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■ E ditorial S ta ff '■ > Editor-in-Chief ............................... :.....1...... ................................................Irene T hom p son Feature Editor ....... Art Editor .....

Ruth S p o re — ..........................

Calendar

B a rn ey R e e s ;..........

M e lb a M anning

Sports Editor ............................... ..............................................................H arry S tep h en so n Snapshot Editor

.................

Literary Editor

Iren e H ofg ard

i . .......................- ......................

G la d y s D eev er

Staff Typist ......................................................................................................... V era T h am er Faculty Advisor ...................................................... ............................Pro/. C h a rles B isset Faculty Advisor ................................................................................... Prof. C hris P. K eim B u sin ess S taff Business M anager ................ ...... ...................................................... L a w ren c e C a s e b e e r Advertising- M anager .............................-............-............................... ...Keith A d a m so n Assistant Advertising M anager ....... S a les M anager .......

E n g ra v in g b y A rtc ra ft E n g ra v in g C om pan y S t . J o s e p h , M isso u ri

* P r in tin g

by

H u b P r in tin g C o m p an y K e a rn e y , N e b ra sk a

❖ P h o to g ra p h y by " T h a t M a n G a le ” Y o r k , N e b r.

..Jea n Brow n Everett G reen


DEDICATION To

A l d e n Qa r wo o d W ho in his fourteen years of faithful service as caretaker of the York College cam pus and buildings h as m ade hosts of friends b ecau se of his willingness to cheerfully help others, and b ecau se of his fine, Christian character, we respectfully dedicate this 1936 Marathon.

Pnae 4


AD M IN ISTRA TIO N BUILDING The administration building is the background for all the scen es of college life. Studying in the classroom , convening in the chapel, or chatting in the halls, the "A d" building observes the development of our personality and character and it watches us absorb the knowledge of the past and, perhaps, add something worthwhile for posterity. W hen we recollect our happy carefree days, and our serious, thoughtful moments, a vision of the old red brick "A d" building on the hill will return to us, to hover in the background of our memories.

P-zfip 5


H U LITT C O N SERV A TO RY From here, harm ony w as wafted upon the breezes to soothe our turbulent souls with peace and calm. Pacre fi


GYM NASIUM Strong bodies and keen, clean minds ingrained with fair play and sportsmanship are developed within such walls as these. . E m eJ


ALUMNI LIBRARY W e whispered here and studied some. The library w as our haven after m any an intellectual storm.


COLLEGE CHURCH W e have dream ed our dream s, we have sung our songs, we h ave worked and we h ave played; now, we gather here for quiet, peace, and communion with our God. P age 9


Miss Ruby C arol Rickard, of W ashington, K ansas, the author and com足 poser of our college song, "O n the Hill of the Rising Sun", presented a chapel program of her own composition this spring. Miss Rickard stated that when she w as on the cam pus five y ears ago a friend said that York C ollege needed a song so she proceeded to write one. She said it w as a hobby of hers "to think that people should sing a lot." She h as written an entire concert program of original songs, which h ave not yet been published. Although she h as lost her eyesight, she not only sings, plays, and composes, but she also whistles beautifully and speaks in several languages.

On the hill of the rising sun, Stands the college we hold so dear. Rooted deep is our loyalty; Grounded firm is our faith sincere. In our hearts will ever, ever be Blue and white a blessed memory, Through the y ears our voices raise in praise to thee, All Hail! Hail! York! Looking down on the busy town Stands the college with aim s so high; For the best in our work and sport W e are glad we can sound the cry.

Page 10


President J. R. Overmiller A. B., K ansas City University. B. D., Bonebrake Sem inary. D. D., Honorary lege.

Degree,

York

Col足

Mr. Overmiller has devoted the past eight years to the work of Christian Education as president of York College. He has done his utmost to m ake York College an outstanding school for modern young people.

Because

of his

friendly attitude and his willingness to understand and sympathize with stu足 dents and their problems, and b ecau se of his untiring efforts for his chosen work, he has been ab le to ag ain build up and m aintain the student enroll足 ment. Although he h as been forced to work under critical financial difficulties the past few years, he h as directed York College successfully through them to a favorable outlook for the future. It w as voted by the C ollege Board of Trustees to confer the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity on President Overmiller on M ay 27, Commencement.

Page 13

1936, at


Earl I. Doty V ic e -P re s id e n t and D ir e c to r o f C u rric u la r P ro g ra m . H is to r y and P o litic a l S c ie n c e . A . B ., L e a n d e r C la rk C o lle g e ; B . D ., B o n e b ra k e S e m in a ry ; A . M ., U n iv e rsity o f C h ica g o . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rs ity o f ca g o , U n iv e rs ity o f K a n sa s.

C h i足

Chris P. Keim D ir e c to r

of

S tu d e n t

G u id a n ce.

P h y sic a l S c ie n c e . A . B ., N e b ra sk a W e sle y a n U n iv e rs ity ; M , S ., U n iv e rs ity o f N e b ra sk a , G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rsity o f P itts 足 bu rg, U n iv e rs ity o f N e b ra sk a .

Charles Bisset D ir e c to r o f S c h o o l R e la tio n s. S o c ia l S c ie n c e and H isto ry . P h . B ., S a n Jo a q u in V a lle y C o lle g e ; A , M ., U n iv e rsity o f K a n sa s; B . D ,, B o n e b ra k e S e m in a ry ; D . D . , Y o r k C o lle g e . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rs ity o f C h i足 ca g o , U n iv e rsity o f N e b ra sk a .

M ary Alice Slee D ir e c to r o f S tu d e n t O rg a n iz a tio n s and A ctiv itie s. E d u c a tio n . A . B ., Io w a S ta te T e a c h e rs C o lle g e ; M . S ., C o rn e ll U n iv ersity . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rsity o f Io w a ; G re e le y S ta te T e a c h e r s C o lle g e .

P a g e 14


Edith M. Callender E n g lis h . A , B ., Y o r k C o lle g e ; A . M ,, U n iv e rsity o f N e b ra sk a . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv ersity o f ca g o , U n iv ersity o f N e b ra sk a .

C h i­

W. W. Sw ezey B io lo g y .

Alm a Tress Lundman

S . B ., M o u n t U n io n C o lle g e ; S c . D .» T h e J o h n s H o p k in s U n iv e r ­ sity. G rad u ate S tu d y : T h e J o h n s H o p k in s U n iv ersity .

E x p re s sio n and E n g lis h . A . B . , H u r o n C o lle g e ; D r a m a tic D ip lo m a , M a c P h a il S c h o o l, M in n e a p o lis , M in n . P u b lic R e a d e r an d T e a c h e r D ip lo m a , C u rry Sch ool of E x p re s sio n , B o s to n . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv ersity o f W is ­ co n s in .

Howard C. Feemster M a th em a tics. A . B ., D r u r y C o lle g e ; A . M ., U n iv e rs ity o f N e b ra sk a . G rad u ate S tu d y ; U n iv e rs ity o f b raska.

N e­

P age 15


J. Clifford Morgan C la ssic a l L a n g u a g e an d B ib le . A. B ., C a m p b e ll C o lle g e ; A . M ., U n iv e rsity o f K an sas. G rad u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rsity o f cag o , U n iv e rsity o f N e b ra sk a .

C h i­

R. E. Townsend B u sin e ss C o lle g e . M . A c c ts ., C a m p b e ll C o lle g e ; T e a c h e r ’s D ip lo m a , P a lm e r S c h o o l o f P e n m a n s h ip ; T e a c h e r ’s C e rtifica te , G re g g S c h o o l o f S h o rth a n d ; H ig h e r A cco u n ta n cy C o u rse D ip lo m a , L a S a lle E x te n sio n U n iv e rs ity ; U n iv e rsity o f K an sas.

Zelda M. W akelin M o d e rn

L a n g u a g e s.

A . B ., N e b ra sk a W e sle y a n U n iv e rs ity ; A. M ., U n iv ersity o f N e b ra sk a . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv ersity o f N e ­ b rask a .

Neal Gallant P h y sic a l

E d u c a tio n

and

A th le tic s .

A , B ., Y o r k C o lle g e . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rsity o f M in n e-

Mrs. J. A. Giauque A rt. M . F . A ., I llin o is W e sle y a n C o lle g e . G ra d u a te S tu d y : C h ica g o A rt I n s t i ­ tu te, C o m p an a S u m m e r In s titu te .

P a g e 16


Eda L. Rankin P ia n o

an d

P ip e

O rg a n .

M u s. B ., U n i v e r s i t y o f N e b ra s k a ; G ra d u a te S tu d y : R u d o lp h G anz; P e rcy G ra in g e r ; P o s e f L h ev v in e.

Charles H. Amadon D ean

of

V o ic e ,

H u litt C o n serv a to ry M u sic. H isto r y

and

of

T h eo ry .

N ew E n g la n d C o n serv a to ry o f M u sic. G rad u ate S tu d y ; W h itn e y In te rn a 足 tio n al S c h o o l o f M u s ic ; L . A . T o r e n s of C h ic a g o ; W illia m S h a k e sp e a re , J r . ; C h icag o M u sic S c h o o l,

G ladys Pearson P ia n o an d K in s c e lla M e th o d . M u s. B ., U n iv e rs ity o f N e b ra s k a . G ra d u a te S tu d y : R u d o lp h G a n z , F ro k e n S to ck m a rr, C o p e n h a g e n , D e n 足 m a rk ; P e rcy G ra in g er.

Muriel Thomas Clarke V io lin ,

P u b lic S c h o o l M u s ic , O rc h e s tra tio n .

and

A. B ., D o a n e C o lle g e ; M u s. B ., T a r k io .

A nna J. Thompson R e g is tra r an d T r e a su re r. Y o rk

C o lle g e .

P a g e 17


Edith M. Cone L ib ra ria n . B. S ., U n iv e rs ity o f N e b ra sk a . G ra d u a te S tu d y : U n iv e rsity o f N e ­ b rask a,

Guy O. Ordway F ie ld

Mrs. Emily N. Black M atro n

fo r

W o m e n ’s

R e p rese n ta tiv e.

A . B ., K a n sa s S ta te T e a c h e r s C o lle g e , H a y s.

D o rm ito ry ,

George L. Edie F ie ld

R e p rese n ta tiv e.

A . B ., T a y lo r U n iv ersity , In d ia n a ; B . M u s., T a y lo r U n iv ersity , In d ia n a . G ra d u a te S tu d y : S tc r lln p C o lle g e , K a n s a s; M arion C o lle g e , In d ia n a .

P a g e 18


F irst Row — W illia m C u r n u tt; Ir e n e H o fg a r d ; E v e re tt G re e n , P r e s id e n t; F lo ra B la k e le y ; C a rl L e e . S econ d R °w — R u th A n n M c K a in ; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; D e a n C h a rle s B is se t, S p o n s o r; M a rv en H e s s ; V irg ie C la y to n . T h ir d

Row— R e x L u tz ;

L aw ren ce C a s e b e e r;

Rom a

S q u ir e s ;

E u g e n e W o r le y ;

H a ro ld P h illip s .

Student C ouncil The Student Council of York College w as organized in 1928. Its purpose is to further the interests of the student body; to act a s mediator betw een students and students and between students and faculty; to aid in the regu la­ tion of student activities; and to investigate and pass on an y problem pre­ sented to them in a petition signed by ten members of the student body and faculty. Everett Green, a senior, w as elected this y ear's president by a student vote in M ay, 1935. At the opening meeting this y ear Lawrence C aseb eer w as chosen vice-president, and Virgie Clayton w as elected secretary-treasurer. In addition to its constitutional duties the Council enforces freshm an rules, controls the number of offices held by one student, sponsors the spring election of Representative M an and W om an of the College, and Editor and Business M anager of the Sandburr, and selects appropriate freshman cap s for the ensuing year. This y ear it also sponsored the all-student election and inauguration of a Homecoming Q ueen who reigned over the affairs on Home­ coming Day. This y ea r members were admitted to the Council from the Life Work Recruits and A lpha Sigm a Phi. For the year, 1934-1935, Milton Maurer w as president of the Council, Virgil W alker w as vice-president, and Irene Thompson w as secretary-treasurer. During this term the Council revised the freshm an rules, developed a point system of controlling offices held b y each student, and re-published the handbook regulations for students. Changing conditions in student affairs made such revisions seem very beneficial.

P age 19


All graduates of York College who have attended the institution at least two years, and whose grades for the time enrolled av erage from 90 per cent to 92 per cent inclusive, are aw arded the honor MAGNA CUM LAUDE. Those whose av erag e is 93 per cent or above are aw arded the honor SUMMA CUM LAUDE. The members of these two groups are designated a s York College Scholars and are entitled to w ear a scholarship key bearing the proper wording. The object of this Society is to promote scholarship and the develop­ ment of the highest type of ch aracter among the students of York College. This group w as organized in 1931. Dr. A. P. V annice, '15, w as the first president, and Dr. R. C. Shupe, '05, the second president. W illiam Hice, '34, w as elected third president in the spring of '35; Mrs. A. L. Deever, Campbell College, w as elected vice-president and Mrs. Ardith Kull Fast, '30, w as chosen secretary-treasurer. Scholarship students of the colleges m erged with York College have been admitted to membership in this Society. Although no definite action h as been taken, this group is at present making plans to aw ard a scholarship of $25.00 each semester to either a Sophomore or a Junior to be used during the following year at York College.

W. B. Johns, '01; Mrs. G race Schell Johns, '01; Mrs. Lena Schell Caldwell, '02; Rev. R. C. Shupe, '05; Mrs. Bessie C asebeer Peterson, '08; Robert Getty, '11; Effie Cline, '11; Dr. Lydia Schaum , '13; Mrs. Eva Stuckey Buswell, '13; Mrs. Emma Groelz Feemster, '13; Ruth Callender, '15; Edith Callender, '15; Rev. A. P. V annice, '15; M ary Rankin, '16; Ralph LeFevre, '25; Schuyler Phillips, ‘29; Mrs. Onita Stone Phillips, '30; Minnie G ebbers, '31; W ilhelmina Feemster, '31.

Rev. I. E. Caldwell, '02; C. W. Gwinn, '05; R. E. Caldwell, '06; H. L. Stilson, '06; L. E. Mohler, '07; Rev. C. I. Mohler, '07; W. H. Morton, '09; W. C. Noll, '11; Jane Muir, '15; Mrs. Nina Francis Porter, '15; Jessie Stewart, '16; G. W. Sau n ­ ders, '17; Mrs. Nina Caldwell Graham , '18; Mrs. O pal Harritt St. John, '18; Mrs. Pauline Bradwell Glock, '18; Mrs. Hattie Mapps Rankin, '19; Blanche Harritt, '20; Merle Hamer, '20; Mrs. Ellen Kaliff Coffey, '20; Mrs. Alice Kaliff Stowe, '20; Lenore John, '21; Florine Townsend, '22; Myrvan Cannon, '23; Mrs. F a e Culbertson Fluevog, '23; Harold Prentice, '24; Levi Loreman, '25; Rev. M ax V an W agenen, '25; Myron Holm, '25; Mrs. Pearl Harritt Noll, '27; Ethel Spore, '27; Theron Gard, '27; Mrs. Marian Boughner Clark, '27; M abel Shelquist, '28; Theodore Thompson, '28; Etta Mason, '28; Elanor Allen, 28; Eliza­ beth Jam es, '28; Mrs. Evelyn Lorence Caldwell, '28; Mrs. Lorraine Thompson Sterner, '28; Thornton Miller, '29; Harlon Moore, '29; Edna Coffey, '29; Mrs. Ardith Kull Fast, '30; Raym ond Ruppel, '31; Erma Thomas, '31; Mrs. Neva Brookhart Moore, '31; Mrs. M arie Anderson Innyart, '31; Mrs. Violette Taylor Calkins, '31; Jean Haner, '32; Jeanette Bisset, '32; M aybelle Taylor, '32; Mrs. Irene Winfield White, '33; Mildred Thompson, '34; W illiam Hice, '34; Jam es Sp eece, '35.

Page 20


York Collede Sckolars All graduates of York College who have attended the institution at least two years, and whose grades for the time enrolled av erage from 90 per cent to 92 per cent inclusive, are aw arded the honor MAGNA CUM LAUDE. Those whose av erage is 93 per cent or above are aw arded the honor SUMMA CUM LAUDE. The members of these two groups are designated a s York College Scholars and are entitled to w ear a scholarship key bearing the proper wording. The object of this Society is to promote scholarship and the develop足 ment of the highest type of character among the students of York College. This group w as organized in 1931. Dr. A. P. Vannice, '15, w as the first president, and Dr. R. C. Shupe, '05, the second president. W illiam Hice, '34, w as elected third president in the spring of '35; Mrs. A. L. Deever, Campbell College, w as elected vice-president and Mrs. Ardith Kull Fast, '30, w as chosen secretary-treasurer. Scholarship students of the colleges merged with York College have been admitted to membership in this Society. Although no definite action h as been taken, this group is at present making plans to aw ard a scholarship of $25.00 each sem ester to either a Sophomore or a Junior to be used during the following year at York College.

W. B. Johns, '01; Mrs. G race Schell Johns, '01; Mrs. Lena Schell Caldwell, '02; Rev. R. C. Shupe, '05; Mrs. Bessie C aseb eer Peterson, '08; Robert Getty, '11; Effie Cline, '11; Dr. Lydia Schaum , '13; Mrs. Eva Stuckey Buswell, '13; Mrs. Emma Groelz Feemster, '13; Ruth Callender, '15; Edith Callender, '15; Rev. A. P. V annice, '15; M ary Rankin, '16; Ralph LeFevre, '25; Schuyler Phillips, '29; Mrs. O nita Stone Phillips, '30; Minnie Gebbers, '31; W ilhelm ina Feemster, '31.

