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Summer 2014

Vol. 35

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No. 2


July 21, 2014

Dear Friends,

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onservatives seldom have a reason to cheer for longtime New York mayor and publisher, Michael Bloomberg. However, his commencement address to Harvard graduates merits attention. Bloomberg warned, “There is an idea floating around college campuses—including here at Harvard— that scholars should be funded only if their work conforms to a particular view.” Bloomberg noted, in the 2012 elections, 96% of all contributions from Ivy League faculty members went to Barack Obama. Although Bloomberg also supported Obama, he warned there was “more disagreement among the Old Soviet Politburo than there is among Ivy League” faculty! He said, “A university cannot be great if its faculty is politically homogenous. A liberal arts education must not be an education in the art of liberalism.” Bloomberg made a compelling case that today’s faculties are politically homogenous, and their students face four years of partisan indoctrination. Students can begin to balance the scales of their education by being involved with Young America’s Foundation and its faculty. World-class scholars have spoken to YAF audiences since its inception. The faculty members have included: Milton Friedman, Russell Kirk, Jeane Kirkpatrick, Forrest McDonald, Christina Hoff Sommers, James Gwartney, Thomas Sowell, Jeffrey Hart, Art Laffer, Newt Gingrich, Harvey Mansfield, Dean Clarence Manion, and Ludwig von Mises. Nobel laureates James Buchanan and Vernon Smith also addressed our summer conferences. To underscore Young America’s Foundation’s long history of working with leading academics, Libertas features the series, “Professors You Need to Know.” Professor Paul Kengor’s scholarship and teaching is highlighted in this issue’s pages. Anyone who has had the privilege of being taught by, hearing lectures from, or reading the books of Dr. Kengor has had an enjoyable and most informative experience. Dr. Kengor personifies an ideal faculty member. We are occasionally asked, “What is the common denominator among Young America’s Foundation speakers?” The answer is easy: they are scholars willing and eager to help educate, motivate, and empower students. Paul Kengor, Burt Folsom, Robert George, and Walter Williams are the most frequent faculty members addressing Foundation audiences. Our leadership team works with those rare freedom-oriented teachers wherever they are found. It is a healthy sign when a Michael Bloomberg at least warns of a “Politburo” atmosphere in our nation’s most generously supported universities. But, reform has to take place in the classroom—not just at a rare commencement address. Students, parents, and grandparents must have access to scholars who have persevered through leftist intolerance to help students learn how to think—not just the latest leftist fad of what to think.

Sincerely,

Ron Robinson President


LIB ERTAS Summer 2014

Vol. 35

No. 2

Volume 35

Number 2

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Graves, Schweizer, Flynn, and Shapiro Inspire Students in Santa Barbara

By Katie Taran, Conference Director

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What I Learned at the High School Conference at the Reagan Ranch

By Kaitlyn Anderson, Chairman, Canyon High School YAF

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“What did Reagan Believe?” An Excerpt from 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative

By Dr. Paul Kengor, Professor, Grove City College

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Professors You Need to Know: Dr. Paul Kengor

By Ashley Pratte, Spokeswoman

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Huizenga, West, Cuccinelli, Campos Duffy, and Buchanan Headline Spring Conference

By Raj Kannappan, YAF Chapter Services Program Officer

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Steve Forbes Shares Free Market Ideas With 1,300 High School Students

By Patrick X. Coyle, Vice President

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National Journalism Center Alumnus Greg Gutfeld Offers Advice to Students and Aspiring Journalists

By Brendan Pringle, Development Officer and NJC Alumnus

On the Cover: Summer 2014

Dr. Paul Kengor addresses Young America’s Foundation’s high school conference at Grove City College in Pennsylvania.

Also in This Issue: 4 5 6 7

YAF Activists Gather for CPAC 2014 Senator Phil Gramm Addresses 500 at New Jersey Reagan Day Local ROTC Cadets Enjoy Tours of Rancho del Cielo Louis L’Amour’s Wife and Son Headline Reagan Birthday Celebration

Libertas, the Latin word for liberty, is a publication of Young America’s Foundation which highlights the programs, events, students, staff, and supporters of the Foundation. You may contact Libertas and Young America’s Foundation by writing to: Young America’s Foundation, National Headquarters, 110 Elden Street, Herndon, Virginia 20170; calling 800-USA-1776; or visiting yaf.org. Editor: Jessica Jensen; Publisher: Ron Robinson; Publication Design: Jonathan Briggs; Assistant Editors: Kimberly Begg, Amy Brooker, Cheryl Cerame, Patrick X. Coyle, Amy de Venoge, Nicole Hoplin, Haley Jones, Chris Miranda, Ashley Pratte, Brendan Pringle, Morgan Shields, and Ashley Weaver; Washington, D.C. event photographer: Face to Face Photography and Jensen Sutta; California event photographer: Jacqueline Pilar. This document and all herein contents, images, stories, graphics, and design, fall unto copyright © 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 Young America’s Foundation, unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Any use of Libertas’ content without the written permission of Young America’s Foundation is prohibited.

Young America’s Foundation Board Of Directors Ron Robinson President of the Board Ronald Pearson Vice President of the Board Frank Donatelli Secretary and Treasurer of the Board T. Kenneth Cribb, Jr. Wynton C. Hall Peter Schweizer James B. Taylor Thomas L. Phillips Director Emeritus Reagan Ranch Board Of Governors Frank Donatelli Chairman Edwin Meese Co-Chairman Robert F. Agostinelli Governor George Allen John Barletta Dr. Suzanne Becker Lisa M. Buestrin Robert Cummins Becky Norton Dunlop Robert Giuffra, Jr. Timothy S. Goeglein Ambassador Patricia L. Herbold Eric & Nicole Hoplin Marty Irving Harold Knapheide Mark Larson Rebekah Mercer Al Moore Doug & Pat Perry Thomas L. Phillips Rear Admiral JJ Quinn Fred & Ruth Sacher Richard & Jane Schwartz Craig Shirley Owen & Bernadette Casey Smith Barbara S. Waddell National Journalism Center Board Of Governors T. Kenneth Cribb Chairman Kellyanne Conway Rich Lowry Alex Marlow Alex Mooney Katie Pavlich Ron Pearson Matt Robinson Tom Winter Thomas L. Phillips Chairman Emeritus


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Young Americans for Freedom Activists Gather at CPAC 2014 Young Americans for Freedom (YAF) student activists

University Young Americans for Freedom activists Samantha Reinis from colleges and high schools across the country descended Clemson and Katherine Nickels speak with attendees at the 2014 CPAC outside of on National Harbor, Maryland, to passionately advocate for Washington, D.C. the principles of freedom and limited government. As thousands of attendees entered the Gaylord National Harbor hotel for the 2014 Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), they were welcomed by groups of YAF activists distributing Young America’s Foundation’s posters featuring Ronald Reagan and Sarah Palin, as well as stickers emblazoned with sayings such as, “Big Government = Big Problems.” Our student activists also engaged in energetic conversation with attendees of all ages—from youth seeking advice on how they can get involved in the Conservative Movement to YAF alumni from the 1960s. To cap off a successful presence at CPAC, Young America’s Foundation hosted a packed student dinner, featuring Kate Obenshain, Foundation alumna and author. Obenshain delivered an engaging talk, imploring students to stand up Foundation alumna, author, and frequent Fox News contributor Kate Obenshain for their beliefs and challenge their peers, educators, and inspires the student activists gathered for a special Young Americans for Freedom dinner during CPAC. administrators to defend their God-given rights. In particular, Obenshain criticized the concept of a free-speech zone, something many colleges and high schools have instituted to restrict students’ rights to express their opinions and views. Ultimately, YAF activists made sure to let all of the CPAC attendees know that they are ready to engage their generation.

