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To those that refuse to walk the path set out by others. To stand in line or blend-in. To those that believe trends are something you make, not follow. There is VAIO速 from Sony速. Bold colours and styles, incredibly advanced technology and software that unleashes your creativity. Edit video, pictures, music. Set your own path. Stand Apart. VAIO.

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Photo ERWYN LOEWEN


Photo CHRISTOPH STRUBE


YYZ LIVING MAGAZINE IS THE APEX OF LUX LUXURY.

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ISSUE V

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ISSUE V

ON THE TABLE PLAY THE PART POP AND STEP-OUT BILLION DOLLAR SKYLINE MICHELLE OBAMA PRESIDENTIAL SECRETARIES THE SOCIALITE DRESSED TO KILL NORWAY'S POLAR NIGHT HONEST FARE OBAN, 14 YEARS HER MAJESTY TRUE (NOT SO HOLLYWOOD) STORY ARTHUR MENDONÇA WANT! HOT SHOPS THE LITTLE DEATH YOUR DRIVE TO THE TOP TECH FIXATION READ THIS, PLEASE HARVEST ISPY EDITOR'S PICKS

19 26 30 34 38 40 46 52 56 60 62 68 74 78 86 88 94 98 100 104 110 112


ISSUE V

EDITOR'S NOTE Recently, I read an interview with Michelle Obama. Between talking about the charities she supports and the President’s basketball skills, she revealed that the traits she most valued were discipline and tenacity. At the time, I agreed. I had been proud to say the same of myself: without discipline, it would have been impossible to succeed as an editor. Without tenacity, the act of creating a magazine would be futile. However, one night, on my way home, late after a day featuring a few small disasters, some 30-somethings were break-dancing outside my office. They were surprisingly talented, and questioning them afterwards, it turned out they were lawyers. These were men and women with tenacity and discipline, and they were focused—but not on their continued advancement or self-discovery, as Michelle Obama had emphasized. They were focused on having fun. When I asked them why they were dancing, they told me they had been training for months to one-up each other at the clubs. A competitive streak isn’t rare, I thought, so perhaps this wasn’t such an odd development. Still, why train for fun? And more poignantly, if training is fun, why should work be any different? We’ve created this issue of YYZ LIVING to understand that elusive boundary between work and play.

"IT’S A SHAME THAT THE ONLY THING A MAN CAN DO FOR EIGHT HOURS A DAY IS WORK. HE CAN'T EAT FOR EIGHT HOURS; HE CAN'T DRINK FOR EIGHT HOURS; HE CAN'T MAKE LOVE FOR EIGHT HOURS. THE ONLY THING A MAN CAN DO FOR EIGHT HOURS IS WORK.” ~WILLIAM FAULKNER

So, to answer the question, why not start where the thought first began? We turned to Michelle Obama to tell us the things that make her life as productive and successful as it has been, and the result is an interview titled, “Michelle Obama: How to Sweat, Win Gracefully, and Lose with Dignity.” To understand those in creative fields, where the line between work and play is more blurred, we turned to a celebrity whose fame originated in the glamorous party scenes of Los Angeles, and who is a capable and shrewd entrepreneur. We turned to Lauren Conrad in an article titled, “True (Not So) Hollywood Story.” For a more balanced opinion, we turned to Arthur Mendonça, a dedicated, and innovative fashion designer, whose work straddles the line between luxury and readyto-wear. His interview, “The Explorer: Arthur Mendonça,” provides a vivid enumeration of a professional life. Getting to the heart of the party mentality, we traveled to Norway to experience a celebration held during ‘polar night,’ a 4-month period where the sun does not rise. We also ate at one of the hottest restaurants in Toronto, The Harbord Room, a restaurant where the chefs have been experimenting with whimsical, world-conscious cuisine. Lastly, we commissioned a piece describing the true nature of Oban Whisky, and how its subtle grandeur is cultivated from a life spent seriously. We hope you enjoy this, our newest issue of YYZ LIVING. For us it has been a journey through the valley separating work and play, and working with our talented editorial teams has itself been the perfect way to bring those cliffs together. Regards,

Shivani Kumar-Chohan @yyzshivani


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ISSUE V

CONTRIBUTORS MARC SALTZMAN

CHRISTOPH STRUBE

Marc Saltzman is one of North America’s most recognizable and trusted tech experts, specializing in consumer electronics, internet trends, and interactive entertainment. Marc has authored fifteen books since 1996 and currently contributes to nearly fifty high-profile publications in North America, including Toronto Star, USA Today, AARP, MSN, Yahoo!, Costco Connection, Postmedia, Media Planet, Sympatico, Movie Entertainment, and Rogers Connected. Marc hosts various video segments, including “Gear Guide” and “Tech Talk” and is a regular guest on CNN, CNN International, and CTV’s Canada AM.

Christoph Strube was born in Germany. During the mid-80's, Strube moved to west Berlin to study photography. He came to Canada in 1988 and built up his portfolio by shooting for magazines such as Flare, Toronto Life Fashion, Chatelaine and Elle. In addition, he has spent the last 20 years shooting retail advertising and cosmetic campaigns.

“I will never work in this city again... just kidding...lol.”

“I love Toronto’s energy: its work hard, play hard vibe, unparalleled ethnic tapestry, and rich cultural offerings.”

SCOTT MONTGOMERY

KIRSTEN READER

Scott Montgomery is the creative director at an online education agency. He has written articles for MUDD Magazine, is completing a documentary on American diplomat George F. Kennan, and is currently shooting a featurelength documentary on the ritual of the Spanish bullfight.

Kirsten Reader is a freelance wardrobe stylist based out of Toronto, whose work has graced the pages of a wide variety of local and international publications including Vogue India. Her method of mixing labels and styles has been exhibited in many fashion editorials and she has worked with many well-known personalities.

“Although I spend a lot of time abroad, Toronto will always remain my home and an endless source of inspiration.”

“I love how people from Toronto have such a powerful sense of pride.”

CAMILLE MOORE

Australian-born photographer Dean West has been named “one of the world’s best emerging photographers” by AfterCapture magazine. With a highly conceptual and thought-provoking style of contemporary portraiture, his body of work has been featured in top photography magazines, art galleries, and received numerous international awards.

Camille Moore has worked as a model for the past ten years in Toronto and internationally. However, last year she decided to put modeling on hold and follow her lifelong passion—earning a Diplome de Cuisine from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris. Still modeling, she now works in catering, food styling, and recipe testing for Food Network Chef, Roger Mooking.

“Toronto has such great ethnic diversity—we’re completely surrounded by deep pockets of culture.”

“No matter where I’ve lived or traveled, Toronto is the only city that pulls on my heart as home.”

Photo ERWYN LOEWEN

DEAN WEST


ZAGNY DURBIN

BRIAN HAMILTON

TAD MUNNINGS

Zagny Durbin grew up as British and Chinese Hong Kong with parents from Toronto. She was always drawing, whether at home in Toronto, or in Melbourne, Australia. This evolved into a Bachelor of Design, illustrating children’s books, and her current participation in art exhibits. She now works as an illustrator based out of Tel Aviv, Israel.

Brian Hamilton is a skilled artist who finally settled into the world of digital media as a producer, photographer, and videographer. He shoots everything from fashion to society and is currently the host of “The Secret Stash” on Rogers TV.

Tad Munnings is a renaissance man of media. He runs Storystream, a full service production company in Toronto, and is currently in production on several documentaries, including one that explores the connection between spirituality and long distance running.

“Toronto has a magnetic personality.”

“The more I find myself immersed in other cultures around the world, the more appreciative and proud I am of the diversity and vibrance of Toronto.”

“Toronto is the only place I’ve been where the real world seems to function symbiotically with the impossible.”

DREW HARAN Drew Haran has photographed a range of subjects all over the world. He has photographed musicians, filmmakers, and models such as Drake, Michael Bay, Myles Sexton, and Joanna Krupa. His editorial work has been featured in magazines such as W25, Peace Magazine, and Photography Link. He has also worked with commercial brands such as Comedy Central, Noir Blanco, and Pharmafreak. Drew Haran is always eager to point his lens in the direction of the new and the altogether foreign.

"It's our city, our concrete jungle. The city thats starting to never sleep."

ERWIN LOEWEN Erwin Loewen has been a fashion photographer for the past four years, breaking into the Toronto market with his introduction to Chantale Nadeau. He is largely self-taught, yet his expertise is much in demand as a guest speaker. He is hailed as a 'master of available light.' Currently, his work takes him around the world, shooting internationally for a variety clients.

“Toronto, with its diverse population, has a way of making everybody feel at home and accepted.”


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POP AND STEPOUT THE INS & OUTS OF C H E S S B OX I N G Words / ABE MATHEWS, Images / JAMES BARTOSIK

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WATCHING FROM BEHIND THE RING, IT WAS IMPOSSIBLE TO THINK THAT OUR CANADIAN CHAMPION WOULD WIN. HE ADVANCED SLOWLY, HE LOST PIECES, HE HAD A WEAK FLANK. BUT WHEN HE STOOD UP FROM THE CHESSBOARD, HE PUNCHED HIS OPPONENT IN THE FACE. THAT SEEMED TO SEAL THE DEAL. 28

In the world of chess boxing, this is not an uncommon occurrence. Four-minute rounds of chess alternate with three-minute rounds of boxing, until either player is knocked out or runs out of time. With successive blows weakening clarity of mind, and complex board strategies weakening fighting stamina, chess boxing is a game of bravado and tenacity. On October 30th, 1974, Muhammad Ali and George Foreman boxed in a match dubbed the “Rumble in the Jungle”, setting the stage for the birth of chess boxing decades later. Here, Ali’s incredible victory created an unquestionable notoriety for boxing founded on misdirection, bravado, and outright lies. In that match, Ali was expected to “poppop-pop, then step-out,” using his welldocumented speed to strike and escape before Foreman could hit back. But, at the sound of the first bell, Ali planted his feet and waited for Foreman’s attack. The crowd hushed, Ali’s manager yelled, Foreman set upon him. In that first moment, it has been said, Ali won. Rather than play to Foreman’s preparation, Ali’s switch in tactics ensured that he would be entering the fight with a significant lead—Foreman fought against the opponent he thought should be there, rather than fight against the man standing still in front of him. Outside the chess boxing stadium where our Canadian was crowned, day jobs were discussed amid talk of strategy. The champion, by day a banker with Goldman Sachs, had fought against a banker from Citibank. These professional designations were not uncommon; the list of past champions comprised of artists, lawyers, and bankers, almost anyone but professional boxers or chess grand masters. It seemed a widespread belief that beyond training, the primary skill required of the chess boxing champion was tenacity. Winning the match during the eleventh


and final round, our Canadian had perhaps as much of it as the great chess players who preceded him. On July 11th 1972, the Chess World Championship forever changed the sport. Russia, long dominant in chess, had just been publicly accused by an American, Bobby Fischer, who claimed the country was quietly fixing matches. The championship was to be Russia’s retaliation. The fight lasted a month, survived a pre-game walkout from Fischer, two separate sweeps for mind-control devices, and ended in a hysteria now referred to as “The Game of the Century.” The match was Fischer’s greatest victory. Before it had begun, he threatened not to get on the plane taking him to the match, threatened to throw out the network cameras that had paid the championship purse, threatened that the lights were insufficient and so he could not continue. When he finally agreed to play the match as promised his opponent was already tiring. When the match officially began, Fischer used new and varied strategies rather than the same series of moves that had earned him his reputation as a genius.