Rev. I. E. Caldwell, '02; C. W. Gwinn, '05; R. E. Caldwell, '06; H. L. Stilson, '06; L. E. Mohler, '07; Rev. C. I. Mohler, '07; W. H. Morton, '09; W. C. Noll, '11; Jane Muir, '15; Mrs. Nina Francis Porter, '15; Jessie Stewart, '16; G. W. Saun足 ders, '17; Mrs. Nina Caldwell Graham , '18; Mrs. O pal Harritt St. John, '18; Mrs. Pauline Bradwell Glock, '18; Mrs. Hattie Mapps Rankin, '19; Blanche Harritt, '20; Merle Harner, '20; Mrs. Ellen Kaliff Coffey, '20; Mrs. Alice Kaliff Stowe, '20; Lenore John, '21; Florine Townsend, '22; Myrvan Cannon, '23; Mrs. F a e Culbertson Fluevog, '23; Harold Prentice, '24; Levi Loreman, '25; Rev. M ax V an W agenen, '25; Myron Holm, '25; Mrs. Pearl Harritt Noll, '27; Ethel Spore, '27; Theron Gard, '27; Mrs. M arian Boughner Clark, '27; M abel Shelquist, '28; Theodore Thompson, '28; Etta Mason, '28; Elanor Allen, 28; Eliza足 beth Jam es, '28; Mrs. Evelyn Lorence Caldwell, '28; Mrs. Lorraine Thompson Sterner, '28; Thornton Miller, '29; Harlon Moore, '29; Edna Coffey, '29; Mrs. Ardith Kull Fast, '30; Raymond Ruppel, '31; Erma Thomas, '31; Mrs. Neva Brookhart Moore, '31; Mrs. M arie Anderson Innyart, '31; Mrs. Violette Taylor Calkins, '31; Jean Haner, '32; Jeanette Bisset, '32; M aybelle Taylor, '32; Mrs. Irene W infield W hite, '33; Mildred Thompson, '34; W illiam Hice, '34; Jam es Sp eece, '35.

P a g e 20


H arold B a b e r M a jo r - E n g li s h ;

Y.

Mrs. M yrtha B a b e r Dayton, Ohio

Dayton, Ohio M . C. A.

M a jo r -E n g lis h ;

V ery l Burch

Lila E lam

Merna, Nebr.

Elba, Nebr.

M a jo r -M u s ic ; Y . W . C . A .; P an th er C lu b ; G le e C lu b ; O r c h e s tra ; M ay Q u e e n 4 ; P a n th e r S w e e th ea rt 3 ; W . A . A.

M a jo r - E n g lis h ; Y . W . C , A . C a b in e t; Z e t a ; S a n d b u rr S t a f f ; C la s s T r e a s u re r, 3 : \V. A . A.

C arl H arold B u rhoop W aco, Nebr. M a jo r -M u s ic ; B a n d ; O rc h e s tra ; C lu b ; Z e t a ; H istrio n ic .

Y . W . C. A.

D avid B. E n der

York, Nebr.

M a jo r-C h e m istr y ; F o o tb a ll; B a s e b a ll; T r a c k ; " Y ” C lu b ; Y . M . C . A ., C a b in e t; P A L S ; S a n d b u rr S ta ff.

G le e

Mrs. N e v a Butterm ore Dayton, Ohio

C alvin F eem ster Lincoln, Nebr.

M a jo r - E n g lis h ; Y . W . C . A ., C a b in e t; P a n th e r C lu b ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; W . A . A ., V ic e -P re s id e n t; L ife W o r k r e ­ c ru its ; Z e ta .

M a jo r-M a th e m a tics ; Y . M . C . A .; P A L S ; " Y ” C lu b ; T e n n is C h a m p io n ; F o o t b a ll; S a n d b u rr S ta ff .

m V ern ie Butterm ore Dayton, Ohio

B ru ce W .F r e e t

Ja c k G raham

Y o rk ,

Nebr.

M a jo r -H is to r y ; H a stin g s C o lle g e l l C la s s P re sid e n t 4 ; S a n d b u rr B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r 4 ; F o o t b a ll; " Y ” C lu b .

M a jo r - H is to r y ; Z e ta , P re sid e n t, 4; C la ss P re sid e n t 4 ; L ife W o r k R e c ru its; T r a c k ; Y . M . C . A .; H is trio n ic C lu b , P r e s id e n t; P a n th e r C lu b .

York, Nebr.

M a jo r - E n g lis h ; S a n d b u r r E d ito r -I; S a n d b u r r B u sin e ss M a n a g e r 3 ; M a ra ­ th o n B o a rd 3 ; C la ss P r e sid e n t *5 R e p rese n ta tiv e F o o tb a ll M an 3 ; A lp h a S ig m a P h i; Q u a rte ite ; " Y ” C lu b ; Z e t a ; jt . M . G . A ,, C a b in e t; S tu d e n t C o u n c i l ; Fo o ih a l! , B a s ke t ba ll, T r a c k .

P a g e 24


L ev i S. Joh n son Kismet, Kan. M a jo r -H is to r y ; P A L S ; L if e W o r k R e ­ c ru its ; A lp h a B e ta P h i; Y . M . C . A*

D ean K im b a ll

Dayton, Ohio

M a jo r -P h ilo s o p h y ; Y , M . C . A ., C a b ­ in e t; P A L S ; L ife W o r k R e c ru its; A l­ p h a S ig m a P h i; D e b a t e ; G le e C lu b ; B a n d ; O rc h e s tra .

Mrs. F ra n ce s K im ball Dayton, Ohio M a jo r-P h ilo s o p h y ; Y . W . C . A ., C a b ­ in e t; Z e ta , P re sid e n t; L ife W o r k R e ­ c ru its ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; A lp h a S ig m a P h i; D e b a t e ; S a n d b u rr S t a f f ; H is ­ trio n ic C lu b .

Milton M au rer

York Nebr.

M a jo r-H is to ry ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il, P r e s i­ dent F o o tb a ll C a p ta in 4 ; R e p re ­ sen ta tiv e Y . C . M an 4 ; R ep resen tative F o o tb a ll M an 4 ; C la ss P resid en r 2 ; Y C lu b ; H is trio n ic C lu b , P re si­ d e n t 2 ; Y . M . C . A .. C a b in e t.

L yn dle M oore

Aurora, Nebr.

M a jo r-S o c ia l S c ie n c e ; MY " C lu b , P re sid e n t 4 ; C la s s P re sid e n t 3 ; Y . M . C . A ., C a b in e t; P A L S ; B a n d ; H is t r i­ o n ic C lu b , V ic e -P re s id e n t; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; G le e C lu b ; f o o t b a l l ; T r a c k .

C arroll M yers W ashta, Iowa M a jo r -E n g lis h ; L if e W o r k R e c ru its, P r e sid e n t; Z e t a V ic e -P re s id e n t; C la ss V ic e -P re s id e n t; Y . M . C . A .

R oberto L a rra cu en ta Defiance, Ohio

R u ssell Sm ith V an Nuys, California

M a jo r-E d u c a tio n ; D e fia n c e , O h io C o l­ le g e 1, 2 ; Z e t a ; Y . M . C . A .

M a jo r - B io lo g y ; Y . M C . A ,, C a b in e t; P A L S T r e a s u r e r ; L ife W o r k R e c ru its; G le e C lu b .

C h a rles L en ih a n

York, Nebr.

M a jo r-C h e m is tr y ; Y . M . C . A .

Ja m es S p eec e

York, Nebr.

M a jo r-M a th e m a tic s ; H is trio n ic C lu b , P r e s id e n t; T r a c k ; P A L S ; Y . M , C . A ., P r e s id e n t; " Y ” C lu b .

W alter S p e e c e

York, Nebr.

M a jo r-M a th e m a tics ; F o o t b a ll; B a s k e t­ b a ll; Z e t a ; Y . M . C , A .; * 'Y ” C lu b .


A bit of history attached to a picture, a poem, a song, or an y cherished possession adds greatly to its worth. The following song w as written by an alum nus in 1905 for the college song and later resurrected by another alum ­ nus and called the Alumni Song. It w as used m any y ears in its original c a ­ pacity but w as gradually discarded in favor of one with more "pep." It w as felt by the resurrector that it should not be forgotten b ecau se of its historical interest. This song changed the college colors. They were formally navy blue and white but from an interpretation of the song royal blue and white banners and supplies were ordered and their attractiveness appealed to students and the ch ang e resulted.

Alumni Son| Come, let us sing together A glad triumphant song To our own Alm a Mater With praises loud and long; The p an sy is her emblem Of every tint and hue Her banner floating o'er us Is the Royal White and Blue. C horu s The pansy is her emblem Of every tint and hue Her banner floating o'er us Is the Royal White and Blue. Her halls so high and lofty G ive glory to her nam e; The fight for greater wisdom Adds luster to her fam e; W hen you grow sad and w eary Of life and all else too; Just think of old York College And the Royal W hite and Blue. W hen we have left to others The toils of college life And out upon life's billows Have met with m any a strife; And when with cares unnumbered, Our eyes are wet with dew, W e'll lift our voice in triumph For the Royal W hite and Blue. — C. W. Gwinn, '05.

Page 26


E la cio Ja ra m illo Vallecitos, N. Mex. • 'Th e w orld is so f u ll o f a n u m b e r o f th in gs, I 'm su re we sh o u ld a ll b e as happy as k in g s .”

H ow ard C a ld w e ll S an Germ an, P. R. ’'N o n e f a ir .”

but

th e

M a jo r-M a th e m a tic s ; C a b in e t.

b ra v e

deserves

Z e ta ;

Y.

M.

th e

M a jo r - B io lo g y ; PA LS; Y . M. c ru its.

C. A.

V irgie C lay ton Parsons, Kan. " T h e w orld n e s s .”

lo v es

a sp ice

F o o t b a ll; “Y ” C lu b ; C . A .; L ife W o r k Re-

York, Nebr.

S a m u el G. L e e

o f w icked­

" L o v e ca n n o t lo n g b e h id .”

M a jo r -B io lo g y ; P a rso n s J u n io r C o lle g e 1, 2 ; Z e ta P re sid e n t 4 ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il S e c r e ta r y -T re a s u re r 4 .

M a jo r - E n g lis h ; S a n d b u rr B u s. M n g r. 4 ; Y . M . C . A .; C la ss P re sid e n t 4 ; L ife W o r k R e c ru its.

G la d y s M . D ee v e r York, Nebr. " M y tru e-lo v e h av e h is .”

h ath

my

h e a rt

and

J e s s e L. Luthi

I

M a jo r - E n g lis h ; In d e p e n d e n c e J u n io r C o lle g e 1, 2 ; Z e t a ; Y . W . C . A . C a b ­ in e t 3 , 4 ; L if e W o r k R e cru its 3 ; P a n ­ th e r C lu b S e c .-T r e a s . 4 ; C la s s S e c .-T r e a s . 4.

a

b rav e

an d

M a jo r -E n g lis h ; Y . W . G le e C lu b ; O rc h e s tra .

Everett W. G reen

C.

n o b ile A .:

fo r

w ere

M a jo r - S o c io lo g y ; S a n d b u rr S t a f f ; W o r k R e c ru its; Z e t a ; Y . M . C . A .

L ife

York, Nebr.

" L i f e is a je s t and a ll th in g s show it, I th o u g h t so o n c e and now I know it .”

and

M a jo r - E n g lis h ; M a ra th o n B o a r d ; P A L S , V ic e -P re s . 4 ; Y . W . C . A ., V ic e -P re s . 4 ; W . A . A .; G le e C lu b ; S a n d b u r r S t a f f ; H is trio n ic C lu b .

PA LS:

Polk, Nebr.

** ’T is sw eeter f a r to me, T o w alk to g e th e r to th e kirk W ith a g o o d ly c o m p a n y !” M a jo r -H is to r y ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il P re s. 4 ; P a n th e r C lu b ^ President 3 ; " Y ” C lu b , S e c .-T re a s . 3 ; Z e ta * T r e a s . 3 ; M a ra th o n B o a r d ; S a n d b u r r S t a f f ; Y . M . C . A ., C a b in e t, 3 ; B a n d ; F o o tb a ll, 4 ; S tu d e n t M n g r. 2 , 3 ; T ra c k 1, 2 , 3 ; B a s k e tb a ll ca p ta in , 4.

P a g e 28

*

none

M elb a M anning

T h elm a R a e G ilm ore Lushton, Nebr. "R esp ect m y n d e .”

Abilene, Kan.

" I stro v e w ith n o n e , w orth m y s tr if e .”


Paul E. M y ers

W ashta, Iowa

H arry S tep h en so n Fairmont, Nebr.

**I c a re fo r n o b o d y , n o , n o t I , I f n o o n e cares fo r m e .” fv tajor-M ath em atics; S tu d e n t C o u n c il 4 ; G le e C lu b ; Z e t a ; Y . M . C . A .; B a n d ; L ife W o r k R e cru its.

"A

O rm al T a ck

Harold. P hillips Haviland, Kan.

Iren e T hom pson

D enzel Sm ith Lushton, Nebr.

M a jo r-P h y sic a l S c ie n c e ; M a ra th o n E d i­ to r 4 ; M a y Q u e e n 4 ; P a n th e r S w e e t­ h e a rt 4 ; C la ss P r e sid e n t 2 , 3 ; W . A . A .; S tu d e n t; C o u n c il S e c .-T r e a s . 3 ; Y . W . C . A ., V ic e -P re s . 3 ; S e c . 4 ; P A L S , V ic e -P re s . 3 ; S a n d b u r r S t a ff .

2.

York, Nebr.

Ruth S p o re "'N e v e r w ere such ask’ d as this d ay.”

sh arp

York, Nebr.

" A s m erry as th e d ay is lo n g .”

" T h e r e s to o d the u rc h in , as you will dtvine, S o m e th in g betw een a h in d ra n c e and a h e lp .” P r e sid e n t

th o u g h ts

M a jo r-M u s ic ; K a n sa s W e sle y a n 1; B e th a n y C o lle g e 1 ; Z e t a ; Q u a rte tte 2 , 3 , 4 ; C la ss V ic e -P re s . 4 ; B a n d D i ­ r e c to r 2 , 3 , 4 ; G le e C lu b ; O rc h e s tra ; Y . M . C . A.

M a jo r-M u s ic ; Y . M . C . A .; G le e C lu b ; P A L S ; Q u a rte tte ; B a n d ; S tu d e n t C o u n ­ cil 4 ; P a n th e r C lu b 4 ; L am b d a P h i,

C lass

Gaylord, Kan.

''W h a t fo n d and w ayw ard w ill slide I n t o a lo v e r’s h e a d .”

" T h o u g h this be m ad n ess, y e t th e re is m eth od in it .”

M a jo r-H is to ry ;

m an ’s a m an fo r a ’ th a t.”

M a jo r -H is to r y ; D o a n e 1 ; Y . M . C , A .; S a n d b u r r S t a f f 2 , 4 ; M a ra th o n B o a rd 4 ; P A L S ; 11Y ” C lu b ; F o o t b a ll C ap tain 4 ; R e p rese n ta tiv e F o o t b a ll M an 4 ; R e p r e ­ s en ta tiv e Y o r k C o lle g e M a n 4-

D on ald V a rco e Primrose, Nebr.

q u e stio n s

" N e v e r was I a fra id C atch m e, cow ardly ca n !”

M a jo r-C h e m istr y ; Y . W . C . A . P re sid e n t 3 , 4 ; W . A . A . P re sid e n t 2 ; P A L S , P re sid e n t 4 ; P a n th e r S w e e th ea rt 3 ; R e p ­ resen tativ e Y o r k C o lle g e W o m a n 3 , 4 ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il 1 , 3 ; P a n th e r C lu b 2 ; M a ra th o n B o a rd 4; S an d b u rr S ta ff 2, 3 , 4 .

o f m an; kn aves, if

yo u

M a jo r -H is to r y ; Z e t a ; C la s s P re sid e n t 3 ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il 3 ; Y . M . C . A ., C a b ­ in e t; L if e W o r k R e c ru its 1 ; F o o tb a ll C a p ta in -E le c t 4 ; " Y ” C lu b .

Senior not in picture: M a u d e R e e d Gresham , Nebr, C lass Motto— "M ea su re y ou r m ind's h eig h t b y the s h a d e it casts." — Browning. C lass Colors—G ra y a n d O ld R ose. C lass Flower—A m erica n B ea u ty R ose.

P a g e 29


Senior Memories In the fall of 1932 approxim ately one hundred students matriculated at York College to m ake up the freshman class. Since then, with numerous withdrawals and a few additions the class passed four years in York, and in the spring of 1936 eighteen were granted their degrees. During the first y ea r the class w as headed by Lucille Dierdorff and W ay n e Norwood; in the second year by Irene Thompson; in the third year b y Donald V arcoe and Irene Thompson; and in (he fourth year by Sam Lee. In their freshman y ear this class of 1936 succeeded in enjoying two class parties, so well planned a s to be unmolested by upper classm en. M any of the members enjoyed the refreshments cleverly procured from the JuniorSenior Hallowe'en party. A picture, "Christ on the Mount of O lives," by Giovanni, w as presented to the college. Professor J. C. M organ and Miss Alma Tress Lundman w ere sponsors. W hile sophomores, the giving of the Sophomore Reception and the pre足 sentation of shrubbery to the college on Arbor Day were the main accom 足 plishments. This shrubbery w as planted at the west end of the walk lead足 ing from the Administration Building. For their junior year they will remember the Junior-Senior banquet they planned for the seniors at the Country Club, carrying out the ap p earan ce of a Palm Beach resort. The fourth and last y ea r is the most important in a student's college life. This y ea r on Recognition Day, the class breakfasted together, attended the Recognition Service given them b y the juniors, lunched together, went to a show, then to the York-Doane basketball gam e, and completed the day by being entertained b y Professor and Mrs. Keim. The seniors gav e the juniors an April-Fool's Party at the Y. M. C. A., and later in April were given the Junior-Senior banquet by the juniors. The selection of announcements, of class rings and pins, and various activities of Commencement week all added to the pleasures of the graduates. As a parting gift to the college the class chose indirect lighting reading lam ps to be placed on each table of the library. Professor Chris Keim w as sponsor of this class for the last three years. To him and Mrs. Keim the cla ss wishes to express its gratitude and apprecia足 tion for their m any kindnesses.