YAF activists from around the country meet like-minded friends and share activism ideas at CPAC.

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Senator Phil Gramm Addresses 500 at New Jersey Reagan Day More than 500 people attended the 11th annual New Jersey Reagan Day, which Young America’s Foundation is proud to sponsor. This event has become the largest annual gathering of conservatives in the state and the largest Reagan Day celebration on the East Coast. It has also become an important recruiting resource for the Foundation’s programs. Senator Phil Gramm, the featured speaker, shared memorable stories about how Ronald Reagan’s principled leadership shaped one of America’s most successful Presidencies. Senator Phil Gramm headlines the annual New Jersey Reagan Day dinner sponsored by Young America’s Foundation. Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno also spoke, giving impassioned remarks about how Ronald Reagan inspired her love of freedom as a young person. New Jersey Assemblyman Jay Webber, the founder and organizer of NJ Reagan Day, emceed the event. Kimberly Martin Begg, Esq., vice president and general counsel of Young America’s Foundation, gave an overview of Young America’s Foundation’s youth outreach programs at the Reagan Ranch and across the country. One of the highlights of the evening was the announcement that a local New Jersey supporter, who wishes to remain anonymous, has updated his estate plans to include a gift to fund future Reagan Day celebrations and provide annual support to help young people understand and be inspired by ideas of freedom. Lauren Scirocco, Foundation alumna and associate producer of The Sean Hannity Show, also attended along with students from local colleges and universities.

New Jersey Assemblyman Jay Webber emcees the dinner which he founded and began organizing 11 years ago. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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Local ROTC Cadets Enjoy Tours of Rancho del Cielo In early 2014, ROTC cadets from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Cal Poly-Pomona, Claremont-McKenna College, and Azusa Pacific University made their annual visits to Rancho del Cielo to learn from the leadership of President Ronald Reagan. ROTC Cadets (from left) Brooke Klopchinski, Emily Romero, and Andrea Rodriguez During their tours, the young leaders were not explore the exhibit galleries at Young America’s Foundation’s Reagan Ranch Center. only inspired by Ronald Reagan’s accomplishments as Commander-in-Chief but also by the humility apparent at Rancho del Cielo in the Santa Ynez mountains. The tours also included visits to the Reagan Ranch Center exhibit galleries and screenings of Young America’s Foundation’s film, Still Point in a Turning World: Ronald Reagan and His Ranch. “Our time at the Reagan Ranch gave us an extraordinary perspective on the depth of one of America’s greatest leaders. The Ranch and its history demonstrate that when a leader sticks by his upbringing and rules with character, it fosters growth and, in this case, a better nation,” noted Cadet Benjamin Waldman.

(Left and below) ROTC cadets from Cal Poly-Pomona, Claremont-McKenna College, and Azusa Pacific University make their annual visits to Rancho del Cielo to learn about President Ronald Reagan’s values and lasting accomplishments.

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Louis L’Amour’s Wife and Son Headline Reagan Birthday Celebration Young America’s Foundation was honored to host special guests Kathy L’Amour, widow of the famed novelist Louis L’Amour, and their son, Beau L’Amour, during the celebration of Ronald Reagan’s 103rd birthday at the Reagan Ranch Center. As part of the program, Western publisher William C. Reynolds interviewed Beau L’Amour about his father’s history and the making of the graphic novel version of his father’s book, Law of the Desert Born. Foundation President Ron Robinson also awarded special Reagan Ranch sheriff badges to Kathy and Beau L’Amour during the event. L’Amour was one of Ronald Reagan’s favorite fiction writers, and his books still line President Reagan’s bookshelves at Rancho del Cielo. As an actor, Reagan had portrayed Western characters seeking law and order on the silver screen. He could relate to L’Amour’s depiction of the West and its characters, set in a place and time where individualism was heralded and flourished within a system of law, order, justice, and freedom. Both Reagan and L’Amour shared a deep appreciation for individual freedom. In 1984, President Reagan presented Louis L’Amour with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, honoring him as a great American novelist. He remarked of L’Amour: Louis L’Amour has played a leading role in shaping our national identity. His writings portrayed the rugged individual and the deep-seated values of those who conquered the American frontier and added to our understanding of our past and reaffirmed our potential as a pioneering and free people.

The event was followed by a question and answer session and book signing.

(Below) Publisher William Reynolds (left) interviews Louis L’Amour’s son, Beau, about his father’s writings and legacy.

(Above) Kathy L’Amour, wife of Louis L’Amour, cuts into birthday cake during Young America’s Foundation’s celebration of Ronald Reagan’s 103rd birthday. President Reagan’s close friend and Secret Service agent, John Barletta, also joins the celebration.

Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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Graves, Schweizer, Flynn, and Shapiro Inspire Students at Fall Conference By Katie Taran, Conference Director

Bestselling author and Foundation alumnus Peter Schweizer discusses his latest book, Extortion, during the Fall Conference at the Reagan Ranch Center.

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ore than 240 participants gathered at the Reagan Ranch Center in Santa Barbara, California, for Young America’s Foundation’s Fall Conference and President’s Club Weekend at the Reagan Ranch. Students from 24 states and the District of Columbia, representing 54 schools, joined the supporters and friends attending the annual program. The event began with author and Breitbart.com Editorat-Large Ben Shapiro speaking on “10 Rules for Debating with a Liberal” in the David Louis Bartlett Outreach Center. Following his remarks, a panel of leading conservatives discussed California’s economic woes and whether or not the rest of the country would follow in its path. Panelists included California State Senator Tony Strickland; reporter for CalWatchdog Katy Grimes; and University of California, Santa Barbara professor Dr. Lanny Ebenstein. Flash Report Editor Jon Fleischman moderated the panel. Attendees also watched the Foundation’s short film, The Conservatives, and heard from Foundation Vice President Patrick Coyle on ways they could promote conservative ideas at their schools. The evening featured a reception for supporters in the Exhibit Galleries and a reception for students on the Center’s Alwal Anheuser Beims Moore Rooftop Terrace. Following the receptions, students and supporters gathered in the Outreach Center for a dinner banquet emceed by Foundation Vice President Andrew Coffin and featuring bestselling author Peter Schweizer. Schweizer, who is also a member of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, discussed his bestseller, Extortion: How Politicians Extract Your Money, Buy Your Votes, and Line Their Own Pockets. The speech was filmed by C-SPAN’s BookTV, and Schweizer stayed afterwards to sign copies of his book. (continued on page 10)

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Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

(From left) Foundation supporter Richard Zapp meets with Development Officer Danielle Behler and University of Arizona student Olivia Mountz at the Reagan Ranch Center during the Fall Conference and President’s Club weekend.

Louisiana State Senator Elbert Guillory addresses the students attending the Foundation’s Fall Conference.


Samantha Billings from Las Positas College enjoys the speaker sessions at the Reagan Ranch Center.

