 tsp orange zest 2 tsp fresh orange juice To serve: Custard or vanilla ice cream 1 Add the flour and sugar for the pastry to a bowl and rub in the butter until crumbly. Add a little water until the mixture comes together as a dough. Shape into a disc, wrap in cling film and refrigerate for 20 minutes.

2 Fit the dough round into a 23cm tart tin. Pierce the bottom of the crust all over with a fork and freeze for another 20 minutes. 3 In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, oats, brown sugar, ginger, salt and orange zest. Stir in the melted butter. Refrigerate until ready to use. 4 Preheat the oven to 190°C/170˚C fan/gas mark 5. 5 In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, cornflour and salt. Add the strawberries and rhubarb and stir to combine. Let stand for 20 minutes, then drain off the excess liquid. 6 Stir in the orange zest and juice. Pour the filling into the crust. Sprinkle evenly with the crumble topping and place the pie dish on a baking tray. 7 Bake for 45-55 minutes until the crust is golden brown and the filling is bubbling, covering the top and edges with tin foil if they brown too quickly. 8 Leave to cool completely before serving with custard or ice cream. Per Serving 508kcals, 23g fat (14.1g saturated), 71.8g carbs (30.9g sugars), 6.2g protein, 4.1g fibre, 0.213g sodium

36 Easy Food

MAY 2019


what’s in season? rhubarb

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 37


All about rhubarb Perfect prep Cut the bottom and top of each rhubarb stalk with a sharp paring knife. Cut off the leaves. Rhubarb leaves and roots contain a high concentration of a toxic compound called oxalic acid, meaning that only the stalk is edible. Rinse the stalks with cold, running water. Use a vegetable peeler to pare away brown spots. You do not need to peel the skin off from the whole stalk. Cut the stalks horizontally into small pieces — no wider than 1cm. Fresh rhubarb can be frozen for up to six months. Spread the rhubarb pieces in a single layer on a baking tray. Place the pan in the freezer. Once the rhubarb is frozen, place all the pieces in a sealable bag and squeeze out the air. Return the bag to the freezer. Allow frozen rhubarb to thaw at room temperature in a colander before adding it to baked goods. Better baking Mix up healthy baked oatmeal for breakfast. Combine whole oats, milk, oil, baking powder and a sweetener such as brown sugar or maple syrup in a large bowl. Stir in diced rhubarb and other healthy ingredients such as walnuts or flaxseed. Scoop the batter into greased muffin tins and bake until a toothpick stuck into the centre of each breakfast cake comes out clean. Toss diced rhubarb with a few tablespoons of granulated white sugar and orange zest. Stir the rhubarb into a vanilla pound cake, muffin or quick bread

38 Easy Food

batter and bake according to the recipe instructions. Orange zest enhances the natural acidity and flavour of rhubarb. Make a simple compote by combining rhubarb, sugar, orange juice, orange zest and vanilla in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Bring the compote to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer and cook until the sauce has thickened. Allow the compote to cool completely. Roll out sugar cookie dough and cut out circles. Put a small spoonful of rhubarb compote into the centres of half of the circles. Cover the compote with another circle and crimp the edges of each cookie with a fork. Bake according to the sugar cookie recipe instructions. Bake frozen puff pastry shells according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Allow the shells to cool, then fill them with rhubarb compote. Top with a dollop of whipped cream or ice cream. Fill an unbaked pie crust with raw, diced rhubarb tossed with sugar, flour and orange zest. Dot the rhubarb with small pieces of cold butter. Cover the filling with a second crust and crimp the edges. Cut a few slits in the top crust to allow the pie to vent steam. Bake the pie until the top is golden brown and allow it to cool completely before serving. Reactive rhubarb Make rhubarb compote in a non-reactive pan made of stainless steel, Tefloncoated aluminium or enamelled cast iron. Rhubarb reacts with aluminium, iron and copper and will turn an ugly brown colour as a result.

MAY 2019


larder luck TURN TO YOUR STORECUPBOARD TO MAKE MEALS IN MINUTES

40-47

IN THIS SECTION

TINY TREATS, p40

Kids will love these treats for World Baking Day on May 17th!

www.easyfood.ie

NEW WAYS WITH PASTA SAUCES, p42

Tasty oil-, cream- and tomato-based sauces for that bowl of pasta you've been craving

FROM THE BUTCHER'S BLOCK, p46

Local butcher Michael Fleming is feeling the need for speed

Easy Food 39


GET THE KIDS BAKING for World Baking Day May 17th with Dr. Oetker

Dr. Oetker rainbow Cupcakes Makes 12 Cooking time: 20 mins Prep time: 15 mins 165g butter, softened 165g caster sugar 2 eggs 1tsp Dr. Oetker Madagascan Vanilla Extract 165g plain flour 2tsp Dr. Oetker Baking Powder A pinch of salt Dr. Oetker Baking Cases 2 tubs Dr. Oetker Vanilla Buttercream Dr. Oetker Gel Food Colour (1-2 drops each blue, yellow, green, orange, purple and red) Dr. Oetker Ultimate Sprinkle Mix Unicorn Confetti NEW Dr. Oetker Unicorn Wafer Placements NEW Dr. Oetker DInos Wafer Placements 40 Easy Food

1 Preheat the oven to 180ËšC/160ËšC fan/gas mark 4. Line a 12hole muffin tin with Dr. Oetker Baking Cases. 2 In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Stir in the Dr. Oetker Madagascan Vanilla Extract. 3 Fold in the flour, Dr. Oetker Baking Powder and a pinch of salt. 4 Spoon the mixture into the baking cases and bake for 15-20 minutes. Allow to cool completely. 5 Divide the Dr. Oetker Vanilla Buttercream amongst six bowls. Mix in 1-2 drops of gel food colour to each bowl. 6 Roll out a sheet of cling film. Spread even stripes of each colour next to one another up the centre of the cling film. Roll up the cling film into a sausage and cut off any excess. Using a star nozzle in a piping bag and place the sausage of buttercream inside the bag. 7 Pipe a swirl of the rainbow buttercream on the top of each cupcake. Decorate with Dr. Oetker Unicorn Confetti and stick one of the Dr Oetker Wafer Placements on top.


Dr Oetker mini poptarts Makes 20 Cooking time: 25 mins Prep time: 20 mins For the pastry: 280g plain flour 6 tbsp Dr. Oetker Cocoa Powder 3 tbsp icing sugar 200g butter 1 large egg 4 tbsp cold water For the fillings: Strawberry jam Dr. Oetker White Chocolate Chunks Dr. Oetker White Chocolate Peanut butter Dr. Oetker Milk Jumbo Chocolate Chips Dr. Oetker Milk and White Chocolate Hearts Dr. Oetker Hundreds and Thousands For the icing: 200g icing sugar 1-2 tbsp water

To decorate: Dr. Oetker Ultimate Sprinkle Mix Unicorn Confetti Dr. Oetker White Chocolate Chunks Dr. Oetker Milk Jumbo Chocolate Chips Dr. Oetker Milk Chocolate, melted Dr. Oetker Hundreds and Thousands Dr. Oetker Milk and White Chocolate Hearts 1 Preheat the oven to 180ËšC/160ËšC fan/ gas mark 4. Line two baking trays with parchment paper. 2 In a large bowl, add the flour, icing sugar and Dr. Oetker Cocoa Powder. Rub in the butter until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. 3 Make a well in the centre and crack in the egg. Use a fork to combine and add in enough water until dough is formed. Wrap in the dough in cling film and refrigerate for at least one hour. 4 On a floured surface, roll out the dough to about the 2mm thick. Using a ruler, cut the dough into 4 x 6cm rectangles. Gather any scrap pastry and re-roll to cut out more poptarts.

For More Baking Inspiration, visit www.Oetker.ie or www.easyfood.ie

5 For a jam poptart, add 2-3 teaspoons of jam in the centre, add one square of Dr. Oetker White Chocolate and a few Dr. Oetker White Chocolate Chunks. 6 For a peanut butter jam pop tart, add 2-3 teaspoons of peanut butter and a few Dr. Oetker Milk Jumbo Chocolate Chips. 7 For the love heart and sprinkles poptart, add a few Dr. Oetker Milk and White Chocolate Hearts and sprinkle with Dr. Oetker Hundreds and Thousands. 8 Brush the edges of the pastry with a little water, top with a piece of pastry and seal the edges using a fork. Bake for 20-25 minutes. Allow to cool completely before icing. 9 To make the icing, mix the icing sugar and a little water in a small bowl. Slowly add the water until you get a slightly runny consistency. 10 Spoon a little icing onto the top of the poptarts and decorate with a variety of Dr. Oetker sprinkles and Dr. Oetker Chocolate.

Dr.OetkerBakingIreland Easy Easy Food Food 59 41


3 CREAMY

PASTA SAUCES

Indulgent roasted garlic cream linguine Serves 4 Preheat the oven to 200˚C/180˚C fan/gas mark 6. Cut the top off a whole head of garlic, exposing the individual cloves. Place on a square of tin foil and drizzle with olive oil. Wrap up in the foil, crimping to seal. Roast for 35-40 minutes until soft. Squeeze out the cloves and mash with a fork. Melt 80g butter in a saucepan over a medium-low heat. Add the mashed garlic and 400ml double cream. Bring to a gentle simmer and whisk in ½ tsp black pepper and 120g grated Parmesan (or vegetarian alternative). In a small cup, stir together 2 tsp flour and 1 tbsp cream to form a thick paste. Add this paste to the sauce and whisk together until smooth and thickened. Season to taste. Toss through 320g cooked linguine and a splash of the pasta cooking water.

42 Easy Food

NEW WAYS WITH PASTA SAUCES

Creamy mushroom pasta Serves 4 Melt 20g butter with 1 tbsp olive oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add 200g sliced chestnut mushrooms and cook for 6-7 minutes until golden. Add 3 crushed garlic cloves and cook for one minute. Remove from the pan and set aside. Pour in 80ml white wine, 1 tsp Italian seasoning, a squeeze of lemon juice, 1 tsp plain flour and 1 tsp Dijon mustard. Stir to form a smooth paste. Stir in 250ml cream and let it simmer for a couple of minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pan. Reduce the heat and cook for 3-4 minutes longer until slightly thickened. Season to taste. Toss through 320g cooked tagliatelle and a splash of the pasta cooking water. Scatter with some fresh parsley to serve.

Sun-dried tomato Mascarpone pasta Serves 4 Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add 1 chopped onion and cook for 6-8 minutes until soft. Add 150g chopped roasted red peppers (from a jar), 120g chopped sun-dried tomatoes and 4 crushed garlic cloves. Cook for one minute. Add ½ tsp dried oregano, 1 x 400g tin of chopped tomatoes and some salt and black pepper. Bring to a simmer and cook for 3-4 minutes. Stir in 220g Mascarpone until well combined. Stir in 50g grated Parmesan, 120g chopped baby spinach leaves and a handful of chopped fresh basil. Toss through 320g cooked penne and a splash of the pasta cooking water.

Don’t forget to fi nish your pasta sauce with a spla sh of the pasta coo king wate r! Flip to p.130 fo r the othe r tips you n eed to coo k perfect pa sta every time.

MAY 2019


larder luck pasta sauces

NEW WAYS WITH PASTA SAUCES Spaghetti with anchovies and crunchy crumbs Serves 4 In a pan over a very low heat, combine 120ml extra-virgin olive oil, 40g anchovy fillets, 1 quartered onion, 1 halved garlic clove and 2 strips of lemon zest. Warm slowly until the anchovies have disintegrated into the oil. Remove from the heat and set aside for the flavours to infuse. Heat a splash of olive oil in a separate pan over a medium-low heat and cook 120g breadcrumbs with a pinch of salt until just beginning to turn golden. Remove from the heat immediately. Use tongs or a slotted spoon to remove the onion, garlic and lemon zest from the oil. When almost ready to serve, gently warm the oil over a low heat. Toss through 320g cooked spaghetti and a splash of the pasta cooking water, to loosen. Add the juice of ½ a lemon and toss vigorously to emulsify the oil and lemon juice. Divide amongst plates and top each portion with the golden breadcrumbs.

Spaghetti aglio e olio Serves 4 Combine 6 sliced garlic cloves and 120ml extra-virgin olive oil in a cold pan over a medium-low heat. Cook slowly for 10 minutes until the garlic is light golden brown. Remove from the heat. Stir in a pinch each of dried chilli flakes, salt and black pepper. Toss through 320g cooked spaghetti and a splash of the pasta cooking water, to loosen. Stir in some chopped fresh parsley and scatter with grated Parmesan, to serve.

3 OIL-BASED PASTA SAUCES

Mediterranean tomato and artichoke sauce Serves 4 Heat 120ml extra-virgin olive oil in a large heavy-based pan over a medium heat. Lower the heat and add 4 crushed garlic cloves and a pinch of salt. Cook for 10 seconds, then stir in the a handful of chopped fresh parsley, 350g halved cherry tomatoes, 2 chopped spring onions, 150g chopped artichoke hearts (from a jar), 1 tbsp lemon zest and a generous crack of black pepper. Cook for 30 seconds until warmed through. Toss through 320g cooked linguine and a splash of the pasta cooking water, to loosen. Finish with some crumbled Feta.

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_042-044_New ways with.indd 43

Easy Food 43

26/04/2019 5:18 p.m.


3

NEW WAYS WITH PASTA SAUCES

TOMATO PASTA SAUCES

Classic tomato and basil pasta Serves 6-8 Heat 1 tbsp olive oil in a saucepan over a medium heat. Cook 1 finely chopped onion for 6-8 minutes until soft and lightly golden. Separate the leaves and stalks of a bunch of fresh basil and roughly chop both. Add 2 crushed garlic cloves and the basil stalks to the pan. Season with some salt and pepper and cook for two minutes. Stir in the 1kg chopped fresh tomatoes (or 2 x 400g tins of tomatoes), 1 tbsp red wine vinegar and a pinch of sugar. Bring to a boil, then turn the heat down to a simmer. Cook gently for around 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in the chopped basil leaves. Toss through 320g cooked fusilli and a splash of the pasta cooking water.

44 Easy Food

Fiery penne al’arrabbiatta

Spaghetti puttanesca Serves 4 Heat 2 tbsp olive oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Cook 4 garlic cloves with 4 anchovy fillets for two minutes until the garlic is golden and the anchovies have melted. Add 60g pitted black olives, 2 tbsp capers and a pinch of dried chilli flakes. Add 2 x 400g tins of plum tomatoes and crush them against the sides of the pan using the back of a wooden spoon. Season generously with black pepper and cook over a medium-high heat for 10 minutes or until the tomatoes break down into a sauce. Toss through 320g cooked spaghetti and a splash of the pasta cooking water.

Serves 4 Melt 20g butter with 1 tbsp olive oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add 2 crushed garlic cloves and ½ tbsp dried chilli flakes and cook for two minutes. Add 2 x 400g tins of tomatoes and season with a pinch of sugar and some salt and pepper. Simmer for 30 minutes until thickened, stirring occasionally. Stir in a handful of torn fresh basil leaves. Toss through 320g cooked penne and a splash of the pasta cooking water.

MAY 2019


gift guide local food

Like Prosecco? MCGuigan Frizzante!

A new style of sparkling

DISTRIBUTED BY

Enjoy McGUIGAN WINES Sensibly. www.easyfood.ie

EF139_ADS.indd 45

DISTRIBUTED BY

Easy Food 101

26/04/2019 5:44 p.m.


46 Easy Food

MAY 2019


larder luck butcher advice

From the

BUTCHER'S BLOCK Local butcher Michael Fleming is feeling the need for speed

Which are the best cuts for quick fix dinners? Generally, the smaller or thinner the piece of meat or poultry, the faster it will cook. Similarly, cuts that are more tender — think chicken fillets, pork fillet or a lean minute steak — typically cook faster than tougher cuts that require more time to become tender, such as beef chuck or pork shoulder. Mince also works well, whether cooked into a sauce like Bolognese or formed into patties or meatballs that are small enough to cook through quickly. What cuts should I avoid for fast meals? Obviously large pieces of meat like roasts will take a relatively long time, and even thick cut steaks like fillets will need significantly more cooking time than thinner steaks. While cheaper cuts are fantastic when cooked “low ‘n’ slow,” they’re usually not suitable for quick cooking. Keep the housekeeper’s cut for the slow cooker! What are the best methods for quick cooking? Pan-frying, stir-frying and grilling are all quite quick ways to cook. What meat would you recommend for a stir-fry? Chicken is always a popular choice. I like to use thinly sliced beef, and lean strips of lamb can be really delicious. The pork fillet recipe shown here is a great option with loads of flavour and very lean meat. The cornflour adds a light crunchy coating to the meat and helps thicken the sauce.

www.easyfood.ie

What are the most important things to remember when stir-frying? Use clean oil, and choose one with a high smoke point like peanut oil. Make sure your pan or wok is nice and hot before you begin cooking. Don’t crowd the pan — your food will end up steaming instead of getting the nice brown exterior you want. Instead, work in batches. Brown your meat, then cook your vegetables, and only then return everything to the pan and cook it all together in the sauce for a couple of minutes to heat through. What meats work best for pan-frying? Steaks and lamb chops always work well in the pan. Chicken fillets are also good for pan-frying, but it can help to pound them to an even thickness first using a rolling pin or mallet before slicing. Does it matter what type of steak I buy for a quick dinner? Thicker cuts like fillet steaks often require a short time finishing in the oven, so go for steaks 2cm thick or thinner. A minute steak is best if you’re really short on time. Is there any way to cook a roast chicken without taking hours? Absolutely — spatchcocking it drastically reduces the cooking time. Spatchcocking, or butterflying, is the process of removing the backbone and flattening the bird out, and you can ask your butcher to do this for you. Alternatively, you can ask him/her to joint the bird so it cooks more quickly.