M arg aret A k o fe r " L e a r n in g m in d .”

re fin e s

E lizabeth F eem ster York, Nebr.

York, Nebr. and

M a jo r-E n g L is h ; Z e t a ; Y . A sso c. E d ito r S a n d b u rr.

elev a tes

the

W.

A .;

C.

" T h y m odesty m e rit.”

is

a

ca n d le

to

thy

M a jo r - E n g lis h : P A L S ; O r c h e s tra ; Y . W . C . A . C a b in e t; G le e C lu b ; W . A . A .

D orothy A lex a n d e r Parsons, Kan.

H arold F. F riesen Henderson, Nebr.

" " S a y s h e— " I ' d b e tte r c a ll a g in ,” S ays she— " T h i n k lik e ly , M is t e r !” T h e t last w ord p rick ed him lik e a pin, A n ’-wal, h e up a n ’ kist h e r .”

" T h i s new lif e is lik e ly to b e H a rd fo r a gay y o u n g fello w lik e m e .” M a jo r-M u s ic ; Y . M . C . A ., V ic c -P r c s . 3 ; C o lle g e Q u a rte tte ; G le e C lu b .

M a jo r - B io lo g y ; Z e t a ; C la ss S e c re ta ry 3 ; A lp h a S ig m a P h i; P a rso n s J r . C o lle g e 1, 2 .

F lora B la k e le y Kearney, Nebr.

W a d e G reen

" F o r m en m ay c o m e and m en m ay g o, B u t I ’ll g o o n fo re v e r.” M a jo r -H is to r y ; K ea rn ey 1; S tu d e n t C ounciL 3 ; Y . W . C . A . T r e a s . 3 ; W . A . A .; P A L S ; G le e C lu b ; H istrio n ic C lu b 2 .

Je a n Brow n

M a jo r -H is to r y ; Y . M . C . A .; P A L S .

Iren e H oig ard Torrington, Wyo.

York, Nebr.

" F u n d a m e n ta lly , I am a w om an s tro n g fe m in in e in s tin c ts .”

York, Nebr.

" I fe a r n o fo e , I fawn n o frie n d ; I lo a th e n o t l if e ; n o r d read m y e n d .”

with

" M o s t g lo rio u s n ig h t! T h o u s en t fo r s lu m b e r !”

M a jo r-M u s ic ; C la s s V ic e -P re s . 3 ; G le e C lu b ; L a m b d a P h i 3 ; T r i o ; Q u a rte tte ; P A L S ; M a rath o n B o a r d ; O p era 1, 2 , 3 ; W . A . A .; Y . W . C . A .; S tu d e n t C o u n ­ c il 2 .

M a jo r-M u s ic ; Y . W . C . A . S tu d e n t C o u n c il 3 ; W . A . S e c . 3 ; M a ra th o n B o a rd 3 ; ( C h e e r L e a d e r) 3 ; G le e H is trio n ic C lu b 1.

E v a lin a C a ld w e ll San German, P. R.

w ert no t

V ic e -P re s . 3 ; A . P re s. 2 ; P a n th e r C lu b C lu b ; Z e t a ;

W en d ell Joh n son York, Nebr.

" Y e t leav in g h e re a nam e, I tru st, T h a t w ill n o t p erish in the d u st.”

" H e d o th , in d eed , show so m e sparks th at are lik e w it.” M a jo r-M a th e m a tics .

M a jo r-M a th e m a tic s ; Z e t a ; W . A . A .; L if e W o r k R e c ru its ; G le e C lu b ; Y . W . C. A.

R alph Jo rd a n L aw ren ce C a s e b e e r York, Nebr.

" H a v e ye e ’er h eard y o u n g L o c h in v a r ? ”

" T h e r e is a p le a su re , sure, in b ein g m ad, w hich n o n e b u t m adm en k n o w .” M a jo r -B io lo g y ; M a ra th o n B u s. M n g r. 3 ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il 2 , 3 ; P a n th e r CLub (C h e e r L e a d e r) 3 ; Y . M . C . A .; C la ss P r e sid e n t 3 ; Z o o lo g y A ssista n t.

P a g e 32

Beloit, Kan. of

g a lla n t

like

I

M a jo r -B io lo g y ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il 3 ; Y . M . C . A .; F o o tb a ll 2 , 3 ; “ Y ” C lu b ; Z e ta T r e a s . 3 ; C la ss V ic e -P re s . 3 ; O rc h e stra ; B a n d ; G le e C lu b .

I I 1


C re s to n K lin g m a n W ic h ita , K a n . "W h e n ce

thou

dost

pour

up o n

C ecil R. Sm ith Van Nuys, Calit.

the

w o r l d a f lo o d ^

O f h arm ony,—xa

" A l a s , the love o f w o m en ! it is know n to b e a lo v e ly an d a fe a r fu l th in g .”

s^r. M u sic; Y . M . C . A .; G le e C lu b ; Band; Q u a rte tte ; Lam bda

O rch estra;

M a jo r-M a th c m a tic s ; F o o tb a ll 3 ; B a s k e t­ b a ll 2 ; B a s e b a ll I ; P A L S ; T r a c k C a p ­ tain 4 ; " Y ” C lu b , P re sid e n t 3 ; P a n th e r C lu b ; G le e C lu b ; Y . W . C . A . V iceP r c sid c n t 3 .

Phi.

la V e lle L e a s e Sumner, Iowa " T h e q u ie t crow n .’

m ind

M a jo r - M u s i c ; P A L S ; W o r k R e cru its; G le e

Carl L ee

is

ric h e r

th an

W e s le y W hite

a

Y . W . C . A .; L ife C lu b ; O rc h e s tra ,

M a jo r -H is to r y ; Y . M. C. A.

Dawson, Nebr.

" W r it e m e as one who lo v es h is low m en .” M a jo r - E d u c a t i o n ;

Y . M . C . A .; C o u n cil; L ife W o r k R e cru its.

Tulsa, Okla.

" N i c e g o o d w ife, th a t n e v e r goes o u t, K e e p in g h o u s e w h ile I fr o lic a b o u t.” L ife

W o rk

R e cru its

3;

W ilbu r W illiam s York, Nebr.

f e l­

" T h e fa ce o f a ll th e w orld is c h a n g e d , I th in k , S in c e firs t I h eard the fo o tste p s o f thy s o u l.”

S tu d e n t

M a jo r-S o c io lo g y .

Irvin G. L ew is

Aurora, Nebr. W arren W itham

" H e had a head to c o n triv e ; a to n g u e to p ersu ad e ; an d a h an d t o e x e cu te any m isc h ief.” M a jo r-E n g lis h ; A lp h a S ig m a P h i, P re s. 1, 2 ; D e b a te ; P A L S , P re sid e n t 2 ; C la ss Pres. 1, 3 ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il 2 ; Y . M . C. A . C a b in e t; E d ito r , T h e S a n d b u r r 3 .

H arvey P a rk er

Agra, Kan.

" M y stre n g th is as the stren gth ten b ecau se m y h e a rt is p u r e .”

of

M a jo r -H is to r y ; F o o t b a ll; " y ’m C lu b ; Z e ta V ic e -P re s id e n t 3 ; Y . M . C . A .

L eta Y ost

York, Nebr.

York, Nebr.

o f a ll th e ir

" T h e days o f o u r y ou th a re th e days o f o u r g lo r y .”

M a jo r-H is to ry ; C la s s P re sid e n t 3 ; F o o t­ ball 2 ; " Y ” C lu b ; L ife W o r k R e c ru its; Y . M. C. A.

M a jo r -H is to r y ; P a n th e r C lu b (C h e e r L e a d e r) 1 , 2 , 3 ; H is tr io n ic C lu b 1 ; W . A . A .; P A L S ; Y . W . C . A ., C a b ­ in et,

" I do what m any dream lives.”

M ax Riggs Des Moines, Iowa 'S am e old story, sam e o ld so n g, Sam e old g irl all ye ar lo n g .”

Juniors not in pictures:

M a jo r-E n g lis h ; C la s s P r e sid e n t 2 ; C la ss ec.-T reas. 1 ; Q u a rte tte ; P A L S , P r e s i­ dent 2 ; Y . M . C . A .

Ruth A llesh o u se Trenton, Mo. H erbert S p e e c e M eadowlands, Minn.

P a g e 33


Storg of tlie Chapel Fla; Hanging on the south wall of the chapel is a large wooden frame with a plate glass front. Protected in this fram e is a flag, a pic­ ture, some gold and blue stars, a letter, and a list of nam es. At first glan ce this is all that is seen, and to most students and alumni this is all that is known concerning the m e­ morial presented to the college by the class of 1924. But behind this flag, this picture, these gold and blue stars, this letter, and this list of nam es, is a story, and a story that should be known by every student, alumnus and friend of York College. O ne evening in 1919, the late M. O. M c­ Laughlin, a former president of York College, then a mem ber of the house of representa­ tives, attended a banquet of the Methodist Brotherhood in W ashington. It so happened that the flag hanging in the banquet room w as the one which had flown over the demo­ cratic national convention in Baltimore in 1912 and in St. Louis in 1916 at which Presi­ dent W ilson had been nominated a s a can ­ didate for the presidency of the United States. This flag w as given to Representative McLaughlin to present to the sm all denom­ inational college in N ebraska of which he had been president. Mr. McLaughlin accep t­ ed the gift and dedicated it to the York col­ lege football team of 1919. In 1924 the senior class w as seeking for a fitting memorial to leave the college. V ari­ ous suggestions were m ade and finally on senior class day in 1924 the senior class m ade a valu able and a m em orable gift to the college. "O ld Glory" w as draped around a picture of President W ilson which he had

purposely autographed for this gift, the flag bearing the gold and blue stars for the men who had served "O ver There" for "Old Glory," the college honor roll, and the letter from President W ilson's secretary to the class of 1924 were all placed in a wooden frame with a plate glass front and present­ ed to the college. The gold stars represent former students of York college who died during the period of arm y service, some in training cam p and some at the battle front. Their nam es are: Lester Kettering, '18, of K ansas; Arthur Wolfe, ex-'21 of Ericson; Ray­ mond White, ex-'21 of Lincoln; Ross Gudgel, (commercial) of G resham ; W illiam A. Steven, (Academy) and Elmer Bolton, (Academy) both of York. Long has the story of this gift been forgot­ ten. But now it h as been revived. The col­ lege is the owner of a picture of President W ilson which he purposely autographed to be presented to the college with the flag which had flown over both of the conven­ tions at which he had been nominated. The college is also the possessor of a tradition which should not be allowed to die. Hanging on the south w all of the chapel there m ay be a large wooden frame with a plate glass front. Protected by this frame there m ay be a flag, a picture, some gold and blue stars, a letter, and a list of names. But also hanging on the south wall of the chapel there is a memorial to our country, to an idealistic president, and to "our boys over there." And represented by this me­ morial is a valu able tradition which the col­ lege cannot afford to lose.


Erwin B ranson Lawrence, Kan. Keith A d a m s on Sedgwick, Kan.

P A L S ; A lp h a SiRnva P h il D e b a te ; H is trio n ic C lu b ; l i f e W o r k R e cru its; Y . M . C . A .: S a n d b u rr S t a f f ; B a n d ; G le e C lu b ; E x te m p o ra n e o u s C o n te st 1.

P A L S , P re sid e n t, 2 ; Y . M . C . A .; C la s s P re sid e n t, 2 ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il, 1 ; "Y ” C lu b ; T rack ; M a ra th o n B o a r d ; D e b a te .

W illa rd Bish

F o o tb a ll, “ Y ” C lu b ; Z e t a ; C lu b .

Doris G rew ell

O p e re tta 1 , 2 ; O r c h e s tr a ; Y . W .

H is trio n ic

G le e C lu b ; P A L S ; C . A .; G ir ls T r io ,

1, 2 .

L ois E. Brow n

York, Nebr.

Dawson, Iowa

G le e C lu b ; O rc h e s tra ; Band; W o r k R e c ru its; V io lin E n s e m b le ; trio n ic C lu b .

Y . W . C . A .; S a n d b u rr S t a f f ; P a n th e r C lu b ; G le e C lu b .

A u d rey V. B la ck Fellsburg, Kan.

L e slie C a lla h a n

Chanute, Kan.

Y . M . C . A ., d e n t, 1 ; P A L S .

L if e W o r k R e cru its, P re sid e n t 2 ; Y .M . C. A ., C a b in e t; T r a c k ; C lass V ic e -P re s i­ d e n t, 2 .

W illiam E. Curnutt San ta Ana, Calif. A lp h a S ig m a P h i, S e c .-T r e a s 1 2C la s s V ic e -P re s id e n t, 1 ; H is trio n ic C lu b ’, P re sid e n t, 1 ; C h e e r L e a d e r, 1 ; P anrh pr C lu b , j ; L ife W o r k R e cru its 1 3 “ C o u n c il 2 ; 'Z e t a ; D e b a te , 1.

P age 36

L ife H is ­

York, Nebr.

J a c k C a lk in s

Y . W . C . A . C a b in e t, 2 , 3 ; P A L S : L if e W o r k R e c ru its; H is trio n ic C lu b ; B a n d ; O r c h e s tr a ; G le e C lu b .

M erle Blinn

York, Nebr.

Ja n ic e E. Brow n

M arian, Ind.

York, Nebr,

C a b in e t;

C la ss

P r e s i­


Ruth D aw son Fairmont, Nebr. A b ie Franz Henderson, Nebr.

Z e ta .

Band;

Lawton, Iowa

M errill L. D ay Y . M . C. G le e C lu b .

A .;

L if e

W o rk

Y.

M.

C.

A.

D arlen e Franz Lushton, Nebr.

R e c ru its;

P A L S ; Y . W . C . A .; S a n d b u r r S t a f f 1 , 2 ; H is trio n ic C lu b 2 ; G le e C lu b .

L o ren a E stey

York, Nebr.

Z e t a ; Y . W . C . A .; C lu b ; S trin g T r io .

O r c h e s tra ;

Burton F e a s te r

York, Nebr.

F o o tb a ll; C lu b .

O rc h e s tra ;

B a s k e t b a ll;

W illiam F riesen Henderson, Nebr.

G le e

G le e C lu b ;

T rack;

H elen F rieze

M . C . A .;

York, Nebr.

Y . W . C . A ., C a b in e t; P A L S ; D ra m a tic R e cita l, 2 ; H is trio n ic C lu b , S e c r e ta r y ; G le e C lu b .

"Y "

R obert N. Ferris Spokane, W ash. F o re n s ic C lu b ; Y . H istrio n ic C lu b .

Y . M . C. A.

Edith G o o d b a n

York, Nebr.

W . A . A ., P re sid e n t 2 ; V ic e -P re s id e n t 1 ; Y . W . C . A . 1 ; C la ss S e c -T r e a s . 1, 2 ; G le e C lu b I , 2 ; G ir ls 5 T r i o ; O p eretta .

PA LS;

Doris G rew ell

York, Nebr,

W . A . A . 1, 2 ; P A L S A .; G le e C lu b ; O p e re tta ,

P a g e 37

1; Y . W . C. 1.


G e n e v ie v e H am m ar York, Nebr.

N orm an H ubertus York, Nebr.

Y . W . C. A .; L a m b d a P h i, P re sid e n t, 2.

P ertecto Ja ra m illo Vallecitos, New Mexico

L a w r e n c e H a y e s , York, Nebr. B a s k e tb a ll;

"Y ”

C lu b ;

L u cille H ein s 2;

PA LS.

B a s k e tb a ll,

C lu b .

Iola, Kan.

Ruth Jo n e s

York, Nebr.

Io la J u n io r C o lle g e 1 ; Y . W „ C . A .; L if e W o r k R e cru its, V ic e - P r e s .; Z e t a ; G le e C lu b ; H is trio n ic C lu b .

P A L S ; Y . W . C . A .; W . A . A . T r e a s . G le e C lu b .

M arv en H ess Shelby, Nebr.

Fairmont, Nebr.

R ex Lutz

A lp h a S ig m a P h i; D e b a te ; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; Z e t a ; Y . M . C . A .; H is trio n ic C lu b .

F o o tb a ll;

D ulcie H o o tn a g le Dawson, la.

T rack;

"Y ”

C lu b ;

PA LS.

W illiam M cC on n ell Otis, Colo.

Y . W . C . A ., P re sid e n t, 2 ; C la ss V ic e -P re s . 2 ; L if e W o r k R e c ru its; G le e C lu b ; Iow a S ta te C o lle g e 1.

Y.

G lenn M cP herson Rush, Colo. Y . M . C . A ., P re sid e n t 2 ;

"Y ”

Band.

P a g e 38

M.

C.

A .;

G le e C lu b .


P au l M ain K ansas City, Kan. H is trio n ic C lu b ; Z e ta .

C lu b ;

Q u a rte tte ;

H erbert Sill

G le e

Sedgwick, Kan.

P A L S ; Y . M . C. A.

R obert M arp le Woodston, Kan C lass P r e sid e n t 2 ;

R obert M erch an t

y.

Benedict, Nebr.

F o o tb a ll;

S tu d e n t C o u n c il; Y . W . C . A . C abin e t; P A L S ; S a n d b u rr S t a f f ; H istrio n ic C lu b , V ic e - P r e s .; G le e C lu b .

K en n eth N elson

P au lin e S tep h en s

Edmond, Kan. M.

P a n th e r C lu b ; C. A .

F red R a sp

G le e

C lu b ;

Z e ta ;

W aco Nebr.

Y.

PA LS; Y .

W . C . A .;

G le e C lu b .

L ois M. S to sk o p l Hoisington, Kan.

Gresham , Nebr.

Y . M . C . A .; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; C lu b ; " Y � C lu b ; F o o tb a ll.

w. c. A.

R o m a S qu ires,

Polk, Nebr.

