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Pretend

I’m Not Here

Two lives intersect between Baghdad and North Carolina OLE ASHEBORO

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FORLORN STRANGERS

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BY M.C. ARMSTRONG LARUE ON ELM

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November30-December6,2016YES! WEEKLY


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YES! WEEKLY > NOVEMBER 30 - DECEMBER 6, 2016 > VOLUME 12, NUMBER 48

5500 Adams Farm Lane Suite 204 Greensboro, NC 27407 Office 336-316-1231 Fax 336-316-1930 Publisher CHARLES A. WOMACK III publisher@yesweekly.com

PRETEND I’M NOT HERE

EDITORIAL Editor JEFF SYKES jeff@yesweekly.com Contributors KRISTI MAIER JOHN ADAMIAN RICH LEWIS STEVE MITCHELL BILLY INGRAM ALLISON STALBERG IAN MCDOWELL DEONNA KELLI SAYED

Sarah grew up in the Al-Wesfya neighborhood of southern Baghdad, known by some as The Triangle of Death. She now lives in Colfax, North Carolina, where she often likes to start her days with meditation and Korean OST (original sound tracks), a form of music she finds soothing and “romantic.”

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Movies MARK BURGER marksburger@yahoo.com

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Theatre LENISE WILLIS lenise@yesweekly.com PRODUCTION Graphic Designers ALEX ELDRIDGE designer@yesweekly.com AUSTIN KINDLEY artdirector@yesweekly.com ADVERTISING Advertising Manager KATHARINE OSBORNE

kat@yesweekly.com Marketing BRAD MCCAULEY brad@yesweekly.com TRAVIS WAGEMAN travis@yesweekly.com CLAUDIA BURNETT claudia@yesweekly.com Promotion NATALIE GARCIA

DISTRIBUTION JANICE GANTT BRANDON COMBS We at YES! Weekly realize that the interest of our readers goes well beyond the boundaries of the Piedmont Triad. Therefore we are dedicated to informing and entertaining with thought-provoking, debate-spurring, in-depth investigative news stories and features of local, national and international scope, and opinion grounded in reason, as well as providing the most comprehensive entertainment and arts coverage in the Triad. YES! Weekly welcomes submissions of all kinds. Efforts will be made to return those with a self-addressed stamped envelope; however YES! Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. YES! Weekly is published every Wednesday by Womack Newspapers, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. First copy is free, all additional copies are $1.00. Copyright 2016 Womack Newspapers, Inc.

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“Hairstyling and barbering are a craft and I think, we should all support each other,” said JENNIFER HUTCHINS, owner of Irvin Roberts Salon and Day Spa in Clemmons and now Co-Owner of Ardmore Barbershop alongside her fiancé Jeremy Ingle.

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WORLD AIDS DAY is held each Dec. 1 to commemorate those who have died from AIDS related illnesses and to spread awareness of those living with HIV. 11 The construction of the first out of six homes has begun in the OLE ASHEBORO neighborhood.

voices 12

Did North Carolina BARBECUE help Donald Trump win the presidency? North Carolina’s barbecue guru, John Shelton Reed, has a theory.

arts, entertainment & dining 24

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The light-hearted, country production highlights the fictitious Open Heart Community Fellowship and the congregation’s down-home telling of the NATIVITY STORY. Using toe-tapping folk music, they spin a holiday tale that starts where it all began: Genesis. 30 In Ralph Ellison’s novel “INVISIBLE MAN,” the narrator speaks of being “a man of substance, of flesh and bone,” but navigating a world in which people don’t see him. 31 Let no one say that the INDEPENDENT FILM movement in North Carolina is dying. Sure, it’s taken a few hits... but the indie filmmakers of the Tarheel State represent a resilient and resourceful, to say nothing of talented, creative contingent. 32 The November installment of our triadfoodies Chef’s Table, where we LET THE CHEF SURPRISE US, had us back in Greensboro once again. This time, at LaRue Elm, a multi-cuisine restaurant that leans a bit French at 403 North Elm Street downtown.

The founding members of FORLORN STRANGERS had a first-hand taste of the grit of agriculture and the power of the sun. The band, which is now an acoustic quintet that operates out of Nashville, took shape in Florida...

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

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BE there EVENTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS | BY AUSTIN KINDLEY ENT MT

ART

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FRIDAY A TUNA CHRISTMAS FRIDAY

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RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER

CHRISTMAS WRAPPED IN BRASS

TANGLEWOOD FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS

WHAT: The most famous reindeer of all from the longest running and highest rated holiday television special will be live on stage with the critically acclaimed Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Lawrence Joel Veterans Memorial Coliseum. 2825 University Parkway, Winston-Salem. MORE: $20 - $40 tickets.

WHAT: The North Carolina Brass Band celebrates the opening of the Christmas holiday season with performances of holiday favorites. Celebrating the release of their second album, ‘Christmas Wrapped in Brass’, the NCBB will get you into the spirit of the holidays! WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Carolina Theatre. 310 S. Greene Street, Greensboro. MORE: $5-$20 tickets.

WHAT: Tanglewood Park’s rolling countryside will be transformed into a winter wonderland of giant, twinkling snowflakes and whimsical scenes! Entering our 24th season, Tanglewood’s Festival of Lights continues to be one of the most spectacular light shows in the entire Southeast. WHEN: 6 p.m. WHERE: Tanglewood Park. 4201 Manor House Circle, Clemmons. MORE: $5-$100 admission.

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A TUNA CHRISTMAS

DISNEY ON ICE

WHAT: In this hilarious sequel to Greater Tuna, it’s Christmas in the third smallest town in Texas. Radio station news personalities Thurston Wheelis and Arles Struvie report on various Yuletide activities, including hot competition in the annual lawn display contest. WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Community Theatre of Greensboro. 520 South Elm St., Greensboro. MORE: $10-$15 admission.

WHAT: Disney On Ice is bringing DisneyPixar’s record-breaking animated feature Finding Dory to the ice for the first time in this live production produced by Feld Entertainment. The ice skating extravaganza featuring DisneyPixars Inside Out, Disneys Frozen and other beloved Disney stories visits Greensboro. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Greensboro Coliseum Complex - Arena. 1921 West Gate City Blvd Greensboro MORE: $15-$95 tickets.

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REPTIDAY SATURDAY

SATURDAY SATURDAY

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W-S REPTILE & EXOTIC ANIMAL SHOW WhAT: ReptiDay Winston-Salem is a one-day reptile event featuring vendors offering reptile pets, supplies, feeders, cages, and merchandise as well as live animal seminars and frequent free raffles for coveted prizes. Exciting, educational, family-oriented fun for everyone! When: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. WheRe: Winston-Salem Fairgrounds. 421 27th St NW, Winston-Salem. MoRe: $5 - $15 admission.

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SATURDAY

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BLACK NATIVITY WS JAYCEES WhAT: Black Nativity, written by Langston Hughes, is an electrifying rendition of the Christmas story told with an infusion of gospel music, dance and spoken word. The director and choreographer is Broadway veteran Mabel Robinson. The cast includes some of the best talent in the Triad area. Audiences are captivated by this wonderful holiday classic. Performance elements are changed each year to showcase the artists. When: 8 p.m. WheRe: Arts Council Theatre. 610 Coliseum Drive, Winston-Salem. MoRe: $18 - $26 tickets.

MADE 4 THE HOLIDAY PARADE HOLIDAYS MARKET WhAT: Who doesn’t love a parade?

For the past 26 years the Winston-Salem Jaycees have orchestrated the one and only Winston-Salem Holiday Parade. To put on such and event we needs lot of people helping out behind the scenes and this year we need you! When: 8 a.m. - 8 p.m. WheRe: Downtown Winston-Salem. 4th Street, Winston-Salem. MoRe: Free event.

WhAT: Join us for GSO’s holiday favorite all local holiday gift giving show. More than 100 artists, crafters, and makers at this juried event. Free admission, free parking, and entertainment. When: 11 a.m. WheRe: Greensboro Farmers Curb Market. 501 Yanceyville Street, Greensboro. MoRe: Free program.

SUNDAY

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HOPS & SHOPS: HOLIDAY CRAFT WhAT: We are excited to announce the fourth HOPS & SHOP event. This juried event will feature over 70 local and regional arts & craft vendors. There will be 4 food trucks including: Home Slice, LaVie En Rose, StrEAT Provision and Camel City Grill who will be serving food throughout the day. The event is held indoors and is free to the public. When: 12 p.m. WheRe: Foothills Brewing Tasting Room. 3800 Kimwell Dr., Winston-Salem. MoRe: Free event.

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JENNIFER AND JEREMY - A BARBER LOVE STORY BY CLAUDIA BURNETT

“Hairstyling and barbering are a craft and I think, we should all support each other,” said Jennifer Hutchins, owner of Irvin Roberts Salon and Day Spa in Clemmons and now Co-Owner of Ardmore Barbershop alongside her fiancé Jeremy Ingle. Jennifer and Jeremy met through referring clients to each other. Acquainted through the salon and barber circuit, Jennifer would refer her straight razor clients to Jeremy while he worked at Washington Park. Cosmetologists, by law, are prohibited to perform razor cuts. Jeremy would send her thank you messages through Facebook, then flowers, and finally an invitation to dinner solidified the start of a blooming relationship. “It flows and he gets it and I get it”, said Jennifer, to which Jeremy agreed. “We started looking this summer and talking about possibly owning something together,” said Jennifer. The couple came across Ardmore Barbershop and both agreed that if ‘there were any existing barbershop in Winston, this would be the one”. Luckily, the

previous owner of over 40 years, Wayne Waters, was looking to sell the business and still continue to cut hair. They met with Wayne, decided to take a leap of faith and bought the business. Jennifer believes that they “manifested this place for ourselves.” Through renovations, they never closed the shop and business is growing. Ardmore Barbershop will have several retail items, including beanie hats, hair products, cigars, beer from Stella Brewing and free coffee from Ardmore Coffee shop. They are launching Winston Salem’s first beard oil bar with a mixologist to help you create the perfect blend. Jennifer, Jeremy, and his son Aidon are excited to be part of the wonderful Ardmore community. They want to bring the community together for many years, one hair cut at a time. Check out Jennifer, Jeremy and Aidon and the awesome staff at Ardmore Barbershop located at 1311 S. Hawthorne Rd. The shop is open Mon-Fri 8 am-7 pm and Saturday 7 am-12 pm. !

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8 YES! WEEKLY

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NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

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[SCUTTLEBUTT] Items from across the Triad and beyond

LIBRARY HOSTS HURRICANE MATTHEW RELIEF BENEFIT WITH JILL MCCORKLE

In early October, Hurricane Matthew made landfall along the eastern part of our state. With historic flooding in many communities, countless people were forced to evacuate their homes and were without basic necessities--and some still are. Join us for Reading for Relief: a Hurricane Matthew Benefit featuring New York Times best-selling author Jill McCorkle and award-winning poet Jaki Shelton Green at 3 pm on Sunday, December 4 at Central Library, 219 N. Church St. McCorkle has authored such works as The Cheer Leader and July 7th, Carolina Moon, Going Away Shoes, and most recently Life after Life. She has taught at Tufts University, UNC Chapel Hill, Harvard University and currently teaches creative writing for the master’s of fine arts program at NC State. Green received the North Carolina Award for Literature, the highest honor the state can bestow, in 2003 and in 2009 was selected as the first North Carolina Piedmont Laureate. Her works include Dead on Arrival, Blue Opal, Conjure Blues, Singing a Tree into Dance and Breath of the Song. She currently teaches at Duke University. Both authors will read from the book Carolina Table: North Carolina Writers on Food. Featuring 20 noted authors and chefs, the Carolina Table offers a collection of food-related stories set in NC. Geography is sometimes secondary to the main theme, which is food in any form: meals and manners, cooking and ingredients, recipes and recollections. While the reading is free and open to the public, the American Red Cross will be accepting donations for the duration of the program. A book signing and reception will follow.

NC AIDS ACTION NETWORK CELEBRATES WORLD AIDS DAY

The North Carolina AIDS Action Network, the state’s only HIV/AIDS advocacy organization, will be celebrating World AIDS Day in a big way with a series of events across the state on December 1st and 2nd. The HIV/AIDS community designates December 1st as World AIDS Day every year to raise awareness of the AIDS pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection and to mourn those who have died from the disease. “World AIDS Day is an opportunity to remember and reflect on those we’ve lost to HIV and AIDS, said Lee Storrow, Executive Director of the NC AIDS Action

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Network. ‘But it also must be an opportunity to stand up and speak out about what we need to do to end the epidemic. Maintaining a strong AIDS Drug Assistance Program, expanding access to PrEP through our county health departments and investing in prevention so that young people have the tools and information they need to stop the spread of HIV. ” World AIDS Day 2016 Events December 1st- A World AIDS Day Luncheon at noon at Marriott Charlotte City Center in Charlotte, NC, hosted by RAIN. NC AIDS Action Network Executive Director Lee Storrow will make remarks. December 1st- East Carolina University Infectious Diseases Red Carpet Affair at 6 PM at ECU Heart Institute Auditorium in Greenville, NC. This annual event is hosted by ECU Physicians and the NCAAN Women’s Empowerment Team of the East. NC AIDS Action Network Grassroots Advocacy Coordinator Matt Martin will be in attendance, and State Senator Don Davis will be the event’s main guest speaker and will also be presented with an award for his lifelong support of HIV funding. December 1st- World AIDS Day Service at 7 PM at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Winston-Salem, NC, hosted by North Star LGBTQ Community Center and Interfaith Voice. The theme of this year’s service is “Love, Serve, Remember” and will feature remarks by NC AIDS Action Network Board member Adam Linker. December 1st- World AIDS Day Gathering at 8:30 PM at The Junction Salon and Bar in Raleigh, NC hosted by Crape Myrtle Festival. NC AIDS Action Network Executive Director Lee Storrow will make remarks at this gathering to remember those that have lost that battle and those still fighting. December 2nd- Where Do We Go From Here?: HIV Treatment and Prevention Advocacy in North Carolina at 8:30 AM at the Duke Sanford School of Public Policy in Durham, NC, hosted by the NC AIDS Action Network. The main event will consist of a panel conversation to discuss HIV treatment and prevention efforts in North Carolina and the policy changes we need to make in 2017 to keep our state moving forward. Vanessa Duren-Winfield, NC AIDS Action Network board member and Winston-Salem State University professor, will serve as the panel moderator, and national expert, Ronald Johnson, the Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at AIDS United, will join a panel of North Carolina HIV advocacy experts. !

