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OSCAR NOMINATIONS

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COMIC BOOK COLLECTING

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CHATHAM RABBITS

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GreensboroColiseum

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APRIL 7

Upcoming Events

FEBRUARY 2 FEBRUARY 22 & 25

APRIL 5 FEBRUARY 23

FEBRUARY 23 FEBRUARY 9

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MAY 1

FEBRUARY 23

MARCH 17

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MARCH 15 & 16

ALSO COMING:

- Wine & Chocolate Festival > February 9 - Atlantic Coast Power League Volleyball Tournament > February 2 & 3

- NCHSAA Dual Team Wrestling State Championships > February 3 - 2019 NCHSAA State Wrestling Championships > February 14 - 16

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JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019 VOLUME 15, NUMBER 5

16 CVA HOSTS PAPER2FILM BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS Every weekend in February, Greensboro’s Center for Visual Artists will celebrate Black History Month with an arts festival by PAPER2FILM, a summer-long, extracurricular film technology program for teenagers. Heading the festival are Paper2Film co-founders Larry Syid Wright and Tiffany Walker McKiver.

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5500 Adams Farm Lane Suite 204 Greensboro, NC 27407 Office 336-316-1231 Fax 336-316-1930 Publisher CHARLES A. WOMACK III publisher@yesweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor KATIE MURAWSKI katie@yesweekly.com Contributors IAN MCDOWELL JENNIFER ZELESKI BILLY INGRAM JIM LONGWORTH TERRY RADER MATT BRUNSON JOHN ADAMIAN MARK BURGER KATEI CRANFORD PRODUCTION Graphic Designers ALEX FARMER designer@yesweekly.com AUSTIN KINDLEY artdirector@yesweekly.com

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...under lights strung across their outdoor patio, past a charcoal grill billowing with smoke, and into a spacious, whitewalled room is where invited guests will find MACHETE; part underground dinner party, part pop-up restaurant. 10 The University of North Carolina at Greensboro will present “Another Year of the Dead” performance by the band, SPARTANS PLAY DEAD, on Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. at The Crown at the Carolina Theatre. 11 Filmmaker PAWEL PAWILOWSKI’s evocative romantic drama Cold War (three stars) earned unsurprising Academy Award nominations for Best Foreign Language Film and Lukasz Zal’s superb cinematography... 12 Following the recent announcement of the NOMINATIONS for the 91st Academy Awards, many favorites — or should that be favourites? — still find themselves in the mix... 17 I was lucky to witness that period when COMIC BOOK collecting emerged from being a shameful pastime to achieving a genuine level of respectability, considered a better investment than the stock market. YES! WEEKLY

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“Ethan is the sort of person who makes the world better and I can’t imagine doing this whole life thing without him in it,” said Greensboro bartender Mikey LePard to me on Monday. She was talking about her friend ETHAN ARCHER, who suffered a debilitating heart attack on Jan. 13, and whom she’s determined to do anything she can to help him. 19 There aren’t too many people on the planet who have won an EMMY, a Tony, and a Golden Globe, but then, there aren’t too many people like HAL LINDEN. 20 There are different ways of honoring tradition. The husband-and-wife stringband duo CHATHAM RABBITS play music that’s rooted in the old-time traditions of artists like the Carter Family, Charlie Poole and Bascom Lamar Lunsford. 21 MATTY SHEETS is a fixture in the Greensboro music community. Lauded through slews of sick local bands, and sickness itself, it’s been his Tuesday open mics which have long anchored the Monkeywhale of a man.

ADVERTISING Marketing TRAVIS WAGEMAN travis@yesweekly.com TRISH SHROYER trish@yesweekly.com LAUREN BRADY lauren@yesweekly.com Promotion NATALIE GARCIA

DISTRIBUTION JANICE GANTT KARRIGAN MUNRO ANDREW WOMACK We at YES! Weekly realize that the interest of our readers goes well beyond the boundaries of the Piedmont Triad. Therefore we are dedicated to informing and entertaining with thought-provoking, debate-spurring, in-depth investigative news stories and features of local, national and international scope, and opinion grounded in reason, as well as providing the most comprehensive entertainment and arts coverage in the Triad. YES! Weekly welcomes submissions of all kinds. Efforts will be made to return those with a self-addressed stamped envelope; however YES! Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. YES! Weekly is published every Wednesday by Womack Newspapers, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. First copy is free, all additional copies are $1.00. Copyright 2019 Womack Newspapers, Inc.

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EVENTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS | BY AUSTIN KINDLEY

be there

GAELIC STORM THURSDAY

LUKE COMBS

SATURDAY

THUR 31

FRI 1

SAT 2

GAELIC STORM

FIRST FRIDAY

LUKE COMBS

WHAT: After nearly two decades and more than 3,000 live shows, Gaelic Storm — the chart-topping, multi-national Celtic band — is looking sharper than ever with their latest release, Matching Sweaters. The new album mixes traditional Irish music with modern influences, creating a sound that’s as wideranging as the band’s own audience. WHEN: 9 p.m. WHERE: The Blind Tiger. 1819 Spring Garden Street, Greensboro. MORE: $17 tickets.

WHAT: Join us in downtown Greensboro for February’s First Friday! Explore new art exhibits, listen to live music and dine on delicious food as we celebrate all our amazing city has to offer! 6-9pm on Friday, February 1st. WHEN: 6-9 p.m. WHERE: Downtown Greensboro MORE: Learn more at firstfridaygreensboro.org.

WHAT: Luke Combs will kick off his “Beer Never Broke My Heart Tour” in 2019—his first ever headline arena tour, marking another major career milestone for the breakthrough musician. The extensive tour—which will feature special guests LANCO and Jameson Rodgers—will come to Greensboro Coliseum on Saturday, Feb. 2. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Greensboro Coliseum Complex. 1921 W Gate City Blvd, Greensboro. MORE: $25-60 tickets.

WHO’S BAD SATURDAY SAT 2

WHO’S BAD: THE ULTIMATE MICHAEL JACKSON EXPERIENCE WHAT: Founded in 2003, Who’s Bad’s live performance is an unrivaled celebration of pop music’s one true King. Their powerpacked performance of Michael Jackson’s expansive catalog has ignited crowds on every continent and can only be described as a jaw-dropping, musical must-see. WHEN: 7-11 p.m. WHERE: The Ramkat. 170 W 9th St, Winston-Salem. MORE: $15-25 tickets.

SAT 2 BLACKOUT 4.0! AFRO CARIBBEAN 2K19 WHAT: Details Join us as we take you on a journey through time and space and give you the opportunity to travel to another continent without a passport. Featuring two diverse DJs and a special host. WHEN: 10 p.m. - 2:30 a.m. WHERE: Greene Street. 113 N Greene St, Greensboro. MORE: $20-25 tickets.

WHITE LIGHTNING By Elyzabeth Gregory Wilder NORTH CAROLINA PREMIERE!

Strap in, put the pedal to the metal and head straight into Photo by VanderVeen Photographers.

adventure and romance.

JAN. 27 - FEB. 17, 2019 BUY TICKETS TODAY!

232 S. ELM STREET | GREENSBORO | 336.272.0160 | TRIADSTAGE.ORG YES! WEEKLY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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[SPOTLIGHT]

GREENSBORO ROLLER DERBY INTEREST MEETING AND BOOT CAMP BY KATIE MURWASKI

This skater is excited to be back on skates once again with Greensboro Roller Derby! After a couple of months off skates, (which, in derby time feels like years), the league has settled into the practice schedule and is preparing for the Roller Derby Interest Fair and Boot Camp on Feb. 2. The interest fair and boot camp are bi-annual and are a way for Greensboro Roller Derby to reach out to the community and show “why over 60 diverse league individuals have fallen in love with this sport and dedicated themselves to being members of Greensboro Roller Derby,” according to the most recent GSORD press release. The boot camp will take place from 1 to 3 p.m. in the gym at High Point City Lake Park in Jamestown (602 W. Main St.) and will answer any questions attendees have about GSORD or roller derby in general. The league tryouts will be held Feb. 17 at Skate South in High Point (208 W. Fairfield Rd.) from 11:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Attendees will need to bring their own gear (quad skates, mouth guard, elbow and knee pads, wrist guards, and of course, a helmet), and are welcome to come anytime after 11 a.m. to warm up. “We know the idea of ‘try-outs’ is daunting, but we promise—you can do it! And we’ll be there to help you every step of the way,” said GSORD director of membership Hattie Fisher (aka Southern Belladonna) in the press release. So, what happens after coming to the

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interest fair and tryouts? New skaters will have to go through a 90-day training period learning all the basic skills of roller derby, followed by a six-week “Scrimmage School” that applies all of the training into gameplay alongside the experienced skaters on the league. GSORD is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit corporation, and members are required to pay monthly dues to help cover the rent for practice spaces. The membership cost for new skaters in the training program is $35, and full-time league members pay $50. Since Greensboro Roller Derby is controlled and operated through the Women’s Flat Track Roller Derby League, skater insurance is mandatory and costs $75 a year. Since I joined Greensboro Roller Derby back in October 2017, I have met so many inspiring and empowering people who have pushed me to be a better skater and team player. Even though I was a transfer skater and did not go through the new skater-training program, I can vouch and say that anyone who wants to give it a shot is in good and more than capable hands. For more information about joining the league, email Fisher at membership@ greensbororollerderby.com, and for more information about the league, email Sara Campbell (aka Just Sadie) at prmarketing@greensbororollerderby.com or visit the Greensboro Roller Derby website and social media pages (Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter). !