Y . M . C . A ., P re sid e n t 2 ; G le e C lu b ; " Y � C lu b .

York, Nebr.

A lice S im m on s

G le e C lu b .

G le e

P A L S ; L ife W o r k R e c ru its; B a n d ; H is trio n ic C lu b ; Y . W . C . A . S ecreta ry .

L u cille J. S to sk o p l Hoisington, Kan. PA LS; H is trio n ic

P a g e 39

L ife W o r k R e c ru its; C lu b ; Y . W . C . A .

Band;


B ern ice S trickler Julian, Nebr.

N orval R. Trout Culbertson, Nebr. P A L S ; y . w. c. A .

Y . W . C . A .; L if e W o r k R e c ru its; P A L S ; O r c h e s tra ; G le e C lu b ; V io lin T r io 1, 2.

R o s a V arie S w e z e y B each City, Ohio

V era T h a m er

Maize, Kan.

E lsie W a lk e r

P a n th e r C lu b , P r e s id e n t; Y . W . C. A .; L a m b d a P h i; P A L S ; W . A . A .; G le e C lu b ; O r c h e s tra ; O tte rb e in Cole g e 1.

P A L S , S ecreta ry C a b in e t 2.

York, Nebr.

2;

Y.

W.

C.

A .,

G e o r g e W a lla n d er York, Nebr.

Y . W . C . A . C a b in e t I , 2 ; H istrio n ic C lu b P re sid e n t 1 ; P A L S , T r e a su re r 1 ; W . A . A . V ic e -P re s . 1 ; M a ra th o n B o a r d ; E x p ressio n R e cita l 2 ; G leti C lu b .

F o o tb a ll; B a s k e tb a ll; P a n th e r C lu b .

R o lla n d Tonkin Amistad, New Mexico

"Y �

C lu b ;

M erle W ittm ey er York, Nebr.

F o o t b a ll; B a s k e tb a ll; T rack ; < 'Y 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; C lu b ; Y . M . C . A . C a b in e t; P a n th e r C lu b ; Z e ta .

Z e t a , V ic e -P re s id e n t 2 ; Y . M . C . A ., S e c .-T re a s . 2 .

Sophomores not in picture: P au l C a s k e y , Shaw nee, Okla. L a w ren ce R og ers Dawson, Iowa J. B u sw ell S p ore, York, Nebr.

P a g e 40


R ich a rd B urgess Goodell, la.

C lifford A d a m s

L if e C . A.

Edmond, Kan.

W ork

R e c ru its;

PA LS;

V.

M.

Band,

L y le A n d erson Cedar Falls, Iowa L if e W o r k R e c ru its; Z e t a ; O rc h e s tra .

Y.

M.

C.

G lenn A. C ain St. George, Kan.

A .;

L ife W o r k R ecru its.

Mrs. V e lm a A n d erson Cedar Falls, Iowa L if e Z e ta .

W ork

R e c ru its ;

Y.

W.

C.

E d n a C offm an Broken Bow, Nebr.

A .;

Z e t a ; G le e C lu b .

L a w ren c e D eev er York, Nebr. F e m e Brant PA LS;

Robinson, Kan.

York, Nebr.

N in a B risbin Y- w . T reasu rer.

D e b a te ; H istrio n ic C lu b ; A lp h a S igm a P h i; S tu d e n t M a n a g e r, F o o tb a ll and B a s k e tb a ll.

Band,

C.

A .;

W,

A.

A .;

PA LS,

V erd ette B u m g arn er York, Nebr.

M arjorie D u dek

York, Nebr.

W alter E k d a h l

Polk, Nebr.

F o o t b a ll;

H is trio n ic C lu b .

P a g e 42

llY "

C lu b .


Henderson, Nebr.

A n n a E pp

Y . W . C . A .; G le e C lu b ; L if e W o r k R ecru its.

J a m e s A llen F a r le y Rush, Colo. y

. m . c.

R obert G a le

York, Nebr.

P a n th e r C lu b ; Y . M . C . A . C a b in e t; F o o t b a ll; B a s k e tb a ll; ” Y M C lu b ; Q u a r­ tette.

L loy d G reen

Kimball, Kan.

A.

G ilbert F ellers Mullenville, Kan.

V esta M a e G ross Lushton, Nebr.

F o o t b a ll; B a s k e tb a ll; " Y ” C lu b ; G le e C lu b .

Y . W . C. G le e C lu b .

B ernita F ra n k PA LS;

T rack ;

PA LS;

Clayton, Kan.

O rc h estra .

C arl F riesen Henderson, Nebr. y

.

m

. c . A.

Lizzie F riesen Henderson, Nebr. G le e C lu b ; Y . W . C . A .

A .;

PA LS;

W.

A.

A .;

D on ald G ro ssh a n s York, Nebr.

Im o g e n e H arm s Charleston, Nebr. y

. w .

c.

A.

N orm a H arris Great Falls, Mont. C la ss S e c .-T r e a s .; P A L S ; Y . W . C . A .


W ilm a Jan zen Henderson, Nebr.

J o y c e H aw s Charleston, Nebr. PA LS.

Y . W . C . A .; R e c ru its; P A L S .

G le e C lu b ; L if e W o r k

Doris O. Joh n son M acksville, Kan. R ollie H a y s

Lushton Nebr.

G w en d o ly n B. H o o in a g le Dawson, Iowa Y . W . C . A .; P A L S ; P a n th e r C lu b ; W . A . A .; G le e C lu b ; B a n d ; H is trio n ic C lu b .

C la s s V ic e - P r e s .; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; H is trio n ic C lu b , S e c .; P A L S ; Y . W . C. A .; O r c h e s tra ; V io l in T r i o ; G le e C lu b .

E lea n o r Ju n g e Bradshaw, Nebr. W . A . A .; Y . W . C . A .; P A L S .

4

C h a r le n e H urley Des Moines, Iowa P A L S ; Y . W . C . A .; L ife W o r k Rec ru its ; W . A . A .; A lp h a S igm a P h i.

M arvin H. Iv e s St. Johns, Kan. Z e ta ;

C lass V ic e - P r e s .;

G le e C lu b .

York, Nebr, Basketball-^

G le e

C lu b .

V au ghn L earning Dawson, Iowa L ife W o r k R e c ru its, P r e sid e n t; Y . M . C. A .; C h o r u s ; T r a c k ; P A L S ; H is trio n ic C lu b .

B yrdin e W ilcox L e e York, Nebr.

D on ald Ja c k s o n F o o t b a ll;

A n n a K ro ek er Henderson, Nebr.

"Y * Âť C lu b .

Y. Stage

W . C. A rt.

A .;

L ife

W ork

R e c ru its;


M artha J. L e e

Harriett M iller Alexander, Kan.

Dawson, Nebr.

L if e W o r k R e cru its.

Y.

C. A .;

Z e ta , S ecreta ry .

O cie E thel M oran

York, Nebr.

M ern a M cG aitin

W.

Yuma, Colo.

P A L S ; H is trio n ic C lu b . PA LS.

H azel E. M organ

O rvis M cNurlin Bradshaw, Nebr. PA LS; Y . B a s k e tb a ll.

M.

C.

A ld en M arv el

A .;

G le e

York, Nebr. Y . W . C. P h i; Z e ta .

C lu b ;

A .;

G le e

C lu b ;

Lam bda

G e o r g ia N elson Cordova, Nebr.

Giltner, Nebr.

Z e t a ; L a m b d a P h i; Q u a r te tte ; G le e C lu b ; O r c h e s tr a ; B a n d ; Y . M . C . A .; Track.

P A L S ; Y . W . C. A .;

W . A. A.

W a n d a L e e O verm iller Tulsa, Okla.

C h a r le s M elv ille Trenton, Mo.

P a n th e r C lu b .

W ilbu r O v erm iller York, Nebr.

H arold X. M iller Pueblo, Colo.

F o o tb a ll; C lu b ; C la s s

P a g e 45

B a s k e t b a ll; S e c re ta ry .

T rack ;

"Y â&#x20AC;?


Ruth E. R og ers Bradshaw, Nebr.

York, Nebr.

D on ald P eters

PA LS;

B ern ice P eterson M ahaska, Kan.

Y.

W.

C.

A.

D on ald R o se

Agra, Kan.

Z e t a ; G l e e C lu b ,

E d w ard L. S c h a lk Dawson, Iowa

W a lla c e R ath jen Benedict, Nebr.

L ife

y.

Hudson, la.

O r c h e s tra ;

R ich a rd R o a c h

Y.

M.

C. A.

Ong, Nebr.

A.

York, Nebr.

Band.

D arold S n ed ig a r Portland, Ore.

LaCrosse, Kan. G le e

w. c.

W a d e S lo a n

L if e W o r k R e c ru its; H is trio n ic C lu b ; Y . W . C . A .; P A L S ; G le e C lu b .

PA LS;

R e c ru its;

Lu cille S ch rie fer

H arold R e y n o ld s Eads, Colo.

D orothy B. R iggs

W o rk

C lu b .

P a g e 46


York, Nebr.

R obert S p o re PA LS;

F o o t b a ll;

I s a b e lle T hom pson York, Nebr.

San d b u rr S ta ff.

Y . W . C. A. P A L S , T re a su re r.

G le e

C lu b ;

L ife

F o o tb a ll; B a s k e tb a ll; T rack ; C lu b ; P A L S ; Y . M . C . A .

P a r a le e S tep h en s W aco, Nebr. PA LS;

Y.

W.

C.

A .;

G le e

A. A.

M.

C.

A .;

PA LS;

Z e ta ;

Band.

Q u a rte tte.

H arold W o ch n er York, Nebr. York, Nebr.

PA LS;

ÂŤ<Yâ&#x20AC;?

De W im m er Alexander, Kan.

L orn a B. Stoulter Y . W . C . A .;

A .;

L u cy Ja n e W illiam s York, Nebr.

W a y n e S to sk o p l Hoisington, Kan. Y.

A.

M ary A lice T u cker York, Nebr.

C lu b .

H azel M. Steuart Denton, Kan. w.

W.

M au rice T h o m p son York, Nebr.

Ruth S ta r k e y Neodesha, Kan. Z e t a ; O r c h e s tra ; W o r k R ecru its.

C a b in e t;

C la ss P re sid e n t; A lp h a S ig m a P h i; P A L S ; Y . M . C . A ., C a b in e t; Q u a rte tte ; H is trio n ic C lu b , V ic e -P r e s ., B u sin e ss m an ager.

G le e C lu b .

P a g e 47


Freshm en Not in Picture G e o r g e M. Berry, York, Nebr. I s a b e l l e B u ckles, Winfield, Kan. D w ight Burch, M erna, Nebr. Ja rv is C o b e , Dawson, Nebr. Jo h n D ow d, Dawson, Iowa W e s le y D ow d, Dawson, Iow a K en n eth E lm ore, Bradshaw, Nebr. E rna F riesen , Henderson, Nebr. M a u rice H errick, Raym ore, Missouri E d w a rd L arson , Polk, Nebr. E u g en e W orley,

C lay ton L eh m a n , Woodward, Okla. W in fred M oore, Aurora, Nebr. V ictor' O rd w ay , DeMar, Kan. D orothy P eterson , York, Nebr. B a rn ey R e e s , Pueblo, Colorado V irginia R o se, Agra, Kan. Ja m e s S h a p p ell, M ankato, Kan. Roy S p e e c e , York, Nebr. C arroll W a g e s , York, Nebr. A n n a J a n e W ard, Big Springs, Kan. W ichita, Kan.

We Fresh men Under the shedding walnut tree The college Freshm an struts, The Frosh, a witty m an is he, The wisest of the nuts. His cap is green, his face is'red , Frosh rules h ave just begun; With the upper-class, h e's w ay ahead, They've got him on the run. W eek in, w eek out, from mom till night You ca n h ear those fellows blow; You ca n h ear them tell of all the things They did long years ago. These children going home from school. Look b a ck at the awful bore; They hate to leave the raving Prof., W ho gav e poor grades galore. They go on Sunday to the church, And sit upon the pews; They h ear the parson pray and preach, And listen while he stews. It sounds so much like their father's voice, C alling them from their sleep; They needs must think of him once more For they've mowed not what they reap. Higgling,—wiggling,— fiddling,— Onward through life he goes— Each morning sees some class begin, E ach evening sees it close. Thanks, thanks to thee my worthy friend For the lesson thou h a s taught, Thus in this hectic college life, A sprouting Freshm an's wrought.

P a g e 48


Betty Bittinger

R oss M artinez San ta Cruz, N. Mex.

York, Nebr.

P a n th e r C lu b ; V . W . C . A .

C o m m e rc ia l

H arry H arnish Chisholm,Minn.

C la ss

R u ssell P ickrel

P re sid e n t.

York, Nebr.

P a n th e r C lu b .

S tu d e n t C o u n c il.

Ruth Ann M cK ain Angus, Nebr.

G ail Virgin

Gresham , Nebr.

Y . W . C . A .; S tu d e n t C o u n c il; P A L S ; H is trio n ic C lu b S ecreta ry .

D orothy Y ost

York, Nebr.

Those not in picture: A lice D eV oll, Bradshaw, Nebr. T h e lm a D on elson , Stromsburg, Nebr. A le e n D onnel, Broken Bow, Nebr. Mrs. A rdith Ellsw orth, York, Nebr. L o d e m a F ried en , Shickley, Nebr. J a n e Furm an, York, Nebr. L a V ern e L a k e , York, Nebr.

N aom i M ann, O akdale, Nebr. Mrs. A m a n d a O rd w a y , York, Nebr. M argaret Propst, York, Nebr. R obert R ich ard s, LaCrosse, Kan. N a d in e R ichter, York, Nebr. M ildred S a c k s c h e w s k y , York, Nebr. M arg aret W olsten h olm , McCool, Nebr,

P a g e 50


The Goodwill Committee The Goodwill Committee is a group which w as organized in the fall of 1934 through the enthusiasm of Jack Graham and Professor Chris Keim. Its pur足 pose, a s intended by the originators, is to promote goodwill and a better understanding betw een the townspeople and the college, this program to be promoted by students and faculty. The members of the group the first year were Jack Graham , Ruth Spore, Everett Green, Milton Maurer, Lyndle Moore, Irene Hofgard, and Howard Wright, with Miss A nna Thompson and Professor Keim as sponsors. Those who formed the group this past y ear were Everett Green, Dulcie Hoofnagle, Irene Thompson, Rosa Swezey, Irvin Lewis, Cecil Smith, Edith Goodban, Glen McPherson, and Dean Charles Bisset, sponsor. It w as decided that those who were to form a permanent committee were the leaders of the following or足 ganizations: Student Council, Sandburr Staff, Y. W. C. A., Y. M. C. A., "Y " Club, W. A. A., Panther Club, and M arathon Board. The chairm an of the committee and the faculty member is chosen by the members them selves at the opening of each school year. One college function which this group h as m ade definitely its own is the sponsoring of the Spring Banquet. Their one idea is to have a banquet during the lull of activities in March with less formality than usually is found at college functions. Both banquets have been unusually successful. Last y ear Jack G raham acted a s toastmaster and original poetry w as featured on the toasts. This y ear the leap y ear theme w as used in the following program: Toastmaster, Law rence C asebeer; The Scien ce of Spring, Merle W ittmeyer; Cutting Up, Barney Rees;

Leap Y ear Versus W omen, Norma Harris;

Men

Versus Leap Year, Robert Spore; Spring is Such a Lovely Season, Nina Brisbin. The Revelers, the Harmoniers, and the Girls' Trio each gave m usical numbers. The program w as concluded by singing the college song.

P age 53


F ir st

Row — R u th

Secon d

S p o r e ; Ir e n e T h o m p so n , E d it o r ; L aw ren ce C a s e b e e r, B u sin e ss M a n a g e r; B a rn ey R e e s ; M e lb a M a n n in g ; J e a n B r o w n ; Ir e n e H o fg a r d . Row — D e a n C h a rle s B is se t, F a c u lty A d v is o r; G lad ys D e e v e r ; E v e re tt G r e e n ; H a rry S te p h e n s o n ; K e ith A d a m so n ; V e r a T h a m e r ; P r o fe s s o r C h ris P . K e im , F a c u lty A d v iso r.

Marathon Board

.

Ir e n e T h om p son ......................................................... Editor-in-Chief L a w r e n c e C a s e b e e r ........................... Business M anager Ruth S p o r e ...........................-............................................................................. Feature Editor B a r n e y R e e s ........................-..................................................................................—Art Editor M e lb a M ann in g ................. Calendar H arry S tep h en so n ............................................................................................ Sports Editor Ir e n e H olg ard ..................................... Snapshot Editor G la d y s D eev er ................................... ................. .............— _r Literary Editor V era T h a m er ........... Staff Typist K eith A d a m so n ........ Advertising M anager J e a n Brow n ....................................................................Assistant Advertising M anager E verett G reen ................................................................... S ales M anager Prof. C h a r le s B isset .................... _...................................... Faculty Advisor Prof. C hris P. K eim ...................................................... Faculty Advisor Along the northern edge of the cam pus of York College lies a grove of elm trees which h as been, and still is, known a s Marathon Park. Because of numerous gatherings which w ere held there, the junior class in 1917, in pub­ lishing the first y ear book decided to call it "The M arathon." Since then each su ccessive annual board, except one, h as retained the nam e of M arathon for the y ea r book. The junior and senior cla sses h ave tried to m ake of this M arathon the best yet produced. By profiting from the experience of other boards and b y gaining the loyal support of the student body the members of the Marathon Board of 1936 in preparing this book h ave hoped to m ake of it a treasured keepsake for ea ch possessor.

P a g e 54


F irst Row — G lad y s D e e v e r ; M iss E d ith C a lle n d e r, F a cu lty C r itic ; D a r le n e F ra n z ; M a rg a re t A k o fe r ; D o ro th y B ittiin g e r; R u th S p o r e ; Ir v in Lew is, E d ito r. Row — S a m L e e , B u sin e ss M a n a g e r; J e s s e L u th i; H a rry S te p h e n s o n ; R o b e r t F e r r is ; R o b e r t S p o r e ; E rw in B ra n so n .

