Page 1

PUYR Guidebook was co-written by Stephanie Manriquez & Brenda Hernandez

1


2

Pop Up Youth Radio

Preface

Yollocalli Arts Reach of the National Museum of Mexican Art

We believe that in order to fully engage youth within

Public Media Institute’s Lumpen Radio Truestar Foundation Real Chi Youth of Free Spirit Media

media, the web and cultural production, we need to first ‘level out the playing field’ by supporting underrepresented yet valuable voices within traditional media. Pop Up Youth Radio (PUYR) is a project that seeks to create a site-specific conversation and humanities show by youth and their allies that responds to sociopolitical

PUYR Guidebook was co-written by Stephanie Manriquez & Brenda Hernandez

contexts in a lighthearted yet poignant way. The PUYR Guidebook documents our process and best practices so that others can develop their own communal voice platform. This guidebook is an effort led by Yollocalli Arts Reach of the National Museum of Mexican Art with generous support from the Chicago Hive Learning Network & the Hive Fund of the Chicago Community Trust and the participation of youth from Free Spirit Media (FSM) & Truestar Foundation. A very special thank you to the Public Media Institute’s WLPN Lumpen Radio for their efforts to revitalize radio in Chicago and believing youth voices should be included in that revitalization. Brenda Hernandez/Yollocalli Arts Reach Program Coordinator, PUYR Project Lead Stephanie Manriquez/ Yollocalli Arts Reach Instructor Andrea Hart/ Free Spirit Media’s Real Chi Youth Instructor LaTeefa Harland/ Truestar Foundation Instructor


Introduction

Radio is one of the original mass media, along with newspapers and printed media, and like many media it has become pervasive, biased, limited to entertainment, and even exclusive. Although national and international radio offers an audio community for particular tastes, radio for the most part is hyper-local. According to a recent study done by the Nielsen Group, 242 million people are listening to radio each week, and 92% of those listeners are over the age of 12. It is fair to say that radio production is limited to adults, leaving youth to listen to radio that is for the most part disconnected from their lives and lifestyles. Here in Chicago, the United States’ third biggest radio market, radio largely includes: college stations, public media such as WBEZ and Vocalo; and mainstream outlets like Power 92, 107.5 WGCI, or 103.5 Kiss FM. These popular stations have specific agendas that are not inclusive or responsive to the city’s diverse, yet segregated neighborhoods. During the mid-90s and early 2000’s when run by the National Museum of Mexican Art, Radio Arte, then 90.5 now 90.7 and run by Chicago Public Media, had served as community-oriented news voice that also spoke to global issues. But since owners changed in 2012, Radio Arte is no longer the youth-led, culturally and politically conscious medium it once was. PUYR is an attempt to fill this void.

Building Community, Creating a Network Yollocalli Arts Reach, Free Spirit Media (FSM), Truestar Foundation and the Public Media Institute are strong advocates for open media, art and countercultures, and have been committed to serving people from Chicago by providing them with tools, resources and the space to share their stories on their own terms. This guidebook reflects the skills and expertise

each organization

has to offer.

How is PUYR a perfect fit for our current times? In addition to the need for a community radio outlet in Chicago, this

model

is

reflective

of

contemporary

mobile

technology,

educational and media consumption innovations. What’s more--it better serves, empowers and reimagines how radio can work WITH communities often neglected or stereotyped by mainstream media. Yollocalli and Free Spirit Media have intentionally designed PUYR to meet under-resourced, post-Millennial media makers where they are at physically and creatively, while also understanding their nuanced news consumption. “This generation tends not to consume news in discrete sessions or by going directly to news providers. Instead, news and information are woven into an often continuous but mindful way that Millennials connect to the world generally,

Location, location, location. PUYR

focused

its

efforts

which mixes news with social connection, problem solving, social on

servicing

youth

of

color

from

neighborhoods often depicted by local media as gang infested and

action, and entertainment,” according to a 2015 study from the American Press Institute.

consequently crime-ridden. PUYR intentionally selected community

This guidebook is divided into two main parts: the first is an

events to broadcast from and guests that contradict the negative

anecdotal account about how we developed the PUYR Pilot and

narrative produced by popular media, highlighting instead the

what we learned; the second is a how-to guide that we hope helps

good,

organizations, groups and youth to develop their own pop-up radio

exciting

and

inspiring

people,

places

and

stories

of

marginalized communities. Pop Up Youth Radio is fighting to reclaim radio, and consequently

shows, or at least understand the power that creative audio and radio production can have on youth and their communities.

creative media, through intimate, community centered conversations and talent recruitment. PUYR is an opportunity for young people to have agency and voice within a media landscape that largely ignores them. Internet radio offers people access to airwaves that are otherwise very difficult to access. Very few people have the opportunity or the resources to take part in AM/FM radio. Although internet radio content can be hyperlocal, scheduled and archival listening made possible by the internet connects communities globally

3


4

PA R T 1

What we did and how we did it

The PUYR Guidebook was developed and produced over the lapse of two summers, Summer 2015 & Summer 2016. In Summer of 2015 we explored internet radio best practices, and developed the format for what would turn out to be a youth-led, collaborative, travelling radio show. Our experiences from the first summer provided the framework for this guidebook- we took our failures and successes and translated them into a useful and practical internet radio guide. During the summer of 2016 we had our guidebook used and tested by youth, educators and radio enthusiasts - doing so allowed us to understand the needs of our audience and ensure clarity of content, all while engaging with and amplifying the voice of a diverse community.

