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YMCA NSW

COMMUNITY SERVICES

OUTCOMES REPORT 2018


CONTENTS WHY WE HERE 3 ARE COOMA YOUTH 4 HUB TAREE YOUTH 6 HUB 8 STREETGYM 10 TEEN GYM YOUTH 12 PARLIAMENT BREAKFAST 14 CLUB SKATE PARK 16 LEAGUES (SPL) CHILD AND 18 FAMILY AFFINITY 20 NETWORK RECONCILIATION 22 ACTION PLAN (RAP) 24 SWIMABILITY 26 BRIGHTSIDE COMMUNITY VISITORS 28 SCHEME (CVS)


COMMUNITY SERVICES OUTCOMES REPORT WHY MEASURE OUTCOMES? The Community Services Team has embedded an outcomes framework in every program we deliver and engages a quality improvement process that focuses on numbers, quality and, most importantly, outcomes for the customer. It is imperative that we measure the impact of our programs to ensure our customers are better off and finite resources are being used well. Results Based Accountability (RBA) is an outcomes based quality improvement framework that supports a disciplined approach to making a difference in programs and communities. The purpose of using an outcomes framework is to know how we are doing so we can continually improve our impact. There are three key questions that need to be asked to measure the effectiveness of a program: How much did we do? How well did we do it? Is anybody better off? This report will answer these three key questions for each of our community programs and provide data, stories, a list of partners and next steps. All stories documented are aligned to the data, developed in consultation with key partners and provides critical context and creates a complete picture. The Community Services Team is proud of our achievement in embedding outcomes measurement in all we do. We ensure our programs are of high quality and exceedingly focused on positive outcomes for young people and communities. Overall, some great outcomes have been achieved and we are just getting started. Without the support of all areas of YMCA NSW businesses, this report and more importantly the impact occurring for many young people and communities couldn’t happen. Thank you. Regards,

Executive Leader Community Services Louisa Mckay

WHY WE ARE HERE

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YOUTH: Cooma Youth Hub

COOMA YOUTH HUB IS A YOUTH-LED DROP-IN SERVICE IN SOUTHERN NSW SUPPORTING YOUNG PEOPLE AGED 12 TO 24 THROUGH A RANGE OF PROGRAMS AND SERVICES. The Cooma Youth Hub offers support and referral services for young people aged 12 to 24. It creates recreational, educational and self-developmental opportunities for young people across the region. Three youth workers are based at The Hub to provide support and assistance for young people: Snowy Monaro Regional Council Youth Development Officer

I t’s a great option for teens during school holidays and it keeps them entertained.

YMCA Youth Project Coordinator Grand Pacific Health Youth Health Worker

SOCIAL INDICATOR 33.5% OF SCHOOL STUDENTS REPORT NOT HAVING A STRONG SENSE OF WELLBEING

425 attendances at the Cooma Youth Hub drop in service, 736 attendances across school holiday activities 5 wellbeing programs delivered in partnership with local high school, with 211 attendances 5 wellbeing programs delivered directly at the Youth Hub, with 35 attendances 79% who say they are developing skills that will help them now and in the future at Youth Hub 81% who say they have positive connections with others as a result of Youth Hub meetings or activities

4

YOUTH


63%

83%

96%

OF YOUNG PEOPLE

OF COMMUNITY PARTNERS BELIEVE COOMA YOUTH HUB HAS A POSITIVE IMPACT

ENJOY GOING TO

YOUTH HUB MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES

OF YOUNG PEOPLE FEEL AN INCREASE IN THEIR SELFCONFIDENCE

BEHIND THE DATA School holiday activities are more fun for young people to attend rather than after school drop in. School holiday activities numbers may have increased due to young people having input into what is run, parents liking what we have to offer and knowing where their teen is, and getting better at promoting the program in the community.