Secon d

The Sandburr Staff Irvin G. L ew is .................................................................................................Editor-in-Chief G la d y s D e e v er .......................... First Sem ester, News Editor M arg aret A k o ie r ........................................................... Second Sem ester, News Editor S a m L e e ................................................................. Business M anager M iss Edith M. C a lle n d e r ........... Faculty Critic J e s s e Luthi ............................ ......................................... Chapel Reporter Ruth Spore ..........................................................................................................Feature Editor w........................................................ Columnist Erwin B ran son ........................................ R obert Ferris .............................................................................. SportsEditor H arry S tep h en so n ......................................................................................Sports Columnist R obert S p o r e ..................................................................... Reporter D orothy Bittinger ................................................ .................. Reporter H ow ard C a ld w e ll ......................... ....Reporter M e lb a M ann ing ..................................................................... .Reporter „....— ......................... Reporter R o m a S q u ires ........................................ D arlen e Franz ....................................... — ..................................................... Reporter "The Sandburr," although it w as first published in 1900 as a monthly m agazine, becam e later a fortnightly newspaper. Its nam e w as appropriate in that there w as a profusion of those prickly plants on the cam pus at that time. The motto of the paper w as, "Don't Step on M e." This y ear the paper has inaugurated a new headline style which involves the use of the capital and sm all letter headlines on all lead stories. Further than that, a concrete front p age make-up policy w as established. These and other changes were in accord with the best new spaper style as outlined by the A ssociated Collegiate Press, of which "The Sandburr" is a member. The establishm ent of a newswriting class which offers college credit and practical experience to students, w as a forward step taken this year. Miss Edith M. Callender conducts this class.

Page 55


F ir s t

Row — I r e n e T h o m p so n , S e c r e ta r y ; M e lb a M a n n in g , V ic e -P re s id e n t; M iss A n n a J . T h o m p s o n , F a cu lty A d v is o r; R u th S p o re , P r e s id e n t; V e r a T h a m e r , T r e a s u r e r ; G la d y s D e e v e r. Row — P a u lin e S te p h e n s ; I r e n e H o fg a r d ; L eta Y o s t ; A u d rey B la c k ; H e le n F r ie z e ; E ls ie W a lk e r .

Secon d

Youn^ Womens Christian Association The purpose of the Young W om en's Christian Association is to realize a full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. The three sides of life, spiritual, m ental and physical are stressed. To carry out this purpose, weekly meetings are held at which m usical programs, discussions on perti­ nent questions, devotional services, and various types of programs are planned which will in an y w ay help the college woman to grow and adjust herself to college life and to every day living. Guest speakers on subjects of literature, art, and nature w ere very much appreciated. The official business of the organization is done by the cabinet, which consists of the officers and standing committee chairm en. The big-little sister plan w as again carried out this year. Each new girl w as assigned to one who had alread y been on the cam pus, then she w as invited b y her big sister to a tea in the college reception room and later to a picnic. The purpose of this plan is to hasten friendships am ong the women on the campus. During the y ear the m em bers of the Y. W. C. A. participate in various social activities. They cooperate with the Y. M. C. A. in giving the Jolly-up ea ch semester, and in presenting the M ay D ay fete the latter part of May. This y ear the annual banquet w as held in the college dining room, at which time Dulcie Hoofnagle took up her duties a s the new president. The candle lighting cerem ony w as used to induct the new officers. The new cabinet w as informally entertained and initiated at a slumber party given by the retiring cabinet. Helen Cole, first representative of the United Brethren schools to go to W est Africa; B arb ara Lautz, traveling secretary for the Rocky Mountain Re­ gion of the Student Christian Movement; and Jean Hastings, traveling secre­ tary for the Student Volunteers, visited our Y. W. C. A. during the past two years. M embers of the Y. W. C. A. h ave been urged to attend the Association Conference held each spring at Estes Park.

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F ir s t Row — K e ith A d a m so n ; R o b e r t G a le ; R o b e r t M e rc h a n t, P r e s id e n t; E v e re tt G r e e n ; C a rl L e e . S ec o n d Row — G le n n M c P h e rs o n , T r e a s u r e r ; D o n a ld V a r c o e , S e c r e ta r y ; C e c il S m ith , V ic e -P re s id e n t; H a ro ld F r ie s e n ; P r o fe s s o r C h ris P . K e im , F a cu lty A d v iso r.

Youn^ Men s Christian Association The student Young M en's Christian Association is a part of a national and international youth movement. Having originated in the civic Y. M. C. A. it h as gradually adjusted its program to the particular needs of the college student. By this adjustment this organization h as taken upon itself a ' definite task of helping to mold an alytical student minds with Christian attitudes. The ulimate goal of the group is a four-square development in the realm of mental, spiritual, social, and physical life. Regular meetings are held in the college chapel every Tuesday morning. M usical numbers, vocational and educational talks, and discussions of peace, moral, and student problems furnish much of the program material. Most of the programs are given by students in an effort to develop talent and leader­ ship. Several professional men have given very interesting talks to the Y. M. C. A. this year. The first social function of this organization is the watermelon "feed" held early in the fall, at which time all college men have an opportunity to becom e well acquainted. The Jolly-up, held at the gym nasium, is sponsored jointly with the Y. W . C. A. during the first week of each sem ester for all college students and faculty. M any picnics, dinners, and programs are planned with the Y. W . C. A. and its cabinet. The M ay D ay fete is the outstanding social production of their com bined efforts. The Association this y ear sponsored an all-college basketball tournament, which provided an outlet for the physical side of the organization goals. They invited a group of Y. M. C. A. presidents and sponsors to our cam pus in March, at which time problems, ideas, and aim s were discussed. During the past two y ears the worth of the Young People's Association Conference at Estes Park h as been stressed. The two Christian Associations created a joint fund and sent Everett Green a s their delegate to the Student Volunteer Con­ vention in Indianapolis, Indiana in December. The organization is financed by pledges from its m em bers and from M ay Day receipts.

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F ir s t Row — B e rn ita

Fran k ;

S e c o n d Row — H e le n K e ith A d a m so n ,

V e s ta G r o s s ; E ls ie W a lk e r ; B e rn ic e S t r ic k le r ; V e r a T h a m e r ; P a u lin e S te p h e n s ; P a r a le e S te p h e n s. F r ie z e ; A u d rey B la c k ; D o r is G re w e ll; M iss Z e ld a W a k e lin , S p o n s o r ; D o ris J o h n s o n ; P r e s id e n t; M e lb a M a n n in g , V ic e -P re s id e n t; L u cy J a n e W illia m s ; D a r le n e F ra n z ; M a ry A lic e T u c k e r ; L o r n a S t o u f fe r ; I r e n e T h o m p so n .

T h ir d Row — D o r o th y R ig g s ; G ilb e rt F e lle r s ; N in a B r is b in ; T h e lm a G ilm o r e ; J a n ic e B r o w n ; Erw in B r a n s o n ; R o m a S q u ir e s ; R o za S w ezey ; H a r o ld P h illi p s ; Is a b e lle B u c k lc s ; R ich ard B u r g e s s ; H a rry S te p h e n s o n . F o u rth F ifth

Row — R o b e rt

S p o re;

B e tty

B ittin g e r ; R o b e r t M e rc h a n t; R u th S p o r e ; E liz a b e th F e e m s te r; H a ro ld W o c h n e r ; R ich a rd R o a ch . Row— M y rn a M c G a ff in ; C h a rle n e H u r le y ; E le a n o r J u n g e ; L u c ille H e in s ; F lo ra B la k e le y ; R o b e rt G a le ; J e a n B ro w n ; C e c il S m it h ; G e n ev iev e H a m m a r; G e o rg ia N e ls o n ; N o rm a H a r r is ; Is a b e lle T h o m p s o n ; Ir v in L e w is; M a x R ig g s ; R o b e r t F e rr is ; N o rv a l T r o u t.

PALS

The y ear 1935-1936 marked a change in the functions of the PALS Literary Society. The constitution w as am ended so that this organization is no longer a literary society but a social club. Meetings and programs are held on alter­ nate Tuesday evenings in the PALS hall as previously, but em phasis is laid on the social aspect of college life and not on literary exercise. Although the im portance of parliam entary order and forensic exercises is recognized, the development of social consciousness is considered of primary value. Such a conversion is still in the em bryonic stage; its success or failure will be de­ termined in the future. But to the present members of the society such a ch an g e seem ed essential to the life of the organization. The programs included talks on entertaining subjects, readings, musical numbers, impromptu addresses, and debates. The fall reception, occasional parties, the spring picnic, and the annual spring banquet are the outstanding social functions of the PALS. The PALS Literary Society w as formed in 1914-15 when the Philomathean Society for women and the Amphictyon Society for men were merged into one organization.

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F ir st Row — G lad y s D e e v e r ; W illia m C u r n u tt; Ir e n e H o fg a r d ; O rm a l T a c k , V ic e -P re s id e n t; V ir g ie C layton^ P r e s id e n t; K e n n e th N e ls o n ; D o ro th y A lexan der,- D e a n C h a rle s B is se t, S p o n s o r; H a z e l E m m a M o rg a n . S e c o n d Row — E v a lin a C a ld w e ll; L o re n a E s te y ; L a w re n ce D e e v e r ; W a rre n W ith a m ; E v e re tt G r e e n ; H a r r ie t M ille r ; W illa r d B is h ; R u th D a w so n ; P a u l M a in ; P e r fe c to Ja r a m illo ; O liv e K in g ; R u th J o n e s . T h ir d Row — M e rle W ittm e y e r ; M a rv in Iv e s ; H a ro ld R e y n o ld s; E d n a C o ffm a n ; P a u l M y e rs ; D o n a ld V a r c o e ; R a lp h J o r d a n ; B a rn ey R e e s ; B e rn ic e P e te rs o n ; R o b e r t M a r p le ; R u th S ta rk ey .

Zeta Literary Society

The Zeta Literary Society, formed in 1914 by the union of the Zetalethean Society for women and the Zetagathean Society for men, meets on alternate Tuesday evenings in the Zeta Hall. It is an organization of students who are interested in promoting intellectual advancem ent, social culture, and mutual improvement am ong its members. Early in the first sem ester a reception w as held for the faculty and nonmembers, and w as well attended. During the y ear about twenty-five members were admitted into the society, most of whom were initiated during the Fall Festival meeting with Dorothy Alexander reigning a s Queen. Due to the feeling among members that social activities were needed on the cam pus, this ph ase w as stressed throughout the year, and m any out­ standing social events resulted. Formality w as dispersed with throughout all of the meetings. As interest in travel proved to be quite general am ong the members, entertaining programs were developed about this subject. Both speakers from the faculty and society m embers gave accounts of their travels. The y ear will be closed with the annual picnic and banquet.

P ag e 59


F ir st Row — G la d y s D e e v e r ;

M iss Z e ld a W a k e lin , F a cu lty A d v iso r; R o sa Sw ezey, P r e s id e n t; B e tty B ittin g e r, S e c r e ta r y -T re a s u re r ; Ir e n e H o fg a r d . S e c o n d Row — R u sse ll P ic k r e l; W a n d a L e e O v e r m ille r; P r o fe s s o r C h ris P . K e im , F a cu lty A d v is o r; L e ta Y o s t ; H a r o ld P h illip s. T h ir d Row — R o b e rt G a le ; R o lla n d T o n k in ; C e cil S m ith ; L aw re n ce C a s e b e e r.

Tlie Panther Cluh P-A-N-T-H-E-R, Panthers! Yeh, Blue! Yeh, White! Yeh, Team! Fight, Fight, Fight! These are some of the echoes of the college spirit, the loyalty, and the "p ep " created on the York C ollege campus. It is the purpose of the Panther Club to arouse this enthusiasm, to circulate it throughout the student body, then to m aintain it at a high point. The Panther Club w as organized in 1926 as the "Booster Club." Later it w as nam ed after the team s for which it boosted. Two members are selected from each class and from the faculty to constitute this club. Its "pep chapels" and "pep band s" have been popular mediums for the carrying out of its pur­ pose. Early this y ear at chapel try-outs, Irene Hofgard and Law rence C asebeer were elected cheer leaders. Their cheering sections created at the Midland and W esleyan football gam es were spectacular. The Panther Club plans and supervises the annual banquet honoring the football men. "A Stratosphere Flight" w as the theme of the 1935 banquet on Decem ber 6. The identity of the Panther Sweetheart, the Representative Foot­ b all Man, and the 1936 Captain, previously elected by the squad, w as re­ vealed. The following program w as given: "The Ripcord Lets Out the Air", Toastm aster Rosa Swezey; "W e Honor the Choice of the Crew", Representative Football Man, Harry Stephenson; "The Flight Would Fail Without Ballast", Kenneth Elmore; "O n W ings of Song", M ale Quartette; "The Commander Reviews the Flight", Coach N eal G allant; "Every Flight Has its Loyal Ad­ m irers", Panther Sw eetheart, Irene Thompson; "There's Music in the Air", String Trio; "The Explorer", Mr. John Riddell; "The Pilot M akes a Successful Landing", Captain Harry Stephenson. Interest w as added to this occasion when friends and alumni were introduced.

Page 60


F ir s t Row — G le n n

M c P h e r s o n ; M rs. V e lm a A n d e r s o n ; B e rn ic e S t r ic k le r ; M e rle B lin n , P r e sid e n t; C h a rle n e H u r le y ; R u th J o n e ? ; C s fl L e e ; A n n a J a n e W a rd . Second! Rcvr'-— B v a lin a C a ld w e ll; O liv e K in g ; L i V d l e L e a s e ; M e r r ill D a y ; O c ie M c r a n ; H a rv e y P a r k e r ; M a rth a L e e ; D u lc ie H o o f n a g le ; R u th S ta rk e y . T h ir d Row— D o ro th y R ig g s ; L o is B ro w n ; P a u l M y e rs ; E d w ard S c h a lk ; M rs . B y rd in e L e e ; Sam L e e ;’ L y le A n d erso n . b o u rth Row — W e sle y W h it e ; G e o rg e B e r r y ; R ich a rd B u rg e s s ; P r e sid e n t J . R . O v e rm ille r, F a cu lty A d v is o r; J e s s e L u th i; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; P r o fe s s o r J . C . M o rg a n , F a cu lty A d v iso r.

Life Work Recruits On every college cam pus one will find a group of young men and women desirous of developing their spiritual lives to the fullest extent, of discovering Truth as it can be applied to life. Some of this group go even further in desiring to devote their lives to Christian Service. The purpose of the Life W ork Recruits is to m eet the needs of just such a group. The organization h as increased this y ear over other years in membership and also iii deeper religious feeling. Gospel team s h ave gone out to neighbor­ ing churches to hold m eetings m any Sundays. Both they and the churches vis­ ited profited by the programs given. A special project taken up by the group this y ear w as the presentation of the m issionary play, "B a Thane". It is a dram a dealing with the conflict of the m issionary and com m ercial forces in Burma, India. The purpose of the pre­ sentation w as to collect funds for the African project carried on by all the United Brethren colleges. It is a plan b y which each college has the privilege of sending a representative to Sierra Leone, W est A frica for a period of two years, the support of whom all the colleges cooperate. The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. also work on this project. The organization this y ear also sent a delegate, Vaughn Learning, to the Student Volunteer Convention in Indian­ apolis, Indiana. To President J. R. Overmiller and Professor J. C. Morgan the group owes much of its success. The Life W ork Recruits a s well as the student body a s a whole, h ave benefited greatly by such religious leaders a s Bishop Ira D. W arner, Dean C. E. Ashcraft, Dr. J. Stuart InnArst, Dr. S. G. Zeigler and others.

P age SI


F ir s t Row — P a u lin e S te p h e n s ;

L o r n a S t o u f f e r ; V e s ta G ro s s ; J o y c e H a w s ; D o r is G re w e ll; M y rn a M c G a ff in ; M a rth a L e e ; G la d y s D e e v e r ; A n n a E p p . Row — M rs. J . A . G ia u q u e , in s tru c to r ; L izzie F r ie s e n ; E d n a C o f fm a n ; R o m a S q u ir e s ; W ilb u r O v e r m ille r; B e rn ic e P e te r s o n ; W ilm a J a n z e n ; E rn a F r ie s e n ; A n n a K r o e k e r ; R u th R o g ers. T h ir d Row — W illia m F r ie s e n ; L o ren a E s te y ; E le a n o r J u n g e ; Is a b e lle B u c k le s ; M a rv in Iv e s ; G e o rg ia N e ls o n ; E d ith G o o d b a n ; I r e n e T h o m p s o n ; C a rl F rie se n . Secon d

The Art Department A liberal arts college attempts to take care of all phases of a student's life. Among those phases, art and its appreciation stands high. The purpose of the Art Department of York College is to satisfy needs along that line. This department is com posed of three classes of students, those who are taking it with a view to teaching it, those who are planning to m ake some practical use of it, and those who are taking it as an elective. Because their interests are sim ilar much can be accom plished by the department as a whole a s well as by the individual artists. The Normal Art class scheduled for the second sem ester is especially helpful to grade school teachers in their work with youngsters. A "feed " w as held in the spring to help develop the social life of the students a s well a s the educational and appreciation sides. This, with other informal gatherings, brought the students together in a w ay they could not h ave been brought together in the classroom. Becau se of its purpose— that of fostering an appreciation of the work of others and to develop along with that, the student's own ability to express himself— Mrs. Giauque holds an art exhibit each y ear which is a part of the commencem ent week program. These exhibits h ave alw ays been of unusual and particular interest to students, faculty, and towns people. Because of all this the art department should hold a place of ever increasing importance in the college curriculum.

