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THE PERSONALITIES OF YoCo’s FOOD & BEVERAGE INDUSTRY

Profiles of Flavor

› Celebrating Food & Spirits in YoCo › Expanding Palates for Business Growth › Liquor Law Modernization Impacts Craft Brewing


Board Room = Bored Employees Team building with the champs! Treat ‘em, thank ‘em, and excite ‘em with the champions of fun at a York Revolution game.

• Exclusive perks like ceremonial first pitches and behind-the-scenes tours of PeoplesBank Park • Great seating options, from suite-level views to mixers directly behind home plate • Affordable, all-inclusive turnkey service

To create your unforgettable, customized corporate event at a York Revolution game, call Reed Gunderson at (717) 801-4498 or send an email to rgunderson@yorkrevolution.com.


IN THIS ISSUE FEATURES: THE PERSONALITIES OF YoCo’s FOOD & BEVERAGE INDUSTRY

07 08 10 12 16

05 KEVIN’S MESSAGE:

CHEERS TO YOU, YoCo!

CELEBRATING FOOD & SPIRITS

14

ADVOCACY: BREWING UP BUSINESS? LIQUOR LAW MODERNIZATION IMPACTS THE CRAFT BEER INDUSTRY

15

YCEA THANKS OUR FALL 2017 INTERNS

18

MAIN STREET HANOVER EVENTS 2018’S 2ND SATURDAY SCHEDULE

19

YCEA EVENTS JANUARY/FEBRUARY

JOIN THE JOURNEY OF REVOLUTION AT VICTOR’S SERVING UP MORE THAN FOOD ALONE: BAIR’S FRIED CHICKEN CORNERS CUSTOMER LOYALTY VINE BEHIND THE WINE: ALLEGRO WINERY KEEPS YORK COUNTY FRUITFUL

READY TO EXPAND? LET US HELP.

Featured on the front cover: Photography by YRK Creative The personalities behind some of YoCo’s food and beverage industry businesses gather outside Central Market in downtown York: Annette Fisher, Bair’s Fried Chicken (Central Market, York); Carl Helrich, Allegro Winery (Brogue, York County); Executive Chef George Sheffer, Victor’s (York)


CREDITS:

144 Roosevelt Ave. Ste 100 York, PA 17401 P: 717.848.4000

ycea-pa.org

YCEAPA

YCEAPA

YCEAPA

PROUDLY DESIGNED IN YORK, PA, BY

210 York St., Suite 102 York, PA 17401 yrkcreative.com | P: 855.860.5909 Advertising Megan Myers YRK Creative megan@yrkcreative.com P: 717.578.8353

View the digital version of YoCo Connect online at www.ycea-pa.org The opinions expressed in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced electronically or in print without the express written permission of the publisher. YCEA YoCo Connect is published bimonthly. Copyright Š 2018 York County Economic Alliance. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, in whole or in part, without the specific written permission of the York County Economic Alliance.


KEVIN’S MESSAGE

CHEERS TO YOU,

YoCo!

BY KEVIN J. SCHREIBER PRESIDENT & CEO, YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE

It’s no secret that York County (YoCo)

visitors alike. This past July, the York County Convention and Visitors

loves our food and drink. Whether

Bureau (YCCVB) recorded an astounding $217.6 million spent on

they’re the chips from Martin’s, a locally

the food and beverage industry, second only to transportation

brewed craft beer, or the iconic York

costs. Seeing the opportunity, the YCCVB has already tapped (no

Peppermint Pattie , there is no arguing

pun intended) into the industry trends with the Susquehanna Ale

about our infatuation with food. At the

Trail and the Mason-Dixon Wine Trail. Now, the Keystone Craft

end of February 2017, York celebrated

Spirits Trail has launched.

®

Restaurant Week, which has become a

The success of restaurants in our community is a leading indicator

foodie tradition for the past seven years.

of the nation’s economic health and our region’s economic drive.