The reigning champion, Boris Spassky, attempted to keep pace, but his efforts only resulted in multitudinous uncharacteristic misplays. By the twenty-second match, Spassky was too exhausted to appear, conceding the match by telephone, then slipping out to the sea to watch the tides. The World Chess Boxing Organization was formed in Amsterdam in 2003 by Iepe Rubingh, its current director, a famed conceptual artist. Finding inspiration in the French comic book Le Froid Équateur by Enki Bilal, the event’s original goal was to be an “artistic performance in which the themes of a healthy spirit in a healthy body and aggression management played a role.” Growing from these ideals, the organization has continued to emphasize control over ferocity, regulating training instead of rehearsals through brawls. For this purpose, the organization has designated specific clubs as training grounds, in the process creating footholds for the sport in Berlin, London, Russia, and San Francisco. Each year, at least two championships are held where the best competitors from these clubs meet to determine the world and European champions.

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After the fight, when the majority of fans had left to go home to their children and wives, or one of the many spirited afterparties, both Canadian Sean Mooney and his Singaporean opponent had time to speak with the stragglers, press, and officials who remained at the arena. Among heated debate about heroes, tactics, and other speculative matches (Would Fischer win a match against Ali?) there was little agreement on any front. But, perhaps the philosophy behind these two bankers’ participation in the sport was unspoken: getting the hell beaten out of you in the ring is a great respite from getting the hell beaten out of you at work.


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BILLION DOLLAR SKYLINE TORONTO: A R C H I T E C T U R A L PA R A D I S E OR INFRASTRUCTURAL HELL? Words / MARK HACKING, Images / DREW HARAN

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A quick glance at Toronto’s skyline will reveal that an astounding transformation is taking place. This city is becoming dense with skyscrapers. Whether you live here, but have not had the wherewithal to look up from your desk, or you are a visitor for the first time in a few years, Toronto may well have become unrecognizable to you.

established network of transit and we’re choking on cars,” Greenberg says. “With all this development, we’re now experiencing the problems of enormous success—and the Achilles heel in all of this, is transportation.” The person responsible for ensuring that the city’s development successes outweigh its problems, is Jennifer Keesmaat, the City of Toronto’s Chief Planner and Executive Director since September, 2012. Every new project in the city must cross her desk—the good, the bad, and the downright ridiculous—and she has proven herself to be forthright in her assessments.

The past decade has brought unprecedented development to Canada’s largest city and there’s still more on the horizon. In fact, some studies report that there is more development planned here than all other cities in North America combined. Given the recent softening in the residential real estate market, quality control issues with condominium projects, and continuing challenges with infrastructure, industry experts have begun to question how Toronto will develop in the future.

An advocate of commuters cycling to work and children walking to school, she recognizes that urban mobility is a big problem for Toronto, but she maintains that progress has been made. “We’ve got a completely maxed-out public transportation network and a completely maxed-out road network,” she admits. “But we’ve also got consensus across the spectrum at City Hall that we need better transit. We just need to figure out where it goes, who gets served first and where the money’s going to come from.”

Ken Greenberg, an architect, urban planner, and former Director of Urban Design and Architecture for the City of Toronto, sees bright spots in the city, but expresses cause for concern as well. “Toronto is experiencing a rate of growth that is unbelievable. We’re now seeing hyper-density,” he explains. “It’s almost as if Dubai has come to the centre of Toronto—and the city was never prepared for that.” For Greenburg, “city-building” is an essential but under-utilized concept. Traffic-stopping works of architecture and spiraling towers can be compelling from a visitor’s standpoint, but the residents of any given city crave quality of life in the form of walkable neighbourhoods, green space, and an efficient transportation system.

As with all things business-related, it makes sense that money is at the crux of this issue. In certain cases, at times like these, a cash-strapped city will set their long-term thinking aside and look at the more immediate benefits of buying into a developer’s grand vision. This is how you get proposals for sports stadiums, Ferris wheels, monorails, casinos, and shopping malls. This is how you get Las Vegas.

The last point, in particular, is one that has concerned citizens. “If you compare Toronto to Hong Kong or Tokyo or New York, they have an

There is no question that Toronto needs a better transit system. The only question is, at what cost? One project that has crossed

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Keesmaat’s desk is an Oxford Properties proposal for a casino complex along Front Street, on and around the land currently occupied by the Metro Toronto Convention Centre.

the ten tallest buildings in the city, but by 2015, a further five tower developments will be threatening to push them off the list. One architect who is a proponent of the skyscraper is James K. M. Cheng, who is noted for having a powerful influence on Vancouver’s skyline. In that city, his green-skinned condo towers are so prevalent that they have given rise to an architectural movement known as “Vancouverism.”

The project would see an eleven-acre swath of land used to house a new convention centre, a casino, parkland, and a hotel, retail, and residential complex. It is enormous—and the scale of the project is matched by the developer’s decision to hire world-renowned architectural firm Foster + Partners to lead the project.

Following the completion of his first project in Toronto, the aforementioned Shangri-La, Cheng weighed in on the recent backlash against the seemingly ubiquitous glass towers. “Unfortunately, in Toronto and in Vancouver, with so many towers being built at once and in close proximity, they give an impression of uniformity,” the award-winning architect explains. “This is, in part, due to the lack of coordination or attention to the design of the public realm. Towers are part of building a city, not an isolated object.”

According to some observers, the casino could deposit up to $100 million annually into the city’s coffers, but Keesmaat says she is not yet convinced. Greenberg also expresses concern saying, “There is a real fascination among architects with doing bigger and bigger projects, where the building itself engulfs parts of the city. The Oxford proposal is for 8 million square feet, the equivalent of many city blocks, all within the hands of one architect—and sometimes a name architect is used as a shield to obscure all the things that are not being considered.”

For her part, Keesmaat is not opposed to towers, per se, as long as they meet the rigorous criteria needed to complement a burgeoning city with all sorts of growing pains. “I’m not too concerned about skyline to be honest,” she says. “I’m more concerned about places, about what’s happening where the building meets the street. Plus, we are seeking creative design, more innovative design, and higher-quality materials because quality is about longevity.”

Another recent glitzy proposal, this one a re-envisioning of King Street West by theatre promoter David Mirvish and “starchitect” Frank Gehry, was met with even more opposition. The main issue: does Toronto need three more gigantic condominium towers when so many—and, more pointedly, perhaps too many—are already well underway. Certainly, the size of the projects coming to Toronto has taken a turn for the massive, and this is reflected in a renewed fascination with the high-rise. In 2012 alone, three high-profile, high-altitude hotel condominium towers have opened their doors: the Four Seasons, the Trump International, and the Shangri-La. All three are among

There are so many questions surrounding the future of development in Toronto and so many of them appear to be incredibly complex. Perhaps we are at the very edge of an infrastructure disaster. But equally likely is that this city is on the verge of becoming a high-density, highvoltage global centre to rival the likes of London, New York, or Tokyo.

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MICHELLE OBAMA

H O W T O S W E A T , W I N G R A C E F U L L Y, A N D L O S E W I T H D I G N I T Y. Words / ANA CONNERY / BONNIER / THE INTERVIEW PEOPLE, Images / BONNIER / THE INTERVIEW PEOPLE

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TODAY I TYPED A RATHER UNUSUAL FACEBOOK POST: “PREPPING FOR MY BIG INTERVIEW WITH THE FIRST LADY OF THE UNITED STATES. WHAT TO WEAR? WHAT TO ASK?” WITHIN SECONDS, I HAD EARNED MY FIRST “LIKE”—THEN THE COMMENTS STARTED TO COME IN FROM FRIENDS AND COLLEAGUES. I WAS TREMBLING LIKE AN EMPTY STARBUCKS CUP ON A SUBWAY PLATFORM. WITH A MIXTURE OF NERVES AND EXHAUSTION, I FINISHED PACKING THE DOZENS OF OUTFITS I ORDERED ONLINE, AND STUFFED A WHOPPING SEVEN PAIRS OF SHOES INTO MY SUITCASE—YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN THEY’LL COME IN HANDY. On a flight bound for Washington, DC, my list of questions for the First Lady gets updated more often than the national debt sign in Times Square. I can’t ignore the fear that I will somehow make a mistake: I will trip on my way towards her; my bra will show; my shoes will look fantastic, but be so uncomfortable that I’ll walk with a limp. Michelle Obama is a big deal.

The First Lady sits down for an interview in the old family dining room on the second floor of the White House. She tells me about her mom’s kitchen prowess. “She cooked almost every night, and she sort of followed the traditional plan of having a meat, a starch, and a vegetable,” says Mrs. Obama. “We couldn’t afford to go out, so we had fast food maybe once a week. We used to get pizza on report-card day as a reward, and that was like once a quarter! There were things that I don’t think they were intentionally doing [like sitting around the dinner table], but looking back, it’s where we’re trying to get parents and families today… I think it’s the simple things that hold true regardless of income or location: eliminating sugary drinks, cooking a little bit more,” she says. “It’s hard to do. I struggled with it as a working mom myself. But thinking about it once or twice a week even, sitting around a table, getting to know our kids more, is a good thing.”

We enter through a lower level into a foyer with black-and-white checkerboard marble floors. Bo, the First Family’s Portuguese water dog, comes bouncing down the hall, barking. It’s lunchtime and the building is busy with people bustling back and forth, carrying sandwiches on cardboard trays. We’re ushered into the Bookseller’s Room, which has a wall of glass that leads out to the garden, where beautiful blooms flank stone pathways leading to a gazebo.

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How does she and the President make time for this? Sure, there are at least two White House chefs that I know of, but she is married to the leader of the free world. How involved is President Obama really? “You know, we go to all the important school functions,” she says matter-of-factly. “At least one of us is there. It’s important to get to know their friends and teachers and to understand what they’re going through on a daily basis.” It turns out the President has even found time to help coach his daughter Sasha’s basketball team. “We set the expectation that sports are as important as homework and friends. It’s important to learn how to compete, to develop a skill...” “And to learn how to lose,” I chime in. “Exactly. And how to work as a team. I want them to learn how to sweat, how to win gracefully and lose with dignity. I want them to learn what it feels like to get better at something that you didn’t think you were good at…I tell my kids that you have to practice who you want to be every day,” continues the First Lady. “You won’t wake up in twenty years and become a compassionate person if you’re not practicing that along the way.”