Page 62


Miss Alma Tress Lundman Director E x p ression D epartm ent The Expression Department of York College, under the ab le direction of Miss Alma Tress Lundman, is becom ing increasingly important to college students and the community. Students are finding it very beneficial to be a b le to express their thoughts to an audience with clarity and ease. The Histrionic Club is one of the major divisions of this department. Its members study and present the better types of plays, both classical and modern. W hile memorizing their own parts in these plays they analyze them and evaluate them a s to their dram atic qualities and literary values. Mem足 bers also are shown how to apply m akeup and arrange the scenery. By participation in debate, public speaking, and private expression les足 sons, students get practical experience in constructing and presenting their own m aterial before an audience, a s well a s in memorizing readings for dram atic presentation. This y ea r V era Thamer and Helen Frieze were pre足 sented in a joint recital by this department. M any other public appearances h ave been given by individuals from this group; several of these were on radio programs. This spring Miss Lundman w as honored by membership in the National Dramatic Fraternity, Alpha Psi O m ega, which has headquarters in Hamilton, New York. The Membership is conferred on the b asis of merit in dram atic production.

P age 63


F ir s t Row — L o rn a S t o u f fe r ; V e r d e tte B u m g a rn e r; R o m a S q u ir e s ; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; R u th Jo n e s . S e c o n d Row — D o r is J o h n s o n ; M iss A lm a T r e s s L u n d m a n , F a cu lty A d v is o r; E rw in B r a n s o n ; L u c ille H e in s ; R u th A n n M c K a in . T h ir d Row — Is a b e lle B u c k le s ; R o b e r t F e rr is ; P a u l M a in ; L o is B ro w n . F o u rth Row — G w en d o ly n H o o fn a g le ; V e r a T h a m e r ; H a ro ld W o c h n e r ; R ic h a rd B u r g e s s ; Law ren ce D e e v e r ; M y rn a M c G a ff in ; A le e n D o n n e l.

The Histrionic Club First S em e s te r O fficers

S e c o n d S e m e s te r O fficers

President ... .......... V era T h a m er Vice-President H arold W o c h n er Secretary ...............Ruth A nn M cK ain Treasurer ........................Erwin B ran son Business M anager P au l M ain

President ................. ....Vera T h am er Vice-President ...............R o m a S q u ires Secretary .................. ..Doris Joh n so n Treasurer ........ Erwin B ranson Business M anager H arold W o ch n er

DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY Cast ............. D arlen e Franz Cora ...........................................................^— v. Fedele ............................ C h a rles M elv ille Duke Lambert ........................................ Erwin B ran son V era T h am er A lda .................................................. Duchess Stephanie ...................... D orothy R iggs Princess of San Luca _________ ________________ _____________Ruth A llesh o u se Baron C esarea ..................................................... ................ ..................... H arold W o ch n er Rhoda Fenton .................................................................. Eric Fenton ...................................................... Corrado ............. ...............’.......... L a w ren c e D eev er Grazia ........................ ...........................................................................................H elen F rieze His Serene Highness, Prince Sirki, of V italba Alexandri.................R obert Ferris M ajor W hitread ...................... V au ghn Learning The plot of "Death Takes a Holiday" is based on the poetic conception of Death suspending all activities for three days during which period he falls in love with a beautiful girl, and through her realizes why mortals fear him. This play by Alberto C asella w as ono of the two m ajor productions of the year.

P a g e 64

Doris Joh n son ...R ichard R


L aw ren ce D e e v e r ; R u th A n n M c K a in ; R ich a rd B u r g e s s ; Is a b e lle B u c k le s ; V e r d e tte B u m g a rn e r; B r a n s o n ; D o r is J o h n s o n ; M iss A lm a T re ss L u n d m a n , d ir e c to r ; H a r o ld W o c h n e r ; Pau l M a in ; V e r a T h a m e r ; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; R o b e r t F e r r is ; R o m a S q u ire s.

E rw in

The Best People Mrs. Bronson Lenox .............. ........ ........................ .................................. R o m a S q u ires Bronson Lenox ........... .................. R obert Ferris Marion Lenox ..........................................................................................Ruth Ann M cK ain Bullock ..... ........ ......................................... P au l M ain Lord Rockmere ................................................................................................ Erwin B ran son Henry ----- ----------------- --------------------------- --------- ------------ --------- L a w ren ce D eev er Miss Tate ........ V era T h am er George Grafton ............. H arold W o ch n er Bertie Lenox: ...... -....... .Vvrdetta B u m g arn er A W aiter ...................... -....... -.................. R ich a rd B u rg ess Millie ...................... Doris Jo h n so n A lice O'Neil ............. -..........-..... -....... -........ I s a b e lle B u ck les Another W aiter .......-........ V au ghn L earning On the evening of November 13, the Histrionic Club opened its 1935-1936 season by presenting David G ray and Avery Hopwood's three-act comedy, "The Best People," in the high school auditorium. The theme of the brilliant and am using com edy centers on the question, "Are young people being reared for real life or m erely for superficial society?" The plot is developed around the w ealthy Lenox family, "The Best People", a s they consider them selves, and the efforts of the son and the daughter to free them selves from the world into which they were born in order to becom e useful citizens.

Page 65


F ir st Row — L o rn a S t o u f f e r ; V e r d e tte B u m g a rn e r; R o m a S q u ir e s ; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; R u th J o n e s . S e c o n d R ow — D o ris J o h n s o n ; M iss A lm a T r e s s L u n d m a n , F a cu lty A^dvisor; E rw in B r a n s o n ; L u c ille H e in s ; R u th A n n M c K a in . T h ir d Row — Is a b e lle B u c k le s ; R o b e r t F e r r is ; P a u l M a in ; L o is B ro w n . F o u rth R ow — G w en d olyn H o o fn a g le ; V e r a T h a m e r ; H a ro ld W o c h n e r ; R ic h a rd B u r g e s s ; L aw ren ce D e e v e r ; M y rn a M c G a ff in ; A le e n D o n n e l.

The Histrionic Cluh First S em e s te r O fficers

S e c o n d S e m e s te r O fficers

President ..........................V era T h a m er Vice-President H arold W o c h n er Secretary ...............Ruth Ann M cK ain Treasurer ....................... Erwin B ran son Business M anager P au l M ain

President s _............... V era T h am er Vice-President ...............R o m a S qu ires Secretary ........................Doris Johnson Treasurer ......................... Erwin B ranson Business M anager Flarold W o ch n er

DEATH TAKES A HOLIDAY Cast Cora ..................................................................................... D arlen e Franz Fedele ..............................................................................................................C h a r le s M elville Duke Lambert .................................................................................................Erwin B ranson A lda .......................................................................................................................V era T h am er Duchess Stephanie ........................................................................................D orothy R iggs Princess of San Luca ............................................................................. Ruth A llesh o u se Baron C esarea , .............. ........................... .......................... ...... ......H arold W o ch n er Rhoda Fenton ................................................................... Doris ]oh n son Eric Fenton ....................................................................................................... R ich a rd R o a ch Corrado .................................. ...... ......... ............................... ..................... L a w r e n c e D eev er G razia ............................................................................................ H elen F rieze His Serene Highness, Prince Sirki, of V italba Alexandri................R obert Ferris M ajor W hitread ......... ............................................................................. V au g h n Learning The plot of "Death Takes a H oliday" is based on the poetic conception of Death suspending all activities for three days during which period he falls in love with a beautiful girl, and through her realizes why mortals fear him. This play by Alberto C asella w as one of the two m ajor productions of the year.

P age 64


L aw ren ce

D eev er;

R u th

A nn

M c K a in ;

R ich a rd

B u rg e s s ;

Is a b e lle

B u c k le s ;

V e r d e tte

B u m g a rn e r;

E rw in

B r a n s o n ; D o r is J o h n s o n ; M iss A lm a T te s s L u n d m a n , d ir e c to r ; H a ro ld W o c h n e r ; Pau l M a in ; V e r a T h a m e r ; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; R o b e r t F e r r is ; R o m a S q u ire s.

The Best People Cast Mrs. Bronson Lenox ........... ............................ _____.............. R o m a S q u ires Bronson Lenox ....................................................... Marion Lenox ......................... ........................... ____................................Ruth Ann M cK ain Bullock .................................... ...................................................... .................. ...... P aul M ain Lord Rockmere â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ........... .................. Erwin B ran son Henry ........................................................................................................... L a w ren ce D eev er Miss Tate ........................................................................................................... V era T h a m er George Grafton .......... ...... ............... ...................... .................................. H arold W o ch n er Bertie Lenox ..................................................................... V erd ette B u m garn er A W aiter ............................. __................................ R ich ard B u rgess Millie .................................... Doris Jo h n son A lice O'Neil .................................................................................................I s a b e lle B u ck les Another W aiter ......................................................................................... V au ghn Learning On the evening of November 13, the Histrionic Club opened its 1935-1936 season by presenting David G ray and Avery Hopwood's three-act comedy, "The Best People/' in the high school auditorium. The theme of the brilliant and am using com edy centers on the question, "A re young people being reared for real life or m erely for superficial society?" The plot is developed around the w ealthy Lenox family, "The Best Peopleâ&#x20AC;?, as they consider them selves, and the efforts of the son and the daughter to free them selves from the world into which they were born in order to becom e useful citizens.

P age 65

R obert Ferris


F irst Row — W illia m C u m u t t ; M iss A lm a T r e s s L u n d m an , P r o fe s s o r J C . M o rg a n , F a c u lty A d visors. S e c o n d Row — Irv in L e w is; Erw in B r a n s o n ; H a ro ld W o c h n e r ; M a rv en H e s s ; L aw ren ce D e e v e r ; R o b e r t F e rris.

Debate With four debate lettermen and a number of bright prospects signifying their intention to concentrate long and loud on the question, debate stock soared high this past year. Lettermen included M arven Hess, W illiam Curnutt, Robert Marple, and Irvin Lewis. Outstanding recruits were Erwin Bran­ son, forensic letter winner of 1935, Keith Adamson, who had received ex­ perience the past year, Robert Ferris, Law rence Deever, Harold W ochner, C harlene Hurley, and Dorothy Alexander. The national Pi K appa Delta question on the advisability of giving to Congress the power to override Supreme Court decisions w as used in all debates. York entered a team in the national Alpha Sigm a Phi invitational meet held at D ana C ollege but w as eliminated b y N ebraska W esleyan Uni­ versity. The next tournament w as of the practice nature and w as sponsored by K earney State Teachers College. A York team composed of Lewis and Branson turned in victories over team s from K earney and Midland, while an ­ other team of Ferris and Deever won from Chadron and W esleyan. The de­ bates of the B team m ade up of Hess and W ochner were not judged. The series of d ebates with N ebraska Central College were included in the preparation for the annual tournament of the N ebraska Inter-collegiate Forensic Association, of which York College is a member. Team s selected by the coach es, Miss Lundman and Prof. Morgan, to represent York in this tourna­ ment consisted of Erwin Branson, sophomore, first speaker, and Irvin Lewis, two y ear letterman, second speaker, a s the A team. The B 1 team members were Law rence Deever, freshman, and Robert Ferris, sophomore. The B 2 team consisted of Keith Adcrmson, sophomore, and Harold W ochner, fresh­ man. In the A tournament Lewis and Branson won victories over Doane College, D ana College, and N ebraska Central College, but failed to place in the tournament. In the B tournament Ferris and Deever tied for third place am ong eleven schools with ten victories and four defeats. W ochner and Adam son won four debates.

P age 66


F ir s t Row — M iss A lm a T r e s s L u n d m a n , S p o n s o r ; W illia m C u r n u tt; Irv in Lew is, P r e s id e n t; D a r o ld S n e d ig a r; C h a rle n e H u rle y . S e c o n d Row — R ich a rd B u r g e s s ; M a rv en H e s s ; Erw in B r a n s o n ; L aw ren ce D e e v e r ; P r o fe s s o r J . C . M o rg a n , S p o n so r. T h ir d Row — R o b e r t F e r t is ; K e ith A d a m so n ; B a rn e y R e e s; H a ro ld W o c h n e r.

Alpha Si^ma Phi The Theta chapter of the Alpha Sigm a Phi w as the first Greek letter honor society on the York College cam pus. These Greek letters, Alpha, Sigm a, and Phi are the initial letters of the Greek words m eaning Truth, Wisdom, and Eloquence. Inasm uch as the organization is national in ch aracter its p lace on the cam pus elevates the forensic standing of the college. The Alpha Sigm a Phi, under the direction of Miss Alm a Tress Lundman and Prof. J. C. Morgan, h as furthered and sponsored all forensic activities of the past year. Membership in the organization is divided into three classifications. Resi­ dent membership com es from active participation in inter-collegiate debate or oratorical contests with the resultant winning of a forensic letter. This membership also requires the m aintenance of a high scholastic standing and the carrying of a full college course. A ssociate membership includes those actively preparing for participation in inter-collegiate forensics. These m ay b e voted into the organizations by a three-fourths m ajority vote of the resi­ dent members, as m ay honorary members. This class includes instructors and others interested in the work. At the beginning of this term, there were five resident members in the local chapter. These were Irvin Lewis, president, Erwin Branson, vice-president, W illiam Curnutt, secretary-treasurer, M arven Hess, Student Council repre­ sentative, and Robert Marple. Miss Lundman and Prof. M organ are honorary members. During the progress of the forensic season, Deever, Ferris, Adam ­ son, and W ochner won their right to resident membership by their participa­ tion in approxim ately twenty-five inter-collegiate debates each. J’ack G raham placed third in the state after-dinner speaking contest in 1935, and Erwin Branson placed second in 1936. Local elimination contests determined the entrant in the annual P eace O ratorical contest. Law rence Deever w as York's entrant in 1936.

Page 67


2.

3.

Ruby Carol Rickard, author and com poser of "O n the Hill of the Ris足 ing Sun." Y Cabinets Picnic. Edith, lean, Janice.

P age 68

4. 5. 6. 7.

W ilm a June. Puerto Rico Students. W inners of Music "Y 's". Olive King, music student.


Cliarl es H. Amadon Dean C o n serv a to ry o f M usic The Music Department, under the direction of Dean C harles Amadon, is a vital part of college life. No program is complete without the representation of this department in some manner. In fact those who h ave not even a sm all p lace in this section are very few. Under the sponsorship of Mrs. Muriel Clarke, violin instructor, and Miss Eda Rankin and Miss G ladys Pearson, piano instructors, is a class of solo pupils. The purpose of this group is to help students to gain experience and ea se in appearing before the public. A very outstanding outgrowth of the Music Department, of com paratively recent date, is the M usic "Y" Club. The group is composed of those who h ave earned a "Y " in m usical competition. Before earning a letter a student must have given at least- ten public perform ances. The emblem, a s differing from the athletic "Y", is a lyre with an old English "Y " in it. Another important regular feature of this department has been its Sunday radio programs. Beginning early in this school year, regular programs under the direction of Dean Amadon have been presented from 4:30 to 5:00 o'clock. These h ave been of much general interest and h av e helped the college in m any w ays, a s well a s the students participating.

P age 69


Choir an d Ql ee c l uh In Decem ber the United Brethren Church Choir and the York College G lee Club invited an y others who desired to help, and presented an afternoon concert consisting of the best known arias, recitatives, and choruses of Han足 del's great oratorio, "The M essiah". The solo numbers were sung by Irene Hofgard, Janice Brown, Edith Goodban, Orm al Tack, Raym ond W ochner, '34, Hester Whitemore, and Bernice Peterson. Although this w as the largest joint production of these two groups, they practice together every week for the regular services at the college church. This is one of the m any instances in which the splendid cooperation between the college and its church proves to be to their mutual benefit. For m any years the choir h as been under the direction of Dean Charles Amadon, with Miss Eda Rankin, also of the Music Department, assisting a s organist. The glee club h as a one hour class period each Tuesday, at which time it studies selections to be presented in public. In 1934-1935 the glee club pre足 sented the operetta, "In Old Louisiana", by Dodge, at the annual M ay Day fete. This year their m ajor production w as the opera, "M arth a", by Frederick von Flotow. Both of these perform ances drew large greatly enjoyed.

P a g e 70

audiences and were


F ir s t Row Secon d

A ld e n

Row â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M rs.

M a rv e l;

M iss E d a R a n k in , F a cu lty A d v is o r; G e n ev iev e H a m m a r, P re sid e n t'; P e a rso n , F a c u lty A d v is o r; H a z e l E m m a M o rg a n

E liz a b e th

T a lb o t D o t y ; H a ro ld P h illip s ; J e a n B r o w n ; T r e a s u r e r ; R o sa S w ezey, V ic e P re sid e n t.

C resto n

M iss G la d y s

K lin g m a n ,

S ecreta ry -

Lambda Phi An innovation in the Music Department of York College w as the organi­ zation, in the fall of 1935, of an honorary society for piano scholarship, to be called Lam bda Phi.

It h as a s its purpose that of benefiting advanced

piano students by their association and cooperation and of increasing the appreciation of piano am ong its own members and in the community. The members are chosen by the piano faculty and the student must h ave had at least one sem ester of piano in York College. In order to be a m em ber one must be of recital calibre. Before the piano student can becom e a permanent member, he must fulfill for three consecutive sem esters certain requirements a s to the amount of practice and the number of public appearances. He must attend all m usical recitals of York College. Olive King and Betty Perry were admitted as pledge members. Alumni m embers are those who were outstanding in the piano department when they w ere in college. This group includes Jeanette Bisset, Doris Moomey, and Milan Lambert. A special feature this y ear w as the Lam bda Phi recital given on April 20. Each member played one number.

It is planned to m ake this an annual

affair. Lam bda Phi sponsored Milan Lambert's concert given on the evening of M ay 7, the proceeds of which began an organ fund.

Page 71


F ir s t

Row â&#x20AC;&#x201D; D e a n C . H . A m a d o n , F a cu lty D ir e c to r ; C resto n K lin g m a n ; W a y n e S to s k o p f; A u d rey B la c k ; A b ie F r a n z ; G le n n M c P h e rs o n ; L u c ille S to s k o p f; L o is S t o s k o p f; K e ith A d a m so n ; O rm a l T a c k , S tu d e n t D ir e c to r. S e c o n d Row â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A ld e n M a rv e l; H a r o ld P h illip s ; C liffo r d A d a m s; P au l M y e rs; F c rn e B r a n t; G w en d olyn H o o fn a g le .