Over 40 downtown York restaurants

The industry is growing, with every dollar spent in restaurants

participated, with 12 new restaurants

generating an additional $2 in sales for other industries. This case is

signing on for the first time last year.

true for locally owned restaurants—whether they are independent

This week yields a minimum of a 100

or have a local franchise owner.

percent increase in sales for most of

This winter, as the cabin fever sets in and the grayness makes us

the restaurants. This one week alone

long for the bright sky of summer, break the dreariness with a visit

generated over $300,000 in sales

to a local restaurant, bar, or stand at Central Market. Whether that

in 2016.

destination is Victor’s, Bair’s Fried Chicken, or Allegro Winery, York

While

those

numbers

support

a

downtown economic surge, the love

County has no shortage of establishments to choose from or an eager and invested community to support them.

of a good bite or refreshing drink is a countywide trend for residents and

05 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


Now among the nation’s most

Well

prepared hospitals in caring for stroke. Proud to be certified by The Joint Commission as a Comprehensive Stroke Center. WellSpan York Hospital has been certified as a Comprehensive Stroke Center by The Joint Commission – a designation awarded to only 3% of registered U.S. hospitals. We are honored that this organization recognizes the skill of our physicians, nurses and other clinical staff members in caring for the most complex conditions.

This achievement, together with our Primary Stroke Centers in Gettysburg, Ephrata and Lebanon, means that WellSpan is WellPrepared to deliver better outcomes and survival rates for our friends and neighbors across southcentral Pennsylvania.

For more information about the signs and symptoms of stroke, visit WellSpan.org/Stroke 5664 PR&M 9/17


FEATURE: CELEBRATING FOOD & SPIRITS

Celebrating FOOD & SPIRITS

From left: Annette Fisher, Bair’s Fried Chicken; Carl Helrich, Allegro Winery; Executive Chef George Sheffer, Victor’s

Warm up the cold winter months with a new experience in a local restaurant, brewery, or winery. Featured on the following pages are three of our members — Victor’s, Bair’s Fried Chicken, and Allegro Winery.

Mark your calendars to celebrate more local establishments during Restaurant Week presented by Fulton Bank, February 24–March 3. 07 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: VICTOR’S

Join the Journey of Revolution

at Victor’s STORY BY KATIE MAHONEY VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY YRK CREATIVE

From a church to a biker bar (and a barbershop) to a

embrace the culture of change on a personal level.

classic-meets-modern casual fine dining experience,

“We change and evolve our menu by what inspires us

the building Victor’s calls home has always been a

while maintaining an appreciation for the ‘traditional’

model of change. It’s a fitting theme for a restaurant

Italian dishes we have been known for,” Sheffer

that is both a comfortable neighborhood favorite and

states. “It is exciting to take bold initiatives and move

an Italian bistro offering award-winning cuisine paired

people out of their comfort zone, but we also take

with carefully selected wines, beers, and cocktails.

great pleasure in being able to prepare their longtime

“In a town where change can be difficult, Mark

favorites.” This reflection of innovation extends to

and Marie and Chef are not afraid, and are pushing

the beer, wine, and cocktail lists as well, highlighting

for new things,” says Bill Albritton, Victor’s front of

some

house manager. “It takes some courage to push

commonly found.

local breweries

and

unique

wines

not

forward and not become stagnant—when you

“Mark and Marie have done a lot of things behind

have been successful—in a finicky business like the

the scenes that will keep us growing and moving

restaurant business.”

forward,” says Albritton.