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MACHETE: Greensboro’s best-kept secret dinner party

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ome of the best food in Greensboro can’t yet be found in a restaurant. Rather, it’s tucked away on a quiet street downtown, in the warm and welJennifer Zeleski coming atmosphere of Tal and Nicole Blevins’ home. Contributor This isn’t your neighborhood’s potluck. There are no casserole dishes or aluminum trays scattering a kitchen counter. Instead, under lights strung across their outdoor patio, past a charcoal grill billowing with smoke, and into a spacious, white-walled room is where invited guests will find MACHETE; part underground dinner party, part popup restaurant. The concept is not foreign to Tal Blevins, and it’s not new to more metropolitan dining scenes around the country. Blevins recently moved back to Greensboro from San Francisco, where pop-up restaurants are abounding. He found each opening developed a more “unique and underground,” vibe in the West coast city, one that fascinated him enough peak his interest both creatively and financially. His eye for flavor led to him becoming “one of the first investors in Lazy Bear, a pop-up turned two-Michelin star restaurant in San Francisco’s Mission District, and a partner in San Francisco cocktail and bar food concept True Laurel, named one of Esquire’s Best Bars in America and on Eater’s Best New Restaurants 2018 list.” After getting re-acclimated with the Greensboro food scene, Blevins noticed the same passion and potential in the local work of Kevin Cottrell and Lydia Rae Greene. “I kept running into them and we’d talk about food and our favorite restaurants and ingredients and flavors and preparations,” Blevins said. “We had a good rapport from the beginning, and eventually that lead us all to simultaneously say, ‘You know what, we should do something together!’” Cottrell, the executive chef of MACHETE, is in his mid-20s with nearly a decade of experience in the food industry and has been an integral part of its success. Greene, a graduate of the culinary YES! WEEKLY

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program at Alamance Community College with specialization in bread and pastries, has been working side-by-side with Cottrell for the past three years and has also brought her innovative creativity and skill to the table — literally. The trio has now created breath-taking eight-course meals on five different occasions. They pride themselves in high-quality ingredients, purposeful portions, and bringing together the community. Familiar faces and first-time guests have come and gone, each one wowed by the surprise of each carefully-crafted dish. I was lucky enough to get a coveted seat at their fifth event which honored a Japanese Izakaya theme, based off of Cottrell and Greene’s exploration into global flavors, and Blevins’ many travels to Japan. The passing hors d’oeuvres set the mood for the evening. Guests had gathered with their own libations around the space, (the event is BYOB, but pairing suggestions are offered in advance), and were ready for something to snack on. I had never seen something like the

house-made Tapioca Crisps with Marinated Tuna. The crisps had been dyed with charcoal powder, giving them an ink-like color, and the marinated tuna was miles above any sushi roll I could use as a comparison. Each bite was light and crisp, with the marinated tuna offering a salty, soy flavor with undertones of sweetness from vinegar, cucumber and sesame. Starting the night off with bright, fresh and addictive flavors was a sign that we were all in good hands. Once seated, the courses started to arrive in a well-paced succession. The first course was the White Kimchi, paired with Grilled Shishito Peppers encrusted with house-made Togarashi Spice, topped with Bonito Flakes. The Togarashi spice blend consisted of orange peel, nori (dried seaweed), ginger, Szechuan and black pepper, and chili flakes, which heightened the mild flavor of the peppers (unless you received an exceptionally spicy one), and made for a wonderful citrus-like combination with the smokiness of their charred exteriors. The kimchi quickly became my favorite though, with

its vibrant fermented flavor and delicious crunch. Not too strong, yet not too sweet. Second was the Fried and Fresh Tofu, house-made Dashi Broth with Mushrooms and topped with Yuzu Kosho Paste. The broth was salty and comforting, what seemed like the perfect umami, and both types of tofu allowed for a different experience in texture. One was soft and tender, and the other was just slightly crisp with each bite, pairing well with the mushrooms every so often. The Yuzu Kosho paste was reminiscent of wasabi, with its strong and spicy flavor, and was just enough for those looking for just a bit more from the dish overall. The third course was a triple-take on rice, the main being mixed with egg and topped with house-made forbidden black rice crisps and grains of puffed rice. This dish was also savory, and the thinly sliced green onion gave it just enough freshness to not be too rich. It was smoky, smooth and a great balance of taste and texture. The fourth inspired a child-like excitement: Karaage Chicken with Burnt Lemon Kewpie Mayonnaise. Was this the

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tickets: ucls.uncg.edu

HERBIE HANCOCK 2.12.19 Kevin Cottrell and Lydia Rae Greene best adult version of tender, flavorful chicken nuggets that I’ve ever had? Yes. The chicken was crunchy with plenty of flavors in the breading, and the burnt lemon mayo was all I could talk about. The blackened citrus flavor was unlike anything I had ever tried, and although there were only three pieces of chicken to dip, I made each drop count. The fifth course was similar to passing hor d’oeuvres, a Short Rib Bao with Sesame-pickled Cucumbers. The bao was soft and pillowy, and the short rib had so much flavor, I could have easily eaten it on its own. The marinated cucumbers gave a necessary crunch, and would be any pickle-lovers dream. Sweet, tart and delightful. By the sixth course, I couldn’t believe the creativity and beauty behind each dish. Their presentation was highly impressive, but the flavors were exceptional. I could hardly wait to see what came next. The seventh course was Blevins’ favorite dish of the night, and so far, his favorite dish out of all of the MACHETE creations. A thinly-sliced Japanese Himachi with a green apple Dashi, diced pear, fresh water chestnuts and Yuzu Granita. The Hamachi fish was shipped from Japan, and cured overnight after being wrapped in Kombu (sea kelp), and dusted with salt and sugar to slightly dry out the fish while giving it a firmer texture, and a “clean, slightly briny,” flavor in each slice, Blevins said. The green apple dashi was drizzled, offering a tart and bright flavor, especially paired with the chopped pear and the crisp water chestnuts. The dish was already fantastic, but it elevated to phenomenal with the frozen and flaky, almost sour, granita that melted as soon as it hit your tongue. “I absolutely adore this dish and it nails the simple perfection we’re going for with MACHETE,” Blevins said. “There’s a lot of thought and technique that goes into a dish like this with just a few ingredients, but when everything comes together it’s just magical.” WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Topping that would be difficult, but they did it anyway. The second to last dish was the Noodle Bowl (Ramen-esque), with 72-hour Japanese Tonkatsu broth, thick ramen noodles, Enokitake mushrooms and shaved green onions. The broth was thick and rich, but not creamy like many American soups tend to be. The noodles balanced the salty and smoky flavors, and the green onion brightened it up just a bit. But I couldn’t get enough of the short rib. It was braised and tender, perfectly spiced and incredibly addicting. I was sad to see it go, knowing I could never recreate it on my own. There’s no other way to finish than with dessert. Cottrell and Greene’s take on a Banana Cream Roll with banana sponge cake, banana cream, toasted coconut and sliced young banana. Banana desserts are often overdone to the point of sickness, but this one was just enough to be sweet and textured, and round out the evening’s meal. I was speechless. As I was handed a menu to take home, and a small bag of house-made chocolate cranberry Pocky sticks, I didn’t know what more could be said. Blevins summed it up perfectly, “We want people to eat well, drink well, be surprised, try new things, laugh a little and have fun.” Blevins’ hope for MACHETE is to bring their high-caliber meals, as well as a focus on local business and community to the Greensboro area as a permanent location, which they have plans for, but are still seeking support. If you’re interested in attending a MACHETE event or finding out more information, you can join their email list through their website, or through their social media platforms at MACHETEGSO. ! JENNIFER ZELESKI is a senior Communication major at High Point University, who is always eager to cook, eat and listen. Her many food adventures can be followed on Instagram @jayz_eats.

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Spartans Play Dead to perform Grateful Dead songs at The Crown

he University of North Carolina at Greensboro will present “Another Year of the Dead” performance by the band, Spartans Play Dead, on Feb. 15 at 8 Terry Rader p.m. at The Crown at the Carolina Theatre. The band will cover Contributor Grateful Dead songs as part of a yearlong series of events marking 30 years since sociologist and professor Rebecca G. Adams took a class of 21 UNCG students on tour with the Grateful Dead. Adams said that the series of events is a collaborative effort by a large committee of volunteers. Organizer, department head of Anthropology and guitar player of Spartans Play Dead Bob Anemone said that the musical performance is only one event for UNCG’s

PHOTO BY JAMES CLAIBORNE

Spartans Play Dead band and support crew. (Front, kneeling) Rebecca Adams and Bob Anemone

academic 2018-2019 interdisciplinary events series “The 60s: Exploring the Limits.” Anemone said he worked with Charles Frank, writer/producer of the music collective and booking/promotion agency Uncle John’s Bone, to put out a call for artists and organize bands with the help TE Connectivity in Greensboro, of Muhsin Orsini, and UNCG alumnus NC is looking for a Continuous Justin Able. Anemone said the musiImprovement Analyst (Quality Encians who responded to the call were gineer) to provide statistical inforUNCG department heads, faculty, staff, and alumni, and well-known musicians mation for quality improvement including David Bryan of The Terrapin by identifying testing methods Chamber Ensemble from New York. and samples. To apply, mail re“Everyone in our band, from our local sume including job title to ATTN: up-and-coming musicians to the pros Brittany Vaden, 233 Burgess Road, are all inspired by the love of the music Bldg. 263, Greensboro, NC 27409. of the Grateful Dead, and we are looking forward to performing at The Crown,” Anemone said. UNCG professor of Asian CARRIE MAE History, singer-songwriter WEEMS and one of the musicians in the band James Anderson 02.07.19 said that the performance will include an acoustic set covering songs from albums such as “American Beauty” (1970), “Reckoning” (1981), followed by an electric set covering the 1960s through the late 1970s with songs such as “China Cat Sunflower” (1969) and “Shakedown ucls.uncg.edu Street” (1978). He said that YES! WEEKLY

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all of the musicians are UNCG faculty, staff, former students or employees and some play in both bands with several guitar players taking turns playing the lead. “This show is a homage for the Grateful Dead and playing with this amazing group of accomplished musicians and their great love of the Grateful Dead music inspires me,” Anderson said. “That love of the music just rubs off and fills the room in our practice sessions.” The acoustic set band includes Bob Worrells, lead guitar; Dave McFadden, guitar, vocals; Anemone, guitar; Gavin Douglas, guitar, mandolin and fiddle; Able, bass; Melissa Floyd-Pickard, vocals; Anderson, harmonica; and Jeremy Fountain on drums. The electric set band includes Melissa Floyd-Pickard, vocals; MC Armstrong (Viva la Muerte), guitar and vocals; Bob Worrells, (High Strung Bluegrass), guitar; Jason Blalock, guitar and vocals; Anderson, guitar and harmonica; Eddie McGee (Dante’s Roadhouse) keyboards; Jeremy Fountain, drums; and Ryan Waide (The Fat Katz) on drums. Anemone said the series of events also includes a screening of the documentary film, Long Strange Trip: The Untold Story of the Grateful Dead at the Greensboro Project Space. The first two parts of the film were screened in 2018 and led by UNCG department of history professor Richard Barton, P.h.D. According to the Greensboro Project Space website, parts

three and four’s screening discussions of the film will be led by Adams on Feb. 8 at 6:30 p.m. Parts five and six discussions will be led by the film’s director Amir BarLev on April 26 at 6:30 p.m. Two other concurrent Grateful Dead events include an art and photography exhibit. Curators Emily Edwards and Lisa Goble will speak at the “Psychedelic Counter Culture” art exhibit on Saturday, Feb. 9 at 6 p.m. at the Greensboro Project Space, and this exhibit will run from Feb. 4 through Feb. 9. “Images of the Grateful Dead and Deadheads” photography exhibit (curated by Adams and Lena Rodriguez-Gillet of LDR Galleries) will open on March 1 with a closing reception on April 27 at Tate Street Coffee House and will feature D.C.-area photographer Lloyd Wolf, along with the work of other photographers. “It’s a lot of fun,” Adams said. “I am really looking forward to the events leading up to the full day of scholarly discussions and closing reception for the photo exhibit in April.” Adams said she also wanted to publicly thank College Park Baptist Church and Greensboro Project Space for offering rehearsal space for the bands. ! TERRY RADER is a freelance writer, poet and songwriter, formerly an ad agency creative director/branding strategist/copywriter and Earth Harmony columnist, a storyteller on a mission to raise awareness for creativity and environmental sustainability along with part-time work in Community Outreach & Wellness at Deep Roots Market co-op and her pet/home sitting business, Paws n’ Peace o’ Mind.