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President Reagan’s friend and Secret Service agent John Barletta shares stories of his time with Ronald Reagan during a special session in the Hay Barn at Rancho del Cielo.

(continued from page 8)

The next day, while supporters toured the Reagan Ranch, students gathered in the Outreach Center to hear from Congressman Tom Graves of Georgia who addressed the importance of conservative leadership. Louisiana State Senator Elbert Guillory later spoke on the failures of the Obama administration. Students then joined supporters for a luncheon on the lawn of Rancho del Cielo. Foundation Vice President and General Counsel Kimberly Begg emceed the program, which featured author and Foundation alumnus Dan Flynn discussing his recent book, The War on Football: Saving America’s Game. Flynn offered his assessment on how football has never been safer and underscored that today’s youth need the leadership and discipline they gain from playing the sport. The young participants later toured Ronald Reagan’s beloved Rancho del Cielo, where they saw the Ranch House, the Tack Barn, and the Secret Service Command Post. They also gained great insight into who President Reagan was by hearing from his close friend and Secret Service agent, John Barletta, who is also a member of the Reagan Ranch Board of Governors. Student Alejandro Capote from Florida State University was particularly inspired by his time at the Reagan Ranch. “Born in Cuba, I never knew what freedom was until I came to the States,” he noted. “President Reagan is my hero—the reason I got involved in the Conservative Movement. 10

Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

Author and Foundation alumnus Dan Flynn discusses “The War on Football,” the topic of his latest book, during a luncheon on the lawn of the Reagan Ranch.


Students from around the country enjoy an afternoon at Rancho del Cielo during Young America’s Foundation’s annual Fall Conference at the Reagan Ranch.

The Ranch was breathtaking. I was honored and humbled to walk in his shoes.” The weekend concluded with a reception and dinner at the Reagan Ranch Center. Foundation Vice President Nicole Hoplin emceed the evening’s program, which also included an interview with University of Arizona student Olivia Mountz, who had recently served as a Sarah T. Hermann Intern Scholar at the Reagan Ranch Center. Congressman Graves (who addressed the student audience earlier in the day) then inspired the President’s Club attendees with his optimistic speech on America’s future and exceptionalism. “Only in this country,” he said, “can you dream of being something you’ve never done.” Attendees left the conference inspired and ready to take the fight back to their campuses and beyond. Nate Honeycutt of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo noted, Thank you for providing the opportunity for me to learn about the inspiring life of Ronald Reagan and how I can take the values and principles he embodied to become a steadfast activist for conservatism on my campus. You are helping prepare and pass the torch to the next generation. We will do our best not to let you down!

——————————————————————————— Hillsdale College Young Americans for Freedom activists meet Ben Shapiro following his remarks at the Reagan Ranch Center. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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Learn the truth about our nation’s great entrepreneurs Read how private enterprise beats out government subsidies time after time The Myth of the Robber Barons describes the role of key entrepreneurs in the incredible economic growth of the United States from 1850 to 1910. This breakthrough book contrasts “market” entrepreneurs and “political” entrepreneurs and clearly shows the superiority of those who do not depend on government subsidies. It concludes by highlighting common history textbook bias and exposing authors who misread business history. Get your copy now by calling Young America’s Foundation at 800-USA-1776.

“Revises in important ways many misperceptions that historians have imposed upon the record.” — Forrest McDonald

“Perhaps the best, most readable, entertaining and informative business history ever written.” — Lawrence Reed, President, Foundation for Economic Education

“Provocative and cogent…” — Journal of American History

“This book is the perfect supplement to most standard economic and business history textbooks…” — Dr. Larry Schweikart, Best-Selling Author

“Classic…” — Dan Henninger, Wall Street Journal

Dr. Burt Folsom is a popular speaker at Young America’s Foundation’s programs nationwide. He is available to speak at your event or on your campus as part of our Free Enterprise Lecture Series. Please call Patrick Coyle at 800-USA-1776 or visit www.yaf.org for more information.

Get your copy today! Available through Amazon.com or by calling 800-USA-1776 National Headquarters, F.M. Kirby Freedom Center, 110 Elden Street, Herndon, Virginia 20170, 800-USA-1776

Center, 217 State Street,| Summer Santa Barbara, 14Reagan YoungRanch America’s Foundation 2014 California 93101, 888-USA-1776 | Libertas

© Copyright 2014 Young America’s Foundation

www.yaf.org


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What I Learned at the High School Conference at the Reagan Ranch By Kaitlyn Anderson, Chairwoman, Canyon High School YAF

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his spring, I traveled from Texas with eight other members of the Canyon High School Chapter of Young Americans for Freedom (YAF) to Young America’s Foundation’s High School Conference held at the Reagan Ranch Center in Santa Barbara, California. This was

my second time attending a Young America’s Foundation conference in Santa Barbara, and I returned home with greater knowledge, hope, and inspiration. When I attended my first conference in 2013, my YAF chapter had just gotten off the ground. Attending that conference made me realize that I was

Young Americans for Freedom activists from Canyon High School in Texas (from left) Benton Brooke, Kaylin Ikels, Genna Ibarra, Kali Goetsch, Lauren Millsaps, Kaitlyn Anderson, Trey Deiley, and Carter Anderson enjoy a visit to Rancho del Cielo during the High School Conference at the Reagan Ranch.

only just beginning involvement in something so much larger than myself. When I returned from the first conference, I was fired up to promote conservative principles and mobilize the members of my chapter. It became my goal to bring as many students as possible to the spring High School Conference at the Reagan Ranch, so they could have the

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Economist Mark Skousen interacts with student Drew McTier from Phoenix, Arizona, during his presentation.

President Reagan’s son, Michael Reagan, and his daughter, Ashley, enjoy their time at the high school conference.

Liz Cheney, former State Department official and public policy expert, addresses the high school students at the Reagan Ranch Center.

same transformational experience. Nine students, including myself, attended that spring conference, and, although organizing an entire group was stressful at times, Young America’s Foundation assisted me with every step of the process. During our weekend at the Reagan Ranch Center, we learned that we are not the only high school students who are passionate about

up included Michael Reagan, author and President Reagan’s son; Liz Cheney, former State Department official and public policy expert; Kate Obenshain, author and Fox News contributor; Ron Robinson, president of Young America’s Foundation; Dr. Mark Skousen, author and economist; Kirby Wilbur, executive director of the National Journalism Center; Jim Lacy, author; Eliana Johnson,

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free enterprise, individualism, and a strong national defense. Being able to relate on important subjects and debate them freely with our peers made for engaging and meaningful conversation throughout the conference. It was refreshing to be among like-minded students from across the country! The weekend also included top-notch speakers addressing a variety of topics and current events. The program’s line-

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(continued on page 16)


Kaitlyn Anderson and Grace Klehn spend the weekend meeting like-minded friends and learning from inspiring leaders at the Reagan Ranch Center. S t u d e nt