Drop in numbers may have declined as young people age and move on, while the younger ones are testing the water. An increase in wellbeing programs delivered in school is assisting more young people. Outcome based surveys have been embedded into all wellbeing programs over the

NEXT STEPS Implement three new wellbeing programs for young people including Streetgym pilot program Review services and activities provided by the Cooma Youth Hub Implement the new Targeted Early Intervention reform required by FACS Establish Cooma Youth Aboriginal Leadership Group Continue to improve support and assistance to young people in a timely manner

past 12 months. This is first time that client outcome data has been captured for a full 12 months. Performance measures changed throughout the past 12 months, making it difficult for a turn the curve analysis of outcomes to be completed.

PARTNERS Snowy Monaro Regional Council – Youth & Community Services

Barnardos – Adolescent and Family Program

Grand Pacific Health – Youth Health & Aboriginal Health team

Monaro Family Support Services

Monaro Community Access Service Mission Australia – Happy, Healthy Minds Program & Specialist Homelessness Service

Monaro High School

Juvenile Justice – Queanbeyan & Bega Family & Community Services NSW Tenant Participation Resource Service

COOMA YOUTH HUB

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YOUTH: Taree Youth Hub A PREVENTION PROGRAM PROVIDING YOUNG PEOPLE OPPORTUNITIES TO CREATE PROGRAMS, EVENTS AND ACTIVITIES IN THEIR LOCAL COMMUNITIES. Developed by young people, community leaders and educators, Youth Hubs provide a unique environment to establish relationships, participate in goal setting and increase connection to their community. The aim is to improve young people’s physical, mental and social wellbeing by increasing their confidence, instilling a sense of purpose and developing leadership skills. YMCA Youth Hub consists of Young Leaders aged 13 to 18 who plan and run activities and events for other young people. They are supported by Volunteer Facilitators aged 19 to 25 years.

SOCIAL INDICATOR 33.5% OF SCHOOL STUDENTS REPORT NOT HAVING A STRONG SENSE OF WELLBEING

12 REGULAR

100% of young leaders

MEMBERS

OF THE YOUNG LEADERS’ TEAM

12

MEETINGS HELD

enjoy attending youth hub activities

100% of young people

feel their contribution is valued

FROM JANUARY TO JUNE 2018

106 HOURS

VOLUNTEERED

BY YOUNG PEOPLE SINCE JANUARY 2018

4

YOUTH-LED EVENTS

185

YOUNG PEOPLE ATTENDED EVENTS

SINCE JANUARY 2018

6

FOUR EVENTS SINCE MARCH

YOUTH

87.5% of young leaders

are developing skills for their future

75% of young people

have made positive connections with other people

62.5% of young people

have developed leadership skills


BEHIND THE DATA A group of five young leaders began meeting following three orientation sessions in November - December 2017. This group was simultaneously attending Taree Council Young Leaders Group – a program with a similar scope. As a result, in May 2018, YMCA and Mid Coast Council Young Leaders groups came together to hold combined meetings every second Wednesday. After initial challenges of working together, we are developing foundational processes. Support for the young people is being increased to build their skills and experience. They are trialling new ideas with mixed results. The initial Friday Fun Night at the Taree YMCA was well attended, with the local PCYC bringing over 40 young people through their pick-up bus service. Two community sports afternoons at Forster and Taree YMCA had lower attendance in contrast to a well-attended skate league in Foster. Access to transport and length of engagement seemed to be key determinants of event participation.

NEXT STEPS

I like being part of a functioning and cooperative team and tackling real issues.

PARTNERS

Facilitate a monthly youth-led event in the local community Source funding and begin a Streetgym program in the community Increase numbers and participation in the young leaders group through partner connections and promotion at youth events Work with the MidCoast Youth Strategic planning group, including FaCS and Prime Minister and Cabinet’s Aboriginal Affairs team, to identify youth priorities for the community Finalise and implement a training program for young leaders

MidCoast Council Taree PCYC Rotary Club Manning Mental Health Biripi Aboriginal Medical Centre

TAREE YOUTH HUB

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YOUTH: Streetgym STREETGYM IS A PREVENTION PROGRAM ENGAGING AT-RISK YOUNG PEOPLE IN SAFE, INCLUSIVE AND FUN GAMES, SPORT AND ACTIVITIES YMCA NSW runs Streetgym at Sturt Park, Telopea one afternoon per week during school term for young people aged 12 to 18. Free of cost to participants, it provides a safe, inclusive and positive environment for young people to gather and connect.