Top tip

cuts of Marinate lean king, ba meat prior to and g tin as ro , griling d ad to barbecuing t en ev pr d an flavour om them fr drying out.

Quick sticky pork and cashew noodles Serves 2 2 nests of dried egg noodles 2 tbsp cornflour 1 tsp Chinese five spice Salt and black pepper 250g pork fillet, cut into strips Vegetable oil, for frying 200g mangetout, halved lengthways 2 garlic cloves, crushed Juice of 1 lemon 1 tbsp honey 2 tbsp soy sauce 2 tbsp sweet chilli sauce 30g unsalted cashews 4 spring onions, sliced into matchsticks 40g beansprouts 1 Cook the noodles according to package instructions, then drain well. 2 Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the cornflour with the Chinese five spice and some salt and black pepper. Add the pork pieces and toss to coat. 3 Heat one tablespoon of the vegetable oil in a wok or large pan over a high heat. Working in batches if necessary to avoid crowding the pan, cook the pork for 2-3 minutes until browned on all sides. Transfer to a plate using a slotted spoon. 4 Carefully wipe out the pan using a ball of kitchen paper, then heat another splash of oil over a high heat. Add the mangetout and garlic and cook for one minute. 5 Add the lemon juice, honey, soy sauce and sweet chilli sauce along with a splash of water. Stir to combine. 6 Return the pork to the pan and add the cashews, spring onions and beansprouts. Allow to bubble for 3-4 minutes or until the pork is completely cooked through. 7 Add the noodles and toss to heat through. Serve immediately. Per Serving 507kcals, 17g fat (3.1g saturated), 46.5g carbs (15.4g sugars), 42.6g protein, 2.7g fibre, 1.033g sodium

x

Easy Food 47


“WHAT COULD POSSIBLY TOP THIS OFF? YOUR IMAGINATION”


what's for dinner? FEEDING YOUR FAMILY, MADE EASY!

50-68

IN THIS SECTION

WEEKLY MENU PLANNER, p50

Keep it simple, keep it quick with our whole week's worth of tasty family meals

www.easyfood.ie

OH MY GOODNESS, p62 Aoife Howard creates a lighter, plant-based twist on an Italian classic

PASTA PERFECTION, p64 Endlessly versatile and so quick to prepare, pasta is perfection on a plate

Easy Food 49


Weekly

MENU PLANNER

Keep it simple, keep it quick with our tasty midweek meals

50 Easy Food

MAY 2019


what's for dinner? weeknight meals

Monday Goat’s cheese and mushroom Dutch baby Serves 2 For the filling: 1 tbsp olive oil ½ a small red onion, sliced 200g button mushrooms, quartered Salt and black pepper Fresh rocket For the Dutch baby: 3 large eggs 180ml milk 60g plain flour

1 tsp herbs de Provence 30g butter 2 tbsp fresh thyme leaves 80g goat’s cheese, crumbled 1 Heat half a tablespoon of olive oil in a heavybased, ovenproof 20cm pan over a medium heat. Cook the red onion with a pinch of salt and pepper for 6-8 minutes until softened but not browned. Transfer to a bowl. 2 Add the remaining olive oil to the same pan and cook the mushrooms with over a mediumhigh heat for 5-6 minutes until golden. Season with salt and pepper. Add to the bowl with the onions, cover tightly with foil and set aside. Wipe out the pan with a ball of kitchen paper. 3 In a blender, combine together the eggs, milk, flour, herbes de Provence and a pinch of

salt. Whizz until well blended and foamy. 4 Preheat the oven to 220˚C/200˚C fan/gas mark 7. 5 Place the butter into the pan and place in the oven for one minute or until just melted. Remove from the oven and pour the batter into the pan. Scatter evenly with the thyme and goat’s cheese. 6 Bake for 18-20 minutes until puffed and golden brown. 7 Remove from oven and add the mushrooms and onions. Season with some salt and pepper and scatter with some fresh rocket.

Per Serving 627kcals, 41.3g fat (21.8g saturated), 35.2g carbs (8.1g sugars), 31.7g protein, 3.2g fibre, 0.462g sodium

Meat-free Monday!

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 51


Tuesday Serves 4

4 tbsp soy sauce 2 tbsp sriracha (or other spicy Asian chilligarlic sauce) 3 spring onions, chopped

1½ tbsp sesame, peanut or vegetable oil 500g pork mince Salt and black pepper 1 small onion, finely chopped 150g broccoli, finely chopped 1 red pepper, deseeded and finely chopped 150g frozen mixed vegetables 600g day-old cooked brown rice, chilled 2 large eggs

1 Heat half of the oil in a large wok or pan over a medium-high heat. Add the pork and season with salt and pepper. Cook for 5-6 minutes until completely browned throughout, breaking up any lumps using a wooden spoon. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. 2 Heat the remaining oil in the same wok and cook the onion, broccoli, pepper and mixed vegetables for 3-4 minutes until softened.

Spicy pork and vegetable fried rice

52 Easy Food

3 Add the cooked rice and return the pork to the pan. Stir to combine and heat through. 4 Push everything to one side of the pan and crack in the eggs. Stir and scramble the eggs for one minute, then stir into the rest of the stir fry. 5 Stir in the soy sauce and sriracha. Serve topped with chopped spring onions and extra sriracha, if desired.

Per Serving 649kcals, 13.3g fat (1.7g saturated), 126.3g carbs (5.2g sugars), 10.2g protein, 6.3g fibre, 1.019g sodium

x

MAY 2019


what's for dinner? weeknight meals

Wednesday Roast chicken baps Serves 6 For the chicken: Juice of 2 lemons 4 tbsp olive oil Handful of fresh mint leaves, roughly chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed 6 chicken fillets, bone-in For the tarragon mustard mayonnaise: 8 tbsp mayonnaise 2 tbsp fresh tarragon, finely chopped 1 tsp Dijon mustard

www.easyfood.ie

To serve: 6 soft baps, split Tomato, sliced Watercress Potato wedges or salad 1 In a sealable bag, combine the lemon juice, olive oil, mint and garlic. 2 Place the chicken in a shallow dish and rub it with the marinade. Cover and set aside for 30-45 minutes. 3 Preheat the oven to 200ËšC/180ËšC fan/gas mark 6. Season the chicken with salt and pepper and roast for 35-40 minutes or until completely cooked throughout.

4 In a bowl, stir together the ingredients for the tarragon mayonnaise. 5 Remove from the oven and allow to rest for 10 minutes. Once cool enough to handle, pull the meat from the bones into thick strips. 6 Place the chicken pieces back in the roasting dish and turn to coat in the juices. 7 Spread the baps generously with the tarragon mayonnaise. Layer with sliced tomato, fresh watercress and the roast chicken. Serve with potato wedges or salad. Per Serving 604kcals, 27.2g fat (6.3g saturated), 47.7g carbs (5g sugars), 39.4g protein, 3.2g fibre, 0.538g sodium

x

Easy Food 53


Thursday Cajun surf and turf pasta Serves 4 320g tagliatelle 400g sirloin steak Salt and black pepper Cajun seasoning 3 tbsp rapeseed oil 400g large, raw prawns, peeled and deveined 1 small onion, sliced 1 green and 1 red pepper, deseeded and sliced 3 garlic cloves, crushed 100ml white wine 350ml chicken stock 120ml cream

54 Easy Food

1 Bring a large pan of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta according to package instructions until just al dente. 2 Meanwhile, season the steaks generously with salt, black pepper and 2-3 teaspoons of Cajun seasoning. 3 Heat two tablespoons of the rapeseed oil in a large, heavy pan over a medium-high heat. Cook the steaks for four minutes per side or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate, tent loosely with foil and set aside to rest. 4 Add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the pan. Season the prawns generously with salt, pepper and Cajun seasoning. Add to the pan and cook for two minutes or until pink and opaque. Remove to a bowl and set aside. 5 Add the onion and peppers to the pan and cook for 2-3 minutes until golden brown but still crisp. Add the garlic and cook for 30 seconds. Transfer the vegetables to the bowl

with the prawns and set aside. 6 Place the pan over a high heat and add the wine and chicken stock. Allow to bubble for 2-3 minutes, scraping any sticky bits from the bottom of the using a wooden spoon. 7 Turn the heat to medium-low and add the cream, stirring constantly. Cook the sauce for 2-3 minutes, until slightly thickened. Taste and add salt and pepper as needed. 8 Slice the steaks against the grain. Add to the sauce along with any juices from their plate. Add the prawns and vegetables. 9 Add the cooked pasta and toss to combine. Divide amongst bowls and serve immediately.

Per Serving 736kcals, 22.4g fat (4.5g saturated), 58.6g carbs (2.9g sugars), 64.9g protein, 2.3g fibre, 0.681g sodium

MAY 2019


what's for dinner? FEEDING YOUR FAMILY, MADE EASY!

50-68

IN THIS SECTION

WEEKLY MENU PLANNER, p50

Keep it simple, keep it quick with our whole week's worth of tasty family meals

www.easyfood.ie

OH MY GOODNESS, p62 Aoife Howard creates a lighter, plant-based twist on an Italian classic

PASTA PERFECTION, p64 Endlessly versatile and so quick to prepare, pasta is perfection on a plate

Easy Food 49


what's for dinner? weeknight meals

Friday Hoisin duck noodles with mango Serves 4 4 x 180g duck fillets 2 tbsp hoisin sauce 1 x 2cm piece of fresh ginger, peeled and grated 2 garlic cloves, crushed Salt and black pepper 3 nests of dried egg noodles 80ml soy sauce 1 tbsp sesame oil 1 tbsp brown sugar Juice of 1 lime 1 mango, pitted and sliced 4 handfuls of watercress

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_050-060_Weekly budget.indd 55

1 Preheat the oven to 220ËšC/200ËšC fan/gas mark 7. 2 Remove the duck from the fridge. Use a sharp knife to cut a criss-cross pattern in the skin of the breasts, being careful not to cut all the way through to the meat. 3 Place the duck in a bowl with the hoisin sauce, ginger and garlic. Turn to coat all sides, then cover with cling film and allow to marinate at room temperature for 30 minutes. 4 Remove the duck breasts from the marinade. Pat the skin side dry with kitchen paper. Season with salt and black pepper. 5 Place the duck in a dry, cold non-stick pan over a medium heat, skin side down. Cook for 6-8 minutes or until the skin is very crisp, then carefully drain off the fat into a small bowl. Turn the duck breasts over and cook for a further 2-3 minutes. 6 Remove the duck to a rack in a roasting dish

and cook in the middle of the oven for 12-15 minutes, depending on how rare you like it. 7 Transfer to a warm plate, cover with tin foil and allow to rest for 7-8 minutes. 8 Meanwhile, cook the noodles according to packet instructions. Drain well and return to the pan. 9 In a jug, whisk together the soy sauce, sesame oil, sugar and lime juice. Toss half of the dressing through the noodles. Divide the noodles amongst four serving bowls. 10 Slice the duck breasts and place on top of the noodles with the mango and watercress. Drizzle over the remaining dressing and serve. Per Serving 679kcals, 26.7g fat (7.4g saturated), 61.8g carbs (17.3g sugars), 49.7g protein, 4g fibre, 1.63g sodium

x

Easy Food 55

26/04/2019 5:28 p.m.


Saturday Homemade popcorn chicken Serves 4 2 eggs 1 tsp hot sauce 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce 60ml buttermilk 600g chicken fillets, cut into nugget-sized pieces 180g plain flour 60g breadcrumbs 3 tbsp cornflour ¾ tsp bicarbonate of soda 2 tsp salt 2 tsp black pepper 2 tsp paprika ¼ tsp cayenne pepper

56 Easy Food

½ tsp garlic powder Cooking spray To serve: Chips, baps or wraps 1 Preheat the oven to 220˚C/200˚C fan/gas mark 7. Line a large baking tray with parchment paper and set aside. 2 In a rectangular baking dish, whisk together the eggs, hot sauce, Worcestershire sauce and half of the buttermilk. Add the chicken pieces and toss to coat. 3 In a large shallow bowl, combine the flour, breadcrumbs, cornflour, bicarbonate of soda, salt, black pepper, paprika, cayenne pepper and garlic powder. Add the remaining buttermilk

and mix well with a fork to create crumbs. 4 Dip each chicken strip into the crumb mixture, then into the egg wash (making sure to coat both sides) then place back into the crumbs. Turn to coat completely, pressing the mixture on with your fingers. Place coated nuggets on the prepared baking tray. Allow to rest for a few minutes, spray generously with cooking spray. 5 Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown and completely cooked throughout. Serve with chips or in baps or wraps.

Per Serving 537kcals, 14.4g fat (3.9g saturated), 46.1g carbs (2.2g sugars), 52.4g protein, 2.8g fibre, 1.137g sodium

MAY 2019


what's for dinner? weeknight meals

Dessert Easy brownie custard trifles Serves 4 200g cream, whipped 4 chocolate brownies, roughly chopped 2 bananas, sliced 250g custard 4 tbsp toffee sauce 30g dark chocolate, grated

www.easyfood.ie

1 Divide the brownie pieces amongst four glasses. 2 Layer over the bananas, custard and cream. 3 Drizzle with toffee sauce and top with grated chocolate. Per Serving 473kcals, 19.6g fat (10.9g saturated), 76g carbs (43g sugars), 8.8g protein, 13.8g fibre, 0.102g sodium

Easy Food 57


Sunday Easy salmon tacos with avocado gremolata Serves 2 For the avocado gremolata: 1 small, ripe avocado, pitted and chopped Handful of fresh parsley, chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil Juice of 1 lemon For the salmon: 2 salmon fillets, skin on ½ tbsp olive oil

58 Easy Food

Salt and black pepper Pinch of cayenne pepper (optional) To serve: Small soft tortilla wraps 1 In a small bowl, combine all of the ingredients for the gremolata. Place in the fridge while you cook the salmon. 2 Pat the salmon fillets dry with kitchen paper. Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium-high heat and add the salmon fillets, flesh side down.

Season with the salt and pepper and a pinch of cayenne pepper, if desired. 3 Cook for two minutes, then carefully flip over. Cook for another 4-5 minutes until the flesh feels firm to the touch. 4 Flake the salmon and serve in tortilla wraps with the lemon and avocado gremolata.

Per Serving 681kcals, 44.3g fat (8.3g saturated), 34.3g carbs (1.9g sugars), 40.9g protein, 8.1g fibre, 0.568g sodium

x MAY 2019


what's for dinner? weeknight meals

Dessert Dark chocolate pastry plait Serves 4-6 1 x 320g puff pastry sheet, thawed 60g Mascarpone, at room temperature 1 x 180g dark chocolate bar 1 egg, beaten with 1 tsp water 30g flaked almonds To serve: Cream or ice cream 1 Preheat the oven to 200ËšC/180ËšC fan/gas mark 6.

www.easyfood.ie

2 Lay the puff pastry flat on a sheet of parchment paper. 3 Spread the Mascarpone down the middle lengthwise, leaving about 8cm of space on either side. 4 Top with the chocolate bar. 5 To make the plait, cut diagonal lines leading outwards from the filling and away from you at 1cm intervals up each side of the pastry dough. Fold the rectangular ends of the puff pastry up over the filling. 6 Beginning on one side, pull one strip of dough over the filling, then alternate with a strip of dough from the other side. Continue

pulling the strips over the filling until you reach the top. 7 Once the entire puff pastry is wrapped up, lift it up on the parchment paper and transfer to a baking tray. 8 Brush with the egg wash and scatter with the flaked almonds. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until golden brown. Cut into quarters and serve warm with cream or ice cream. Per Serving 346kcals, 24.6g fat (6.3g saturated), 25.5g carbs (0.7g sugars), 6.6g protein, 1.5g fibre, 0.146g sodium

Easy Food 59


LOOSE ENDS Whizz flaked almonds into a pesto with olive or rapeseed oil, watercress, lemon juice, some seasoning and plenty of garlic. Use the pesto in toasted sandwiches with leftover goat’s cheese. Use leftover buttermilk to make sweet or savoury scones, brown bread or creamy salad dressings. Cold buttermilk also makes a refreshing low-fat drink! Stir some hoisin sauce into the mince mixture for burger or meatballs for an Asian-inspired twist. If you don’t want to eat extra mangoes on their own, make a fruit salad, add some chopped mango to a spicy curry for a touch of sweetness, or try adding a layer of sliced mango and a pinch of chilli powder over your avocado toast for a tasty twist. For a creamy salad dressing, combine 120ml extra virgin olive oil, 2 tbsp Dijon mustard, 2 tbsp white wine vinegar, 2 tbsp chopped fresh tarragon, 1 tsp sugar, ¼ tsp salt and ¼ tsp white pepper. Beat together well with a wire whisk until creamy and emulsified. Store in the fridge and use within two days.

