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REPORT  TO THE COMMUNITY

2015-2016 School Year


STRATHCONA-TWEEDSMUIR SCHOOL (STS) IS MORE THAN A GREAT SCHOOL – STS INSPIRES JOURNEYS THAT LEAD OUR STUDENTS BEYOND ANYTHING THEY COULD HAVE IMAGINED.


MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS...........4 MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL........................6 ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE ....................................................... 8 INTEGRATED PROGRAMMING .......................................... 12 GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE .............................................................. 16 TEACHING EXCELLENCE ........................................................ 20 OUR COUNTRY CAMPUS ...................................................... 24 ALUMNI AND COMMUNITY ................................................ 28 FINANCE REPORT......................................................................... 32

1 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

TABLE OF CONTENTS


OUR VISION

OUR MISSION

OUR CORE VALUES

A leading educator recognized nationally and internationally for delivering exceptional programs in a unique setting with an enduring sense of community.

To develop well-balanced students for a life of purpose by inspiring excellence in scholarship, leadership and character.

Integrity Kindness Respect Responsibility Safety Service


3 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School’s Repor t to the Community highlights snapshots of our achievements in relation to the areas that make STS unique and exceptional: academic excellence, integrated programming, global perspective, teaching excellence, the country campus, and our alumni and community.

This repor t also celebrates how we live our School’s vision, mission and core values every day. This annual publication repor ts on the September 2015 to August 2016 school year and is distributed to parents, alumni, parents of alumni, faculty and staff. We hope you enjoy reading it and welcome your feedback.


MESSAGE FROM THE BOARD OF GOVERNORS The School has had an extraordinary year. Our students, past and present, continue to excel in their achievements, both academic and co-curricular. Construction on the inspiring facilities expansion is well under way and the new wing should be ready for eager faculty and students in the fall of 2017. The Board continues its commitment to represent the school membership and I would like to thank the Governors for their significant commitment of time, skill and effor t over the past year. All-in-all the School is well equipped to continue succeeding in its mission of developing well-balanced individuals who can excel in this rapidly changing and increasingly complex world. As we near the completion of the Inspiring Possibilities campaign and building construction, we are also embarking on the development of a reinvigorated strategic plan to set our school’s course for the next few years. Over the next 12 months, a committee will consult with the various constituents of the school to understand their various priorities, in order to incorporate them into a plan for the School’s future. Each year, the Board meets with STS administration, and many of its faculty and staff, to review progress on academic results, key indicators of leadership and character, co-curricular par ticipation, health and safety, school finances, and so on. The Board is pleased to see progress in all facets of the organization’s goals, demonstrated in recent parent and government surveys which show the school to be achieving excellent results in all aspects of student success. The School continues to exceed all expectations with respect to meeting and exceeding the demanding standards of the IB Programme, the Outdoor Education cer tifications and independent school accreditations. There are seemingly endless hours of preparation by school employees devoted to achieving the well-deserved, excellent reputation afforded to our school. Our interactions with the staff and teachers provide us with comfor t that your children are being guided by the best in the profession. Although I say this at every oppor tunity, it bears repeating – the more time that I spend with the educators at our school, the more impressed I am with their professionalism and loyalty to students.

The culture of STS is evolving. As more and more parents and students see the devoted effor ts of the School to improve not only infrastructure, but teaching methods and interaction with students, the more cohesive and trusting the atmosphere becomes. The extraordinary effor ts of many, including the Co-Chairs of our fundraising campaign, Jan Waterous and Mike Jackson, and Dr. Jones and Dinnie Baker and the Advancement and Community Relations team, have resulted in a very successful, but not quite finished, Inspiring Possibilities campaign. Not only have significant funds been raised to build inspiring new facilities, suppor t the Centre for Teaching Excellence, and boost scholarships and bursaries, there is a burgeoning philanthropic spirit in our community. I look forward to the increasing impact of the Centre for Teaching Excellence, which exemplifies the core value of the School to promote excellence in everything we do. It allows us to walk the talk and show that we are dedicated to being the best we can be. The School will continue to prepare its students for success in higher education, careers in the new and shifting job landscape and to be citizens of the world, armed with critical thinking, compassion and openness. As I did last year, I would like to give thanks to our students, parents, the families that suppor t us even though their children are now alumni, alumni, and every employee and volunteer for your contributions to the School. It is you that makes STS a truly exceptional learning community which stands out in the educational landscape of Canada and a place that we can all be proud to be a par t of.