Proudly supported by:

Key community services like mental health support, youth workers, police liaison officers and more are available and a healthy afternoon tea is provided.

SOCIAL INDICATOR ONE IN FIVE CHILDREN IN NSW IS OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE ONE IN SEVEN YOUNG AUSTRALIANS EXPERIENCE A MENTAL HEALTH CONDITION

Participation has gone up significantly across the term There has been a decline in percentage of participants who report learning something about health and wellbeing and percentage of participants who report being made aware of other services available to them

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YOUTH


100%

SAID THEY FELT SAFER IN STURT

I came to Streetgym because it was a fun opportunity after school instead of just sitting at home.

PARK AS A RESULT

OF STREETGYM BEHIND THE DATA

The increase in participation may have impacted on our ability to deliver other outcomes. The decline in percentage of participants who report learning something may be due to: Greater focus was on the delivery of the program as a result of the increase in participation numbers.

Greater learning occurred when the participants were new to the program in term 4, 2017

NEXT STEPS Explore what other areas Streetgym is needed and leverage this to provide opportunities for young people in the local area Explore the sector landscape to find out the gaps for young people and develop new partnerships to enhance the program

Confounding effects of the people administering the survey. In the first instance the survey was administered by Lynne (someone they did not know previously) whereas in the second instance it was by Laura (someone they knew well)

PARTNERS Dundas Neighbourhood Centre

Headspace Parramatta

Hume Housing

Youth Liaison Officer Cumberland Police Area Command

Parramatta Active Van Hope Connect

STREETGYM

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YOUTH: Teen Gym TEEN GYM IS A FUN AND FRIENDLY FITNESS PROGRAM JUST FOR 11 TO 15 YEAR OLDS, TEACHING TEENAGERS HOW TO DEVELOP POSITIVE EXERCISE AND HEALTHY HABITS FOR LIFE WHILST BOOSTING SELF-CONFIDENCE AND FRIENDSHIPS

SOCIAL INDICATORS ONLY SIX OUT OF 10 CHILDREN AGED BETWEEN FIVE AND 14 YEARS PARTICIPATE IN SPORT OUTSIDE OF SCHOOL, ACCORDING TO THE AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS. 25 PER CENT OF AUSTRALIAN CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS AGED FIVE TO 17 YEARS ARE OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE, INDICATING THAT WE NEED TO FOSTER A MORE SPORTS-MINDED CULTURE THAT ENCOURAGES CHILDREN TO BE PHYSICALLY ACTIVE (THE AUSTRALIAN HEALTH SURVEY, APRIL 2012) PEOPLE WHO ARE ACTIVE DRAMATICALLY REDUCE THEIR RISK OF MANY DISEASES, INCLUDING HEART DISEASE AND OSTEOPOROSIS. REGULAR EXERCISE IS ALSO KNOWN TO REDUCE THE RISK OF EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS SUCH AS ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION. HABITS ARE ESTABLISHED EARLY IN LIFE AND EVIDENCE SUGGESTS THAT PHYSICALLY ACTIVE CHILDREN ARE MORE LIKELY TO MATURE INTO PHYSICALLY ACTIVE ADULTS.

10

YOUTH


OF YOUNG PEOPLE SAID THAT THEIR 93% CONFIDENCE HAS INCREASED

93% OF YOUNG PEOPLE

HAVE INCREASED THEIR AMOUNT OF EXERCISE

63%

OF YOUNG PEOPLE OR FAMILY MEMBERS HAVE ENGAGED IN OTHER YMCA ACTIVITIES

48%

54%

LEARNED ABOUT HEALTHY EATING

ATTEND AT MINIMUM ONCE PER WEEK

BEHIND THE DATA Teen Gym is run by qualified fitness trainers with verified Working with Children checks at nine of our recreational centres. Offering 42 sessions per week, there are currently 374 Teen Gym members. Many of these teenagers joined Teen Gym after participating in another YMCA program such as swimming lessons and squads, Teen Boot Camp or the Girls Make Your Move campaign. Small class sizes and good induction on the gym floor have resulted in excellent outcomes for participants. Teen Gym could be improved by: Providing a consistent and standard program structure. Currently some centres offer a dedicated class, access to the gym only or a combination of the two. Some provide nutrition education (to participants and parents) and others don’t. Some centres have also changed the name of the program.

