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MAY JUNE

LIVING THE GREEN LIFE H o w Yo C o i s C h a n g i n g O u r C a r b o n F o o t p r i n t

› Horn Farm Center › Saving the Earth a Little Bit at a Time › Bridging Suburbs With City


BoardRoom = Bored Employees Team building with the champs! Treat ‘em, thank ‘em, and excite ‘em with the champions of fun at a York Revolution game.

behind-the-scenes tours of PeoplesBank Park • Great seating options, from suite-level views to mixers directly behind home plate • Affordable, all-inclusive turnkey service

To create your unforgettable, customized corporate event at a York Revolution game, call Reed Gunderson at (717) 801-4498 or send an email to rgunderson@yorkrevolution.com.


IN THIS ISSUE FEATURES:

living the green Life H ow Yo C o i s C h a n g i n g O u r C a r b o n Fo o t p r i n t

08 10 12 14 18

05

KEVIN’S MESSAGE: SUSTAINABILITY AS A PHILOSOPHY

HERITAGE RAIL TRAIL: BRIDGING SUBURBS WITH CITY

16

ADVOCACY: ADVOCATING FOR THE SUSQUEHANNA NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA

A NECESSITY, NOT A LUXURY: PARKS PLAY A KEY ROLE IN YORK COUNTY RECREATION

22

YCEA EVENTS MAY/JUNE

SAVING THE EARTH A LITTLE BIT AT A TIME

23

MAIN STREET HANOVER EVENTS ART ALLEY AND ARTSFEST

HORN FARM CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION: AT THE FOREFRONT OF ECOLOGICAL CHANGE IN YORK COUNTY

FOR THE HEALTH OF YORK’S YOUTH

Featured on the front cover: Photography by Eric Forberger, YRK Creative Living the green life at the Horn Farm Center for Agricultural Education: Alyson Earl, Executive Director, and Jonathan Darby, Education Director


CREDITS:

144 Roosevelt Ave. Ste 100 York, PA 17401 P: 717.848.4000

ycea-pa.org

YCEAPA

YCEAPA

YCEAPA

PROUDLY DESIGNED IN YORK, PA, BY

210 York St., Suite 102 York, PA 17403 yrkcreative.com | P: 855.860.5909 Advertising Megan Myers YRK Creative megan@yrkcreative.com P: 717.578.8353

View the digital version of YoCo Connect online at www.ycea-pa.org The opinions expressed in this material are for general information only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced electronically or in print without the express written permission of the publisher. YCEA YoCo Connect is published bimonthly. Copyright Š 2018 York County Economic Alliance. All rights reserved. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, in whole or in part, without the specific written permission of the York County Economic Alliance.


Sustainability as a Philosophy BY KEVIN J. SCHREIBER PRESIDENT & CEO, YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE Society is becoming increasingly aware of the legacy we

and emits 30 percent less carbon than other fossil fuels—

leave behind, including the carbon footprint of today that

keeping our air cleaner and our economy thriving. Similarly,

impacts future generations. From cleaner gas to farm-to-

credit is owed to Rabbit Transit, along with many businesses

table movements, the sustainable industry is supporting

and municipalities, which has shifted fleets over time to

over 2 million workers in the United States. Sustainability as

more energy-efficient, clean fuel alternatives.

a philosophy is becoming ever more conscious in the minds

That clean air and sustainable decision making permeates

of businesses, community, and citizens.

other industries, including agriculture. There is very little

LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)

that is much “greener” than having an apple from Brown’s

designations are predicted to directly contribute $29.8

Orchards & Farm Market on your kitchen table. Consumers

billion to the GDP by 2018. In recent years, York County

continue to adapt their tastes to palates that favor farm

has seen LEED certifications designated at properties

to table and the purchasing of fresh, local options. The

such as Warehaus (formerly LSC Design), the recipient of a

increased “buy fresh” culture means that our County’s

Platinum LEED designation in 2014, as well as Think Loud

homegrown economy—from agriculture to craft brewing—

Development, the recipient of a Silver LEED certification in

is poised for growth. That growth is incredibly significant as

2016 for renovations at 210 York Street.