The Band The York College Band is a com paratively young organization, having been organized just three y ears ago. Anyone who plays an y sort of m usical instrument m ay becom e a member and then increase his own skill and enjoy­ ment of music a s well a s develop ease in appearing before student and other groups. This y ear the band h as appeared several times in chapel, played for all the home football and basketball gam es, and even m ade a cold trip to Doane in the b ack of a truck to play for the football gam e here.

W henever they

h ave appeared they h ave furnished the n ecessary air to fan the smouldering coals of passive interest into the flam e of school spirit and enthusiasm that forms the backing of all athletic combats. The band this y ear has been under the direction of Orm al Tack, with Harold Phillips acting as assistant director.

P age 72


F ir s t

Row â&#x20AC;&#x201D; E liz a b e th F e e m s te r; B e rn ic e S t r ic k le r ; D o r is J o h n s o n ; L o re n a E s te y ; D o r o th y Y o s t ; A ld e n M a tv e i; W a d e S lo a n ; R u th S ta r k e y ; L a V e lle L e a s e ; L y le A n d e rs o n . S e c o n d R ow â&#x20AC;&#x201D;-R osa Sw ezey, p ia n is t; M rs . M u rie l C la rk e , d ir e c to r ; E a r l C a ld w e ll; L o is B r o w n ; A u d rey B la c k ; J a n ic e B r o w n ; O rm a l T a c k ; C re sto n K lin g m a n ; J o h n D o w d ; T h e lm a G ilm o r e ; G e o rg e B e rry .

Tke Orchestra The fall of 1934 marked the beginning of an organized orchestra, and it h as proved to b e a successful venture.

It is natural that it should m ake a

marked improvement in the second year. This group, under the a b le direction of Mrs. Muriel Thomas Clarke, has m ade several public appearances, am ong them being a ch ap el program in December, a radio program in March, and part of a program at the United Brethren Church in May. The music chosen has been of the highest type and h as been received with interest and appreciation.

Som e of the selections chosen were "The

M agic Flute O verture" by Mozart, "The Atlantis Suite" b y Safranek, "The Coronation M arch" from The Prophet by M eyerbeer, and "Country G ardens" â&#x2013; by Grainger. Of this group, two are seniors, nine h ave previously lettered in music and seven are taking music a s their major.

Page 73


O rin a l

T ack;

A ld e n

M a tv e i; J e a n B ro w n , a c c o m p a n is t; P h illi p s ; R o b e rt G a le .

H a ro ld

H a ro ld

Je a n

B ro w n , a c c o m p a n is t; E d ith

K lin g m a n ;

Pau l

M a in ;

De

W im m er,

This quartette sang together for the first time this year. A lready they h ave m ade m any pub­ lic appearances including two radio programs and several church programs. They have m ade one short trip in N ebraska and a fourhundred mile trip into K ansas. On this last trip of two days ten programs were given in high schools and two in churches. Harold Wochner took Paul M ain's p lace this semester.

Of this group, two members h ave been on varsity quartettes in previous years. Harold Phillips w as accom panist for last y ear's quar­ tette. This is Orm al Tack's third y ea r as first tenor for the varsity four. This group has m ade several trips into western N ebraska and K an­ sas, and h as alw ays been popular with pro­ gram committees for all sorts of occasions.

B row n ;

C resto n

Harmoniers

Revelers

J a n ic e

F r ie s e n ;

Ja n e

B e rn ic e S t r ic k le r ;

C a ld w e ll;

Goodban.

G i r l s 7 T r io

D o r o th y Y o s t ; L o ren a E s te y ; L o is Brotffli acco m p a n ist.

String Trio

This m usical group has been one of the most popular on the cam pus. They have given regu­ lar radio programs this year, and h ave enter­ tained at m any college and community func­ tions, oftentimes singing their original com posi­ tions. They also h ave m ade trips to high schools and churches for advertising purposes. This y ear Jean Brown, a s well as being pianist, took the p lace of Jane Caldwell a s second so­ prano. Jane w as in last y ear's trio.

This trio h as m ade no very long trips but b<?| given nineteen programs at surrounding schools and churches, the farthest being Ale3t andria. Of these four, including the pianist, Wjj w ere in last y ear's trio. Doris Johnson has with the group only the second semester, ing taken the p lace left vacant b y Dorothy Y° It seem s quite probable that this trio wiU ^ kept intact for next year. P age 74


Neal Gallant A thletic D irector a n d C o a c h Beginning in the fall of 1935 the entire athletic program of York College w as placed under the supervision of Neal Gallant. N eal is a graduate of York College. W hile a student, he had an enviable record in n early every division of inter-collegiate athletics and h as the dis足 tinction of winning twelve honor "Y 's" in his four years of competition in Football, Basketball, and Golf.

He also had a brilliant record for his three

years of high school coaching at Polk, N ebraska. C oach G allant is respected as a coach and a leader. He is alw ays ready to help a student and do more than his share for York College.

Page 77


1936 Y. C. Captains

C ecil Sm ith Track

H arry S tep h en so n

Everett G reen

Football

Basketball

P a g e 78


■ > l

F irst Row — W a lt e r E k d a h l; C a rr o ll W a g e s ; G e o rg e W a lla n d e r ; W ilb u r O v e r m ille r ; E u g e n e W o r le y ; G ilb e r t F e lle r s ; D o n a ld V a r c o e , C a p ta in -E le c t; H a rry S te p h e n s o n , C a p ta in ; E la c io Ja r a m illo ; W a d e G r e e n e ; F r e d R a s p ; W illia m M c C o n n e ll; M a u ric e T h o m p so n . S ec o n d Row— H a ro ld W o c h n e r, S tu d e n t M a n a g e r; K e n n e th E lm o r e ; D o n a ld J a c k s o n ; R o b e rt S p o r e ; R a lp h J o r d a n ; E v e re tt G r e e n ; W a rr e n W ith a in ; R o lla n d T o n k in ; C e c il S m ith ; W illa rd B is h ; B u rto n F e a s te r ; R o b e r t M e rc h a n t; R e x L u tz ; R o b e r t G a le ; C o a ch N e a l G a lla n t.

Football Of the stiff ten gam e schedule, the 1936 Panthers won six gam es and lost four. There were twenty-six letters earned this year. With less than three weeks of practice Coach G allant took the team to Hebron and they were victorious by a score of 21 to 0. Under the new lights installed by the college, a group of huskies from Fort Dodge, Iowa, administer­ ed the first defeat for the Panthers b y a score of 20 to 12. On Homecoming, they scored a thrilling victory over the highly touted Midland Warriors. It w as the first victory over the Midland aggregation since 1921 and also the first conference victory for the Panthers this season. For the final gam e of the season the Panthers journeyed to Doane College to settle third and last places in the N. C. A. C. Conference. With breaks that occur in football, the Tigers scored a 2 to 0 victory to end the season for the Blue and White. The season 's summary: ............. 21 York York.......................26 York...................... .12 York.. ............. 0 York ..... ...51

Hebron ............. 0 M cCook ........... 0 Ft. D o d g e_____ 20 Hastings ____ 45 Nebr. Central 0

York........................25 York _____ 3 York....................... .26 York__________ 0 York... 0

D ana .................. 0 Midland ......... 0 Concordia .... 7 W esleyan ........12 D oane 2

H arry S tep h en so n Ht. 6' Wt. 203 Lbs. Tackle “ S t e v e '5 was ca p ta in o f the team th is ye a r. H e p la y e d h is firs t year at D o a n e C o lle g e an d was ra te d an A ll-C o n fe re n c e ta ck le in 1 9 3 2 . T h e p ast two seaso n s h e h as p la y ed fo r Y o r k C o lle g e . I n 1 9 3 4 he was rated o n the sec o n d A ll-C o n fe re n c e se le c tio n fo r c e n te r. T h is year he w as s h ifte d to tack le an d h is o ffe n s iv e and d e fen siv e a b ility was o u tsta n d in g . H e w as ch o sen 1 9 3 5 A ll-C o n ­ fe re n c e s e le c tio n a t ta ck le . H e w ill b e th e o n ly re g u la r lo st th is sea so n b y grad u ation ,

D on ald V a r co e Ht. 5' 10" Wt. 175 Lbs. Guard D o n , w ho w ill ca p ta in th e 1 9 3 6 P a n th e r sq u a d , was one o f the b e st b lo c k e rs on the squ ad . H e p la y ed a n e x c e lle n t defen sive ga m e an d h as been rated h ig h in the N .C .A .C . c o n fe r e n c e . T h is is D o n 's seco n d y e a t o n th e P a n th e r squ ad and h e w ill m ake a •splendid le a d e r fo r th e 1 3 3 6 m ach in e.

P a g e 79


K en n eth E lm ore Guard G ilbert F e ller s H e ig h t

6’

1” ;

W e ig h t

Guard 175

H e ig h t

’ ’B e r t ” had n o p rev io u s fo o t­ b a ll exp erien ce b e fo r e com in g to Y o r k C o lle g e b u t h e d isplayed an u n u su al b ra n d o f fo o tb a ll for a fre sh m an . H e re ce iv e d re c o g ­ n itio n on th e 1 9 3 5 N .C .A .C . H o n o ra b le M e n tio n list.

W alter E k d a h l H e ig h t

5* 9 ” ;

W e ig h t

Guard 150

W e ig h t

150

Tackle lb s.

W illiam M cC on n ell Guard H e ig h t

" W a g s ” was o n e o f th e fin est q u a rte rs o f the c o n fe r e n c e this year. H is p asses w ere a co n stan t th re at to o p p o n e n ts. B e s id e s b ein g a b le to pass h e c o u ld lu g and k ick th e p ig sk in . W e p red ict that he can d e v e lo p in to a n e o f the fin e s t field g e n e ra ls on th e g r id ­ iro n .

D on ald J a c k s o n

lb s.

" G e n e ” , a lth o u g h h e h a d no f o o tb a ll e x p erien c e b e fo r e e n te r­ in g Y o r k C o lle g e , p rov ed th a t he c o u ld p lay e ith e r ta ck le o r gu ard w ith th e b e st o f th em .

lb s.

5’ 8 ” ;

W e ig h t

150

lb s.

" B i l l 1' fo u n d h im s e lf an d d is­ pla y ed lo ts o f scrap tow ard the end o f the seaso n . A lth o u g h lig h t h e is g o in g to fig u re in the fig h t fo r a re g u la r gu ard n e x t fa ll. H e is a g o o d d e fen siv e gu ard.

End

H e ig h t 5 ’ 1 1 ” ; W e ig h t 1 5 0

180

H e ig h t 6 ’ : W e ig h t 1 6 0

C arroll W ag es Quarterback 5’ 9” ;

W e ig h t

E u g en e W o rley

lb s.

" E c k ” , a w atch ch arm gu ard, co u ld h o ld h is ow n ag a in st a great w eig ht advantage an d h as show n g rea t p rom ise. He w as fa st e n o u g h to lead th e o ffe n s e and was a good b lo c k e r.

H e ig h t

5 ’ 9 M;

" K i n g ” had n o p rev io u s g r id ­ iro n e x p erien c e b e fo r e co m in g to Y o r k C o lle g e , b u t h e w ill m ake a stro n g bid fo r a re g u la r b e rth n e x t year. H e is a h a rd -ch a rg in g g u a rd . H e show ed g rea t prom ise in the D a n a gam e.

lb s.

W a d e Greene

lb s.

Tackle

H e ig h t 6 ’ ; W e ig h t 1 5 6

“ S h ad o w ” d e v e lo p e d in to the m ost aggressive an d co n siste n t end on the P a n th e r sq u ad . W ith in the n e x t three years he sh o u ld be know n th ro u g h o u t th e co n fe re n c e fo r h is d efen siv e a b ility , a sam ple o f w hich was show n th is ye a r in th e D o a n e gam e.

lb s.

G re e n e is a so lid , ru g g e d gu ard who is 'w illin g to m ix in to every play. H e is a h a rd w o rk e r and with a little m ore exp erien ce w ill m ake a d e p e n d a b le lin e m a n .

P a g e 82


F irst Row D w ig h t B u r c h ; P e r fe c to J a r a m illo ; R o b e r t G a le ; E v e re tt G re e n , C a p ta in ; M a u ric e T h o m p s o n ; R o bert S p o re ; Roy Sp eece. S ec o n d Row â&#x20AC;&#x201D; H a rry Step h en son ^ A ss t, to C o a c h ; R e x L u tz ; D o n a ld J a c k s o n ; C e c il S m it h ; W ilb u r O v e r m ille r; R o lla n d T o n k in ; G ilb e rt F e lle r s : E d w ard L a r s o n ; C o a ch N e a l G a lla n t. N o t I n P ic tu re â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B u rto n F e a s te r ; G e o rg e W a l la n d e r; L a w re n ce H a y e s and C a rro l W a g e s .

Basketball The 1936 Panther basketball team w as developed from an inexperienced group that performed well at times and compiled a record of four victories out of an eighteen gam e schedule. Starting the season with only six lettermen in suit and a fine crop of new material, Coach G allant developed a team that exhibited

fine

basketball

even if the victories w ere few. This team w as built around men who will be playing two or three years and should develop into a strong contender in the conference. They clim axed this y ear's

schedule by defeating the Doane

Tigers on their own floor 39 to 25 and then ended the basketball season in a novelty gam e with the well known Harlem G lobe Trotters.

P age 83


F ir s t R ow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; M e rle B lin n ; W a lte r E k d a h l;

R e x L u tz ; C e c il S m ith , C a p ta in ; D w ig h t B u rc h .

R o lla n d T o n k i n ;

G ilb e r t F e lle r s ;

S e c o n d R ow â&#x20AC;&#x201D; H a rry S te p h e n s o n , A ss t, to C o a c h ; A ld e n M a rv e l; R o b e r t S p o r e ; E d w ard L a r s o n ; J a r v is C o b e ; W ilb u r O v e r m ille r; V a u g h n L e a rn in g ; R o y S p e e c e ; M a u ric e T h o m p s o n ; C o ach N e a l G a lla n t.

Trade In 1935, the N. C. A. C. meet w as held at the University of N ebraska stadium. The Panthers placed fourth with 20 1-3 points. Smith w as the star performer for them, capturing the 220 low hurdle honors by defeating the Shum an twins of W esleyan. He also took third in the 120 high hurdles. Jam es Sp eece, 1935 track captain, placed second in the two mile run. Lutz placed third in the shot put and fourth in the century. He also ran anchor for the relay team , placing third. Adamson, bettering all his previous perform ances, by leaping 5 feet 11 inches, figured in a three w ay tie for second place. Merchant placed third in the 220 yard dash; Feaster figured in a three w ay tie for fourth p lace in the pole vault. The summ ary of this meet w as: Hastings, 70 points; Doane, 36 2-3; W esleyan, 22; York, 20 1-3; and Midland, 16 points. In the 1936 interclass track meet the freshmen proved their superiority by defeating "the other classes and exposed some fine track m aterial for next year. Captain Cecil Smith w as the outstanding individual of the meet by scoring the entire 38 points for the juniors. Cobe and Blinn showed up well in the distance runs and Fellers swept everything in the weight events. The summary: Freshmen, 68 1-2 points; Sophomores, 50 1-4; Juniors, 38; and Sen ­ iors, 2 points. Tonkin and Lutz figured well to the top with individual scorings. C ecil Smith, 1936 track captain, hails from California. He is a four letter m an in track, basketball, and football. His favorite track events are the hurdles; he rates as one of the best hurdlers in the conference. He also scores in the pole vault, high jump, and broad jump, and runs anchor on the relay team.

P age 86


Pussvwillcm>s T h e Pu ssyw illow s w on th e tro p h y in the in tra m u ra l b a sk e tb a ll to u rn a m e n t sp o n so red b y th e Y . M . C . A . F iv e o th e r team s, the R o se b u d s, th e S to o g e s , th e B u sy B e e s , the O d d s and E n d s , and th e T o r n a d o e s , w ere all in th e ra ce , T h e B u sy B e e s h and ed th e ch a m p io n s th e ir o n ly d e fe a t in a five g im c s ch e d u le. T h o m p s o n , w ith 4 7 p o in ts, and L u tz , w ith 3 2 p o in ts, b oth o f th e P u ssy ­ w illow s, w ere h ig h s co re rs o f th e to u r n a ­ m ent.

F ro n t Row — J . B . S p o re , M iu r ic e T h o m p ­ so n , th e trop h y , R e x L u tz , F r e d R asp . S ec o n d

1. 2. 3.

Girls' Champion Basketball Team. Coach Commands his Crew. York and Doane in Action.

P age 87

4. 5. 6.

Row — Irv in L ew is, M a x S c h a lk , J o h n D ow d .

Looks tough for the Tiger. W oe-m ance and Wythm. Girls' Tennis Champion.

R ig g s,

Ed


F ir s t Row — P e r fe c to J a r a m i l l o ; E v e re tt G r e e n ; G ilb e rt F e lle r s ; W a rr e n W ith a m ; W illa r d B i s h ; R a lp h J o r d a n ; R e x L u tz . S e c o n d Row — C oach N e a l G a lla n t; W a lte r E k d a h l; B u rto n F e a s te r ; L aw re n ce D e e v e r ; R o lla n d T o n k in , S e c r e ta r y -T re a s u re r ; E la c io J a r a m illo ; H a rv e y P a r k e r ; D e a n C h a rle s B is se t. T h ir d Row — R o b e r t S p o r e ; K e ith A d a m so n ; R o b e r t G a le ; C e c il S m ith , P r e s id e n t; D o n a ld J a c k s o n ; F re d R a s p ; M a u ric e T h o m p s o n ; G e o rg e W a lla n d e r. N o t in P ic tu r e — H a r r y S te p h e n s o n , W ilb u r O v e rm ille r.