Summer 2015 During our first summer of production, youth from two neighborhoods came together over an 8 week period to learn about radio production and collaboratively produce a series of live radio broadcasts. We recruited a mix of youth from Yollocalli Art Reach’s media program and Free Spirit Media (Real Chi Youth) who had an interest to start a dialogue with the community. We created a space that was inviting, collaborative, experimental and fun through group activities as well as our tumblr, where we published all of our work. Establishing space is important in order for students to feel empowered to rethink, redesign and redistribute a new kind of community radio. To unify the groups and give them ownership of the live recordings we had them develop mission statements, collaborate


with a graphic designer to create a logo

2015, students participating in 2016

and discuss what content they wanted to

had previous radio experience. Although

cover during the pop-up shows. Together

limited to in-studio radio production,

they identified how Pop-Up Youth Radio

this group of students took their skills

could be a space to highlight and cele-

to the streets and learned a new set of

brate those underrepresented community

technical skills. There were three live

spaces and members on a hyperlocal level-

broadcasts in three different neighbor-

-the mom and pop shops, the neighborhood

hoods of Chicago with very distinct

events, the unclaimed spaces--to own the

communities. The first was held at Yollo-

narratives of their communities.

calli Arts Reach’s Spring Show in Little

Youth produced and hosted three live broadcasts. They researched community events that they thought would benefit from a live broadcast. After sifting

Village, the second was the Graffiti Battle at Barrett Park in Pilsen, and the last was at the Southside Maker Faire at Ford City Mall.

through several potential events and

Students were resourceful when segments

spaces for their public live recording,

fell through and learned to rally as

the youth and instructors landed on

a team when conditions, such as the

Yollocalli Art Reach’s Alumni Panel,

heat, weren’t ideal. Youth exchanged

Yollocalli’s Summer Exhibition and the

skills and cultural competencies--with

culminating event was Villapalooza.

some reporters translating interview

Villapalooza is an all-day, free grass-

responses from Spanish to English or

roots music festival that highlights

sharing their neighborhood knowledge. It

local and international artists. All

was a beautiful opportunity for intergen-

events took place in the Little Village

erational, interracial collaboration.

neighborhood on Chicago’s Southwest Side.

Additionally, in order to ensure that the

To raise the bar for the youth, one hour

content we provide in this guidebook is

of their entire show was broadcasted live

accessible, concise and resourceful we

on WLPN,105.5 FM Chicago (Lumpen Radio),

hosted a focus group made up of educators

via their website and mobile app.

with no radio experience, professional radio producers and youth programming

Summer 2016 During the summer of 2016 Yollocalli partnered with Truestar Foundation, an organization that focuses on providing programming grounded in media produc-

administrators. The insight and feedback provided by this group helped us address issues we hadn’t foreseen and inspired us to develop an audio CD in addition to a video tutorial.

tion, including FM radio to Black youth. We wanted to not only partner with a new organization and set of youth, but also wanted to see how youth with radio backgrounds used the guidebook, what they needed to learn to produce community broadcasts. Unlike the summer of

5


6

PA R T 2

How you can do it too First of all, let’s be honest, this is by no means the definitive manual to producing radio with youth; what this is a our simplified approach to it. We hope that this section of our guidebook supports your exploration of youth radio while providing helpful tips. We are presenting you with a concise look at the best-practices we have found so far in our own exploration of radio.

A Developing Your Broadcast Identity

Some examples of content include:

To develop our broadcast identity we are

W E LC O M IN G Introduction to the show and

going to create a series of pre-recorded

the day content (approx. 2-3min)

samples used by radio stations as segways between the show and songs that give listeners a tease, an Audio Image. This audio image is composed by drop-ins, sweepers, intro and outro that will set the tone of your show. Be creative when writing out the script and feel free to

Let’s clarify a few concepts that are

experiment with recording vocals and

commonly misinterpreted or confused,

editing. Utilize audio clips, effects and

Audio Production and Radio Production.

sound bytes to enhance your recording.

These two concepts may go hand-in-hand

The basic audio image needs for a radio

but when we are referring to Audio

show are:

Production we mean content (investigating information or data, recording

IN T R O ( A PPR OX . 45     S E C T O 1    M IN)

voice or audio clips and editing) audio

ex. “Pop-Up Youth Radio is where youth

data, audio-stories, pre-recorded inter-

get to take over the airwaves in your

views, promos, etc. Radio Production

neighborhood… it’s about to start”

refers to structuring a radio show, from

with a specific person. Interviewees can be a profile where someone tells a personal narrative or an expert interview where someone uses their skills to comment on a topic. (approx. 5-7min) VOX P O P U L L I Also known as person-on-thestreet interviews, Vox populli are mainly pre-recorded and used to start a segment. You can produce these clips by creating a two-question survey around a newsworthy topic to ask 5-8 random people. (approx. 2-3min) L I V E TA L K O R D I S C U S S I O N A live conversation about a specific topic among hosts or host(s) and guest(s). (approx. 5-7min)

planning content, developing segments

D R O P IN S ( A PPR OX . 10     S E C T O 30     S E C)

and knowing how to connect and utilize

1. ex. “If you have an opinion on XX

radio equipment.

IN T E R V IE W S Can be pre-recorded or live

tweet us at XX using hashtag XX”

L I V E IN T E R V E N T I O N A host will mention who we are, explain our location and why we pop up, narrate the surrounding and

2. ex. “Follow us on tumblr at XX”

maybe ask some thoughts from a pulled

a class practice into real-life radio

3. ex. “Did you like our last segment?

over walk in. Also, the host will need to

production. As such, we used the same

Don’t go anywhere & stay tuned”

Our program was designed to facilitate

process radio producers would grapple with at any given time. The process includes pre-production, production and

4. ex. “You’re listening to the young sounds of XX radio”

introduce the following segment or music. (time may vary) L I V E M E N T I O N S Station ID (if applicable), name of the show, remind people topic or

post-production.