This isn’t a new concept for the Obamas; the President ran on a record of community service. At one point during his campaign, he even suggested that college students spend time doing some form of community service. At home, “we’ve done everything from work at a soup kitchen to box up packages for military families,” says the First Lady. But beyond those seemingly presidential duties, the Obamas have their own family traditions. “Every Thanksgiving, my family comes over for dinner, and we do a day of service somewhere. Last year my brother, who’s a basketball coach, brought his team, so we had six-foot-nine basketball players passing out food to people in the community, and you know, for all the young people in our family, they found that was the best part of the visit. It’s not just coming to the White House, it’s serving and giving back.” Our time is up, so I do what any modern woman would if given the chance: I ask her to sign my shoe. Under my seat is a pair of red, white, and blue pumps I’ve had forever that were perfect for a visit to the White House. I had to bring them along with me, even if they weren’t on my feet. “Have you signed a shoe before?” asks a White House staff photographer standing nearby. “You know what? I think I may have,” she says. That’s OK. Coming in second with the First Lady is just fine by me.

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THE

WO R L D

HAS

CHANGED

SINCE

THE

SIXTIES.

C I G A R E T T E S A R E T OX I C , M C D O N A L D S N O T FA M I LY OW N E D, S E C R E T A R I E S

LIST

AMONG THE

E X T I N C T,

T H O U G H PA U L M C C A R T N E Y ’ S S T I L L T H E S A M E . I N C A N A D A , R A Y N OVA K , F O R M E R L O D G E R T O P R I M E M I N I S T E R H A R P E R , I S A R I G H T- H A N D - M A N , A S E C R E T A R Y OF SORTS, GATEKEEPER TO THE PRIME MINISTER’S A D D R E S S B O O K B U T A L S O A P O L I T I C A L A DV I S O R . I N T H E U N I T E D S T A T E S O F A M E R I C A , R E G G I E L OV E I S A FORMER AID TO

BARACK OBAMA

WHOSE

HELD

BAG

ALL THE

PRESIDENT’S

E S S E N T I A L

NEEDS,

WHOSE

TERM

WA S C U T S H O R T

BY

CALL

TO

HIS

BUT

COMPLETE

THE

MASTERS

A T W H A R T O N . I N C H I N A I S L I Z H A N S H U, T H E D E P U T Y SECRETARY

TO

FORMER

PA R A M O U N T

LEADER

HU

J I N S H O U, W H O S E T I T L E B E S T OW S H I M A S W E E P I N G AUTHORITY GREATER THAN THE AMERICAN CHIEF OF STAFF’S. DESPITE DECADES AND OCEANS, ONE ASPECT OF THE SECRETARY’S LEGACY REMAINS, STRADDLING THE LINE BETWEEN DUTY AND PERSONAL TASTE, THEIR C L O T H I N G M U S T A LW A Y S B E B E YO N D R E P R OA C H .


Words / ZAK ORMUT-FLEISHMAN, Illustrations / ZAGNY DURBIN

PRESIDENTIAL SECRETARIES REGGIE LOVE

ANGELA KELLY LI ZHANSHU UNITED KINGDOM Personal Assistant

CHINA Director of the General Office

RAY NOVAK

The campaign trail is as dynamic as a battlefield. Just off-bus are picket lines, supporters, and pundits hollering, stump speeches given impromptu (and prepared for accordingly), and TV cameras recording it all. For the president to navigate it with grace and poise, the role of ‘body man’ was created. Carrying a bag holding everything from Tide-to-Go and dental floss to water bottles and security memos, the body man is always by the president’s side. During his time as body man, ‘iReggie,’ as the president called him, was a paragon in his field: friend, confidant, and the man often deciding who could occupy the president’s time. Usually found just off-camera, Mr. Love wore dark-striped suits, primary colour ties, and squash-court sunglasses—always accessorized by a large black bag.

Let’s face it, the Queen at eightysix, looks healthier, speaks more eloquently, and dresses more elegantly than Posh Spice ever could. It could be said however, that one ray of radiance is not her own, one so tied to her current regime of chic that to lose it would mean a different, less glamorous, queen. Without Angela Kelly, the Queen’s personal assistant and dresser, there would be no memorable pink Chanel suits, no proper hats, no glorious pearls. As personal assistant, Kelly is also responsible for the Queen’s correspondence and mail, as well as maintaining her daily routine, but it is undoubtedly for Kelly’s style that she was chosen. When dressing herself, Kelly wears regal attire in comfortable cuts, with a heel for good measure.

When the son of the former deputy secretary was found dead in his totalled Ferrari Spider, with two women still alive, all of them naked, no questions were asked. The secretary was fired, internet searches blocked, and Li Zhanshu was hired in his place. As the director of the general office, Li is at the top of the branch of Chinese government responsible for organizing government affairs. Privy to the most sensitive information, discreet directors have in the past moved to the highest ranks of government officialdom. In stark contrast to his predecessor, Li wears a businessman’s suit, slightly too big and shapeless, and does what is expected of him.

Here at home, politics lack the drama of constant elections, the austerity of communism, or the desperation caused by dictatorship. Instead, we have Stephen Harper. He likes hockey, dislikes the Kyoto Agreement, and stirs national identity around targeted commercials. For a man so focused on informational hegemony, Ray Novak was perfectly trained. Described by Harper as “a beacon of strength,” Novak is said to act discreetly and efficiently dealing with Harper’s everyday needs and political ones. If Harper needs something important from you, Ray Novak will be the one at your door. Wearing a blue-black powersuit, aggressively textured tie, and permanently windswept hair, Novak wears the uniform of the Canadian spy, nondescript with a flourish.

PERKS OF THE JOB: As part of

PERKS OF THE JOB: Kelly enjoys tea

PERKS OF THE JOB: Li has more

Obama’s election ritual, Love gets to play the first game of basketball with the leader of the free world.

with the Queen, privately.

power than the rest of the list combined and doubled.

PERKS OF THE JOB: Along with the prime minister, Novak calls 24 Sussex Drive his home.

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Personal Assistant (Body Man)

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CANADA Principal Secretary


PHOTOGRAPHER / FLORENCE LEUNG STYLIST / COREEN MILLER MAKEUP / OZ ZANDIYEH (JUDY INC. / M.A.C COSMETICS) HAIR / ATEFEH SHOJAIE MODEL / LUCY B. (LIZBELL AGENCY)

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Gown, JACQUELINE CONOIR $725 Headpiece, EXPRESSION $59 Ring, H&M $10

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Gown, JACQUELINE CONOIR $1,200 Bolero, MAX STUDIO $89 Bracelet, EXPRESSION $29 Ring, FOREVER 21 $10

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Gown, VINCENT LEE $360 Shoes, MARC FISHER $89 Headpiece, STYLIST’S OWN Ring, FOREVER 21 $10 Bangle, EXPRESSION $29

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Dress, TAYLOR BLACK $150 Bolero, LINDSAY WALSH Price upon request Earrings, VINTAGE $25 Shoes, STEVE MADDEN $150 Gold Ring, ALDO $15 Black Ring, FOREVER 21 $10

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Dress, VICTOR COSTA at HOLT RENFREW VINTAGE

Necklace, ALDO $39 Bracelet, HOLT RENFREW $129

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DRESSED TO KILL THE JOURNEY FROM MAN TO MATADOR Words / SCOTT K. MONTGOMERY, Stills / SCOTT MONTGOMERY / TAD MUNNINGS

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To watch a matador dressing for a bullfight is to be given a privileged glimpse into an ancient and powerful tradition. Over the course of an hour, the matador transforms himself into a mythical figure who, like David, will risk his life to bring down a giant. If he succeeds, he will instill in his audience a brief and overwhelming immortality. Of course, making a living by risking one’s own life is not for everyone; bullfighting is more a calling than a job. Like a priest or a monk, the matador lives apart from society, occupying instead the ‘world of the bulls’—a world entirely consumed by, and devoted to, the sphinxlike creatures. Any undue attachment is potentially lethal weakness. The costume worn for the bullfight, or ‘suit of lights,’ is only the outward manifestation of an inner distinction maintained by the matador every hour of every day. The dressing ritual is a solemn and solitary experience. Although the matador’s sword master is there to assist him (putting on the suit of lights is not a one-man job), the sword master is a non-presence, neither talking, nor getting in the way of whatever rituals help the matador get ready to face the charges of a 600 kilogram bull. Only rarely is an outsider extended the honor of an invitation to attend.

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My first dressing was on Easter Sunday in Madrid. Victor Barrio, Spain’s most promising apprentice matador (imagine Sidney Crosby just before being drafted into the NHL), was about to take his alternativa, a bullfight in which an apprentice is invested with the title of full matador de toros.

difficult transition from apprentice to full matador. Failure could lead to the end of his dream, a fate worse than death for most matadors. Although he lives in Madrid, Barrio chose to dress in a nearby hotel, beginning the process of distancing himself from the regular world. Each town in Spain has a hotel that is favoured by those who move in the ‘world of the bulls.’ A cape and sword on display in the lobby indicate the torero’s presence, one that temporarily consecrates the entire building.

Barrio’s choice of time and place created almost unrealizable expectations. In Spain, bullfighting and religion go hand in hand. Many of the biggest bullfights fall on, and are associated with, the highest Catholic holidays. It does not get any more dramatic than Easter Sunday. Likewise Madrid: bullfighting’s undisputed capital is known as the “city that gives everything, and the city that takes it away.” A triumph here could guarantee Barrio important contracts for the rest of the season, allowing him to make the extremely

Barrio’s room was silent. He made me promise in advance that I would not speak unless I was spoken to. When I arrived, he was having trouble attaching his castañeta (a detachable pigtail) to the back of his head. In the past, matadors wore a real pigtail as a kind

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of caste mark indicating their separation from the rest of society. In the early twentieth century, Juan Belmonte—widely regarded as the most important matador of the twentieth century, and the man who brought modernism to the art of bullfighting—cut his pigtail off to eradicate this priestly distance. Ironically, Belmonte’s deathdefying style of statuesque stillness in the face of the charge and the terrifying closeness with which he let the bull’s horns pass his body, were greeted with an elation that made him seem all the more distinct. Since Belmonte, bullfighters have worn clip-ons. I am not sure if Barrio took his difficulty in securing his castañeta as symbolic, but the tension in the room was palpable. Victor’s sword master helped him into the sheer silk underwear, sterilized to prevent infection should he be gored. The garters that hold up his pink stockings took fifteen minutes to get right. His pants are so tight that he was lifted off the ground with each attempt to pull them up. Throughout, Victor peered into a floor-length mirror. Like the other matadors whose dressings I would attend over the course of the season, he kept examining himself anew as he donned each garment. He seemed to be asking himself: “Do I really have it in me to do this today?” “Am I really a matador?” If his answers were anything but affirmative, it could mean goring or death in the ring. It struck me how different this was than watching an athlete dress. The suit of lights is not a uniform. And bullfighting—as any aficionado will tell you—is not a sport. It is a ritual. Watching Barrio dress was more like watching a priest preparing to administer an important mass. Matadors are often extended a kind of holy reverence. This afternoon, Barrio would have to induce in his audience the kind of cathartic ecstasy normally associated with religious reverie.