"Y" Glut The "Y " Club is an active organization on the campus. Its purpose is to stimulate interest in athletics and maintain an organized association for those who are interested in York College athletics. The membership of the club is limited to those men who h ave earned an official "Y " by meeting the requirements in at least one of the inter-collegiate sports, and by completing at least twelve hours of college work. Although membership in the "Y " Club is for life, only those men who are enrolled in college are considered active members. The regular monthly dinners held at the college dining room afford op­ portunity to discuss athletic plans and club business. This y ear the club sponsored its sixth annual high school track and field meet. New rules con­ cerning sw eaters were formulated recently. It w as planned that those men who earned a "Y " this year, and who return to York C ollege next fall, m ay receive a sweater, one half of which will be paid b y the college and "Y" Club, the other half to b e paid b y the man who receives the sweater. Upon graduation, if he h as m ade at least two letters, one of which h as been earned in the senior year, he will receive a sw eater and a medallion which will admit him to all York College athletic events. These will be presented to him by the college and "Y " Club. The ruling heretofore, that an y m an who had earned one "Y " could secure a life pass medal, has been thought unwise in the light of this new provision.

P age 88


F irst Row — R u th S p o r e ;

V e r a T h a m e r ; L e ta Y o s t ; M iss Z e ld a W a k e lin , F a c u lty A d v is o r; E d ith G o o d b a n , P r e s id e n t; D o ris G re w e ll; I r e n e H o fg a r d , S e c re ta ry . S e c o n d Row — G w en d o ly n H o o fn a g le ; L u c ille H e in s , T r e a s u r e r ; F lo ra B la k e le y ; I r e n e T h o m p s o n ; A m an d a O rd w a y ; M e lb a M a n n in g . T h ir d Row — V esta G ro s s ; C h a rle n e H u r le y ; J e a n B r o w n ; Is a b e lle T h o m p s o n ; R o sa S w ezey ; N in a B r is b in .

Womens Athletic Association The W om en's Athletic Association is composed of those college women who are interested in and desire to participate in athletic contests. Its pur­ pose is to stimulate interest in women's athletics and to provide opportunity for women to develop the physical side of their lives. Basketball, b aseb all, and tennis were the activities which occupied the m ajor interests this year. Points are given for attendance at regular meetings held every Tuesday and Thursday afternoon, as well a s for participation in swimming, sledding, tennis, skating, hiking, and bicycling. Points are granted on a b asis determined by the group and aw ards are given. For one hundred points a member receives a W. A. A. letter; for five hundred points, a pin; for one thousand points, a sweater; and for one thousand five hundred points, a h eav y blue blanket with a large white "Y " in the center of it. The W. A. A. sponsored a waffle supper at the college dining room last year, the proceeds of which they used to buy a sunTamp to be used at the gym for injuries. This lamp has been very helpful to the athletic department. This y ear several basketball gam es were scheduled with the high school girls. Later an interclass tournament w as played <if betw een the freshman, Sophomore and com bined junior-senior teams. Picnics and roller skating par­ ties added variety to the regular meetings.


1 1. 2. 3. 4.

Lucky Me! I'm eligible! W arm ing up. Straw boss. Come, Helen!

5. 6. 7. 8.

P age 90

Steady, boy! I'll get off! Wythm and W om ance. There ain't no justice! Terrible Tonkin.


Ma^ Fete The all-college M ay Fete, which is spon足 sored each y ear by the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A., w as held on the college campus on M ay 22.

At this time Irene Thompson

w as crowned Q ueen of M ay and presided over the M ay Day festivities.

The opera,

"M artha", b y Friedrick von Flotou w as pre足 sented. The M ay Queen is chosen by a vote of the student body. Activity in Y. W. C. A. and popularity warrant the honor. Each class selects its representative to at足 tend the Queen, and another attendant from each

class is chosen by the M ay Q ueen

herself. The Y. W. C. A. president, Dulcie Hoofnagle, w as maid-of-honor. The attend足 ants this year were: S en io rs M elba Manning

Ruth Spore Ju n iors

Irene Hofgard

Flora Blakeley S op h om ores

Darlene Franz

Ruth Rogers

V era Thamer F resh m en Isabelle Thompson

B u sin ess C o lle g e Lodema Frieden M argaret Wolstenholm

P a g e 93


May> Fete The all-college M ay Fete, which is spon足 sored each y ear by the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A., w as held on the college cam pus on M ay 22.

At this time Irene Thompson

w as crowned Queen of M ay and presided over the M ay Day festivities.

The opera,

"M artha", by Friedrick von Flotou w as pre足 sented. The M ay Queen is chosen by a vote of the student body. Activity in Y. W. C. A. and popularity warrant the honor. Each class selects its representative to at足 tend the Queen, and another attendant from each

class is chosen by the M ay Q ueen

herself. The Y. W. C. A. president, Dulcie Hoofnagle, w as maid-of-honor. The attend足 ants this year were:

.

S en io rs M elba Manning

Ruth Spore Ju niors

Irene Hofgard

Flora Blakeley S ophom ores

Darlene Franz

Ruth Rogers

V era Thamer Freshmen Isab elle Thompson

B u sin ess C o lle g e Lodem a Frieden M argaret W olstenholm

P a g e 93


Editli GoodL an HOM ECOM ING QUEEN Chosen by popular vote of the student body to reign over the Homecoming celebration.

Page 94


1

Irene Tkompson PANTHER SWEETHEART Chosen by the 1935 football squad and honored at the annual football banquet.

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Ruth Sp ore REPRESENTATIVE Y. C. W OM AN Selected by the students of York College as being the most representative woman on the basis of character, scholarship, and leadership.

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Harrg Stephenson REPRESENTATIVE Y. C. M AN â&#x2013;  REPRESENTATIVE FOOTBALL MAN Selected b y the students a s the most representative man on the basis of character, scholarship, and leadership; also chosen by the 1935 football squad as their representative man.

P age 97


1935 Honorary Selections

Ruth Sp ore P an th er S w eeth eart. R ep r e s en ta tiv e Y. C. W om an .

Milton Maurer R ep resen ta tiv e F o o tb a ll M an. R ep resen ta tiv e Y. C. M an.

L il

E l am

M a y Q u een .

Page 98


1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

Q ueen Lila. "In Old Louisiana." Campus View.

Page 99

Q ueen and Attendants. M ay Pole Dance. The Coronation.


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For Your Enlightenment Since the purpose of such a book a s the MARATHON is to retain in per­ manent form all the activities and associations of the college days of the students, the editors of this section of the MARATHON believe that such a record would b e incomplete without the mention of certain prominent features of this y ear's term. For this reason the following synonym s and exam ples are included here. W ebster's N ew In tern ation al D ictionary— Fellowship (n)—partnership, allian ce, casu al intercourse; com panionship of persons on equ al and friendly terms, friendliness, com radeship, companionship, association, community of interest, com pany, (v.i.) to be in communion. T h e N ew N ation al W e b s te r D ictionary lor School, H om e, a n d O ffice— Fellowship (n)— association, communion, intimacy, society, joint interest or feeling. T he Y ork C o lle g e V o c a b u la ry — Fellowship (n, adj., adv., interj., or v) or obsolete). E. G., Come and fello w s h ip with us. York College fe llo w s h ip s are lasting. The fe llo w sh ip p in g of our students is adm irable. Fellowshipl! or, preferred, FELLO W SH IP**!!*! W eb ster's N ew In tern ation al D ictionary— Set-up (n)—carriage of the body; a m achine for upsetting the bloom that has been lengthened by the squeezer; an iron bolt or rod upset at one end; a position of the balls from which it is ea sy to score; a treat. T h e N ew N ation al W e b s te r D ictionary for S ch o o l, H om e a n d Office— Set-up— (not given). T he Y ork C o lle g e V o c a b u la r y — Set-up (n,v.)— (colloquialism)— E. G., The set-up here at York is splendid. Feaster, you certainly missed a wonderful set-up. Mirandy had a h ead ach e, so I set-up with her last night. And so on, ad infinitum.

Round the Re§ister "H eaven, I'm in H eaven", it is only Keith rounding the corner to join the group 'Round the Register. Irene, Bud, Flora, G rosshans, C asebeer, and a few other odds and ends are gathered there. The talk goes on and on, round and round. Others approach and others leave. The h all fills and empties, and fills again. Laughter echoes through the corridors and student life throbs 'Round the Register. O ne o'clock. There are Jordan, Imogene, and M ary Alice standing 'Round the Register. Izzy's laugh and Irene's reprimand float from the office door. Shadow and Popo com e and go like ghosts in the night. The outside door squeaks rustily, a giggle, and a hearty laugh are heard. It is only Norma and S e a se entering the Ad building. From somewhere a fam iliar noise is heard,— is it from upstairs or down?— the high tinkling sound of ice in a glass, the shrill siren of the Fire Chief, mingled with a silly, pleasing suggestion of mirth,— yes, just V era addressing Sandburrs in the workroom. But all is echoed and re-echoed 'Round the Register. The talk goes on, about German, Psych, and English Lit., about dates and parties, about puns and pranks, and on and on . G aily, seriously, laughingly, quietly (?), students en gage in gossip and silly slang, puns and occasional witticisms, "griping" and serious philosophizing. And thus it goes on, a s it has gone on, and a s it will continue to go on a s long a s students are young and g a y and foolish and wise. As long as the 'ol register will en­ dure, life will throb 'Round the Register.

Page 108


Chapel Chumps (The following are accounts of chapel programs presented during the y ear which were thought to b e so outstanding that a permanent record of them w as deem ed ad visable to prolong their existence in the minds and hearts of the students of Pork College.) Released through the courtesy of the Quote Right Press. Septem ber 16 (QR) President J. R. Mullover today welcomed the m any students to the fellowship of the Pork College halls of learning for the coming session of pure, Christian education. "The set-up is extrem ely friendly to a y ear of pleasant fellowshipping", said the president. 'This past summer w e h ave had our representatives in the fields seeing the good people of our constituency in order that they might be urged to give their all for their college", h e continued. "M y communications with these good people h av e urged them to raise an extra swine in their sty for Pork College. Also, I asked them to pierce a pig for dear old Pork", the prexy said. A n d so, I gladly extend the hand of fellowship to ea ch of you new K an­ sas students and other outstate students. I hope that when you becom e acquainted with our entire set-up here, you will enjoy nine months of pleasant fellowshipping", w ere his concluding remarks. November 13 (OR)— Dr. W. W. Tweezey in his regularly scheduled chapel address to the students of Pork College thundered, on— "G en erally speaking, a man is a man regardless of his origin, but genetically speaking, a man is only a m an after he has been an am oeba, a worm, a tarantula, a beetle, a squirrel, a chicken, and a chim panzee. You m ay doubt the veracity of that statement, but experiments h av e been worked out in Burma, Tahiti, Baltimore, and W ahoo which prove conclusively that a man is not what he ap es." Dr. Tweezey concluded by citing several of his experiences with chim­ panzees and gorillas whose reactions confirmed his belief in this genetic development. Decem ber 21 (OR)— A group of students from the Expression Department of Pork College presented a short dram a in two scenes, "The Green Petti­ coat", by Frederick Lisbon. Miss Balm y Dress Lungman of that department directed the play. March 31 (OR)— In the half hour allotted to the students for group meet­ ings Dean C. H. Randomon announced that he would like to meet the Devillers and Muleteers for a brief moment after dismissal. April 3 (OR)— Professor Hard C. Stam pster reread a paper before the stu­ dent body which he had prepared originally a s an assignm ent in Advanced Composition b a ck in '89. The title of this discourse w as "Few and Few M ake More." "M any young upstarts contend that Sam pson w as not killed by a •seedy pedagogue," said Mr. Stampster, "But, nevertheless, few and few m ake more." "Zacharias had two sons, one of whom m ade 70's in all of his subjects except English, math., science, and a few other m iscellany which he flunked, the other son m ade 60 in all of his courses. This w as not because his locks were clipped by various women. Nevertheless, few and few, if friction is not counted, do not alw ays m ake m ore", concluded Mr. Stampster with a final thrust of flooding oratory.

P age J 09


1936 - Calendar - 1936 SEPTEMBER. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept. Sept.

5-10— Freshm an W eek. 10— C lasses begin. 16— Bish begins. 18— Big-Little sister hike. 23— Grosshans decides to begin. 27— San d b u rrs out! O ctober.

Oct. 2-3— Good-Will Tour to surrounding towns. Oct. 8— Nina is advised in Freshm an Court to reduce her h ead size to that of a freshm an cap. Oct. 14— Dr. J. Stuart Innerst begins his series of meetings at the church and college. Oct. 22— Slim performs his "peanut-pushing" act. Oct. 29— Upperclass women defeat freshies in basketball gam e. Oct. 31— Ghosts! W itches! Cats! All-college H allowe'en party. N ov em b er. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov.

1— Panthers defeat Midland, 3-0! Edith Goodban presided over activi­ ties as Homecoming Queen. Upperclassmen win Olympics. 6— Miss Jean Hastings visits cam pus in the interests of the Indianapolis convention. 13— Histrionic Club presents "The Best People". 25— Guess what? The freshmen and O scar Jones entertain the upper­ classm en. 27— Thanksgiving recess. 27-Dec. 2— Jordan starts his savings account for the football banquet. D ecem b er.

Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.

2— Panther Club meeting at 12:45 in Miss W akelin's room. 3— Panther Club meeting at 12:45 in Miss W akelin's room. 4— Panther Club meeting in Miss W akelin's room at 12:45. 5— Sam e thing, sam e place, sam e time. Jordan is still saving his money. 6— Ditto. Irene Thompson, Panther Sweetheart, Harry Stephenson, representa­ tive football man, and Donald V arcoe, captain-elect, presented at football banquet. Dec. 7, 8, 9, 10— "You gotta h ave a chaperone." Dec. 20— Christmas vacation begins! Hurrah! Jan u ary . Jan. Jan.

6— Christmas vacation ends. (Gripe, gripe). 9— Mrs. W. C. Baer reviews Lloyd Douglas' "G reen Light."

P a g e 110


Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan.

16— Marionette show given. 17— Students and faculty entertained at the Sophomore Reception. 18— Orm al considers asking the fatal question. 22-24— Sem ester exam s! (Gripe, gripe). 25 Orm al decides topop the question. 29 Orm al popsl and Joyce accepts. F eb r u a ry .

Feb. 6— Senior Recognition Day. Seniors celebrate I Feb. 7— Sub-zero weather. Lutz circulates chapel petition. Feb. 8— And more weather. Jolly-up postponed becau se ofweather. Slim and Popo freeze their toes b y taking a moonlight stroll with Dulcie and Izzy, (it w as only 25° below zero.) Feb. 11— Dulcie Hoofnagle and Glen M cPherson elected presidents of the Y. W. and Y. M. Feb. 12— Lewis "B arb aro ssa" finally shaves off that horrible reddish orange beard. Feb. 14— Pussy W illows win the Y. M. basketball tournament. Feb. 17— Y-club initiation.. Feb. 18— C oach receives that letter from Chicago. Feb. 26— The Lam bda Phi m akes its debut in chapel. Feb. 27-—Y. W. banquet at college dining hall. Limburger cheese! M arch. M arch 5— Panthers go round and round with G lobe Trotters. M arch 6— Y. W. cabinets en joy a slumber party? M arch 13— Football letters aw arded in chapel. M arch 16— Hazel Emma M organ and Hester Whitemore are presented in joint recital. M arch 17— Faculty appear slightly grouchy. M arch 18— Annual Board Meeting. M am a and p ap a in York for Educational Conference. M arch 19— Expression recital given b y -H elen Frieze and V era Thamer. M arch 20— C oy smiles and hair-ribbons. The Leap-year Spring Banquet. M arch 26— Seniors entertain juniors at a party— an April fools party accord­ ing to W itham and Lewis. M arch 27— Spring vacation, no kiddin'. A pril. April 2— Faculty entertain students at their annual reception. April 6—The Revellers present a program of so n g in chapel. April 10— Miss Ruby Carol Rickard, author and composer of the college song, presents a chapel program. April 16— Seniors w eave their tapestry for a ch apel program. Histrionic club presents "Death Takes a Holiday". So did Bob Ferris.

P a g e 111


April 17— Stop! Look! Listen! Junior-Senior banquet at Presbyterian church. April 18— York College is host at its annual music, track, and expression in­ vitational contests. April 20— Lam bda Phi give a piano recital. M ay. M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay M ay

4— Jean and Janice are presented in a joint recital at the church. 7— The York College Conservatory of music present Mr. M ilan Lambert, '32, organist, in a recital. 13— Miss Betty Perry and Mr. Alden M arvel appear in joint recital. 14— Voice recital b y Orm al Tack. 20— Mr. Harold Phillips gives recital. 21— There ain't no recital tonight. 22— Irene Thompson reigns as Q ueen of May. 24— Y. M. and Y. W. A nniversary program. 26— Senior C lass Day. 27— Mr. Charles E. Miller delivers the comm encement address. Field D ay and alumni banquet. 27— It's all over!

Bob— "M ay I go to PALS with you?" Ruth— "Not unless you ch ange clothes and comb your h air." Bob— "But I don't want to go incognito." Flora— ''Do you think a girl can learn to love before eighteen?" Irene— "No, it's too large an audience," Harold-—"I'm keeping a record of all our good tim es." Isab elle— "O h, a d iary?" Harold— "No, a checkbook." A girl is not necessarily a chicken just b ecau se her father is henpecked. W hen cheek meets cheek, then com es the tug for more. The m issionary's burning. Holy Smoke. They say Halitosis is better than no breath at all. Freshm an (Marvel)— "P lease, m am a, could I go out tonight? I'll be b ack by ten." Sophomore (Branson)— "M ay I go out tonight? I'll be b ack by ten." Junior (Smith)— "I'm going out tonight, Dad." Senior (Steve)— "Good night, folks, I'll bring in the milk."

P age 112



Marathon 1936