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National Review reporter; Joseph Phillips, actor and author; Dr. Dave Newton, author; and Patrick Coyle, vice president of Young America’s Foundation. Each speaker offered great insight and helpful advice. I especially enjoyed listening to Kate Obenshain’s passion for America and hearing about her faith in young conservatives. She, alongside the other speakers, serves as a role model for my generation, so the opportunity to learn from, and ask questions of her was incredible. Dr. Mark Skousen was also a favorite of our group. A widely acclaimed economist, he underscored the importance of promoting the free enterprise system. After the speakers discussed the principles that Ronald Reagan held dear, we experienced how the President lived them out by visiting his beloved Rancho del Cielo—the Ranch in the Sky. Once we reached the Ranch, located in the Santa Ynez Mountains, it was easy to understand the origin of the home’s name. The beautiful scenery reflects Reagan’s deep faith, and the ruggedness of the structures illustrates the simplicity he valued. The uniqueness of this experience made my visit to the Ranch the highlight of the conference. The inspiration I derived from attending both high school conferences at the Reagan Ranch has been the largest motivation for my involvement in Young Americans for Freedom this year. As soon as my chapter returned to Canyon High School, we were ready to stand tall for our shared values and principles. Every student who attended has shown a deeper understanding of conservative ideas and a renewed enthusiasm for our activism projects. Through Young America’s Foundation, I have gained a better understanding of what I believe and why I believe it. I have developed a renewed faith in my country and myself, and I am eager to live out my beliefs. 16

Kaitlyn Anderson takes notes during the speaker session at the weekend-long program in Santa Barbara.

Author and Foundation alumna Kate Obenshain meets with Kaitlyn Anderson and Anna Rose Wiencek following Obenshain’s speech in the David Louis Bartlett Outreach Center at the Reagan Ranch Center.

Students from around the country cap off their experiences at the Foundation’s high school conference with a special visit to President Reagan’s beloved Rancho del Cielo.

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“What Did Reagan Believe?” Excerpt from 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative By Dr. Paul Kengor, Professor, Grove City College

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s a Reagan biographer, the questions I’m most frequently asked by voters and pundits and media types of all stripes go something like this: What would Reagan do if he were president right now? Where would Reagan stand on this issue? Which candidate is most like Reagan? Who’s the next Ronald Reagan? What did Ronald Reagan really believe? Such questions can be difficult to answer, and the answers often would surprise many of those begging a response. For example, would Reagan have endorsed George W. Bush’s attempt to expand Reagan’s “March of Freedom” from the former Soviet empire into the Middle East? Bush, after all, invoked precisely that “March” as a chief 1 motivation for his Middle East policies and actions. Would Reagan have raised the debt ceiling during the bitter debate between President Obama and the GOP Congress in the summer of 2012? All sorts of media sources, especially on the liberal side, insisted he would have done so. Would Reagan have acquiesced to an increase in income taxes in 2013? Here again, liberals assured us he would. What was Reagan’s position on immigration? I’m always taken aback by certain voices on the right invoking the name of Reagan as they

demand immediate deportation of all illegal immigrants. Conservatives and liberals alike might be surprised by the answers to some of these questions. And how did Reagan himself see conservatism? Speaking in October 1983 to the house of conservatism, the Heritage Foundation, Reagan quipped, “During the years when I was out on the mashed-potatoes circuit [i.e., a popular dinner speaker] I was sometimes asked to define conservatism, and I must confess that, while I have the cream of the conservative intellectual movement before me, I’m tempted to use Justice Potter Stewart’s definition. He gave it for another subject, by the way. He said 2 he couldn’t define it exactly, but ‘I know it when I see it.’” Fair enough. We can take Reagan at his word that he understood conservatism when he saw it. But do we know it when we see it? Many professing conservatives think they know it when they see it, but clearly they don’t all see eyeto-eye on a common definition. They do, however, tend to agree on one thing: When they see Ronald Reagan, they see conservatism. Reagan is synonymous with conservatism. Look up conservatism in a dictionary, and you might just as well see a picture of Ronald Reagan. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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“What Did Reagan Believe?” ––––––––––––––—————––––——–—–––––––––––––––– By Dr. Paul Kengor ––––––––––––––––——————————––––––––––––––––

Reagan’s most frequent ruminations on conservatism The principles of conservatism are sound because they came at CPAC—an annual mecca of conservatives, where the are based on what men and women have discovered disciples of Reagan and the likes of Buckley and Goldwater through experience in not just one generation or a dozen, and Russell Kirk do pilgrimage. Reagan began speaking at but in all the combined experience of mankind. When we CPAC in 1974, its first gathering. He addressed the faithful conservatives say that we know something about political no less than thirteen times through his final year in the affairs, and that we know can be stated as principles, White House, not missing a single CPAC during any year we are saying that the principles we hold dear are those 3 of his presidency. Perhaps his most that have been found, through vigorous defense of conservative experience, to be ultimately beneficial “Reagan then enunciated thinking came in his 1977 CPAC for individuals, for families, for a number of conservative remarks, delivered February 6, 1977— communities and for nations—found principles: freedom and his sixty-sixth birthday. through the often bitter testing of pain 5 There, Reagan began by conceding or sacrifice and sorrow. liberty, free markets, that conservatism can “mean different religious freedom, Reagan then enunciated a number things to those who call themselves of conservative principles: freedom and conservatives.” He delineated positions constitutional rights liberty, free markets, religious freedom, that tend to identify social and and protections, anticonstitutional rights and protections, economic conservatives. Reagan, anti-communism, smaller government, for the record, was both a social and communism, smaller local government, individualism, economic conservative; indeed, how government, local voluntarism, communities, families, could a complete conservative—which government, individualism, self-reliance, hard work, common sense, is really what Reagan was—be strictly reason, faith in God. He called for a just one or the other? voluntarism, communities, and prudent government that spends The essence of conservatism is to families, self-reliance, money wisely and whose stewards act preserve and conserve time-tested with integrity and honesty. values that have endured for good hard work, common sense, Reagan told the CPAC brethren that reason and for the best of society, reason, faith in God.” he believed the “old lines” once dividing for citizens, for country, and for social and economic conservatives were order—a brief summation that the late “disappearing.” He hoped the time Russell Kirk, probably conservatism’s 4 had come “to present a program of action based on political preeminent philosophical spokesman, would have endorsed. Conservatives aim to conserve. Ronald Reagan said much the principle that can attract those interested in the so-called same in this February 1977 speech: ‘social’ issues and those interested in ‘economic’ issues.” Reagan asked, “In short, isn’t it possible to combine the two major The common sense and common decency of ordinary segments of contemporary American conservatism into one men and women, working out their own lives in their politically effective whole?” own way—this is the heart of American conservatism Here was a form of what William F. Buckley Jr. and Frank today. Conservative wisdom and principles are derived Meyer, another influential conservative, had earlier called 6 from willingness to learn, not just from what is going on “fusionism.” Buckley’s publication, National Review, the flagship of conservatism and a favorite of Reagan’s, intended now, but from what has happened before. 18

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“What Did Reagan Believe?”