W. Scott Kirker STS Board Chair


5

W. Scott Kirker, STS Board Chair

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

“ I would like to give thanks to our students, parents, alumni and their parents, and every employee and volunteer for your contributions to the School. It is you that makes STS a truly exceptional learning community which stands out in the educational landscape of Canada and a place that we can all be proud to be a part of.�


MESSAGE FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL As I sit writing this ar ticle, I do so against the sonic backdrop of heavy equipment, cement mixers and construction workers busily erecting our new, state-of-the-ar t learning facilities that will serve the everevolving needs of our students for decades to come. It is indeed an exciting time in the history of Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School as we complete this final component of our 2010 Strategic Plan, take a quick breath, and then begin the process of developing a blueprint for the next chapter. It is, at once, both exciting and daunting to begin contemplating what knowledge, skills and attributes our students will need to thrive and how best to ensure that they acquire these as we look toward a somewhat unpredictable future. But that is our work. And we embrace it with the same passion, confidence and renewed exper tise that have given substance to the last strategic plan. As you peruse this year’s Repor t to the Community, I trust that you will see evidence that our students and our school are continuing to thrive. As one of a handful of IB World Continuum Schools in Canada and a member of Round Square, we engage our students at all levels in learning inquiries that instill an international mindset and other impor tant learner attributes, and broaden their perspectives on the world. International service projects in places like Costa Rica and Guatemala, Humanitarian Outreach Projects, international language trips, student exchanges and meaningful interactions with students from Round Square schools in other countries, provided potent learning and developmental experiences during this past year. In addition to academic excellence, there is a growing body of work in the field of education that underscores the impor tance of developing character and leadership abilities in preparing students for success in post-secondary education and beyond. Character and leadership development are two critical tenets of our mission and we have continued to create and strengthen oppor tunities to instill these attributes in our students. Student engagement in co-curricular activities has grown during the past year and teachers

are continuously making new connections between curricular learning and co-curricular activities. These and new approaches to transdisciplinary learning have advanced the strategic goal of integrated programming and promoted innovation, creativity, persistence and resilience as qualities of character in our students. Among all of the things that we do at STS, teaching and learning continue to be our central focus. During the last year, we have been able to build upon the exper tise and instructional skills of our teachers by providing robust professional growth oppor tunities funded through the Centre for Excellence in Teaching. This year we brought in Michael Horn who is a renowned author and exper t in the field of blended learning. We were also able to provide a number of teachers with impactful learning oppor tunities over the summer months at places like Harvard and Stanford where they extended their knowledge and skills. In addition, we have been working with an educational consultant to help us prepare for the effective use for the new facilities that are currently under construction so that we can fully leverage these spaces to optimize learning. Looking forward, I envision a very bright future for STS and its students. In addition to our talented faculty and staff, I would like to thank the many parent volunteers, alumni, donors and our Board of Governors for their enthusiastic suppor t in creating and enabling our vision.

Dr. William Jones Head of School


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“Looking forward, I envision a very bright future for STS and its students.” Dr. William Jones, Head of School


ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE At STS, we are always thinking about how best to prepare students for the future to ensure that they have the skills they will need to thrive in a rapidly changing and increasingly global world. Students today must understand how to filter, evaluate, synthesize, and interpret immense amounts of information. Also, careers are constantly evolving – young people need to develop the work ethic, and collaborative skills and tools to be able to adapt to new opportunities as they emerge.

To that end, STS is Alberta’s only full International Baccalaureate (IB) continuum independent school. Through the IB Programme, students are encouraged to become active and compassionate life-long learners, to develop their own cultural and national identity, and to broaden their intercultural understanding and respect. The IB continuum also prepares students for success in post-secondary studies. Elementary, Middle, and Senior School students engage in and experience a challenging and dynamic learning environment where they acquire the knowledge, skills and attributes that will allow them to succeed.