WANNA

go?

2/4-2/9, opening 6 to 9 p.m., Psychedelic Counter Culture Art Exhibit, Greensboro Project Space, 219 W. Lewis St., gallery hours: Mon.-Fri., 11 a.m.- 4 p.m., and is free and open to the public. 2/15 at 8 p.m., Another Year of the Dead, two back-to-back live music performances, open to the public, free with suggested donation, The Crown at The Carolina Theatre, 310 S. Greene St. 336-333-2605, box office hours: Mon.-Fri. 12-5 p.m. 3/1, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Images of the Grateful Dead and Deadheads Photography Exhibit with a closing reception on 4/27 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Tate Street Coffee House, 334 Tate St., and is free and open to the public.

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Cold War: Love in the time of communism Filmmaker Pawel Pawilowski’s evocative romantic drama Cold War (three stars) earned unsurprising Academy Award nominations for Best Foreign Language Film and Lukasz Zal’s superb Mark Burger cinematography, and a surprise one for Pawilowski as Best Contributor Director – thereby likely edging Bradley Cooper (for A Star is Born) out of the race. First and foremost, Cold War (originally titled Zimna wojna) is the director’s film. Pawilowski is unquestionably the star of the show. Tomasz Kot and Joanna Kulig are the nominal leads and give effective performances, but it almost wouldn’t have mattered who played their roles; they are essentially figures in a landscape – Pawilowski’s landscape – one adorned by aural and visual glory. The camera loves their faces, but it could also be said that Zal’s camera loves everything in Cold War, given the intricate (and indulgent) visuals. That said, the film is a feast for the eyes and ears. The musical selection is spectacular, and the aforementioned visuals never cease to impress. The story takes place in post-World War II Poland, where both the landscape and the populace still bear its physical and emotional scars, and things haven’t improved much – if at all – under Com-

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munist domination. Hope is a thing of the past, and the future seems no brighter. Happiness and joy are fleeting concepts, at best. Zula (Kulig) and Wiktor (Kot) are brought together when he chooses her – as a member of a state-sanctioned musical troupe devoted to performing traditional folk music. He is the conductor and creator; she is the creation who will become the troupe’s star singer. The success of the troupe arouses the interest of the government, which wants them to use their talent and popularity to spread Communist propaganda to the masses. This displeases Irena (Agata Kulesza), the artistic director and a traditionalist at heart, but is consented to by general manager Kaczmarek (Borys Szyc). Needless to say, Irena goes her own way while Kaczmarek rides the wave to further acclaim. He knows the score. The situation is further complicated when Zula and Wiktor embark on a passionate, clandestine romance that would seem more consuming were the characters allowed to emerge more fully. He wants them to defect and makes plans to that effect. He flees, she stays – and the narrative jumps forward a few years when they are reunited in Paris. The lovers are drawn together by their love for culture and music, yet they’re never happy – whether together or apart. This may be the only love story in recent memory in which the principals never seem to smile. They’re miserable at the outset, miserable during separations, and miserable still during reunions. Almost

by default, the most likable character is Szyc’s Kaczmarek, who may be a complacent – and complicit – opportunist, but doesn’t wallow in self-pity. Despite the despair and gloom, of which there is plenty, it’s impossible to overlook or downplay the sheer artistry of the endeavor. The story is reportedly based on Pawilowski’s own parents, and the filmmaker couldn’t have fashioned a more evocative and stylish account of a starcrossed romance. Yet, deep down, Cold War is a film more defined by mood and music, less than by the main characters’ emotions or motivations. It’s not a film to warm up to, but it’s an easy one to admire. Nevertheless, for all his directorial indulgence, Pawilowski keeps the narrative moving at a steady clip. The film runs barely 90 minutes and that’s just fine. (In Polish with English subtitles) ! See MARK BURGER’s reviews of current movies on Burgervideo.com. © 2019, Mark Burger.

WANNA

go?

Cold War opens Friday at a/perture cinemas, 311 W. Fourth St., Winston-Salem

1642 Spring Garden St., GSO (corner of Warren St.)

Phone: 336.274.1000 Hours: Mon-Sat 11 am-2am / Sun noon-2 am

Open grill till 2am every night!

Best Daily Drink Specials Greensboro’s home for the Washington Redskins!

MON: $4 Jose Silver & $1 off all draft TUES: $4 Vodka Red Bull & $1 off all craft beer THURS: $5 LIT & blue motorcycle FRI: $3 all craft cans

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Oscar nominations: Roma and other favourites formance in any film this past year came from Elliott, a never-before-nominated veteran who initially seemed like a lock for a nod until he was ignored by the Golden Globes and BAFTA. Thankfully, the Academy came through. When he learned of the news, Elliott amusingly stated, “It’s about fucking time” before turning more humble. He got it right with that first quip.

BY MATT BRUNSON

ollowing the recent announcement of the nominations for the 91st Academy Awards, many favorites — or should that be favourites? — still find themselves in the mix while the good fortune of other stars is suddenly stillborn. Here, then, are the highlights, low points and other notes of interest associated with this year’s crop. Highlights * The 10 nominations for The Favourite. Director Yorgos Lanthimos’ bawdy period romp earned my vote as the best picture of 2018, so it was gratifying to see it tied with Roma for the most overall nominations. Speaking of Roma, that was No. 3 on my 10 Best list, joined by fellow Best Picture contenders A Star Is Born (No. 6), Black Panther (No. 10), and BlacKkKlansman (Honorable Mentions list). As expected, the Academy continued the awards season category fraud by placing The Favourite’s Olivia Colman in Best Actress and co-leads Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone in Best Supporting Actress, but I suppose that was the only way all three could have been honored for their excellent turns. * Black Panther for Best Picture. The absence of The Dark Knight from the 2008 Best Picture race was so blatant — and so controversial — that, moving forward, the Academy immediately opened up the number of nominees from the normal five to up to 10 to accommodate the likelihood

of more popular favorites being nominated. Of course, that has led to dubious Best Picture nods for some less-than-stellar blockbusters (e.g. The Blind Side, this year’s Bohemian Rhapsody), but on the plus side, it has finally allowed a superhero movie to nab a Best Picture slot — an overdue Academy first. * The Best Animated Feature lineup. Remember that internal rule change instigated last year, the one that allowed the feeble toon flick The Boss Baby to slip into the Best Animated Feature race? It

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was expected that this awful turn would continue this year with the desultory likes of The Grinch and Sherlock Gnomes up for Oscars, but happily, that’s not the case. I have yet to see the Japanese anime yarn Mirai (though it’s been thus far receiving positive reviews), but the other four nominees — Incredibles 2, Isle of Dogs, Ralph Breaks the Internet and Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse — are all worthy contenders and deserve their bids. * Sam Elliott for Best Supporting Actor in A Star Is Born. Perhaps my favorite per-

Low Points * No noms for youthful leads. The best leading performances I saw in 2018 both came courtesy of young’uns: 15-year-old Elsie Fisher in Eighth Grade and 21-yearold Lucas Hedges in Boy Erased (he was also excellent in Ben Is Back). Alas, both were overlooked for nominations. * No noms for critical faves. You wouldn’t know it from the relative lack of publicity, but Ethan Hawke won a headspinning 28 critics’ awards for his leading role in Paul Schrader’s First Reformed — more impressively, he went 3-for-3 in nabbing them from the biggest of the groups (New York, Los Angeles, and National Society). But longtime Oscar prognosticators knew his sort of performance rarely gets singled out by Oscar, and we were right, as he was denied a nomination. Other critical darlings who failed to make the cut: Hereditary’s Toni Collette, Support the Girls’ Regina Hall, Burning’s Steven Yeun, and Widows’ Elizabeth Debicki. * Bao for Best Animated Short Film. Pixar shorts routinely get nominated in this category regardless of quality, but Bao might be the worst the company has ever produced. Nevertheless, it garnered a nomination. * Three Identical Strangers MIA. There were so many stellar nonfiction features produced in 2018 that a few gems were bound to be left out. Worthy efforts like RBG and Free Solo made the cut, but, to the shock of most, the beloved Mr. Rogers doc Won’t You Be My Neighbor? was overlooked. For me, the most disappointing omission in the Best Documentary Feature category was Three Identical Strangers, the only doc this year to land on my 10 Best list. Other Points of Interest * Every single critics’ group worth its salt — a whopping 31 in total — gave the 2017 Best Supporting Actor award to Willem Dafoe for his remarkable and low-key performance in The Florida Project. Alas, later-in-the-season outfits like the Broadcast Film Critics, the Golden Globes, the Screen Actors Guild, the Academy, and,