Albritton is referencing owners Mark and Marie

This work includes a revamped prep kitchen and

Sindicich, and Executive Chef George Sheffer, who

dishwashing space in the lower level to free up 08

YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: VICTOR’S

“This idea of giving back just indicates the bigger reflection that Victor’s is a neighborhood spot.” -Bill Albritton, Front of house manager

main kitchen space. More space means new food and beverage options for guests—an area which remains their primary focus. “We want to bring our guests along on the journey so they can be part of the experience,” Albritton says. “We have a passion for this. We aren’t as concerned about the bottom line. A sample of wine, a taste of a new dish before it’s on the menu, and keeping our community, our supporters, ‘in the know’ with a taste of what is coming helps to bridge the gap between the tradition and the new.” One

component

that

hasn’t

changed

is

the

neighborhood roots. Victor’s blew up their locally loved bocce league this past summer with 60 teams. They also support a Dine and Donate program with concepts such as using Horn Farm produce in their menu and donating a portion of proceeds back to the local farm. “This idea of giving back just indicates the bigger reflection that Victor’s has been a neighborhood spot for 33 years,” says Albritton. “We’re trying to promote a sense of community by connecting a delicious dinner with friends or a fun night out at our bar with local charities and groups. Our hope is that, through reaching out, our neighborhood spot continues to grow, allowing us to share more of what we love with more guests.” When asked about those guests, Albritton adds, “There are two groups: the loyals, who have been coming here for 30 plus years, some that we see multiple times a week…. Then there are the first-timers who are surprised by what they find when they join us and who we hope will become lifelong guests…friends whom we share our love of food, drink, and community with.” So, which are you?

554 South Ogontz St., York, PA 17403 | 717.854.7958 /victorsofyork

victorsofyork.com 09 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: BAIR’S FRIED CHICKEN Annette Fisher will tell you she’s not great with names. Now, faces—that’s a different story. “I will tell you [that] people are creatures of habit. When they come up, I know exactly what they’re going to order,” says Fisher, owner of Bair’s Fried Chicken in Central Market. Over the past 11 years, Fisher has perfected the ability of connecting faces to orders, which could be anything from baked mac and cheese and collard greens to fried chicken or the Dutch potatoes. “I’ve had people come back to York who haven’t lived here for 20 years who tell me they’ve just gotten off the plane and they came because they had to have the Dutch potatoes,” she says. This loyalty and love of signature dishes is one of the biggest compliments Fisher has received while owning the stand, located in the corner of Central Market adjacent to the Beaver Street entrance, since 2007. Originally, Bair’s Fried Chicken only sold eggs at the market when the company was founded in the mid1970s. Phillip Bair and his family went on to eventually sell eggs to several markets across Central Pennsylvania and one in Baltimore. In 1985, Bair’s started selling fried chicken. Phillip’s daughter Wanda and her husband Sam took over the business when Phillip could no longer run it. Meanwhile, Fisher was working only a few short feet away from Bair’s. “One of my friends owned Bricker’s Famous French Fries. They [Bair’s] asked if I wanted to run the stands a

Bair’s Fried Chicken Corners Customer Loyalty

few days a week to get out of the house since I had been a stay-at-home mom for a few years. I told them, ‘That would be great!’” Fisher says

STORY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ MANAGER, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ AND YRK CREATIVE

with a chuckle. She was familiar with the stand, having spent many lunchtimes at Central Market when she worked as a paralegal for Stock and Leader. Suddenly, things started to come full circle.

10 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: BAIR’S FRIED CHICKEN

“The price was right. We decided we enjoyed the food industry,

“I’ve had people come back

so we said, ‘Let’s do this.’” Fisher admits the huge learning curve that existed: It was hard but gratifying work.

to York who haven’t lived

“Maybe someday, somebody will come up to me and say, ‘I

here for 20 years who tell

love what you’re doing. I want to do it. Sell this to me’,” she says.

me they’ve just gotten off

“It’s crazy. When you look back and you think how fast the last

the plane and they came

11 years have gone—and all of the changes. My kids are now working for me.”

because they had to have the Dutch potatoes.” -Annette Fisher

34 W. Philadelphia St., York, PA 17401 | 717.848.1945 /bairschicken

bairsfriedchicken.com 13 11 CHAMBER YoCo CONNECT CONNECT| |JANUARY/FEBRUARY SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2018 2017 | YCEA-PA.ORG | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: ALLEGRO WINERY