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

YES! WEEKLY

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the lead

POLITICS, UPDATES, TRENDS AND OTHER VITAL INFORMATION

HIV/AIDS still here, especially in Guilford County BY DEONNA KELLI SAYED

W

orld AIDS Day is held each Dec. 1 to commemorate those who have died from AIDS related illnesses and to spread awareness of those living with HIV. There are currently 1.2 million people living with HIV in America. Guilford County sees about 100 new cases a year. In North Carolina, there are 6,500 people who don’t know they are HIV positive and are at risk of transmitting the virus. Triad Health Project (THP) has worked for 25 years to change those numbers. The agency assists those infected with HIV and AIDS, and offers support to family members and caregivers. THP is one of the main agencies in North Carolina uplifting communities impacted by HIV and AIDS. Some of its programs serve as models at the national level. THP’s Winter Walk for AIDS and the Ron Johnson 5K takes place Sunday, Dec. 4 and will start at the UNCG campus. The annual walk is a fundraiser for the agency’s client services and prevention programs. HIV and AIDS remains a public health issue, even if the virus and AIDS-related deaths no longer make headlines like they did 20 years ago. The Triad Health Project offers free and anonymous HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing. Other services include education, prevention services, a food pantry, education, and counseling. In 2015, THP distributed more than 32,000 free condoms at various locations in efforts to encourage safe sex.

THP facilitates the Higher Ground Day Program. The program is open to anyone impacted by HIV and AIDS, including caregivers and family members. There is no cure for HIV. Lifelong – and daily -- treatment is necessary to remain virally suppressed and healthy. Finding the right medication combination and services can be difficult, particularly for those without a support system and challenged by limited resources. Paula Barger, THP’s Development Director, points out “over 60 percent of those we serve fall below the Federal Poverty level. A third have no income and are in dire poverty. They lack resources in many different ways.” Triad Health Project provides client case management to over 500 people a year. The goal is to empower individuals to stabilize and improve their health and quality of life. “We want to make sure that people who are infected can mange their diseases,” says Barger. An HIV diagnoses can be overwhelming and filled with challenges, from finding the right medicine combination to navigating social services. A diagnosis may trigger or coincide with substance abuse or mental health issues. Furthermore, side effects of certain HIV medications are unpleasant and may discourage compliance with treatment. The Triad Health Project provides a support system and offers case management to help navigate those challenges. For the Triad, the issues are urgent. “As we look overall nationally, there is a list of top 25 metro areas for HIV infections. The Greensboro-High Point metropolitan area is number 20 on that list,” Barger shares.

Data from a 2014 study from The Center for Disease Control (CDC) indicates that North Carolina ranks 8th in the United States of reported HIV diagnoses in the country. Few modern illnesses have impacted American culture like HIV and AIDS. The issue defined the political and social arena during the 1980s. AIDS forced new discussions around sexuality, public health policy, and end-of-life-issues. The epidemic peaked in the 1990s and spurred innovation in medical treatment, which led to an HIV diagnosis no longer being an automatic death sentence. As of 2015, around 698,000 AIDS-related deaths have occurred in the United States. The virus has claimed more lives than World War II casualties. Infection rates have declined nationally due to increases in awareness and testing. Yet, the highest rates of new infections are in the south, particularly among gay and bisexual African-American and Hispanic men. Scott Kent from THP’s Prevention Services says that these “two groups who are least likely to be adequately insured.” Staff indicates that stigma and access to resources are the biggest challenges facing HIV diagnoses and treatment in the Triad. Trent says that “we are also very concerned that the increase in homophobia and transphobia that have found expression in the political arena on both state and national levels--and perhaps even most dangerously in the lived experiences of our LGBT community who are increasingly victims of these attacks-- are going to roll back years of progress against HIVrelated stigma.” Successful treatment is holistic and

requires community support. “It isn’t as simple as just taking a daily pill,” says Barger. Medication impacts people differently. Furthermore, an individual can become resistant to a medication regime. Barger stresses that it is also “important for people to know that when someone becomes infected, it doesn’t just impact them. A lot of people are parents or primary care givers. When an individual doesn’t have food stability or the ability for steady work, there is a ripple effect on the family.” Triad Health Project hopes the Winter Walk for AIDS will “raise awareness that HIV is still very much present in our community. One in six people don’t know their HIV status. They can transmit the virus if they don’t know their status,” says Barger. The Winter Walk for AIDS will offer free and anonymous HIV and STI testing. A pharmaceutical company will also discuss a new clinical trial study for those diagnosed with HIV. An after party at Westerwood Tavern that evening will provide another opportunity to support and learn about THP’s work. Barger shares the agency’s motto: One 4 Zero. “We ask every member of our community to do what they can to reach zero new infections in Guilford County. Prevention is key,” she says. “There are people still dying of AIDS,” Barger points out. !

WANNA

go?

Registration for the walk is from 1-2 pm on Dec. 4. The opening ceremony begins at 2:00 pm at the Elliot Center at UNCG. To learn more, visit thetriadhealthproject.com.

ServiceS AdminiStrAtor

MADE 4 THE HOLIDAY ARTS, CRAFTS, & POTTERY SHOW Sunday, Dec. 4, 11am - 4pm The market will transform into an eclectic wonderland of locally produced fine art, fiber art, pottery, jewelry, bath & body and fresh holiday decorations including wreaths, roping and Christmas trees. Vendor sales go directly to the Artists which keeps dollars in our community while supporting talented artists across NC. Food trucks on site all day serve you lunch or dinner. Free entry and free parking for general admission. 501 Yanceyville St. • Greensboro, NC WWW.GSOFARMERSMARKET.ORG

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NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

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Six homes to be built in Ole Asheboro community

Community Housing Solutions received a grant that will go toward building six new homes in Greensboro’s Ole Asheboro neighborhood. BY ALLISON STALBERG The construction of the first out of six homes has begun in the Ole Asheboro neighborhood. Plans and efforts have been led by Community Housing Solutions with the collaboration of many organizations including the Ole Asheboro Neighborhood Association, Greensboro Housing Development Partnership, the City of Greensboro Neighborhood Development, Greensboro Builders Association, Housing Consultants Group and Carolina Bank. At a recent press conference CHS was awarded a $120,000 grant from Wells Fargo toward the building of the six new homes. The destination of the homes, Ole Asheboro, is a significant neighborhood in Greensboro. “The Ole Asheboro neighborhood is a very historic neighborhood,” said President and Executive Director of CHS Gene Brown. “It was one of the very first neighborhoods of Greensboro over a hundred years ago.” According to Brown, there has been a lot of revitalization in Ole Asheboro over the last 20 years. Other initiatives have worked to restore and fix older homes, bring businesses back, established a new church and plans for the Union Square campus in the northern end of the neighborhood. During the revitalization process, some homes were beyond repair and demolished. That’s when CHS and its collaborative partners came in. “Now what we’re going to be able to do is help restore those lots with a home that’ll be a brand new house that a family will be able to buy and move into,” said Brown. “We’re going to help what I call neighborhood stabilization or neighborhood renovation in terms of building WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

homes that people can live in. “And it’s a proven fact that home ownership helps to stabilize things like crime, prostitution and drugs. The higher percentage of home ownership in a neighborhood, the more stable and safe the community is to live in.” The first two homes to be built will have a similar floor plan. They will be single story homes and about 1,500 square feet with three bedrooms and two baths. The plan is for the homes to be sustainable and low maintenance. The homes will be made of materials to save money for homeowners “We insulate the house and crawl space, we put air-sealing in terms of making the house well sealed so that when you are heating or cooling your house, you have lower heating and cooling bills,” said Brown. “The last thing you want to do is build a house, but not be energy efficient. What we want to do is to put a first time home buyer in these homes but have their maintenance cost be as minimal as possible in terms of water bills, electric bills, gas bills, types of heating, cooling and water bills.” Due to being an historic neighborhood, Ole Asheboro had architectural standards for the new homes. “The windows we are putting in, besides them being energy-efficient, they are matching the style of the look of this neighborhood from the early 1900s,” said Brown. “This house is not going to look foreign in the character of the neighborhood. “There are particular architectural standards that we had to go through with the city to have them review it and make sure we were building it within those standards so that when we are building these homes, we are not only building a home that a homeowner would love to be able to buy and move into but we also

have the support of the Old Asheboro neighborhood.” Brown predicts the homes will cost around $95,000 but buyers could have the opportunity for payment assistance programs or qualify for a mortgage. The first home will take about six months to finish. “The house should be for sale probably around April 1 in terms of availability for someone to buy,” said Brown. “The project

overall, we currently own two lots that we are building on in two different streets, they are not right next to each other because the lots that we are building on are what I call scattered sites. “We would probably expect within two to two and a half years we will build six homes.” !

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voices

WRITE US AT EDITOR@YESWEEKLY.COM

Politics and barbecue, together again Did North Carolina barbecue help Donald Trump win the presidency? North Carolina’s barbecue guru, John Shelton Reed, has a theory. D.G. Martin More about that in a minute, but first let’s celebrate Contributor having two books from Reed about barbecue ready for your holiday giving to friends who love to talk about and eat our state’s favorite pork product. Reed’s new book, titled simply “Barbecue,” is a short, but comprehensive, cookbook that sets out in simple steps how to prepare a variety of meat dishes cooked slowly over wood coals. Soon after publishing “Barbecue,” UNC Press reissued in paperback “Holy Smoke: The Big Book of North Carolina

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Barbecue” written by Reed, his wife Dale Volberg Reed, and William McKinney. That book came out in 2008 and gained recognition as the reliable source of information about the history (where and how North Carolina barbecue came about), cooking (how the pig or its portions are prepared, along with directions for the slaw, hush puppies, corn bread, Brunswick stew, and baked beans that go along with the pig), and the people (biographies of the legendary individuals and families who built and maintain the state’s barbecue traditions). All this information, packed into 300 pages, provides enough facts to win or settle every conceivable argument about North Carolina barbecue. If you are thinking “Holy Smoke” would make a good present for your brother-in-law, your boss, or your best friend, do not hesitate. Buy it now and enjoy reading it for a few days before wrapping it up to give away. “Holy Smoke” comes with a new

[WEEKLY SUDOKU]

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

preface that covers developments in the North Carolina barbecue world since the book was first published. The authors write about several growing concerns. At the top of their list is that fewer restaurants are cooking over wood coals. They write, “It’s a sad fact that a great majority of North Carolina barbecue places, including some of the oldest and best known, no longer use wood or charcoal at all, and it’s a sadder fact that we’ve let them get away with it. Outsiders are starting to notice, and our state’s longstanding reputation for barbecue excellence has begun to suffer.” Another worry is the growth in places that “hew to the ‘International House of Barbecue’ model: pick your meat, pick your sauce; mix and match; the customer is always right. The result is a sort of barbecue Esperanto--barbecue from nowhere.” The authors write that they have come around to welcoming the more expensive, higher-end barbecue restaurants even though they are costly. But “something will be lost. In the past barbecue has brought all sorts of people together. Lawyers and construction workers, cops and college students, cowboys and hippies, preachers and sinners, black and white (since desegregation)—all could savor a $3.50 barbecue sandwich at Wilber’s or Stamey’s. We hope some oldtimey places like that will still be around for our grandchildren and for North Carolinians who can’t or won’t spring for a $12.00 version.” John Reed likes to tie barbecue to politics, and “Holy Smoke” is full of stories about politicians who lost elections because of some barbecue-related gaffe they made on the campaign trail. The latest, he told me the other day, was Hillary Clinton’s choice of a barbecue stop in Charlotte at the end of the presidential campaign. She and President Obama ate at the Midwood

Smokehouse. It has a varied and upscale menu, but it is not a traditional barbecue eatery. Meanwhile, Donald Trump was buying one of those $3.50 barbecue sandwiches at Stamey’s in Greensboro. “Maybe Clinton’s choice sold in Charlotte,” Reed said, “but the rest of the state was thinking Trump was eating at a real North Carolina barbecue stop, a big reason he won and she lost.” You can hear my entire conversation with John Shelton Reed at: www.chapelboro.com/category/wchl/lifestyleweekly/whos-talking ! D.G. MARTIN hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on UNC-MX digital channel Time Warner #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m. This Thursday’s (December **) (December 1) guest is Bridgette Lacy, author of “Sunday Dinner.” Note that Bookwatch’s Sunday airing will be preempted for special programming. (Next week’s (December 8) guest is Scott Ellsworth, author of “The Secret Game.” To view prior programs: http://video.unctv.org/ program/nc-bookwatch/episodes/ For upcoming programs: www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch - Thursday 5pm November 31 Bridgette Lacy author of “Sunday Dinner” - Thursday 5pm December 8 Scott Ellsworth, author of “The Secret Game” - Thursday 5pm December 15 Robert Morgan , author of “Chasing the North Star” - Sunday noon December 18 and Thursday 5pm December 22 Bryan King & Shane Heavner, authors of “12 Bones Smokehouse: A Mountain BBQ Cookbook” - Thursday 5pm December 29 Bart Ehrman, author of “Jesus Before the Gospels” - Sunday noon January 1 **and Thursday 5pm January 5 Kathy Reichs, author of “Speaking In Bones”

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ACROSS 1 5 12 20 21 22 23

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 38 40 41 42 47 51 52 53 55 57 61 64 65 66 67 69 73 74