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shamefully, my own Southeastern Film Critics Association predictably preferred Sam Rockwell’s showboating, look-MaI’m-acting! turn as a lovable racist cop in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Perhaps the Academy felt guilty about its wrong choice since practically nobody predicted Willem Dafoe to immediately nab another nomination this year, this time as Best Actor for his intense turn as Vincent Van Gogh in At Eternity’s Gate. The performance is certainly worthy, but the film was mostly forgotten throughout the season. Incidentally, besides Dafoe, only one other nominee from last year is up again this time. That would be, yup, Rockwell, repped in the Best Supporting Actor category for his amusing if hardly golden turn as George W. Bush in Vice. * Last year, Mary J. Blige became the first person to ever be nominated in both an acting category and a music category in the same year, earning nods for Best Supporting Actress and Best Original Song (“Mighty River”) for Mudbound. History repeated itself immediately, as Lady Gaga now becomes the second person to pull off the feat, grabbing noms for Best Actress and Best Original Song (“Shallow”) for A Star Is Born. * Black Panther nabbed an impressive seven nominations, but, rather surprisingly, it failed to snag one for Best Visual Effects. Instead, the superhero genre is repped in that category by Avengers: Infinity War. For the record, the other four nominees are Christopher Robin, First Man, Ready Player One, and Solo: A Star Wars Story. * Despite (among other achievements) writing the scripts for three of Martin Scorsese’s best films — Taxi Driver, Raging Bull and The Last Temptation of Christ — Paul Schrader has never been nominated for an Academy Award … until now. With First Reformed, the writer-director is in the running for Best Original Screenplay. * Actress Meryl Streep and composer John Williams are Academy favorites, seemingly earning a nomination every time they leave the house. But for 2018, they were both ignored. Streep appeared in small roles in two sequels, Mary Poppins Returns and Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again, but was rightly bypassed for both. As for Williams, he actually didn’t compose an original score or song in 2018. I mean, you would think that would guarantee he wouldn’t be in the running, but after rewarding him with 51 nominations, I’m surprised the Academy didn’t find a way around that. OSCAR’S 8 BEST These were the films nominated by the Academy for Best Picture. 1. The Favourite (10 nominations) WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

2. Roma (10) 3. A Star Is Born (8) 4. Vice (8) 5. Black Panther (7) 6. BlacKkKlansman (6) 7. Bohemian Rhapsody (5) 8. Green Book (5) CRITICS’ 10 BEST Based on a national sampling of 810 critics, these were the films that appeared the most frequently on 10 Best lists. 1. Roma 2. First Reformed 3. The Favourite 4. If Beale Street Could Talk 5. Eighth Grade 6. Black Panther 7. BlacKkKlansman 8. Burning 9. A Star Is Born 10. Hereditary (Source: www.criticstop10.com) BRUNSON’S 10 BEST These were my picks for the year’s best movies. 1. The Favourite 2. Eighth Grade 3. Roma 4. The Hate U Give 5. Three Identical Strangers 6. A Star Is Born 7. Widows 8. First Reformed 9. Lean on Pete 10. Black Panther MOVIEGOERS’ 10 BEST These were the year’s biggest moneymaking releases. 1. Black Panther 2. Avengers: Infinity War 3. Incredibles 2 4. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom 5. Deadpool 2 6. Aquaman 7. The Grinch 8. Mission: Impossible — Fallout 9. Ant-Man and the Wasp 10. Solo: A Star Wars Story (Source: www.boxofficemojo.com) ...AND THE WORST OK, we now have a sense of which films reigned as the biggest and/or best of 2018. But what about the worst? Glad you asked. Based on cumulative scores at Rotten Tomatoes, 10 Worst lists, and other factors, these were the year’s biggest turkeys: 1. Gotti 2. Death of a Nation 3. Slender Man 4. Holmes & Watson 5. The 15:17 to Paris !

[RED] Feb 1-7 GLASS (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 12:00, 2:50, 5:40, 8:30, 11:20 Sun - Thu: 12:00, 2:50, 5:40, 8:30 MARY POPPINS RETURNS (PG) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Thu: 12:30, 3:20, 7:10, 10:00 THE FAVOURITE (R) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 12:15, 2:55, 5:55, 8:35, 11:20 Sun - Wed: 12:15, 2:55, 5:55, 8:35 Thu: 12:15, 2:55

[A/PERTURE]

AN ACCEPTABLE LOSS (R) Fri & Sat: 12:25, 2:40, 4:50, 7:15, 9:30, 11:45 Sun - Thu: 12:25, 2:40, 4:50, 7:15, 9:30 ON THE BASIS OF SEX (PG-13) Fri - Wed: 12:10, 8:40 Thu: 12:10 PM THE UPSIDE (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30, 11:15 Sun - Thu: 12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30 ESCAPE ROOM (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:20, 2:40, 5:00, 7:20, 9:40

ROMA (R) Fri & Sat: 12:00, 2:55, 5:50, 8:45, 11:40 Sun - Thu: 12:00, 2:55, 5:50, 8:45

STAN & OLLIE (PG) Fri - Thu: 12:25, 5:20

MISS BALA (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55

AQUAMAN (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 12:50, 3:55, 7:00, 10:05

THE GANDHI MURDER (GANDHI: THE CONSPIRACY) (NR) Fri & Sat: 12:00, 3:00, 9:00, 11:45 Sun: 12:00, 3:00, 9:00 Mon & Tue: 12:00, 3:00, 6:05, 9:00 Wed & Thu: 12:00, 3:00

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDERVERSE (PG) Fri - Thu: 2:45, 7:35, 10:10

THE KID WHO WOULD BE KING (PG) Fri - Wed: 12:00, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20 Thu: 12:00, 2:35

GREEN BOOK (PG-13) Fri - Wed: 12:40, 3:30, 7:05, 10:00 Thu: 12:40, 3:30

SERENITY (R) Fri - Wed: 12:05, 2:30, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55 Thu: 12:05, 2:30, 4:55

BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 2:50, 5:50, 11:05 Sun - Wed: 2:50, 5:50 Thu: 2:50 PM

THE FAVOURITE (R) Thu: 5:55, 8:35

Feb 1-7

ON THE BASIS OF SEX (PG-13) Fri: 3:30, 6:00, Sat: 9:45 AM, 6:00 Sun: 3:30, 6:00, Mon: 6:00 PM Tue: 3:30, 6:00, Wed: 6:00 PM Thu: 3:30, 6:00 STAN & OLLIE (PG) Fri: 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Sat: 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Sun: 11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30 Mon: 6:30, 9:00, Tue: 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Wed: 6:30, 9:00, Thu: 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 VICE (R) Fri: 8:30 PM, Sat: 12:15, 8:30 Sun: 10:00 AM, 12:45, 8:30 Mon - Thu: 8:30 PM COLD WAR (ZIMNA WOJNA) (R) Fri: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Sat: 10:00 AM, 12:30, 3:15, 5:30, 8:00 Sun: 10:00 AM, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Mon: 8:45 PM, Tue: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Wed: 5:30, 8:00, Thu: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 SHOPLIFTERS (MANBIKI KAZOKU) (R) Fri: 2:15, 5:15, 8:15 Sat & Sun: 11:15 AM, 2:15, 5:15, 8:15 Mon: 5:45, 8:45, Tue: 2:45, 5:45, 8:45 Wed: 5:45, 8:45 Thu: 2:45, 5:45, 8:45

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[NEWS OF THE WEIRD] FASHION FOIBLES

— Because white shoes are so distracting when you’re lining up your putt? According to Time magazine, Nike will be mowing over the competition with its Chuck Shepherd new Air Max 1 golf shoes, which feature uppers covered with a green material that resembles grass. Matching green laces will further disguise your dogs as you play a round, but lest you think you’ll disappear altogether, fear not: The trademark Nike swoosh on the sides is bright white. The sneakers, yet to be released, are expected to retail for $140. — Just when you thought there was nothing new under the blue jeans sun: A Ukrainian designer is asking $377 for a pair of jeans that have one fitted leg and one flared leg. Ksenia Schnaider, who calls her design the Asymmetric Jean, told DazedDigital.com: “It’s good to get people talking, and they’re definitely going to make people turn their heads as you walk by!”

PEOPLE WITH(OUT) ISSUES

Rachel Childs, 29, of Pearland, Texas, is not autistic and doesn’t have a twin autistic sister, according to the Houston Chronicle. Nevertheless, she hired a caregiver for her (fake) twin sister who is (not) autistic. The elaborate plot, which played out in early January, involved the caregiver picking up the “twin” at Childs’ house and taking her to the caregiver’s home, where he was hired to care for her

overnight. But when Childs’ “twin” exhibited sexual conduct toward the caregiver, he became suspicious and investigated Childs, then contacted police. Childs was charged with burglary of a habitation with intent to commit assault and indecent exposure.

PRECOCIOUS

— Employees of John J. Murphy Elementary School in Round Lake Park, Illinois, were surprised on Jan. 9 when a car drove into the drop-off lane and an 11-year-old student exited the driver’s seat. Witnesses alerted police, who issued an arrest warrant for the front-seat passenger, 31-year-old Khafilu M. Oshodi of Round Lake, for two counts of child endangerment; a 9-year-old was riding in the back seat. Police Chief George Filenko told the Lake County News-Sun the situation could have “resulted in any number of tragic scenarios.” The children have been placed with other relatives, and police are still looking for Oshodi. — Alijah Hernandez of Houston is a skilled barber in her father’s shop, reported KTRK-TV on Jan. 17 — which wouldn’t ordinarily be newsworthy. But Alijah is only 7 years old. Her dad, Franky, says she’s been watching him since she was a toddler and started perfecting her skills three years ago. For her part, Alijah says cutting hair comes naturally to her; she practices on friends and family (with her dad supervising) and has already faced off in barber competitions across Texas.

WHAT’S THAT UP IN THE SKY?

— The rare super blood wolf moon of Jan. 20 was so captivating to some sky-

watchers on Florida’s Ponte Vedra Beach, that they didn’t notice when the tide rolled in and waterlogged their Honda CRV. The St. Johns County Sheriff ’s Office told News4Jax the occupants were able to get out of the car and move to safety, although the vehicle itself wasn’t recovered until the next day. A photo showed water up to the windshield on the front end. — Meanwhile, in West Palm Beach, Florida, two unnamed 24-year-olds chose to view the Jan. 20 eclipse by lying prone in the middle of a dark road near the Apoxee Wilderness Trail. Which would have worked out fine, except around 11:30 p.m. a West Palm Beach police officer patrolling the area ran over the pair. Fortunately, reported the South Florida Sun Sentinel, he was cruising at just 5 mph, and the human speed bumps sustained only non-life-threatening injuries. The officer was put on paid administrative leave while the incident was investigated.