60 Easy Food

MAY 2019


y m h O Goodness Aoife Howard creates a lighter twist on an Italian classic

Aoife is a doctor and food blogger. She loves to create simple healthy recipes so that you can have your cake and eat it too! www.thegoodfoodgoddess.com

Few countries can compete with the culinary powerhouse that is Italy. This country boasts a rich food tradition and history that has been lovingly passed from generation to generation, and its delights span both sweet and savoury. Each region offers its own style of cooking and specialities, from pesto alla Genovese to risotto alla Milanese, not forgetting cannoli Siciliani. However, all regions share the same fundamental approach to food; eating is considered one of life's greatest joys, and provenance is key. Focus is placed on simple recipes that capture nature’s freshest ingredients in their prime. Think of the simplicity of a Caprese salad; juicy tomatoes, fragrant basil and creamy Mozzarella combine to create an iconic dish. I've tried to capture a little taste of the flavours of Italy with my nutrient-rich take

62 Easy Food

EF139_062-063_Oh my goodness.indd 62

on the perennial favorite that is spaghetti and meatballs. Although I've created a wholefood take on this classic, I've still used traditional ingredients to make these fibre and flavour-rich bean balls. Beans are traditionally found in Italian cooking usually in the form of borlotti beans in the north, cannellini beans in Tuscany and broad beans in the south. Although native to the Middle East, chickpeas have found their way into Italian cooking. Here they provide the perfect texture to these bean balls as well as the satisfying combination of fibre and protein. Nutritional yeast not only adds an umami kick but also acts as the perfect binder. Sun-dried tomatoes are one of my favourite foods and — in my opinion — heaven in a jar, thanks to their potently intense sweet-tart flavour which pairs beautifully with the fresh basil in these bites. I've added the bean

balls to a delightful tomato sauce slowly simmered to a rich consistency. I love to serve these piping hot on a bed of spaghetti, tossed in the vibrant tomato sauce with a handful of juicy olives and sprinkle of nutritional yeast. While a traditionalist might not approve, I also love to use courgette noodles in lieu of spaghetti for a lighter offering that’s perfect for a summer lunch. Alternatively, serve atop a leafy salad with a handful of olives and a generous drizzle of herby basil pesto. I tend to make a large batch of the rich tomato sauce to slather over a cauliflower pizza, toss with roasted vegetables and pasta or use as a quick dip along with pesto for crudités. I hope this recipe captures some of the vibrancy of Italian cooking and transports your tastebuds to a sun-drenched terrace. Best served al fresco!

MAY 2019

26/04/2019 5:29 p.m.


s

what’s for dinner? lighter Italian food

Vegan spaghetti and meatballs Serves 4

For the “meatballs”: 1 tbsp ground flax, whisked with 2 tbsp water 1 x 400g tin of chickpeas, well drained 15g sun-dried tomatoes, drained Small handful of fresh basil, chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 4 tbsp nutritional yeast 30g oats For the sauce: 1 white onion, finely diced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 x 400g tins of chopped tomatoes 30g sun-dried tomatoes, drained and roughly chopped 1 tsp coconut sugar (optional) 1 small bunch of basil, finely chopped 1 To make the meatballs, combine the flax and water in a small bowl and set aside for 5-10 minutes. 2 Place the chickpeas, sundried tomatoes, basil, garlic, nutritional yeast, oats and flax in a blender or food processor and blitz until well combined. If the mixture is too sticky, add more oats and blend again. Transfer to a large bowl and season to taste. 3 Refrigerate for 25 minutes to allow the mixture to firm up. 4 Preheat the oven to 170˚C/150˚C fan/gas mark 3 and line a baking tray with parchment paper. 5 For the sauce, heat a splash of oil in a pan over a medium heat and cook the onion and garlic in a little for 6-8 minutes until golden and soft. 6 Add the tinned tomatoes and sun-dried tomatoes along with the coconut sugar, if using. Reduce the heat and allow to simmer for 20-25 minutes. Stir in the basil and season to taste. 7 With damp hands, divide the meatball mixture into 16 even sized balls. 8 Heat a non-stick pan over a medium-high heat and brown the meatballs on all sides. Transfer to the prepared tray and bake for 10-12 minutes. 9 Serve the meatballs and sauce over spaghetti. Sprinkle with nutritional yeast and chopped basil. Per Serving 183kcals, 3.2g fat (0.4g saturated), 31.6g carbs (10.5g sugars), 31.6g protein, 9.3g fibre, 0.243g sodium

x www.easyfood.ie

EF139_062-063_Oh my goodness.indd 63

Easy Food 63

26/04/2019 5:29 p.m.


n o i t c e f r e p a t s a P to q ickk to so uic qu d n a so d le n ti a a rs le e ti v a rs ly e ss v le ly d ss EEn ndle p te a late n pla o a n o n ti o c n e o rf ti e c p e rf is e a p st is a p a , st re a a p , p re re a p prep

64 Easy Food

MAY 2019


what’s for dinner? pasta

r w you o n k o Get t

Ravioli

Tortellini Gnocchi

Bucatini Tagliatelle Canule

Spaghetti

Fricelli

Tortiglioni

Penne

Fusilli

Rigatoni Orecchiette

www.easyfood.ie

Farfalle

Ziti

Ditalini

Easy Food 65


Homemade lasagne Serves 6

For the ragù: 2 tbsp olive oil 900g beef mince 2 onions, finely chopped 1 courgette, finely chopped 1 large carrot, peeled and finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tsp dried oregano 2 tbsp plain flour 150ml beef stock 1 tsp sugar 3 tbsp tomato purée 2 x 400g tins of chopped tomatoes For the white sauce: 50g butter 50g plain flour 750ml hot milk 2 tsp Dijon mustard 60g mature white Cheddar, grated Salt and black pepper

66 Easy Food

For the lasagne: 12 lasagne sheets 40g Parmesan, grated To serve: Salad Garlic bread 1 For the ragù, heat the oil in a large pan over a medium-high heat. Add the mince, season with salt and pepper and cook for 6-8 minutes until no pink parts remain, breaking up any lumps with a wooden spoon. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the mince to a plate. Drain away all but one tablespoon of fat from the pan. 2 Add the onions, courgette and carrot and cook for 5-6 minutes until softened. Add the garlic and oregano and cook for one minute. 3 Return the mince to the pan and stir in the flour. Add the stock and bring to the boil. Add the sugar and tomato purée and stir to combine well. Stir in the tinned tomatoes. 4 Bring to the boil again, then cover and simmer over a low heat for one hour. 5 For the white sauce, melt the butter in a saucepan over a medium-high heat. Add the

flour and whisk for 1-2 minutes. Gradually whisk in the hot milk and keep whisking for 4-5 minutes until thickened. Stir in the mustard and Cheddar and season with salt and pepper. 6 To assemble the lasagne, soak the lasagne sheets in boiling water in a single layer for five minutes, then drain. 7 Spread one-third of the meat sauce over the base of a 22cm baking dish. Spoon one third of the white sauce on top. Arrange one layer of lasagne sheets on top. 8 Spoon half of the remaining meat sauce on top and then half of the white sauce. Put another layer of lasagne sheets on top, then the remaining meat sauce and remaining white sauce. Sprinkle over the Parmesan. 9 Preheat the oven to 200˚C/180˚C fan/gas mark 6. Bake the lasagne for 45 minutes or until golden brown and bubbling. Allow to rest for 5-10 minutes, then serve with salad and/or garlic bread. Per Serving 843kcals, 29.7g fat (12.6g saturated), 75.1g carbs (14.7g sugars), 67.9g protein, 3.9g fibre, 0.499g sodium

MAY 2019


what’s for dinner? pasta

Courgette and ricotta rigatoni Serves 4

60g pine nuts 2 tbsp olive oil 2 shallots, finely chopped 3 courgettes, halved and thinly sliced Pinch of dried chilli flakes (optional) Salt and black pepper 100g mushrooms 3 garlic cloves, crushed 320g rigatoni Handful of fresh basil, chopped Zest of 1 lemon 50g Parmesan (or vegetarian alternative), grated, plus extra to serve 250g ricotta 1 Place the pine nuts in a dry pan over a medium-low heat and toast lightly for 3-4 minutes until golden, watching them carefully to ensure they don’t burn. Set aside. 2 Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the shallots and courgettes and season with the chilli flakes (if using) and some

www.easyfood.ie

salt and black pepper. Cook for 6-8 minutes until softened and golden. Transfer to a plate using a slotted spoon. 3 Add the mushrooms, season and cook for 5-6 minutes until golden. Add the garlic and cook for two minutes longer. Return the courgette mixture to the pan. 4 Meanwhile, bring a large pan of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta to al dente according to package instructions. Drain well, reserving some of the cooking water. 5 Add the pasta to the vegetables along with the fresh basil, lemon zest and Parmesan. Stir in the ricotta and add a splash of the cooking water to loosen. 6 Divide amongst bowls and top with the toasted pine nuts and some extra Parmesan. Per Serving 586kcals, 22.7g fat (7.1g saturated), 72.1g carbs (6g sugars), 27.5g protein, 5.2g fibre, 0.254g sodium

Nicola Naessens says, “I cooked this dish for a quick family Saturday lunch. It’s a simple to follow recipe and quick to prepare — it only takes as long as it takes the pasta to cook. The lemon zest stands out and, while the chilli a es are o tional woul efinitely reco en a in them. My daughter and I — both vegetarian — really enjoyed this dish. My husband had it too, but wasn’t as keen! I will cook it for my daughter and me in the future.”

Easy Food 67


r e v o C

Cook the

Top Tip

awns sit in Letting the pr e of soda the bicarbonat utes before for a few min to keep cooking helps d juicy. an p um them pl

Spaghetti with prawns, garlic and chilli Serves 4

320g spaghetti 450g large raw prawns, peeled and deveined ½ tsp bicarbonate of soda Salt and black pepper 100g butter 2 tbsp olive oil 6 garlic cloves, crushed About 10 cherry tomatoes, halved Pinch of dried chilli flakes 30ml white wine Handful of fresh parsley, chopped Zest and juice of 1 large lemon, plus lemon wedges to serve 1 Bring a large pan of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta to al dente according to package instructions. Drain well, reserving some of the cooking water. 68 Easy Food

2 Meanwhile, place the prawns in a bowl and sprinkle over the bicarbonate of soda and half a teaspoon each of salt and black pepper. Mix to combine well. Set aside for 10 minutes. 3 Heat a knob of the butter with one tablespoon of oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Stir in one teaspoon of the crushed garlic and the breadcrumbs. Cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes until golden and slightly crisp. Remove from the pan and set aside. 4 Heat two teaspoons of olive oil in the pan. Cook the prawns for 4-5 minutes until pink and cooked through. Transfer to a plate and set aside. 5 In the same pan, add another teaspoon of oil and cook the cherry tomatoes for 2-3 minutes until blistered. 6 Add the remaining garlic and the chilli flakes and cook for one minute. Add the wine and allow

to bubble for 1-2 minutes until reduced. 7 Add 90ml of the pasta cooking water to the pan along with the wine and remaining butter. Add the pasta and cook for 1-2 minutes, tossing to melt the butter and coat the pasta. 8 Add the prawns along with the parsley, garlicky breadcrumbs, lemon juice and zest. 9 Turn off the heat and add more salt, pepper and/or chilli flakes to taste. Add a splash more cooking water if necessary to loosen. Serve with lemon wedges on the side.

Per Serving 520kcals, 19.5g fat (9.1g saturated), 48.7g carbs (0.5g sugars), 35.3g protein, 0.6.g fibre, 0.582g sodium

MAY 2019


cooking for fun GET CREATIVE IN THE KITCHEN WHEN YOU'VE GOT THE TIME TO SPARE

70-85

IN THIS SECTION

A TASTE OF ITALY, p70 Take your tastebuds on a tour of Italy's culinary landscape with these regional recipes

www.easyfood.ie

PICK A SIDE, p78

Meat-lovers' pizza or strictly vegetarian? Either way, your pizza night will be oh-so-good

LA DOLCE VITA, p80

You'll be living the good life with these Italian-inspired desserts

EAT IRELAND, p84

Recipe Editor Jocelyn Doyle heads to Wicklow for a fabulous farmhouse blue

Easy Food 69


A TASTE OF

Italy

Take your tastebuds on a tour of Italy’s culinary landscape with these regional recipes

70 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking cookingfor forfun fun| authentic Italian

SICILY

Arancini (stuffed rice balls) Makes around 12

For the rice: 800ml chicken or vegetable stock 250g Arborio rice ½ tsp salt Generous pinch of saffron 50g Parmesan (or vegetarian alternative), grated 150g fresh Mozzarella, chopped into small chunks For the filling (ragù alla siciliana): 3 tbsp olive oil 1 onion, finely chopped 1 carrot, finely chopped 1 small celery stalk, finely chopped 500g beef mince 200g tomato purée 300ml tomato passata 100ml chicken stock Salt and black pepper 120ml red wine 250g frozen peas For coating and cooking: 1 egg 170g plain flour Around 170ml water 500g dried breadcrumbs Vegetable oil, to cook 1 For the rice, bring the stock to the boil in a pan set over a high heat. Add the rice, salt and saffron. Bring back up to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer over a medium heat until the stock has been absorbed. 2 Stir in the Parmesan and season to taste, then set aside and allow to cool completely. 3 Heat the oil in a large pan or casserole dish over a medium heat. Cook the onion, carrot and celery for 10-12 minutes, stirring frequently, until very tender. 4 Add the beef and cook for 6-8 minutes until completely browned throughout and no pink parts remain, breaking up any lumps with a wooden spoon. 5 Add the tomato purée, passata and stock. 6 Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer gently for 20 minutes. 7 Stir in the frozen peas. Return to a simmer and cook for 3-4 minutes longer. Set aside and allow to cool completely.

www.easyfood.ie

8 To assemble the arancini, use wet hands to roll 2-3 tablespoonfuls of rice into a ball. Poke a hole in the middle and add a spoonful of ragù and a piece of Mozzarella. Cover with extra rice and firm together, sealing the filling inside. Repeat until all of the rice is used up. 9 Place the rice balls in the fridge and chill for one hour. 10 Beat together the egg and flour and add just enough water to make a thick batter. Season with salt and pepper. Pour the breadcrumbs into a shallow bowl. 11 Dip each rice ball into the batter to coat, then into the breadcrumbs, pressing them on gently until well coated. 12 In a deep pan or wok, heat 5-6cm of vegetable oil until a thermometer reads 170˚C, or until a breadcrumb sizzles when you drop it in. 13 Cook the arancini in batches until golden brown, making sure the oil comes back up to temperature between batches, and drain on kitchen towel. Sprinkle with a little salt while still warm and serve hot or cold. Per Serving 593kcals, 17.5g fat (4.6g saturated), 67.8g carbs (7.7g sugars), 37.5g protein, 5.2g fibre, 0.564g sodium

Top Tip

This recipe will make extra ragù, perfect for stirring through pasta another night.

FUN FACT In Palermo, these rice balls are considered to be feminine, so one is an arancina and two or more are arancine. In Catania, on the other side of the island of Sicily, they are thought to be masculine; one is un arancino, and the plural is arancini.

If you have leftover risotto (is there such a thing?), you can use this to make arancini

instead of cooking rice especially for them.

Easy Food 71


PUGLIA

Patate, riso e cozze (potato, rice and mussel bake)

Serves 4-6

680g potatoes, peeled and sliced 3mm thick 900g mussels, washed, scrubbed and debearded 120ml white wine 75ml extra-virgin olive oil 6 garlic cloves, crushed 1 onion, sliced 450g plum tomatoes, chopped Handful of fresh parsley, roughly chopped Salt and black pepper 550g Arborio rice Boiling water 30g Pecorino Romano, grated 1 Preheat the oven to 180ËšC/160ËšC fan/gas mark 4. Open all of the mussels. Remove and discard the top halves of the shells. Pour any juice released from the mussels into a jug and set aside. 2 In a large bowl, combine the wine, olive oil, garlic, onion, tomatoes and parsley. Season with salt and pepper, then stir to combine well. 3 Cover the bottom of a large, deep baking dish with a layer of the onion and tomato mixture. Layer over some sliced potatoes and place a layer of mussels over the potatoes. Spread half of the rice over everything. 4 Repeat another layer each of onions and tomatoes, potatoes, mussels and rice. Cover the top with the remaining potatoes and vegetables. 5 Drizzle over any reserved mussel juice and any liquid left in the vegetable bowl. Pour over the boiling water until it comes to just below the top layer of potatoes. Scatter over the cheese. 6 Cover with tin foil and bake for 50 minutes. Remove the foil and bake for an additional 10-12 minutes until the top is lightly golden, the potatoes are tender when pierced with a knife and the rice is al dente. 7 Place under a hot grill for 3-4 minutes until the top is a deep golden colour. Allow to rest for 20 minutes, then serve.