Photos courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library

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President Reagan gives the commencement address at the University of Notre Dame on May 17, 1981.

precisely that objective. Both Buckley and Reagan saw the conservative tent as wide enough for both social and economic conservatives. Neither should bar the other; both belonged—they were siblings. That was what Reagan proposed in this particular CPAC speech, delivered not even a full year since his attempt to wrench the nomination from the incumbent, President Gerald Ford—who Reagan rightly saw as not a conservative. At this point, Reagan was already positioning himself for a run in 1980 against President Jimmy Carter. Reagan insisted that a “conservative majority” could emerge from within the fractured GOP to win back the White House and take America in a genuinely conservative direction. “We can do it in America,” Reagan assured. “This is not a dream, a wistful hope. It is and has been a reality. I have seen the conservative future and it works.” Reagan articulated a message that ought to resound with conservatives today: “Our task now is not to sell a

President Reagan delivers a “Radio Address to the Nation” from Rancho del Cielo. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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“What Did Reagan Believe?” ––––––––––––––—————––––——–—–––––––––––––––– By Dr. Paul Kengor ––––––––––––––––——————————––––––––––––––––

philosophy, but to make the majority of Americans, who 1988, Reagan said that conservatives must always “vote for already share that philosophy, see that modern conservatism limited government, family values, and a tough, strong foreign offers them a political home. We are not a cult, we are policy.” Reagan said that conservatives should vote for such a members of a majority. Let’s act and talk like it.” (Still today, platform unfailingly, “every single time.” Such conservatives 9 Americans self-identify as conservative over liberal by a are “believers in common sense and sound values.” 7 Yet, even with these Reagan margin of almost two to one. ) “For Reagan, This would require, said Reagan, an ruminations on conservatism, adherence to “political principle” and to developing a single, succinct definition conservatism was a “principled politics.” can be elusive. It is often easier to principled ideology define conservatism not in general And after adhering to just that in his 1980 presidential campaign, thereby philosophical terms but according from which cohesive winning the presidency in a landslide, to certain principles and clear policy principles emerged.” and getting reelected with that same positions. That is also true for Reagan philosophy and platform in 1984, conservatism. Reagan, in fact, did a Reagan would remain just as positive masterful job of coalescing conservatism about the potency of a principled conservative message. (and conservatives and their country) around certain key principles and policies and issues. He viewed conservatism In February 1987, well into his second term after cruising back to the White House with the backing of every state in as a practical ideology given to practical application. Reagan the nation but Minnesota (the home state of his challenger), told CPAC that conservatism was one political viewpoint 10 Reagan told CPAC that the conservative movement remained mercifully “free from slavish adherence to abstraction.” 8 For Reagan, conservatism was a principled ideology from in ascendancy because it had a “bold, forward-looking agenda.” In his final presidential address to CPAC in February which cohesive principles emerged. Notes 1 On this, see George W. Bush’s November 2003 speech to the National Endowment for Democracy and my article “The ‘March of Freedom’ from Reagan to Bush,” Policy Review, December 2007 / January 2008. 2 Reagan, “Remarks at a Dinner Marking the Tenth Anniversary of the Heritage Foundation,” Washington, DC, October 3, 1983. 3 Between 1974 and 1988, Reagan missed only the 1976 and 1980 meetings of CPAC, in both cases because he was in New Hampshire campaigning for the presidency. James C. Roberts, ed., A City Upon a Hill: Speeches by Ronald Reagan Before the Conservative Political Action Conference (Washington, DC: The American Studies Center, 1989). 4 Kirk’s leading conservative works include The Conservative Mind, The Roots of American Order, and (among others) The American Cause. All are highly recommended for understanding true conservatism. 5 Reagan, “Remarks at the Annual Conservative Political Action Conference,” Washington, DC, February 6, 1977. 6 On this see Lee Edwards, William F. Buckley Jr.: The Making of a Movement (Wilmington, DE: ISI Books, 2010). 7 Typically, the range is 35–40 percent of Americans who call themselves conservative versus 20–25 percent who call themselves liberal, even at times of seeming liberal ascendancy. A major Gallup poll conducted from January to May 2009, amid Barack Obama’s first inauguration and at the height of “Obama mania,” found more self-described conservatives than liberals not only by a margin of 40 percent to 21 percent but in literally all fifty states, from California to Massachusetts—the same electorate that chose Obama. For analysis, see Paul Kengor, “The End of the Reagan Era?,” American Spectator, January 21, 2013; and Paul Kengor, “An Obama-Reagan Presidency?,” February 13, 2009, posted at the website of the Center for Vision & Values. 8 Reagan, “Remarks at the Annual Conservative Political Action Conference,” Washington, DC, February 20, 1987. 9 Reagan, “Remarks at the Annual Conservative Political Action Conference,” Washington, DC, February 11, 1988. 10 Reagan, “Remarks at the Annual Conservative Political Action Conference,” Washington, DC, February 6, 1977. —————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————— Source: Kengor, Paul, 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative. New York: Beaufort, 2014. 4-8.

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Professors You Need to Know

Dr. Paul Kengor speaks to students attending Young America’s Foundation’s 2010 High School Conference at Grove City College in Pennsylvania.

An Interview with Dr. Paul Kengor By Ashley Pratte, Spokeswoman Libertas: What sparked your interest in Ronald Reagan and the Conservative Movement?   —————————————————————————————————————————

PK: I was a college student at the University of Pittsburgh in the late 1980s, majoring in biochemistry/biophysics. I was a pre-med major working for the organ-transplant team. Pitt pioneered organ transplantation under the great Dr. Thomas Starzl, for whom I was working for 20 to 30 hours per week while in school full-time.

Today’s young people are rarely introduced to conservative ideas in their classrooms and on their campuses. Most go their entire academic careers without meeting or hearing from a conservative professor. While the outlook seems grim on most campuses, there is a glimmer of hope among the faculty at several schools. Over the next few issues of Libertas, Young America’s Foundation will highlight some of the country’s top conservative professors. These are individuals directly reaching today’s young people with the importance of free enterprise, individual freedom, and limited government. Their teachings extend beyond their classrooms: through their own writings, their involvement with Young America’s Foundation, media appearances, and nationwide lectures. They are steadfast in their beliefs and dedicated to ensuring today’s young people receive the education they deserve. This issue features Grove City College political science professor Dr. Paul Kengor. Dr. Kengor is also the executive director of the college’s Center for Vision & Values and the author of several books, including 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative (see excerpt on page 17).

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I say all of that to illustrate that I had no interest whatsoever in public policy. I was totally apolitical. And yet, I couldn’t escape the results of the Reagan Revolution that were all around me, from Reagan’s impact on America to his impact on the world. I knew enough about current events to realize that communism was collapsing just as Reagan famously had said it would. Even people who were apolitical had heard Reagan’s many statements about communism’s imminent doom and that the Soviet Union was an “Evil Empire.” But while Reagan was being vindicated by 1989, I discovered that there were these really angry people on campus called liberals. They attacked Reagan with the most vicious names and refused to give him credit even for the momentous things he had obviously predicted. I started investigating these issues and events on my own, in a completely neutral, objective way—as a science major would do. I wanted to learn about this Reagan guy and what he believed. To make a long story very short, this was the start of my introduction to Ronald Reagan and the Conservative Movement. I was drawn in and have never let go.