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O N L Y T W E N T Y-

Before tightening his tie, Barrio shaved and then pomaded his hair, nervously whistling the whole time, his eyes on the mirror. He was helped into his jacket.

FOUR YEARS IN,

He looked like the perfect image of a matador. He placed his hat upon his head and turned to the mirror one last time. In a moment, he would be on his way to the bullring to prove that he was indeed a matador de toros; that with his cape he could create an illusion so powerful that it could bring one of nature’s most lethal beasts under his complete control; that he could get close enough to the bull in both mind and spirit that he could kill it, before it—slowly figuring out how to find the solid body of the matador behind the illusion—killed him.

BARRIO’S LIFE HAD REACHED

Only twenty-four years in, Barrio’s life had reached its climax.

ITS CLIMAX.

Officially, Barrio would become a full matador an hour later in the ring, but for me it happened, all of a sudden, in a dark hotel room, in front of a mirror. Fully dressed in pink silk and gold brocade, he watched himself cape imaginary bulls as if here were his audience. He seemed untouchable. He told me beforehand to be ready: when he decided to leave for the ring, there would be no hesitation. In a single gesture he turned away from the mirror, strode out the door, down the hallway, and into the elevator. On the way down, he took one last moment for self-reflection. When the elevator opened, he turned himself over to the public, and to the inevitability of events transpiring too quickly to think about. People touched him as he crossed the lobby. He made his way to the van that would take him to the ring.

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TORERO

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NORWAY'S POLAR NIGHT A SEASON UNDER THE STARS Words / JAYA THOMLISON, Images / VISITNORWAY.COM

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Thomas Skyum


Stockshots / visitnorway.com

I wake up in a strange house, grateful that the sun is still well below the horizon. My group had been following a trail of glass lanterns from porch to porch and here is where we landed. Bodø, Norway can be disorienting at 1pm.

We string glass lanterns between our houses, buy Akevitt and wine, invite musicians to bring their guitars, and synthesizers, and drum kits, and violins, and tambourines, and any other noisemakers that they have been hoarding in their closets for the rest of the year: we celebrate. Surrounded by snow and with temperatures of nearly -40°C, there is no chance of the sun rising tomorrow.

Most people’s familiarity with Norway is limited to knowledge about the fjords or the Northern Lights. The more pedantic among us will, perhaps, also have heard of the Rondane Mountains or Norway’s epithet, “The land of the midnight sun.” Few people, however, know about the counterpart to the midnight sun, Norway’s polar night.

Standing up from the couch I had been sleeping on, it strikes me that the musicians are still playing—twenty-eight hours after they first began. A second shift must have come to relieve them of their duties. Attempting to out-do each other with energy and drive, they play jazz interpretations of classic seventies rock—David Bowie sung in scat, The Doors played syncopated like Duke Ellington.

For four months of each year, every morning, as the sun is just about to rise above the horizon, it stops. Beginning in November, at first you can see the earliest stages of dawn develop in the distance before the sun begins to set. By January, the sun makes no effort to rise at all, and darkness lasts from midnight to midnight.

I stagger to the impromptu buffet where one of the tired musicians is trying to decide between a morning meal of eggs and stockfish cod, or a more lunch-appropriate sandwich. Norwegian at heart, the stockfish cod won out. A form of preserved fish, stockfish gains layers of flavour from the wind and ocean salt that it is exposed to as it hangs outside in the cold weather to cure. It is a salty, savoury delight that has been served in Norway for over a thousand years.

In an attempt to break up the night, various devices have been employed, such as alarm clocks with sun-imitating lamps, to help create signposts with which to delineate the days. Ultraviolet mood lamps spray sixties fluorescence at the walls, supposedly providing energy and vitamin D. Work routines shift to help those too disoriented to wake up before noon. Then there are the rest of us.

With food in hand, and a group of people building behind me, I put on layers of clothing, and trundle outside. In the midday darkness, the sky is alive with stars. Not only do the northern lights periodically wrap the atmosphere in a wreath of green light, but when the city, in an attempt to associate light only with the waking hours of the day, shuts off the lights in office and government buildings, the milky way blazes overhead.

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Yngve Ask

Sónia Arrepia Photography

It becomes much easier to acclimatize to the darkness when you realize the stars are so close above you—it imparts the feeling that the distance between earth and stratosphere is traversable, just a 50 km drive upwards. It is no doubt for this experience that cruise ships continue to float down the fjords of northern Norway throughout the season, providing tourists and stargazers a taste of the night while not subjecting them to the full four-month battery of darkness.

Arriving at our destination, a stone house with a bright red door, we are greeted by glasses of straw-coloured spirits and a warm fire. The man who had run the marathon, dusted his clothes off and walked towards me. I cannot remember his name. Had we even talked? The house has had at least fifty people stream through it in the darkness, and everyone was pairing up in conversation. Was he a friend’s friend? Did he speak English?

We make our way to the house next door, guided by glass lanterns, and holding each other’s hands so we don’t get lost. Some of us are more experienced with the extended night than others—the man beside me had run in the popular half-marathon in Tromsø that annually celebrates the polar night, while the woman leading the way looked somewhat disoriented.

He walked past me, stopping at the buffet table. Picking up two sandwiches, he smiled and walked past me again to sit in front of the fireplace. I sat down beside him, next to the fire and introduced myself. He handed me a sandwich. It turned out he spoke no English, had slow hands not made for gesturing, and we stayed together in a comfortable, still silence until the band had grown tired and been replaced by another shift.

It’s not always easy to stay in good spirits in the absence of daylight. People avoid the nature reserves and fisheries, and head towards the city lights and universities. It was this impulse that drove us from house to house. Surrounded by people, and music, and delicious food, whole days pass ensconced with lively conversation, warmth, and revelry.

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Nancy Bundt

Arriving at our destination, a stone house with a bright red door, we are greeted by glasses of straw-coloured spirits and a warm fire. The man who had run the marathon, dusted his clothes off and walked towards me. I cannot remember his name. Had we even talked? The house has had at least fifty people stream through it in the darkness, and everyone was pairing up in conversation. Was he a friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s friend? Did he speak English? He walked past me, stopping at the buffet table. Picking up two sandwiches, he smiled and walked past me again to sit in front of the fireplace. I sat down beside him, next to the fire and introduced myself. He handed me a sandwich. It turned out he spoke no English, had slow hands not made for gesturing, and we stayed together in a comfortable, still silence until the band had grown tired and been replaced by another shift.

Terje Rakke

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HONEST FARE 56


HONEST FARE

There are restaurants in the trendy districts of Toronto whose bright lights and multi-million-dollar design inspire hope for our culinary future. You enter excitedly, order extravagantly—but when your meal arrives you find the rice crunchy, your grilled whitefish so dry that the pricey imported olive oil cannot provide salvation. You begin to wonder if there is any hope of finding somewhere to have an inspiring meal and killer cocktail, thinking, “Enough with flashy decor! What about the food?” For those willing to venture away from the usual haunts there is The Harbord Room, a restaurant in its fifth year of operation that offers patrons good food, well prepared, in uncomplicated surroundings. Walking into the little red house on Harbord Street, hip-hop is playing, although not as loudly as is nowadays the norm. Staff greet you with a casual, cool air. You begin to worry. However, once you are lead to a table by an accommodating server, sit down and take a look at the menu, you relax: Chefs Cory Vitiello and Curt Martin are in control of everything. The menu is unpretentious and substantial. It features grilled flank steak with hush puppies, a 60-minute egg, and foie gras sauce; a naturally raised beef burger with sharp cheddar, and caramelized onions on an egg bun with fries. There is no strained thematic vein. If anything, the theme is good food. As Chef Martin puts it, “we have created a menu based on food that we believe is good from our professional standpoint, and that we believe our customers will like simply because of the pleasure they may experience while eating it.” The Harbord Room is not about creating an atmosphere of imposed value; rather it is about allowing the quality of the food and the efforts of its makers to speak for themselves.

AT THE HARBORD ROOM THE PROOF OF THE PUDDING IS IN THE EATING Words / CAMILLE MOORE, Images / BRIAN HAMILTON

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When creating new items for their menu, Chefs Vitiello and Martin aim to balance the composition of the plate. Having a single flavour is forbidden in their culinary aesthetic; combinations of flavours and textures are intended to play off of each other and create a depth of experience. A menu staple, the whitefish ceviche is an equilibrium of expertly marinated fish (not too tangy), pickled watermelon (juicy and delicious), avocado purĂŠe (creamy), shelled tender edamame (fresh), and is finished with a sprinkling of house-made corn nuts (an appropriate crunch).

While undoubtedly talented and worthy of the acclaim they receive, one does not get the impression that chefs Martin and Vitiello seek out praise. Chatting with them, it is evident they pursue a humble and progressive approach to their craft; reinvention is not the goal, but constant professional improvement is. Of course, accolades are a compliment, and often indicative of value, but the chefs rate the achievements of their restaurant differently. They prioritize fine food, fine work, fine atmosphere, camaraderie, and most importantly, a patronâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enjoyment. Does it matter that the slice of rutabaga in my composed winter salad was prepared sous-vide with notes of orange and mustard embedded within? Yes, but that culinary technicality is subordinate to its exquisite taste. The Harbord Room strips away the superfluous components of a restaurant and gets down to the heart of the matter.

The concept of balance is even extended to the decor. The space is framed by the wainscoting panels of a gentlemanâ&#x20AC;şs cigar nook, yet the paint colour is rosy in the dim evening light. Art Deco candleholders sit on marble tables surrounded by comfortable wood and leather chairs. Light streams into an open-air patio busy with heavy metal tables. Visually, The Harbord Room is vibrant and historic at once.

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On the heels of their busiest season so far, the chefs have seized the opportunity to expand and will be opening a new restaurant just a few doors west of their current spot. Chef Vitiello will stay on at the helm of their first venture, while Chef Martin is slated to take the lead at the new location, adding a brunch service to their collaborative repertoire. Rather than focusing on a particular dining trend or theme, the new restaurant aims to provide a lively atmosphere set in stylish surroundings. Where The Harbord Room excels for its honest fare, much of Torontoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dining culture still relies on smoke and mirrors for success. But, in a city where flash often draws crowds, restaurants like The Harbord Room serve to remind us that food is still a valuable component of the dining experience.