Providing training and resources to staff. Some staff struggle in engaging and building rapport with teenagers, especially the younger ones. Addressing staff capacity could increase the times Teen Gym is scheduled.

Standardizing membership processing in our point of sale software Links to enable proper report generation and online registration. Promoting the program through schools and other relevant channels.

NEXT STEPS Train and upskill staff utilizing in house expertise such as Camping staff Standardise the program across all YMCA centres Standardise the membership process Develop partners for the program Promote the program through many channels and ensure that the social elements of the program – making friends – is highlighted

TEEN GYM

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YOUTH: YMCA NSW Youth Parliament YOUTH PARLIAMENT NURTURES THE POTENTIAL OF YOUNG PEOPLE TO LEAD, LEARN AND CONNECT TO THEIR COMMUNITY AND BE ADVOCATES FOR CAUSES THEY ARE PASSIONATE ABOUT.

YP took me out of my sheltered community and broadened my horizons. It would be a great privilege to come back.

Youth Parliament is an empowerment and advocacy program that provides a platform for young people in years 10, 11 and 12 or equivalent to have their voices heard through legislative debate and decision making. Every participant’s potential to lead, learn and connect is nurtured through parliamentary education, community engagement, confidence building and teamwork. They develop their skills in creating social impact and positive change in a safe and supportive environment.

SOCIAL INDICATOR 19.8% OF AUSTRALIAN YOUNG PEOPLE AGED 18-24 YEARS FEEL ABLE TO HAVE A SAY WITHIN THE COMMUNITY ON IMPORTANT ISSUES ALL OR MOST OF THE TIME – PROPORTION OF YOUNG PEOPLE WHO FEEL THEY ARE ABLE TO HAVE A SAY

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YOUTH


OVER

90%

OF PARTICIPANTS PROVIDED FEEDBACK UP FROM BELOW 50% LAST YEAR

MORE THAN

50%

OF PARTICIPANTS WERE NEW TO THE PROGRAM

BEHIND THE DATA This year’s Youth Parliament participants were aged 13 to 16+ years; previous years had separate programs for the two age groups: 13 to 15 years − Junior Parliament 16+ years − Youth Parliament

A number of parents and/or guardians have shared that the program had a positive impact on their child. The positive results this year highlights the beneficial changes in the program and structure of the Taskforce.

NEXT STEPS Determine whether to incorporate more formal support for young people postprogram to continue to develop their advocacy and community engagement skills Improve representation and diversity among participant body Increase education and leadership opportunities for volunteers in the YMCA

PARTNERS Volunteers

Community Organisation

NSW Parliament House

Advocacy bodies

NSW Government House

YMCA teams

Members of Parliament

External media

YOUTH PARLIAMENT

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YOUTH: Breakfast Club BREAKFAST CLUB PROVIDES A HEALTHY BREAKFAST FOR STUDENTS IN THE GOROKAN COMMUNITY WHO MAY OTHERWISE ARRIVE AT SCHOOL HUNGRY. Established in 2010, the Breakfast Club operates out of Lake Haven Recreation Centre four mornings of every school week. The program supports local families by offering a safe space for young people to eat a free breakfast and participate in a range of sporting activities. Breakfast and sports activities are offered free of cost providing a healthy start to the day. The young people are also encouraged to volunteer their time in the preparation of breakfast, developing leadership skills and a sense of belonging.

We love coming for breakfast. We love the hot chocolate. We love it all!