S W E E PE R ( A PPR OX . 10 S E C T O 2 0 S E C)

guest of the day, social media outlets

Pre-Production

ex. “You’re listening to the young sounds

such as webpage, facebook, twitter,

of XX radio”

instagram, (approx. 30sec -1min)

We will begin with pre-production which includes - developing content, research & writing, structuring a show and looking at the roles people have during a radio show. Before we start, it is necessary that the participants develop a radio identity of their own voice and style that is informed by their mixed personalities and

O U T R O ( A PPR OX . 45     S E C T O 1    M IN) ex. “Thank you for listening to one more session of Pop-Up Youth Radio. Tune

C A L E N DA R O F E V E N T S Announce happenings of

in for our next show...”

interest around your community, neighbor-

*You can find samples of these in the supplemental Audio CD

interests. Once they decide what direc-

B Creating Content For Our Radio Show

tion (content goals & objectives) their

You can add different dynamics to your

radio show will take, we highly suggest

Pop Up Radio show; to keep your audience

to develop their broadcast identity

interested and more willing to watch a

creatively using audio-production skills

live recording by making them a partici-

as a tool; this is often referred to as

pant through comments, suggestions, and

Audio Image. Work on the image of your

opinions. The type of content that we can

show with drop-ins, sweepers, intros and

implement for a Pop Up Youth Radio show

outros and maybe few shorts segments. Let

can vary and can be pre-recorded or live.

your imagination explode!

P S A Public Service Announcement can be pre-recorded or live. (30sec to 1min)

hood, area or city. Youth choose events to match the overarching theme of the show as well as ones that appeal to the entire production crew. (time may vary) AU D I O PIE C E A pre-produced story of a specific topic. (time may vary) M U S I C Youth select songs from local friends who were also musicians. Additionally, youth can select music that is relevant to the spaces they are recording in--such as picking songs from artists performing at the festival. (time may vary)


C Researching Your Information Have a meeting with all the participants and decide the location of your Pop Up. The location will help guide the content of the show- what information and data is valuable, useful and necessary to know in order to have a steady and fluent conversation.

All the participants need

to feel confident with

the topic. Assign

and distribute different portions of the topic to help diminish the workload. Quality research can help fill any on-air lulls and enhance interviewing skills. HERE ARE SOME TIPS THAT YOU SHOULD CONSIDER 1. Search info about your event. Investigate and read about the topic and other curious facts about it, to help with your conversation 2. Remember to attribute “according to, XX” 3. Include some of the trend findings and data on social media about topic 4. Identify potential interviewees and look for their background 5. Have possible interview questions ready based on your findings 6. It may be a good idea to have any past interviews or audio pieces

6. Identify pre-recorded material that could fit into a show. 7. Use a clock or an outline to delimit times. 8. And… don’t forget to integrate your background music, songs, intro/outro, drop-ins, pre-recorded interviews and audio pieces!! 9. Create a playlist in iTunes of prerecorded materials or of the songs for your show to have handy. (See drawing and outline to understand how to coordinate these pieces during your live recording.) 10. Team members need to choose a role based on their strengths and knowledge. Nevertheless, all team members always have to be prepared and aware of other’s roles to help at anytime. These are two useful tools to use when structuring your show and managing your time.

Broadcast Clock & Broadcast Outline (Next

Page)

related to the topic handy 7. Find music that goes along with your conversations 8. Share info and facts with your colleagues

D Structure Your Broadcast Create Segments And Assign Roles Structuring your show should be fun. Remember to keep it simple! Creating segments will help organize your time, lay out your ideas, divide content and create fluidity in broadcast. Assigning roles to each participant is helpful, this ensures there is no overlap and facilitates communication amongst the team. H E R E A R E S O ME T IP S T O S T R U C T U R E YO U R B R OA D C A S T 1. Choose a theme for your show based on the location/event/community you are broadcasting from. 2. Brainstorm talking points and music related to your theme. 3. Organize your ideas in chronological order or in order of importance. 4. Break ideas into segments—remember to prioritize and connect topics. 5. Order your topics based on timeliness, controversy and human interest. It’s also good to understand what is news compared to portions that may be more creative.

7


8

Pop Up Youth Radio @Villapalooza

HOSTS: Essence & Sarah CONTROLS: Edwin & Angel 1: 3 0 Intro / Welcoming

September 25th, 2015 1:30 - 5:00pm

Live on Lumpen Radio HOSTS: Essence & Sarah CONTROLS: Edwin & Angel 2 :0 0 -2 : 2 0

1:4 5

Intro (Sarah) & Introduce Pre-recorded

Interview Live with Barber Shop

interview w/ Villapalooza organizers

(Essence and Sarah)

by Edwin

SEGMENT Why art is important in schools? (Essence and Sarah)

2 : 2 0 -2 : 3 0 Music / drop ins 2 : 3 0 -2 : 3 5 Riot fest vs Villapalooza Audio piece 2 : 3 5-2 :4 0 Interviews w/ randoms, artists and/or families (Gianna / Adilene) **LOOK for Eliza Lopez, managing family activities 2 :4 0 -2 :4 5 Host take over: Who we are? Where we are? Follow us in twitter and tumblr (Sarah & Essence) 2 :4 5-2 : 5 6 Interview w/ Nahuales Underground (Brian) ·· You listened Pop Up Youth Radio at Lumpen Radio WLPN, One O Five point Five FM. (105.5FM) ·· Bye Lumpen Radio but you can continue listening the live transmission through: mixlr.com/yollo-radio DROP IN - PUYR Thanks to… Cut Transmission w/Lumpen


HOSTS: CONTROLS: Edwin & Angel

4pm - 5pm HOSTS: Essence & Sarah CONTROLS: Edwin, Angel & Brian

TAG L IN E

TAG L IN E

Live from Villapalooza, Who we are? etc…

Live from Villapalooza, Who we are? etc…

Twitter, Tumblr. #hastags

Twitter, Tumblr. #hastags

Interview w/ Matthew Silva, curator of

4:0 5- 4:15

the art exhibition (Brian)

