Scorpion's Sting Study Guide

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VANCOUVER OPERA IN SCHOOLS PRESENTS

MUSIC AND LIBRETTO BY DEAN BURRY | STAGE DIRECTION BY ADAM DA ROS

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VANCOUVER OPERA IN SCHOOLS PRESENTS

THREE YOUNG ARCHAEOLOGISTS LOST IN THE EGYPTIAN DESERT UNRAVEL THE ANCIENT MYTH OF ISIS IN AN EFFORT TO SAVE THEIR DYING PROFESSOR. A 45 minute production written for elementary school audiences


Vancouver Opera In Schools

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TABLE OF CONTENTS HOW TO USE THIS STUDY GUIDE ............................................04 PRODUCTION LISTINGS ............................................................05 ABOUT THIS PRODUCTION.......................................................06 NOTES ON THE SCORPION’S STING........................................07 DIRECTOR’S NOTES....................................................................08 BIOGRAPHIES ..............................................................................09 SYNOPSIS......................................................................................12 LESSONS FOR KINDERGARTEN TO GRADE THREE.................13 LESSONS FOR GRADE FOUR TO SEVEN ..................................16 BEFORE WE CONFIRM YOUR PERFORMANCE........................21 APPENDIX.....................................................................................23 SPONSORS...................................................................................28

Vancouver Opera In Schools The Scorpion’s Sting Study Guide © Vancouver Opera 2017. All rights reserved. For educational purposes only. Not for resale. Unauthorized reproduction, copying, or rental is strictly prohibited by law. Distributed by Vancouver Opera, The O’Brian Centre for Vancouver Opera, 1945 McLean Drive, Vancouver, BC, V5N 3J7 Vancouver Opera operates under the jurisdiction of the Canadian Actors’ Equity Association and the Vancouver Musicians’ Association Study Guide written by Colleen Maybin and Courtney Dugan Study Guide designed by Yvonne Olivotto

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HOW TO USE THIS STUDY GUIDE This study guide has been designed to be accessible to all teachers regardless of previous experience in music or opera. Teachers are encouraged to adapt the lessons to meet the dynamic needs of their students. The lessons are designed to engage students in learning about the opera they will be attending as well as thinking critically about art and its meaning. The lessons in the study guide go deeper into both responding to the art (primary) and making connections between the art and daily life (intermediate). The setting and topic of the story align with the Grade Seven social studies curriculum. While the lessons have been divided into primary and intermediate level activities, all of the suggested activities can be modified to work with the age, ability and interests of your classroom. How deeply students go into this material will depend on each teacher. However, we do suggest the following as the minimum commitment to preparing for the performance. • Students are familiar with the synopsis and the trailer video that can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oo6KEPjVMsY • Students are able to identify the socio-historical context of the opera (when and where it was set). • Students are given the opportunity to reflect on and discuss their response to the performance. All students benefit from the opportunity to write or create a critical review of the opera as part of reflecting on the performance. Therefore, the study guide also includes an appendix with blackline masters for both primary and intermediate students that are useful for structuring a critical review. Each lesson contains an Overview, specific Objectives and a list of the Materials needed for the activity. All of the lessons are designed to be either Quick or In-Depth, and for Before the Performance and/or After the Performance. This design aims to provide teachers with the flexibility to tailor lessons to their classrooms.

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PROGRAM LISTING DIRECTORS MUSIC DIRECTOR

Holly Kroeker

STAGE DIRECTOR

Adam Da Ros

VOIS TOURING ENSEMBLE PROFESSOR HORNSBY/SET

Matthew Dalen

SALLY SMITH/ISIS

Elaina Moreau

DAVID SANDA/OSIRIS/THE SCORPIONS

Micah Schroeder

MOLLY BROWN/NEPHTHYS/TAHEMET

Stephanie Tritchew

VOIS STAGE MANAGER

Collette Brown

VOIS PIANIST

Holly Kroeker

PRODUCTION TEAM PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Leslie Dala