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it. The Foundation was a breath of fresh air, offering the only genuine diversity among the diversity-preaching liberals and progressives that dominate campus life. Libertas: You have worked closely with Young America’s Foundation and our students. What are some of the experiences that really stand out in your mind when you reflect on your past involvement? ————————————————————————————————

PK: There are many: speaking to high school students at the excellent annual summer conference that YAF hosts in Washington, addressing the aspiring young journalists at the National Journalism Center, and lecturing on Ronald Reagan at the Reagan Ranch Center. I’m particularly proud of writing the content for the exhibits on Reagan at the Reagan Ranch Center. And I’m especially proud of my former Grove City College student, Andrew Coffin, who is currently the vice president and director of the Reagan Ranch. But perhaps most of all, it’s a privilege to represent YAF at various colleges where students are begging me to come speak so they can hear just one conservative Libertas: How did you first viewpoint from the classroom become involved with Young podium during their four America’s Foundation? years at their universities. The ———————————————— most telling example is the Dr. Kengor addresses students at the Foundation’s National High School PK: It wasn’t long after my talk that I’ve been asked to Leadership Conference just outside of Washington, D.C. conversion from political give a number of times. It’s agnosticism to conservatism that I saw how amazingly titled, “Why Communism is Bad.” intolerant and ideologically one-sided universities were. They Think about this. These poor students need to bring to were monoliths of liberal thought. That was obvious to a campus someone from the outside to explain to their fellow blind and deaf man. Liberals, especially on universities, profess students why communism—an ideology that killed more than “diversity” and “tolerance.” In truth, they only tolerate things 100 million people in the last century, double the combined they agree with—which, of course, isn’t really tolerance. What death tolls of World War I and II—is bad. liberals actually practice is, at best, a selective tolerance and a That’s pretty darned pathetic. Such is the wretched state of selective diversity. higher education in America today. It’s really a mis-education I very quickly learned that Young America’s Foundation and at an astronomical cost. It’s the biggest rip-off in the (YAF) was one of the only forces bringing another point country. A scandal. If conservatives ran the universities and of view to these ideologically monolithic universities. If a charged this kind of money for such political brainwashing, conservative speaker magically materialized on a campus one Congress would hold hearings and shut down higher education. day—a miraculous event—you could bet that YAF was behind If you want to know why America is a mess today, it’s

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because of the universities. YAF is one of the few groups doing something about that. Libertas: What brought you to Grove City College and what is your favorite part about working with students? ————————————————————————————————

PK: I ended up at Grove City College through a lot of hard work, a little luck, and by the grace of God. Grove City College is one of the few conservative colleges in the country, and it just happens to be located in the area where I grew up and that I love: Western Pennsylvania. Ronald Reagan once said of Eureka College that he wanted to go there so bad that it hurt. I felt the same way about Grove City College. My favorite part of working with students is helping them along in their careers after college. I literally spend more time helping a student get a job or internship than I do grading his or her exams. The exams, of course, are important, but nothing is more important than helping these young people to go out and make a better country and world. Libertas: What advice do you have for students involved in the Conservative Movement on their campuses? ————————————————————————————————

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PK: Be not afraid! Don’t run away from or be embarrassed about what you believe. There are more people on campus who think like you than you realize. Still today, even in the Obama era, Americans self-identify as conservative over liberal by a margin of almost two-to-one. The polling on that has been consistent for about 20 years now—since Reagan. You’re not alone. It just seems like you’re alone because the leftists on campus are so loud and intolerant. Stand up for what you believe. Accept and embrace who you are. God has us in this world to be His intermediaries and representatives here on earth. We’re here as His workers and apostles to do His will. Through the free will He has given us, we must choose to do the right thing and make this world a better place. Ronald Reagan had a favorite quote of Winston Churchill that he used often: “When great causes are on the move in the world, we learn we are spirits, not animals, and that something is going on in space and time, and beyond space and time, which, whether we like it or not, spells duty.” We have a duty, whether we like it or not, to do the right thing, even when it’s hard. Reagan called this “A Time for Choosing.” We all have our times for choosing to do what is right.

Dr. Kengor speaks with students following his remarks at the Reagan Ranch Center in early 2014. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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Dr. Kengor headlines the Wendy P. McCaw Reagan Ranch Roundtable dinner at the Reagan Ranch Center.

Libertas: Your latest book, 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative, highlights the values and ideals that Reagan held so dear. How are these ideas applicable to today, and how can today’s young people benefit from studying Ronald Reagan’s lasting accomplishments? ————————————————————————————————

PK: We constantly hear various candidates for office and for the Presidency claim, “I’m a Reagan conservative,” or “I believe as Ronald Reagan believed.” Well, what did Reagan genuinely believe? What truly is a “Reagan conservative?” I felt like someone needed to lay that out. That answer is a crucial one right now in the life of the country, the culture, and the Conservative Movement. So, a couple of years ago I wrote a paper and gave a talk titled “What is a Reagan Conservative?” I laid out various principles of Reagan conservatism. Among those who heard that talk and encouraged me to turn it into a short book was Kimberly Begg, vice president and general counsel of Young America’s Foundation. I eventually did just that. I ended up with 11 principles of a Reagan conservative. Those principles are freedom, faith, family, sanctity and dignity of human life, American exceptionalism, the Founders’ wisdom and vision, lower taxes, limited government, peace through strength, anti-communism, and belief in the individual. Ronald Reagan said, way back in 1977, that we needed a “principled politics” and “politics of principle.” Well, these were the principles that Reagan abided by. In turn, he took those principles into the Presidential contest in 1980, got the nomination, defeated incumbent Jimmy Carter in a landslide

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(winning 44 of 50 states), and then was reelected by winning 49 of 50 states four years later. Reagan stuck to his conservative principles, and he succeeded greatly. He changed the country and the world. Young conservatives, likewise, need to stick to their conservative principles. And if they need some guidance in understanding what a conservative truly should believe, and what conservative principles genuinely are, I strongly recommend that they consult and study these 11 Reagan principles. They are time-tested and timeless principles. Libertas: Of those 11 principles, which would you say is the most important? ————————————————————————————————

PK: Faith. Libertarians talk about freedom. Liberals talk about freedom, though they apply their belief in freedom selectively. Conservatives also talk about freedom, but conservatives realize that freedom is rudderless without faith. Freedom without faith is Las Vegas, not the City of God. Freedom is best and at its fullest when infused with faith. Faith enables our freedom to aspire to our better angels and to love more than ourselves—to love others. Freedom without faith is license. Right now, in American culture today, you’re observing the carnage of freedom without faith. In addition to faith, I would point to the sanctity and dignity of human life and belief in the individual, which go hand-in-hand. The right to life is the first and most fundamental of all freedoms, without which no other freedoms are possible. Ronald Reagan said that. He understood that. Reagan said that each and every person is a “res sacra;” that is, a sacred reality. Every human being


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has a soul, which makes every person eternal and thus more important than any state that governs that person. States don’t have souls. They come and go. But the individual, because of that soul, is eternal. Individuals are incomparably more important than states. Reagan understood this, which is why he argued that every human being from the womb to the tomb deserves and must receive our special love and protection. That’s a conservative value. It is not a liberal value, especially given the terrible extremism of liberals on the abortion issue. And yet, liberals try to argue that they possess the compassionate, caring ideology. They do not. Conservatism is infinitely more optimistic, with far greater respect for the individual. Young conservatives should know that, internalize it, and communicate it.