Street Art Audio Piece

House DJs interviews (Mike and Gianna)

4:10 - 4: 2 0

3pm-4pm

**Music and Audio Pieces in between segments **LOOK for Eliza Lopez, managing family activities **LOOK for breakdancers, live art artist **LOOK for artists

Sent rock interview (Brian) 4: 2 0 - 4: 3 0 Play music, audio pieces and drop ins 4: 3 0 - 4:4 0 Interview w/ tropiezo (Edwin) 4:4 0 - 4:4 5 Animal cruelty audio piece

9


10

W H O I S D O IN G W H AT

Types of roles The following roles are most commonly found in pre-production. Ideally, all participants will know how to perform each role, this will allow each member of your team to partake when necessary. During the live recording some of these roles are shared as mishaps arise, such as the Internet dropping out or a guest canceling.

Producer

Host / Co-Host / Interviewer

K E Y D U T IE S To direct the show, to coor-

K E Y D U T IE S prepare scripts, help smooth

dinate the entire crew, location and

out difficulties by keeping conversations

media release, to organize a rundown of

going, introduce segments, create ques-

the show, what the crew will be saying,

tions for interviews, find interviewees

researching

on-site and grab people from the audience

S K IL L S Coordination, organizing, time management, research, leadership O N -A IR Has a rundown of the show and is directing different reporters and guests to microphones, as well as keeping track of time.

Lead Technical Producer K E Y D U T IE S To set up equipment, to ensure sound quality when it’s in action S K IL L S Equipment management, audio levelling, communication, teamwork, ingenious troubleshooter, organized O N A IR Works hand in hand with the producer. Sits at set microphone monitoring the audio levels and broadcast connection, as well as cues people.

Assistant Technical Producer K E Y D U T IE S to support lead technical producer S K IL L S Attentive, organized, music guru O N A IR in charge of cueing up pre-recorded materials and music playlists.

to participate in the conversation, work with producer to coordinate interviews, mention location, phone numbers as well as social media outlets on air S K IL L S Script writing, conversationalist, thinks on their feet, organized, improvisational O N A IR Communicates with the producer what is next as segments are being played.

Social Media Manager K E Y D U T IE S packaging pre-production, production, post production for digital distribution, interaction, documenting recording, and curating conversations on social media (twitter, FB, etc.) S K IL L S Writing, content management for social media, takes content to post after production, hashtags, live tweeting O N -A IR Live tweeting the event and taking photos for social media to publish.


All of these roles need to communicate smoothly and sometimes quietly. To ensure understanding, here are some basic universal hand gestures to use during recording.

11


12

Production

Production

Basic Gear includes

The production stage of radio is the most

1. Console Mixer (4 channels)

exciting but also the one that needs the

2. Microphones Omnidirectional & Unidirectional

most attention to detail. Radio production is heavy on technical activity. It includes, handling equipment, basic audio

3. XLR Cables (Male & Female)

engineering* and basic broadcasting.

4. 1/8” & 1/4” Cables (Stereo / Mono)

We know, it seems like a lot to cover

5. RCA to 1/4”

but trust us, we will give you the most comprehensive, digestible roadmap.

6. ⅛” to ¼” Adapters 7. Splitters

*DISCLAIMER - Audio Engineer for our purposes will be called Technical Production

8. Speakers 9. Headphones

A Getting The Equipment

10. Multichannel Output = Headphone Splitter Stereo (4 channels)

A big part of radio is to know basic

11. Mic Stands

technical knowledge. Youth need to know

12. Speaker Stands

the main idea of a studio, its components and technical language. Knowing the basic set-up and equipment allows you the opportunity to create it at any site and troubleshoot any technical issues that

13. Wi-Fi Device 14. Audio Interface or USB Cable (based on Console Mixer)

may arise.

15. 2 Laptops (One for Streaming & One for Music/Internet Search)

Here basic list of gear and equipment

B U T D O N ’ T F O R G E T S O M E E X T R A G E A R L IK E

you may need to start your set-up:

1. Foldable Table 2. Foldable Chairs or Stools 3. Extension cords 4. Multi-outlet 5. Computer Charger


Get acquainted with your equipment

We recommend using a basic 4 channels

before doing an audio set-up, we’ll start

console mixer, such as Podium Pro Audio,

with some basic language.

MX1204. Let’s explore it!

Microphones

Audio Channels IN P U T S

Choose your microphone! Be aware of your

Individual volume control for each audio

environment. Besides your voice, do you

input FA D E R

want to capture the ambient noises around you and give your audience a sense of where you are? Or do you want to have a neat and clear sound of you and your guest’s voice? O M N ID IR E C T I O N A L M I C R O PH O N E Microphone

A switch for each input M U T E B U T T O N that allows to assign or cut the signal towards the main output Equalizer knobs E Q allow to change or transform the sound on each of the inputs

with a 360 degree pickup pattern, even

An associated equalization medium for each

level from all sides. Often used in

of the inputs G A IN

Classical Recording.

A main volume control M A S T E R VO L U ME that

U N ID IR E C T I O N A L M I C R O PH O N E Microphone

allows to regulate the sum of all inputs

with a narrow pickup pattern, ideal

M I X at the same time

level from one side only. Also known as “Cardioid” microphone, used in Radio Broadcast and Studio Recording.

At least a main audio output, it can be assigned to the recorder, transmitter or speakers O U T P U T S

Mixer

A medium to listen to each input to check

A mixer is a console that makes it easier

our “cues” H E A D PH O NE O U T P U T

for you to manage all your equipment. You connect microphones, speakers and even your computer to it. There are different brands and types of console mixers.