Per Serving 686kcals, 16.9g fat (3.6g saturated), 103.3g carbs (5.5g sugars), 28.6g protein, 4.1g fibre, 0.574g sodium

72 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking for fun authentic Italian

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 73


TRENTINE-ALTO ADIGE

Strangalopreti (spinach and cheese bread dumplings) Serves 4-6

1kg stale bread, torn 500ml milk, lukewarm 2 tbsp olive oil 500g spinach, roughly chopped Salt and black pepper Fresh nutmeg, grated 100g Grana Padano, grated 2 eggs To serve: 100g butter 4-5 fresh sage leaves 1 Place the bread in the lukewarm milk and set aside to soak for 2-3 hours. 2 Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium-high heat and cook the onion for 5-6 minutes until softened. Add the spinach and cook for another 4-5 minutes until wilted. Season with salt and pepper and a small grating of nutmeg. 3 Add the spinach and onion mixture to the bread. Add the Grana Padano and the eggs and mix well to combine.

74 Easy Food

4 Cut the dough in half and roll out into two long sausages around 2cm thick. Chop the sausages into pieces around 3cm in length and roll over the tines of a fork to decorate, if desired. 5 Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil over a high heat. Working in batches, add the strangalopreti and cook until they rise to the top. 6 Meanwhile, melt butter in a saucepan over a medium heat and add the sage. 7 Drain the strangalopreti and serve tossed with plenty of grated Grana and the hot sage butter. Per Serving 754kcals, 32.1g fat (15.6g saturated), 92.2g carbs (11.5g sugars), 25.4g protein, 6.2g fibre, 1.492g sodium

FUN FACT Strangalopreti means ‘priest stranglers’ and was traditionally served on Fridays, when the Catholic Church forbade the consumption of meat. Priests enjoyed this dish so much that it was said they would eat it until they choked!

MAY 2019


cooking for fun authentic Italian

TOP TIP: This stew will be at its best if you make it the day before you want to eat it!

LAZIO

Coda alla vaccinara (braised oxtail stew)

200ml red wine 1 x 400g tin of chopped tomatoes Beef stock, as needed ½ tsp cocoa powder

Serves 4-6

1½kg oxtail, chopped into 3-4cm pieces Salt and black pepper Plain flour, for dusting 20g lard, or olive oil 150g pancetta 1 onion, chopped 3 celery stalks, 1 chopped, 2 split lengthways then cut into thirds, leaves reserved for garnish 1 carrot, chopped 2 garlic cloves, crushed 1 cinnamon stick 2 bay leaves 3 sprigs of thyme 1 sprig of rosemary 1 tbsp tomato purée

www.easyfood.ie

To serve: Polenta Handful of raisins Handful of pine nuts 1 Season the oxtail pieces with salt and pepper, then dust with flour. Heat the lard or olive oil in a heavy pan over a medium-high heat and brown the oxtail pieces on all sides, working in batches to avoid crowding the pan. Transfer to a plate and set aside. 2 In the same pan over a medium heat, cook the pancetta, onion, chopped celery stalk, carrot and garlic for 4-5 minutes until soft. 3 Add the cinnamon, bay leaves, thyme, rosemary and tomato purée and cook for one minute, stirring. Pour in the red wine and allow

to bubble for 2-3 minutes, scraping up any sticky bits from the bottom using a wooden spoon. 4 Return the oxtail to the pan and let the wine reduce by half. Add the tinned tomatoes, remaining celery and enough beef stock to cover the oxtail. 5 Cover with a lid and simmer over a low heat for 3-4 hours until the meat is falling away from the bones. Check on it occasionally, adding more stock if necessary. 6 Season to taste with salt and pepper and stir in the cocoa powder. Discard the cinnamon, bay leaves and rosemary and thyme stalks. 7 Serve the oxtail stew over cooked polenta. Scatter with the raisins, pine nuts and the reserved celery leaves.

Per Serving 623kcals, 37.3g fat (13.8g saturated), 7.9g carbs (3.7g sugars), 57.2g protein, 1.8g fibre, 0.919g sodium

x

Easy Food 75


PIEMONTE

Torta alle nocciole (hazelnut cake) Serves 8

200g hazelnuts, shelled 150g plain flour 1 tbsp baking powder 125g butter 200g sugar 3 eggs 125ml whole milk 125ml strong coffee 1 tbsp olive oil 2 tbsp rum or hazelnut liqueur (optional) To serve: Hazelnuts, crushed 1 Preheat the oven to 200˚C/180˚C fan/gas mark 6. 2 Place the hazelnuts on a baking tray and toast in the centre of the oven for 8-10 minutes, shaking the pan halfway through, until golden brown. Watch them carefully so that they don’t burn. Set aside to cool for a few minutes.

76 Easy Food

3 Turn the oven temperature to 180°C/160˚C fan/ gas mark 4. Grease and flour a 26cm springform cake tin and set aside. 4 In a food processor, whizz the toasted hazelnuts until very fine. Stir together with the flour and baking powder. 5 Beat the butter and sugar together until smooth and creamy. Beat in the eggs one by one until well combined. Add to the dry ingredients and mix well. 6 Add the milk, coffee, olive oil and rum or hazelnut liqueur, if using, and mix until just combined. 7 Pour into the prepared cake tin. Bake for 35 minutes or until golden brown and springy. Allow to cool. Top with crushed hazelnuts and serve. Per Serving 481kcals, 32g fat (10.2g saturated), 45.2g carbs (27.1g sugars), 8.4g protein, 3g fibre, 0.122g sodium

MAY 2019


cooking for fun authentic Italian

EMILIA-ROMAGNA

Tortellini in brodo (stuffed pasta in broth) Serves 8

Knob of butter 1 sprig rosemary 1 garlic clove, lightly crushed 120g pork mince 50ml white wine 100g prosciutto, very finely chopped 100g mortadella, very finely chopped 150g Parmigiano Reggiano, grated 4 eggs 1 pinch of nutmeg 260g plain flour To cook and serve: Good-quality chicken or beef broth 1 Melt the butter in a pan over a medium heat

www.easyfood.ie

and add the rosemary and garlic. Cook the pork mince for 5-6 minutes until no pink parts remain, breaking up any lumps with a wooden spoon. 2 Add the white wine and allow to bubble and reduce. Discard the garlic and rosemary. 3 Transfer the pork mince into a bowl along with any liquid and stir together with the chopped

8 Dust the board and a rolling pin with flour. Roll out the dough into a very thin layer of pasta. (If you prefer, you can use a pasta maker instead of a rolling pin.) 9 Cut the sheets of dough into 2cm squares. Place a pea-sized piece of the meat filling in the centre of each square, then fold over to form a

prosciutto and mortadella. 4 Add the Parmigiano Reggiano, one egg and a pinch of nutmeg. Rub together with your hands until well combined. Cover and place in the fridge for at least six hours, or up to 24 hours. 5 For the pasta, place the flour on a large wooden board. Make a well in the centre of the flour. Crack in the remaining three eggs and beat lightly with a fork, incorporating the flour a little at time. 6 Knead for 10-12 minutes until smooth and uniform, adding a little more flour if necessary. 7 When the dough forms a smooth, elastic ball, wrap it in cling film and place into a bowl. Place in the fridge for 45 minutes before rolling.

triangle. Finally, roll up the triangle and join the angles creating the typical tortellino shape.While working, keep the pasta covered with a damp, clean towel to prevent it from drying out. 10 Bring a large pan of good quality chicken or beef broth to a boil and add the tortellini. Cook for 2-3 minutes until they rise to the surface. Serve in the hot stock.

Per Serving 369kcals, 15.5g fat (7.4g saturated), 36g carbs (0.7g sugars), 20.9g protein, 1.3g fibre, 0.868g sodium

Easy Food 77


Homemade pizza dough Makes 1 x 30cm pizza In a large bowl, combine 130g plain flour with 2 x 7g packet of instant yeast, 1½ tsp sugar and ¾ tsp salt. Add 2 tbsp olive oil and 180ml warm water and use a wooden spoon to stir together very well. Gradually add another 130g flour and bring together into a cohesive dough, adding extra flour if needed. Knead for 3-4 minutes. The dough will still be slightly sticky but still manageable. Drizzle a separate bowl with olive oil and rub around to coat the insides of the bowl. Lightly dust your hands with flour. Form the dough into a ball and transfer to the oiled bowl, turning to coat in the oil. Cover the bowl tightly with cling film and place it in a warm place. Allow the dough to rise for 30 minutes or until doubled in size. Preheat the oven to 220˚/200˚C/gas mark 7. Once the dough has risen, transfer to a lightly floured surface and knead for 3-4 minutes until smooth. Use your hands or a rolling pin to work the dough into a 30cm circle. Transfer to a pizza pan or baking tray lined with parchment paper. Drizzle with 1 tbsp olive oil and brush over the entire surface of the pizza. Use a fork to poke holes all over the centre of the pizza to keep the dough from bubbling up in the oven. Add your desired toppings and bake for 13-15 minutes or until golden brown and bubbling.

No-cook pizza sauce Makes enough for 6-8 pizzas In the bowl of a food processor, whizz 4 garlic cloves until coarsely chopped. Add 1 x 400g tin of tomatoes, 2 tbsp olive oil, 1 tsp balsamic vinegar, 1 tsp sugar, ¾ tsp salt and 1 tsp black pepper. Whizz until smooth. Refrigerate unused sauce for up to one week or freeze for up to three months.

k c i P e d i s a Meat lovers’ pizza or strictly vegetarian? Either way, your pizza night will be oh-so-good

78 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking for fun GET CREATIVE IN THE KITCHEN WHEN YOU'VE GOT THE TIME TO SPARE

70-85

IN THIS SECTION

A TASTE OF ITALY, p70 Take your tastebuds on a tour of Italy's culinary landscape with these regional recipes

www.easyfood.ie

PICK A SIDE, p78

Meat-lovers' pizza or strictly vegetarian? Either way, your pizza night will be oh-so-good

LA DOLCE VITA, p80

You'll be living the good life with these Italian-inspired desserts

EAT IRELAND, p84

Recipe Editor Jocelyn Doyle heads to Wicklow for a fabulous farmhouse blue

Easy Food 69


cooking for fun pizza

Meat lovers’ pizza Serves 2-3 1 tsp olive oil 2 rashers, chopped 1 x 3cm piece of spicy chorizo, removed from casing and chopped 120g beef mince ½ tsp dried oregano Salt and black pepper 1 chicken fillet, halved lengthwise 1 pizza base, homemade or shopbought 80-120ml pizza sauce 120g Mozzarella, grated, or 1 x 125g fresh Mozzarella, sliced 10 slices pepperoni To serve: Parmesan, grated (optional) Fresh basil, torn (optional) Dried chilli flakes (optional) 1 Heat the oil in a large pan over a medium heat. Add the chopped rashers and chorizo and cook for 2-3 minutes until very lightly golden. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a plate and set aside.

Veggie lovers’ pizza Makes 1 1 pizza base, homemade or shopbought 80-120ml pizza sauce 120g Mozzarella, grated, or 1 x 125g fresh Mozzarella, sliced 3 button mushrooms, sliced ¼ a small red onion, sliced 2 tbsp sweetcorn, drained ½ a green pepper, deseeded and sliced 6 cherry tomatoes, halved 4 black olives, sliced 40g tinned pineapple, drained (optional)

2 Add the beef mince and season with the oregano and some salt and pepper. Cook until completely browned through and no pink parts remain, breaking up any lumps with a wooden spoon. 3 Bring a pan of salted water to a gentle simmer and add the chicken fillet. Poach gently for 8-10 minutes or until completely cooked throughout. Remove to a board and shred using two forks. 4 Spread a pizza base with sauce and then top with Mozzarella. Add the beef, the bacon and chorizo mixture, the shredded chicken and the pepperoni. 5 Sprinkle with grated Parmesan, torn fresh basil and/or dried chilli flakes to taste. 6 Preheat the oven and bake the pizza according to instructions until golden brown and bubbling. Per 1/3 pizza (with our homemade base and sauce) 738kcals, 33.3g carbs (7.7g saturated), 70.5g carbs (3.1g sugars), 37.6g protein, 2.9g fibre, 1.09g sodium

1 Spread a pizza base with sauce and then top with Mozzarella. 2 Add the mushrooms, red onion, sweetcorn, green pepper, cherry tomatoes, black olives and pineapple, if you like it. 3 Sprinkle with grated Parmesan, torn fresh basil and/or dried chilli flakes to taste. 4 Preheat the oven and bake the pizza according to instructions until golden brown and bubbling. Per 1/3 pizza (with our homemade base and sauce) 483kcals, 15.8g carbs (2.3g saturated), 75.6g carbs (5g sugars), 10.7g protein, 4g fibre, 0.641g sodium

To serve: Parmesan, grated (optional) Fresh basil, torn (optional) Dried chilli flakes (optional)

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_078-079_pick a side.indd 79

Easy Food 79

26/04/2019 5:31 p.m.


La dolce vita Live the good life with these Italian-inspired desserts

80 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking for fun desserts cooking for Italian fun | chocolate

Espresso martini trifles Serves 4

200ml strong black coffee 1 tsp brown sugar 1 tbsp vodka 4 tbsp coffee liqueur 250g mascarpone 300ml double cream 2 tbsp icing sugar ½ tbsp vanilla extract 1 tsp instant espresso coffee powder 150g sponge fingers 30g dark chocolate Cocoa powder, for dusting

www.easyfood.ie

1 Mix the black coffee, brown sugar, vodka and three tablespoons of the coffee liqueur in a shallow bowl. 2 Mix the mascarpone in a separate bowl for two minutes, then beat in the double cream, icing sugar and vanilla until it forms soft peaks. 3 Spoon out one-third of the cream into another bowl. Mix the coffee powder with the rest of the liqueur and stir in to make a coffee cream. 4 Dip the sponge fingers into the vodkacoffee mixture, then arrange into trifle or martini glasses, breaking to fit if needed. 5 Spoon over some plain cream, then finely

grate over a generous layer of dark chocolate. Layer on more soaked sponge fingers, then spoon over the coffee cream and another layer of grated chocolate. 6 Chill for at least two hours until ready to serve. Dust with cocoa powder to finish. Per Serving 577kcals, 37.5g fat (22.8g saturated), 43.2g carbs (9.2g sugars), 11.3g protein, 0.4g fibre, 0.084g sodium

Easy Easy Food Food B81


Biscotti and Nutella semifreddo Serves 8

5 biscotti, roughly crushed 600ml double cream 125g dark chocolate, broken into chunks 100g Nutella 3 egg whites 100g caster sugar 100g hazelnuts 1 Line a 900g loaf tin with baking paper. Add two of the crumbled biscotti into the bottom of the tin, distributing evenly. 2 Put half of the cream in a pan and gently bring to a simmer. Meanwhile, put the chocolate and Nutella in a bowl. 3 When the cream is just simmering, pour over

82 Easy Food

the chocolate and Nutella and leave it to melt, stirring occasionally. Set aside and allow to cool to room temperature. 4 Beat the egg whites in a clean mixing bowl until stiff, then add the sugar and beat again until you have a thick, shiny meringue. 5 Whisk the remaining cream to stiff peaks. Gently fold the whipped egg whites and cream into the chocolate, followed by the hazelnuts and remaining biscotti chunks. 6 Carefully transfer the mixture into the loaf tin. Cover with cling film and place in the freezer for at least five hours, or overnight if possible. 7 Remove from the freezer and leave to sit for 15 minutes before slicing to serve. Per Serving 602kcals, 46g fat (25.5g saturated), 42.6g carbs (32.4g sugars), 7.9g protein, 2.4g fibre, 0.099g sodium

MAY 2019


cooking for Italian fun | chocolate cooking for fun desserts

Homemade cannoli Makes 14

For the filling: 400g ricotta, drained if necessary 100g sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 tsp orange zest 30g dark chocolate, grated For the shells: 150g plain flour 1 tsp baking powder 30g butter, softened 2 tbsp sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract 3 tbsp white wine 1 egg, lightly beaten, plus 1 for brushing

www.easyfood.ie

Vegetable oil, for frying Icing sugar 1 In a bowl, combine all the ingredients for the cannoli filling. Cover and refrigerate until just before serving. 2 Combine the flour and baking powder for the shells in a bowl. In another bowl, work the butter, sugar and vanilla together with a wooden spoon for about two minutes. Add the wine and egg. Mix well. 3 Using a wooden spoon, mix in the dry ingredients. Mix until the dough forms a ball. Knead the dough on a floured surface for about five minutes. 4 Preheat the oil in the deep fryer to 190°C. Line a baking tray with kitchen paper. 5 On a floured surface, roll the dough into a

sheet about 3mm thick. Cut into 8cm squares. 6 Lay the metal handle of a whisk diagonally across a dough square. Pull one corner of the dough square over the tube, brush with egg, and pull a second corner over the tube, overlapping the first and pressing to seal. 7 Fry each shell, still on the whisk handle, for about two minutes. Drain on the baking tray. Repeat with the remaining dough. Let cool completely before removing the tube. 8 Using a pastry bag fitted with a large nozzle, pipe the filling into the shells. Dust with icing sugar just before serving. Per Serving 196kcals, 11.2g fat (4g saturated), 18.6g carbs (8.8g sugars), 4.8g protein, 0.3g fibre, 0.053g sodium

Easy Food 83


EAT Ireland Recipe Editor Jocelyn Doyle heads to Wicklow for a fabulous farmhouse blue

As an island of dairy lovers, it’s strange to think that Ireland’s farmhouse cheese industry only came to life in the late ‘70s with Veronica Steele and her Milleens. That washed-rind cheese changed everything and, one by one, new, inventive, carefully handmade creations began to appear: hard cheeses, soft cheeses, funky washed rinds, aged Gouda-style options, earthy, sweet Cheddars, tangy goat’s logs, creamy blues. One type of cheese that had been over-looked, however, was the traditional Brie-style bloomy rind, for which our rich Irish milk was ideal. John Hempenstall noticed this dearth when he started out as a cheesemaker in 2003. Already a dairy farmer, “I trained in Moorepark [the Teagasc food research centre in Fermoy, Co. Cork],” he says, “where I learned how to make cheese.” John originally started the business to provide more opportunities for his family and become more sustainable. His eye for the gap in the Irish cheese market helped him achieve this goal, and today John employs three family members and a number of local people to help expand the dairy herd and the business for the next generation, “which makes all of my efforts worthwhile.”