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CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF 2016 GRADUATES


ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE HIGHLIGHTS Grade 4 students went on a deep dive into the geography of Alber ta, learning about all that lies beneath the surface…namely fossils! Equipped with ar t sketchbooks and the eyes of scientists, students uncovered the fossil history of our province before they came back to school to connect in Ar t class where they created their own dinosaur bones out of clay. The clay bones were then buried on campus, and students did an archeological dig to uncover them.

We had 100% completion of the Grade 10 Middle Years Programme (MYP) Personal Projects. Two MYP Personal Project examples are: Apostoli Marinakos ’18 designed and built an electric guitar in his quest to answer the question: “How can creating and designing a more functional instrument affect the way it is played and used in music old and new?”

Grade 8 students designed toys that would be useful for people with a disability, and made prototypes using in-class 3-D printers. For example, Will McNeil ’20 created braille playing cards for the visually impaired, and Ben Duthie ’20 created a toy for children who have lost their fingers. Grade 6 students inquired into the challenges that face vulnerable people in our local communities through research and trips to visit organizations that provide suppor t. In “Dragon’s Den” style pitches, students successfully advocated for 19 different organizations and encouraged the Calgary Foundation to donate $31,000 on behalf of the students. The Diploma Programme (DP) Class of 2016 had 54 students registered, including seven full Diploma Candidates, with a 100% success rate achieved for the fifth straight year. 77% of the students in the Grade 12 class were registered in at least one IB course.

DP Candidate essays representing a diverse cross-section of topics were of the highest academic quality. Sample topics include:

“Biology: How do Body Mass Index and Papillae Density affect measured Fat Taste Sensitivity in adolescent females?” – Nary Gawdat ’15

“Physics: An Analysis of the Vertical Acceleration Attenuation of a Wooden Meter Stick Oscillating over a Hard Plane Surface.” – Liam Ma ’16

Dee van Zyl ’18 painted awe inspiring works of ar t to represent different mental illnesses in order to answer the question, “Can mental illness be represented in works of art?”.

“History: The Significance of Women in the Greek Resistance of World War II and the Greek Civil War.” – Sarah Stumpf ’16

Cho stud mor thro


English Language Arts 6 Mathematics 6

$650K in reported scholarships awarded or received (this is a self-reported, and historically under-reported statistic)

23

schools in four countries with confirmed attendance (Canada, USA, England and Scotland)

Post secondary offers received:

Acadia, Alber ta, Bishop’s, Brigham Young, British Columbia, Brock, Calgary, Carleton, Central Lancashire, Chapman, City University London, Dalhousie, East Anglia, Edinburgh Napier, Exeter, Glasgow, Guelph, Hawaii, Hawaii Pacific, Huron, Johns Hopkins, King’s London, Kwantlen, Lethbridge, London Metropolitan, McGill, McMaster, Mount Royal, National University of Ireland, New Brunswick, Nor thumbria, Ottawa, Prince Edward Island, Queen’s, Ryerson, Saskatchewan, Southern California, St. Andrew’s, St. Francis Xavier, St. Mary’s, Strathclyde, Texas at San Choral andAntonio, band Texas at Arlington, Toronto, Victoria, Waterloo, Western, West students performed to Texas A&M, Wilfred Laurier, York more than 1,000 people throughout the year.

Programs of study:

Medicine, Nursing, Health Sciences, Nutrition, Ar ts (Economics, Political Studies, Philosophy, International Relations, History, Psychology, Creative and Cultural Industries), Fine Ar ts (Acting, Vocal Performance, Piano, Interior Design), Business/Commerce, Engineering, Education, Sciences (Biology, Biochemistry, Biomedical, Chemistry, Computer, Environmental, Kinesiology, Medical, Molecular, Psychology)

Science 6 Social Studies 6 English Language Arts 9 Mathematics 9 Science 9 Social Studies 9