local businesses return approximately 52 percent of their

The George Street Commons housing development

revenue to the local economy, compared to approximately

was York’s first residential development to receive LEED

14 percent for the national chain retailers.

certification. The mixed-use infill in York’s Central Business

York County restaurants—certainly not limited to Wyndridge

District was part of a public-private partnership between the

Farm, Revival Social Club, ROOST Uncommon Kitchen, the

YMCA and the Partnership for Income Restricted Housing

Roosevelt Tavern, or John Wright (the list is extensive!)—

Leadership. By improving the health of the surrounding

have embraced local agricultural initiatives. Farm to Freezer

community with accomplished market acceptance, George

sessions and the Farm to City Dinner have grown in popularity

Street Commons received an Award for Excellence at the

in our community. This increased popularity is a delicious

Urban Land Institute Philadelphia Conference.

example of York County’s own “sustainable industry.”

More important than receipt of LEED designations,

As the weather warms up, be sure to mark your calendar

construction is becoming more efficient and ever aware of

to check out events such as Hanover’s Sip & Stroll. Hit

development procedures and materials that will result in

the Rail Trail for a ride, and stop by Steam Into History—

back-end energy savings. Necessity is certainly the mother

the locomotive still burns coal, but what the heck! Take a

of innovation.

springtime tour of farmers markets throughout YoCo, or

York-based Shipley Energy has taken the sustainable

enjoy any number of our County’s impressive parks. Let’s

industry by storm. One year ago, the company announced

give a shout-out to our York County Parks which celebrate

the opening of York County’s first public compressed natural

their 50th anniversary this year.

gas (CNG) fueling station. The demand for these stations

York is rich in opportunity to enjoy our environment and

could increase, driven by the lower fuel and operating costs

what she offers back to us!

in combination with less impact on the environment. The average CNG price of gas is much less volatile than diesel 05 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


WellPrepared to treat the most complex matters of the heart.

WellSpan is proud to welcome cardiovascular surgeon Giovanni Ciuffo, MD, now providing advanced specialty heart care at WellSpan York Hospital If your heart’s health is standing in the way of reaching your goals, trust the experts at WellSpan Heart & Vascular. Highly respected for his skills in minimally invasive treatment and “bloodless” heart surgery, Dr. Ciuffo joins Dr. Mark Burlingame at WellSpan York Hospital in providing the highest level of surgical treatment for complex cardiac conditions. Dr. Ciuffo and Dr. Burlingame work together with a team of highly skilled cardiologists and other clinicians to offer the members of our community advanced diagnostic and treatment options, including leading-edge technology and

Giovanni Ciuffo, MD Cardiovascular Surgeon

therapeutics and access to national research trials. At WellSpan, we believe that advanced specialty care for complex conditions should be close to home. That’s the WellSpan Way. And, we think, a better way.

Get to know Dr. Ciuffo at WellSpan.org/Ciuffo


living the green Life H o w Yo C o i s C h a n g i n g O u r C a r b o n Fo o t p r i n t

Photo Courtesy of Seth Nenstiel

Horn Farm Center for Agricultural Education: At the forefront of ecological change in York County

Heritage Rail Trail:

Bridging suburbs with city

A Necessity, Not a Luxury:

Parks play a key role in York County recreation

Saving the Earth a Little Bit at a Time:

A Q&A with Troy Yerger, Continental Paper Grading 07 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


Horn Farm Center For Agricultural Education: At t h e Fo ref ro nt of Eco l o g i c a l C h a n g e i n Yo r k C o u nt y

STORY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ MANAGER, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY ERIC FORBERGER FOR YRK CREATIVE & SETH NENSTIEL

In a time of changing weather patterns and increasing fears that consumers don’t know how their food is grown and produced, the Horn Farm Center for Agricultural Education provides reassurance. 08 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


HORN FARM CENTER

“I think this gives people hope that there’s another way that works and can provide for all of us moving into the future,”

“It was a citizen action,” Earl says. “They saw something that was happening to a public land, so they organized and went through the procedures to protest and have something different happen.”

says Alyson Earl, executive director. “People appreciate

Last year, the York County Commissioners decided to

the Horn Farm Center for a number of reasons. They can

permanently preserve the Horn Farm with a conservation

come to learn how to cook and explore the world of wild

easement through the Farm and Natural Lands Trust,

edibles. We have 102 community garden plots that we

and extend their land lease term to 99 years, solidifying

rent each year, so a lot of people are involved because

the value of the Farm to the York County community

they grow their own food here.”

in perpetuity.