All of the milk used in Wicklow Farmhouse Cheese comes from John’s own herd of Holstein Friesian cows on the 170-acre farm, and — like all artisan cheesemaking — it’s a heavy duty, hands-on job. John wakes very early and checks his emails before heading to the farm to check on all of his cows and calves. “Then I open up the factory, start up the boilers and set up the pasteurisers,” he says.

“Once the staff arrives, we start pasteurising and I pump milk into the cheese vats. I then get into my production clothes, go into the factory and start adding cultures to the cheese vats. By lunchtime, the cheese is made, so I head back into the office to catch up

on paperwork and emails. I normally go onto the farm for the rest of the evening and finish up around 7pm, although at this time of year I’m also on duty throughout the night for calving!” The cheeses are handmade in small batches in order to maintain a high level of quality. Because the dairy is on the farm itself, there are no food miles involved in turning the milk into cheese. This, in part, is why the company is a member of Origin Green and aims to be an accredited Sustainable Dairy Assurance Scheme member by July 2020. “We’re also presently working to reduce our water usage and our carbon footprints,” says John. So what are the finished cheeses actually like? John maintains that the farm’s close proximity to the sea provides unique flavour to the lush grasses there and, as a result, the milk produced. “The Bries are mild, creamy and distinctive, with an aroma of mushroom. Our Cheddars are sweet, similar in flavour to a Swiss cheese, and are deliciously creamy and aromatic,” he tells me. In 2018 alone, Wicklow Bán won the title of Best Irish Cheese at the Global Cheese Awards, while Wicklow Blue brought a Silver Awards home from the World Cheese Awards. John’s favourite way to enjoy his cheese is with some good old-fashioned crackers, grapes and a glass of wine, although he says the Beechwood Smoked is best with pork or beef and a cold cider, and they all make great breakfast cheeses. When he mentions their good melting properties, I immediately start planning to bake a Wicklow Blue Brie, my favourite in the range.

Wicklow Farmhouse Cheese produces three Brie-style cheeses: Wicklow Blue Brie, the double cream Wicklow Bán Brie and St. Kevin, a brick-shaped Brie produced with foodservice industry convenience in mind. John also makes five varieties of Wicklow Gold Cheddar: plain, nettle and chive, basil and garlic, tomato and herb and Beechwood Smoked, which is cold smoked over beechwood chips.

84 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking for fun local food

I know many people are wary of blue cheese, but the Wicklow Blue is a great place to start for any blue-vein virgins who already enjoy cheeses like Brie and Camembert. Mild and buttery with a soft, vaguely mushroomy rind, its high cream content relegates the typical deep blue flavours to a supporting role. Baking the Blue results in a gorgeously rich treat, and we pulled no punches here, achieving real decadence by dolloping the oozy beauty over steaks and adding some caramelised onions — a combination which, incidentally, would make the most amazing steak sandwich. A baked Wicklow Blue would also be fabulous with just some crusty baguette (hello, girls’ night in), or stirred through pasta for a truly indulgent dinner. It seems sheer madness to think that the artisan cheese industry is still in its relative infancy, considering it has found a home so welcome at the heart of our native food; I like to think of it sitting at the right hand of butter, long-ruling queen of the pantheon of Irish dairy. We’re lucky to have a wonderfully wide-ranging variety of worldclasses cheeses available to us these days, thanks to the hard work and clever vision of producers like John Hempenstall and his team. Long may it last.

www.easyfood.ie

Wicklow Blue fillet steaks with caramelised onions Serves 2 For the onions 1 tbsp olive oil 30g butter, plus extra for greasing 2 onions, sliced 2 tsp balsamic vinegar Salt and black pepper 1 tsp brown sugar 1 tsp fresh thyme leaves For the steaks: 2 x 170g fillet steaks 1 x 150g Wicklow Blue, split horizontally 2 tsp white wine To serve: Crusty bread (optional) Mixed leaves with vinaigrette 1 Heat the oil and butter together in a heavy-based pan over a medium-low heat. Add the onions and balsamic, season with salt and black pepper and sprinkle over the sugar and thyme. 2 Turn the heat to low and cook for 40-45 minutes until deep brown and

sticky, stirring occasionally and adding a splash of water if the onions start to stick to the pan. 3 Preheat the oven to 180˚C/160˚C fan/ gas mark 4. 4 Meanwhile, season the steaks with salt and pepper. Heat a heavy-based pan over a high heat and cook the steaks for 4-5 minutes per side or until cooked to your liking. Transfer to a plate, tent loosely with foil and set aside to rest for 10 minutes. 5 Grease two small ovenproof baking dishes or ramekins with butter and add the Wicklow Blue, cut side up. Add a splash of wine to each. Bake for around eight minutes until melted and bubbling. 6 Stir any juices that have been released from the steaks into the onions. 7 Place the steaks on serving plates, add a generous spoonful of the caramelised onions and then scoop one portion of baked Wicklow Blue on top of each steak. Serve with crusty bread and some mixed leaves dressed with vinaigrette. Per Serving 897kcals, 66.8g fat (33.8g saturated), 12.6g carbs (6.6g sugars), 59.5g protein, 2.6g fibre, 0.803g sodium

Easy Food 85


Want fresh recipe ideas straight to your inbox? Get inspired with the Easy Food Newsletter! • Seasonal recipes chosen just for you • Cooking for kids • Step-by-step videos • Expert kitchen tips

Sign up at www.easyfood.ie

EF139_ADS.indd 86 easyfood_NL_pressad_2018.indd 98

26/04/2019 5:45 p.m. 30/07/2018 15:33


kids' kitchen 88-92

A GO-TO GUIDE FOR BUDDING YOUNG COOKS

IN THIS SECTION

COOK THE SEASON, p88

This month's Home Ec expert shares reasons to cook for the seasons

www.easyfood.ie

EASY JUNIORS, p91 You can make this cool, fruity treat in under five minutes!

Easy Food 87


COOK THE

n o s sea Heather Brady from St. Angela’s College, Sligo, shares reasons to cook for the seasons

Strawberry coulis Serves 6 2 tbsp water 1 heaped tbsp caster sugar 300g strawberries, de-stemmed and halved 1 tsp vanilla paste (optional) 1 Bring the water and sugar to the boil, stirring to dissolve. 2 Add the strawberries and vanilla (if using) and cook for 4-5 minutes, or until soft. 3 PurĂŠe the mixture until smooth. Serve with ice cream or pancakes. Store in the fridge for up to two days. Per Serving 29kcals, 0.2g fat (0g saturated), 7.3g carbs (6g sugars), 0.3g protein, 1g fibre, 0.001g sodium

x 88 Easy Food

MAY 2019


kids’ kitchen home ec

T

oday, due to importation and food processing, most foods are readily available year-round. Our supermarket shelves, therefore, are not necessarily an indication of what is in season. With such a variety of foods to purchase from, one may wonder why it is necessary to consider the season. However, as responsible consumers, we ought to make informed choices when it comes to our food. Choosing to consume local seasonal produce is a great start — and more seasonal produce is certainly better than none!

Taste and texture Fresh seasonal produce has superior flavour and texture to foods that have been imported and thus subjected to delayed distribution and deterioration.

Nutritional content As flavour and texture deteriorates over time, so too does the nutritional value of foods. Fresh fruits and vegetables are bursting with vitamins and minerals but, when grown in artificial environments, highly processed or preserved, the nutritional content of fruit and vegetables is compromised.

Health implications Atmospheric packaging involves the use of preservative gases to prevent potential spoilage. This prolongs the natural state of the food, but in a less than natural manner. Similarly, artificial sprays can also be used to delay food ripening or deter pests. Like all artificial additives, these chemicals can become toxic to the body in large amounts. By choosing organic produce, where possibly, you can eliminate the presence of these chemicals in the food chain. Similarly, by consuming locally grown produce that is in season, the need for such chemical intervention will ultimately be reduced.

future generations. The transportation, refrigeration and storage of imported foods result in a significant carbon footprint. Furthermore, the longer foods spend in transit, the higher the probability of them spoiling and becoming waste. This potential waste is in addition to the packaging generated from such distribution. The use of pesticides, artificial fertilisers and genetic modification also have an impact on our biodiversity and environment. By purchasing seasonal produce, we can help to stimulate natural biodiversity.

Value for money When foods are naturally plentiful, they are more affordable to buy or even on offer. When manufacturers spend money on genetic modification, processing or artificial production measures, this cost is passed on to the consumer.

Cream of pea and asparagus soup Serves 4 3 tbsp olive oil 2 onions, finely diced 1 garlic clove, crushed 1l chicken stock 500g frozen petit pois, or freshly shelled peas 500g asparagus, trimmed and chopped 200ml double cream Salt and black pepper 3 tbsp chives, chopped 1 Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat. Gently cook the onions and garlic for 10 minutes, or until soft and golden. 2 Add the stock and bring to the boil. Add the peas and, as soon as they come back to the boil, add the asparagus. 3 Return to a simmer, then cover with a lid and cook for 20 minutes or until the asparagus is very soft. 4 Whizz until smooth using a hand blender, or transfer to a blender and purĂŠe in batches. 5 Strain through a sieve, if desired, then return to the pan. Stir in half of the cream and season to taste. 6 To serve, mix the chives into the remaining cream and swirl into each bowl of soup. Per Serving 408kcals, 31.2g fat (13.7g saturated), 23.8g carbs (8.8g sugars), 12.6g protein, 10.8g fibre, 0.87g sodium

The local economy Spending money on locally sourced produce supports local farmers and smaller agri-businesses.

Sustainability Every individual has the responsibility of ensuring that our actions today do not negatively affect the needs of

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 89


CHECK OUT THE BRAND NEW

.IE

Want all this straight to your inbox? Sign up to our weekly newsletter!

• TRIED AND TESTED RECIPES • COOK-ALONG VIDEOS • • TIPS FROM OUR TEST KITCHEN • FOOD NEWS • COMPETITIONS •

EF139_ADS.indd 90

26/04/2019 5:45 p.m.


kids’ kitchen frozen yoghurt

Easy Food j un iors

You can make this cool, fruity treat in under five minutes!

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 91


Easy Food j un iors

t Cut ou ep! e k d an

:-)

Instant strawberry frozen yoghurt Serves 4 ½ a lime 600g frozen strawberries 3 tbsp honey 140g plain Greek yoghurt 30ml orange juice

1 Assemble your ingredients. Squeeze the juice out of the lime. 2 Pour the lime juice into a blender. Add the rest of the ingredients. whizz until smooth. 3 Whizz everything together until smooth. 4 Divide into bowls and enjoy immediately!

Per Serving 143kcals, 4g fat (2.2g saturated), 26.7g carbs (22.3g sugars), 2.4g protein, 3.1g fibre, 0.002g sodium

MAKE IT YOURS: Use a mixture of different frozen berries if you prefer.

92 Easy Food

MAY 2019


make it healthy! GIVE YOUR BODY THE LOVE IT DESERVES

94-117

IN THIS SECTION

GOING GLAMOUR COELIAC-SAFE GLUTEN-FREE 10 FACTS GLUTEN-FREE, SANS GLUTEN, STAYCATIONS, & FABULOUS, ABOUT p94 p106 COELIAC p96 p104 Our top tips for Throwing a gluten- The best gluten-free You won't miss DISEASE, p114 making your transition to a gluten-free diet

www.easyfood.ie

free dinner party has getaways around never been more our emerald isle delicious

the gluten in these delicious creations

Nutritionist Sarah Keogh fills in the facts

DON'T CUT THE CARBS, p116

We explain why carbs are important and look at GF options

Easy Food 93


Going Gluten-free Our top tips for making your transition to a gluten-free diet as smooth as possible

94 Easy Food

MAY 2019


make it healthy going gluten-free

Be patient

Adapting to a completely gluten-free diet can feel overwhelming and many people may experience a form of grief. Don’t expect the transition to be without its challenges, but things will get easier as you learn more and gain confidence in your choices.

Focus on the positives

Concentrate on what you can eat, not on what you can’t. Remember that most healthy foods are gluten-free, including meat, fish, poultry, potatoes, rice, beans, eggs, vegetables, corn, fruits, rice, nuts and legumes. Plain fruit juices, milk, coffee, tea, wine and distilled alcoholic beverages are also free from gluten.

Don’t cheat

You may be very tempted to cheat on your gluten-free diet. If you have coeliac disease, it is crucial that you resist. Damage is done to your gut every single time you ingest gluten.

Make connections

Get in touch with the Coeliac Society of Ireland and/or another support group. Not only will you find it helpful to talk to other people who understand what you’re going through, but such groups can also be a wealth of information on things like shopping, cooking and eating out.

www.easyfood.ie

Gather information

Learn everything you can about the glutenfree diet, choosing reputable sources such as the Coeliac Society of Ireland; there is a lot of conflicting information out there.

Adapt your cooking

Learn some new, specifically gluten-free recipes. As you become more used to coeliac-friendly cooking, you can work on converting your old favourites to work without gluten.

Grow supermarket savvy

At first, shopping trips will take much longer than they used to, as you’ll have to read every label every time and you won’t be familiar with many of the ingredients. This will become second nature after a time. Focus on the fruit, vegetable, meat, fish and dairy aisles, where practically everything will be gluten-free.

Become a label expert

Learn your label language and how to identify hidden gluten. Label reading may seem overwhelming, but will become much easier with practice.

Vary your diet

Simply eating the same meals over and over again may seem like the easiest option, but a varied diet is crucial for good health.

Choose whole grains

Whole grains are a crucial part of a healthy gluten-free diet, including rice, buckwheat, quinoa, sorghum, amaranth, teff and millet. Whole grains are rich in fibre, antioxidants, important minerals such as calcium, magnesium and selenium, and vitamins including B6, E and niacin.

Be clear about calcium

Eat plenty of calcium-rich food, as calcium is one of the main nutrients robbed from the body by coeliac disease. Insufficient intake of calcium can lead to long-term health problems, such as osteoporosis.

Learn how to eat out

When dining out, clearly explain your dietary needs to the server, manager or chef. An increasing number of restaurants now have gluten-free menus, but it’s always important to emphasise that you have coeliac disease and that eating gluten-free is more than a lifestyle choice.

Plan appropriately

Many meals are naturally gluten-free. Plan meals around fish or meat, vegetables and potatoes or rice for an option that doesn’t involve too much thought.