TERRIFYING TECHNOLOGY

Laura Lyons of Orinda, California, was in her kitchen on the afternoon of Jan. 20 when a loud alert noise blared in the living room, followed by a detailed warning from “Civil Defense” that intercontinental ballistic missiles were on their way from North Korea to Los Angeles, Chicago and Ohio. Lyons told the San Jose Mercury News the message warned residents they had three hours to evacuate. As she and her husband absorbed the news, they realized it had come from their Nest security camera — not from the TV, where the Rams-Saints game was proceeding as normal, and news channels were not reporting anything unusual. “It was five

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minutes of sheer terror,” she said. The Lyonses called 911 and then Nest, where a supervisor told them they had been victims of a “third-party hack” on their camera and speakers.

SELF-MEDICATING

When a 33-year-old unnamed Irish man was admitted to a Dublin hospital with swelling in his right forearm and a rash, he surprised the attending physician with the “cure” he had been using for his back pain. For a year and a half, reported Canoe.com on Jan. 16, the man had been injecting his own semen into his right forearm. X-rays revealed a pool of the fluid under his skin, which had become infected. “He had devised this ‘cure’ independent of any medical advice,” noted Dr. Lisa Dunne in the Irish Medical Journal. He also told Dr. Dunne that his back pain had worsened after lifting a heavy metal object.

LATEST RELIGIOUS MESSAGES

British retailer Marks & Spencer is in hot water with Muslims who claim the store’s brand of toilet paper is embossed with the Arabic symbol for the word “God.” An unnamed man posted a video to social media displaying a roll of M&S Aloe Vera 3-ply tissue and urging his Muslim brothers and sisters to avoid buying it or boycott the store altogether. Metro News reports that in response, Marks & Spencer says the symbol is of an aloe vera leaf: “The motif on the aloe vera toilet tissue, which we have been selling for over five years, is categorically of an aloe vera leaf, and we have investigated and confirmed this with our suppliers.”

KEEP THAT TO YOURSELF

Dennis Palmer, 31, appeared to be guilty of more than TMI on Jan. 10 when police were called to a Walmart in Stuart, Florida. TCPalm.com reported that Palmer was in the pillow aisle when he was seen exposing and touching himself inappropriately. Palmer told police “he was just itching himself because he has crabs.” But surveillance video recorded Palmer indulging in “rubbing” and activities other than scratching; “this continued for several minutes,” the affidavit stated. When police asked Palmer what he was thinking, he replied that “he wasn’t thinking, but he should have been thinking.” He was jailed for exposure of sexual organs. !

© 2019 Chuck Shepherd. Universal Press Syndicate. Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com.

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[KING Crossword]

[weeKly sudoKu]

HER MIXED-UP ACTIVITIES

ACROSS

1 9 14 19 20 21 22 25 26 27 28 30 37 40 41 42 43 52 53 54 55 58 65 66 67 68 70 75 76 78 79

Make hostile Sliced to bits, as a potato Quibble Used with both ears Love, in Lido Like a lamb Eleanor Roosevelt’s successor chars beef and pork? Step foot in Pluralizable word By means of D.C.’s nation “The Cosby Show” actress defeats a jungle beast? Lamb’s cry Org. for cavity fillers Suffix with election High volcano in Europe “La La Land” co-star makes an animated fish docile? First episode Actor Hale “— big girl now” Piece of lifting lingerie “Mixed Nuts” actress successfully woos a seamster? Ivanisevic of tennis “Como —?” (Jorge’s greeting) Tiptoed about Smear (on) Female pastor, e.g. Poet Gallagher Deep dislike Battery pole Some iPods

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81 87 88 89 90 92 98 101 102 103 104 113 114 115 116 120 127 128 129 130 131 132

“Crazy” singer cuts a gossipy meddler’s fingernails? Comedian Schumer Wade’s rival Top 40 tunes Big name in tractors “Gidget” star challenges the head of a college? Frozen drink brand Savings plan, for short Holiday in Vietnam Divs. of a ton 1980s astronaut irritates a peeress? — tight leash Poet’s p.m. Ray of McDonald’s Brewery kilns “Buttons and Bows” singer stashes away dozens of cases of classic soda? Habituate Circus venue Part of PG Franklin’s belief in God Burdened “No turning back now!”

DOWN

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Singer Lane Debt security Research center: Abbr. Prop for art — -Grain (cereal bar brand) Airport landing abbr. Greek letter #19 Graceful tree Talked too long Permeate

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 23 24 29 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 55 56 57 59 60 61 62 63 64

“See how many there are,” informally Be off target Fox’s home Sky streaker Declares By means of Know instinctively Classroom instruction Year, to Jorge Hot tub site Gasteyer of “Mean Girls” Roosted Busyness Ho-hum Queen, e.g. Hosp. sites Singer Sayer Queen, e.g. ABA or AMA part: Abbr. Uncertainty of meaning Large tour vehicle Sky shiner Loop trains Eastern ideal Actress on NBC’s “The Brave” Leaf, Sentra and Maxima Ambulance VIP “Serpico” author Peter 1990 Jamie Lee Curtis action thriller Birds of Arabian myth Torah cases WWII female enlistee Got some air Toronto-to-Detroit dir. Midori on ice War zone of the ‘60s Spoke slowly and solemnly

68 69 71 72 73 74 77 80 82 83 84 85 86 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 117 118 119 121 122 123 124 125 126

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CVA hosts Paper2Film Black History Month events

E

very weekend in February, Greensboro’s Center for Visual Artists will celebrate Black History Month with an arts festival by Paper2Film, Katie Murawski a summer-long, extracurricular film technology program Editor for teenagers. Heading the festival are Paper2Film co-founders Larry Syid Wright and Tiffany Walker McKiver. “Paper2Film started in 2013, and it is a program to teach teenagers about filmmaking, from start to finish,” McKiver said. According to Paper2Film’s website, “This program is designed to give students a creative outlet while honing new technological skills in media. Our mission is to capture our youth attention through film technology and multimedia by educating them on the fundamentals of developing and writing original script for film.” McKiver said that Paper2Film has even been contracted to work on films with organizations such as the Salvation Army and Bethel A.M.E. Church. Wright said he wanted to see different kinds of Black History Month celebrations in a centralized location that is accessible to the black community of Greensboro. He said he and McKiver wanted to take celebrating Black History Month to the next level and invite Greensboro artists across all mediums to come together and form The Art of Blackness Collective. The collective will be collaborating and producing several events for the festival from Feb. 2 to 24, all happening at the Center for Visual Artists, located at 200 N. Davie St. in Greensboro. “I am real big on my culture,” Wright said. “Some people, from our community, don’t even celebrate Black History Month, they think it is 365 days a year, and of course, I agree. I look at Black History Month like people look at Christmas, and people look at New Year’s and the way people look at Independence Day. It is honestly a time for us to really focus on us and let people know how we really love and respect our culture.” Both McKiver and Wright spoke highly about the host. YES! WEEKLY

Snapshot from “Political”

“They have an awesome group,” McKiver said of the CVA staff. “We wanted to do a Black History Month program, show, movement for the month and they said ‘hey, we are with it, whatever y’all come up and present, we will make it work,’” Wright said. Wright said the point of the Black History Month events at the CVA is to strengthen the black community of Greensboro. “I think this is a big move for not just the CVA, not just Paper2Film, but for the city and for black people,” Wright said. “Our art is in central Greensboro, in a place where you have hundreds and thousands of people come through a year.’” On Feb. 2, Wright said that there would be an improv sketch called “Women of Destiny,” featuring “Malcolm X interviewing Michelle Obama, Oprah Winfrey, and a young Angela Davis.” Wright said that the interview would tackle questions surrounding the civil rights, feminist and Me Too movements. This will take place from 1 to 2 p.m. and features Jeffrey L. Wall, Latonya Simms, Roslyn Kristina and Constance Rae Reynolds. “They are not rehearsing,” Wright said of the local actors that will be participating in the skit. “They don’t even have the questions. The questions will be presented the day of the show, which makes it more interesting.” On the same day, Wright said there would be an unplugged, spoken word open mic, “where all the artists can’t use music,” hosted by Lavinia Missie Jackson from 4 to 6 p.m. On Feb. 8, Wright said there would be a music performance called Love N Hip Hop introducing poet/rapper Madame and featuring Bruce LaRonde from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. On Feb. 9, is the premier of the

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

first episode of the web series “Political,” at the Van Dyke Performance Space from 5 to 9:30 p.m., with the show starting at 6 p.m. (Tickets start at $10 and can be purchased through Eventbrite.) “Political” is a YouTube-based web series with 20-minute long episodes produced by the Paper2Film co-founders starring members of the Art of Blackness Collective. Before the screening of “Political,” Wright said there would be a screening of a short film called “Bully,” directed by Patrick Ferrara. “‘Political’ is a story about this problack, black nationalist, young politician, who believed in supporting community first,” Wright said. “He believes if we are going to support anything first, we need to support the black community first.” “He is unique to Greensboro,” McKiver said of the actor playing the main character Phil Muhammad. “He actually was a minister. So he is really connected to the community and seeing the better in the community. Now he is playing this politician, who will not bend to the power and the money game that is in the politics, which causes conflicts.” “Political” is co-written and directed by Wright and features local actors/cowriters Wall, McKiver, Camilia Carter Bass, Chauncey Miller, John McNeil, Michael Smith, Shane Grissom, Ferrara, Bruce LaRonde, Maurice Booth and Gerald Carter. The cast of “Bully” includes Carlton Ballard, Kareem Lamar Alston, Michael Smith, Marvin Ollison, Nadia Covington and Patrick Ferrara. Wright said “Political” is based on the speech by Malcolm X called “The Ballot or the Bullet.” ‘’Political’ is pretty much a call to action,” Wright said. “The thing about the film is that the city is 75 percent black, 10