Neighbor of Chile Chemist’s outerwear Some captives Copies Magic’s city Fearmonger Centennial State pageant winner Start to chew Clinic fluids Enjoy a meal DVR biggie Baste, e.g. Text giggle Output of Tolkien Highly skilled people Prudential competitor “— found it!” Member of a noted racecar-driving family Surplus item Be a cast member of Oklahoma tribe member Placed in the middle, to a Brit The NBA’s “King James” 120-Down character Sarducci Uru. neighbor Wildlife lair Proverb Add liberally Most August newborns Popular energy drink Anderson of “WKRP in Cincinnati” Rome’s country, in French

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[KING Crossword]

76 77 79 80 82 85 86 87 91 92 98 100 101 102 109 110 111 112 113 115 118 123 124 125 126 127 128

“Fuer —” (piano piece) Sun, e.g. — Moines, Iowa Prism, cone or sphere Beach shoe Stands for hot dishes Melody “Salud!,” say Dutch genre painter Jan Port-au-Prince’s land No. on a road sign Navigator Islands, now Cry upon release 1991 Denzel Washington film Gave a meal Hubbub Chiang Mai native Johnny — Pool coverer Open ocean Parts of it appear at both the starts and ends of this puzzle’s eight theme phrases Bel Air resident, e.g. Funicello of the screen Cry in church Nonclerical females “Possibly” Veg out, say

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6

Cook’s spray Like serials Pick again KGB funder Lav, in Bath Specter in politics

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 24 28 30 32 33 34 35 36 37 39 43 44 45 46 48 49 50 54 56 57 58 59 60 61

Make swollen Magna — — par with Stick in Moreover Natural home With 84-Down, lunch meat with pimiento Goal in Zen Buddhism Uno plus due French bud Knife of TV ads Oxalate, e.g. Vermont ski town Wearing a lounge robe Color a little Tibetan priest Ending for enzymes She sang “Smooth Operator” “— darn tootin’!” 4G — (T-Mobile offering) Retaliate Like some criticism Singer Ochs Actor Greene — -Z Luc’s denial Chilling stuff Camera stand Fixed up Studmuffin West Germany’s Ludwig Deprived Not genuine Wheel turner Little jerk Patients’ gp. First groups of invitees

62 63 65 68 70 71 72 75 78 81 82 83 84 86 88 89 90 93 94 95 96 97 99 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 114 116 117 118 119 120 121 122

Snappy reply Net minder California’s — Woods Splinters MBA, say — -ray Disc Feature of the word “go” — -Kit (police tool) Tub traction aids Medit. land “Or — hear” From way back: Abbr. See 13-Down Shut angrily Structure of a plane without the engine Belfry locales Knotted Quarterback Boomer Spanish for “daddy” Ball caller “Sk8er —” (2002 hit) Chick- — -A Hold dear Taj — Singer Menzel Drenched 1953 Alan Ladd title role Disney mermaid Religious branches Die down Rent- — Chop down — -mo Animal gullet A, in France ‘75 TV debut Ang of film Certain M.D.

FINNut Yes Weekly 2016(485x10.2 print).indd 1

November 30- December 6, 2016

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YES! WEEKLY 11/29/16 4:19 PM


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Four Saints Brewing pays homage to the patron saints of beer, Saint Wenceslaus, Saint Nicholas, Saint Luke and Saint Augustine of Hippo. They’ve become the most recognized patron saints for brewing and beer because of their contributions to and associations with the world’s favorite sudsy beverage. www.taphoppertour.com | (336) 850-1477

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14 YES! WEEKLY

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433-101 SPRING GARDEN ST / GREENSBORO, NC 27401

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Ardmore Barbershop

Chicken, turkey, duck, and quail. A classically upscale, yet comfoable Southern dining experience.

Beard oil is a skin and facial hair moisturizer. It is perfect for this time of year when lack of moisture in the air can leave your skin and facial hair feeling dry and wiry. The essential oils can host a number of benefits as well. We hope you will join our Saturday mixologist events, coming soon. www.facebook.com/Ardmore-Barbershop | 336-725-3279

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Amoroso’s Bakery

“We all grew up with an appreciation of cooking and baking, which meant family time to us. Those memories from days gone by inspire me to create this neighborhood bakery, where all are welcome and all are family!” - Ralph Amoroso

GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE NOW FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

www.amorososbakery.net HP (336) 553-2708 | GSO (336) 547-2600

Breakout Greensboro

This isn’t your average outing or everyday experience - Breakout is for those who would rather solve mysteries than watch someone else have all the fun. Part problem solving, part adrenaline, end-to-end fun!

Book the Christmas Caper Room for a limited time only! Gift Cards Available!

YOUR HOMETOWN NEIGHBORHOOD BAKERY

Call us for your holiday treats! Come on in and browse or just sit, relax and enjoy! 5824 Samet Dr, Ste 190 / High Point / (336) 553-2708

amorososbakery.net / @amoroso.bakery 5803-A Hunt Club Road / Greensboro / Off Guilford College / (336) 547-2600

www.breakoutgreensboro.com | (336) 265-2010

Breakfast with Santa at Pintxo’s What better way to get your list to Santa than to eat breakfast with him! Join us Sunday, December 18 from 10:30am-noon. $10 per child includes pancakes, reindeer food & ornament. Advance tickets strongly recommended!S upplies will be limited. www.pintxospourhouse.com | 336-924-0238

Four Saints Brewing Company $2 OFF a growler when you mention YES! Weekly! Offer expires 12/24/16.

Four Saints Founders Joel McClosky and Andrew Deming are carrying on the brewing tradition in the hopes of future sainthood, or at least to make some really good beer.

www.foursaintsbrewing.com | (336) 610-FSBC (3722)

Just in time for the Holidays! Gift Cards & Gift Sets Available

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POTTERS CLAY AMBER

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GENESIS BELGIAN DUBBEL

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218 South Fayetteville Street | Asheboro, NC 27203 | (336) 610-FSBC (3722) | foursaintsbrewing.com www.yesweekly.com

Remember us for all your holiday needs! Gift Cards, Parties, & Catering 5312 Robinhood Village Dr / Winston-Salem (336) 924-0238 www.pintxospourhouse.com November 30- December 6, 2016

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[NEWS OF THE WEIRD] FUTURE OF TRAVEL

BASEMENT WATERPROOFING CRAWL SPACE REPAIR FOUNDATION REPAIR

Australian aviator David Mayman has promised investors that his personal jet packs will hit the market by mid-2017, though early adopters will pay about Chuck Shepherd $250,000 for one, to fly a person at up to 60 mph for 10 minutes. The JB-10 (developed by Mayman and designer Nelson Tyler) has made about 400 test runs in Monaco and over downtown London and New York City, but the partners realize that ultimate success will require that the fuel tanks be downsized so that the craft can be powered electrically — and thus seek crowdfunding both for that model and a larger one to accommodate the Pentagon’s (Special Operations Command) tactical needs.

THE CONTINUING CRISIS

Wet Basement?

Foundation Issues?

Before

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After

We Lift Concrete! “Don’t Replace it, RAISE IT!”

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Free Estimate 16 YES! WEEKLY

866-907-2616 GreensboroBasements.com

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

— Wild Life: The state agency Colorado Parks and Wildlife filed 21 criminal charges in October against the Squirrel Creek Wildlife Rescue center in Littleton, alleging that some of the orphaned and rehabbing animals Kendall Seifert houses are not being kept according to the state’s strict standards — and that Seifert’s 15-year-old center is also home to his popular swingers’ club (Scarlet Ranch) featuring weekend sex parties. One of the criminal charges suggests that rescue animals could be stressed by gazing at activity in the ranch’s bar area. Seifert said he will challenge the charges out of fear that many of the raccoons, foxes, song birds, coyotes, skunks, rabbits and squirrels he would have to relinquish would not find suitable facilities elsewhere. — In St. Paul, Minnesota, a 25-year-old woman told police on Nov. 3 that she was involuntarily roughed up several hours after being voluntarily roughed up at Arnellia’s Bar’s weekly “Smack Fest” — in which female patrons competitively slap each other’s faces for three “rounds” under strict house rules. The woman said she spoke amicably with her opponent, but by closing time, the opponent and several friends, including men, punched and kicked her outside the bar. (In other slapping news, a 71-year-old woman died in Lewes, England, in November while participating in a Chinese healing seminar that emphasizes being slapped repeatedly to rid the body of poisoned blood and toxins. The “healer,” Hongshi Xiao, charges clients around $900 to beat what he calls the “sha” out of them.)

— Episode Almost Ended in a Tie: In November, in a remote area of Oregon’s Maury Mountains, a 69-year-old man killed an elk and dragged the carcass behind his off-road vehicle up a hill. According to the Crook County Sheriff’s office, the vehicle suddenly flipped over backward, and the man landed on, and was impaled by, the elk’s antlers. Fellow hunters summoned a helicopter, and the man has apparently survived.

THE ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT

(1) In a retail market long dominated by priests, “nonsectarian” funeral eulogizers now offer to give individually tailored remembrances of the deceased for a fee, according to an October report by a New York Post reporter who interviewed two local “celebrants,” who cited the declining appeal of “prayers.” (2) The British retailer ASOS announced in August that 3-footlong clip-on dinosaur tails had sold out in one of its two models (although New York magazine, which reported it in the U.S., was, for obvious reasons, baffled about why).

ARKANSAS CHIC

Kristi Goss, 43, an assistant to a Garland County (Arkansas) judge, was arrested in October and charged with stealing nearly $200,000 in public funds, which she used to buy such things as a tuxedo for her dog, sequined throw pillows, a “diamond bracelet” (retailing for $128) and, of course, Arkansas Razorback football tickets.

THE ARISTOCRATS!

(1) Motorist Kurt Jenkins, 56, was arrested in November in Boynton Beach, Florida, after a pedestrian said Jenkins, naked, motioned him to his car to take a look. The pedestrian said there were children in the area — and also that Jenkins appeared to have wires running from his genitals to an unidentified “electrical device.” (2) Among a stash of pornography found recently on the computer of Michael Ward, 70, were photos of humans having some sort of sex with “horses, dogs, (an) octopus and (an) eel,” according to a report of England’s Chelmsford Crown Court proceedings. A pre-sentencing order forbade Ward to have contact with children under 16 (but was silent about possible contact with fish or mollusks). Thanks This Week to Jim Doughtie and Gary Krupa and to the News of the Weird Board of Editorial Advisors. !

© 2016 Chuck Shepherd. Universal Press Syndicate.

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Spend the Holidays with Greensboro Downtown Parks LeBauer Park Food and Gift Fair Saturday, December 3rd in LeBauer Park – 12pm - 7pm Join us after the Greensboro Holiday parade

Gingerbread House Workshop

Saturday December 10th – 12pm-3pm Join us for the My Granville Homes Gingerbread House Workshop. $15 to decorate and take home your Gingerbread House.

for lunch from Ghassan's, nOma, and food trucks. Shop for holiday gifts from local vendors.

Holiday Carole Sing-a-Long Karaoke The classic face through-the-hole - Elf style!

FREE Karaoke in LeBauer Park

Post your photo to social media for a chance

Saturday December 10th – 7pm – 9pm

to win weekly prizes!

More details: Greensborodowntownparks.org/YesElfieSelfie

#TBTLBP Happy Hour

Join us for #TBTLBP Happy Hour in LeBauer Park (Throwback Thursday LeBauer Park Happy Hour) HOLIDAY EDITION Thu December 29th, 5:00PM to 8:00PM

Brunch with Santa Sunday December 18th in LeBauer Park 12pm – 3pm

Enjoy Beer and Wine from kiosks nOma Food & Co. and Ghassan’s No outside alchohol allowed in Greensboro Downtown Parks.

For a listing of all events visit our facebook page. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

/greensborodowntownparks

Nightly Snow at LeBauer Park We’re making it snow - 6 PM nightly

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016 YES! WEEKLY

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18 YES! WEEKLY

Pretend I’m Not Here

Two lives intersect between Baghdad and North Carolina

By M.C. Armstrong

S

arah didn’t say she’d be bringing a friend. They sat down across from me at The Green Bean coffee shop on Elm Street, Sarah in a champagne satin hijab, her friend in maroon cotton. “Pretend I’m not here,” said her friend, paintings of jellyfish-kitten hybrids on the coffee shop wall, duct tape around the thick duct stretching across the stampedtin ceiling, Sarah’s cell-phone adorned with gold glitter-studded mouse ears and a silver neck-lanyard because she’s always losing everything. “It’s just cuts,” she said, referring to her memories of Iraq. “Cuts, cuts, cuts.” Sarah grew up in the Al-Wesfya neighborhood of southern Baghdad, known by some as The Triangle of Death. She now lives in Colfax, North Carolina, where she often likes to start her days with meditation and Korean OST (original sound tracks), a form of music she finds soothing and “romantic.” But Sarah can only handle so much romance in her music. Sometimes, on the way to school, she’ll turn up Evanescence (a hard rock band from Arkansas), and pound the wheel as she drives down the highway. “I’m not just one thing,” she said. “I don’t like it when people try to put me in boxes or use stereotypes or generalizations like chess pieces.”

November 30- December 6, 2016

When I asked Sarah about 2006, the year her family left Iraq, and what she remembered other than the war, she suddenly smiled at her friend. Sarah’s bright brown eyes, so wide even when she’s pensive, lit up the room like a laugh. “There was a boy in my fifth grade class,” she said. “His name was Marjwan. He wrote me a confession letter.” “A confession letter?” “A love letter.” “What happened?” “He got caught!” I’d like to give you a photograph or a video to show you Sarah’s expressive face as she described the fiasco of the two Marjwans in her school and how the wrong one was punished by the teacher for the love letter (which Sarah never got to read). But Sarah’s story belongs here with the written word because she doesn’t allow herself to be photographed. Although I’m tempted to say her big sultry eyes remind me of Marilyn Monroe’s (whom Sarah admires), I think that would be putting Sarah in a box, using the celebrity descriptor as a “chess piece.” After all, Marilyn Monroe’s eyes were blue. Sarah’s are brown. Sarah studies biology and chemistry at Guilford, the Quaker college here in Greensboro. She and her friend are two-thirds of “the trio,” a group of three generally inseparable women, one Saudi Arabian, Sarah and her friend both from Iraq.