PRINCIPAL COACH

Kinza Tyrrell

SET & COSTUME DESIGNER

Brent Krysa and Calgary Opera

HEAD OF WARDROBE

Parvin Mirhady

HEAD OF PROPS

Heidi Wilkinson

UNDERSTUDIES PROFESSOR HORNSBY/SET

Scott Rumble

SALLY SMITH/ISIS

Roan Shankaruk

DAVID SANDA/OSIRIS/THE SCORPIONS

Brian Delong

MOLLY BROWN/NEPHTHYS/TAHEMET

Jody Lear

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ABOUT THIS PRODUCTION

DEAN BURRY COMPOSER AND LIBRETTIST

PHOTO COURTESY DEAN BURRY

Composer and librettist Dean Burry was born in St. John’s, Newfoundland but grew up in the town of Gander. His opera, The Brothers Grimm, has been seen by over 165,000 children internationally and is believed to be the most performed Canadian opera ever. Other major works include The Hobbit for the Canadian Children’s Opera Company and Sarasota Opera, The Scorpions’ Sting for the Canadian Opera Company, the CBC serial radio opera Baby Kintyre (released on the Centredisc and Naxos labels in September, 2014) and Beacon of Light for Rising Tide Theatre. In 2015 he was appointed the Artistic Director of the Canadian Children’s Opera Company and is a professor at the

Glenn Gould Professional School of the Royal Conservatory of Music. Burry was the 2011 recipient of the Ontario Arts Foundation’s Louis Applebaum Composers Award for excellence in the field of music for young people. His most recent compositions include Tempest in a Teacup, which premiered in Guiyang, China, The Bells of Baddeck, The Sword in the Schoolyard (VIVA! Youth Singers of Toronto), the song cycle The Highwayman and a Montreal Chamber Music Festival commission of Jacob Two-Two Meets the Hooded Fang featuring renowned Canadian tenor Ben Heppner.

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NOTES ON THE SCORPION’S STING The Scorpion’s Sting (2006) was the second opera that I wrote for the Canadian Opera Company following The Brothers Grimm in 2001. I had fallen in love with the genre of children’s opera by then, and especially the idea of a 45-minute performance in English that could be performed in a theatre or a school gym. “Pocket operas” like that really need to be all about the music, the story and the characters. It’s one of my favourite forms of opera. And when you are thinking about story, you have to carefully choose the right theme. Since I was a boy, I have loved Egyptian mythology - such a combination of real history and a mystical fantasy world. So it seemed perfect to adapt this story as an opera. As a librettist, I find researching projects really compelling. For this opera I found myself in many libraries and museums looking at old Egyptian artifacts and hieroglyphics.

PHOTO: MICHAEL BROSILOW

The story of Isis and the Seven Scorpions was actually recorded on a stone stele (a kind of stone slab) called the Metternich stele. I was also able to find aspects of the story (and some of the actual text of the opera!) in the Egyptian Book of the Dead. There is even a spell which the goddess Isis uses in the opera taken directly from that text. Musically, the opera is filled with sounds that represents the swirling winds of the desert, the cavernous depths of an ancient temple and the skittering legs of seven scorpions (how many legs is that!), but you will also hear the traditional scales of Egyptian music woven into the fabric of the opera. Like the character Isis, I went on quite a journey to write this opera, and what I discovered was an incredible world of magic, betrayal and friendship.

DEAN BURRY

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DIRECTOR’S NOTES Music, and opera in particular, can be a powerful educational tool, and I’m thrilled to be bringing this tour of The Scorpion’s Sting to Metro Vancouver schools. Dean Burry is a prolific Canadian composer of children’s opera, and this production marks the first time that Vancouver Opera has mounted one of his works. It is also my first time directing for the organization, and it is a great privilege for me to be able to work alongside my incredibly talented colleagues in the Yulanda M. Faris Young Artists Program. My first exposure to opera came at a very young age, and I believe that it is crucial that children grow up with music and theatre as a part of their lives. The performing arts have the power to open our hearts to a wide array of emotions and

PHOTO: HEATHER MOORE

experiences in a direct and visceral way, and in the process teach us more about each other and ourselves. The legend of Isis and the seven scorpions deals with issues of vengeance, forgiveness, and the importance of not judging people based on their appearance. These same themes can be found in many other faiths and mythologies across the globe. By examining these different beliefs, both ancient and modern, we can further our understanding of how similar our various cultures are, and the shared values, passed down over centuries, which make us all human.