Acceptable Standard

Standard of Excellence

STS

100

56.3

Province

82.9

20.4

STS

98.4

42.2

Province

72.2

14

STS

100

75

Province

78

27.1

STS

98.4

75

Province

71.4

22

STS

98.5

71.6

77

15.2

STS

98.5

58.2

Province

67.8

17.5

STS

98.5

52.2

Province

74.2

22.4

97

59.7

64.7

18

Acceptable Standard 100

Standard of Excellence 29.9

86.8

10.7

STS

92.2

50

Province

70.7

25.9

STS

100

33.3

Province

75.4

16.8

STS

96.7

26.7

Province

84.9

14.3

STS

100

53.1

Province

85.1

32.4

90

50

Province

81.5

34.5

STS

100

52.2

Province

85.8

39.8

Province

STS Province

2016 Diploma Exam Course Results in Percentages STS English Language Arts 30-1 Province Mathematics 30-1 Mathematics 30-2 Social Studies 30-1 Biology 30 Chemistry 30 Physics 30

STS

11

2016 Provincial Achievement Test Results in Percentages

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

GRADUATING CLASS OF 2016 UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE HIGHLIGHTS:


INTEGRATED PROGRAMMING A cornerstone of a STS education is integrated programming – meaning that students benefit from a holistic, balanced education where curriculum is reinforced in a variety of learning environments. Our many co-curricular programs enhance our academic programming and support our mission. Students benefit from this well-rounded approach which reinforces concepts and removes silos so that learning can be applied in multiple ways. This gives them the tools to be able to solve ‘real world problems’, i.e. climate change is an economic, scientific, social, and political issue. Also, they learn critical skills that will benefit them throughout life, including public speaking. Most importantly – students are excited to go to school because they enjoy a wide-variety of engaging activities intended to enhance their love of learning, character development, and overall health and well-being.


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2015 Senior School musical, Big Fish


INTEGRATED PROGRAMMING HIGHLIGHTS

90

74% of Senior School students were involved in athletics.

co-curricular activities offered

More than 10 Elementary School clubs including Environment, Book, Spor ts, Science and Speech Club.

60 More than

Choral and band students performed to more than 1,000 people throughout the year.

Student ar t shows were held throughout the year including the 22nd Annual Spring Ar t Show, featuring well over 200 pieces of ar twork from students in Grades 7 to 11.

Senior School students participated in Model United Nations (MUN)


15

Grade 6 leadership groups were in charge of Fun and Fitness, Public Relations, Special Events, and Recreation.

80 students were in the Middle School play, Funhouse, and 70 students performed in the Senior School musical, Big Fish.

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

92 students par ticipated from both the Middle and Senior Schools in Speech and Debate and entered at least one tournament. STS has the second largest speech program in Alber ta.

Integrated programming was in action on 30 multi-day and 10 single-day OE trips. In the great outdoors, students developed character and a sense of community, while learning more about biodiversity, chemistry, astronomy, navigation, geography, and conflict resolution.


GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE Whether in their own backyard, or on the other side of the world, STS students’ learning beyond the classroom is enriching. They explore and gain an understanding of other cultures and our natural environment. They pursue leadership opportunities, gaining a sense of independence, responsibility and confidence. They challenge themselves to be their best. They strive to be caring citizens. They endeavour to live with integrity and compassion. All members of the STS community – students, parents, teachers, staff and alumni – put the STS mission to ‘live a life of purpose’ into action. Our students are inspired by those around them, and strive to experience and give back to their global community every day.


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Round Square International Conference, Singapore


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GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE HIGHLIGHTS

Gr.11 students

19

universities

11

cities & towns

3

provinces

2015 UNIVERSITIES TOUR

80 Grade 11 students par ticipated in the Agencies Program, a time-honoured tradition at STS, working with more than 10 community organizations.

100% of STS students par ticipate in community service. Grade 8 drama students did a unit of Native legends of the buffalo. They wrote scripts using legends that they found in our library and then performed their pieces for Elementary students. 57 Elementary students par ticipated in the Humanitarian Outreach Program (HOP), which focuses on the root causes of pover ty, how they affect our world, and what actions can be taken to eliminate them. This year’s group focused on clean and affordable water, and students chose, researched, planned, and implemented an action project that was of interest to them. Throughout the year, they shared information at school events, and shared lessons learned with their fellow HOP members.

34 STS student delegates travelled to Washington, D.C. to participate in the 53rd North American Invitational Model United Nations (UN) hosted by Georgetown University. In addition to the conference, students visited the Canadian Embassy, the Smithsonian Museums, and the US Holocaust Memorial Museum. Three Middle School students went to Debate Nationals in Halifax. The Senior band travelled to Los Angeles to perform at Disneyland and Santa Monica High School. Grade 7 students par ticipated in an exchange with students from Hackley School in Tarrytown, New York.