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The author spent a month in Iraq during 2008 embedded with a SEAL team as part of a freelance journalism assignment. He met Sarah, a Guilford College student from Baghdad following his return to Greensboro.

“I am the crazy one, and she is the mature one,” Sarah said, pointing furtively with her eyes. Shortly after the real Marjwan confessed his love, Sarah and her family of six left Baghdad to vacation in Jordan, as they often did. But the violence in her neighborhood was so bad that her family never returned. For seven years they lived in Jordan until her father told the family to get ready to fly to America. “They gave us a weight,” Sarah said. “I’m the kind of person who doesn’t like to throw things away, but all we could carry was this very certain weight.” She cried as she looked into her father’s closet and saw a particular shirt he’d have to leave behind. Her father told her if she would stop crying he would carry less of his things so she could carry more of hers. When I asked what should be done about other immigrants fleeing the wars and if America has a responsibility, Sarah said: “We do, but for a limit.” She looked at her friend. “I want to put it in a good way,” Sarah said. “I don’t think you should have asked that question,” her friend said. “Why not?” I asked. Some conversation topics feel easy. TV shows like Grey’s Anatomy? Yes. Sarah loves it. The old woman in the shoe store at the mall who scolded Sarah for a pair of high heels, saying “You can be sexy WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

down there but not up here?” Yes. Bring it on. All the Guilford “hippies” who like to “run around almost naked”? Fine. Yes. Sarah described herself as a “feminist” who loves her fellow students and the fact that they get to be who they want to be, just as she is grateful to be able to express herself in her own way. But this question of immigration and refugees inspired what, for a moment, felt like an intervention. Sarah slipped her fingers through the silver loop of the cell-phone lanyard and sat back as I turned my attention to her friend.

Eight years ago, just before the election of Barack Obama, I visited Sarah’s home country of Iraq. Just before I stepped onto the midnight plane to Baghdad, a fellow war reporter asked me what should have been a simple question: “Who do you work for?” The reporter’s name was Moni Basu. She had thick dark hair, an intense, purposeful demeanor, and she wore a helmet that said “Evil Media Chick.” We were drinking coffee at a picnic table behind a beverage kiosk at the back of the Ali Al Salem base in Kuwait. Her traveling companion, a mustachioed photographer named Curtis Compton, had caught shrapnel from an IED during a previous NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

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embed. I told Moni I worked for a magazine called “CQ.” “GQ?” “No. CQ.” “You write for Congressional Quarterly?” The questions never stopped with Moni. She worked for The Atlanta Journal and Constitution at the time. She was a good reporter. “Convergence Quarterly,” I said. “It’s a new magazine. This will be our first issue. We’re sponsored by North Carolina A&T.” “You work at North Carolina A&T?” I nodded nervously. I’m white. A&T is an historically black college in Greensboro. Many people argue that the student protest movement of the 60s began at A&T when four courageous young men conducted a sit-in at a Woolworth’s lunch counter on February 1, 1960. This was the part of our school’s history that we advertised to the world. There was another history, however, that we ignored. “Do you know who graduated from there?” Moni asked. “Uh, Jesse Jackson?”

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“Khalid Sheikh Mohammed?” Moni said it like that, like a question, like she couldn’t believe that I was here with her and didn’t know this crucial fact. It was early March, 2008, the fifth anniversary of the Iraq invasion. I’d been working at A&T as a lecturer for three years, but I didn’t know who Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was or why I should care, and Moni Basu was about to tell me why. “This is the guy who masterminded the attacks on 9/11,” Moni said. “You don’t know who Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is?” Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, it turns out, got nearly his entire exposure to America from Greensboro in the mid 1980s. Moni glanced at Curtis, her photographer, who was applying a cloth to a lens with calm circular strokes. It was just beginning to dawn on me that I might be in way over my head, like maybe I was the man my father was afraid I was, a fool destined to die some ridiculous death in the coming days, my charred body hung from a bridge in some war-torn hamlet, men in loosefitting garments cheering as my ashy American corpse twisted in the wind.

November 30- December 6, 2016

I took a long sip of my coffee. There I was, about to visit Sarah’s country—about to embed with Navy SEALS in Haditha, one of the most dangerous cities in Iraq— and I had no idea about the man who had started the very war I was trying to cover. I’d traveled seven thousand miles from Greensboro, North Carolina to find out that the mastermind of 9/11 had been educated in my own backyard. “Excuse me,” I said. Rather than being a good humble journalist and question Moni relentlessly about KSM, I retreated to the base bathroom to attend to suddenly struggling bowels. I stared at the graffiti on the walls: Chuck Norris’s tears cure cancer. Too bad he never cries. Here I sit, cheeks a’flexin, ready to unleash another Texan. Have a nice war. They called our bus. I put on my army surplus helmet and my bulletproof vest. I jotted down a few notes. I sat close to Moni as the bus filled up. I didn’t want to lose her. I wanted her to teach me more, stay with me a little longer. I felt like I

needed her, and I wasn’t used to that feeling, that fear. The simple truth is: I was scared. I didn’t want to be left alone in Iraq. We walked across the tarmac and up the ramp into the plane, the loud bloated hull of a C-130 Hercules. It was me, Moni, Curtis, four soldiers, and two contractors. The C-130 is an exposed experience, a cabin stripped of padding and panel, the seats nothing more than red net and steel pole, the lights a dim red, white, and blue, the floor studded with traction pads. After the plane took off, Moni fell asleep, and so did one of the soldiers. Another sat with his headphones blasting death metal so loud it sounded like spit was coming out of his ears. I smelled grape Kool-Aid powder. I looked around at the seemingly calm faces occasionally jostled by the turbulence. There was no turning back. For the past six months, I’d been obsessed with seeing Iraq for myself and escaping the media-saturated mindjam of left versus right, peace versus war, WMDS, beheadings and conspiracy theories. I wanted to see the war for myself and now that I was here I couldn’t stop thinking

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about how blind I’d been to the very place I was escaping: America: Greensboro: my own backyard. All the lights went out in the Hercules, the cabin a dark tunnel of jiggling multinational bodies as this massive airship began its spiral descent to Baghdad, the famous lights-out, corkscrew roller-coaster free-fall approach the military’s way of evading RPGs and demonstrating to rookie journalists just how simultaneously colossal and agile America can be if she truly wants to keep herself a secret.

Since that journey to Iraq, the big secret I’ve been interested in telling is not so much that Greensboro was the womb of The War on Terror insofar as Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was educated here. What’s really interesting to me now is that now Greensboro is now the home of so many of the war’s consequences, otherwise known as human beings. According to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees, over two million Iraqis were displaced as a result of the American invasion. After leaving North Carolina A&T, I began teaching at Guilford College in 2013. I met Sarah last year in a tutoring session at Guilford’s Learning Commons. In our early conversations, I realized she was special, bold and curious, extremely intelligent. But I also noticed that Sarah was not alone. There were many others like her in the Guilford community. Just as our Quaker community of friends once lent a helping hand to slaves seeking passage on the underground railroad, so do they now offer refuge to immigrants from the wars in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan, and elsewhere. “I almost died,” Sarah’s friend said to me. “I’m sorry,” I said. “My dad got kidnapped.” Even though Sarah’s friend told me I “shouldn’t have asked that question” about America’s responsibility for the chaos in her country, she didn’t ask me to stop asking questions once I started. “I don’t get politics. I don’t like politics,” she said. “People see these issues and they want to solve it and they put these videos on the Internet and they go viral and I’ve just been through like so much that my heart—it’s like not dead—I just don’t care.” Sarah’s friend, who is also from Baghdad, does not wear makeup. She leaned forward. Band of Horses was playing on the Green Bean stereo. She said that during the war, for her family, every trip to the grocery store was “suspense” because she didn’t know if her mother would return. “One day,” she said. “My grandma was WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

the principal at the school, and my mom worked at the school, and we were leaving and stuff, and my grandpa came to pick us up, and we got into the car, and we were about to leave, and this woman came up to us and ran up to the car and wanted to talk to my grandma about this child and like two minutes later these bombs went off.” Her eyes were wet. I wanted to reach across the table and take her hand. Her pain was palpable. I felt responsible. I told myself to keep asking questions, that questions were not rude but good. I asked her how close the bombs were to the car where she sat with her mother, her grandmother, and her grandfather. “Close,” she said. “They were on a bridge two miles away. That woman was like an angel. We would have driven across that bridge.” Sarah’s friend described being a young girl in this neighborhood where she saw bodies and bombs all the time and airplanes flying so low she felt like she could reach up with her fingers and touch their wings. “Every single time children are the victims,” Sarah said, returning to the conversation. Her friend nodded. “Do you see yourself as a victim?” I asked. “No,” Sarah said. “Do you ever want to go back to Iraq?” Sarah paused before answering that question. “I’m scared to go back,” she said. “But I’m the sort of person who is like ‘I’m going to say ‘yes’ because I’m scared.” I think I’m a bit like Sarah. I, too, am scared of what has been done. But I also want to understand. I want to see things for myself. Sarah wants to be a dentist. She likes swings, has never once touched pork, and loves America. But she’s not so sure how serious America is about certain things like protecting the First Amendment, the Freedom of Religion. “It’s a pretense,” she said. Sarah stood up just before the end of our conversation. “Look ,” she said. “I am modest. I wear the hijab. But look at my shoes.” Her friend smiled into her fist. I looked down at the hundreds of scuffs and pocks from other heels that have stomped and danced on the hard wood of The Green Bean’s floor. Sarah said she doesn’t trust Donald Trump, but that “every country has its Trump.” She said her two favorite places to eat are Panera and Nazareth. But her champagne hijab and her highheeled open-toed Aldos said something as well, and so did her smile and her desire to tell her story with a friend by her side. !

Sarah prefers not to have her face shown or provide her last name. She came to Greensboro after fleeing Iraq in 2006 due to increased violence in her Baghdad neighborhood. Sarah wants to be a dentist. She likes swings, has never once touched pork, and loves America. But she’s not so sure how serious America is about certain things like protecting the First Amendment, the Freedom of Religion. NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016 YES! WEEKLY

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Submissions should be sent to artdirector@yesweekly.com by Friday at 5 p.m., prior to the week’s publication. Visit yesweekly.com and click on calendar to list your event online. HOME GROWN MUSIC SCENE | Compiled by Austin Kindley

ASHEBORO

FOUR SAINTS BREWING

218 South Fayetteville St. | 336.610.3722 foursaintsbrewing.com Dec 2: Open Mic w/ Wolfie Calhoun Dec 3: Momma Molasses Dec 9: RD & Co. Dec 10: Be The Moon Dec 16: Bradon Hughes Dec 17: Emma Lee Dec 21: Traditional Irish/Celtic Music Session Dec 30: Matt Walsh Dec 31: John The Revelator Jan 6: Open Mic w/ Wolfie Calhoun

CLEMMONS

RIVER RIDGE TAPHOUSE 1480 River Ridge Dr | 336.712.1883 riverridgetaphouse.com Dec 1: Bradley Street Dec 2: The Invaders Dec 3: Stephen Legree Band Dec 9: Exit 180 Dec 10: Southern Eyes Dec 15: Jake Dean

DANBURY

GREEN HERON ALE HOUSE

1110 Flinchum Rd | 336.593.4733 greenheronclub.com Dec 3:Wyndy Trail Travelers Dec 10: Another Roadside Attraction Dec 17: David Childers Dec 23: Local Music Christmas Celebration Dec 31: New Years Eve Social with Regal Sloan

GREENSBORO

ARIZONA PETE’S

2900 Patterson St #A | 336.632.9889 arizonapetes.com Dec 2: 1-2-3 Friday Dec 9: 1-2-3 Friday

ARTISTIKA NIGHT CLUB

523 S Elm St | 336.271.2686 artistikanightclub.com Dec 2: DJ Dan the Player Dec 3: DJ Paco and DJ Dan the Player

Fabulous craft cocktails, extensive draught & botTled beEr selections, tasty smalL plates in a fun, relaxed, upscale atmosphere.