Easy Food 95


GLAMOUR SANS GLUTEN

Throwing a gluten-free dinner party has never been more delicious…

96 Easy Food

MAY 2019


make it healthy gluten-free dinner party

GLUTEN-FREE RED ONION TARTE TATIN Serves 4-6 50g butter 2 red onions, peeled and sliced 2 tbsp honey 2 tbsp balsamic vinegar 80g goat’s cheese, crumbled 1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves Salt and black pepper Gluten-free plain flour, for dusting 250g ready rolled gluten-free puff pastry To serve: Rocket Parmesan, shaved

www.easyfood.ie

1 Preheat the oven to 180˚C/160˚C/gas mark 4. Melt the butter in a 20cm ovenproof pan over a medium heat. Cook the onion slices for 5-6 minutes until just beginning to brown, using tongs to turn them occasionally. 2 Add the honey and balsamic and cook for 4-5 minutes longer, shaking the pan occasionally so the onions don’t stick. 3 Arrange the onions neatly in the bottom of the pan, remembering that this will be the top of the tart. Scatter over the goat’s cheese and thyme and season well. Set aside to cool. 4 Dust the work surface lightly with glutenfree flour. Roll out the pastry on to a lightly floured surface and cut into a circle a little larger than the 20cm diameter of the pan. 5 Lift the pastry over the onions, tucking it

down into the sides of the pan. Use the tip of a knife to poke 2-3 small steam holes. 6 Bake for 20-25 minutes or until the pastry is risen and golden. Allow to stand for five minutes before removing the tart. 7 Cover the pan with a serving plate and, moving smoothly and carefully, invert the pan. Lift away the pan, leaving the tart on the plate. Serve warm or cold with some rocket and shaved Parmesan. Per Serving 402kcals, 27.5g fat (11.6g saturated), 32g carbs (9.5g sugars), 8.1g protein, 2.4g fibre, 0.229g sodium

Easy Food 97


98 Easy Food

MAY 2019


make it healthy gluten-free dinner party

SLOW ROAST ROSEMARY PORK BELLY WITH CELERIAC AND APPLE MASH Serves 4-6 1½kg pork belly, skin scored 3 rosemary sprigs, leaves stripped 2 tsp sea salt 8 black peppercorns For the mash: 750g celeriac, peeled and chopped 1 large potato, peeled and chopped 2 apples, peeled, cored and chopped 50ml cream 40g butter To serve: Green vegetables www.easyfood.ie

EF139_096-100_GF dinner party.indd 99

1 Preheat the oven to 220˚C/200˚C fan/gas mark 7. Take the pork out of the fridge and pat the skin dry with kitchen paper. 2 Use a sharp knife to score the skin of the pork in a criss-cross pattern, being careful not to cut into the meat. 3 Use a pestle and mortar to grind together the rosemary leaves, salt and pepper. Place the pork on a rack inside a large roasting tin and rub all over with the rosemary mixture, making sure it gets into the cuts in the skin. 4 Roast the pork for 30 minutes, then reduce the heat to 170˚C/150˚C fan/gas mark 3 and cook for another 1½ hours. 5 Turn the heat back up to 220˚C/200˚C fan/gas mark 7. Cook for another 20 minutes until the skin has crisped up. 6 Transfer to a plate, tent loosely with foil and allow to rest for 15 minutes.

7 A few minutes before the pork comes out of the oven, place the celeriac and potato in a large pan and cover with water. Bring to the boil and cook for 10 minutes until just tender. Add the apples and cook for three minutes longer until everything is very soft. Drain well, then mash until smooth. 8 Beat in the cream, butter and some salt and pepper to taste. Serve the mash with the pork and some green vegetables. Per Serving 768kcals, 50.1g fat (19.8g saturated), 39.2g carbs (10.4g sugars), 42.4g protein, 5.6g fibre, 1.517g sodium

Easy Food 99

29/04/2019 5:14 p.m.


COFFEE PANNA COTTA Serves 6 For the panna cotta: 2 gelatine leaves 100ml strong black coffee or espresso 100ml whole milk 300ml double cream 80g soft light brown sugar 1 tsp vanilla extract For the coffee syrup: 100ml strong black coffee or espresso 100g caster sugar 20ml Tia Maria 1 Soak the gelatine in a bowl of cold water for 30 minutes. 2 In a bowl, combine the coffee, milk and cream. Pour about a quarter of this liquid into a pan and place over a low heat. 100 Easy Food

3 Add the sugar and stir until dissolved. Remove the pan from the heat. 4 Squeeze out the gelatine sheets and add to the pan. Stir until dissolved. 5 Pour the warmed liquid through a sieve back into the remaining coffee, milk and cream mixture. Stir in the vanilla extract. 6 Divide the panna cotta mixture amongst six small serving glasses or bowls. Chill in the fridge for at least four hours, or preferably overnight. 7 In a pan, simmer the coffee and sugar together over a medium heat until the sugar has dissolved and the coffee has thickened. 8 Stir in the Tia Maria, then remove from the heat and allow to cool. 9 Just before serving, pour a little of the coffee syrup over each panna cotta. Per Serving 313kcals, 19.3g fat (12g saturated), 33.3g carbs (31.9g sugars), 1.6g protein, 0g fibre, 0.035g sodium

MAY 2019


Gluten Free, Same Fresh Pizzeria Taste

Now everyone can enjoy the Fresh Pizzeria Taste with Dr. Oetker Ristorante. We use only the finest quality ingredients to create generous, mouth-watering toppings, now available on a deliciously thin & crispy Gluten Free base. Choose from two irresistible flavours: Pizza Mozzarella and Pizza Salame. Discover the Fresh Pizzeria Taste in the freezer aisle today.

Find me in the Freezer Aisle


THESE TIPS WILL ENSURE YOUR GLUTEN-FREE DINNER PARTY RUNS SMOOTHLY. Focus on what’s naturally gluten-free, like meat, fish, potatoes, vegetables, fruits, fresh herbs and dairy. Working with gluten-free whole foods like these is the most straightforward way to make a coeliac-friendly dinner. Familiarise yourself with the gluten-free options out there before you start planning your menu. There are more gluten-free versions of breads, pastry, sausages, puddings and many other foods than ever before. Always read labels. There can be hidden gluten in things you would never expect. Some of the most surprising culprits include flavouring extracts, cooking oil sprays and even some types of chocolate chips and sprinkles. Use cornflour or arrowroot starch to thicken gravies; these can actually be better thickeners than many wheat-based flours anyway, as they tend to be less lumpy. You don’t have to avoid stuffing — simply make your own breadcrumbs by whizzing up your favourite gluten-free bread. Make sure to check that any beer, liqueurs or fizzy drinks you’re buying are gluten-free. Wine and sparkling wine are naturally coeliac-friendly, as are most distilled spirits. If dinner is served buffet-style, coeliac diners shouldn’t hesitate to go first, before the possibility that serving spoons are transferred from one dish to another and contaminated with gluten.

102 Easy Food

MAY 2019


EF134_49_Nairns Ad.indd 74

21/09/2018 12:55 p.m.


Coeliac-safe staycations Travel writer Thomas Breathnach finds the best glutenfree getaways around our emerald isle Forget the years of B.Y.O.B. (bring your own bread!) — Ireland’s hospitality sector has today become a world leader when it comes to accommodating gluten-free travellers. But who does it best? From charming B&Bs to opulent five-star retreats, here are the properties to consider for your dream glutenfree getaway.

Harvey’s Point, Donegal Known for its warm Donegal welcome, Harvey’s Point on the shores of Lough Eske extends a céad míle fáilte to their gluten-free guests. The restaurant’s fine dining lakeside restaurant offers numerous coeliac-friendly triumphs, while their kitchen has thankfully embraced the movement too, with all sauces, gravies, soups and chowders blissfully gluten-free. Come morning, ramble down for breakfast where every final touch is considered, from gluten-free bread and scones to a specially designated toaster. www.harveyspoint.com

104 Easy Food

pastries as well as coeliac-friendly sausages and puddings. Staying for dinner? The restaurant’s Wild Atlantic Way menu features sublime gluten-free options from Kerry beef fillet with porcini mushrooms to halibut with black bacon. Divine! www.muckrosspark.com Coolanowle Country House, Laois Nowadays, travel trends are leaning towards lesser-visited locations with few tourists and even fewer Instagrammers. That’s why the bucolic beauty of Laois makes for such an attractive retreat. The rustic manor of Coolanowle is just one of the many stellar country houses in the county, but what really sets it apart are its gluten-free credentials. It helps that it’s set upon a glorious organic farm producing a bounty of coeliac-friendly food from glutenfree soda bread to sausages. Expect to leave feeling highly satisfied. www.coolanowle.com

Muckross Park Hotel, Killarney Set in the switch-off surrounds of Killarney National Park, the luxury Muckross Park Hotel offers a gluten-free foodie refuge with a certain Downton Abbey flair. The ceremonious breakfast still ranks as the best I’ve had in Ireland, with tiers of gluten-free breads, scones and

The Adelphi, North Antrim Located in Portrush along the spectacular Causeway Coastal Route, the boutique Adelphi hotel is well worth the road trip north. Park up alongside its Victorian seaside townhouse façade and you’re quickly lulled into getaway mode — and the menus help, too! The Adelphi’s on-site bistro tempts with garlic ciabatta, chicken goujons and freshly battered cod and chips (yes, all gluten-free), while the kitchen also offers gluten-free breads, baps and pitta pockets. They freshly bake their own soda breads, pancakes and muffins, too. www.adelphiportrush.com

MAY 2019


make it healthy gluten-free staycations

Faithlegg House Hotel, Waterford It’s always a good sign when you’re staying in a four-star hotel wondering if it’s a five-star. That’s the feeling you have at Faithlegg House, the recently made-over manor hotel located along a stunning stretch of countryside on Waterford’s Suir Valley. At night, you can hit the eiderdown in affordable period rooms — and why not treat yourself to a delicious gluten-free breakfast in bed? www.faithlegg.com

The Olde Post Inn, Cavan Some hotels cater to gluten-free diets due to fads, trends or public demand. But for The Olde Post Inn in County Cavan, there’s more of a personal story behind the menu. Owner and head chef Gearóid Lynch is himself a coeliac, and he has created a gluten-free dining heaven in Ireland’s hidden heartlands. If you’re inspired by the delicious fare, you can even enrol in one of his cooking courses. www.theoldepostinn.com

Garryvoe Hotel, East Cork East Cork seems to be challenging West Cork as the nation’s foodie capital of late. It’s the home of Ballymaloe House, Ballycotton Seafood, Jameson whiskey and Castlemartyr Resort. Bedding down doesn’t have to cost a fortune: Garryvoe Hotel — a freshly refurbished four-star overlooking the Celtic Sea — offers excellent value, particularly for an off-season spring break. At breakfast, the panoramic Samphire restaurant has a designated gluten-free zone, too. www.garryvoehotel.com

The Twelve, Galway Looking for a gluten-free getaway with a side of romance? The Twelve in Galway, voted Ireland’s best hotel in 2018, is full of swipe-left appeal. Known for its gluten-free hospitality, the hotel features its own fine-dining West Restaurant, the bustling Pins Gastro Bar and its acclaimed pizzeria Dozzina’s, which tempts with glutenfree pizzas. Buonissima! Plus, if you fancy bringing your dog along, the hotel is pet-friendly, too. www.thetwelvehotel.ie

The Shelbourne, Dublin Looking to tick off your accommodation bucket list this year? Alongside the likes of Ashford Castle and Adare Manor, The Shelbourne is one of Ireland’s most iconic five-star properties. It does come at a price, but the hotel’s fine dining is worth the indulgence if budget allows. If staying overnight isn’t on the cards, the hotel’s glutenfree afternoon tea served in the chandelier-lit Lord Mayor’s lounge is a masterclass in baking! www.theshelbourne.ie

www.easyfood.ie

EF139_0104-105_GF travel.indd 105

Easy Food 105

26/04/2019 5:33 p.m.


GL UT E N - F R E E

& fabulous You won’t miss the gluten in these delicious creations

106 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking for fun gluten-free baking

Gluten-free peanut butter cookies Makes about 15 200g peanut butter 175g soft brown sugar ¼ tsp salt 1 egg 30g peanuts, chopped 1 Preheat the oven to 180˚C/160˚C fan/gas mark 4. Line two large baking trays with parchment paper.

2 In a large bowl, use a wooden spoon to combine all the ingredients into a soft dough. Chill in the fridge for 15 minutes. 3 Spoon small balls of dough onto the tray, leaving room beside each cookie. Place in the fridge for at least one hour. 4 Bake for 12 minutes, until golden brown around the edges. Allow to cool on the tray before serving. Per cookie 138kcals, 8g fat (1.7g saturated), 14.4g carbs (12.7g sugars), 4.2g protein, 1g fibre, 0.108g sodium

x

TOP TIP

h uit doug the bisc to s Chilling lp e h aking before b cuits t the bis n e v re p in d a g from spre . ch u m too

URS MAKE IT YgOsweeter,

ethin For som hips or colate c o h c d ad d of the a it inste dried fru , or dip peanuts chopped lted m ies in e the cook hill in c d n a te chocola t. e until se the fridg

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 107


108 Easy Food

MAY 2019


cooking for fun gluten-free baking

Gluten-free banoffee loaf Serves 8 For the loaf: 75g butter, softened 150g soft brown sugar 2 eggs 4 bananas, mashed 300g gluten-free self-raising flour Pinch of bicarbonate of soda 80g dark chocolate chips For the icing: 100g cream cheese 30g caramel sauce, plus extra to drizzle 2 tbsp icing sugar 1 banana, sliced 2 tbsp chocolate chips 1 Preheat the oven to 180ËšC/160ËšC fan/gas mark 4. Line a 900g loaf tin with parchment. 2 In a large mixing bowl, beat together the butter and sugar until fluffy. Add in the eggs one by one, beating between each addition. 3 Fold in the mashed bananas, flour, bicarbonate of soda and chocolate chips. 4 Spoon the mix into the prepared tin and bake for 45-50 minutes or until a skewer inserted into the centre comes out clean. Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely. 5 To make the icing, whisk together the cream cheese, caramel and icing sugar until smooth. 6 Spread the icing over the top of the loaf cake. Top with sliced banana and sprinkle with chocolate chips. Warm a little caramel sauce and drizzle over top.

Per Serving 476kcals, 17g fat (10.1g saturated), 77.1g carbs (36.1g sugars), 8g protein, 3g fibre, 0.299g sodium

URS MAKE IT YicO banana

lass Make a c alnuts dding w a y b s. d brea te la chip of choco d a e s te e s in he cream c g Top with ombinin c y b e d a m , g in ic heese cream c sugar. g in ic and

www.easyfood.ie

Easy Food 109


Gluten-free fluffy pancakes Makes 10 pancakes For the pancakes: 250g gluten-free plain flour 2 tbsp icing sugar 1¼ tsp gluten-free baking powder 2 eggs 150ml milk 50g butter, melted For the filling: 100g mixed berries 1 tbsp sugar 200g vanilla yoghurt

1 In a large bowl, sift together the flour, icing sugar and baking powder. 2 In a jug, whisk together the eggs and milk. Make a well in the centre of the flour and gradually whisk in the milk mixture until smooth. 3 Pour in the melted butter and whisk to form a thick batter. 4 Lightly oil a frying pan and add ladle in some of the batter to form an 8cm pancake. Fry until bubbles appear on top and the base is golden. Flip the pancake and fry until golden brown. Continue until all of the batter is used up.

5 To make the berry compote, combine the mixed berries and sugar and cook on a medium heat. Allow the fruit to stew until soft and leave to cool completely. 6 Layer the pancakes with vanilla yoghurt and berry compote. Per pancake 184kcals, 6.3g fat (3.5g saturated), 26.9g carbs (6.5g sugars), 5g protein, 1.1g fibre, 0.062g sodium

URS MAKE IT YOte chips

cola Add cho our rries to y e b e lu b r or fo r e tt ba pancake t. is tw a tasty

Niamh Foskin says “With Coeliac Awareness Week in May, this recipe gave me a great opportunity to try out these pancakes using a new gluten-free flour mix that I had not tried before. I made a batch of them for my midweek breakfasts and, as the recipe makes 10, it was ideal to keep me going for a few days. All of the ingredients were store cupboard essentials, so there was no need to buy anything extra. I played around with various toppings over the week, both sweet and savoury. Next time I might try using a nut milk and see how that would work out.”

110 Easy Food

MAY 2019


TAKE A LOOK

INSIDE OUR

LAUNDRY

RANGE

BELLING, GREAT HOME APPLIANCES SINCE Look into the full Belling Laundry Collection at leading electrical retailers nationwide.

Glen Dimplex Ireland t: +353 1 842 4833 e: salesireland@glendimplex.com w: www.belling.ie

Belling Sensicare2 A4 PR+5mm.indd 1

22/03/2019 12:38


Always wash your hands before you begin baking, and make sure you avoid contaminating gluten-free items with ingredients containing gluten if you are working in a kitchen that isn’t gluten-free.