An external medium C U E M O N I T O R to listen to the final mix before you release the main volume (headphones or monitor speaker) A ME T E R to visually monitor the audio levels of the final mix, usually in form of lights The PH A N T O M power increments volume on certain type of microphones, common case condensed microphone, more receptive and sensitive (can be uni or omni- directional).

13


14

Adapters, Cables, Connectors, Oh My! Adapters, Cables and Connectors are as

IN P U T is the connection to plug sound

essential as any other main piece of

signal source (microphone, instrument or

equipment. It is very important to learn

line input)

how to differentiate them.

There are

many brands and styles, but what’s important to know is what they do and how they look. You can never have too many! Input / Output Cables, Connectors and Adapters: Referring to them with an analogy “male / female”, where the female is generally a receptacle that receives and holds the male. Transmitting audio signals in a mono or stereo wave.

O U T P U T is the connection to plug sound signal to receive (Amplifier/Speakers, Headphones, Mixer) M O N O is 1 channel sound signal S T E R E O is 2 channel sound signal (Left and Right)


15


16

Basic Gear

Multichannel Output A multichannel Output is also known as a Headphone Splitter Stereo (4 channels). It is a device where you can plug several headphones at a time. This can also be used to send the signal to a computer or recorder.

Audio Interface An audio interface is used is to connect a mixer (which is analog) to computer (which is digital). An audio interface improves the quality of audio by converting analog sounds to digital ones.

B A S I C T E R M IN O LO GY

Input

audio in

Output

audio out

Fade in

volume up

Fade out Mono

volume down

The sound is not divided on the

speakers (left and right), exits out evenly (same signal in both on left and right).

Stereo

The sound is divided dynamically

into left and right on the speakers.


Speakers

(Side notes)

1. Make sure you connect the cable in the Input, not in the Thru. 2. Make sure the speaker is off and/or the volume is down before you connect any cable. This will avoid damage to the speakers. 3. After the speakers is on, send audio signal, then adjust the volume levels with the knob in the back of the speaker. (Make sure your audio signal is not saturated)

Speaker Stands S E C U R E IN S T R U C T I O N S 1. Adjust the legs of the tripod stand 2. Tide the legs with the screw on the side 3. Adjust the pole to the desired height and secure it with the screw 4. IMPORTANT - Pin the metal bar to the pole to secure the pole height 5. Place the speaker on the top

17


18

an interface that makes transmission possible. There are many kinds of software, but for our purposes we can use a basic one, and luckily for us there are cheap ones available. 1. You can choose to download and install a software like NICECAST, but make sure to always be connected online with an IP. Mobile hotspot devices do not come with it, so your connection will be unsuccessful. A link will be originated at the time of the broadcast to share it with listeners. 2. Or you can choose to download and install an application like Mixlr. A profile account will need to be created and logged in before every broadcast. Listeners will be able to go directly to your profile to

B Streaming Online

M O B IL E (M I - FI)

There are two main ways to broadcast

Pros

radio - on the air using transmitters

1. Have own access don’t need to ask

that broadcast an FM or AM signal and

listen live.

2. Can transmit everywhere

C Transportable Radio Audio Setup

radio broadcasting is quite expensive

Cons

Before you set up your recording

and requires more equipment as well as

1. Comes from a satellite signal and is

1. Organize gear

internet broadcasting. Traditional air

an actual studio. We are fortunate enough the have an air radio partner, WLPN-LP 105.5FM. Although we have an FM outlet, all our production is based on internet broadcasting- it’s easier(relatively), and economical.

enough the have an air

vulnerable to weather changes 2. Weaker signal, if in a crowded area where people are using their mobile phones, signal can be compromised 3. Doesn’t come with an IP address-some

2. make sure all equipment is stored by type 3. Identify where to place folding table, 4. set up four to five chairs for hosts, producers and guests

radio partner, WLPN-LP 105.5FM. Although

radio softwares may require one.

we have an FM outlet, all our production

(Ex. cannot use Nicecast with a mobile

5. identify outlet

is based on internet broadcasting- it’s

connection)

6. Identify internet options for

easier(relatively), and economical.

W IFI

Choose your Internet Signal

Pros

It’s important to count on a strong

1. Stronger connection than Mi-Fi

Internet signal. You can use a mobile

2. Has an IP address, which can be

hotspot device such as a Verizon Jetpack 4G LTE (MIFI) or land Internet such as a basic wireless connection like Comcast or RCN. Here are the pros and cons of using either connection

connections 7. Identify where to put speakers and run cable 8. Test wifi connection

required for certain broadcasting

R A D I O S E T- U P W/AU D I O IN T E R FAC E

software. (Ex. Nicecast needs an

Here is the basic set-up instructions.

IP address)

Also, you can check the easy process

Cons

video we made for you!!!

1. Limited to recording in a space that

1. Connect inputs in mixer Mics &

has it’s own Internet C H O O S E A N O N L IN E PL AT F O R M T O B R OA D C A S T

Computer 2 (for Audios) *For Computer 2 use a XLR x ⅛ cable 2. Connect outputs Speakers and Multi-

Now that you know you can transmit a

channel Output (to the headphone

signal you need to use a platform to

jack).

facilitate the production of content transmission. Broadcasting softwares are

3. Connect headphones to Multichannel Output for monitoring audio.


4. Bridge Audio Interface into Multichannel Output and Computer 1 (for Streaming) 5. Audio Settings in the Computer 1, that connects with audio interface * ··

Go to Preferences if Mac / Sound / Input = Choose name of your Audio Interface / Output = Choose name of your Audio Interface

6. Turn on mixer console (make sure phantom is on too) 7. Turn on speakers (make sure all the levels are down in your mixer) 8. Check audio levels speakers, headphones & interface input 9. Open online platform (see page #--) and do corresponding audio settings (Choose your input = Audio Interface) 10. In Mixlr or in Nicecast select “start broadcasting” 11. Enjoy!!