14 students traveled to Guatemala for the Spring Break International Service Project focused on suppor ting Somos Children’s Village, which suppor ts Mayan families. The students also completed a trek through the Mayan highlands, staying with Mayan families and developing fur ther understanding of this unique way of life.


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Through HOP and Round Square, students of all ages participated in several service projects including: • monthly food service at the Calgary Drop-In Centre • fundraising for the Prince Alexander Project Fund • collecting donations for the Veterans’ Food Drive • Christmas Campaign Food Drive for Calgary Interfaith Food Bank • establishing the STS Environmental Sustainability Club • a ‘Reduce Waste’ campaign • an endangered species awareness campaign

Students organized on-campus initiatives to build awareness and engagement for impor tant issues such as bully awareness and prevention, and celebrating diversity.

Students travelled to Bali and Singapore for Round Square International Conferences.

• collecting donations for Fort McMurray fire evacuees

Grade 7 students attended a Young Round Square Conference in San Francisco and Danville, California.

12 students traveled to Costa Rica for the Spring Break International Service Project focused primarily on the conservation of leatherback tur tles, as well as rugged travel, and cultural immersion volunteering alongside Costa Rica’s largest indigenous group, the Bribri people.

STS students created a Gender and Sexuality Awareness Club (GSA).

STS, in partnership with alumnus Jay Cross ’80, formed the organizing committee for the 2050 Project, with the objective to engage youth across Canada through an authentic, multidisciplinary exploration of global issues that will shape what the world will be like in 2050. Through a positive, solution-oriented lens, 2050 Project delegates will have the opportunity to design solutions to complex and interrelated challenges by bridging science, design, art, and culture, with changing expectations on leadership. Through this creative experience, youth will be given a voice, and the opportunity to drive innovation.


TEACHING EXCELLENCE Our talented, caring teachers deliver well-rounded programming, giving all STS students the opportunity to flourish. They also connect with students through coaching opportunities, outdoor experiences, sharing service trip adventures and leadership of many other co-curricular programs. A priority of the School continues to be attracting, developing and retaining exceptional faculty who will elevate teaching practice at STS and inspire excellence in the broader teaching community. In order to remain a leader within the independent school community both nationally and internationally it is essential to provide extraordinary learning opportunities. STS continues to invest in teachers and their ongoing development in order to advance our mission of excellence in scholarship and student learning. Professional development takes many forms but has a common thread – enriching our students’ learning experience.


REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

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TEACHING EXCELLENCE HIGHLIGHTS STS’ 77 faculty members are life-long leaners and hold a combined

173 degrees

STS was proud to host the second annual Exper ts in Education Speaker Series event, featuring Michael Horn, a leading authority on the future of education and blended learning. Horn is the author of Disrupting Class, 14th on Newsweek’s list of “Fifty Books for Our Times”, and Blended, and he is a regular contributor to numerous publications including Forbes, The Washington Post, The Economist, The Huff ington Post, and Education Week. The series brings world-class educators and leading thinkers in the field of education to STS to work with STS faculty, and to share their exper tise with parents and the broader community. In addition to a public evening presentation, Michael Horn led the entire STS faculty in a one-day workshop around blended learning.

Putting STS on the map locally, nationally and internationally as a Centre for Teaching Excellence: • The STS Fine Ar ts Depar tment hosted a Fine Ar ts PD Day for faculty from several other schools. • We hosted two groups of U of C students for the Field Experience Practicum focused on school culture. • Several STS faculty led IB workshops for their peers from other organizations around the world. • STS teachers shared their exper tise with their colleagues at faculty-led PD sessions.


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GORDON FREIGHT EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING GRANT RECIPIENT: Carrie Duncan-Moore Learning and the Brain Conference Orlando, Florida

Brian Uzick The Arts and Passion-Driven Learning Program Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education

Scott McKay and Matt Kerr Juno Beach Centre Summer Institute and French Battlefield Tour

Michelle Melton and Nola Adam Camtasia Studio for E-learning Chicago, Illinois

70

professional development sessions attended around the world by STS faculty

The STS Mentorship Program, currently in its eighth year and recognized provincially, is a means of integrating new faculty into the STS community and constructively guiding their development both professionally and culturally.