Baking cakes t"EEJOHTMJHIUMZNPSFHMVUFOGSFFCBLJOH QPXEFSUIBOUIFSFDJQFSFRVJSFTDBOIFMQ NBLFBMJHIUFSBOEýVGåFSDBLF t"EEJOHNPSFMJRVJEUIBOTUBUFEJOUIF SFDJQFNBZCFOFDFTTBSZJOPSEFSUP SFIZESBUFHMVUFOGSFFýPVS"EEUIFMJRVJE BUBCMFTQPPOBUBUJNFVOUJMUIFNJYUVSF SFBDIFTESPQQJOHDPOTJTUFODZ t#BLJOHUIFDBLFGPSBOFYUSB NJOVUFTNBZCFOFDFTTBSZ EVFUPUIF FYUSBMJRVJEDPOUFOU5FTUJGUIFDBLFJT DPPLFECZJOTFSUJOHBTLFXFSJOUPUIF DFOUSFUPTFFJGJUDPNFTPVUDMFBO t4PNFHMVUFOGSFFCBLFTBSFQSPOFUP CSPXOJOHNPSFRVJDLMZ TPEFDSFBTJOH UIFUFNQFSBUVSFTMJHIUMZBOEJODSFBTJOH UIFDPPLJOHUJNFXJMMMPXFSUIFSJTLPGB CVSOUUPQ

Gluten-free baking tips All the tips and tricks you need to make gluten-free baking a breeze

Baking breads t"TUIFSFJTOPHMVUFOJOZPVSýPVS  OPLOFBEJOHJTSFRVJSFEGPSHMVUFOGSFF CSFBET%POUCFDPODFSOFEUIBUZPVS EPVHIIBTBXFUUFSDPOTJTUFODZ‰JUNBZ CFNPSFMJLFCBUUFSUIBOUSBEJUJPOBMEPVHI t(MVUFOGSFFMPBWFTDPOUJOVFUPEFWFMPQ UIFJSTUSVDUVSFVOUJMUIFZBSFDPNQMFUFMZ DPPM TPJUTCFTUUPPQFOUIFPWFOEPPS BOEMFBWFUIFMPBGJOTJEFVOUJMJUDPPMTUP SPPNUFNQFSBUVSF

Watch out for... t(MVUFOGSFFCBLJOHQPXEFSJTBWBJMBCMF UPCVZJOTVQFSNBSLFUTTPEPOUGPSHFUUP CVZUIFHMVUFOGSFFWFSTJPO t#JDBSCPOBUFPGTPEBJTOBUVSBMMZHMVUFO GSFF BTMPOHBTJUTQBDLBHFEJOBHMVUFO GSFFFOWJSPONFOU t*DJOHTVHBSJTOBUVSBMMZHMVUFOGSFF  BMUIPVHIUIFSFJTUIFQPTTJCJMJUZJUDPVME DPOUBJONPEJåFETUBSDIBTBCVMLJOHBHFOU ‰UZQJDBMMZDPSOýPVSJTVTFE CVUXIFBU TUBSDIDPVMEBMTPCFVTFE t0BUTEPOUDPOUBJOHMVUFO CVUUIFZ BSFPGUFOQSFQBSFEJOBOFOWJSPONFOU XIFSFXIFBUNBZCFQSFTFOU TPJUTCFTU UPDIFDLUIFMBCFMBOEQVSDIBTFQVSF  HVBSBOUFFEHMVUFOGSFFPBUT

112 Easy Food

TOP TIP Don’t waste your “mistakes”! *GZPVSHMVUFOGSFFCBLFýPQT EPOUKVTUUISPXJUJOUIFCJO#MJU[TBWPVSZCBLFTJOBGPPE QSPDFTTPSUPGPSNDSVNCT UIFOTUPSFJOUIFGSFF[FSBOEVTFBTZPVXPVMECSFBEDSVNCT 6TFTXFFUCBLFENJTUBLFTBTDSVNCMFUPQQJOHT

MAY 2019


10

d e e n u o y things t u o b a w o n to k e s a e s i d c a coeli

Nutritionist Sarah Keogh fills in the facts you may not know about coeliac disease

Sarah Keogh MSc. BSc. Dip. MINDI Sarah is the founder of Eatwell and has over 20 years’ experience working in nutrition and dietetics. Sarah has a degree in Human Nutrition and Dietetics from Trinity College, Dublin, and a Masters in European Food Regulation. Sarah works with clients one-to-one to help manage a range of issues, and also delivers workplace wellness sessions and nutrition courses. She also works with some of Ireland’s leading companies and is regularly featured on the radio.

Coeliac ns s Week ru Awarenes th 19th and 13 – from May ise d by Prom re is sponso ut o k c e! Che Gluten Fre fo liac.ie r www.coe ils. more deta

114 Easy Food

MAY 2019


make it healthy coeliac disease

An estimated 47,500 people in Ireland have coeliac disease, but only around 12,000 have actually been diagnosed. Are you one of the people that have been missed? When it comes to coeliac disease, many of us are well aware that problems with digestion are common. However, coeliac disease can affect your whole body even if your gut is behaving itself — so don’t rule out coeliac disease if you are feeling unwell…

Did you know?

1

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation throughout your body. This means that coeliac disease can be a cause of migraines, infertility, exhaustion, nerve problems and depression as well as tummy upsets. These problems can be caused by other things, but you should rule out coeliac disease, just in case. Your irritable bowel could be coeliac disease. Lots of people who get bloating, constipation, excess gas and upset tummies diagnose themselves with irritable bowel syndrome. But could it be coeliac disease? It’s always essential to bring your funny tummy to your GP and check for coeliac disease before you think about IBS.

2

www.easyfood.ie

3

Not everyone with coeliac disease has a funny tummy. In fact, many people with coeliac disease do not experience gut symptoms at all! Food intolerance tests will not diagnose you with coeliac disease — or rule it out. Most food intolerance tests (e.g. IgG testing, vega testing, hair analysis, etc.) do not actually pick up food intolerances. So even if you have had a test that says you are not sensitive to gluten, you may still have coeliac disease. Only your GP can diagnose you with coeliac disease. You need a blood test and, if the results are positive, you will then need to see a gastroenterologist for a biopsy to confirm the test. You must be eating gluten for six weeks before you have a coeliac test. If you cut out gluten, your body goes back to normal and your test will come back negative even if you do have coeliac disease. Never ‘try’ a gluten-free diet before you get tested. Always test first. The only treatment for coeliac disease is a strict gluten-free diet for life. This is a surprisingly complicated diet to get right, so make sure your GP refers you to a CORU Registered dietitian as soon as you are diagnosed. The Coeliac Society of Ireland runs a Dietitian Clinic for members and you can make an appointment by calling 01 872 1471 or going to www.coeliac.ie.

4 5 6

7

8

Lots of foods that are made with gluten-free ingredients can still pick up gluten from other foods during cooking or manufacture. This is why all people with coeliac disease need to have an up-to-datecopy of the Coeliac Society of Ireland’s Food List of gluten-free products. This is compiled by the Society every year and is available free to all members. The coeliac diet is more than just eating gluten-free. People with coeliac disease are at higher risk of several nutrient deficiencies including vitamin D, calcium and iron. Seeing your CORU-registered dietitian at diagnosis and once a year after that will help you to avoid long term problems like osteoporosis, infertility and anaemia. Coeliac disease never “goes away”. Once a coeliac, always a coeliac. Your GP will test your blood levels every year and, if they are back to normal, this means that you are following your gluten-free diet very well; it does not mean the coeliac disease has gone away. Sorry.

9

10

Easy Food 115


WE EXPLAIN WHY CARBOHYDRATES ARE IMPORTANT AND LOOK AT THE GLUTENFREE OPTIONS YOU CAN STILL ENJOY 116 Easy Food

MAY 2019


make it healthy gluten-free carbs

Chicken and chorizo paella Serves 4

120g chorizo, peeled and sliced 1 tbsp olive oil 3 chicken fillets, chopped into bitesized pieces 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 tsp ground turmeric ½ tsp smoked paprika 225g long grain rice 600ml gluten-free chicken stock Salt and black pepper 1 x 400g tin of chopped tomatoes 1 red pepper, deseeded and sliced 120g frozen peas Squeeze of lemon juice 1 Heat the chorizo in a large paella pan or frying pan over a medium-high heat until it releases its oils. Remove from the pan using a slotted spoon. 2 Heat the olive oil in the chorizo pan and brown the chicken pieces on all sides. Add the onion, garlic, turmeric and paprika and cook for two minutes. 3 Add the rice and stock and return the chorizo to the pan. Bring to the boil and season, then turn the heat to medium. Cover and cook for 15 minutes. 4 Add the chopped tomatoes, red pepper and peas. Cook for a further 10 minutes or until the chicken is completely cooked through and the rice has absorbed all of the liquid. Squeeze over some lemon juice to serve. Per Serving 675kcals, 27.3g fat (7.7g saturated), 61.5g carbs, 8.5g sugars, 44.2g protein, 5.5g fibre, 0.995g sodium

x

Gluten is a protein that is naturally found in rye, barley and wheat, including less common wheat varieties like spelt, kamut, farro and durum. These grains are found in common carbohydrate products such as pasta, cous cous, bulghur, semolina and many baked goods. One of the biggest challenges of going gluten-free is the widespread prevalence of these grains — wheat, in particular. The good news is that there are plenty of naturally gluten-free carbohydrates that you can still enjoy on a gluten-free diet. These days, many of the gluten-free grains can be found in the supermarket, but some of the lesser-known varieties may be available only in specialty or health food shops. The following grains and other starchcontaining foods are naturally gluten-free:

Pota toes a n d sweet pota toes Le g umes s uc h a s bea n s, pea s and l en til s Gluten -free oa ts Nu t flours Gr a in s s uc h a s: Ric e Ca s sa va Corn /ma ize Soy P ota to Ta p i oc a Sorghum Qu i n oa M il l et Bu c k w h e a t g r oa t s / k a s h a Ama ra n th Teff Flax Chia Yuc c a

Why are carbs important? t(PJOHHMVUFOGSFFTIPVMEOPUNFBOHJWJOH up carbohydrates altogether. Carbs are a valuable source of energy, and including some carbs in your diet is essential. t$BSCPIZESBUFTBSFCSPLFOEPXOJOUP smaller units of sugar, which are absorbed into the bloodstream. This blood sugar (or blood glucose) is transported throughout the body, supplying energy to muscles.

www.easyfood.ie

t.PTUPGPVSDFMMTVTFHMVDPTFGPSFOFSHZ  but our brains are especially reliant on it. This is an extremely important function of carbohydrates and is why low-carb diets can make your brain feel foggy and slow. t*ODMVEJOHTVGĂĽDJFOUBNPVOUTPG carbohydrates in your diet means that your CPEZDBONFFUJUTFOFSHZOFFET*GZPVS intake of carbs is too low, or you are using them up too quickly (such as during intense exercise), then your body is forced to break down proteins for energy, preventing them from playing their important roles in maintaining muscle and other body tissues. t.BOZGPPETDPOUBJOJOHDBSCTBMTPQSPWJEF ĂĽCSF XIJDIJTOFDFTTBSZGPSBXFMM functioning digestive system.

TOP TIPS t.PSFBOENPSFHMVUFOGSFFQSPEVDUT are being launched onto the market all the time, so keep your eyes peeled for newer options. t*UJTQPTTJCMFGPSOBUVSBMMZHMVUFOGSFF grains to be cross-contaminated through contact with gluten-containing grains during harvesting and processing. Always check the label to ensure that the product was produced and packaged in a gluten-free environment. t5IFIFBMUIJFTUUZQFTPGDBSCPIZESBUFT are wholegrains, such as those listed above, and other natural plant food sources, such as potatoes, corn, beans and lentils. t1MFOUZPGXIFBUGSFFýPVSTDBOCF TVCTUJUVUFEGPSSFHVMBSýPVSXIFONBLJOH baked goods. Just be aware that certain options work better in some recipes UIBOPUIFSTGPSFYBNQMF OVUýPVST work well for cookies, but aren’t ideal GPSCSFBESFDJQFT*UPGUFOUBLFTTPNF FYQFSJNFOUBUJPOUPüHVSFPVUXIJDI ýPVSTPSCMFOETZPVMJLFVTJOHCFTU t#SFBEDSVNCTBSFPGUFOVTFEUPCJOE burgers, meatballs or meatloaf. These can be swapped out for gluten-free CSFBEDSVNCT‰PSVTFHSPVOEýBYTFFE UPBEEBüCSFCPPTU

Easy Food 117


Like our Facebook page for new recipes, up-to-date news and to connect with the Easy Gluten-Free community!

Make sure to let us know what you think of Easy Gluten-Free!

www.facebook.com/EasyGFMag

EF132_128_EGF Ad.indd 128 EF139_ADS.indd Facebook 118 EF_ISSUE136_Ads.indd 128

06/12/2018 12:05 26/04/2019 5:45 10:51 p.m. 18/01/2019


All the know-how you need to develop your cooking skills and become an expert in the kitchen


w n o a H Itali s it? i Lasagne

ITALIAN!!

Lasagne originated in Italy during the Middle Ages, and places its invention in the city of Naples. The first recorded recipe dates from the early 14th century. The traditional lasagne of Naples is layered with sausage, small meatballs, hard-boiled eggs, Neapolitan meat sauce, ricotta and Mozzarella. The lasagne we know well here in Ireland is more associated with the Emilia-Romagna region, and is made with a thicker ragù and layers of Béchamel sauce.

Garlic bread Look — garlic bread is delicious. We love it. We would marry it if that were legal. But it ain’t Italian. The closest thing Italy has to garlic bread as we know it is the practice of rubbing a cut clove of garlic over bruschetta.

Not Italian!

ITALIAN!!

Carbonara Comprised of egg yolks, hard cheese, guanciale (pork cheek) and black pepper, spaghetti carbonara is absolutely Italian and hails from Lazio, the region of Rome. (Adding cream, however? Not Italian at all.) 120 Easy Food

Bruschetta

ITALIAN!!

Amicizie e maccheron i, sono megli o caldi. Friendship s and best when

macaroni are they are w arm.

Spaghetti Bolognese ‘Spag Bol’ as we know it is arguably much more of a British invention than an Italian one. In Bologna, the ragù (meat sauce) that you find is likely to be made from a mixture of beef and pork. It will be slow-cooked and much less saucy than spaghetti Bolognese, and — crucially — will be served with tagliatelle rather than spaghetti. For Italians, there’s an innate logic in matching pasta shapes to particular sauces, and a meat sauce simply won’t cling to spaghetti the way it should.

Not Italian!

Bruschetta was created in Italy during the 16th century, but its origins can be traced all the way back to Ancient Rome. It’s thought that it was initially used as a way to taste freshly pressed olive oil just after the harvest.

Spaghetti and meatballs This dish, combining meatballs cooked in tomato sauce with spaghetti, is an Italian-American invention. Although a variation of polpette in tomato sauce can be found in the Italian South, they are served as a main course, and not with pasta. Meatballs in Italy were traditionally very small and bulked up with stale bread due to necessary frugality. Italian immigrants newly arrived in the States were shocked by both their increased wealth and the ready availability of meat, and as a consequence the meatballs became much larger. At the time, spaghetti was the only pasta available in large parts of the US, and tinned tomatoes were cheap and easy to find, making these the default companions to the new, plus-sized meatballs.

Not Italian!

Pizza

ITALIAN!!

True pizza originated in Italy, specifically Naples. However, one could argue that Americanisation has turned pizza into a second, very different thing altogether. If you’re eating a Neapolitan-style pizza with a soft, thin base and just a couple of well-thought-out toppings, that’s about as Italian as it can get. On the other hand, if your pizza has a thick base and is loaded with everything from pepperoni to pineapple, we’d argue that that’s an American beast. (Our pick-a-side pizzas on p.78 are definitely not authentically Italian — but they’re still delicious!) MAY 2019


from our kitchen to yours

d Don’taddcheesetoseafoo dishes

A tavola non si invecchia.

itrary rule, This may seem like an arb y strongly but many Italians feel ver rmigano (or about it! Adding grated Pa seafood pasta any other cheese) to your is a cultural faux pas.

At the table, one does not age.

Focus on quality produce

Never break or cu t your spaghetti

This is sacrilege in Italia. Don’t break long pasta before putting it in the water — and don’t use a knife to cut it on your pla te.

Italians look for foods that are top quality and in season. With excellent ingredients, every dish will be at its absolute best.

Match the right pasta to your sauce

Pasta shapes matter! Different sauces cling better to different shapes. There’s a shape out there for every kind of sauce, so be sure to look for the right one.

Don’t waste food Many classic Italian dishes were born out of frugality — there’s even a phrase for this, cucina povera, or peasant cooking. The delicious panzanella salad was devised to use to stale bread; in Sicily, they make use of leftover pasta as a filling for frittatas, and the traditional pasta e fagioli is a hearty dish designed to line stomachs for as little money as possible. Even Parmesan rinds are simmered in soups to add flavour. To cook like a true Italian, don’t waste things that can be used again.

Invest in good olive oil

To an Italian, oil is not merely a means to cook your food, but is an essential part of the finished dish. Spend an extra few bob on a really good olive oil and notice the difference. Save the extra-virgin for drizzles and salad dressings.

k o o C n a like n a i l Ita

Make it an event The biggest trick to cooking like an Italian is to treat every meal as a real occasion. Meals should be enjoyed with loved ones and never rushed. www.easyfood.ie www.easyfood.ie

Keep it simple Less is more with Italian cuisine — it’s better to let a few great flavours shine. That’s why you’ll never see a real Italian pizza or pasta dish loaded with toppings.

PERLY PASTA PRO COOK YOUR

al rules for the cardin Flip to p.130 t way. asta the righ on cooking p

L'app et man ito vien App giand etite o com . w ith e ating es .

Serve pasta in hot bowls The heat can go out of pasta very quickly. Warm your serving bowls beforehand to keep it at that perfect temperature for longer.

Easy Food 121


How to make pasta

1

Sift 400g of 00, or tippo, flour into a large mixing bowl. Whisk three large or four small eggs together. Make a well in the centre of the flour and add the eggs. Mix until it comes together as a dough; it should not be sticky.

3

Divide the dough into sections and flatten slightly. Use a pasta maker to roll the dough into sheets.

5

Slice into strands for spaghetti/tagliatelle, or cut into any other shape you desire. 122 Easy Food

2

Knead for a few minutes until smooth, then place in a bowl to rest for about 30 minutes.

4

Fold over the sheets to make a rectangle, then continue feeding through the pasta maker while adjusting the setting to make each roll thinner.