The Horn Farm Center also has a farming internship

“The core of our mission is to address issues of degraded

program which grows food for the community and

lands that have been farmed in ways that have taken away

distributes that food through its CSA (community-

the health of the soil and surrounding woodlands, and to

supported agriculture). This approach goes hand in

show a way of farming that improves the health of the soil

hand with the farm business incubator, which addresses

and the surrounding ecosystems,” Earl says.

the need to train new farmers. With the average age of farmers in this country being older than 60, the Horn Farm Center is addressing a crucial need for sustainable living. Last year, the Horn Farm Center had more than 50 classes and workshops on topics covering cooking, foraging, ecological design, farming and gardening, and wilderness skills. “We aren’t organically certified, but we have gone beyond organic in a lot of our practices to make sure we are leaving the soil and woods in a better condition than the way we found it,” says Earl. “I think we’re really at the forefront of ecological change and changing the way we produce food for ourselves—producing it locally and producing it in a way that benefits the air, land, and water we depend on.” The 186-acre property was donated to the county in 1981, but the Horn Farm Center for Agricultural Education exists today because of a group of concerned citizens who, in 2000, petitioned to save the property from industrial development.

4945 Horn Rd., York, PA 17406 | 717.757.6441 /hornfarmcenter

Photo Courtesy of Seth Nenstiel

hornfarmcenter.org 09 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


HERITAGE RAIL TRAIL: BRIDGING SUBURBS WITH CITY

STORY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ MANAGER, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE

TIM MILLER CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER OF DOWNTOWN INC

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RANDY FLAUM

The York County Heritage Rail Trail is a main connector leading into Downtown York and has been since 1979. Now it’s getting a $1.5 million upgrade thanks to grants and local donations. The plan is to widen, repave, and add storm water management features to the Rail Trail.

10 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


HERITAGE RAIL TRAIL

The following updates to the Rail Trail will begin in the spring of 2019: • Construction of a 12-foot-wide, two-way multimodal traffic path approximately 1,900 feet in length along the Codorus Creek from West Philadelphia Street to North George Street • The use of pervious pavement for the path will create a linear storm water filter to reduce nutrient loads from urban runoff that could make their way from the Codorus Creek and, eventually, via the Susquehanna River to the Chesapeake Bay • Installation of LED lighting to provide a safer and more inviting environment throughout the evening hours (this lighting will be energy efficient and easily maintained) • Installation of safety, accessibility, and pedestrian-bicycle signals and traffic-calming improvements to trail crossings at West Philadelphia, North Beaver, and North George streets • Installation of an at-grade railroad crossing with signals and possible gates on the York Rail Line • Retrofit North George Street (Bicycle PA Route J) with shared lane markings and signage to Hamilton Avenue to provide alternate facilities for bicyclists • Relocation of the traffic signal with added pedestrian and bicycle-friendly features at Hamilton Avenue (formerly at Jefferson Avenue) to facilitate safe crossing of the trail on North George Street’s busy four lanes

2 E. Market St., York, PA 17401 | 717.849.2231 /DowntownYorkPa

downtownyorkpa.com

11 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


A NECESSITY, NOT A LUXURY: PARKS PLAY A KEY ROLE IN YORK COUNTY RECREATION STORY BY SAMANTHA GALVEZ MANAGER, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY YORK COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PARKS & RECREATION

12 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


YORK COUNTY PARKS

“Parks and recreation are no longer a luxury. It’s a

“Last year, there were 35,000 hours of volunteer

necessity for the community,” says Tammy Klunk,

service, including park ambassadors, cleaning up

executive director of York County Department of

the parks and leading workshops,” Klunk says. “That’s

Parks & Recreation.

more than 15 full-time employees.”

Whether your interest is biking, fishing, horseback

And it’s necessary. Last year, more than 1.4 million

riding, checking out nature, or hiking, the York County

people visited the county’s 11 parks. Park employees

Department of Parks & Recreation has something

are expecting that number to increase as they

for you.

celebrate the 50th anniversary of these parks with new programs and year-long events.