SOCIAL INDICATOR ONE IN FIVE CHILDREN HAVE GONE HUNGRY AT SOME STAGE IN THE PAST YEAR. OF THOSE, 18% GO TO SCHOOL WITHOUT EATING BREAKFAST AT LEAST ONCE A WEEK

Three students in every class will arrive at school hungry or without having eaten breakfast’ Children who come to school hungry are less attentive, more disruptive and less likely to understand and remember the day’s lessons Teachers report that students can lose more than two hours of learning time each day they come to school hungry. Unfortunately teachers are reporting that the problem is getting worse, not better

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YOUTH


94%

SAID THEY CAN CONCENTRATE

BETTER AT SCHOOL BECAUSE

OF BREAKFAST

97% SAID THEY ENJOY

47%

FEEL HEALTHIER AFTER ATTENDING BREAKFAST CLUB

67%

COMING TO BREAKFAST CLUB

SAID BREAKFAST CLUB HAS HELPED THEM TO MAKE FRIENDS

BEHIND THE DATA The young people that attend range from 5 to 18 years of age. The average age is 13 to 15 years. The young people enjoy: the food, especially hot chocolate in winter, friendly staff and volunteers, sport in the gym and spending time with friends. Most said they wouldn’t like any changes.

Some suggested that bacon and eggs be served more often. Whilst at Breakfast Club, they learn to socialise with their peers and join in sport programs and leave with the comfort of a good breakfast.

NEXT STEPS Explore the sector landscape, address gaps for young people and develop new partnerships to enhance the program

PARTNERS Bakers Delight Gorokan Butcher

BREAKFAST CLUB

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YOUTH: Skate Park Leagues (SPL) SKATE PARK LEAGUE EVENTS ARE COMPETITIONS HELD AS PART OF A NATIONAL YMCA PROGRAM, ENGAGING YOUNG PEOPLE WHO OFTEN DON’T PARTICIPATE IN STRUCTURED COMMUNITY OR SCHOOL-BASED RECREATION ACTIVITIES. YMCA Action Sports, based in Victoria leads the National Skate Park League program. They operate seven competitions in NSW and we partner with them in YMCA locations. A one day event, Skate Park League provides a great opportunity to connect with young people that might not attend more traditional YMCA programs. Working closely with local partners is essential for growth.

SOCIAL INDICATOR YOUNG PEOPLE IN NSW BUILD POSITIVE COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS THROUGH ENGAGEMENT IN SAFE, HEALTHY AND RELEVANT RECREATION ACTIVITIES – PROPORTION OF YOUNG PEOPLE WHO BUILD POSITIVE FRIENDSHIPS THROUGH SKATE PARK EVENTS

16

YOUTH


COMPETED

200 SPECTATORS

OVER

56 YOUNG PEOPLE

5 COMMUNITY PARTNERS

ABOUT SPL Skate Park Leagues are one day, annual events. While they engage young people who greatly benefit from community connections, more work needs to be done to leverage these events into ongoing engagement through the year. Research suggests that a young person who regularly rides a skateboard, scooter or BMX will average 9 hrs per week at their local skate park. Many of these young people are not engaged in other recreation activities and frequently identified as vulnerable youth.

The skate league competitions engage them throughout the day and provide opportunities for recognition, community connections and tasks such as judging and announcing. Ongoing engagement at the skate park following the event, such as a Streetgym program, is necessary for meaningful impact.

NEXT STEPS

PARTNERS

Increase competitions where YMCA has a strong presence Identify funding opportunities for skate park competitions and ongoing programs Engage participants in young leaders groups

YMCA Action Sports MidCoast Council Homebase Youth Services Manning Mental Health Ted Bickford

SKATE PARK LEAGUES

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YOUTH: CHILD AND FAMILY PROGRAM OUR CHILD AND FAMILY PROGRAM PROVIDES FAMILY SKILLS SEMINARS, STAFF TRAINING AND LINKS YMCA TO OTHER COMMUNITY SERVICES AND PROGRAMS IN WESTERN AND SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY. This program is funded by the NSW Department of Family through the Community Builder Program. It is based on the belief that families are key to transforming vulnerable children’s life outcomes. This program also trains staff in engaging and supporting families using evidence based practices, partnership development with community services and the delivery of programs on positive parenting.

I am grateful for this training and guidance. I am using the strategies already and they are working with my son.