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

STS EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING GRANT RECIPIENTS


OUR COUNTRY CAMPUS

STS continues to offer enriched learning opportunities on our 200-acre country campus, which acts as an outdoor extension of our indoor classrooms. Students enjoy hands-on learning, physical activity, fresh air, and natural beauty. No other school in our region can offer students these unique experiences – all without having to step foot off campus.


REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

25


COUNTRY CAMPUS HIGHLIGHTS

Physical Education programs utilized and enjoyed our campus for canoeing on the pond, and running, hiking, biking, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing on more than 10 kms of trails.

Students and faculty alike enjoyed accessing our outdoor classroom, Aspen Lodge – a beautiful natural setting for integrated learning in all seasons. Examples include lunchtime mindfulness and yoga classes.

Science classes in all Divisions utilized our country campus by: • testing pond water, soil samples and vegetation • studying motion sensor camera footage to see local animals in our shared habitat • studying the changing seasons and geography of our landscape • exploring insects in their habitats

Grade 1 students used the campus for various writing tasks including reading a picture book about animal tracks, then going outside to search for real-life tracks and taking photos of them, then using the photos to write about the animal. Art students were inspired to sketch wildlife and plants, creating beautiful projects using the natural landscape as their muse. Grade 2 students took their “Boats and Buoyancy” unit outside to test boat prototypes in pools of water. Grade 2 students were compelled to take action when they learned about the environmental and human factors that are threatening bee and butterfly populations. Students decided to research the flowers that these amazing creatures love most, and plant them in a protected garden on campus.

• composting to study how worms break down organic material


27 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

Grade 8 Design and English classes were integrated when students wrote nature poetry based on sights, sounds, smells, and tactile items found on our campus, then found photos related to their poems and created beautiful posters showcasing the image and poem.

Elementary students spent their outdoor recess time building elaborate forts, putting their design, collaboration, leadership, problem solving, and team work skills into action.

Grade 12s hosted the fourth annual Spartan Race where students tested their might on an obstacle course featuring a variety of challenges including traversing a mud pit and canoeing on the pond.


ALUMNI AND COMMUNITY STS celebrates a strong and vibrant community of more than 700 students, 1,025 parents, 7,000 alumni, and 106 faculty and staff – all rooted in our more than 110-year history. Our community of parents are stead-fast partners in supporting STS students’ learning experience. They spend countless hours volunteering for school events, driving students to numerous activities, tournaments and games, cheering on the sidelines, and helping with homework in the evenings. The STS Alumni Association fosters a lifelong relationship with our ever-growing alumni community, keeping our school’s deep-rooted traditions alive, while providing opportunities to network with each other and engage with current students. We hold many parent and alumni events on the STS campus, in Calgary and across the globe. These events bring our community together – creating a welcoming space for current families, bringing students and successful alumni together for invaluable mentorship opportunities, and reconnecting alumni friends. Also, our community as a whole is responsible for raising essential funds. Last year, pledges and gifts towards our $27 million Inspiring Possibilities campaign goal reached an incredible $23 million. These funds will go towards enhancing our facilities, investing in our teachers’ continued professional development, and ensuring that our school is accessible to exceptional students (read more in the inserted campaign newsletter).


Homecoming and Fall Fair 2016 REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

29


ALUMNI AND COMMUNITY HIGHLIGHTS

200 parent volunteers signed up for more than 400 volunteer positions

$11,189 74% was raised by

of the 2016 graduates and their parents for their class bursary

More than 230 alumni, and retired faculty and staff enjoyed reconnecting at the 10th annual Alumni Dinner.

30% 90% 2% parents

The Inspiring Possibilities campaign reached an incredible $23 million of the $27 million campaign goal. Our community came together to break ground on the new inspiring facilities which are a major priority of the campaign.

employees

alumni donated to STS.