“We believe that it’s very important that people have places close to home where they can stay

The Department of Parks & Recreation is encouraging

fit, rejuvenate, and can get away and get back into

people to visit all parks this year and participate in

nature,” Klunk says.

special projects which will include tree planting, habitat improvements, and trail building, followed by

The 11 parks throughout York County make up a

a banquet to be held in mid-October.

combined 4,300 acres—impressive, Klunk admits, for the department. But what’s more impressive are the

“There’s so much to do,” Klunk says. “We’re never

volunteers who help keep these parks maintained.

satisfied. We just want to continue to serve an important need in our community.”

400 Mundis Race Rd., York, PA 17406 | 717.840.7440 /YorkCountyParks

yorkcountypa.gov/parks-recreation.html 13 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


SAVING THE EARTH A LITTLE BIT AT A TIME A Q & A W I T H T R OY Y E R G E R , YO R K P L A N T M A N AG E R , C O N T I N E N TA L PA P E R G RA D I N G STORY BY KATIE MAHONEY VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY BY CONTINENTAL PAPER GRADING

Founded in the early 20th century, Continental Paper Grading (CPG) serves as one of the largest independent waste paper brokers in the United States and Canada. From waste paper buying and selling to services covering shredding, baling, roll cutting, warehousing, and financing, CPG delivers solutions to address global paper needs. YoCo Connect spoke with CPG’s York plant manager Troy Yerger about the company’s role in supporting environmental sustainability locally.

14 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


CONTINENTAL PAPER GRADING

Q. How does Continental Paper Grading support green initiatives? A. Since 1919, we have provided recycling options for waste paper, post-industrial and post-consumer plastics, metals, and other products. Q. How has the York community adapted to being more planet-conscious? A. People reach out all the time. The call we often receive is “I don’t want to throw this away. Can you help?” The environment is in everyone’s thoughts right now, and recycling has become a “popular” thing over the years. It’s been great to see people thinking about the green effect now more than ever, both businesses and households. One of our most popular events is the community Shredding Event we hold with the York County Economic Alliance’s (YCEA) help. We partner with AARP, and in the past, we have welcomed over 600 families at some of these events. We try to do these events each April, following Tax Day, to help individuals recycle paperwork no longer needed and ensure they are protected from identity theft or fraud. The volume of cars that arrive, ready to recycle, shows how top of mind recycling is for our community. Q. What is the impact to York County both every day and in the long term? A. In the short term, keeping these recycling items out of landfills, as well as opening our facility for the shredding event, allows people a free way to recycle. In the long term, we are saving the earth a little bit at a time. Saving trees means cleaner oxygen for our environment, and it really starts with that aspect. Q. What can we expect from CPG in the future? A. We’d love to expand our footprint and facility in York County when the time is right. It’s been very successful for us. We are in York to stay; this is our home and we are proud to be here for good. Of course, any expansion of our recycling efforts to reach out even farther into the United States would be ideal. We also are looking forward to connecting with the YCEA membership base to lend our recycling services, share options, and see if we can help them in any way.

3350 Concord Rd., York, PA 17402 | 717.885.7881 cpgco.com 13 15 CHAMBER YoCo CONNECT CONNECT | SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG 2017 | YCEA-PA.ORG


ADVOCATING FOR THE SUSQUEHANNA NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA

STORY BY DAVID GONZALEZ JR. MANAGER, ADVOCACY YORK COUNTY ECONOMIC ALLIANCE PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SUSQUEHANNA NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA