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S I N G L E MALT WHISKY, S C O T TISH HIGHLANDS Words / LONELLE SELBO

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BODY Observing the contents of the crystal cylinder, a warming liquor, the colour of rich honey, winked back, glinting copper under the muted lights of the club’s carefully 'après work' atmosphere. His highlight reel ticked off darkened images: a tailored shape bent over a large metal desk, the small hours of the morning, growing smaller. The relentless demands from a client parade. He looked hard at the glass, tilting it this way then that. Watching the potion move, the way its body lay against the thickly transparent walls, legs to heaven—it was neither too heavy, nor too light.

NO S E A few spears of grassy smoke escaped the glass and travelled upwards prickling his nose. The young executive breathed in deeply, exhaling in a long sigh. There was something to remember, something about the long road. His mind went to summer: a bowl of fruit left slightly too long in the late afternoon sun; the smell of the sea somewhere just out of sight; notes of dust, blown up by the rhythmic rock of a creaking chair on the old wooden porch. He remembered the clammy, mudcaked hand of childhood. The man smiled slowly and raised the glass to his lips.

F I E L D N O TE S

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TAS T E The first sip was long and friendly; the whisky felt its way around his mouth before he swallowed—firmly, purposefully. He took another sip and the peaty, salt-kissed toffee lingered gently, a sweet burn at the back of his throat. It was true about the finish: He could taste it still, though it always slipped away too soon. He closed his eyes and embraced the sensation of youth, of sitting at the peak of an empire, on the edge of everything. The crew would join him later and then they would switch to vodka, but he had another hour to savour until then.


PHOTOGRAPHER / DEAN WEST STYLIST / KIRSTEN READER (JUDY INC.) HAIR + MAKEUP / DAVID ALLAN JONES (P1M) MODEL / LISA RAY

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FACE / Foundation, ILLAMASQUA SKIN BASE FOUNDATION 4.5 $51 Highlights, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER WHITE/PINK 943 $22 EYES / Brows, DIOR EYEBROW PENCIL 453 SABLE $27 Pigment, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER BLACK GOLD 950 $22 Eyeliner, M.A.C EYE PENCIL FELINE $18 Eyeliner, SMASHBOX JET SET WATERPROOF EYELINER MIDNIGHT BLACK $27 Eyeshadow, ILLAMASQUA 4-COLOUR LIQUID METAL PALETTE $54 Mascara, GIVENCHY NOIR COUTURE 4 IN 1 MASCARA BLACK SATIN $35 LIPS / Lipstick, M.A.C LIPMIX ORANGE $18 Lipgloss, ELLIS FAAS GLAZED LIPS L304 SHEER ORANGE $42 Dress, CHLOÉ COMME PARRIS AT THE NARWHAL $395 Belt as Necklace, CHANEL $3,050 Earrings, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COLLECTION $250

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FACE / Foundation, ILLAMASQUA SKIN BASE FOUNDATION 4.5 $51 Highlights, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER WHITE/PINK 943 $22 EYES / Brows, M.A.C PENULTIMATE BROW MARKER $18 Pigment, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER BLACK GOLD 950 $22 Eyeliner, M.A.C EYE PENCIL FELINE $18 Eyeliner, ILLAMASQUA EYELINER CAKE MISLEAD $23 Eyeshadow, ILLAMASQUA 4-COLOUR LIQUID METAL PALETTE $54 Mascara, GIVENCHY PHENOMEN’EYES MASCARA PHENOMEN’BLACK $30 LIPS / Lipstick, M.A.C LIPMIX FUSCHIA $18 Dress, JUNYA WATANABE COMME DES GARÇONS at TNT $995 Belt as Necklace, CHANEL $3,050 Earrings, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COLLECTION $250

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FACE / Foundation, YSL LE TEINT TOUCHE ÉCLAT BEIGE DORE 60 $55 Highlights, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER WHITE/ORANGE 940 $22 Blush, ILLAMASQUA CREAM BLUSHER LIBIDO $32 EYES / Brows, DIOR POWER BROW PENCIL 453 SABLE $27 Eyeliner, M.A.C EYEPENCIL COFFEE $18 Eyeliner, M.A.C EYEPENCIL FELINE $18 Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOR EVER PURE PIGMENTS #2 $23 Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOR EVER PURE PIGMENTS #4 $23 LIPS / Lipstick, M.A.C LIPMIX FUSCHIA $18 Blouse, EMILIO PUCCI at HOLT RENFREW $1,695 Earrings, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COUTURE $400

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FACE / Foundation, COVER FX TOTAL COVERAGE CREAM FOUNDATION E20 $39 Highlights, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER WHITE/MAUVE 942 $22 EYES / Brows, M.A.C CHARCOAL BROWN SHADOW $18 Eyeliner, ELLIS FAAS CREAMY EYES DEEP BLACK E103 $43 Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER PURPLE 954 $22 Mascara, ELLIS FAAS E401 BLACK $41 LIPS / Lipgloss, COVER FX MINT TINT PINK COPPER $22 Blouse, RAG & BONE at THE NARWHAL $370 Jacket, DRIES VAN NOTEN at HOLT RENFREW $1,915 Necklace, SHOUROUK at THE NARWHAL $350 Necklace, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COUTURE $750 Necklace, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COUTURE $850 Necklace, DANNIJO at HOLT RENFREW $380 Earrings, MINDHAM FINE JEWELLERY $6,650

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FACE / Foundation, COVER FX TOTAL COVERAGE CREAM FOUNDATION E20 $39 Highlights, MAKE UP FOR EVER STAR POWDER WHITE/TURQUOISE 944 $22 EYES / Brows, ANASTASIA BROW WIZ BRUNETTE $26 Pigment, M.A.C PIGMENT NAVAL BLUE $25 Eyeliner, M.A.C EYE PENCIL FELINE $18 Mascara, DIOR DIORSHOW MASCARA BLACK $31 LIPS/ Lipgloss, COVER FX MINT TINT PINK COPPER $22 Dress, BALMAIN at TNT $4,860 Collar, CHANEL $7,725 Earrings, OSCAR DE LA RENTA at HOLT RENFREW $345 Silver Bracelet, PAMELA LOVE at TNT $585 Cuff, MINDHAM FINE JEWELLERY $19,500

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the

TRUE not so

HOLLYWOOD

STORY THE BUSINESS OF LAUREN CONRAD Words / HEIDI HOFSTAD, Images / HARPER COLLINS CANADA

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Lauren Conrad

HAD SOMETH SOMETHING TO PROVE. SINCE LEAVING REALITY TELEVISION, WHERE SHE STARRED IN B BOTH MTV’S LAGUNA BEACH AND THE HILLS, THE TWENTY-SIX-YEAR-OLD HAD BEEN WORKING HARD TO DITCH THE STIGMA OF HER CELEBRITY. DO NOT LET HER LAIDBACK OMBRÉ LOCKS AND SIGNATURE WINGED EYELINER FOOL YOU: CONRAD IS AN ACCOMPLISHED DESIGNER, BUSINESSWOMAN, AND WRITER TOO. 70


Conrad’s current portfolio is vast. She maintains two fashion lines (LC Lauren Conrad and the more contemporary Paper Crown) and produces a collection of reusable makeup, shopping, and lunch bags called XO(eco) from BlueAvocado.com. She has authored a small library of books that frequent the New York Times bestseller list: two novel series, LA Candy and The Fame Game, a fashion guide called Lauren Conrad Style, and the latest, a tell-all compendium of hair and makeup trade secrets called Lauren Conrad Beauty. Frankly, her new reality is based more on hard work than (televised) play. Asked about her transition from star to seamstress, Conrad revealed the depth of her aspirations. “The television shows created an opportunity for me and I had several things I wanted to do, but fashion has always been my main focus.” She has taken to fashion with a fervour that few others can claim. Describing her design aesthetic for LC Lauren Conrad and Paper Crown, she recounts the minutiae that compose her ‘girly vibe,’ details such as specific lace insets, bows, and trims. And hard work does not scare her either. “I’m at my best when I’m running out of time and I haven’t gotten enough sleep—it sounds strange, but I just kind of love being a little overwhelmed. I go back and forth with Kohl’s on a lot of emails, regarding LC Lauren Conrad—which has expanded to shoes, accessories, and sunglasses,” shares Conrad, becoming animated as she refers to her growing day-to-day schedule. “They’ll shoot over quick questions, whether it’s options for an upper on a shoe, or different colours of jewels to use in a certain piece of jewellery.”

This hands-on involvement also extends to Paper Crown, where her roles in the design and production of the line—from first sketch to final sample—keep her constantly in the office. Conrad explains, “In fashion design, you must pay attention to the business that individual pieces of clothing are performing. Each collection is like a puzzle of disparate bottoms, tops, dresses, and jackets that you fit together to make outfits and to complement each other.” Taking her theory of complementary design further, Conrad believes there is an ideal venue that will highlight her first showing of Paper Crown. Opting out of highprofile locations, such as New York and Los Angeles Fashion Weeks, Conrad decided on a low-key backdrop, explaining, “a more intimate setting, where you can display the line over cocktails and talk to everyone who has come to see it,” would be more appropriate. Conrad emphasizes the importance of spending time with her fans while on her most recent book tour. “It’s a really positive atmosphere to meet people face-to-face. Without people supporting you, there’s no business…it’s non-existent.” Conrad does however concede that she always considered writing a creative hobby, and that her transition to author was not always without objection. Originally pitching an advice-based dating book, she explains. “I’ve had a really bizarre dating life. Several gentlemen have gone on to date men after me, so there are definitely red flags I would suggest girls look out for. The publisher didn’t want it.” On the subject of writing rituals, she simply laughs them off, saying time does not afford her that ‘luxury’, “I do my best to get it all done. As long as I have my laptop, I can do it. Lauren Conrad Beauty took three to four months to write, edit, shoot, and compile. That deadline was a little insane—the fastest I’ve ever produced a book.”

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Conrad’s non-stop schedule keeps her from the Los Angeles party scene—not that she minds too much. Describing her social life as a nice dinner with friends or Sunday-night bowling, she prefers a quiet night in. “I’m pretty exhausted by the end of the day, so I’m happy to just go home, watch a rerun, and go to bed. If I can, I stop by the market so I can make dinner for the night, because I like to cook,” she says, adding, “I also usually have at least a few emails or posts for my website to work on.” But perhaps Conrad’s biggest gain since leaving television, is one that cannot be measured. “When you’re working on differentt things, you wear a lot of hats. It’s really important to be able to take them off and have a nice evening.” The freedom to plan herr own days, ws, has given without considering cast members and production crews, ue a true (not so Conrad the opportunity to do what she loves—pursue Hollywood) story.