1,016 alumni attendees at 16 alumni events


31

STS alumni related stories posted on social media

1,815

30

POSTS volunteers welcomed close to 176 new parents in the fall, and gave more than 7,700 volunteer hours in running programs like Tweeds and More and Lost and Found, organizing events to thank our bus drivers, staff and faculty, and hosting many socials to help build a sense of community at STS.

stories about STS alumni covered in the media

fans

681

followers

570

followers

322 members 127 followers

STS ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Homecoming and Fall Fair 2016 brought more than 800 alumni and current families to the STS country campus to enjoy family activities, food trucks, and much more. Susan Elliott ’89 and Rober t-Falcon Ouellette ’95 were named this year’s Nil Nisi Optimum Notable Alumni.

Distinguished Alumni recipient, Vinay Ruparell ’80 and retiring faculty member Wendy Rodney were honoured at the 10th annual Alumni Dinner.

We had 46 2nd and 3rd generation families with 79 children representing 11% of our student population – we are proud that our alumni are ‘coming home’ to give their children the same well-rounded education.

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

176

more than


FINANCE REPORT Revenue

Expenses

The primary revenue source for the School is tuition revenue of $14.33 million and other mandatory student fees of $766,000. Alber ta Education provides the School with $3.67 million. Contribution from the STS Foundation includes funds received for scholarships, bursaries and awards.

The primary expenses for the School are salaries and benefits, representing 61% of our total expenses followed by busing (7.5%), asset amor tization (7%), plant (4.6%), and academic program costs (6%). During this year, $718,000 was awarded for scholarships, bursaries and other student assistance.

Tuition and mandatory student fees

Salaries and benefits

Government grants

Administration and advancement

Busing fees

Busing

Amortization of deferred contribution

Academic

Donations

Buildings, grounds and maintenance

Miscellaneous Scholarships, bursaries and awards

Scholarships and financial aid

Strathcona-Tweedsmuir School is incorporated under the Societies Act of the Province of Alberta and is a registered Canadian charitable organization in accordance with the Income Tax Act.


33

Statement of Revenue and Expenses for the year ended August 31, 2016

Unaudited

Unaudited

Assets

2016 $

2015 $

Cash and cash equivalents

5,879,280

5,201,033

Accounts receivable

1,022,825

1,274,802

Prepaid expenses

425,844

428,051

Inventory

109,077

98,968

Current assets

Revenue

2016 $

2015 $

14,325,109

13,299,428

Government grants

3,668,581

3,464,279

Busing fees

1,344,100

1,287,575

Membership fees

448,000

476,000

Tuition fees

Capital assets

7,437,026

7,002,854

5,743,960

6,256,744

13,180,986

13,259,598

2016 $

Liabilities

Amortization of deferred contribution

432,084

385,050

Sundry

302,430

365,003

Student equipment rental revenue

317,817

304,405

248,663

181,503

Contributions

60,237

81,508

Interest

25,759

33,343

Scholarship grants/bursaries/prizes and awards

2015 $ 21,172,780 19,878,094

Current liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

389,123

745,470

6,861,412

7,861,875

7,250,535

8,607,345

Salaries and benefits

Deferred contributions

2,077,042

2,548,290

Employee future benefits

1,947,700

1,972,100

11,275,277

13,127,735

2016 $

2015 $

3,528,497

3,747,618

Deferred revenue

Expenses

Net assets Internally restricted net assets invested in capital assets Deficit

- 1,622,788 - 3,615,755 1,905,709

131,863

13,180,986

13,259,598

2016 $

2015 $

11,774,097

11,427,009

Amortization

1,366,928

1,346,089

Bussing

1,447,762

1,323,232

Academic

1,101,403

965,233

Plant

879,381

878,797

Administration

710,063

780,496

Scholarship grants/bursaries/prizes and awards

717,684

533,860

Advancement

486,868

431,244

Information technology

419,748

392,059

350,000

350,000

Rent

19,253,934 18,428,019 Excess of revenue over expenses

A copy of the complete STS audited financial statements can be obtained from the School’s Finance Office by calling 403-938-9124

1,918,846

1,450,075

REPORT TO THE COMMUNITY 2015-2016

Statement of Financial Position as at August 31, 2016


RR 2, Okotoks, Alberta, Canada Tel: 403-938-4431 www.sts.ab.ca

INSPIRING POSSIBILITIES

Report to the Community 2015-2016  
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