ADAM DA ROS

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BIOGRAPHIES THE SCORPION’S STING ARTISTIC TEAM

HOLLY KROEKER  |  MUSIC DIRECTOR Originally from Grande Prairie, AB, Holly started playing piano at the age of 3. She always had a love for musical theatre, and began working with singers as much as possible. While pursuing her undergraduate degree at the University of Alberta in piano, her work with singers opened the door to the world of Opera. It was a way for her to combine a love of all her favourite things- piano, singers, languages, the stage, and story telling. Holly continued her formal studies at the University of Toronto where she completed a Master’s degree in collaborative piano. She has been fortunate to work in Opera all over Canada, as well as Italy and Hawaii. When she is not working with singers, Holly can be found in the dance studio playing ballet classes for companies such as Ballet Jorgen and the National Ballet Company In Studio.

ADAM DA ROS  |  STAGE DIRECTOR Adam first encountered opera in the third grade, when he was in the children’s chorus for the community opera company in his home town of Dawson Creek, BC. Growing up he also studied dance, piano, violin, and played the drums in his school band. In high school, he began singing and playing piano for musical theatre productions, which has continued to this day. After moving to Vancouver for university, he joined the UBC Opera Ensemble, and eventually completed a Master’s degree in music. His first time directing was in 2009, when he staged a production of the musical Singin’ in the Rain at his university residence. Since then, Adam has directed and assistant directed across Canada, as well as in the United States and Europe, and is very active in Vancouver as a stage director and musical director for opera and musical theatre.

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THE SCORPION’S STING TOURING ENSEMBLE

ELAINA MOREAU  |  SALLY SMITH/ISIS— SOPRANO Elaina’s first experience with opera was as a member of the children’s chorus in a production of La Bohème at the age of six. She continued to sing in choruses and played piano for the next eight years. Her love of musical theatre drew her to voice lessons at the age of 14. Soon after beginning lessons she started to realize that her true calling was opera. She went on to study classical voice and opera in New York, Toronto and San Francisco. Elaina particularly loves getting to play different characters and tell stories on stage through music. Her career has also given her the opportunity to travel the world, performing across Canada, the United States, and Europe.

STEPHANIE TRITCHEW  |  MOLLY BROWN/NEPHTHYS/ TAHEMET— MEZZO SOPRANO

Mezzo Soprano Stephanie Tritchew is from St. Catharines, Ontario. She began taking voice lessons in elementary school and performed with school choirs throughout elementary school and high school, but did not begin studying seriously until University. Stephanie holds a Bachelor of Music and a Master of Music from the University of Western Ontario and an Opera Diploma from the University of Toronto. Since then, she was an Emerging Artist at Calgary Opera from 2014-2016 and a Gerdine Young Artist with the Opera Theatre of Saint Louis for their 2016 and 2017 seasons. Stephanie is really excited to be in Vancouver because she has never been to Vancouver before now and has heard such wonderful things about the people and scenery! (She loves nature!) Although Stephanie performs mostly opera (and loves it), her favourite music to sing is oratorio and her favourite to listen to is jazz.