Extra Tips for a successful broadcast 1. Before you connect any cable, make sure all the channels in the mixer are off/down 2. Before broadcasting do an audio test to check levels. 3. To avoid any feedback noise, make sure the speakers are positioned away from the mics. 4. The volume of the headphones and speakers are totally independent from the audio feed for the broadcast, just make sure you don’t have any red lights on the mixer. 5. Remember to do your internal audio set up in your computer before you open MXLR or NICECAST 6. Inform the person to maintain a good distance on the microphone for better sound 7. Turn off the mics after the sessions or segments on air, you don’t want people to hear your conversation during broadcast.

Wrapping up your broadcast 1. Before you disconnect any cable, make sure all the channels in the mixer are off/down 2. At the end of your broadcast, FIRST thing you need to do is TURN OFF SPEAKERS 3. Save the recording session for deeper reflection during next meeting 4. Make sure gear is broken down and stored properly 5. Wrap your cables properly

19


20

Audience Engagement

A Say Cheese or Say Something!!

Tips before you go out in the field

Your followers love photos and video,

ˆˆ Always have your playlist ready:

and admit it --so do you. Using platforms

background music, songs, intro/

like Instagram,, Twitter, Facebook live,

outro, drop-ins, pre-recorded

Snapchat, directly connect you with your

interviews and audio-pieces

audience. Documenting the process makes

ˆˆ Have your equipment ready to go,

them feel present and a part of each

create a checklist

moment. What’s more, it’s an opportunity for youth to take “productive selfies”-where they can boast about their

B Write, Reply and Hashtags

work and look cute. Youth are already

Engagement with the audience is essen-

connected to these platforms. Getting them to use social media professionally also helps them develop a critical producer lens. K E Y T IP S 1. Use it to produce commercials and show teasers, show behind the scenes and/or to create the team bios 2. Post at least once every hour during your broadcast 3. Make sure images have full-sentence captions and varied shots – close ups, wide, medium 4. Edit the photo or video without changing its original meaning 5. Add stickers 6. Sharpen the image

tial, on and off-site. When the participants are performing live and having a face to face conversation with the audience on-site, encourage them to participate actively with a photo, video post or mention and the use of hashtags, to create vivid momentums for them and the audience off-site. To communicate with the listeners offsite, the participant must be present in our social outlets and responding actively, through a written message, mention or chat as well as with a shout-out on-air. For example, twitter is great to create a thread among you, your location, your interviewees and your audience; or if you are using Mixlr to broadcast, this application will allow you to see how many people are listening and have a direct conversation in its chatroom!!

ˆˆ Test equipment and streaming platform ˆˆ Test mobile devices and update software


WOW! That was a lot of material to take in, but we hope you can review it at your own pace. Here is everything we covered. You read and learned how to 1. To manage a recording set-up 2. To be able to understand concepts of audio input and output 3. To control a mixer and functions (volumes –fade in and fade out–, equalization and audio monitoring – check the out levels–) 4. To be able to create the connection to stream online 5. To interact and exchange skills as a team.

·· To learn the importance of every member and that while every person has a designated role, they always need to be ready to improvise. ·· To be aware that each person must do and apply their skills in what they do best. 6. To know when to use various communication techniques, not only verbal but also specific sign language and gestures among the group.

When doing off-site broadcasting you must always cover these essentials: ·· Find a place to pop up ·· Contact location, owner, organizer, ·· Have a meeting

·· Use a clock or an outline with time frames ·· Assign roles ·· Create playlist: background music, songs, intro/outro, drop-ins, prerecorded interviews and audio-pieces ·· Have your equipment ready to go, do checklist. ·· Announce your upcoming location on your social media outlets ·· Check the weather  ·· Anticipate mishaps! Troubleshoot! ·· Arrive to the place with time to do set up ·· Test Equipment, volumes and streaming program.

·· Brainstorm

·· Start Broadcast

·· Research and find related content

·· Tweet! Post! Start taking photos

·· Structure you program and establish segments 21


Conclusion

PUYR is just the beginning of a longer trajectory to amplify the voices of youth within traditional media outlets. While developing and implementing PUYR we became inspired, and must admit, a bit surprised by the engagement and commitment participants had with this experiment. We knew this was and continues to be a very ambitious project, so we applaud you as you start producing your own outlet. Producing radio requires much work, dedication, and discipline.

Resources

Equipment www.sweetwater.com www.soundonsound.com www.musiciansfriend.com www.guitarcenter.com www.amazon.com

As we move forward with PUYR we hope that you will feel compelled to engage with

Broadcasting

radio & audio production in your own space. Although PUYR has had great impact in

www.mixlr.com www.rogueamoeba.com/nicecast

its short existence, we knowits potential is far greater than what we could do with just a pop-up show that occurs bimonthly. With our experience thus far we have come to the conclusion that youth are ready and invested in changing public media, and are

Check out our stuff! Tune in!

extremely fed up with popular media’s portrayal of black and latino youth. Youth want

www.popupyouthradio.tumblr.com www.yollocalli.org www.freespiritmedia.org www.truestaris.com

to be able to represent themselves in their voice to a wide audience, that includes being accepted into media outlets meant for everyone and not just outlets with youth as primary source. It is the responsibility of adults, youth allies, to include and acknowledge youth voice within the larger context of practice in whatever their field of expertise is. A large part of PUYR success is that its implementation and dissemination put youth radio producers on the same platform as ‘professional’ (adult) radio producers. What’s more, youth of color and their communities have an opportunity to create their own media outlet. Radio allows us to reclaim airwaves as a thirdspace. Thirdspaces are spaces adults