16 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


SUSQUEHANNA NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA

Since 2008, Susquehanna Heritage and a coalition of local governments, community organizations, and businesses from both Lancaster and York counties have lobbied the U.S. Congress to approve S. 400, sponsored by Senator Bob Casey, and H.R. 2991, sponsored by U.S. Rep. Lloyd Smucker (R-PA 16th District) and U.S. Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA 4th District). The bills would designate Lancaster and York counties as the Susquehanna National Heritage Area. Q. What would the designation mean to the region? A. The designation would include both Lancaster and York counties as the Susquehanna National Heritage Area, bringing new National Park Service technical support, funding, and branding to our region. National Heritage Areas (NHAs) can leverage the National Park Service brand to attract heritage and outdoor travelers. Q. How many National Heritage Areas exist? A. Currently, 49 NHAs help preserve, promote, and celebrate local heritage, culture, and natural resources for the benefit of current and future generations. NHAs include the Ohio & Erie Canalway, Niagara Falls, and Pittsburgh’s Rivers of Steel. Q. Is there an economic benefit to National Heritage Areas? A. In short, yes. NHAs work with communities to collaborate, plan, and implement programs that strengthen community identity, build economic vitality, and attract tourism. A 2012 study showed that NHAs contribute $12.9 billion annually to the national economy, support 148,000 jobs, and generate $1.2 billion in federal taxes. The Susquehanna NHA comes at a perfect time, when the river towns of Columbia, Marietta, and Wrightsville are building efforts to attract development and capitalize on the great resource that is the Susquehanna River. The NHA effort is ongoing, and the York County Economic Alliance is proud to support designation of our region as the Susquehanna National Heritage Area. Susquehanna Heritage needs your help to petition your U.S. representatives and senators to support and advance H.R. 2991 and S. 400 through Congress. To get involved, visit susquehannaheritage.org/about-us or call Susquehanna Heritage at 717.252.0229. With your efforts, we can get one step closer to designating our region as America’s 50th National Heritage Area. Mark Platts, president of Susquehanna Heritage, contributed to this report.

1706 Long Level Rd., Wrightsville, PA 17368 | 717.252.0229 /SusquehannaHeritageArea

Susquehannaheritage.org 17

YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


FOR THE HEALTH OF YORK’S YOUTH

STORY BY MICHAEL VYSKOCIL YRK CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY BY YRK CREATIVE

The hands destined to create, the minds poised to innovate, the voices eager to share big ideas that could transform the future. York County’s youth are our community’s future, and it’s within this community that you’ll find several organizations focused on youth health advocacy and education.

BYRNES HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER: CONNECTING LEARNING AND HEALTHY LIVING With its mission to educate and inspire people to make

Health educators from the Byrnes Health Education

healthy choices, the Byrnes Health Education Center

Center regularly travel to schools throughout York

has been a leader for youth health in York County. Its

County bringing the center’s programs to school students

youth health education curriculum focuses on five key

from kindergarteners to high school seniors. Through a

areas: nutrition and fitness, substance abuse, human

partnership with the York Hospital Auxiliary, the center

growth and development, general health, and character

welcomes third-grade students from 17 schools across

education and behavioral health.

York County to participate in its annual Children’s Wellness Days that give children the encouragement to make

The center’s interactive programs bring this curriculum

healthy choices.

to life for children of all ages. Five teaching theaters cover topics such as disease and violence prevention, drug education, general health, human growth and development, nutrition and fitness, and forensic-based science activities that uncover the mysteries of the human

515 S. George St. York, PA 17401 | 717.848.3064

body’s systems.

/ByrnesHEC

18 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG

byrneshec.org


UNITED WAY OF YORK COUNTY: IMPROVING THE LIVES OF YOUTH

Since 2012, the United Way of York County has focused considerable attention and $2.5 million in funding on programming efforts focused on behavioral and physical health. During that time, more than 3,000 youth and adults received education about the importance of healthy eating habits. Eighty-five percent of over 2,600 youth and adults in behavioral health and intellectual disabilities programs reached goals for improving behavioral health. These successes are part of the United Way of York County’s continued work to achieve its mission of uniting resources to create a positive, lasting impact on people’s lives, including the youngest members of the community. The United Way provides financial support for 28 programs designed to help young mothers and their newborns and youth to stay active and eat healthy. Through the United Way’s Community Fund, nonprofit organizations such as the Children’s Aid Society, Family First Health, Leg Up Farm, the York County Children’s Advocacy Center, and the YWCA Hanover and York have received collectively more than $200,000 for programs ranging from a crisis nursery to pediatric outpatient therapy.