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FZW

ONE hotel

where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd



126-year-old historic banking charm Modern suites with kitchenettes & laundry Prestigious King & Yonge street address Private entrance to subway & PATH Spectacular city and lake views

A Hotel to call Home 1 King Street West Toronto, Ontario 731.866.470.5464 www.onekingwest.com


ARTHUR MENDONÇA MAN OF ALL MARKETS Words / NINA MOURIN, Images / ARTHUR MENDONÇA PRESS

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Arthur Mendonça is a consummate explorer. In his ten-year career, he has designed gowns inspired by the shores of Italy; jumpsuits lit by Egypt’s ancient wealth; and most recently, sharply tailored suiting based on Japanese origami. However, when asked about the foundation for his eclectic aesthetic, he points to a single source, Toronto, the city that “introduces you to other cultures and backgrounds.” Like Yves St. Laurent before him, who brought soigné French tailoring to Asian markets, Arthur Mendonça brings Canadian diversity to an awaiting world.

Speaking just before the release of his 2013 spring/summer collection, Mendonça made clear the enormous effect these formative impressions have had on his life. Soft-spoken when answering questions directly, Mendonça became animated when speaking about his childhood—a tone that reappeared when discussing the careers of his fashion forbearers, Christian Dior and Yves Saint Laurent. Mendonça’s own career began with a bang. His first runway show, at the 2002 Toronto Fashion Week, contrasted casual street style and formal evening attire, mixing denims with chiffons, all held together by Mendonça’s trademark sharp tailoring. It was the most talked about show of Fashion Week, receiving rave reviews from major magazines, celebrities, and designers alike.

Born in Toronto, Mendonça has always had an eye for fashion. Enamoured with the contrast of matte tailored tops and shimmering voluminous bottoms, he admits Disney princesses were early fashion influences. But it was after moving to São Miguel, Portugal that Mendonça was able to see Toronto with fresh eyes, turning the once familiar landscapes and people of his childhood into sources of inspiration. From Portugal, he moved back to Toronto to study fashion at Ryerson University.

For Mendonça this was just the beginning. He continued to hone his skills by branching out into other design processes. He was invited to study at the prestigious SAGA Design Centre in

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Copenhagen, where gifted designers from around the world are asked to experiment with techniques in fur design. In 2004, he received the Best New Designer Award from Style Magazine, and The Design Exchange Gold Award from The National Post. Despite his successes, Mendonça continued to improve upon the skills that had earned him his acclaim, stating “I love [fashion], and I work hard, and I enjoy it.” What is so striking about Mendonça’s work is his ability to incorporate wildly different fabrics, textures, even personalities, into a single outfit. “I put clothes together to make a story and a lot of the time that story comes from fabrics. If a woman walks by wearing an incredible fabric, I’ll think, oh, I really like the way she’s wearing that, and I’ll use her in

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the narrative.” His 2013 spring/summer show made use of everything from satins to leathers to heavy printed materials, elegantly combining feminine tailoring with masculine prints.

So, what’s next for the 36-year-old designer? He has already conquered television, acting as a guest-judge on Project Runway Canada. The Arthur Mendonça brand is already making a mark on the American and European markets. Perhaps if we look to his predecessors we can divine the answer. Like Yves Saint Laurent before him, perhaps his future lies east.

Far from having fallen into success inadvertently, it is apparent that Mendonça is an ambitious man. Within a year of receiving his first awards, the designer ventured out to display his clothing at fashion shows around the world. Beginning with a wildly successful showing at Los Angeles Fashion Week in 2005, he immediately began to prepare collections for display in London, Montreal, and São Miguel. When these shows were met with similar acclaim, Mendonça brought his work to showrooms throughout New York and Toronto, where his dresses sold to celebrities such as Rihanna and Nelly Furtado. This is not to say his career has been without difficulty. In 2009, following a strong year for Mendonça (but a weak year for the stock market), he was forced to take a two year hiatus from fashion design, spending his time traveling and studying fashion from the side-lines. However, the young designer seemed undiscouraged, and in 2011, he held a luxurious “Return-fromBankruptcy” show at the Trump International Tower.

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Necklace, MICHAEL KORS $355 Amber Bracelet, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COLLECTION $1,500 Gold Bracelet, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COLLECTION $325 Ring, ALEXIS BITTAR at TNT $265

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PHOTOGRAPHER / ADRIAN ARMSTRONG STYLIST / DONAVAN WHITE, KIRSTEN READER (JUDY INC.) HAIR + MAKEUP / NICOLE HARRISON MANICURIST / ANNIE LAM MODELS / JANEL, LAUREN (FORD MODELS)

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Briefcase, CHANEL at REMIX CLOTHING $3,000 Two-Tone Bracelet, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COLLECTION $800 Gold Bracelet, MICHAEL KORS $175

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Boot, HERMÈS Price upon request Bracelet, CAROLE TANENBAUM VINTAGE COLLECTION $275

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Scarf, VALENTINO at REMIX CLOTHING $200

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Shoe, CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN at REMIX CLOTHING $500 Bracelet, PAMELA LOVE at TNT $395

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Purse, CHANEL $2,725

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FOR MANY OF US, artistic trends are distant, impenetrable, and barely adaptable to our everyday lives. For a lucky few, however, this process comes naturally. They see potential in high-level artistry, trends in disparate designs, and effortlessly channel them into something relevant on a wider scale. This issue, we talked to some of Toronto’s top interpreters about who they are, how they look at trends, where they find them, and how they subvert them from obscurity into something their audience can really sink their teeth into.

HOTSHOPS:

ORAL KAROL

KIMBERLY NEWPORT-MIMRAN

A proud Torontonian, Oral Karol is a true product of this vibrant and evergrowing metropolis, giving his real-estate clients insight into the various communities that make Toronto a sought-after gem. Part of that insight is lifestyle oriented and with his background as a consultant with Hermès, Karol recognizes that building relationships with clients begins with ‘the look.’ “The work outfit strongly reflects the relationship I have with whomever it is I am meeting. Whether it is a tailored suit…to a more casual layered look with a jacket, sweater, and shirt over slim jeans and brogues. If I could, I’d live in jeans and a sport jacket. It’s a look that can cater to almost any occasion.”

President and Head Designer of Pink Tartan, Kimberly Newport-Mimran co-founded the well-known womenswear line in Toronto in 2002. Two years later, she launched a New York showroom and today the line is available at Saks Fifth Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Holt Renfrew, and The Bay as well as stores in Dubai and Seoul. Newport-Mimran has also channeled her talent for high design into creating the chic uniforms for Canada’s boutique Porter Airlines, Manhattan’s rooftop bar at 60 Thompson, and Hollywood’s Roosevelt Hotel Tropicana Bar, not to mention the stylish concierges at Holt Renfrew. Despite this demanding schedule, Newport-Mimran still finds time to relax. “Everything in moderation. I prefer wine to whisky and a hot bath.” When it comes to dining out, she reveals, “We eat out quite often, so I have many favourite places. I do like grilled fish and salad at Sotto Sotto on Avenue Road—it’s a weekly fave.”

WHERE DO YOU SHOP? There are so many great new options for menswear in Toronto. The Holt Renfrew men’s department is the foundation of my wardrobe (Joey always makes sure my suits are razor sharp). Queen Street West has become a unique men’s corridor of bespoke and ready-to-wear. Since Central King West is where I spend most of my time living and working, none of my outfits are complete without something from Gotstyle.

WHAT GETS YOU INSPIRED? It changes each season and depends on my travel schedule. I do pull a lot of inspiration from fabrics; that’s how I kick off the development of a collection. The design work happens in the silhouette stage for me. I prefer draping and fitting to sketching. I am very tactile in my approach to design.

WHERE DO YOU EAT? I enjoy taking my clients out to eat in neighborhoods they’d like to live in and find myself having lunch meetings at King West Kitchen. The one place I seem to gravitate to when my wife and I are on a date is Church Aperitivo Bar at Queen and Dovercourt. Not only is the food and atmosphere like eating in southern Italy, but owner’s Sandra and Frank make you feel like you’ve grown-up having family feasts together.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH TRENDS? I love research, so when I get an idea, I explore my options thoroughly. I have an extensive fashion library of vintage and new books related to art and fashion [as well as] vintage collections from some of my favourite designers. I love vintage shopping; it’s wonderful to find a treasure!

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE WORK OUTFIT AND WHY?

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

Tech stretch pants and a high twist-viscose turtle—it’s a uniform for me.

This is going to sound like I’m running for elected office, but I actually don’t have a routine that helps me to unwind after a day at work. Of course, you have days that are more colourful than others, but being in a career that you love truly never feels like work…I’m one of the lucky ones. Words / LONELLE SELBO

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INTERPRETERS OF FASHION LAUREN MCPHILLIPS

ROGER MOOKING

Starting her career at Style at Home magazine and working her way up through the masthead, McPhillips decided on a lateral move to a job in PR and digital media. Earlier this year she launched her own company, Bespoke PR, offering a fresh take on PR and social media for small businesses and independent retailers. When she’s not working, writing, or redecorating her apartment, McPhillips can be found out-and-about in the city on any given night. A self-confessed poutine connoisseur and “sucker for Canadian comfort-food joint, Bannock, and their pickerel tacos,” she turns to weighttraining to keep fit, describing cardio as a necessary evil but offering “I also really want to try out the Jukari classes some places in Toronto offer. It’s a Cirque du Soleil type class where you use a trapeze!”

A multitalented interpreter, this Food Network celebrity chef and recording artist is the host and co-creator of the television cooking series, “Everyday Exotic.” In his standard uniform of jeans, sneakers, patterned button-up shirts, and a selfdescribed “crispy haircut,” Mooking admits, “My goal in life is to never have to wear a suit outside of a wedding, a funeral, or the odd awards dinner.” He adds, “I’m in entertainment essentially so I can get away with anything that expresses my personality…and when I want to just blend in and be a fly on the wall, it’s perfect, because no one is paying attention to the guy who is underdressed anyway. It allows me to be a chameleon in any situation.” As for how he relaxes after hours, Mooking replies, “What is ‘after work?’ I’m not really familiar with that. I’ve turned every one of my hobbies into my work, so my outlets for unwinding are also what I do for a living. I risk everything always, both emotionally and creatively every single day. I think it works because I’m constantly unwinding and winding simultaneously, it’s the perfect dynamic tension.”

WHAT INSPIRES YOU? I draw inspiration from everywhere, both traditional and obscure. I obviously look at what other PR firms are doing to be innovative, but I am also inspired visually by graphic design, advertising, and editorial work. In terms of fueling my drive for the work that I do, I read Cathie Black’s book “Basic Black” once a year—it’s an incredible source of advice for working women who want to excel in their career and make a statement.

WHEN DOES INSPIRATION HIT? I’m inspired by everything around me. I particularly like to draw inspiration from outside of the context of the project I'm working on. If it’s a food related project, for instance, I will pay particular attention to architecture, fashion, lifestyle, and music.