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Libertas: Which conservative leaders today, if any, do you think best embody Ronald Reagan’s values and vision for America? ————————————————————————————————

PK: There are a bunch of them: Marco Rubio, Paul Ryan, Ted Cruz, Scott Walker, Bobby Jindal, Mike Lee, Tom Coburn, Rand Paul, Michele Bachmann, Sarah Palin, and some really good members in the House of Representatives. In my neck of the woods in Pennsylvania, there’s Keith Rothfus, Mike Kelly, and Joe Pitts, to name a few. I’m particularly impressed with Marco Rubio, who really resembles and embodies Ronald Reagan’s principles and vision in an inspiring and appealing way, particularly with his understanding of American exceptionalism. Marco Rubio’s story about his father and his family, and how they came from Cuba—and the Reaganesque way in which he tells that story— reminds me of Reagan’s vision and rhetoric of the Shining City. Read the transcript of Reagan’s January 1989 “Farewell Address”, as well as sections of his October 1964 “A Time for Choosing” speech, and you’ll see what I mean. The inspiring ideas in those speeches remind me of the experiences of Marco Rubio. They also remind me of Ted Cruz, for that matter. I love the courage of Ted Cruz and also of the likes of Rand Paul, Scott Walker, and Sarah Palin. They’ve accepted and embraced who and what they are, and they are doing what’s right, despite the vicious criticism. Young conservatives should look to these genuine conservative leaders. Be not afraid.

The popular Grove City College professor signs copies of his new book, 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative, following his remarks in Santa Barbara.

Students line up to meet Dr. Kengor and receive a signed copy of his book, The Crusader, at the Foundation’s High School Conference at Grove City College. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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Congressman Bill Huizenga encourages students at Young America’s Foundation’s Spring Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to stand up for their beliefs and take an interest in public policy.

Ken Cuccinelli, 47th attorney general of Virginia, urges the young attendees to share their love of freedom with their peers.

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Rachel Campos Duffy, television personality and wife of Congressman Sean Duffy, underscores the great need for conservatives to advance our ideas through popular culture.


Huizenga, West, Cuccinelli, Campos Duffy, and Buchanan Headline Spring Conference By Raj Kannappan, YAF Chapter Services Program Officer

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tudent activists from around the country gathered at the Amway Grand Plaza hotel in Grand Rapids, Michigan, to learn about conservative principles at Young America’s Foundation’s Spring Conference. The program, “A Time for Choosing: The Next Generation,” was made possible, in part, through generous support from Richard and Helen DeVos, John and Cleo Leppien, and an anonymous sponsor. Young America’s Foundation’s Spring Conference drew more than 200 students from a wide variety of colleges and high schools, including Clemson University, College of the Ozarks, Grand Valley State University, Grosse Pointe High Schools outside of Detroit, Highland High School outside of Cleveland, the University of Arizona, and the University of Notre Dame. Participants interacted with accomplished conservative leaders, learning how they could better challenge the bevy of liberal student organizations, faculty members, and administrators that occupy positions of power at their institutions.

Students from of the University of Notre Dame meet with Lt. Col. Allen West following his speech at the Spring Conference in Michigan.

Author Bay Buchanan explains why students need to be bold and courageous in their activism.

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Acton Institute founder Rev. Robert Sirico shares his thoughts on the moral vision of freedom.

Scholars (from left) Dr. Harry Veryser, Annette Kirk, and Gleaves Whitney discuss the ideas and legacy of Russell Kirk.

In his remarks, Congressman Bill Huizenga, who was involved with Young America’s Foundation as a student, reflected on how he began his career in public policy. “You’ve got to do something more than sit on the couch and yell at the TV,” noted Huizenga. Rachel Campos Duffy, author and television personality, discussed why it is imperative that young conservatives use popular culture to share their values and beliefs. Rev. Robert Sirico, founder of the Acton Institute, imparted his advice on a moral vision of freedom. In his speech on limited government, Ken Cuccinelli, 47th attorney general of Virginia, implored students to answer the questions, “How can I expand freedom through my efforts, and how can I convince other people that this is important?” Lt. Col. Allen West spoke passionately about the need for young people to stand up for American exceptionalism. Following that, students enjoyed a panel featuring Annette Kirk, Gleaves Whitney, and Dr. Harry Veryser, scholars who discussed why young people should read Russell Kirk, a father of modern conservative thought. Young America’s Foundation President Ron Robinson engaged with students through a lively presentation on the foundational principles of conservatism. Frequent Foundation speaker Bay Buchanan closed out the conference with a speech on why courage is vital for conservative activists. One of the goals of Young America’s Foundation’s conferences is to encourage confidence in students and to make the case that young conservatives can advance freedom at their schools and throughout their lives. Alexia Herrala, an attendee from Milford High School in Michigan, commented that she is often told at her school and elsewhere that she is merely “reiterating” her parents’ beliefs. However, after attending this program she was “very shocked yet incredibly joyful” that conference attendees treated her with respect and actually listened to her opinions. Herrala and her peers ultimately took away from the conference a powerful message delivered by Bay Buchanan: “Get ready, and become leaders in your own communities, in your families. And get yourself ready to help change this nation and to return it to the great and good country that was once given to us!” 28

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More than 200 attendees from around the country spend an inspirational weekend in Grand Rapids, Michigan, at Young America’s Foundation’s Spring Conference.


Students from around the country gather in the Amway Grand Plaza ballroom for the opening dinner banquet at Young America’s Foundation’s Spring Conference.

Lt. Col. Allen West poses for a photo with conference attendees.

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CEO Steve Forbes meets with members of Grosse Pointe North High School’s Young Americans for Freedom chapter before his lecture at the Michigan school.

Steve Forbes Shares Free Market Ideas with 1,300 High School Students By Patrick X. Coyle, Vice President

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s part of Young America’s Foundation’s Center for Entrepreneurship & Free Enterprise, CEO Steve Forbes spoke to a full school assembly at Grosse Pointe North High School in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, reaching 1,300 students, faculty members, district administrators, and school board members. Forbes spoke through the generous support of the Harold Simmons Free Enterprise Lecture Series. The Grosse Pointe North Young Americans for Freedom chapter organized the program. The event was the culmination of a year-

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long effort by YAF Chapter Chair Grant Strobl to secure a conservative speaker. Strobl recalls, “For a year, I met with the administration countless times, even during the summer, to discuss hosting a speaker. At the time, they cited district policy that prevented the school system from allowing events during the school day. So, our YAF chapter advocated for a new policy allowing for assemblies during the school day throughout the district. We are happy the school board and district administration finally saw the value in bringing world-class speakers, like Mr. Forbes, and to allow a speaker during the school day in front of the entire student body.” Forbes began his presentation by showcasing how Hollywood and popular culture mischaracterizes business leaders. He pointed out that many films and television shows cast CEOs as villains. Forbes said, if you believe the narrative Hollywood pushes, CEOs murder more people than serial killers. Forbes then underscored the importance of the free market and outlined important leadership qualities students should adopt. “The ultimate source of wealth is the human mind.” He also explained, “Free markets are not perfect because people are not perfect, but there’s no better system to make people, as Lincoln put it, improve their lot in life.”


About the Center for Entrepreneurship & Free Enterprise Young America’s Foundation’s Center for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise is a bold effort to popularize these ideas among young people. Building on our more than 50 years of experience, the Center for Entrepreneurship and Free Enterprise includes some of the most time-tested and impactful strategies for educating young people. Lectures, seminars, reading materials, and activism initiatives targeting college students, including those in business school, teach about the importance of freedom and an entrepreneurial spirit in this country. 

The Center is directed by Foundation

alumna Jiesi Zhao, a graduate of the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Michigan Law School.