percent Spanish and 15 percent minority, but the city council is 90 percent white. [Muhammad]’s thing is, how can we have a city council that is 90 percent white and a city that is 85 percent minority? There is something wrong with that picture.” “The choices that he makes is solely loyal to his community,” McKiver explained. “But with those choices, he has to pay a price to the ones who are funding his campaign, because he is not doing what they would like for him to do.” Wright said to keep an eye out for the second episode of “Political” that will be directed by McKiver. (Wright and McKiver also said that “Political” is working on a distribution partnership with GrindWorks Broadcast Media Productions.) On Feb. 10, Wright said that there would be a spoken word and music performance by Terence Walker from 3 to 6 p.m. On Feb. 15, Wright said there would be a “sip and paint” session with a nude subject; the event is called “Ebonique Day with Paint & Chill, A touch of eroticism with lady Picasso and the Artking.” On Feb. 16, there will be a fashion show debuting Anthony Redfearn’s fashion line, Black Apple from 4 to 6 p.m. Following the fashion show, will be a live performance by Jake Alexander from 7 to 8:30 p.m. On Feb. 22, Wright said R&B artist Evin Gibson would be performing “classic tunes, old school, top 40, originals and more,” with “Vintage: Live music and Art” from 8 to 10p.m. On Feb. 23, Ms. Lucretia Ventura Albino Black & White will be performing from 2 to 3 p.m. Donalja James will be performing a Diana Ross tribute from 6 to 8 p.m., and LaRonde will be performing from 8 to 10 p.m. that same night. Closing out the festival on Feb. 24 is the DeeDee Walker Film and Music Festival from 1 to 6 p.m. “In our community, (the black community), a lot of us don’t know about the CVA,” McKiver said. “To get more traffic in the CVA, this is a great collaboration between Paper2Film and the CVA.” For more information on the Art of Blackness Collective, “Political” and Paper2Film, visit the website (www. paper2films.com/) and Eventbrite page (www.eventbrite.com/e/political-thepremier-tickets). ! KATIE MURAWSKI is the editor of YES! Weekly. She is from Mooresville, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a minor in film studies from Appalachian State University in 2017.

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The secret origins of Comic Book City I was lucky to witness that period when comic book collecting emerged from being a shameful pastime to achieving a genuine level of respectability. (As it is considered a better Billy Ingram investment than the stock market.) Contributing A copy of Amazing Fantasy #15 (first apcolumnist pearance of SpiderMan) purchased at the going rate in 1969, around $25, could fetch upwards of $500,000 today. In the late-1960s, a teenager collecting comic books was considered symptomatic of a severe case of arrested development. It was not something I readily admitted to while attending Mendenhall Junior High where I met John Hitchcock, a collector into Marvel while I was diehard DC. There weren’t many of us four-color freaks around, as comics discovered on school grounds would be confiscated and destroyed. (Another Mendenhall comic connoisseur, Pierce Askegren, began writing for Vampirella and Creepy in 1979. After being viciously attacked in print by author Harlan Ellison in 1980, Askegren retreated from the pop culture scene, returning a decade later to pen best-selling novels based on Marvel superheroes and Buffy, the Vampire Slayer. He passed away in 2009.) A Shazam!-moment for us came around 1971 when College Hill resident Clay Kimball appeared on The Bob Gordon Show, Channel 12’s Sunday afternoon rerun-fest during which Bob would interview colorful locals. Astonishing as it was to see an adult comic aficionado on T.V., it was equally unnerving watching Bob Gordon manhandle those 10-cent treasures on the air. Kimball, Hitchcock, and I attended the state’s first comic conventions put on three or four times a year beginning in the late-1960s. Held in the backyard of brothers Edwin and Terry Murray’s home in Durham, 20 or so folks would show up to pour over what are now million dollar rarities like Action Comics #1, watch a movie, then eat dinner. Fifty years ago, this hobby could lead you to some sketchy places, such as Sam & Mack’s Newsstand where new releases WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

were displayed next to raunchy porn mags. “You’d look for comics wherever you could find them,” collector Raymond Tucker recalled. “There was a lady with a big moving van in a parking lot who had stacks of pre-code [1940s-1950s] comics for 50 cents apiece.” Hitchcock remembers a house with comic books for sale on High Point Road at the end of a dirt driveway with a large weeping willow out front. “You’d knock on the door and hear people yelling and screaming in there. Inside, there was a lady in a wicker chair with a tackle box who looked put out that we were even there. Behind her was a dog barking like it wanted to rip your throat out. She’d bang on the door and yell, ’Shut up dog!’” The city’s first comic book store popped up in 1973, where Sno-White Cleaners is now, near the corner of Walker and Elam. Back issues were placed inside Ziploc bags and hung with pins from a clothesline. “I think it was called Book Nook,” Tucker said. “I was able to pick up early Neal Adams’ Batman in Brave and Bold for 50 or 75 cents.” “The owner had a goatee, a big gut and

a cigarette with an ash about a mile long on it,” John Hitchcock remembered. “He was not friendly, very condescending.” Back issues generally sold for under $3, that is, until a customer showed the shopkeeper a copy of the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide. “After that,” Tucker said, “the guy wanted highest book value for his comics.” That shop closed after about six months. Kimball put on the area’s first comic convention in 1973 at Friendly Center Auditorium; his guest was Chapel Hill sci-fi pulp writer and Captain Marvel scribe Manly Wade Wellman. Overzealous tax assessors shut down Clay’s conventions after three shows. “We couldn’t believe the city went after this little thing that was only making everybody happy,” Hitchcock told me. Greensboro’s first full-service emporium, Acme Comics, opened in 1982 on the corner of South Elm and McGee, the next year they sponsored the first of many comic-cons with big-name guests including Archie Goodwin, Will Eisner, and Jack Kirby. In 2012, at the urging of Acme Comics, the Greensboro City Council voted

unanimously to give The Gate City a new nickname — Comic Book City, USA. It’s entirely fitting with four comic book retailers inside the city limits, an unusually large number, not to mention Greensboro is a point of origin for a number of notable artists including DC legend Murphy Anderson (Superman, Atomic Knights), Randy Green (X-Men), and Chris Giarrusso (Encounter). Meanwhile, John Hitchcock’s own shop, Parts Unknown the Comic Book Store, is celebrating its 30th anniversary. Kimball liquidated his entire collection before passing away in 2009. “Aunt Buncie was extremely poor and depended on charity from organizations, neighbors and family,” Kimball’s cousin Elvin Perkins told me. “Clay never forgot that and left over $160,000 to feed and care for those in need.” What’s that they say about heroes not needing a cape? ! BILLY INGRAM is the author of five books and can be found Thursday and Friday afternoons talking classic T.V., old Greensboro, and rare comics at Parts Unknown, coincidentally located around the corner from where Clay Kimball lived near Mendenhall and Spring Garden.

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Mending Ethan’s broken heart “Ethan is the sort of person who makes the world better, and I can’t imagine doing this whole life thing without him in it,” said Greensboro bartender Mikey LePard to me on Monday. She was talking Ian McDowell about her friend Ethan Archer, who suffered a debilitatContributor ing heart attack on Jan. 13, and whom she’s determined to do anything she can to help him. “I have two people I call my best friends,” she said. “But they’re more than that to me. They’re my family and my world, and this one has been there for me in ways most people aren’t aware of.” One of those ways happened when Mikey was undergoing severe depression a few years ago. “Ethan would come over and tell me to quit being a loser and get

up and brush my teeth, as he was taking me out to eat. He knew I hadn’t done that in two days.” Mikey tends bar at Westerwood Tavern at 508 Guilford Ave., but she first met Ethan at another one. “He was working the door, and a large man hit me in the face over jukebox credits. Ethan handled him for me and then sat with me to make sure I was OK. He’s the kind of guy that will miss a Thanksgiving meal with friends because another friend’s car broke down two hours away.” That’s why she was so shocked when Ethan nearly died on that unluckily-numbered Sunday 17 days ago. Unlike Mikey, I’ve known Ethan more as a friendly acquaintance than a friend, but he’s somebody I’ve seen around the neighborhood for years, and whom a lot of my close friends have always spoken highly of. And I’ve talked to him enough to know that, under normal conditions, he’d be perfectly capable of eloquently describing his experience. But having had one myself, I also know what near-death

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experiences take out of you, PHOTO BY MIKEY LEPARD and how hard it is to talk to anyone but your doctors and very close friends when you possess much less than half of your normal energy level. Which is why I interviewed Mikey, my favorite neighborhood bartender, rather than the man she’s now spending almost all her waking time helping when she’s not behind that bar. The last thing Ethan needs is some annoying writer asking questions. Mikey described Ethan as originally going to FastMed on Battleground on Jan. 13 because he was experiencing chest pains. “He told them he felt like he might be having a heart attack.” Instead, he was diagnosed with walking pneumonia. Despite his initial concerns, that seemed reasonable enough. “When you’re his age, you don’t think of yourself as being at risk for heart failure.” But he was still suffering Ethan Archer severe pain in both his chest and his arm six days later, so on Jan. 19, he went to Moses Cone, where he was given an EKG and told won’t be able to return to his job in the he’d recently suffered cardiac arrest. kitchen at Kau, the restaurant, bar and Mikey, who was with him for that diagmarket that recently opened at Revolunosis, described hearing it. “It was one of tion Mill in Greensboro, for at least two those surreal moments where the room months, which makes it hard to pay rent starts spinning, and the floor dissolves. All and bills. I could do was ask a million questions to That’s why Mikey and Westerwood understand what was happening and try owner Mike Bosco are holding a Valento understand.” Because he was adopted, tine’s Day fundraising party and silent Ethan doesn’t know his family’s medical auction for him at Westerwood Tavern history. “Because of that, we have no idea on Feb. 14. On Feb. 9, Blue Denim at 217 S. what we’re actually up against.” Elm St., will host a shrimp boil from 2 to Ethan was kept in the hospital from the 4 p.m., with all proceeds going to Ethan. evening of the 19th until the afternoon of Bites and Pints and Kau are also planning fundraisers, and with Westerwood, are all the 24th. He underwent a battery of tests donation drop zones. and had two stents put in his heart. Mikey Pam Cooper, co-owner of Revision Vinsaid she has a cynical suspicion that his tage in Greensboro, started a GoFundMe, lack of insurance might have something “Let’s mend Ethan’s broken heart,” on Jan. to do with his being released after four 25. As of 11 p.m. on Jan. 28, it had earned days. “It seems as though if you don’t $11,388 of its $20,000 goal. ! have health insurance in this country, it’s almost easier to just give you a pine box.” But the enormous hospital bills aren’t IAN MCDOWELL is the author of two published novels, her, or his, immediate financial concern. numerous anthologized short stories, and a whole lot of There’s the daily business of living and all nonfiction and journalism, some of which he’s proud of the mundane expenses it entails. Ethan and none of which he’s ashamed of.