SOCIAL INDICATOR 1 IN 33 CHILDREN RECEIVED CHILD PROTECTION SERVICES (INVESTIGATION, CARE AND PROTECTION ORDER AND /OR WERE IN OUT-OF-HOME CARE) IN 2015–16 Children from low-income households tend to do less well than children whose parents are from higher income households. They have worse health, do less well at school, and are more likely to have behavioural problems. Trauma, often the outcome of child abuse, neglect and violence, affects children’s development and ability to successfully navigate and succeed in the education system. One of the potential impacts of trauma is disengagement from school. Parental involvement contributes to overall student positive attainment, behaviour and attendance at school.

18

YOUTH


BEHIND THE DATA Staff workshops focussed on managing young people with difficult and challenging behaviour. This built on previous years’ work on communication with families. The topic was complex and may have contributed to the slight dip in staff who felt confident that they had increased skills. Each seminar reinforced the information about the three key providers Lifeline, Kids Connect and Family Referral Service being able to connect families to appropriate services in their local communities. This took pressure off staff to have community directories and keep them up to date.

NEXT STEPS During 17/18 the focus of this program will be early intervention for vulnerable young people in Western Sydney. Essential staff training will be continued through the YMCA Learning and Development program.

While 100% of parents had increased parenting skills, only 50% believed that they had increased knowledge about services in their community. Hence information about key support services for families and young people are now displayed in each centre.

PARTNERS Family Referral Service Gateway Family Services Families Together Partnership The Centre for Community Welfare Training

CHILD AND FAMILY

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DIVERSITY & INCLUSION: Affinity Network THE AFFINITY NETWORK IS AN EMPLOYEE SUPPORT NETWORK ASSISTING IN ADVOCATING AND FACILITATING A CULTURE OF INCLUSION AND RESPECT, REGARDLESS OF SEXUALITY, GENDER AND EXPRESSION WHILE RAISING AWARENESS OF LGBTI+ PEOPLE AND ISSUES. This will be achieved through a range of social and personal development opportunities for members of the network while also providing a platform for inclusion and diversity training for Y employees. Research shows LGBTI+-supportive policies and workplace climates are linked to greater job commitment, improved workplace relationships, increased job satisfaction, and improved health outcomes among LGBTI+ employees.

We’re so lucky to have managers, executive leaders and members of the board who know the benefits of improving our inclusivity.

SOCIAL INDICATOR 74% OF LGBTI+ EMPLOYEE FEEL IT IS IMPORTANT TO BE ABLE TO BE OUT AT WORK WHILE ONLY 32% OF EMPLOYEES ARE OUT TO EVERYONE WITH WHOM THEY WORK

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DIVERSITY & INCLUSION


In February last year, YMCA Australia launched the national ‘Why Not?’ campaign to champion our organisation’s three new platforms. These platforms were identified by young people in Australia as the most significant to them and consisted of; youth unemployment, youth mental health, and marriage equality. The YMCA movement, and within that, YMCA NSW are working to build engagement and rejuvenate our relevance and support to the LGBTI+ community by championing our organisational values of inclusion, diversity and acceptance. YMCA NSW will be the first YMCA in Australia to provide a support network for LGBTI+ employees and will have the potential to join the ranks of the country’s most respected businesses.

NEXT STEPS The main objective for the next 12-months for the Affinity Network is preparing the organisation for Australian Workplace Equality Index accreditation. This nationally recognised index is the benchmark for organisations aiming to be seen as diversity and inclusion leaders Active steps being taken include: auditing selected services and centres to ready for the Welcome Here project, improving LGBTI+ inclusions training and on boarding with Learning and Development and applying for the 2019 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras

AFFINITY NETWORK

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DIVERSITY & INCLUSION: Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) OUR RAP ARTICULATES HOW OUR STAFF AND STAKEHOLDERS WILL ENGAGE IN RECONCILIATION ACTION AND CONTRIBUTE TO GREATER UNITY. The Reconciliation Working Group (RWG) was established at the end of 2016 and officially launched in March 2017. In July 2017, the RWG mapped out the RAP and subject meetings were held regularly between a lead RWG member and relevant staff. This assisted to advance specific RAP actions such as organisation wide cultural competency training and communication. Our RAP will be submitted to Reconciliation Australia and is part of the Community Services Business Plan 2018/19.