Other cool pro radio stations and audio projects www.lumpenradio.com www.web.mit.edu/tyr www.barbershopshow.tumblr.com www.radio.centroculturadigital.mx www.escuchatorio.net www.prx.org

can inhabit between home and work. These spaces are important for the holistic well being of humans. Thirdspaces allow us to engage with like minded people, explore new

Credits

ideas, share personal views and exercise our human qualities. Thirdspaces can take

Yollocalli.org Freespiritmedia.org Truestarfoundation.org Lumpenradio.com

forms of neighborhood bars and cafes, community gatherings, or even themed celebrations. Unfortunately youth access to these spaces, especially low-income youth of color, is limited. Youth do not always have the means to go out to a cafe or travel to community events, and many times youth of color are prosecuted for hanging out in large groups in free spaces such as libraries or parks. Pop Up Youth Radio creates a platform physically and conceptually for youth and adults to inhabit thirdspaces to generate shared ideas on art, culture and human endeavors. For Yollocalli the notion of thirdspace is crucial for program development and sustainability. Check out our Homago Guidebook for more information and best-practices. It is because of thirdspace that participating youth authentically engage with activities, become committed to self-growth and actively participate in activities outside of our space and community. If you, your program or institution adopt and implement thirdspace notions into any of your programs the explorative ecosystem for youth will be richer. If we take these same ideas and implement them in our activities outside of our own programs, then we can begin to level the playing field for disenfranchised youth.

Special thanks to : Logan Bay, Todd Carter, Elsa Rodriguez, Charly Garcia, Joseph Mora and the participants below. S U MME R 2 0 15 Free Spirit Media Andrea Hart (Instructor) Grace Barry Essence Green Kyle Gise Sarah Ford

ment of its stakeholders and the authenticity of the content. For PUYR this means

Yollocalli Stephanie Manriquez (Instructor) Angel Fierro Brian Cruz Edwin Gomez

opening up the opportunity for others, not just youth, to implement their own pop-ups

Margarita Estrada

For PUYR the technical aspects of the project, although dense and complex, can be easily learned and managed. What makes a project like this successful is the engage-

or simply submit content to future pop-ups. As this project grows we hope to adapt the guidebook and our practices to suit the needs of many including educators, program-

S U MME R 2 0 16

mers, radio enthusiasts, and media makers. If you have become curious, engaged, or

could be a rally, even a brief one. You’re part of something, and you suddenly realize

True Star Lateefa Harland (Instructor) Corey Lorren Ross Kayla Sullers

you count. To count is very important.

Nick Stroud

even inspired about youth radio please reach out to us. When you become part of something, in some way you count. It could be a march; it

- Studs Terkel

22

Yollocalli Cecilia Ruiz Yajaira Quiñones Brian Cruz Jennifer Galan


Worksheets

When doing off-site broadcasting you must check these essentials:

ˆˆ Find a place to pop up

Before go out in the field:

ˆˆ Contact location, owner, organizer ˆˆ Check internet options ˆˆ Have a meeting ˆˆ Brainstorm ˆˆ Research and find related content ˆˆ Structure you program and establish segments ˆˆ Use a clock or an outline with time frames ˆˆ Assign roles ˆˆ Always have your playlist ready: ˆˆ Background music ˆˆ Songs ˆˆ Intro/Outro ˆˆ Drop-ins ˆˆ Pre-recorded interviews ˆˆ Audio-pieces ˆˆ Have your equipment ready to go, do checklist

ˆˆ Test equipment and streaming platform ˆˆ Test mobile devices and update software

ˆˆ Identify where to put speakers and run cable ˆˆ Test wifi connection ˆˆ Test Equipment, volumes and streaming program.

ˆˆ Announce your upcoming location on your social media outlets ˆˆ Check the weather ☺ ˆˆ Anticipate mishaps! Troubleshoot! ˆˆ Arrive to the place with time to do set up and walk around

Before you start your broadcast: ˆˆ Walk around to check the location ˆˆ Identify possible people of interest ˆˆ Start Broadcast ˆˆ Tweet! Post! Start taking photos!

Before you set up your recording:

ˆˆ Enjoy!

ˆˆ Organize gear, make sure all equipment is stored by type ˆˆ Identify where to place folding table, ˆˆ Set up four to five chairs for hosts, producers and guests ˆˆ Identify outlet ˆˆ Identify internet options for connections

Equipment Checklist BASIC GEAR

ˆˆ Headphones

B U T D O N ’ T F O R G E T S O ME E X T R A G E A R L IK E

ˆˆ Console Mixer (4 channels)

ˆˆ Multichannel Output = Headphone

ˆˆ Foldable Table

ˆˆ Microphones

Splitter Stereo (4 channels)

ˆˆ XLR Cables (Male & Female)

ˆˆ Mic Stands

ˆˆ 1/8” & 1/4” Cables (Stereo / Mono)

ˆˆ Speaker Stands

ˆˆ RCA to 1/4”

ˆˆ Wi-Fi Device

ˆˆ ⅛’’ to ¼” Adapters

ˆˆ Audio Interface or USB Cable

ˆˆ Splitters ˆˆ Speakers

Wrapping up your broadcast!