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Hal Linden: A man of ‘letters’ There aren’t too many people on the planet who have won an Emmy, a Tony, and a Golden Globe, but then, there aren’t too many people like Hal Linden. By age 15, he was playing clarinet for a major Jim Longworth symphony orchestra. In his 20s, he sang Longworth and acted his way onto the Broadway at Large stage. And, as middle age approached, he gained worldwide fame as T.V.’s Barney Miller. Now at age 87, Linden’s considerable talents are still in demand, and on March 7, he will put them on display at the High Point Theatre when he teams with “I Dream of Jeannie” star Barbara Eden in a production of A.R. Gurney’s “Love Letters.” I caught up with Hal last week, and we talked about the play, his co-star, television versus live theatre, and much more. Jim: Ever since “Love Letters” was introduced in 1989, a lot of famous actors have performed the play, including Charlton Heston and Elizabeth Taylor. What makes it such an attractive property for actors? Hal: It’s an amazing property. The only action in the play are people reading letters aloud, and yet through the use of these personal letters between two people who have had a relationship since elementary school, you get to know how those two characters feel about each other. I suspect that’s the draw for actors because you can perform it just by reading a letter in the moment, about the moment. Jim: Given that format, let me ask you about chemistry between you and Barbara. On television and in film, chemistry between the actors is crucial, but on stage, there’s no camera in your face. So is chemistry still important in a play like “Love Letters?” Hal: It’s extremely important, but not as important as the chemistry between my character and the character that Barbara creates. That’s the person who gets to me. What she says as a character, and my memory of her when we were kids together, that’s what stokes the humanity and the feelings in the play. Jim: And makes it believable. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Hal: Yes. I’ve played “Love Letters” with different people, and each person gives you a different dynamic when they read it. Barbara’s humanity is what’s out there. Her character’s past, her history is what I’m listening to. In other words, the past that she puts out there as opposed to any other actress. So it’s an acting challenge based on who you’re sitting next to. Jim: Let’s digress for a moment. Do you think letter writing is a lost art these days? Hal: Definitely (laughs). When was the last time you wrote a letter? Jim: I think it was to the IRS (both laugh) Hal: I mean, your mailbox is full of bills and advertisements. Nobody writes letters. You get maybe a Christmas card or birthday card. It’s a dead art. Jim: So you don’t write letters? Hal: No, I was never much of a letter writer, except there was a period in my life, in my early marriage, when I had to spend extended times on the road with shows, pre-Broadway, or something that

took me away for six or eight weeks. Then I wrote letters because we couldn’t afford telephone calls (laughs). Jim: Let’s talk about accessibility to the arts. We’re fortunate to have you and Barbara come to the Triad and perform on stage, but you can’t go everywhere. Plus, most people can’t afford to travel to New York or L.A. to see a major production. Would you like to see cable networks broadcast Broadway plays so that those productions are more accessible to more people? Hal: I would much rather they go to their local community theatre and see the same plays. I don’t care if it’s professional or not. I would much rather have people see a live play, with performers, live on stage. I think the live quality is important because that forces the audience to become part of the dynamic. I sat in the third row to see James Earl Jones play “The Great White Hope,” and one moment, he was furious and whipped his head around, and a bead of sweat came out and landed on my forehead. That was

a long time ago, but it is as vivid to me today as it was when it happened. Those experiences of actually seeing living people being living people is one you can only approximate on the screen. Jim: I can’t let you go without asking one “Barney Miller” question. Why has that show held up so well? Hal: It was a brilliantly written show. It didn’t settle for cheap jokes. Instead, it was all about the frailties and humor of human behavior. We were also ahead of our time in presenting topics that are still relevant today. Tickets to “Love Letters” are still available by calling the High Point Theatre box office at (336) 887-3001 or visit www. highpointtheatre.com. You’ll get to see two great actors at work, and, if you’re lucky, maybe a bead of sweat will hit you in the forehead. ! JIM LONGWORTH is the host of “Triad Today,” airing on Saturdays at 7:30 a.m. on ABC45 (cable channel 7) and Sundays at 11 a.m. on WMYV (cable channel 15).

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tunes

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HEAR IT!

Chatham Rabbits tap into North Carolina history

T

here are different ways of honoring tradition. The husband-and-wife string-band duo Chatham Rabbits play music that’s rooted in the oldJohn Adamian time traditions of @johnradamian artists like the Carter Family, Charlie Poole, and Bascom Lamar Contributor Lunsford. The couple, Sarah Osborne McCombie and Austin McCombie, are not preservationists though. They’re not engaged in a meticulous recreation of the repertoire and technique of styles from the 1920s and 1930s. Chatham Rabbits write and perform original music, material written in the 21st Century, but you’d be forgiven for wondering if some of their songs were from before World War II. The duo has just released their debut record, All I Want From You, and are crisscrossing the state doing a number of albumrelease shows. They play the Crown at the Carolina Theatre in Greensboro on Sunday, Feb. 3. Earlier this week I spoke by phone with Sarah, who plays banjo and shares vocal duties. Austin, who sings and plays guitar, was busy navigating the mountain roads as the couple made their way back East after playing a show in Asheville. Old-time music, string band music, the dance music, fiddle tunes, ballads, story songs, tales of displacement, betrayal, hardship, and murder, the folk hymns, the songs of the mountains, those distinctive vocal harmonies, a whiff of shape-note singing, strains of the blues, songs of the farms and songs of the mills that went on to become bluegrass and early country — there’s a fair amount of deep tradition in North Carolina. And if one can sometimes feel like this music has thoroughly vanished from our world, one can also get the impression that it’s right here around us, still lingering in the air, with stories and characters and history to pull from just about everywhere we go. Okeh Records made one of its first scouting recordings of string band music in Winston-Salem in 1927, the same year of the landmark recordings in Bristol, Virginia, that some describe as the “Big Bang of country music.” Meanwhile, there were artists like the Blue Sky Boys and the Dixon Brothers who YES! WEEKLY

were from or spent time recording around the Piedmont region. The tradition is rooted here. The Chatham Rabbits channel and touch that history in their own way. The duo’s name pays tribute to a musical and cultural legacy of the town where they settled down after college. With jobs in the Triangle area, the two were drawn to Bynum, in Chatham County, in part because of the acoustic music scene that flourished there. They bought an old house and learned more about the community. (Sarah had grown up in Alamance County and then went on to play in the regional old-time band the South Carolina Broadcasters during her college years.) They learned about how string-band music had thrived among the mill workers in the region back in the first half of the 20th Century. (Sarah’s grandmother was active in the Guilford County Historical Society, and Sarah’s own work as a school teacher touched on North Carolina music history, so this type of research and curiosity was part of how they related to where they lived.) They also learned that Chatham County had been known for producing rabbits for meat, both farm-raised and hunted wild rabbits. In fact, in the 1930s, there was a popular string band made of a rotating cast of players from the area, and that band had been known as the Chatham Rabbits. They played local concerts and appeared on regional

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

radio shows. As it happened, one of the guitarists from the band lived in the house that the McCombies ended up buying. You can think of it as something coming full circle, or of Sarah and Austin as picking up where some others left off. The songs of the contemporary Chatham Rabbits point back to old stories, to the Civil War, to working the land, to faith, to the sense of home that’s bound up in the landscape. Chatham Rabbits went into the studio in late 2017 thinking they’d be recording some traditional old-time tunes, but in the process of working with producer Jerry Brown and with members of Mandolin Orange and Mipso, the two focused on their own original songs. “Although we write, so many of our songs are about a different time and place,” Sarah said. “We don’t really write a lot of songs about ourselves. Austin and I are both really interested in conjuring up characters.” One song, “Bugle Boy,” is a layered bit of storytelling, with the lyrics sung from the perspective of the wife of a soldier who’d had his good friend die in battle, and who had picked up the bugle to honor his fallen comrade. It’s about an act of tribute, but also about wartime suffering, and coping after the fighting is done. Sarah’s and Austin’s voices blend sweetly together, in that kind of harmonic closeness that almost seems to be a func-

tion or expression of emotional ties that singers have together. The string playing can bring to mind the Carter Family, with their signature style of both plucking melodic lines and strumming chords on the offbeat, a style of steadily syncopated playing related to the clawhammer technique that Sarah uses on the banjo. And yet a few of the songs — both in the chord progressions and the phrasing — might make you think of Gillian Welch, another artist who straddles both old and new. The Chatham Rabbits have just released their first record, but the pair are already at work on songs for their second album, and they’re planning to spend most of this year on the road touring. Having set aside their non-musical careers (she was teaching music in a Montessori School, he was a financial consultant), they were prepared to have to sell that old house and to live more or less out of their vehicle, as traveling troubadours. But they’re now hoping that they can stay semi-rooted in Bynum while still bringing the music to listening rooms, theaters, churches and festivals around the country. You might view making string-band music that flourished in the 1930s as a recklessly anachronistic activity, but one can see the current interest in handmade old-time songs as partly a corrective to the mass-produced and computergenerated culture of the moment. It’s also analogous to the continuing resurgence in all things artisanal and local. If people like to feel a connection to their local brewery, bakery, and farmers market, this music is the sonic equivalent. It’s made by people you know, and the sound reflects the place in its own distinct way. The McCombies suspect that the music’s appeal is the same for players as it is for listeners: a driving energy and rawness that feels real. It pulls people together. “I feel like it’s very addictive and very primal, it sounds kind of weird, but that’s the best word that comes to mind,” Sarah said. “This music is very immediate, and it helps to build relationships.” ! JOHN ADAMIAN lives in Winston-Salem, and his writing has appeared in Wired, The Believer, Relix, Arthur, Modern Farmer, the Hartford Courant and numerous other publications.