Vine Behind the Wine

ALLEGRO WINERY KEEPS YORK COUNTY FRUITFUL STORY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ MANAGER, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ AND YRK CREATIVE

If you ask Carl Helrich, co-owner and winemaker at

all of the other wineries in York County combined,

Allegro Winery, how much wine he drinks a week, he’ll

according to Helrich—that Allegro produces per year

tell you “enough.” “I’m one of the more boring people

appeal to the sweet wine drinker or dry wine drinker.

to drink wine with,” he says. “I’ve learned to shut up

“Ninety percent of the stuff you see on the shelves

because I bore people.”

is meant for drinking tonight, which is why we don’t

But if you really want to get on his good side, you’ll

make wines to hold on to,” he says, noting that 80

bring him a Left Bank Bordeaux from France.

percent of the wine purchased is wine people will be

If that wine sounds foreign to you, you aren’t alone.

drinking within 24 hours.

It’s a dry wine, and according to Helrich, most people in

Helrich’s wealth of wine knowledge started back in

America—let alone York County—prefer sweet wines.

the late ’90s. He spent the first half of his life working

Of the 20 to 25 wines Allegro carries at one time,

in the furniture industry, brewing beer, working in IT,

Harmony, Punk, and Suite are some of the winery’s

and doing a bit of truck driving. So how did he end up

best sellers, a condition which Helrich attributes to the

with Allegro?

grapes that grow well in this area.

“I ran away from a real job. I didn’t want to work for

“In the beginning, we couldn’t afford for one person

anybody,” he says.

to come and not leave with a bottle of wine,” he states.

In 2001, he and his wife bought the vineyard from

That’s why the 175,000 bottles of wine—more than

Bill Radomsky, an individual who decided to plant the 12

YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: ALLEGRO WINERY

vineyard in Brogue because it was a great place to

“In the beginning, we couldn’t afford for

grow grapes. “And that’s why we’re in Brogue,” Helrich

one person to come and not leave with

says. “We’re not out here because this is a hotbed for wine sales. I would do a lot better if I was selling

a bottle of wine.”

moonshine out here.”

-Carl Helrich

In the almost 20 years Helrich has been in the business of wine, he has watched the wine consumer

“It’s a vineyard planting design unlike anything in

evolve. “When I got started in this business, people

Pennsylvania—like the vineyards out in Napa,” Helrich

would come out to a winery for a tasting and case

says. “They’re [customers] going to be able to taste the

of wine. That was standard practice. Now, people

highest expression of the wines from our soils. We’re

are buying the experience—especially the younger

talking more intense and complex flavors.”

generation.” That experience is partly about an atmosphere where customers can hang out for a few hours and drink a bottle of wine, but it’s more about seeing the connection—the how, who, and where the wine they love is created. More of that experience is yet to come, with several

3475 Sechrist Rd., Brogue, PA 17309 | 717.927.9148

new vineyards at Allegro planted in 2015 and 2016.

/AllegroWines

13 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG

allegrowines.com


ADVOCACY: BREWING UP BUSINESS

LIQUOR LAW MODERNIZATION IMPACTS THE CRAFT BEER INDUSTRY STORY BY DAVID GONZALEZ JR. MANAGER, ADVOCACY YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE Brewing beer is a $5.8 billion industry in Pennsylvania, and with more than 300 licensed breweries in the state, this large industry shows no signs of slowing down. More than a year has passed since significant modernization came to Pennsylvania’s liquor laws through Act 166 in 2016. That modernization has contributed to economic growth and offers an example of how Pennsylvania can put business-friendly policies in place. In September 2016, Collusion Tap Works, a recent new member of the York County Economic Alliance (YCEA), first opened its doors in the Royal Square neighborhood of downtown York. Co-owner Chuck Barnes shared Collusion’s perspective on how Act 166 has impacted the craft beer industry.