MICAH SCHROEDER  |  DAVID SANDS/OSIRIS/THE SCORPIONS— BARITONE

Native of Vancouver, British Columbia, Micah Schroeder started singing in choirs in school as a young boy. His interest in singing continued in high school when he participated in provincial level choirs and began private voice lessons. Micah decided to focus on opera as a career and completed postsecondary studies at the University of British Columbia where he earned a Bachelor and a Master Degree in Music and the University of Toronto where he earned an Artist Diploma. Micah is extremely excited to be sharing his love for opera with many new young opera-goers in schools. vancouveropera.ca

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MATTHEW DALEN  |  PROFESSOR HORNSBY/ SET— TENOR Matthew Dalen’s love of singing started in the Grande Prairie Boys’ Choir at ten years old. The choir showed him how fun it could be to sing with others, and was a crash course in performance where Matthew grew to love the stage. After graduating high school Matthew decided to study music at the Grande Prairie Regional College and the University of Alberta to complete a Bachelor of Music degree. In 2015 Matthew was accepted into the University of Toronto Opera Program where he earned a Master of in Opera Performance. Since studying, Matthew has performed in operas throughout Canada, The United States of America, and Italy. Matthew is very excited to be performing in The Scorpions’ Sting: An Egyptian myth, and to be a part of Vancouver Opera’s Yulanda M. Faris Young Artist Program. Matthew loves seals, giraffes and any chance to go to the zoo.

COLLETTE BROWN  |  STAGE MANAGER Collette grew up surrounded by music. Whether she was singing in choirs, playing trombone in band, performing in school plays and musicals, or just singing around the piano at home, Collette was never without music in her life. Both of Collette’s parents were music teachers, which she is sure had a large impact on her upbringing and current love of the arts. When Collette was in high school, she discovered that she also had a love of theatre, stage management, and everything that went on behind the scenes. After high school, Collette pursued her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Design and Production at UBC, and this is where she found the world of opera – a fusion of all her artistic passions, both in theatre and in music. Collette now works as a professional stage manager for theatre, musical theatre, and especially opera.

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SYNOPSIS A blinding Egyptian desert sandstorm. Students Sally, David and Molly are searching with Professor Hornby for the Lost Temple of Isis. When Professor Hornby is stung by a deadly scorpion, the students hurry him to shelter in a nearby cave, only to discover that they are standing in the long searched-for Lost Temple. The students know that they must act quickly to save the Professor. Faded hieroglyphics on the wall remind Sally of an Egyptian myth involving Isis that she believes might hold the cure. Scornful, David and Molly retreat to nurse the Professor as Sally remains behind to decode the writing on the wall... Set, God of Disorder, is jealous of his brother Osiris, who is well-loved as the King of Egypt. Determined to become King himself, he tricks his wife Nephthys into setting an elaborate trap for King Osiris and Queen Isis. At a royal banquet given in honour of Osiris, Seth unveils a beautiful chest. Whomever fits perfectly in the chest can become its rightful owner. Guest after guest tries to fit in the box, but only Osiris fits, as the box has been specially molded to fit him. Set slams the lid of the box shut on Osiris and has it thrown into the river Nile, declaring himself King. The grieving Isis is banished to the desert. A heartbroken Nephthys follows her sister, Isis, into the desert. Isis is at first reproachful of her sister for her involvement in the plot, then becomes understanding as Nephthys explains her ignorance of Set’s plans. The

two sisters sing a duet of reconciliation and farewell. Nephthys then gives Isis Osiris’ magical sistrum that will summon scorpions to her to lead her out of the desert. Upon shaking the sistrum, seven scorpions appear and lead Isis out of the desert to a town. Exhausted and parched, Isis comes upon a wealthy woman, Tahemet, and her child, and begs for her help. Judging Isis by her ragged appearance, Tahemet calls her a “beggar and a thief” and hurries away. The scorpions are enraged at this treatment of their Queen. They hatch a revenge plan, giving all of their poison to their leader, Tefen, who stings Tahemet’s baby. Terrified for her child’s life, Tehemet runs out to the street to call for help, but no one will come to her aid. “Scorpions, did you do this?” Isis scolds them. “The child is not to be blamed for the actions of a thoughtless mother.” Taking the child, she casts a spell, “I will take away your sting”, and the baby is saved. Back in the Lost Temple of Isis, Sally, Molly and David realize that they have discovered the cure for the scorpion’s sting. The students and Professor head triumphantly home, having found not only the Lost Temple of Isis but also a new sense of understanding and respect for one another.