SOCIAL INDICATORS

1 in 3 young people experienced racial discrimination

1 in 8 young people experienced physical violence

73% of young people aged between 6 and 18 worry about their future

49% of refugee and migrant young people experienced some form of discrimination or unfair treatment; 64% witnessed someone else being unfairly treated or discriminated against. 66% of those who experienced discrimination indicated that this was because of their race, while 25% was discriminated against because of religion. 49.6% were unemployed or underemployed.

14 ABORIGINAL VOLUNTEERS 3 IN THE RAP WORKING GROUP MEETINGS HELD ON SPECIFIC 27 RAP TOPICS MEETINGS HELD WITH EXTERNAL 3 ABORIGINAL PEOPLE EXTERNAL CULTURAL COMPETENCY 3 TRAININGS ATTENDED STAFF MEMBERS IN THE RAP WORKING GROUP

22

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION


Having Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander members in our RWG was a challenge. We addressed this by inviting young Aboriginal people to become our RAP Ambassadors and members of the group. Three have accepted and were involved in our NAIDOC Week celebrations. We also consult regularly with Aboriginal people on matters requiring Indigenous input. RAP matters are featured in all our communication channels. National Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC Week were celebrated this year in Support Services, our OSHC services and at one recreation site.

NEXT STEPS Review Reconciliation Australia’s feedback and amend our RAP by consulting with relevant staff, volunteers and external stakeholders and Submit revised RAP Build additional respectful relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and organisations Encourage staff to attend external cultural competency training and events Continue to promote cultural awareness

PARTNERS Brand & Engagement Human Resources Property and Procurement Raylene Popovich, Barnardos Australia Steven Ross, City of Parramatta Council Lyne Pearson Aunty Judy Joyce

RAP

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DIVERSITY & INCLUSION: SwimAbility SWIMABILITY IS A PROGRAM PROVIDING VITAL SWIMMING AND WATER SAFETY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH A PHYSICAL OR INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Delivered by qualified and experienced instructors, lessons are structured to provide visual, auditory, and sensory stimulation. Boosting confidence in the water, SwimAbility helps build core strength, improving equilibrium and coordination. Simply being in the water can be soothing, with water’s buoyancy relieving the stress that gravity places on muscles. In water, people can have a greater range of motion, coordination, and improved flexibility. Individuals experience a physical freedom they can’t experience anywhere else.

SOCIAL INDICATOR 32% OF ALL DROWNING DEATHS IN 2016/17 OCCURRED IN NSW

There were 209 SwimAbility participants 100% of clients agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with the program 97% of clients agreed or strongly agreed that the YMCA demonstrates inclusive practice within the program 97% of clients agreed or strongly agreed that they were satisfied with instructor skills and knowledge

24

DIVERSITY & INCLUSION


97%

91%

FEEL MORE

CONFIDENT

HAVE AN INCREASED SENSE OF HEALTH AND WELLBEING

IN THE WATER

75% BEHIND THE DATA The increased participant numbers confirm the demand for swimming skills for people with disabilities. Every “Is anyone better off?” measure increased from the previous year proving the SwimAbility program delivers positive outcomes for participants.

This includes confidence in the water, increased mobility, selfesteem, self-confidence, sense of health and wellbeing and water skills.

NEXT STEPS Complete “Turn the Curve” activity in the next six months to continue improvements of SwimAbility program

HAVE INCREASED MOBILITY You are one of the few organisations who truly offer equal access to children with disabilities.

PARTNERS AUSTSWIM YMCA NSW recreation management and staff Swim school specialist Parents and carers Disability-specific organisations

SWIMABILITY

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MENTAL HEALTH: Brightside BRIGHTSIDE IS A 60-DAY PROGRAM FOR PEOPLE WITH A LIVED EXPERIENCE OF MENTAL ILLNESS WHICH INCLUDES ONE ON ONE APPOINTMENTS WITH A FITNESS INSTRUCTOR AND UNLIMITED ACCESS TO A YMCA FACILITY.

I love the program and my trainer was really supportive which lead to great achievements in my health and body.