Q. Did you face a learning curve getting started in A.

availability of to-go sales for breweries with a G license

the industry with this new law coming into effect?

A.

It has been significant and has allowed for the

The learning curve was twofold. It was and still is

to sell on premises out of tasting rooms and brew pubs.

new for the regulators, Pennsylvania Liquor Control

There is opportunity ahead for how we can expand

Board (PLCB), and for those being regulated. The law is

off-premises sales, and that [opportunity] is a direct

still not where it should be, but that’s part of the process

effect of Act 166.

when laws change.

Q.

Q. Has the clarification that a brewery does not

What’s one problem that has brought a

need a brewery pub license to sell products of

challenge to the industry since the modernization

other licensed breweries, limited wineries, limited

of PA’s liquor laws?

distilleries, and distilleries led to increased sales?

A. A brewer like us who leases a facility is subject to A.

For us, we have enjoyed the ability to sell

interlocking business prohibition—it is against the law

Pennsylvania-produced wine under our LK license for

for a part-owner of the leased building where the beer

our customers.

is manufactured to be a holder of hotel or restaurant liquor licenses. This [prohibition] is to ensure separation

Q. Can we expect an expansion of places where

of the financial and business interests between

people can access your beer?

manufacturers and liquor license holders. This recent

A. We’re regional at this time. We are self-distributing

discovery from the PLCB is a prime example of learning

to surrounding counties. If you’re traveling to Dauphin,

curves that come with figuring out how to regulate a

Lancaster, or Adams counties, you can still enjoy one

new law.

of our quality beers.

Q.

An effect of Act 166 allows for brewed

beverages to be sold by distributors or importing distributors in any amount to customers for off-

105 S. Howard St., York, PA 17401 | 717.848.8400

premise consumption. How has this effect impacted

/Collusiontapworks

the industry? 14

YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG

collusiontapworks.com


YCEA THANKS OUR FALL 2017 INTERNS

Thank You

TO OUR YCEA FALL INTERNS

STORY BY KYLE JOINES MANAGER, SPECIAL EVENTS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ MANAGER, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE

MERCY

YCEA was fortunate to have hosted two outstanding York College interns this past fall. Cody Dooley,

A Legacy of Caring

a senior, and Marlena Schugt, a sophomore, are both political science majors. Cody and Marlena

Misericordia

were incredible additions to the YCEA team. Throughout their internships, they worked on

Nursing & Rehabilitation Center

various projects including Manufacturing Days,

York’s top rated Medicare skilled nursing & rehabilitation center

economic development research, and other events. We are grateful to have had two talented young

A legacy of caring, serving all faiths

professionals join the YCEA team, and we are certain that they both have a bright future ahead of them. INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE YEAR. Our spring internship

www.mn-rc.org 998 S. Russell Street, York, PA 17402 717.755.1964

application is currently available: download it from ycea-pa.org. We encourage college students to apply by Friday, Jan. 19. 15

YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: READY TO EXPAND? LET US HELP.

READY TO EXPAND? LET US HELP. STORY BY KATIE MAHONEY VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING & COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE

The York County Economic Alliance (YCEA) provides

are matching programs which finance portions of

a variety of tools for business growth in the food and

eligible projects.

beverage industry. One of these resources is acting

A significant benefit of working with the YCEA on

as the conduit to assist York County businesses

these programs is the expertise in navigating the

in identifying economic development financing

process of each loan—both boasting long-term fixed

opportunities. YCEA has access to state and federal

loan rates. Two notable success stories are Wyndridge

loan opportunities to provide funding for real estate

Farm in Dallastown and Starlight Diner in Hanover.

expansion and equipment purchases. Both programs,

Wyndridge Farm received a

$2.1 million

Development

SBA 504 loan, which funded part of the cost

Authority – State program) and SBA 504 (Small

of constructing the event venue and production

Business

facility in a 120-year-old barn. Since opening in 2014,

PIDA

(Pennsylvania

Industrial

Administration

Federal

program)

Wyndridge Farm received a

$2.1 MILLION SBA 504 loan

16 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FEATURE: READY TO EXPAND? LET US HELP.