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LESSONS FOR KINDERGARTEN TO GRADE 3

LESSON ONE: ACTIVE LISTENING Big Idea: Dance, drama, music and visual arts are each unique languages for creating and communicating. Category: Before/Quick Overview: Opera uses a unique style of singing. Opera singers train all of their their lives to be able to create a sound that can fill a large space without amplification. For young audiences, the sounds can be new and surprising to hear for the first time. Using excerpts from The Scorpion’s Sting, students will have an opportunity to listen to the sound of opera before attending the performance. Objective: Students will explore the elements of music including pitch, timbre and dynamics. Materials: • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oo6KEPjVMsY Activity: 1. Prepare the class by letting them know they will be watching a short video with excerpts from the opera they will be seeing at school. 2. After viewing, ask students to describe the sound of the singing. Do they like it? Why or why not? 3. Watch the video again, this time taking note of the action. What does this story seem to be about? 4. Read the synopsis out loud before watching the video for a third time. Can they add any more details to the story based on what is in the video? Extension: • Watch short clips of other operas to further familiarize students with the sound of opera singing. Some potential examples that are available on YouTube include: • Queen of the Night from Mozart’s The Magic Flute (Royal Opera House production) • Largo Al Factotum from Rossini’s The Barber of Seville (Metropolitan Opera production)

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LESSON TWO: DESCRIBE AND RESPOND TO THE SCORPION’S STING Big Idea: People connect to others and share ideas through the arts. Category: After/Quick Overview: Critical thinking in the arts can be encouraged through the sharing of responses to a performance within a group. The activity asks students to recreate the story in order and to respond to each scene individually. Objective: Students will describe and respond to works of art Materials: • Either Handout #1 or Handout #2 (See Appendix) Activity: 1. After the performance, have students brainstorm as a large group about the scenes in the story. Working together, put the scenes in order as they were presented during the opera on handout #1 OR use handout #2 to confirm the order of the scenes. 2. Using either handout, have students describe how they responded to each scene. Responses can include drawings, emotions, music descriptions or any other connection the students felt during the process. 3. Have students work in small groups to share their work with each other or have students post their work and then lead a gallery walk to students can see the work of their classmates. 4. Close the lesson with a discussion about their responses to the work. What did they enjoy? What did they not enjoy? What was their favourite part? How would they describe the music? Extension: • This activity could lead into a personal review of the opera. See the appendix for suggestions on structuring a review.

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LESSON THREE: CREATE A SHAKER Big Idea: Creative expression develops our unique identity and voice Category: Before and After/ In-Depth Overview: The sistrum is a sacred instrument from Ancient Egypt. Used in dance and religious ceremonies, the shaker is part of the percussion family. The sistrum plays an important role in the story of The Scorpion’s Sting. Objective: Students will make a shaker that expresses elements of their personal identity. Materials: • Found objects that function as a container (recycled containers, taped off tubes, pop cans etc.) • Found objects will fit inside the container (small pebbles, dried beans, rice, marbles etc.) •

Decorative elements including paper to wrap around the container, paint, pictures, ribbon, stickers etc.

Activity: 1. Students begin by collecting the materials required for their shakers. The initial creation of the shakers will require students to place the small objects into the containers and ensure that they are fully sealed. Encourage students to test various types of objects for their sound. When they are happy with the sound their shaker makes, they are ready to decorate. 2. Sistrum’s were highly decorated as part of their ceremonial significance. Before decorating, have students list at least 5 things that are significant to them. Suggestions could include their favourite colour, pets, activities, sports and their families/cultures. 3. Students will decorate their shakers using items that represent the ideas on their list. 4. When complete, students can either write an artist statement about why they made the choices they did for their shaker or share their choices in small groups or with the entire class. 5. Students can also play with their shakers by playing them along with a favourite class song or to provide the beat for a nursery rhyme.

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Extension: •

The people of the Coastal First Nations also created highly decorated rattles as part of ceremonial practice. Sharing images of these rattles along with a discussion how they are decorated and designed could be a part of the introduction of the lesson or a closing activity.