B R E AT H E Cocktail Lounge

BIG PURPLE

812 Olive St. | 336.302.3728

THE BLIND TIGER

1819 Spring Garden St | 336.272.9888 theblindtiger.com Nov 30: Travers Brothership w/ ESP Dec 2: Holy Ghost Tent Revival Dec 3: Bear With Me, All My Circuits, Barefoot Modern, The NORM Dec 4: Gate City Divas Dec 5: The Showcase Tour Dec 9: Imperial Blend Dec 10: Eric Gales Trio w/ Abe Reid & The Spike Drivers Dec 12: Saving Abel w/ Somewhat Forgotten, Shamck Daniels Dec 16: Norlina EP Release Party w/ The Lilly Brothers Dec 17: Purple Schoolbus w/ Dr. Bacon Dec 18: Brice Street Band

BUCKHEAD SALOON

1720 Battleground Ave | 336.272.9884 buckheadsaloongreensboro.com

CHURCHILL’S ON ELM

213 S Elm St | 336.275.6367 churchillscigarlounge.com Dec 3: C Ricardo Briggs Dec 10: Sahara Reggae Band Dec 17: Jack Long Old School Jam

COMEDY ZONE

1126 S Holden Rd | 336.333.1034 thecomedyzone.com Dec 2: Tennessee Tramp Dec 3: Sinbad Dec 9: Julie Scoggins Dec 10: Julie Scoggins Dec 16: Michael Mack Dec 17: Michael Mack

COMMON GROUNDS 11602 S Elm Ave | 336.698.3888

CONE DENIM

117 S Elm St | 336.378.9646 cdecgreensboro.com Dec 3: Dave East Dec 10: Pop Evil Dec 15: Lil’ Durk Dec 31: 2016 New Years Eve Party w/ Trial By Fire

221 North Main St, Downtown KernersvilLe Wed & Thurs 5pm-12am, Fri & Sat 5pm-2am EclectionNC.com 336-862-9400 $5 anNual membership • Event space available

22 YES! WEEKLY

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

THE GREEN BEAN

341 S. Elm St | 336.691.9990 thegreenbeancoffeehouse.blogspot.com

GREENE STREET CLUB 113 N Greene St | 336.273.4111 greenestreetclub.com Dec 2: #LIGHTSOUT Dec 3: Connie Regan Dec 15: Felly w/ Gyyps

HAM’S GATE CITY

3017 Gate City Blvd | 336.851.4800 hamsrestaurants.com

HAM’S NEW GARDEN

1635 New Garden Rd | 336.288.4544 hamsrestaurants.com

MCPHERSON’S BAR & GRILL

5710 W Gate City Blvd | 336.292.6496 mcphersonsgreensboro.com Dec 31: Radio Narks

PRINT WORKS BISTRO

702 Green Valley Rd | 336.379.0699 printworksbistro.com Dec 2: Evan Olsen & Jessica Mashburn

SOMEWHERE ELSE TAVERN

5713 W Friendly Ave | 336.292.5464 facebook.com/thesomewhereelsetavern Dec 2: Zestrah, Deutronomy Anno Domini, Death of August, Doc Holiday Dec 3: Nevernauts Dec 10: Origin of Disease, NC Hexxes, Trailer Park Orchestra, Mechabull, Manslaughter Dec 17: Black Ritual, Mindjakked, Skinn Jakkitt, Black Demize, Behind The Wheel Dec 23: Made To Terraform, Pavlove Dec 30: Divine Treachery, Annabel Lee, Written in Gray, Haymaker, Without A Hobby Jan 13: Desired Redemption, Drowning Delilah, Zestrah, Swampwater Swill, Trailer Park Orchestra

THE IDIOT BOX COMEDY CLUB

2134 Lawndale Dr | 336.274.2699 www.idiotboxers.com Dec 2: Andy Woodhull Dec 16: Yelling and Prizes! Jan 13: A Trump Roast

VILLAGE TAVERN

1903 Westridge Rd | 336.282.3063 villagetavern.com

WWW.YESWEEKLY.COMW


World of bEEr

1210 Westover Terrace | 336.897.0031 worldofbeer.com/Locations/Greensboro

high point

aftEr hourS tavErn

1614 N Main St | 336.883.4113 afterhourstavern.net dec 2: Chasin’ Skirt band dec 3: rock Machine dec 9: the terrible twos, Kwik fixx

bluE bourbon jaCK’S

jamestown

thE dECK

118 E Main St | 336.207.1999 thedeckatrivertwist.com dec 2: Southern Eyes dec 3: Stereo doll dec 9: disco lemonade dec 10: Soul Central dec 16: radio revolver

kernersville

danCE hall dazE

1310 N Main St | 336.882.2583 reverbnation.com/venue/bluebourbonjacks dec 23: heads up Penny

612 Edgewood St | 336.558.7204 dancehalldaze.com dec 2: Crimson rose dec 3: ambush dec 9: the delmonicos dec 10: Silverhawk

Claddagh rEStaurant & Pub

EClECtion

130 E Parris Ave | 336.841.0521 thecladdaghrestaurantandpub.com dec 6: julian jackson dec 7: Craig baldwin dec 8: buzzard holler boys dec 9: Paris avenue, david & joel dec 10: Midnight gypsies dec 13: julian jackson dec 14: Craig baldwin

haM’S PalladiuM 5840 Samet Dr | 336.887.2434 hamsrestaurants.com

libErtY brEWErY

914 Mall Loop Rd | 336.882.4677 hghosp.com dec 1: davis tucker dec 8: gerry Stanek dec 15: Emma lee dec 22: tyler Millard

221 N Main St | 336.497.4822 eclectionnc.com

thE EMPouriuM

734 E. Mountain St. | 336.671.9159

lewisville

old niCK’S Pub

191 Lowes Foods Dr | 336.747.3059 OldNicksPubNC.com dec 3: Karaoke w/ dj tyler Perkins dec 10: 2nd anniversary Party w/ big daddy Mojo dec 16: Karaoke w/ dj tyler Perkins

oakridge

jP loonEY’S

2213 E Oak Ridge Rd | 336.643.1570 facebook.com/JPLooneys dec 1: trivia

MilnEr’S

randleman

ridEr’S in thE CountrY 5701 Randleman Rd | 336.674.5111 ridersinthecountry.net

MuddY CrEEK CafE

winston-salem

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 dec 2: harvey dalton arnold dec 3: lee Spears dec 4: Phillip Craft dec 9: acoustic harmonies dec 11: rob Price

6th & vinE

209 W 6th St | 336.725.5577 6thandvine.com dec 3: fruit Smoothie trio

bull’S tavErn

MuddY CrEEK MuSiC hall

408 West 4th St | 336.331.3431 facebook.com/bulls-tavern

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 dec 1: abigail dowd, Sam frazier, tyler nail, david Petty dec 2: forlorn Strangers dec 3: across the blue ridge with Paul brown feat lonesome river band dec 8: jonathan byrd and Corn raymond with Sam foster dec 9: joan & joni

finnigan’S WaKE

620 Trade St | 336.723.0322 facebook.com/FinnigansWake dec 3: jerry Chapman dec 10: the radio narks

foothillS brEWing 638 W 4th St | 336.777.3348 foothillsbrewing.com nov 30: redleg husky dec 4: Sunday jazz dec 11: Sunday jazz dec 18: Sunday jazz

thE quiEt Pint

1420 W 1st St | 336.893.6881 thequietpint.com

thE garagE

110 W 7th St | 336.777.1127 the-garage.ws dec 1: Estrangers, no one Mind, victoria victoria dec 9: lacy jags, Spirit System, 1970’s film Stock

johnnY & junE’S Saloon

tEE tiME SPortS & SPiritS 3040 Healy Dr | 336.760.4010

villagE tavErn

2000 Griffith Rd | 336.760.8686

WaYWard brEWS

5078 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.652.2739 waywardbrews.com

2105 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.724.0546 johnnynjunes.com

Saint Wenceslaus Saint Nicholas Saint Luke Saint Augustine of Hippo

a one of a kind bar experience come see for yourself!

Over 165 different beers Over 45 whiskeys Daily Specials

630 S Stratford Rd | 336.768.2221 milnerfood.com dec 4: live jazz

OMIE BLONDE ALE

GERMAN HEFEWEIZEN

POTTERS CLAY AMBER

UPPER ROAD IRISH RED

GENESIS BELGIAN DUBBEL

STOUT ONE STOUT

Free Live MuSic every WeD & Thu 734 E Mountain St, KErnErSvillE | 336.671.9159 opEn EvEry night ‘til 2 | liKE uS on FacEbooK! www.yesweekly.com

218 South Fayetteville Street | Asheboro, NC 27203 | (336) 610-FSBC (3722) | foursaintsbrewing.com November 30- December 6, 2016 YES! WEEKLY

23


tunes

HEAR IT!

Nashville-based Forlorn Strangers play Winston-Salem’s Muddy Creek Music Hall

BY JOHN ADAMIAN | @johnradamian

A

lot of roots/Americana bands tend to romanticize the pull of the land, the rhythms of labor, the poetry of crops and seasons. The founding members of Forlorn Strangers had a first-hand taste of the grit of agriculture and the power of the sun. The band, which is now an acoustic quintet that operates out of Nashville, took shape in Florida where the three founding members were all in college together, and then later in Texas, when the three worked at a farm run by World Hunger Relief, a not-for-profit organization committed to promoting sustainable agriculture and feeding the poor. Forlorn Strangers play The Muddy Creek Music Hall in Winston-Salem on Friday, Dec. 2 at 8 p.m. If you’ve never driven a tractor through a dusty field, dug a fence hole in packed

24 YES! WEEKLY

soil, or gotten up early to fill wheelbarrows of silage to feed hungry cows, the quiet strength and dignity of farm workers might be something to idealize. If you’ve ever had a job on an actual farm, you know that the work can sometimes just be back-breaking and mind-numbing labor, something you might gladly trade for an hourly wage at a desk. The work, with livestock and crops, and the feel

of the place started to seep into Forlorn Strangers’ material, says guitarist Chris Banke, who like all five members of the group, also sings and writes some of the band’s material. “You get up at the crack of dawn,” says Banke, who spoke with me earlier this week by phone from Florida. “It was a great place to really get down to what we wanted to do musically. Several songs

were written on the farm, and even in the barn that we had there.” The folk revival is still going strong. There’s a timelessness to the tradition, and the appeal of acoustic instruments and voices singing together in close harmony is something that might resonate even more to a generation of listeners who often experience music mainly through earbuds or laptop speakers, which can feel isolating and confined. Handmade music can celebrate a group aesthetic, with a utilitarian we’re-all-inthis-together attitude that feels like an antidote to the digital terrain of the 21st century. Forlorn Strangers are part of that movement, heirs to Mumford and Sons, the Avett Brothers and the Lumineers, for sure. But they’re also an eclectic ensemble, with touches of jazz, soul, gypsy music, gospel, soft rock harmonies and bluegrass. Banke says that while they were record-

Thursday December 8 Soul Food at 8pm Live Music Art Music Open Mic 8-11pm @ The Artist Bloc 1020 West Gate City Blvd Greensboro, NC (336) 676-5384

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

WWW.YESWEEKLY.COMW


ing Forlorn Strangers’ self-titled 2016 full-length debut, band members listened obsessively to Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours. Everyone loves Rumours, of course — it’s one of the best-selling records of all time, famous for its impeccable harmonies, studio perfection, and the way it showcased the work of three very different songwriters. That blending of songs about quiet heartache, mystical yearning and optimistic defiance is something that informs the way Forlorn Strangers think about assembling their records. The Fleetwood Mac comparisons might seem even more apt with the other two founding members, Benjamin Lusk on banjo and guitars, and multiinstrumentalist Hannah Leigh Lusk, now a married couple. Hannah’s sister, Abigail Dempsey, joined the band on fiddle in 2013, when the group settled in Nashville. And upright bass player Jesse Thompson eventually rounded out the quintet, after having done some live dates with the group. Some bands have a single songwriter and frontperson, and a certain weight and responsibility falls to them. Forlorn Strangers face a different creative challenge, finding ways to feature the songs and voices of all five players while retaining a cohesive sound. One thing unifying the band is the role of faith and religion in their upbringings. “We all kind of grew up in church families,” says Banke. “Ben’s dad is a pastor. Hannah and Abigail moved to Africa when they were kids when their parents did missionary work.” Songs of devotion, of faith, of salvation, grace, repentance, forgiveness and scripture-based storytelling are all part of the folk tradition that Forlorn Strangers pull from, whether it’s soul, old time or gospel. But the group members, who range from their mid-20s to early 30s, all write original material from five different perspectives. “There is definitely a spiritual component to the band, but that is not our core focus,” says Banke. “It’s kind of a writewhat-you-know philosophy.” With five members contributing songs, that means that the group can winnow their material down to a batch that holds together. And songs have to stand on their own to make the cut, because there’s WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

a fair amount of competition. “We could put out three more records right now if we wanted to,” says Banke. “That’s kind of the fun part of distilling it down.” If there’s a pervading atmosphere to their songs, it’s one of gentle sadness and good-humored endurance. Forlorn Strangers songs aren’t about deep misery, but they’re not about heedless rowdiness either. The vibe is one of open-hearted sober maturity untouched by world-weariness. Listen to “What I Don’t Remember,” a pretty and gentlesad song off the new record, with banjo and fiddle braided together. The voices of the two sisters climb with the strings and male vocal harmonies eventually join in. It’s a song about scars and fortitude and destiny, with brief dynamic breaths in the music that increase the drama and tension without ever requiring a forceful push. The vocal harmonies are the band’s big weapon, with the five voices building in layers of subdued intensity. “Harmonies were the focus,” says Banke of the work on the record. The band does an admirable job of letting the voices build slowly, instead of turning them on thick and relentlessly like an a cappella group. Forlorn Strangers spent most of last year on the road, playing everywhere from community centers, festivals, libraries, clubs and cafes. They’ve mastered what Banke calls the bluegrass approach, of playing and singing without any amplification or of all five players huddling around a single microscope to carefully blend their sound. Banke says a Forlorn Strangers show routinely brings the crowd to the front of the stage for sing-alongs and a generous up-close exchange of spirit. The appeal is almost elemental, he says, and it’s something that many listeners don’t necessarily know they’ve been craving until they feel it first-hand. “I think everybody wants an authentic experience,” says Banke. !

WANNA

go?

Forlorn Strangers play The Muddy Creek Music Hall, 5455 Bethania Road, Winston-Salem, Friday, Dec. 2, 8 p.m. $12, 336-923-8623, muddycreekcafeandmusichall.com

THE TRIAD’S PREMIER LIVE MUSIC VENUE FOR 28 YEARS, BRINGING THE TRIAD SUCH ACTS AS JASON ISBELL, BEN FOLDS FIVE, RUSTED ROOT, LITTLE FEAT, AND MANY MORE!