Low-interest loan financing provides for land and building acquisition, construction, and renovation projects that result in the creation or retention of jobs. Available to businesses of any size.

PIDA

Program Summary:

SBA 504

Program Summary: Loans allow small businesses to finance up to 40 percent of their real estate and equipment projects through a fixed rate loan that is subordinated to the bank’s participation in the project.

PIDA-SB

Program Summary: This program is available to small businesses with 100 employees or fewer for real estate and equipment projects.

Wyndridge Farm has rapidly expanded sales, reaching outside of Pennsylvania and positioned itself as an exceptional event venue. Another SBA 504 loan success is Starlight Diner. Since 2010, the diner’s owners had leased the facility located along Pennsylvania Route 94. In 2014, through a partnership with YCEA and the EDC Finance Corporation, the ownership team received approximately

To learn more about programs available to your bar or restaurant, eligibility, and the application process, contact Kenetha Hansen, Director, Economic Development and Financing, YCEA.

$537,000 loan to acquire the

property. The SBA 504 loan’s 20-year fixed rate term has positively impacted the company’s cash flow.

Email Kenetha Hansen at khansen@ycea-pa.org

These two examples are among many successes the YCEA has facilitated. Others include Dunkin’ Donuts in Red Lion, Roosevelt Tavern, and Crimson American Grill.

144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100 York, PA 17401 | 717.848.4000 /YCEAPA

17 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG

ycea-pa.org


MAIN STREET HANOVER EVENTS

2ND SATURDAY SCHEDULE Every 2nd Saturday of the month from 1-5 p.m., Main Street Hanover and downtown business owners invite the community to experience Downtown Hanover! The 2018 themes are listed below.

JANUARY 13

JULY 14

Cabin Fever

Christmas in July

FEBRUARY 10

AUGUST 11

Share the Love

Main Street Mini Golf

MARCH 10

SEPTEMBER 8

Spring onto Main Street

Artsfest

APRIL 14

OCTOBER 13

Green Clean

Fall Sip and Stroll

MAY 12

NOVEMBER 10

Mom’s the Word

Hometown Heroes

JUNE 9

DECEMBER 8

Sunshine, Sip, and Stroll

Cookie Stroll

18 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


MARK YOUR CALENDARS FOR YCEA EVENTS

JAN.

Small Business Roundtable | 3:30–5 p.m. York County Economic Alliance, 144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100, York

JAN.

Business After Hours | 5–7 p.m. PeoplesBank Stadium, 5 Brooks Robinson Way, York

JAN.

Economics Club Breakfast | 7:15–8:30 a.m. “Economics of Innovation,” featuring Madris Tomes of Device Events and Richard Heddleson of Benjamin Franklin Technology Partners | Wyndham Garden York, 2000 Loucks Road, York

FEB.

WBCO Luncheon | 11:30 a.m.–1 p.m. Heritage Hills Golf Resort & Conference Center, Windows Ballroom (next to oak. Restaurant), 2700 Mount Rose Ave., York

FEB.

Small Business Roundtable | 3:30–5 p.m. York County Economic Alliance, 144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100, York

FEB.

Economics Club Breakfast | 7:15–8:30 a.m. “Economic Update” provided by Jim Glassman of JPMorgan Chase Wyndham Garden York, 2000 Loucks Road, York 19 YoCo CONNECT | JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


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The Personalities of YoCo's Food & Beverage Industry: Profiles of Flavor | January/February 2018  

Say “cheers” to York’s thriving hospitality industry. YoCo Connect highlights the industry professionals adding local flavor to York County’...

The Personalities of YoCo's Food & Beverage Industry: Profiles of Flavor | January/February 2018  

Say “cheers” to York’s thriving hospitality industry. YoCo Connect highlights the industry professionals adding local flavor to York County’...

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