LEFT: EGYPTIAN SISTRUM

COURTESY OF GLOBAL EGYPTIAN MUSEUM

RIGHT: SCALLOP RATTLE CREATED BY STAN GREENE (SEMIAHMOO)

LESSONS FOR GRADE FOUR TO SEVEN

LESSON ONE: MUSIC AS STORY TELLING Big Idea: Dance, drama, music and visual arts are each unique languages for creating and communicating Category: Before/Quick Overview: Music is an integral part of the storytelling of opera. Composers use all of the elements of music to create emotional impact as well as musically illustrate the action. The intent of this lesson is to expand the vocabulary students use to describe music by connecting it to visual images inspired by the music. Objective: Observe, listen, describe, inquire and predict how artists use processes materials. Materials: • Good quality recording of Pictures At An Exhibition by Modeste Mussorgsky (available on iTunes, Spotify, or Youtube). •

Paper for recording ideas.

Activity: 1. Place the paper in landscape orientation and create a chart with 4 columns, numbered from one to four. vancouveropera.ca

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2. For the first three columns, listen to the following excerpts from Pictures At An Exhibition one at a time.

For each excerpt:

• Listen through once and have a general discussion about what the music could be describing •

Listen again and have students write describing words or draw images that represent the music

• Exchange papers with a partner and listen a third time, adding ideas to your partners columns

Finally, reveal the name of the excerpt

Pictures at an Exhibition Excerpt One: Cattle (a large cart drawn by big oxen) Excerpt Two: Ballet of the Unhatched Chicks (fledgling canary chicks) Excerpt Three: Three: Great Gates of Kiev (Large city gates at the outside of Kiev in Ukraine). 3. After the performance of the Scorpion’s Sting, fill in the final column with thoughts and responses to the music in the opera. Extension: • Use the words and images generated in this activity to create a word bank for describing music. Encourage those students with strong music vocabulary to include the technical language of music in the appropriate categories. This activity can be repeated with a variety of musical genres and will increase students’ abilities to describe music using a rich vocabulary.

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LESSON TWO: FACT OR FICTION? Big Idea: Media Sources can both positively and negatively affect our understanding of important events and issues. Category: Before and After/In Depth Overview: Opera is an art form that seeks to find an emotional truth in a story. At times, this means taking poetic license with facts and real life. Theatre, film and other narrative stories often change the details of a story in order to create a more impactful narrative arc. Therefore, audiences benefit from considering what is authentic and what is fiction when presented with a story based in a historical context. Objective: Ask questions, corroborate inferences and draw conclusions about the content and origins of a variety of sources, including mass media. Materials: • The synopsis of The Scorpion’s Sting •

Highlighters

Paper to create a T chart

Access to online research

Activity: BEFORE THE PERFORMANCE

1. Hand out a copy of the synopsis to each student. Using highlighters, have students highlight at least five statements or ideas that they think are true. The opera is based on myth itself but there are elements that are grounded in knowledge about Ancient Egypt. 2. Using research resources, students seek to confirm the truth in the story and report back to the class about their findings. Some of the potential truths include: • the myth the story is based on is authentic • Ancient Egyptians worshipped the gods of Isis and Osiris as part of their religious practices • hieroglyphics were a method of communication • scorpions do live in the desert in Egypt • chests were custom designed for those who were buried in them

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AFTER THE PERFORMANCE

3. Students review the synopsis and now identify where the composer added in fictional details to the story. Discussion around the fictional aspects can focus on why the composer might have made the choices he did. What was the role of the students and the Professor? Why set the story in both modern times and Ancient Egypt? What is the moral the story is trying to express? 4. Located on page 7 and 8 are comments by both the composer and the stage director that speak to the research they did in preparing the opera. How do their comments compare to the findings of the class.