ALL SHOWS 18+

UPCOMING SHOWS WED.NOV.30

TRAVERS BROTHERSHIP

FRI.DEC.2

HOLY GHOST TENT REVIVAL

SAT.DEC.3

BEAR WITH ME

SUN.DEC.4

GATE CITY DIVAS

MON.DEC.5

THE SHOWCASE TOUR

FRI.DEC.9

IMPERIAL BLEND

SAT.DEC.10

ERIC GALES TRIO W/ ABE REID & THE SPIKE DRIVERS

SUN.DEC.11

HOMEGROWN ARTISAN MARKET

MON.DEC.12

SAVING ABEL

1819 SPRING GARDEN STREET, GSO, NC | 336-272-9888

—THEBLINDTIGER.COM— /theblindtiger @blindtigergso @blindtigergso NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016 YES! WEEKLY

25


Fri Dec 2

[CHOICE BEATS]

[CONCERTS]

Upcoming shows you should check out

www.lincolntheatre.com

The Black Lillies

DECEMBER

T h 1 JGBCB (Jerry Garcia Band Tribute) F r 2 THE BLACK LILLIES 8p w/Elise Davis

Sat Dec 3

Sa 3 DOPAPOD

w/Pigeons Playing Pingpong F r 9 THE SHAKEDOWN (Van Morrison) Sa 10 SHOOT TO THRILL w/ Dixie Dust (Female AC/DC) / Mirror 7

Su 11 AFTON MUSIC SHOWCASE 6p Tu 13 JASON BOLAN & SHOOTER JENNINGS 7p We 14 THE NEW MASTERSOUNDS & TURKUAZ 7p Fr 16 GFW Presents: VIRTUAL RIOT Sa 17 YARN & DUNE DOGS 7:30p Su 18 DELTA RAE w/Penny & Sparrow 7p Sa 31 BIG SOMETHING JANUARY

Fr 6 Sa 7 We 11 Th 12

NANTUCKET 7p WINTER METAL FEST LETTUCE 7p THE INFAMOUS STRINGDUSTERS 8p Fr 13 ZOSO Led Zeppelin Experience

Albums I,II,III w/The Whom 7:30p

Sa 14 ZOSO Led Zeppelin Experience

IV, Houses, Presence,Pys Grafitti w/Mojo Rising Th 19 DWEEZIL ZAPPA “Dweezilla On The Road” Guitar Masterclass 2:30p

Dopapod

NC BRASS BAND

The Carolina Theatre (310 S. Greene St. Greensboro) Thursday Dec. 1 7:30 p.m. “Celebrate the release of the NCBB’s newest album, “Christmas Wrapped in Brass,” with traditional and contemporary holiday favorites performed by YOUR North Carolina Brass Band! This event is general admission (no assigned seating). Tickets are $20 for adults and $5 for students (through college). A $2.50 Facility Fee and sales tax will be added to the price of each ticket. Babes-in-arms are free, but still require a ticket. Special rates are available for groups of 12 or more by calling the Box Office at 336-333-2605. Please note: There is an additional $3.50 per ticket web fee for Internet purchases; call 336-333-2605 to avoid those charges!” - via Facebook

Tue Dec 13

Jason Bolan

The New Mastersounds Wed Dec 14

Th 19 DWEEZIL ZAPPA:

“50 Years of Frank” 7p

Yarn

F r 3 AMERICAN AQUARIUM Sa 4 AMERICAN AQUARIUM Tu 14 THE WERKS

Sat Dec 17

w/ Electric Soul Pandemic

Sa 18 PERPETUAL GROOVE Th 23 LOUIS THE CHILD Fr 24 THE LACs MARCH

Adv. Tickets @Lincolntheatre.com & Schoolkids Records All Shows All Ages

126 E. Cabarrus 919-821-4111

26 YES! WEEKLY

St.

BOJANGLES COLISEUM

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.bojanglescoliseum.com Dec 3: Jingle Jam ft. Rick Ross, Lil Boosie, & Young Dolph

THE FILLMORE

1000 NC Music Factory Blvd | 704.916.8970 www.fillmorecharlottenc.com Nov 30: Niykee Heaton Dec 1: Glass Animals Dec 3: For Today Dec 5: Third Eye Blind Dec 9: Slippery When Wet Dec 11: Kane Brown Dec 16: Mac Miller

OVENS AUDITORIUM

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.ovensauditorium.com Dec 3: K-Love Dec 10: Soulful Sounds of Christmas

TWC ARENA

333 E Trade St | 704.688.9000 www.timewarnercablearena.com Dec 8: Trans-Siberian Orchestra Dec 13: Kissmas

DURHAM

DPAC

123 Vivian St | 919.680.2787 www.dpacnc.com Dec 6: The Piano Guys

CAROLINA THEATRE

FEBRUARY

WHO’S BAD Michael Jackson Trib LOS LONELY BOYS THE HIP ABDUCTION REVEREND HORTON HEAT WHISKEY MYERS Y&T MOTHERS FINEST

CHARLOTTE

GREENSBORO

Fr 20 THE BAND OF HEATHENS Sa 21 DAVID ALLAN COE

Fr 3 Sa 4 Th 16 Fr 24 Sa 25 4-22 5-13

Compiled by Alex Eldridge

O’CONNOR BAND FEATURING MARK O’CONNOR

Van Dyke Performance Space (200 N. Davie St. Greensboro) Thursday Dec. 1 8 p.m. “Join us for the first concert of the Great American Music Series at the Van Dyke Performance Space. The great American fiddler Mark O’Connor and his Family Band will take stage for an Appalachian Christmas performance to kick off the 2016 holiday season. The O’Connor Band puts on an engaging, dynamic show featuring compelling arrangements, virtuosic solos, and tight vocal harmonies. Tickets are on sale now! Get them today: http://oconnorchristmas.brownpapertickets.com/ The Great American Music Series is made possible by a partnership with Wrangler and ArtsGreensboro.” - via Facebook !

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

Thu Jan 19

310 S Greene St | 336.333.2605 www.carolinatheatre.com Dec 1: NC Brass Band Dec 2: David Crosby Dec 11: Piedmont Triad Jazz Holiday Concert Dec 15: Carolyn Malachi

GREENSBORO COLISEUM 1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com Dec 11: Trans-Siberian Orchestra

RALEIGH

PNC ARENA

1400 Edwards Mill Rd | 919.861.2300 www.thepncarena.com Dec 14: Trans-Siberian Orchestra

!

CHECK IT OUT!

Click on our website, yesweekly.com, for more concerts. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM


[PLAYBILL] by Lenise Willis The holidays are upon us and so are several winter productions that celebrate family, friends, Christ and Christmas. Continuing this week through Dec. 13 is Barn Dinner Theatre’s Black Nativity, a vibrant retelling of the birth of Jesus that uses gospel music, African drums and high-energy dance routines. Triad Stage is also celebrating the holidays with the Biblical tale. Its production of Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity is a down-home version of the religious classic. The Preston Lane and Laurelyn Dossett original features a loving church, nestled in the Appalachian Mountains, which reenacts the fall of Adam and Eve, the birth of Christ and other miracle tales. Productions run through Christmas Eve. New on Friday, Open Space Café Theatre will entertain audiences with a humorous and sarcastic look at the commercial holiday. The Santaland Diaries and Season’s Greetings, by David Sedaris, highlight the pains of the holidays and of being a Macy’s elf during one of the craziest shopping months of the year. Performances continue through Dec. 11. Community Theatre of Greensboro is paying tribute to The Broach Theatre Company by performing one of its favorites: A Tuna Christmas Friday through Sunday. The following week, Dec. 9, the theatre will turn its attention to one of its own annual classics: The Best Christmas Pageant Ever. Play runs through Dec. 18. Next week, Dec. 8, Theatre Alliance begins its holiday production of White Christmas, a classic-style musical based on the 1954 film of the same name. When two iconic songand-dance men follow a sister act to Vermont, they soon discover that they nearly-bankrupt lodge in which they are to perform is actually owned by their former commanding general. The production includes such hits as “Blue Skies,” “I Love a Piano,” and “White Christmas.” Production runs through Dec. 18. Closer to Christmas, look forward to Twin City Stage’s traditional production of Macy’s Yes, Virginia The Musical, the heart-warming tale of an eightyear-old girl who writes the local paper to ask, “Is Santa real?” The editor’s answer is a spirited message that hones the true spirit of the holidays. The performance is based on a true story and runs Dec. 16-18. !

WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

drama

STAGE IT!

Triad Stage performs 10th anniversary production of Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity

O

ne of the most repeated stories in history is that of the birth of Jesus. The Biblical nativity story traditionally depicts the Virgin Mary and Lenise Willis her husband Joseph seeking shelter for Contributing the night, and the tale of the Three columnist Wise Men who follow the North Star with their gifts. But what about what happened before the birth of Christ? And where does a banjo fit in? Answering these questions is Triad Stage with an anniversary production of its Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity. The light-hearted, country production highlights the fictitious Open Heart Community Fellowship and the congregation’s down-home telling of the nativity story. Using toe-tapping folk music, they spin a holiday tale that starts where it all began: Genesis. This year will be the 10th anniversary of its creation. “It is a wonderful thing to live with a play for 10 years,” said Preston Lane, playwright and Triad Stage artistic director, “to come to know it not only as I did when I wrote it or when I first directed it, but to see it with fresh eyes because of the artists who have invested their time and talents to bring it to life each December and because of the audiences who respond to it with such enjoyment.” Lane says that the play has a long history—even longer than its 10 years of life—and its origin is rooted in many things. It began when he was a graduate student at Yale University and received a grant from the Fox Fellowship to research and create an adaptation of the Medieval English Mystery Cycles, a communitybased drama that told the story of the Bible from Creation to Judgment Day. The concept for the play was also inspired by Lane’s family, which is based in the Appalachian Mountains of East Tennessee. “My Aunt Shirley wrote and had the family preform in the basement of her home for several years,” Lane said. “I’ve always been fascinated by self-

VanderVeen Photographers

Musician and composer Laurelyn Dossett, right, will perform on stage for the 10th anniversary of Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity at Triad Stage. taught artists who make art to glorify, to explore, to praise. The idea of that art being theater is what I was trying to get to in Beautiful Star.” Once the play was fully conceptualized, it was developed into a full-length play titled Wondrous Love. “It had traditional religious music in the play, so I always knew I wanted a musical element,” Lane said. “The idea of taking the first half of Wondrous Love and turning it into Beautiful Star came about because of the great collaboration I found with Laurelyn (Dossett) on Brother Wolf.” Local musician Laurelyn Dossett has collaborated with Lane on several productions, including writing the musical score for his Appalachian nativity story. “Laurelyn’s music is the soul of the play,” Lane said. “In the original production it served as a kind of narrative force for the story. I think that is very much true in this year’s production.” In honor of it’s 10th anniversary, for the first time ever, Dossett will be performing with the band on stage. “Having Laurelyn in the band has given us the strong central voice that ties the stories together,” Lane said. “She’s joined by two fabulous musicians to become a kind of community observer that calls us to worship and to wonder.” Dossett, composer and music director, says that part of the reason they added her to the band on stage was to refresh

the production for its anniversary. “I knew that I would be bringing Eric Robertson back to be in the band; he was in the original production in 2006,” she said. “Gailanne Amundsen was in the band for Radiunt Abundunt. So this is a homecoming for all of us, completing an historical musical circle.” The music that complements Lane’s moving story is best described as “Appalachian-sounding,” simply put by Dossett. “But there is not just one way to sound Appalachian,” she added. “The instrumentation is out of the bluegrass and old-time tradition, but the band has a somewhat modern and chordally sophisticated take on that music. So it is both grounded in the past and very much of the present.” Together, the lyrics, on-stage string instruments and energetic storyline create a heart-warming, mind-opening and magical performance. “Laurelyn and I don’t really write musicals,” Lane said. “I think we’re inventing our own form of theater in which music and acting can exist in a unique way.” !

WANNA

go?

Triad Stage performs Beautiful Star: An Appalachian Nativity Nov. 25-Dec. 24 at The Pyrle Theatre, 232 S. Elm St., Greensboro. Tickets are $10-$42. For tickets and more information call 336-272-0160 or visit triadstage.org.

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016 YES! WEEKLY

27


SCREEN IT!

flicks Given how popular and profitable the Harry Potter series was, it was probably a foregone conclusion that a spin-off would be in the offing. Warner Bros. clearly thought so, having Mark Burger committed to a fivefilm franchise based Contributing on J.K. Rowling’s Fantastic Beasts and columnist Where to Find Them. With Rowling herself penning the screenplay and director David Yates (a four-film Potter veteran) at the helm, Fantastic Beasts (which is

Magic in Manhattan set several decades before the Potters) is a blockbuster made to order, a specialeffects extravaganza laden with wizards, witches, magic wands, wicked doings and, yes, fantastic beasts. Eddie Redmayne, appealing but trying a little too hard, plays the bumbling hero Newt Scamander, whose visit to 1920s New York City is complicated when some of his “fantastic beasts” escape from his patently defective suitcase. There’s an entire magic underground movement already in America (housed in Woolworth’s, no less), and it soon becomes apparent that various factions, particularly those represented by Percival Graves (Colin Farrell), have hidden agendas – which don’t include Newt or his new friends Jacob Kowalski (Dan Fogler), an

Santa slips in sequel After a 13-year hiatus, Bad Santa 2 only serves to reinforce the old adage that sequels are rarely equal to the original – even if the original was no masterpiece to begin with. Billy Bob Thornton jumps once more into the breach – and the Santa suit – as perennial loser Willie Soke, who reconnects with Marcus Skidmore (Tony Cox) to pull off a Christmas Eve heist in Chicago. The mastermind is none other than Willie’s long-estranged mother, the inaptly named Sunny Soke (Kathy Bates). Also back is Brett Kelly, still trailing after Willie in clueless fashion as the adoring Thurman Merman. He still claims to see the good in Willie, despite Willie’s repeated attempts to ditch him. The actors’ timing, delivery, and sheer zest are occasionally able to salvage, if only partially, some of the jokes. A few times Bad Santa 2 threatens to go on a roll, only to lapse back into repetitive insults

28 YES! WEEKLY

and putdowns. The film’s funniest moments are those which usurp the traditional notion of Santa Claus, such as Willie’s brawl with a fellow sidewalk Santa (Mike Starr) or when children sit on his knee and tell him what they want for Christmas. Original director Terry Zwigoff has been succeeded by Mark Waters and original screenwriters Glenn Ficarra and John Resqua by Johnny Rosenthal (his first) and Shauna Cross. Neither change has been for the good. The heist shtick feels as if it was lifted from the first film – including the ending – and despite that enthusiastic cast, which includes Christina Hendricks, Jenny Zigrino, Jeff Skowron and Octavia Spencer (in a rather embarrassing cameo), it’s uphill all the way. The first Bad Santa was admittedly hitand-miss, but some of the hits were truly inspired. Aside from a few intermittent laughs, Bad Santa 2 is more miss than hit. No-ho-ho. !