Brightside is a research-based exercise program that enhances mood, self-esteem, confidence and the energy of people with a lived experience of mental illness. The program was developed in 2009 in conjunction with Suicide Prevention Australia, and with partners including Black Dog Institute, MLC Community Foundation, Lifeline NSW and Division of General Practitioners NSW. Since 2009, YMCA NSW has partnered with over 130 referral organisations, such as disability specialists, mental health specialists, allied health services, community service organisations, NSW Health, headspace providers and General Practitioners. Regular exercise can be an effective way to relieve some forms of depression and is often a neglected strategy in the management of depression.

SOCIAL INDICATOR ONE IN SEVEN YOUNG AUSTRALIANS EXPERIENCE A MENTAL HEALTH CONDITION

26

MENTAL HEALTH


BEHIND THE DATA Data on participants transitioning to membership is captured through the Links point of sales system. The accuracy of this data is heavily reliant on the inputs and processes of individual centres.

Over the past 18 months the consistency of data capture has been a priority through staff training and procedure development.

12 CENTRES DELIVERING

YMCA NSW

BRIGHTSIDE

NEXT STEPS Training for staff on being person centred and engaging to be explored Clear expectations of the eight week program plan to be set from time of on boarding Strict screening process to be put in place A small fee for service to be introduced

BRIGHTSIDE

27


AGEING: Community Visitors Scheme (CVS) THE COMMUNITY VISITORS SCHEME SUPPORTS OLDER AUSTRALIANS IN AGED CARE FACILITIES BY ARRANGING VOLUNTEER VISITORS TO TALK TO, INTERACT WITH AND DO ACTIVITIES WITH. YMCA NSW is funded by the Australian government for 59 CVS visitors in Western Sydney to be the NSW/ ACT State Network Member. We recruit, train and induct volunteers who provide friendship and companionship to older people. One-on-one visits are conducted by one volunteer with a single care recipient. As the NSW Network Member, we support and advise other organisations who are funded for CVS.

She’s like the sunshine that comes to visit every Saturday morning!

CVS volunteers offer friendship and companionship to an elderly person living in an aged care home. Research tells us that volunteering has positive benefits to the volunteer. It is great to see that our CVS volunteers are also reaping the wellbeing benefits of being a volunteer.

SOCIAL INDICATOR BETWEEN 60 AND 70% OF HOME CARE CLIENTS EXPERIENCED LONELINESS

28

AGEING


Volunteering Australia Statistics Report 2015 96% of volunteers say that it “makes people happier� 95% of volunteers say that volunteering is related to feelings of wellbeing. 82% of volunteers were delighted, pleased or mostly satisfied with their lives compared to 75% of non-volunteers Volunteering is highly associated with greater health and happiness

BEHIND THE DATA Most CVS Volunteers are middle aged or retired. Many are at the stages of their lives when illness or health issues arise. As many have been with the program for over 5 years it explains why the graph shows that perhaps their wellbeing is not as good as it may have been 2 years ago or when they started. Some volunteers have lost the person they were visiting through death. This can cause a great sense of loss and grief. Even though many may continue to visit another person, the friendship experienced with the first is often greatly missed. As volunteers get more familiar with the program and meet other volunteers and hear their stories, they enjoy feeling connected, meeting others doing the same thing and being part of something bigger. CVS has a big focus on training volunteers. This could be why we retain our volunteers for long periods of time. In 2017 we celebrated 20 years of service from two CVS volunteers. After initial induction, most training is delivered at breakfast mornings held 2/3 times a year. Relevant guest speakers deliver training at these breakfast mornings.

NEXT STEPS

PARTNERS

We are looking to engage young people as CVS volunteers Introduce technology to further connect older people with their communities

Department of Health

14 aged care facilities

Leep

100 CVS Auspices

Centre of Volunteering NSW

COMMUNITY VISITORS SCHEME

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WE BELIEVE IN THE POWER OF INSPIRED YOUNG PEOPLE


YMCA NSW Level 5, 20 Smith Street Parramatta NSW 2150 02 9687 6233 02 9687 6244 ymcansw.org.au

Profile for YMCA NSW

YMCA NSW Community Services Outcomes Report 2018  

YMCA NSW Community Services Outcomes Report 2018  

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