LESSON THREE: HIEROGLYPHICS Big Idea: Cultural practices that emerged from ancient civilizations have endured and continue to influence people. Category: Before and After/Quick Overview: Hieroglyphs play an important role in The Scorpion’s Sting as one of the main characters has to decode their meaning in order to save the life of another. Many cultures use pictographs or images as symbols of meaning while modern communication increasingly uses emojis in a similar manner. In this activity, students will research the role of the Rosetta Stone in decoding Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics and then create their own Rosetta Stone using English, hieroglyphics and one other language or modern day emojis. Objective: Identify what the creators of texts have determined is significant. Materials: • Access to online or text based research on the Rosetta Stone (introductory videos included below) •

The Rosetta Stone handout (Appendix)

Images of the Rosetta Stone

Large pieces of paper

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Activity: BEFORE THE PERFORMANCE

1. Students are introduced to the story of discovery of the Rosetta Stone and its role in uncovering the meanings of the hieroglyphs. • The Rosetta Stone – Excerpt (produced by the BBC) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ptXlmZzSVV8 • The Rosetta Stone – In Full (produced by the BBC) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iz6MmINBHxk •

Rosetta – the Stone that Unlocked Ancient Egypt’s Secrets – Nutshell Edu – Animated Short

• https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeaTuS8VUyU 2. Working independently, students continue to research the Rosetta Stone to complete the handout (see Appendix). AFTER THE PERFORMANCE

3. Students create their own Rosetta Stone retelling the story of The Scorpion’s Sting. Students start by writing a short synopsis of the story in English. 4. Using a “translator” students rewrite the synopsis in Egyptian hieroglyphics. The original synopsis might need to be adjusted to ensure meaning between the two blocks of text is similar. http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/ngm/egypt/translator.html 5. Students then translate their synopsis a second time into a third language of their choice – French, Chinese or even emoji!. 6. Using 11 x 17 ½ pieces of paper, students trace out their own Rosetta Stone shape and write out the three versions of the synopsis. The final work can be designed to look similar to the Rosetta Stone or like something completely new.

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BEFORE WE CONFIRM YOUR PERFORMANCE School theatre preferred (or gym hall), Minimum space required: 30 ft deep x 30 ft wide, 11 ft high. Performance space is available and free of students or classes for: Arrival/set up: 1 hour 30 min prior Performance time: 55 minutes (45 mins show + 10 min Q&A) Load out/Departure: 45 minutes after Total venue time: 3 hours, 10 mins Please tell us where we can drive our van(s) on your school grounds for unloading directly into the building.* 1 power outlet within 50’ of the stage*. Change rooms (preferably male/female) for singers that are not shared by students. Washrooms that are not shared by students. (Eg. Could be a staff washroom). No painting or construction will occur in or around the performance space during the week prior to the performance (singers cannot perform with paint, glue, Vera-thane fumes, etc.). Agree to provide 4 student helpers for set up and load out assistance.* For bookings of multiple shows: the venue must be locked between performances.* Review, Sign and Send the Confirmation sheet back to Vancouver Opera.

* Venue restrictions such as extra distance takes extra time for setup. Our set pieces will not fit most elevators, and our group operates on a very strict time schedule. Failure to communicate restrictions in advance may result in an invoice for overtime charges. Please inform us of the following in advance: •

if the entrance is more than 100 feet from the performance space;

if there are any stairs or narrow hallway corners that may make it difficult for us to carry in our large set pieces;

if the load-in area has vehicle height restrictions (ex. underground parking lot or covered loading bay);

if the power outlets on 2 different circuits, are more than 50’ from the performance area;

if you are not able to provide 4 helpers for load-in, set up, strike and load-out;

if you are not able to meet any of the above listed requirements.

Vancouver Opera’s Stage Manager will run all of the show’s technical elements from the stage/performance area.

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1-4 WEEKS BEFORE •

Review the required minimum Scorpions’ Sting Learning Objectives* with your students, as found in the Study Guide, that will be available at vancouveropera.ca

ONE DAY BEFORE •

Please tell us the name of the school contact available to meet with the group upon arrival.

Confirm the names of your 4 student helpers available for set up and strike.

All basketball hoops, hanging items or objects on stage must be raised or cleared prior to the group’s arrival for load-in.

Please ensure entryway for set load-in is unchained and parking space is available and clear prior to arrival the next day.