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

equally bumbling human (“No-Maj”) baker, and sisters Tina (Katherine Waterston) and Queenie Goldstein (Alison Sudol). Rowling revels in the period atmosphere, incorporating and adapting familiar elements from the era. Scamander has more than a little Charlie Chaplin in him, and Jacob a bit of Oliver Hardy. With a little more sass, Waterston’s Tina could be a screwball heroine a la Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday (1940), Sudol’s Queenie is a quintessential ‘20s flapper, and Samantha Morton’s hard-nosed anti-magic proponent Mary Lou Barebone is clearly modeled on the suffragette movement. Not unlike the Potter films, some characters – and talented actors – get lost in the shuffle, including Morton, Jon Voight, Ezra Miller, Ron Perlman, Jenn Murray

and Carmen Ejogo (who takes her role as Seraphina Picquery a little too seriously). Of course, these characters can return in subsequent installments, even those who seem to have met their demise. (After all, it’s magic – anything can happen.) Never boring but frequently familiar, Fantastic Beasts moves inexorably toward an anti-climactic finale that recalls Ghostbusters (either version) and any number of effects-laden films already released this year (London Has Fallen, Suicide Squad, Batman v. Superman, Captain America: Civil War, et al). Seeing a major metropolis laid waste in massive CGI fashion simply doesn’t have the novelty it used to. !

Moana the magnificent Directors John Musker and Ron Clements, whose previous collaborations The Little Mermaid (1989) and Aladdin (1992) are widely regarded as classics, turn the hat trick with Moana, a beautifully rendered, CGI-animated fantasy in the grand tradition of the Disney greats. The title character, voiced by newcomer Auli’i Cravalho, is very much the prototypical Disney hero – or heroine, in this case. She’s imaginative, willful, a little rebellious, but always respectful of her elders – particularly her father (voiced by Temuera Morrison) and her grandmother (voiced by Rachel House). When the vegetation on their tropical island begins dying and the fish vanish from the sea, Moana is certain that the island has been cursed, and despite her father’s protestations but her grandmother’s encouragement, she is determined to restore her home to its previous beauty and bounty. To this end, she embarks on a magical voyage filled with whimsy and wonder, aided – somewhat reluctantly – by Maui (voiced by Dwayne Johnson), a beefy but incorrigible demigod whose earlier mischief caused the problem in the first place. Like Robin Williams in Aladdin, Johnson serves as the story’s principal comic relief, pulls it off quite adroitly, and even carries a tune nicely. (That’s right, folks – The Rock sings.) Moana celebrates the folklore and legends of its locale in dazzling, grand-

scale fashion that is humorous but always sincere and respectful. Perhaps a few jokes fall flat, and there could have been more of the egotistical, villainous crab Tamatoa (voiced by Jemaine Clement) – whose musical number “Shiny” is a show-stopper – but these are complaints that fade when one considers the overall excellence. Truly a delight for all ages, Moana is not only one of the season’s best and brightest offerings, it’s quite simply one of the year’s best films. !

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[CARMIKE]

WINSTON-SALEM

Dec 2 - 8

ALLIED (R) 1:20, 4:05, 6:50, 9:35 BAD SANTA 2 (R) 1:00, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40 MOANA 2D (PG) 12:00, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 RULES DON’T APPLY (PG13) 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30 FANTASTIC BEAST 2D (PG13) 12:00, 12:30, 3:00, 3:30, 6:00, 6:30, 9:00, 9;30 ALMOST CHRISTMAS (PG13)- 12:30, 3:05, 5:40, 8:15 DR. STRANGE 2D (PG13) 1:15, 3:50, 6:30, 9:20 HACKSAW RIDGE (R) 12:05, 3:10, 6:00, 9:00 TROLLS (PG) 1:35, 4:05, 6:45, 9:15

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Dec 2 - 8

[RED]

ARRIVAL (LUXURY SEATING) (PG-13) 11:35A 2:10P 4:40P 7:05P 9:35P 11:55P FANTASTIC BEASTS (LUXURY SEATING)(PG-13) 11:30A 2:30P 5:30P 8:30P 11:30P HACKSAW RIDGE (LUXURY SEATING) (R) 11:30A 2:20P 5:10P 8:00P 10:50P A MAN CALLED OVE (PG-13) 12:10P 2:35P 5:00P 7:20P 9:40P ALLIED (R) 11:30A 2:00P 4:35P 7:10P 9:55P ALMOST CHRISTMAS (PG-13) 11:45A 2:10P 4:35P 7:00P 9:25P 11:50P BAD SANTA 2 (R) 12:45P 3:00P 5:25P 7:40P 9:50P 11:55P BILLY LYNN’S LONG HALFTIM (R) 7:35P BLEED FOR THIS (R) 11:30A 10:10P CHRISTINE (R) 12:00P 9:05P 11:30P DOCTOR STRANGE (PG-13) 2:15P 7:25P 10:00P

!

(3D) DOCTOR STRANGE (PG-13) 11:40A 4:50P (3D) FANTASTIC BEASTS (PG-13) 1:30P 4:30P 7:20P 10:15P GIRL ON THE TRAIN (R) 2:30P 5:00P 7:30P HARRY & SNOWMAN (NR) 5:20P 7:15P RULES DON’T APPLY (PG-13) 11:40A SHUT IN (R) 10:00P TROLLS (PG) 11:35A 1:45P 3:55P 6:05P 8:15P 10:15P

[A/PERTURE] Dec 2 - 8

LOVING (PG-13) Fri: 3:00, 5:45, 8:30, Sat & Sun: 9:45 AM, 12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30, Mon: 6:00, 8:45 Tue: 3:15, 6:00, 8:45, Wed & Thu: 6:00, 8:45 MOONLIGHT (R) Fri: 3:30, 6:00, 8:45, Sat: 10:30 AM, 1:00, 3:30, 6:00, 8:45, Sun: 11:30 AM, 2:00, 4:30, Mon: 5:30, 8:00, Tue: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, Wed: 5:00 PM Thu: 5:30, 8:00 TAMPOPO (NR) Fri: 4:15, 6:45, 9:15, Sat: 11:15 AM, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15, Sun: 11:15 AM, 1:45, 4:15, 6:45 Mon - Thu: 9:15 PM THE ROYAL OPERA HOUSE: COSI FAN TUTTE (NR) Sun: 7:00 PM A MAN CALLED OVE (EN MAN SOM HETER OVE) (PG-13) Fri: 9:00 PM, Sat: 1:30, 9:00, Sun: 1:30 PM Mon: 6:30, 9:00, Tue: 4:00, 9:00 Wed & Thu: 6:30, 9:00 BY SIDNEY LUMET (NR) Fri: 4:00, 6:30, Sat & Sun: 11:00 AM, 4:00, 6:30 Mon: 6:45 PM, Tue: 4:15, 6:45, Wed & Thu: 6:45 PM

WANT YOUR TIMES INCLUDED? Send us your theater’s details and movie times to artdirector@yesweekly.com

311 W 4th Street Winston-Salem, NC 27101 336.722.8148

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visions

SEE IT!

Zun Lee, Jerell Willis carrying Fidel over the Brooklyn Bridge. Brooklyn, NY. November 2012. 2012, digital print on archival paper, 20x28”. Courtesy of the artist.

Jordan Casteel, Miles & Jojo, 2014, Oil on canvas, 54 x 72” Courtesy Bernard Lumpkin and Carmine Boccuzzi.

Diggs Gallery exhibit asks simple but provocative question

I

BY ROBERT LOPEZ

n Ralph Ellison’s novel “Invisible Man,” the narrator speaks of being “a man of substance, of flesh and bone,” but navigating a world in which people don’t see him. The artists in the latest exhibition at Winston-Salem State University’s Diggs Gallery are trying to get people to see “I’m a person.” “That’s all they ask, is that, ‘I be a treated as a human being,’” Diggs director Endia Beal said. “This exhibition is focusing on what it’s like to be a black man. It’s also focused on what does it mean to be a human being, a brother, a son, a lover of someone, how do you look at an individual and feel empathy and understanding toward a person.” The exhibition, titled “Do You See Me?,” touches on issues of black identity and the stereotypes people of color deal with. The title is inspired by Ellison’s book. The show, which runs until March 1, features works from nine artists, including High Point native Chris Watts. Beal, a Winston-Salem native and acclaimed photographer, took over as director of the gallery two years ago, and said she’s looking to bring in works that speak to issues of concern for students at the historically black university. “I was interested in contemporary artists that were creating works that have an urgency to them,” she said. “These artists are really talking about things happening in the community right now.”

30 YES! WEEKLY

things, a package The largest work of cigarillos, which in the exhibition is a Brown was accused mixed media sculpof stealing prior to ture by St. Louis getting shot. Anartist Aaron Fowler. other picture shows Described as “part some Skittles, monument, part which 17-year-old shrine,” the work Trayvon Martin features a portrait was carrying on the of Lezley McSpadnight he was shot den, mother of by George ZimmerMichael Brown, man in 2012. who was killed by a Like Brown, MarFerguson, Missouri tin was unarmed police officer in when he was 2014. Aaron Fowler, He Was, 2015, Mixed killed. Zimmerman A grand jury later Media, 134x165x110”, Courtesy Ric was charged with declined to indict Whitney and Tina Perry-Whitney second-degree the officer, Darren murder, but claimed Wilson. he shot Martin in self-defense, and was The 18-year-old Brown, who was acquitted by a jury. unarmed when he was shot, appears in a “Many of the students who come in heart below the picture of his mother. here don’t necessarily need to read the The eulogy McSpadden delivered wall text to understand the work,” Beal makes up the background of the portrait said. “They look at the Skittles and they and mirrors make up her eyes. know that’s Trayvon Martin. They don’t “It’s sort of an altarpiece,” Beal said. need the historical background. They’re “And really, the piece is talking about very aware of the contemporary issues seeing the pain through her eyes. You men of color are dealing with every day.” look in the eyes, and you can see yourself Other pieces in the exhibit deal with in her. He (Fowler) has removed the stereotypes, among them a video instalpolice, removed all these things, and lation by Terence Nance, in which he really is just talking about the pain of a Googles terms like “black boy 1.” mother losing her child. He’s focusing on “And it might bring up a little black boy the idea of loss and tragedy, and the idea cussing,” Beal said. “Or it might bring up that Mike Brown is a human being and he a 16-year-old black boy killed. And you had a mother.” find that certain prejudices and stereoNearby, is a series of photographs by types are reinforced even in a Google Davion Alston depicting among other

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

search. And you have to ask yourself why is that.” Another work touches on the nature of African-American celebrity. Watts’ “Memento” series is made up of church fans with sketches of luminaries like Wesley Snipes, Erykah Badu and Laurence Fishburne on them. “Historically with a church fan, you usually have some kind of religious figure on them,” Beal said. “And this creates a certain ambiguity. You wonder if he’s looking at these people as deities. I think he’s talking about the spiritual nature of celebrities, and especially how celebrities of color can be lifted up in some ways to be spiritual icons.” Beal said most of the artists in the exhibition are simply asking people to “step back.” “And remove yourself from the prejudices that men of color are experiencing,” she said. “If you remove yourself from that and see love, family, pride and pain, you feel the relationship a mother has with her son, the father figure aspects in a black man’s life. These artists are talking about human experiences, the connection we have with each other.” !

WANNA

go?

“Do You See Me?” runs through March 1 at the Diggs Gallery, on the campus of Winston-Salem State University, 601 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Winston-Salem. There is no admission charge for the gallery. For more information call (336) 750-2458 or visit www.wssu.edu/casbe/ diggs-gallery/.

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Shining a spotlight on short films - and those who make them Let no one say that the independent film movement in North Carolina is dying. Sure, it’s taken a few hits – the replacement of tax incentives with a grant program, a significant migration of filmmakers to Mark Burger states with incentives (and therefore more Contributing opportunities), and the ongoing lure of columnist New York and Los Angeles – but the indie filmmakers of the Tarheel State represent a resilient and resourceful, to say nothing of talented, creative contingent. Among that contingent is Zack Fox, a photographer/videographer based in Winston-Salem whose credits include the Dark Heat segment of the North Carolina horror anthology Witching Hour II, the upcoming documentary Sammie the Comic Book Man, and the upcoming Civil War short Our War. Fox is also the gala organizer for the 2nd Annual MPCWS Short Film Social Gala, which takes place Sunday at the Marketplace Cinemas in Winston-Salem, which is both a celebration of the region’s indie talent, the films being screened in front of the proverbial hometown crowd, and a chance for filmmakers to network and make new contacts in the area. The event is being co-sponsored by Lucid Digital, NerdFox Photography and MPCWS. “We wanted to give the chance to local filmmakers to show their films on the big

screen in front of a live audience,” Fox explains. “We also built this festival to help bring local actors, actresses, writers, directors and filmmakers together with our talent ‘Meet and Greet’ before the Gala.” (The “Meet and Greet” in the lobby is free of charge, and admission to the Gala screening is only $2.50.) The first MPCWS Short Film Social Gala last year proved a rousing success, with over 130 people in attendance. Some 600 short films were submitted for consideration. The third-place finalist, Gotta Go, wound up being shown at the Cannes Film Festival and, Fox notes, “last year we helped many directors find new actors for their newest projects.” In terms of selection criteria, “we want to keep this a local event,” he says. “This year we picked 10 short films from local North Carolina and South Carolina filmmakers. We also received many shorts from Russia, Paris, Turkey, London, and even Iran – seriously! – from which we picked two foreign films to be shown in

this year’s Gala. This is our second year and we’re planning on being an annual event.” The Gala will also include five trailers to upcoming films made in North Carolina and a classic short film. The Davie County Community’s 20-piece band is again opening the event, with a performance of a new original piece of music to Jekyll and Hyde. Fox makes no bones about the transition from tax incentives to the state’s current grant program. “It devastated

the filmmaking community, and even the movie-going community here in North Carolina,” he observes. Not only did (soon to be former Gov.) McCrory cut the filming tax incentives, he raised the movie-going tax, too. “As a cinematographer and photographer myself, I’ve driven to Atlanta for a large amount of my work since the incentives were cut. The main thing I and the other judges have taken from seeing all the short films we received this year over last is that the local North Carolina filmmakers are still passionate about filmmaking. They’ll do what they must to get the film made.” !

WANNA

go?