800 E. King St. York, PA 17401 | 717.843.0957

/UnitedWayofYorkCounty

unitedway-york.org

YORK COUNTY YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH ALLIANCE: #TSEH (THE SILENCE ENDS HERE) The York County Youth Mental Health Alliance began in April 2016 by a group of school social workers, school counselors, and school psychologists from across 17 school districts throughout York County. The mission of this student-led initiative is to lift up the voices of York County’s youth on issues impacting mental health. With its hashtag, #TSEH (The Silence Ends Here), the alliance strives to overcome the stigma of and call attention to mental health and York County’s youth. In early 2017, the alliance organized a town hall meeting with about 80 students who represented every school district in York County. The students met with York County officials and Pennsylvania state agency leaders and engaged them in conversations about the mental health issues affecting the county’s youth, such as social media and cyberbullying, drug addition, and stress. Last May, the alliance hosted a “Light Up the Night” event at Northeastern High School featuring a mental health fair and 1-mile fun run that attracted community support from more than 700 people. This year’s “Light Up the Night” will take place on Saturday, May 12, at Northeastern Middle School, 4855 Board Rd., Mount Wolf. York County Youth Mental Health Alliance /thesilenceends 19 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


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You're Invited to our Grand Re-Opening!

Wednesday, May 30, 2018 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM held at Misericordia Nursing & Rehabilitation Center 998 S. Russell Street | York, PA 17402 Join us for Misericordia’s grand re-opening showcasing our extensive renovations as we celebrate 75 years serving the York community. Enjoy light hors d’oeuvres, facility tours, a building blessing with Bishop Ronald W. Gainer, and a meet and greet with Misericordia staff!

Kindly respond by May 21st to: rsvp@mn-rc.org


MAY

Business After Hours sponsored by Doceo Office Solutions | 5–7 p.m. Bell Socialization at Re-Source York, 161 E. Ninth Ave., York

MAY

Spring Legislative Luncheon | 11:30 a.m.–2 p.m. Out Door Country Club, 1157 Detwiler Dr., York

15 17

Small Business Roundtable | 3:30–5 p.m. York County Economic Alliance, YCEA Callahan Conference Room, 144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100, York MAY

30 JUNE

01 JUNE

06 JUNE

07

Economics Club Breakfast - Food and Beverage Industry Update presented by McNees Wallace | 7:15–8:30 a.m. Wyndham Garden York, 2000 Loucks Road, York YCEA 30th Anniversary Golf Outing sponsored by CORE Design Group | 9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Briarwood Golf Club, 4775 W. Market St., York Small Business Roundtable | 8–9:30 a.m. York County Economic Alliance, YCEA Board Room, 144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100, York Member Orientation | 8–9:30 a.m. York County Economic Alliance, YCEA Board Room, 144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100, York 22 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


JUNE

Small Business Roundtable | 3:30–5 p.m. York County Economic Alliance, YCEA Callahan Conference Room, 144 Roosevelt Ave., Ste 100, York

JUNE

Economics Club Breakfast - Transportation Update | 7:15–8:30 a.m. Wyndham Garden York, 2000 Loucks Road, York

21 27

UPCOMING EVENTS MAIN STREET HANOVER LAUNCHES ART ALLEY Main Street Hanover’s public art committee, Art Alley, is excited to announce its first public art program— a pretzel sculpture series. With the help of Hanover High School students and teachers and Riley Welding, Art Alley created a pretzel design that will be decorated by local artists and go up for display in downtown Hanover to represent the community. Pretzels highlight the rich snack food history of Hanover, and the shape of the pretzel creates an interactive sculpture that people can enjoy seeing around the Art Alley. This downtown public art initiative seeks to build an environment where artists—from students and amateurs to professionals—feel welcome and encouraged to be engaged with the downtown improvement efforts. Art Alley is where artists and economic development collide.

CHALK IT UP JOINS ARTSFEST ArtsFest is a new event for Main Street Hanover this year. While still in the planning phase, we at Main Street Hanover know for certain it will include a Chalk It Up event, live art, artists’ vendor booths, and live music throughout the day in downtown Hanover. Stay tuned for more details.

23 YoCo CONNECT | MAY/JUNE 2018 | YCEA-PA.ORG


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Living The Green Life | May/June 2018  

In this issue learn how YoCo is changing our carbon footprint

Living The Green Life | May/June 2018  

In this issue learn how YoCo is changing our carbon footprint

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