Please ensure a minimum temperature prior to arrival: not below 18° Celsius (65°F) or exceeding 30° Celsius (86°F).

ON THE DAY OF THE PERFORMANCE •

Review the required minimum Scorpions’ Sting Learning Objectives with your students, as found in the Study Guide, that will be available at vancouveropera.ca

ONE DAY BEFORE •

Arrival for setup is 1 hour and 30 minutes hour prior to the scheduled performance time.

Please ensure performance space and loading areas are clear of students and equipment.

Please ensure any doors, entry gates, washrooms and change rooms are opened and unlocked prior to arrival.

School contact and student helpers are available and ready to meet with Stage Manager at arrival time.

Please have students seated and ready in the venue by the scheduled performance start time.

No audio or video recording or photography of any kind is permitted.

ON THE DAY OF THE PERFORMANCE •

Send us your reviews, photos, letters, drawings, blogs, comments and questions!

Review the minimum Scorpions’ Sting Learning Objectives* with your students.

Arrange for payment of your performance, after receiving an invoice. Thank you!

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR CONCERNS, PLEASE CONTACT:

COURTNEY DUGAN  |  EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY PROJECTS COORDINATOR TEL: 604-331-4835 EMAIL: vois@vancouveropera.ca

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Vancouver Opera In Schools

STUDY GUIDE

NAME: WHAT HAPPENED IN THE STORY

WHAT I WAS THINKING

THE BEGINNING

THE MIDDLE

THE END

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Vancouver Opera In Schools

STUDY GUIDE

NAME: WHAT HAPPENED IN THE STORY

THE BEGINNING

WHAT I WAS THINKING

Professor Hornby is stung by a deadly scorpion

At the Royal Banquet, Seth unveils a beautiful chest and everyone tried to fit in the box

THE MIDDLE

Isis and Nephthys go into the desert

The scorpions take revenge by stinging the child

THE END

Sally, Molly and David realize they can cure Professor Hornby

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Vancouver Opera In Schools

STUDY GUIDE

NAME: THE WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY AND HOW OF THE ROSETTA STONE

What is the Rosetta Stone? When was it made?

Why is it important?

Who made it? Who found it?

Where was it found? Where is it now?

How was it made? Why was it made?

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Vancouver Opera In Schools

STUDY GUIDE

NAME: MY OPERA REVIEW

My Favourite Scene (draw a picture):

Three Things I Enjoyed 1.

2.

3.

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Vancouver Opera In Schools

STUDY GUIDE

HOW TO REVIEW AN OPERA

1. Open with an overall statement – did you enjoy the performance? 2. Critique the opera by considering it in parts – the performances, the music and the production itself. Write a short paragraph for each topic.

A. What did you think of the performances of singers? Questions to consider:

How well you could hear them? Did you understand what they were saying?

Were their characters believable?

Could you feel the emotions of the characters?

Did anyone stand out for you?

B. What did you think of the music? Questions to consider:

Did you enjoy the music?

How did the music feel to you?

What was your favourite part?

C. What did you think of the production? Questions to consider:

What did you think of the costumes?

What were your thoughts about the puppets?

What about the set? Was it interesting?

3. Finally you can end your review with a recommendation to see the opera and maybe a description of who might like it. If you didn’t enjoy the opera, that is fine too. In that situation you can make recommendations on changes that you think would make it more enjoyable.

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Vancouver Opera In Schools

STUDY GUIDE

SPONSORS

V A N C O U V E R

OPERA

INDIVIDUAL DONORS Martha Lou Henley Charitable Foundation Mrs. Anne Morley Mr. & Mrs. Bruce & Lis Welch Drs. Leo & Flora Wong

YULANDA M. FARIS YOUNG ARTISTS PROGRAM SPONSORS Mr. Moh Faris and family

Grayross Foundation

The Bruendl Foundation

Ms. Jane McLennan

Mrs. Irene McEwen

Mrs. Pat Charles

The Paul and Edwina Heller Memorial Fund

Dr. George Luciuk and Dr. Lidia Schuster

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