6

If making strands, coat them in flour to prevent them from sticking together and shape into nests. Cook in a saucepan of boiling, salted water for 2-3 minutes. MAY 2019


How How to to make make ravioli ravioli

from our kitchen to yours

1

Using a homemade pasta dough (see how to make pasta on p.122), roll out the dough in two or four equal sections, making sure to get the dough as thin as possible.

3

Mix together 50g of grated Parmesan, 120g of Ricotta, one beaten egg, one tablespoon each of chopped parsley and basil and a pinch of salt and pepper in a bowl. Place dollops across the sheet brushed with water at 4cm intervals.

5

Use a knife to cut between the fillings to make even-sized ravioli.

www.easyfood.ie

2

Lay a large sheet of dough out on a lightly-floured surface. Brush with water.

4

Lay over the other sheet of dough, pressing down around the filling.

6

Transfer to a baking tray and leave to dry for at least 30 minutes before cooking in a saucepan of boiling, salted water for 7-8 minutes, or until they float to the top. Easy Food 123


fun fa ct

It’s a myth eat a th at I ll o ta every f these co lians urses meal, onl y consis and most at w t of a cours coup ill e le of specia s. On Sun d a l a me occasions ys and al ma , how ever, y w ell of the se sta include a ll g es last f or ho , and urs.

Antipasto

This is the starter and is often a selection of food, presented on sharing platters. Inclusions vary depending on region, but typically may include cured meats, cheeses, olives, mixed marinated or roasted vegetables, fresh bread and grissini, or breadsticks.

Secondo

This is the meat or fish course. Sides, known as contorni, will be served alongside the main event, and these will usually be focused around vegetables.

Formaggi e frutta

The cheese course will feature whichever cheeses are particular to that locality, along with some seasonal fruit.

Digestivo con caffé

Digestivi are strong alcoholic drinks served with the aim of aiding digestion, such as grappa and amaro. Espresso will be served either just beforehand or immediately afterwards.

ct fun fa rage e e av

Th s n eat Italia nds u o p 51 over ery sta ev of pa ar. ye

124 Easy Food

Aperitivo

Aperitivo time in Italy starts from around 5pm and is a prelude to an evening meal. Usually based around drinks such as wine, prosecco or the Aperol spritz, aperitivo often includes nibbles such as olives, crisps and nuts. Many bars offer complimentary nibbles served with drinks at this time of the day.

Primo

The primo course is when dishes like pasta, gnocchi or risotto are served.

Insalata

Unless there are many leafy green vegetables included in the contorni, a salad will follow the main.

Dolci

Now it’s time for dessert — if you have any room left, that is!

Chi va a letto senza cena tutta la notte si dimena.

He who goes to bed without eati ng will regre t it throughout th e night. MAY 2019


sweet things meringue

Tips FROM THE

TEST K TCHEN

Food stylist Shannon Peare delves into the ways of meringue Types of meringue

“I’ve got eggs… they’re not multiplying”

Getting it right

All meringues have the same base of

The star of any meringue is the egg white!

Keep it grease-free Your bowl and utensils

egg white and sugar. However, there are

There are many factors that can affect a

need to be spotlessly clean and dry —

different methods of making meringue

meringue, most notably the eggs.

meringues are very sensitive and do not like

which each produce a different result.

grease or moisture! Give any other utensils a Separating eggs It is essential to not

good clean with soap and boiling water and

French meringue This is the one we are

allow any yolk into the meringue mixture.

make sure to dry them thoroughly.

most familiar with. Egg whites whip to

Separate eggs by cracking the egg and

soft peaks, gradually spooning in caster

rocking the yolk between the two shell

Foaming on acid Adding an acid like

sugar to form stiff peaks. This meringue is

halves, allowing the egg white to fall into

vinegar, lemon juice or cream of tartar helps

baked, and can be piped it into a variety of

the bowl. Or, crack the egg into your hand,

meringues achieve stability and a crisp

shapes. Once baked, it will give you a light,

slightly separate your fingers and allow the

exterior and a soft, sticky inside.

crisp meringue. Some prefer meringues

egg white to spill into the bowl while still

soft, while others prefer a crisp shell with a

holding the egg yolk. If any yolk gets into

Give me some sugar! Caster sugar is the

chewy middle.

the egg white, it will not whip properly.

go-to when making meringues, as the small

Italian meringue Although this is made

Keep it fresh Fresh eggs work

added gradually after the egg whites have

from the same ingredients, Italian meringue

best for meringue. The proteins in fresher

formed soft peaks; if added too soon, it will

is very different. In a pot over a medium

eggs are stronger, giving the meringue more

take twice as long for the meringue to whip.

heat, heat a sugar syrup (sugar and water)

stability. Older eggs will still whip up and will

Add the sugar a spoonful at a time, whipping

to 121˚C using a sugar thermometer. The

give you a greater volume but won’t give you

between each addition. To ensure all the

egg whites are whipped to the foaming

as much structure as fresher eggs. When

sugar has dissolved, rub some of the mix

stage, then the hot sugar syrup is gradually

whipping fresh egg whites, it may take a

between two fingers. If it feels gritty, the

added while the eggs are beaten on a high

little longer to break down the proteins but it

sugar has not dissolved, so continue to beat.

speed to give it a glossy texture. The hot

will be worth it in the end.

grains dissolve easily. The sugar should be

sugar cooks the egg whites, making it

The test. The classic test to see if your

safe to eat without baking. This is perfect

Keep it room temperature For almost any

meringue is whipped to perfection is to

for lemon meringue pies, buttercreams or

baking, room temperature eggs are a must.

hold the bowl over your head. If you don’t

mousses. Use a blowtorch or place under

Egg whites will whip up much faster than

end up with meringue in your hair, then

the grill to give it a toasted finish.

colder eggs and they will also give better

congratulations — you are ready to pipe!

volume. The ideal temperature to whip Swiss meringue This is a firmer style of

meringues at is 21˚C. If you do store your

It's baking time. Meringues should be

meringue made by stirring sugar and egg

eggs in the fridge, allow them to sit at room

baked at a lower temperature for a long

whites over a pot of simmering water until

temperature for 30 minutes before whipping.

time. If the oven is too high, the heat will

warm to the touch. The mix is removed from the heat and whipped to form a stiff meringue. It is a smooth, silky texture and is often used for buttercreams and cakes.

www.easyfood.ie

Did you know

Humid temperatures cause the meringue to take longer to dry out. If you are making Italian meringue, add a teaspoon of cornflour to the sugar to absorb moisture.

cause the air bubbles to rise too quickly and result in a cracked meringue. Baking at a higher temperature can also cause the sugar to caramelise, resulting in a golden brown colour instead of a crisp white meringue. Easy Food 125


Lemon meringue tart

about 4mm thick. Lift the pastry into the

Serves 8-10

away any excess.

prepared tin, pushing it into the sides. Trim 5 Line the pastry with some parchment

For the pastry:

paper and fill with baking beans. Bake

125g plain flour

the pastry blind for about 15-20 minutes

25g icing sugar

or until the sides of the pastry are a pale

75g cold butter

golden colour. Remove the paper and the

1 egg yolk

beans and bake for a further five minutes.

2-3 tbsp cold water

Remove and allow to cool completely. 6 Fill the pastry case with the lemon curd

For the meringue:

and allow to chill in the fridge.

100g caster sugar

7 For the meringue, put the sugar and the

25ml water

water into a small saucepan over a medium

1 egg, separated

heat. Attach a sugar thermometer to the side of the pot.

For the filling:

8 Slowly start to whisk the egg with using

1 jar of lemon curd, plus extra to serve

an electric beater or a free standing mixer with a whisk attachment. Mix until the egg

1 Preheat the oven to 180ËšC/160ËšC

white starts to foam.

fan/gas mark 4. Grease 35 x 11cm

9 Allow the sugar to reach 121ËšC, then

rectangular tart tin and line the base with

slowly stream the hot sugar into the egg

parchment paper.

white. Turn the mixer to full speed and

2 In a large bowl, sieve together the

whisk until the egg whites have cooled to

flour and icing sugar. Use your fingers

room temperature.

to rub in the cold butter until the mixture

10 Remove the tart from the fridge. Pipe

resembles breadcrumbs.

the meringue on top and toast using a blow

3 Mix in the egg yolk and enough water

torch or under the grill. Decorate with some

to form a soft dough. Turn the pastry onto

lemon zest and a drizzle of curd.

a floured surface and lightly knead until it comes together. Wrap the pastry in cling film and refrigerate for at least one hour.

Per Serving 286kcals, 19.9g fat (10.6g saturated), 30.7g carbs (21.1g sugars), 4.3g protein, 0.3g fibre, 0.157g sodium

4 On a floured surface, roll the dough to

126 Easy Food

MAY 2019


sweet things meringue

TOP TIP Don’t have baking beans? You can use dried beans, rice or pasta to weigh down your pastry when baking blind. Don’t forget the parchment!

Apple and raisin meringue tart Makes 6 small tarts For the pastry: 125g plain flour 25g icing sugar 75g cold butter 1 egg yolk 2-3 tbsp cold water For the meringue: 100g caster sugar 25ml water 1 egg, separated For the filling: 2 cooking apples, peeled and chopped 2 tbsp sugar 1 tbsp water 1 tsp cinnamon 50g raisins 1 Preheat the oven to 180˚C/160˚C fan/gas mark 4. Grease six 10cm round tart tins and line the bases with parchment paper 2 In a large bowl, sieve together the flour

www.easyfood.ie

and icing sugar. Use your fingers to rub in the butter until the mixture resembles

TOP TIP

breadcrumbs. 3 Mix in the egg yolk and enough water to

When separating the eggs for your

form a soft dough. Turn the pastry onto a

pastry, cut down on waste by using

floured surface and lightly knead until the

the egg whites for your meringue!

dough comes together. Wrap the pastry in cling film and refrigerate for at least one hour. 4 On a floured surface, roll the dough to about 4mm thick and cut into six equal pieces. Lift the pastry into the prepared tins, pushing it into the sides. Trim away any excess. 5 Line the pastry with some parchment paper and fill with baking beans. Bake the pastry blind for about 15-20 minutes or until the sides of the pastry are a pale golden colour. Remove the paper and the beans and bake for a further five minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely. 6 In a large saucepan over a medium heat, combine the chopped apples, sugar, water and cinnamon. Allow the apples to stew slowly

heat. Attach a sugar thermometer to the side of the pot. 8 Slowly start to whisk the egg with using an electric beater or a free standing mixer with a whisk attachment. Mix until the egg white starts to foam. 9 Allow the sugar to reach 121˚C, then slowly stream the hot sugar into the egg white. Turn the mixer to full speed and whisk until the egg whites have cooled to room temperature. 10 Remove the tart from the fridge. Pipe the meringue on top and toast using a blow torch or under the grill. Sprinkle with a little cinnamon and serve.

until soft but still with some chunks. Stir in the raisins. Spoon the stewed apple into the tart tin and set aside. 7 For the meringue, put the sugar and the

Per Serving 344kcals, 12g fat (7g saturated), 58.2g carbs (37.7g sugars), 4.1g protein, 2.9g fibre, 0.086g sodium

water into a small saucepan over a medium Easy Food 127


Millionaire shortbread tart Serves 8-10 For the pastry: 125g plain flour 25g icing sugar 75g cold butter 1 egg yolk 2-3 tbsp cold water For the meringue: 100g caster sugar 25ml water 1 egg, separated For the filling: 1 x 397g tin of Carnation Caramel 100g dark chocolate, melted To decorate: 50g chocolate chips 1 shortbread biscuit, crushed

1 Preheat the oven to 180ËšC/160ËšC fan/gas

chocolate to drizzle on top.

mark 4. Grease a 28cm round tart tin and line

7 Spoon in the caramel, reserving a little extra

the base with parchment paper.

for a drizzle later. Place in the fridge and allow

2 In a large bowl, sieve together the flour and

to set.

icing sugar. Use fingers to rub in the butter

8 For the meringue, put the sugar and the

until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs.

water into a small saucepan over a medium

3 Mix in the egg yolk and enough water to

heat. Attach a sugar thermometer to the side

form a soft dough. Turn the pastry onto a

of the pot.

floured surface and lightly knead until the

9 Slowly start to whisk the egg with using an

dough comes together. Wrap the pastry in

electric beater or a free standing mixer with

cling film and refrigerate for at least one hour.

a whisk attachment. Mix until the egg white

4 On a floured surface, roll the dough to about

starts to foam.

4mm thick. Lift the pastry into the prepared

10 Allow the sugar to reach 121ËšC, then slowly

tin, pushing it into the sides. Trim away any

stream the hot sugar into the egg white. Turn

excess pastry.

the mixer to full speed and whisk until the egg

5 Line the pastry with some parchment paper

whites have cooled to room temperature.

and fill with baking beans. Bake the pastry

11 Remove the tart from the fridge. Pipe the

blind for about 15-20 minutes or until the sides

meringue on top and toast using a blow torch

of the pastry are a pale golden colour. Remove

or under the grill.

the paper and the beans and bake for a further

12 Drizzle the top of the tart with melted

five minutes. Remove from the oven and allow

caramel and melted chocolate. Sprinkle with

to cool completely.

chocolate chips and crushed shortbread.

6 Using a pastry brush, brush the inside of the pastry case with the melted chocolate and allow to set in the fridge. Keep the remaining

128 Easy Food

Per Serving 328kcals, 10.5g fat (6.2g saturated), 56.7g carbs (37.9g sugars), 4g protein, 0.5g fibre, 0.206g sodium

MAY 2019


IN THE NEXT ISSUE...

MAKE THE MOST OF THE SUNSHINE WITH THE SUMMER ISSUE!

ENJOY THE PERFECT BBQ Is there anything better than a barbecue? Whether or not we have the weather for it all summer, all you need for a perfect barbecue is some flame-kissed heat, fresh flavours and the right recipes. We’re covering everything, from easy twists to the classic burger and sausage dogs to simple recipes for global favourites like American low-and-slow barbecue, bold Mexican staples and Moroccan mezze. Grab some napkins and get ready to dive in!

E ON SAL TH JUNE 8 !

INSIDE... > Barbecue basics > Summer salads y recipes > Healthy strawberr ing > Low-and-slow cook ers > Quick summer dinn > Fresh cocktails shes > The perfect side di


A pretty penne Don’t be fusilli — it’s pasta time you learned this basic kitchen skill! How to cook perfect pasta Use a large pot Pick a roomy pot that gives the pasta plenty of space to move.

Use lots of water Just as pasta needs a roomy pot, it also needs plenty of water — more than enough to submerge it completely.

Get salty This is crucial to avoid bland results — the pasta cooking water should taste as salty as the sea, so you’ll need to use at least a tablespoon of salt.

Bubble bubble Don’t be tempted to add the pasta when the water is still at a simmer. Wait until it’s at a serious boil before you go for it.

Stir it up Stir the pasta immediately once you put it in, and then stir it every couple of minutes during its cooking time. This will prevent it from clumping.

Test time Start checking the pasta’s doneness 2-3 minutes before the time stated on the package. Using a slotted spoon or fork, fish out a single piece of pasta. Let it cool slightly, then bite into it. Everyone has their own pasta preference, but in general you should regard it as done when it still has a little bite to it. This is known as “al dente�.

Save a scoop

TOP TIPS FOR THE PERFECT PASTA

Before you drain and discard the cooking water, save a cup. Stirring a little of this starchy water into your sauce is key for binding the sauce and pasta together.

t%POUBEEPJMøUPUIFQBTUBXBUFS*UTBNZUIUIBUUIJTXJMMLFFQJUGSPN clumping — a stir will do this perfectly well, and adding oil can mean the sauce won’t cling to your pasta properly.

Drain

t6OMJLFESJFEQBTUB GSFTIQBTUBUBLFTKVTUNJOVUFTUPDPPL

Drain your pasta in a colander or sieve over the kitchen sink, then toss with the sauce and a splash of pasta water.

t4UVGGFEQBTUB MJLFSBWJPMJ XJMMýPBUVQUPUIFTVSGBDFPGUIFXBUFS when ready.

130 Easy Food

t%POUSJOTFZPVSQBTUBPODFJUTDPPLFE5IJTXJMMXBTIBXBZUIF starches that bind it to the sauce.

MAY 2019


LIKE OUR FACEBOOK PAGE JOIN US!

Follow us on F the first look acebook for at new recip e cooking vid eos and tips s, from our test kitc hen

www.facebook.com/easyfoodmag/ Your trusted kitchen companion, both in print and online!

EF139_ADS.indd 131

26/04/2019 5:45 p.m.


DISTRIBUTED BY

DISTRIBUTED BY

Enjoy DISARONNO Sensibly. WK38 Disaronno Trussardi (206x290).indd 1

21/09/2018 11:15

Profile for Zahra Media Group

Easy Food Issue 139 (May 2019)  

Ireland's leading food magazine. This month we're going Italian with must-have cooking tips, authentic recipes and the perfect pasta. Also g...

Easy Food Issue 139 (May 2019)  

Ireland's leading food magazine. This month we're going Italian with must-have cooking tips, authentic recipes and the perfect pasta. Also g...