The 2nd Annual MPCWS Short Film Social Gala will be held Sunday at the Marketplace Cinemas, 2095 Peters Creek Parkway, Winston-Salem. The Meet and Greet begins at 5:30 pm, the Gala at 6:30 pm. Tickets are $2.50. For advance tickets or more information, call 336.725.4646 or visit http://mpcws.com/. You can also find MPCWS on Facebook at http://facebook.com/MarketPlace250Cinemas/.

An Evening With

DAVID CROSBY THE CAROLINA THEATRE, GREENSBORO

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www.carolinatheatre.com or bnpresents.com A BOB NOCEK PRESENTS concert NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016 YES! WEEKLY

31


chow

EAT IT!

To LaRue Elm to let the chef surprise us BY KRISTI MAIER | @triadfoodies

T

he November installment of our triadfoodies Chef’s Table, where we let the chef surprise us, had us back in Greensboro once again. This time, at LaRue Elm, a multi-cuisine restaurant that leans a bit French at 403 North Elm Street downtown. LaRue used to be a few blocks south on Green Street across from the Carolina Theatre. It had a speakeasy type vibe offering French inspired small plates and Chef Trey Bell and his team did everything …all of it…. right in front of you in basically what is not a kitchen at all. Think hot plates and infrared. And it was really, really cool to eat there. But when you’re a chef with an actual culinary staff, sometimes you need an actual kitchen. So about a year and a half in, when the building that used to house Ganache and Blu Margarita came available, Bell swooped in and got it. And this past August, he tripled his capacity at least. It looks as if the en-

32 YES! WEEKLY

tirety of his old digs could fit into his new kitchen. And you can still see the team cooking, only now it’s behind the glass in the deco-inspired building. When I say we let the chef surprise us, I really mean it. I don’t know what’s going to be served. I like to be surprised with the rest of you. Sometimes it’s a new menu and sometimes the chef is trying out new creations. In our case, we got to try a few new things that Chef Bell was working on and hoping to introduce on an upcoming menu. Guinea pigs? Maybe. But that’s what makes it fun. We arrived about a half hour early so we could enjoy drinks and we love it when some of our fellow supper-goers do the same. It’s a great way to get the party started. As we made our way to our tables come dinnertime, Bell placed on the bar and the tables his first course. Appetizer/Bar Course Salt & Pepper Pork Rinds They were salty and peppery and warm from the fryer. They were really big and

Chef Trey Bell of LaRue Elm delighted patrons at a recent Chef’s Table event. NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

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Salt and pepper pork rinds led off the evening.

really crispy. And I don’t know if you’re like me, but I could eat a pile of them. They could be my meal, but Chef Bell wasn’t about to let that happen. Second Course Frog Leg Chef Bell addressed the group of us early on and told his that he hadn’t seen frog legs so succulent and meaty and he was happy to let us try them. Frog legs most assuredly aren’t on most menus in the Triad. But Bell is adventurous enough to give it a try. We had some food restrictions among us that evening and when you can’t eat beef or pork but you can eat chicken and fish, we just figured amphibian is close enough. Bell even used a different breading for the couple of folks who needed theirs to be gluten-free. The frog legs were definitely juicy and meaty. I won’t say it tastes like chicken…except it does. Highly recommend if you find it on the menu in the coming weeks. Third Course/Fourth Course Pan Seared NC Duck Breast atop Beluga Lentils Spiny Lobster Tail This course was like a two for one. It featured a pan seared duck breast atop Beluga Lentils. The duck was quite simply prepared to let the lentils shine. Beluga lentils look like beluga caviar. They are jet black. These were packed with flavor. One of our foodie friends, Ericca, told us they were the best lentils she’d ever had. The spiny lobster came out with the duck breast. What can we say? It was lobster tail. As lobster tails go, it did the trick. If there was anything missing there, it would’ve been some drawn butter. Because, lobster.

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I am looking forward to going back to LaRue Elm on another night and trying another sampling of small plates. If the frog leg is on the menu, it won’t hurt my feelings one bit. One thing for sure is that if you have a large group or party, the new LaRue can certainly accommodate you. There’s plenty of dining room space, a large bar and room for live music. There’s an upstairs too. Chef Bell says they’ve been enjoying their new address and that the upcoming Greensboro Performing Arts Center will help with an increase in business, which is one of the reasons they decided to move in the first place. Previously he’d told YES! Weekly that the increased size in his kitchen would allow him to offer larger plates and entrees rather than keeping things tapas sized. However, small plates are what they are known for at LaRue and it appears that they are here to stay. Which suits us just fine. And the restaurant continues to source local ingredients and strives to use those ingredients in new and inventive ways. And to be sure, the cocktail menu at LaRue is second to none. You’re sure to find an inventive cocktail to suit your taste buds, with exotic and sometimes sexy names to boot. The next time we let the chef surprise us will be on Wednesday, December 14 at The Traveled Farmer in Greensboro. Join us at 7:30 p.m. as we let Chef Jay Pierce surprise us. We’re even shopping at the market beforehand to buy our gifts for a Secret Santa exchange to celebrate this joyous season. Follow the details and RSVP on the triadfoodies Facebook page. !

WANNA

go?

LaRue Elm is located at 403 North Elm Street, Greensboro. larueelm.com

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VISIT YESWEEKLY.COM/GALLERIES TO SEE MORE PHOTOS!

photos [FACES & PLACES] by Natalie Garcia

AROUND THE TRIAD YES! Weekly’s Photographer

Homegrown Artisan Market Blind Tiger | 11.27.16

hot pour presents

BARTENDERS OF THE WEEK | BY NATALIE GARCIA Check out videos on our Facebook!

BARTENDER: Alison Breen BAR: The Tasting Room AGE: 33 HOMETOWN: Camp Lejeune, NC Q: How did you become a bartender? A: First off, I like to use the term winetender! I got into wine kind of by chance. I was working in corporate America and some friends of mine, Joey and Matthew Medaloni, were starting to work on Medaloni Cellars in Lewisville and developing what is now The Tasting Room in Greensboro. I worked side by side with them and now run the shop.

34 YES! WEEKLY

Q: What’s your favorite wine to drink? A: I love so many different ones! I always tend to go for Champagne or Cava. I am really into Argentine Cabemets right now. If I am not drinking wine, you can find me drinking a dry martini with blue cheese olives! Q: What’s the craziest thing you’ve seen while bartending? A: I could write a book! I did have a guy come in one time and ask to use the bathroom and he warned me that he was going to “blow it up.” Q: Who has it harder behind the bar? Guys or girls? A: I don’t really know! I think

NOVEMBER 30- DECEMBER 6, 2016

we have equal positive and negatives really. Q: What’s the best tip you’ve ever gotten? A: I had someone with $1,000 tab and tipped $1,000. Q: How do you deal with difficult customers? A: Thankfully, I have been fortunate to have such amazing people that come to The Tasting Room. It is a very rare occasion that I have someone difficult. In the instance that maybe I can’t find a wine that pleases a particular person, I just try my best. That’s really all that I can do!” Q: Single? A: Yes

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37


last call

[THE ADVICE GODDESS] love • sex • dating • marriage • questions

MOTHERSHIP OF FOOLS

This will sound crazy, but...should I tell my girlfriend, the love of my life, that I was abducted by aliens? It happened a long time Amy Alkon ago, and I have no proof — just my own recollection. Yes, Advice it could’ve been a Goddess dream, but even so, it changed how I see things and opened me up to new possibilities. My girlfriend is a schoolteacher and probably wouldn’t believe me. Whether she’d still stay with me, I don’t know. I want to be completely honest with her. Is that crazy? — UFOnapped Strange how nobody ever manages to shoot video when there’s an alien spaceship in the vicinity — perhaps because they’re too busy recording that guy, two traffic lanes over, who’s picking his nose. Like you, science historian and Skeptic

magazine founder Michael Shermer felt like he had a little meet-’n’-greet with some outer space dudes. However, he realized that his supposed abduction was just the effects of “sleep deprivation and physical exhaustion” because he had just cycled 83 straight hours in a bike-athlon. This — mixed with a “distant memory” of a TV episode about aliens taking over the earth — made for what Shermer calls “nothing more than a bizarre hallucination.” Shermer notes that UFOs and alien abductions are “1. unaccepted by most people in astronomy, exobiology” and SETI (the search for extraterrestrial intelligence), “2. extremely unlikely (although not logically impossible), and 3. ... largely based on anecdotal and uncorroborated evidence.” However, Shermer explains, “the human capacity for self-delusion is boundless, and the effects of belief are overpowering” — leading many people to swear that they actually did go on a ride with the little green men. As “evidence,” they’ll tell you they have really vivid “memories” — of, say, the aliens bickering: “Just put him in the trunk of your flying saucer. Nah, got all my intergalactic soccer gear in there. You take him!” But such “memories” are probably due

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to what memory researcher Elizabeth Loftus and her colleagues call “imagination inflation.” This describes how repeatedly imagining an experience can, over time, lead us to forget that the particular event — “heyyy, how ‘bout them aliens!” — came out of our imagination or a dream. We can start to believe it really happened. For example, Loftus and her colleagues told research participants that a dream they’d revealed to the researchers probably meant that they’d had an upsetting experience before the age of 3, “like being bullied by an older child.” The participants insisted that they didn’t recall anything like that. Yet, about two weeks later, many reported experiencing the bullying they were simply told about — even offering details on how they were supposedly oppressed by some other 3-year-old. This makes sense, considering cognitive psychologist Robert Bjork’s finding that “using one’s memory shapes memory” — meaning that the more we recall something the bigger and stronger it grows in our memory. Also, in recalling some event — for ourselves or others — we have a tendency to “decorate,” adding details that can easily get merged into the particular “memory.” We quickly forget that we just threw them in to, oh, put on a good show at the alien abductee party because we were feeling all “my tinfoil hat is so last season.” Also consider “cognitive dissonance” — the discomfort from simultaneously holding two opposing beliefs, like thinking that your worldview was transformed

by UFOs while also thinking that it’s stupid to believe in UFOs. We tend to smooth out the clash by going with whichever belief works best for our ego. So, in your case, to continue believing that you’re intelligent and also not cockadoody in the head, you tell yourself that your memory of your special vacay with the 00100010111 family has to be real. As for what to tell your girlfriend, what counts is that you had these insights — not the sense that a space alien opened your skull up with some high-tech can opener and dumped them in. If you mention the alien thing at all, explain it in light of the science on how our memory likes to dabble in fiction writing. While you’re at it, give yourself credit for your insights. It may help to understand our brain’s “default mode” processing. Our mind doesn’t just turn off when we take a break from directed, focused thinking (like reading, studying, or pondering something). Wider neural networks take over and do subconscious background processing — gnawing on ideas and problems we’ve been working on. This can make insights seem like they came out of nowhere. But chances are, yours are a product of your mind and your real-life experience — an explanation that, sadly, lacks the panache of claiming the space dudes were going to use the anal probe on you but weren’t sure whether you could afford the copay. ! GOT A problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com) © 2016 Amy Alkon Distributed by Creators.Com.

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[horoscopes] [LEO (July 23 to August 22) You may be surprised to discover something about yourself or your money/debts that you have been avoiding. We are all in denial sometimes. Don’t waste time on a guilt trip. Now that you know, it is time to face the facts and collect the threads of a solution. This is not a good time to have a sexual encounter with someone unknown to you. [VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Mercury, your ruling planet, moves into the sector of life related to children, recreation, personal creativity, and romance. Your attention will be focused in these areas beyond the end of this year. You can expect changes, shifts of gear, and surprises in these territories. Something new is developing in these areas, but it may not become apparent until later in Jan. [LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) The practical things of life seem to stand front and center between you and a pleasurable week. You may be working on a project with a lot of details that requires your full attention in order to be accurate. You and a significant other may need to have a clear discussion about your expectations of one another. [SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your faith will be renewed this week. Your guardian is watching over you. Someone in the background offers help. Your available resources are expanded and you have fresh, interesting work. The gods are with you now. [SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) You are gathering information that will help you launch future plans. It is possible that others are helping, I.e. A sibling, a roommate, or a friend. It is possible that your research may carry you off into a short trip. It is important, while Mercury is preparing to turn retrograde, that you double check everything now. [CAPRICORN (December 22 to Janu-

ary 19) Mercury travels slowly through your sign between now and Feb. 6. It will be going through its retrograde cycle before it moves along. Take care with any decision of importance because you likely will find reason to change your mind. New information keeps popping up to muddy the works. This is normal with Mercury retrogrades. Do not beat yourself because you can’t seem to move forward.

[AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) The planetary energies are on a roll for you, Aquarius. Mars, the Warrior, in your www.yesweekly.com

sign is helping you to tackle more than one project with determined vigor. Even if you need resources, they will come to you without strain or fuss. Your persuasive power is strong and other will listen to you now.

[PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Developments in your career or life direction may cause you to feel ineffective this week. Don’t allow this one experience to alter your sense of self-identity. You are an intuitive person who can almost always assist others to feel better. But you cannot accomplish this goal if the Other does not want to feel better. [ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Mars, your avatar in the zodiac, is making several favorable aspects with other planets. It is favoring your primary relationship(s), bringing a free flowing understanding between you and others. You are also generating forward progress with a plan for expanding your work via an electronic solution. You will be taking something old and turning it into a new creation. [TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) This might be a week in which you let yourself give into chocolate bonbons and other yummy things. Self-discipline is not at its best. Travel ideas are especially appealing. Your partner or a good friend may be the one who provokes temptations, but you are easily led right now. [GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Your attention shifts to matters of shared resources for the next couple of weeks. “Resources” include time, things of material value, energy and sexuality. The territory is wide, ranging from the mundane study of the budget all the way to important discussions with partners over the need for greater intimacy. [CANCER (June 21 to July 22) A changing social situation or a particular friend wanders across your radar this week. You are left with a lot to think about as a result. Your feathers may be ruffled a bit, but this is no major deal. Stay in communication with your partner. The role of woman as Lover versus woman as Caretaker may be mildly challenging now. Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments. There is a fee for services. Website: http//www.horoscopesbyvivian.com

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