HOW DO YOU APPROACH TRENDS?

HOW DO YOU APPROACH TRENDS?

I always keep on top of trends in the PR world and social media community. It’s tough to keep up…so I generally check-in on a few blogs (On the Fourth Floor and NYC PR Girls are great reads) and subscribe to daily e-newsletters, like Mashable and Social Media Today, to glance at in the morning. I’m a tech gal at heart, so social media and the online sphere is integrated into all of the work that I do.

My work allows me a great amount of travel so I’m constantly immersed in global trends. Being in a new situation often forces you to take notice of so many things that you would take for granted if you were living in that place every single day. Then, when I return to Toronto, my own city seems brand new and the perspective I have on it is with fresh eyes.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE TORONTO RESTAURANT?

WHAT DO YOU WEAR TO WORK?

This is not a fair question, but my favourite new restaurant is Actinolite [at Ossington and Dupont]. The chef has a great pedigree, is more genuinely concerned about food than anyone I know…and it’s a young family business of people that I know well and love. Plus the food is spectacular.

I subscribe to the ‘PR uniform’ stereotype—head-to-toe black, all day, every day. I’m big into accessories though, so my typical work outfit is black skinny pants, a silk tank top, and a great black blazer. Add some jewelry, maybe a scarf, and some fun shoes, and I’m out the door. Oh, and sunglasses. Always sunglasses. 87


ALL PHOTOS

FACE / Foundation, CHANEL PERFECTION LUMIERE $55 Concealer, LISE WATIER PORTFOLIO CORRECTORS $31 Contouring, M.A.C SCULPT $18.50 Highlights, BENEFIT WATT’S UP $30 Bronzer, CARGO LIGHT $30 EYES / Brows, BOBBI BROWN DARK BROW KIT $52 Eyeliner, BOBBI BROWN BLACK GEL LINER $26 Eyeliner, STILA STAY ALL DAY INTENSE BLACK LIQUID LINER $20

BESIDE

FACE / Blush, NARS LOVE JOY $32 EYES / Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOR EVER 28076 $22 LIPS / Lipstick, MAYBELLINE DEEPEST CHERRY $14

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the little

death. PHOTOGRAPHER / ERWYN LOEWEN HAIR + MAKEUP / LISA VELLA (FORD ARTISTS) MODEL / HUNTER CHLOÉ (FORD MODELS)

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FACE / Blush, NARS LOVE JOY $32 EYES / Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOR EVER 28128 $22 LIPS / Lipstick, CHANEL ROUGE ALLURE LOVER $32.50 Necklace, PINK PETALS $195

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FACE / Blush, NARS MOUNIA $32 EYES / Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOR EVER 28098 $22 LIPS / Lipstick, CHANEL ROUGE ALLURE ROMANTIC $32.50 Bangle, PINK PETALS $50

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FACE / Blush, NARS LUSTER $32 EYES / Eyeshadow, MAKE UP FOREVER 28076 $22 LIPS / Lipstick, M.A.C STYLE BLACK $18 Bangle, PINK PETALS $50

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YOUR DRIVE to the

TOP H OW FA R W I L L YO U R C A R T A K E YO U ? Words / MARK HACKING, Images / AUDI / LAND ROVER / MERCEDES / ASTON MARTIN / CADILLAC

We are not what we eat. We might be, however, what we drive. For proof, we’ve assembled five must-have rides for professionals travelling along five distinct career paths. Whether you’ve arrived at your chosen destination or are just setting out on the road, if you’re behind the wheel in any of these vehicles, you’re going to love the journey.

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THE CREATIVE GURU 2 013 AU DI R S 5

Whether your creative calling is in media, visual, or even the culinary arts, you’re an established thought leader. Co-workers, colleagues, and competitors look to you for guidance, inspiration, and target practice, respectively. Your choice in rides must be absolutely bulletproof—just like your ideas. The 2013 Audi RS5 [$77,000], is a slick grand touring coupé that’s not only drop-dead gorgeous from every angle, it’s also deliciously powerful. Revving the thundering RS5, 450-horsepower engine, you burst to a top speed of 280 km/h. Don’t worry, the faster you go, the deeper you plunge into the supple leather seats. With the redoubtable quattro all-wheel drive system, and a supremely luxurious and sporty interior, the Audi is a great choice for driving to the studio or to the nearest racetrack.

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THE HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONAL

THE REAL ESTATE MOGUL

2 013 L A N D ROV E R L R 2

2 013 M E RCE DE S - BE N Z G 6 3 A MG

Perhaps it’s the Hippocratic Oath talking, but there’s something disconcerting about doctors, surgeons, or other health care practitioners pulling into emerge in a bright red Ferrari or a matte black hummer. Instead, we believe that a little bit of understatement goes a long way.

If you successfully buy, sell, design, or build property, chances are you have a healthy ego. The challenge is, you cannot afford to be seen as far more successful than your clients, and your vehicle is the most obvious tip-off. The best-laid plan is to leave the Maybach parked at (your) home and pull up to the curb in the 2013 Mercedes-Benz G 63 AMG [$149,900], a dominating off-road-ready vehicle.

In some ways, the 2013 Land Rover LR2 [$39,990] might seem like the country doctor’s Land Rover. But, despite the fact that it is the entry-level offering from the storied British brand, and the engineering has come under fire in the past, this all-new edition seeks to heal all wrongs forever. First off, the LR2 now features the 2.0-litre 4-cylinder turbo that debuted on the wildly popular Range Rover Evoque last year. Reducing the curb weight by 40kg, the revisions include an instrument panel that is svelte rather than chunky and a 7-inch touch screen that is, perhaps, too easy on the eyes. Combine these stats with the legendary Land Rover “take-you-anywhere” capability and the result is a compact crossover that both feels and looks right.

The G 63 AMG is arguably the most irreverent SUV in existence. It’s not the price of this ferocious vehicle that makes it outrageous, it’s the fact that many aspects of the G have remained largely unchanged for over thirty years—and the original was a military vehicle. The G 63 is the most powerful SUV offered by Mercedes-Benz in North America; its twin-turbo V8 develops a mammoth 544-horsepower. While cornering in this boxy SUV is not necessarily its strength, it can effortlessly blast down a straight road and get you to that open house on time.

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THE INVESTMENT BANKER

THE ENTERTAINER

2 013 CA DI L L AC AT S

2 013 A S T ON M A R T I N VA NQU I S H

Like your contemporaries in the real estate world, you want to start out as a winner without looking like you’re bragging. You also want to avoid comparisons to Bernie Madoff. The 2013 Cadillac ATS [$34,000] is perfectly suited for this duty.

Regardless of your chosen medium—music, film, or television—you are accustomed to being the star of the show. As such, you need a car that is much more than just a mode of transportation—you need a fossil-fuelled extension of your personal brand.

The Cadillac ATS is, arguably, the most surprising car of the year. This compact sedan has all the right numbers. Among three different engine choices is a 3.6-litre V6 cranking out 321 horsepower. Even more impressive is how well the ATS handles on the track. Although this little Caddy will likely never be seen in such a setting again, it has been developed on the notorious Nordschleife to deliver crisp handling, high cornering speeds, and superb feedback through the steering wheel. It could be that after test-driving the ATS, you keep the BMW for cruising, and the ATS for driving.

While the 2013 Aston Martin Vanquish [$296,000] is wildly expensive compared to most other cars in the world, it’s also far more entrancing. The body design of this GT coupé, which replaces the DBS in the British carmaker’s line-up, is somehow both curvaceous and muscular. Under the skin, the feeling is mutual: The Vanquish first pummels you with its 565-horsepower V12, adjustable engine mapping, and race-ready launch control system. The initial thrill taken care of, the Aston seduces with its three-mode adjustable suspension system, which allows this fabulous GT to soar over the worst roads imaginable. Just remember, you can’t put a price on looking good in the tabloids.

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Words / MARC SALTZMAN, Images, PRESS

TECH FIXATION

A FINE LINE BETWEEN

Our professional and personal lives have become increasingly intertwined, aided by our smartphones and their apps for both work and play. We’re juggling responsibilities while working from home, and traveling with gadgets to remain organized, productive, and entertained.

9 TO 5 & 5 TO 9

$869

HAVE A SEAT

AERON CHAIR

$1,945

Considered one of the most ergonomic office chairs ever constructed, Aeron Chair ($869) not only supports the way your pelvis tilts naturally forward, but the form-fitting suspension conforms to your body to reduce pressure points. This effect is achieved through a tilt mechanism that lets your neck, shoulders, hips, knees, and ankles pivot naturally as you sit. Other features include breathable material, sloped armrests, and nine adjustment settings. Although the chair is also ninety-four percent recyclable, for the sake of your posture, we hope you’ll never need to recycle it.

MUSIC TO YOUR EARS

AUDEZE LCD3 While $1,945 might be ‘a bit’ steep for a pair of casual-use headphones, reserve your judgment until you’ve had a chance to listen to the high-end Audeze LCD3. Producing clear, powerful, and well-balanced highs, mids, and lows, these American-made audiophile headphones feature Lotus planar magnetic drivers—designed from scratch by Audeze’s engineers—for extraordinary sound quality and frequency extension. Along with free shipping, you can choose between a matching wood storage box and a flight-approved travel case for jetsetters.

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$499

SOUND ADVICE

EN&IS MEGAPHONE Whether it’s to listen to your music without headphones or to enable a better-sounding conference call, Megaphone ($499.99) from en&is is a stylish audio amplifier compatible with the iPhone or iPod touch. Available in multiple colours, the Milan-made ceramic d devic ic sits on a thin wood device f m and employs “passive” frame a ampl p amplification (read: no power n need d needed) to boost the sound vvolum lum and clarity of your volume iiDevice iDevi v docked at the top. Heed tthe call c for this unique-looking cconversation conve v piece.

FLAT OUT COOL

SAMSUNG’S SUR40 Your team will line-up to bring their ideas to this table. Samsung’s SUR40 ($7,599) is Microsoft’s second-generation multi-touch table. Measuring just 4-inches thick, it houses a Full HD 1080p 40-inch display covered with a sheet of toughened “Gorilla Glass.” Unlike the first Surface table, the SUR40 doesn’t use cameras to recognize fingertouches—instead Microsoft’s groundbreaking PixelSense technology can handle more than fifty simultaneous touch-points from fingers, hands, and objects. It’s never been easier to flick through storyboards, collaboratively execute concepts, or simply play solitaire.

$7,599

BEAM ME UP

CELLUON MAGIC CUBE

Budding secret agents will no doubt fall for the charm of the Celluon Magic Cube ($169.99), a laser projection keyboard that splashes a full-sized, but virtual keyboard onto a flat surface, such as a desk, table, or countertop. Wirelessly pair the small, rechargeable device with a nearby smartphone or tablet via Bluetooth. Flick the switch and you’ll see the red laser keyboard appear. Start typing as you would on your PC or Mac and you’ll even hear the clickity-clack of the virtual keys (if desired).