Following his remarks, Forbes received a standing ovation from the student audience. He also greeted students and signed books for YAF members and teachers at a special reception. Strobl reports that the lecture had a strong impact on students and some took immediate action following the event. “As an example of government overreach,” noted Strobl, “Forbes mentioned that cookies that were once sold in our school are now banned due to new regulations put in place by Michelle Obama. The morning after his speech, students created a twitter account called, ‘bring our cookies back,’ which is an effort to protest the increasing government regulation on school lunch plans. This account went viral— gaining hundreds of followers in hours.” The Detroit Free Press and other local outlets covered Forbes’ speech which was also streamed live by the school district. In addition, several school board members expressed interest in hosting more speakers in the future. Strobl reported, “Since Mr. Forbes’ speech, we have reached a pinnacle of discussion about the ideas of free enterprise and limited government, and interest in YAF is greater than ever. Students are realizing today’s overreaching government is impacting their daily lives, and they desire a change.”

Steve Forbes addresses a packed assembly of students, teachers, and administrators at Grosse Pointe North High School in Michigan. Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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If sitting back while the Left indoctrinates our young people is not an option for you...

...then you are ready to join the most patriotic, freedom-loving Americans who include Young America’s Foundation in their estate plans. The Left controls our schools, but the future belongs to young people. Young America’s Foundation is the largest, most effective youth outreach organization in the Conservative Movement. We recruit and inspire America’s most promising young leaders to spread a love for freedom on their campuses. By reaching increasing numbers of impressionable young people, we will eliminate the Left’s advantage at our schools. You can make a gift through your estate that will change lives, control what young people learn about America and freedom, and define your legacy on your terms. Please contact Kimberly Begg, Esq., vice president and general counsel, at 800-USA-1776 or kbegg@yaf.org to request a free, noobligation copy of Young America’s Foundation’s popular Investing in the Future estate planning guide and workbook. Supplies are limited and will be sent on a first-come, first-served basis. Bo WorEstate nu kb Plan s: ook ni Incl ng ud ed

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www.yaf.org 800-USA-1776 The Reagan Ranch Center 217 State Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101 National Headquarters F.M. Kirby Freedom Center 110 Elden Street, Herndon, Virginia 20170

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National Journalism Center Alumnus Greg Gutfeld Offers Advice to Students and Aspiring Journalists By Brendan Pringle, Development Officer and NJC Alumnus

Young America’s Foundation welcomed Fox News Channel personality and National Journalism Center (NJC) alumnus Greg Gutfeld to
the Reagan Ranch Center for the monthly Wendy P. McCaw Reagan Ranch Roundtable luncheon. More than 250 students, supporters, and community members packed the David Louis Bartlett Outreach Center and Wendy P. McCaw Welcome Center to hear Gutfeld discuss his career and new book, Not Cool: The Hipster Elite and Their War on You. Reagan Ranch Board of Governors member Mark Larson emceed the program, and Andrew Coffin, vice president and director of the Reagan Ranch, introduced the sharpwitted host. Coffin’s introduction highlighted Gutfeld’s 1987 application to the National Journalism Center, which is now a project of Young America’s Foundation (see sidebar on page 34).

Gutfeld meets with local students and signs copies of his book, Not Cool: The Hipster Elite and Their War on You.

Fox News host, author, and NJC alumnus Greg Gutfeld speaks on the importance of hard work and celebrating true achievement during the Wendy P. McCaw Reagan Ranch Roundtable luncheon.

The application included a photo of Gutfeld as a student, a writing sample titled, “The Liberal Circus,” and the future Fox News host’s thoughts on how he would benefit from the NJC internship: “The National Journalism Center would serve as an excellent opportunity to improve myself in terms of writing and research, while preparing me for a future in media.” During his remarks at the Reagan Ranch Center, Gutfeld further reflected on his early journalism career, noting, “How did I get to where I am now? First thing I did was I took a job. I took any job.” After his NJC internship with American Spectator, Gutfeld worked at Prevention magazine. “I moved to Allentown, Pennsylvania. I went from the #3 city in the country to #300. I became the editor of Men’s Health. I was responsible for the late-1990s ab craze, where every man was walking around showing his abs. I am ashamed of that, but I was willing to move. I learned how to be a reporter there, and I learned that you could find value at any job.” Gutfeld continued, “Work to me is defined by a hole that you need to fill every day, which is, no matter what you do on Monday, it’s an empty hole on Tuesday.” Gutfeld used his Roundtable speech to offer some practical advice to the high school and college students in the crowd: “They tell you at these commencement addresses to follow your dream. That’s baloney. Do not follow your dream. The dream will find you if you get a job and you start working and you learn to get up. You get up. You go to work. If you don’t like the job, you learn to like it or you move on.” Gutfeld’s advice for aspiring journalists was to “report” rather than “retort.” “It’s more valuable for you to listen than to voice an opinion about yourself,” Gutfeld explained. “Over time you will develop the confidence to have an opinion, but the first thing is to listen. The best reporter, and the best kind of journalism is to admit immediately that you don’t know anything.” Gutfeld connected his work experience to his new book, Young America’s Foundation | Libertas | Summer 2014

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(Left) Gutfeld tours Rancho del Cielo following his address at the Reagan Ranch  Center.

About the National Journalism Center Since 1977, the National Journalism Center, a project of Young America’s Foundation, has trained aspiring journalists in the values of responsible, balanced, and accurate reporting.  Weekly seminars and on-the-job experience provide participants with the tools to become leaders in combating bias in the mainstream media. Seminars include talks with prominent journalists and public policy experts, writing exercises, training in investigative reporting, reading assignments, and current events and policy discussions. Interns spend the majority of the week on assignment with a media outlet learning from professionals in the journalism field. The balance of real-world experience and quality academic training provides students with a competitive edge in the job market after completing the National Journalism Center’s 12week program. For more information, visit yaf.org.

(Right) The Fox News host’s 1987 National Journalism Center application is highlighted prior to his speech in Santa Barbara.

where he contends that the “hipster elite” are undermining the importance of achievement by disassociating “coolness” from achievement. “You no longer have to achieve,” he said. “All you have to be is liked. Doing nothing is now cool.” “Cool is the path to pernicious subversion, primarily because it’s value free,” Gutfeld explained. “Cool is replacing Americanism with factionalism by obliterating patriotism with divisiveness. It’s painted as rebellious when it’s really as edgy as a snowball.” He argued that the only way to defeat this trend is by redefining “cool”—celebrating the military, “saluting business

over brooding,” and “creating a code to live by where common sense and brutal honesty trump jargon and abstract theory.” A question and answer session and book signing followed Gutfeld’s speech. Later that day, Gutfeld traveled to Rancho del Cielo to visit Ronald Reagan’s beloved ranch home. Reflecting upon his experience, he said, “It’s great to be at the Reagan Ranch. These are two words that, when placed together sound incredibly manly.” Upon returning to New York, Gutfeld reported on his time at the Reagan Ranch Center and Ranch during Fox News’s The Five.

More than 250 students and supporters attend the Reagan Ranch Roundtable luncheon.

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Summer 2014 Volume 35 • Number 2

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C

ongressman Sean Duffy takes a “selfie” photo with students at The George Washington University following his speech, organized by Young America’s Foundation.

Libertas  
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Issue 35.2 The official publication of Young America's Foundation.