ˆˆ Foldable Chairs or Stools ˆˆ Extension cords ˆˆ Multi-outlet ˆˆ Computer Charger

(based on Console Mixer) ˆˆ 2 Laptops

ˆˆ Stop your broadcast and save the recording session. ˆˆ At the end of your broadcast, FIRST thing you need to do is TURN OFF SPEAKERS

ˆˆ Wrap your cables properly ˆˆ Make sure gear is broken down and stored properly ˆˆ Revise your equipment checklist to make sure you grab everything

ˆˆ Make sure all the channels in the mixer are off/down, before you disconnect any cable ˆˆ Disconnect cables from outlets and mixer

23


Glossary 24

Audio Engineering

MIX

LIVE MENTIONS

is the sum of all inputs in a mixer

Station ID (if applicable), name of the show, remind people topic or guest of the day, social media outlets such as webpage, facebook, twitter, instagram, (approx. 30sec-1min)

AU D I O I M AG E is composed of drop-ins, sweepers, intro and outro that will set the tone of your show. INTRO

MIXER is a console that makes it easier for you to manage all your equipment, you connect microphones, speakers and even your computer to it.

PSA PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT

every show always needs an introduction (approx. 45sec to 1min)

M O N O is 1 channel sound signal

can be pre-recorded or live. (30sec to 1min)

DROP INS

M U LT I C H A N N E L O U T P U T

C A L E N DA R O F E V E N T S

engage your audience inviting them to follow your social media, call you or just ask them if they liked the past segment (approx. 10sec to 30sec)

a.k.a Headphone Splitter Stereo (4 channels), is a device where you can plug several headphones at a time.

Announce happenings of interest around your community, neighborhood, area or city. Youth choose events to match the overarching theme of the show as well as ones that appeal to the entire production crew. (time may vary)

SWEEPER

is a switch for each input that allows you to assign or cut the signal towards the main output in a mixer

MUTE BUTTON remind your audience what they are listening to (approx. 10sec to 20sec) OUTRO

OMNIDIREC TIONAL MICROPHONE

farewells are sad, but you’ll remind your audience when is your next show (approx. 45sec to 1min)

captures/receives the sound from all its angles.

AU D I O I N T E R FAC E

is the connection to plug sound signal to receive (Amplifier/Speakers, Headphones, Mixer)

OUTPUT is used is to connect a mixer (which is analog) to computer (which is digital). An audio interface improves the quality of audio by converting analog sounds to digital ones.

OUTPUTS

AU D I O P I E C E A pre-produced story of a specific topic. (time may vary) MUSIC Youth select songs from local friends who were also musicians. Additionally, youth can select music that is relevant to the spaces they are recording in--such as picking songs from artists performing at the festival. (time may vary) R ADIO ROLES

CUE MONITOR

can be assigned to the recorder, transmitter or speakers in a mixer

is an external medium that allows you to listen to the final mix before you release the main volume (headphones or monitor speaker)

PHANTOM

are fun and they can be assigned in preproduction and then get a little more fluid during production. Ideally, all the participants would be able to know how to perform each role and rotate when necessary.

is the power that increments volume on certain type of microphones, common case condensed microphone, more receptive and sensitive (can be uni or omni- directional).

is the person who directs, coordinates and organizes the show and the team.

E Q is the abbreviation for equalizer knobs E Q UA L I Z E R K N O B S

PUYR

allow to change or transform the sound on each of the inputs in a mixer

is the abbreviation for Pop Up Youth Radio

FA D E I N is to put the volume up

RADIO CONTENT

FA D E O U T is to put the volume down

creates different dynamics to your Pop Up radio show and keeps your audience interested.

FA D E R WELCOMING

is the individual volume control for each audio input in a mixer

Introduction to the show and the day content (approx. 2-3min)

F E E D B AC K Feedback is the ringing noise caused by a looped signal in the audio system. It occurs when a mic (audio input) is closed to the speakers (audio output)

INTERVIEWS

GAIN

can be pre-recorded or live with a specific person. Interviewees can be a profile where someone tells a personal narrative or an expert interview where someone uses their skills to comment on a topic. (approx. 5-7min)

is an associated equalization medium for each of the inputs in a mixer

VOX P O P U L L I

HEADPHONE OUTPUT is a medium to listen to each input to check our “cues”. INPUT is the connection to plug the sound signal source (microphone, instrument or line input)

Also known as person-on-the-street interviews, Vox populli are mainly pre-recorded and used to start a segment. You can produce these clips by creating a two-question survey around a newsworthy topic to ask 5-8 random people. (approx. 2-3min) L I V E TA L K O R D I S C U S S I O N

I N P U T S are the audio channels on a mixer

is a live conversation about a specific topics among hosts or host(s) and guest(s). (approx. 5-7min)

M A S T E R VO L U M E

LIVE INTERVENTION

is a main volume control that allows to regulate the sum of all inputs in a mixer at the same time METER is used to visually monitor the audio levels of the final mix, usually in form of lights

A host will mention who we are, explain our location and why we pop up, narrate the surrounding and maybe ask some thoughts from a pulled over walk in. Also, the host will need to introduce the following segment or music. (time may vary)

PRODUCER

LEAD TECHNICAL PRODUCER is the person who sets the equipment and ensures sound quality when it’s in action. A S S I S TA N T T E C H N I C A L P R O D U C E R is the person who supports lead technical producer and is in charge of cueing up prerecorded materials and music playlists. HOST is the person who prepares scripts, keeps conversations going and introduces segments and interviewers. CO-HOST is the person who supports host and communicates with the producer what is next as segments are being played. INTERVIEWER is the person who creates questions and dialogues with guest. SOCIAL MEDIAIST is the person who manages the social media to engage with the audience. SEGMENTS help to organize your time, lay out your ideas, divide content and create fluidity in broadcast. STEREO is 2 channel sound signal (Left and Right) UNIDIREC TIONAL MICROPHONE captures/receives the sound on the front side.

YOU ARE AN AMAZING PERSON!

Pop Up Youth Radio  

The PUYR Guidebook documents our process and best practices so that others can develop their own communal voice platform. Video guide can...

Pop Up Youth Radio  

The PUYR Guidebook documents our process and best practices so that others can develop their own communal voice platform. Video guide can...

Advertisement