$850

$169

WATCH THIS

NOOKA ZEM ZEN-H Stand out from the crowd with the Nooka Zem Zen-H gold watch ($850.00). Rather than a conventional analog face or digital readout, you’ll tell time by reading the number of blocks (hours) on the top two rows, while the third and fourth rows show you the number of minutes and seconds, respectively. While unconventional, it’s actually quite intuitive. Along with the current time, the Zen-H also features an alarm and a chronograph mode. With a square gold face on a crocodile skin band, with this watch you’ll always have the luxury of time.

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Words / ZAK ORMUT-FLEISHMAN

READ THIS, PLEASE

etiquette vs.

time

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1727

THE HISTORY OF NATURE

1922

ETIQUETTE

PLINY THE ELDER

IN SOCIETY, IN BUSINESS, IN POLITICS, & AT HOME

722 Pages

EMILY POST 617 Pages

“NO MORTAL MAN, M O R E OV E R I S W I S E AT ALL MOMENTS” Judging another person is a subtle art. Do you stick to your first impression of the bald man wearing a shirt too small for his gut? Does anything change if he is eloquent? Is it all out the window if his eyes are dreamy blue? During the long reign of the Roman Empire, there was an easier way. Standardized rituals governed eating, sleeping, and stargazing. Every occasion had a ritual and each is somewhere mentioned in Pliny’s History of Nature. Aiming to create a complete account of Roman knowledge, Pliny placed medicine with myth and philosophy, each in the context of how to understand, and judge, the Roman man. If you are looking for a guide to interpret the world, Pliny had it first.

MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MONTESPAN MADAME DE MONTESPAN 337 Pages

“ A T T H E C O U R T, WHERE ETIQUETTE SELECTS OUR WO R D S, A S I T R U L E S OUR ATTITUDES, YO U C A N N O T B E YO U R S E L F ” There is no better teacher of etiquette than the courtesan. Mistresses to kings, their wit, strength, and mastery over convention allowed them to move efficiently up through the highest social circles. Besides bodyguards and heirs, the courtesan was the king’s greatest treasure, and among courtesans, Madame de Montespan was the most impressive. Lover of Louis the XIV, she bore him at least seven children, most of whom became heirs to the thrones of Europe. She was faultless in poise and wrote an account of her life in which she potentially coined the word etiquette. Unfortunately, she was disgraced when it was alleged that she poisoned any courtesan who came near her king. It was a testament to her supreme mastery over social convention that the king continued to visit her in secret for years following the incident. If there is one thing to be learned from Madame de Montespan, it is that etiquette is a disguise as well as a weapon.

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"CHARM OF MANNER, K N OW L E D G E O F T H E SOCIAL AMENITIES, AND INSTINCTIVE CONSIDERATION FOR THE FEELINGS OF OTHERS, ARE THE CREDENTIALS BY WHICH SOCIETY T H E WO R L D OV E R RECOGNIZES ITS C H O S E N M E M B E R S .” Emily Post would only begin writing after her sons had left for boarding school and she had divorced her husband. Alone in the house her father had built, she took up the career favoured by noblewomen throughout history— she began to write. Writing columns distributed to nearly 200 newspapers, speaking on radio, and publishing books, she founded the Emily Post Institute which focused on promoting etiquette as a means of consideration and empathy. There is no judgment in the Emily Post dynasty, no hooks that bring us closer to some super-human ideal, only togetherness, and acceptance of the kind that compelled her to care for others before beginning her own career. The brand is now in its 18th printing and 90th year, and written by her great-grand daughter-in-law, Peggy Post.


1936

2004

2007

ETIQUETTE

MANNERS FOR A NEW WORLD PEGGY POST 736 Pages

“ ‘ P L E A S E ’ R E A L LY I S A M AG I C WO R D … I T CHANGES A DEMAND I N T O A R E Q U E S T .”

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE DALE CARNEGIE 304 Pages

Although Peggy Post took over the family business in the mid nineties, it took until the 2004 edition of Etiquette for her to come into her own, executing a major overhaul of her great-grandmother-in-law’s opus. So how far has the Emily Post Dynasty strayed from its earlier incarnation? Of course, times have changed now that interactions tend to come with a wire attached—and with constant contact there is certainly more opportunity for judgment—but fundamentally another shift has occurred. With Peggy Post, what connects us is not a mutual empathy kept strong by etiquette, instead, etiquette stands alone, a ritual that connects us when little else will.

“REMEMBER THAT A PERSON'S NAME IS TO THAT PERSON THE SWEETEST AND MOST IMPORTANT SOUND IN ANY L A N G U A G E .”

ETIQUETTE FOR DUMMIES SUE FOX 288 Pages

“ YO U H AV E T WO EARS AND ONE MOUTH. USE THEM IN THAT P R O P O R T I O N .” Perhaps being called a ‘Dummy’ by a book espousing etiquette is the low you need to organize your life. Perhaps, ‘Dummy’ is not the worst thing you’ve been called today, and so you read on unperturbed. Either way, Etiquette for Dummies provides direct advice about the rules of etiquette, without diving into the messy stuff of meaning. You will learn to judge, what to judge, and how to be judged. You will do with that knowledge what you will. Buried in work, surrounded by colleagues and semi-reliable friends, you have other things to do.

In its first printing, How to Win Friends and Influence People came with a thirteen-point list describing what the book would do for you. It would “enable you to win new clients,” “increase your earning potential,” and “help you avoid arguments.” It was a guide to the hearts and minds of strangers, colleagues, and bosses. However, having decided that the key to the hearts and minds of the modern reader is subtlety, rules regarding the direct manipulation of others were omitted in certain later editions. But there is no reason to panic; How to Win Friends and Influence People is every bit as direct, aggressive, and effective as it has ever been—in the office or not you will learn to use convention to project the perfect, powerful image of yourself.

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Canine, HENRY

PHOTOGRAPHER / CHRISTOPH STRUBE STYLIST / CHARLOTTE CARSON (JUDY INC.) GROOMING / KEVIN SMITH (JUDY INC.) MODEL / TAYLOR DAVID (SUTHERLAND MODELS)

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Jacket, GENUINE OUTERWEAR T-shirt, VINCE Pants, DIESEL Scarf, HOLT RENFREW PRIVATE LABEL Boots, MODEL'S OWN

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Crew Neck Sweater, VINCE Trousers, BURBERRY Sweater, FILIPPA K Scarf, BANANA REPUBLIC

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Blazer, OLIVER SPENCER Shirt, RAG & BONE Vest, JOHN VARVATOS Bow Tie, TOP SHOP Jeans, J BRAND

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Jacket, BILLY REID Shirt, SURFACE TO AIR Vest, BANANA REPUBLIC Tie, TOP SHOP Trousers, DIESEL

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Jacket, BILLY REID Shirt, SURFACE TO AIR Vest, BANANA REPUBLIC Tie, TOP SHOP

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Jacket, BILLY REID Shirt & Tie, BURBERRY Jeans, SCOTCH & SODA

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get the story 109

416 630 2488 strellson.com


ISSUE V

iSPY

I SPY WITH MY LITTLE YYZ EYE SOMETHING HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT. Words & Images / LONELLE SELBO

Tucked away beneath King Street West, between Parkdale and The Fashion District, rests the trendy Toronto enclave of Liberty Village. Just off the main drag, it’s easy to miss, but as the whispers about cool clubs and bustling restaurants grow into resounding recommendations, you would be well advised to pay attention to the street signs. Toronto has begun to embrace the history of its old factories, converting them into loft apartments that maintain the integrity of their classic façades. From the Irwin Toy Factory to the Toronto Carpet Factory Building, the wheels of Toronto’s industrial era are still turning in Liberty Village. Within snug borders, there are restaurants, bars, offices, condos, a marketplace, and daily life amenities—from très chic furnishings at Casalife to handmade soapshop Demo; the delicious window-fare at Cakeballs to more customary requirements like the LCBO and Starbucks—all nestled closely together. You could walk from the gym to Allan Lamport Stadium, cool off, and watch a match. With everything so easily accessible, Liberty Village has cultivated a culture of walkers, and for outsiders, a one-stop shop. The nightlife is equally compelling: sip a Negroni at the Liberty Bistro or, for more boisterous group fun, visit the local Irish pub, The Brazen Head, boasting a large selection of beer, upscale pub fare, and a buzzing rooftop patio in the summer. You can indulge in a cognac and play billiards on King Edward VIII’s pool table (circa 1880) at The Academy of Spherical Arts or head over to Locus 144 on a Saturday for some late night dancing. The next day, crawl out of bed and make your way down to Mildred’s Temple Kitchen for a Sunday brunch that will heal all that ails you. 110


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EDITOR'S PICKS BOTTEGA VENETA / $215

BROOKS BROTHERSS / $2 $28 28

Woven Leather Bracelet

‘A Gentleman Gets Dressed sed Up' U Curttis by John Bridges & Bryan Curtis

LANVIN / $155

Engraved Rose-Gold Plated Tie Clip

SHU UEMURA / $55

Art of Hair Conditioner

SHU UEMURA / $45

Art of Hair Shampoo

TISSOT / $1050 Mens T-Touch

PIERRE HARDY / $210 iPad Case

OLIVER PEOPLES / $604.500

Diandra Rectangular-Frame Optical al Glasses

KÉRASTASE / $35

Bain Capital Force Daily Treatment Shampoo (Densifying)

MOËT & CHANDON / $60.75 The Gift

YVES SAINT LAURENT $2,130

Full-Grain Leather Holdall Bag

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CAUDALIE / $95

Premier Cru Eye Cream


KOKET / $9,720 20 20

Eternity Chandelie ieer

RIZZOLI / $85.00

"Harry Winston” by Andre Leon Talley

STELLA MCCARTNEY / $1,800 Croc-Effect Suitcase

SMYTHSON / $390

Soho Diary Croc-Effect Leather Day Planner

KATY PERRY LASHES / $7.99 Oh Honey!

SCOTCH & SODA / $375 Knitted Poncho

PARI COSMETICS / $15.00 Prescious Glow

TORY BURRCH / $275

Tan and Navy N y Clutch

DANIER / $129 Leather Bag

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN / $1,395

Zip-Trimmed Gold Leather Ankle Boots

PRIVE / $29

Volumizing Dry Shampoo

INNISKILLIN / $49.95 113

Vidal Icewine


Photo ERWYN LOEWEN


ISSUE V

SHOP LIST

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IV

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YYZ LIVING Magazine // ISSUE 5  

YYZ LIVING MAGAZINE IS THE APEX OF LUXURY. WITH RIVETING EDITORIALS AND ALLURING PHOTOGRAPHS,YYZ LIVING PRESENTS A TORONTONIAN VISION OF ART...

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