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See Chatham Rabbits at The Crown at the Carolina Theatre, 310 S. Greene St., Greensboro, on Sunday, Feb. 3, at 4 p.m. carolinatheatre.com

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Matty Sheets: Maestro of the midweek Matty Sheets is a fixture in the Greensboro music community. Lauded through slews of sick local bands, and sickness itself, it’s been his Tuesday open mics which have long anchored Katei Cranford the Monkeywhale of a man. But lately, the Contributor Blockhead has been branching out. With a “drink and draw” on Monday nights and a musician residency on Wednesdays, Sheets’ activities are making more ways for musicians— including himself—to make the Triad midweek more than mundane. “It’s a nice, calm couple of hours where we draw and drink coffee or cocktails and listen to live music,” Sheets said of the “drink and draw” series he’s hosting Mondays at the Artist Bloc, a space that blends an art-shop, bar, and coffeelounge. “I love creating pockets of stillness into my life these days, and seeing what happens when stresses go away for a moment,” Sheets said about the chill vibes of the series. “It’s remarkably less lonely if you’re around other folks doing the same,” he added. As for scheduled musicians, “Ben Singer has been our resident for January,” Sheets said. And Beau James (from Chuck Mountain) is slated for March. Visual art is a new calling for Sheets, who spent his life before a multiple sclerosis diagnosis dedicated to music. “Thinking I’d have to quit playing music really fucked with me,” Sheets said bluntly. “My arms and hands are pretty shaky, but I want to keep getting better,” he said regarding the doodles he shares daily through Instagram. Sheets’ commitment to art surrounds his music, in album covers, show flyers, and, most notably, merchandise for the Tuesday open-mic sessions for which he’s probably best known. “The buttons were all Mikey’s idea,” Sheets said about the recent merch addition to open mic, courtesy of his bartending co-host. “She asked me to do the drawing, and then made the buttons for sale to help with my medical bills,” he explained. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

“I really appreciate Matty inviting me to these shows,” Laura Jane Vincent said, “it’s contributed to me creatively and challenged what I normally would do on my own.” “Matty sets you up for success by allowing you to do your own thing,” she added. “He trusts the process, which makes you feel at ease and that makes it fun.” Truly a maestro, Sheets remains steadfast in conducting spaces, challenging artists and putting them in the light, often before himself. It’s worth witnessing. !

PHOTO COURTESY OF BEN SINGER

Easily a contender for the longestrunning Triad music series, Sheets started the Tuesday night fixture way back in October 2001, spending the first 12 years at the Flatiron, followed by a stint at New York Pizza, before settling at Westerwood Tavern in 2017. Even as he feels his onstage roles change, Sheets continues to host a platform for performers. “After I got my diagnosis, I was afraid I’d have to stop playing music,” Sheets said of times which tested his resolve. “I had a breakdown and probably freaked some people out, venting into the microphone,” he admitted. Ultimately, his drive to perform pushed through, steering him toward a weekly residency on Wednesdays at Common Grounds. “It’s more difficult now, but I can play,” he added, “and Wednesdays have been great since.” On the coffeehouse stage, he’s joined by Erin Hayes on bass and flute alongside songbird guitarist Laura Jane Vincent. “They’ve been my teammates for the most part,” Sheets said, “plus Ben Singer is on drums—well, drum, actually—only a snare drum and a cymbal. It’s lovely.” Sheets’ rotating band of friends is joined weekly by special guests, with Durham’s Pete Pawsey scheduled for the Jan. 30 show. Sheets is also working on a new record with Jeff Wysosky at Lazy Dog Recordings. “I was really nervous at first because I hadn’t worked with anyone new in many years,” he explained, “but we settled into it and got work done.” “Jeff is great, and I’m a weirdo,” Sheets confessed. The record also features artists associated with Sheets including Taylor Bays, Ali Fox, Jerrod Smith, and Emily Stewart, along with Hayes, Singer and Vincent.

“I’m especially excited about this record because it sounds like the current me,” Sheets professed, “not the person I was.” “I’m seldom anyone’s drinking buddy like I used to be,” he explained, “and I’m no one’s cigarette buddy anymore.” Smokes aside, Sheets remains a buddy to Greensboro artists, each of his endeavors involves supporting folks and their craft. It’s through that process he builds— and shares—strength.

KATEI CRANFORD is a Triad music nerd who hosts the Tuesday Tour Report, a radio show that runs like a mixtape of touring bands, 5-7p.m. on WUAG 103.1fm.

WANNA

go?

Catch him with a pen in hand on Mondays at the Artist Bloc (1020 W. Gate City Blvd.), wrangling open mic on Tuesdays at Westerwood Tavern (508 Guilford Ave.) and crooning away Wednesday nights at Common Grounds (602 S. Elam Ave.)

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Submissions should be sent to artdirector@yesweekly.com by Friday at 5 p.m., prior to the week’s publication. Visit yesweekly.com and click on calendar to list your event online. home grown muSic Scene | compiled by Austin Kindley

ASHEBORO

FOUR SAINTS BREWING

218 South Fayetteville St. | 336.610.3722 foursaintsbrewing.com Feb 1: Wolfie Calhoun Feb 2: 80s Unplugged Feb 6: Contentment Is Wealth Feb 8: Couldn’t Be Happiers

clEmmOnS

VILLAGE SQUARE TAP HOUSE

6000 Meadowbrook Mall Ct | 336.448.5330 Feb 1: DJ Bald-E Feb 3: Jukebox Revolver Feb 8: DJ Bald-E Feb 9: Jax N Jill Feb 15: Whiskey Mic Feb 16: Southern Eyes Feb 23: Essick-Tuttle Outfit

dAnBuRy

gREEnSBORO

GREEN HERON ALE HOUSE

ARIzONA PETE’S

ElKIn

ARTISTIkA NIGHT CLUB

1110 Flinchum Rd | 336.593.4733 greenheronclub.com

REEVES THEATER

129 W Main St | 336.258.8240 reevestheater.com Feb 1: Thomas Rhyant Feb 9: The Martha Bassett Show, Alasdair Fraser & Natalie Feb 15: Declan O’Rourke Feb 16: Occidental Gyspsy Feb 22: Big Daddy Love Feb 23: Wayne Henderson & Friends Mar 1: Reeves House Band Mardi Gras celebration Mar 2: The Martha Basett Show, Minton Sparks Mar 9: LoneHollow with The Graybyrds Mar 16: The Mountain Laurels Mar 23: The Honey Dewdrops

2900 Patterson St #A | 336.632.9889 arizonapetes.com Feb 1: 1-2-3 Friday 523 S Elm St | 336.271.2686 artistikanightclub.com Feb 1: DJ Dan the Player Feb 2: DJ Paco and DJ Dan the Player

BARN DINNER THEATRE 120 Stage Coach Tr. | 336.292.2211 Feb 14: Timeless Soul Band Feb 16-Mar 16: Motherhood: The Musical

BEERTHIRTY

505 N. Greene St Feb 1: Dave Moran Feb 7: Geoff Clapp and Charlie Hunter Duo Feb 8: Dana Bearror Feb 15: Craig Baldwin

Feb 22: Susanna MacFarlane and Jamie Pruitt Mar 1: Starstruck Acoustic Duo Mar 8: Gerry Stanek Mar 15: Chad Barnard Mar 22: Dave Moran Mar 29: Dana Bearror

THE BLIND TIGER

1819 Spring Garden St | 336.272.9888 theblindtiger.com Jan 31: Gaelic Storm Feb 1: The John kadlecik Band Feb 6: Fade To Black: A Metallica Tribute Feb 7: Parmalee w/ kasey Tyndall Feb 8: Sevendust w/ Tremonti, Cane Hill, Lullwater, kirra Feb 9: Cosmic Charlie

THE CORNER BAR

1700 Spring Garden St | 336.272.5559 corner-bar.com Jan 24: Live Thursdays

KORN • ROB ZOMBIE • THE PRODIGY

EVANESCENCE • MACHINE GUN KELLY • MESHUGGAH • SKILLET

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

BEARTOOTH • MARK LANEGAN BAND • DOROTHY • BLACK PISTOL FIRE ZE A L & A R DOR • K NOCK ED LOOSE • SLOTHRUST • WILSON H A NDS LIK E HOUSE S • HYRO THE HERO • A MIG O THE DEVIL D E D • A R R E STE D YO UTH • V E I N • B L A C K C O FFE E

TOOL • JUDA S PR IEST • THE CULT

FOO FIGHTERS • BRING ME THE HORIZON • 311

MOTIONLESS IN WHITE • THE DAMNED THINGS • GR ANDSON • BADFLOWER

THE INTER RUPTER S • TOM MOR ELLO • FEVER 333 • R EIGNWOLF

BUSH • BLACK LABEL SOCIETY • CIRCA SURVIVE • YELAWOLF +LIVE+ • MASTODON • KILLSWITCH ENGAGE • ARCHITECTS

22

MEMPHIS M AY FIR E • LIGHT THE TORCH • WAGE WA R • CROB OT DE A D GIR LS ACA DEMY • SYL A R • COUNTER FEIT. • PR ETTY VICIOUS. • SHVPES D I R T Y H O NE Y • A L I E N W E A P O NR Y • HYD E • TE TR A R C H

YUNGBLUD • THE GLORIOUS SONS • HO99O9 • WHILE SHE SLEEPS • BASEMENT SC A R L X R D • MOVEMENTS • TEEN AGE WR IST • DEMOB H A PPY B O ST O N M A N O R • C L E O PATR IC K • TH E D I R T Y NI L

E PI C E NTE R FE S TI VA L .C O M YES! WEEKLY

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comEdY zonE

1126 S Holden Rd | 336.333.1034 thecomedyzone.com Feb 5: T.J. miller

common groundS 11602 S Elm Ave | 336.698.3888 Feb 2: Andrew Kasab

conE dEnIm

117 S Elm St | 336.378.9646 cdecgreensboro.com mar 15: Ben rector Apr 9: cradle of Filth w/ Wdnesday 13 and raven Black Apr 10: chris d’Elia Apr 13: Walker Hayes w/ Filmore

grEEnE STrEET cluB 113 N Greene St | 336.273.4111

HAm’S nEW gArdEn

1635 New Garden Rd | 336.288.4544 hamsrestaurants.com

lEVEnElEVEn BrEWIng 1111 Coliseum Blvd | 336.265.8600 Jan 30: Josh Watson Feb 6: John Stevens Feb 13: William nesmith Feb 20: doug Baker Feb 27: Tony low

lISTEn SpEAKEASY 433 Spring Garden St

lITTlE BroTHEr BrEWIng

348 South Elm St | 336.510.9678 Feb 1: John Emil Feb 2: city dirt Trio Feb 7: dane page Feb 9: Into The Fog Feb 15: Tyler millard duo Feb 21: good morning Bedlam Feb 23: guerrero Street Trio

rodY’S TAVErn

5105 Michaux Road | 336.282.0950 rodystavern.com

SpEAKEASY TAVErn

1706 Battleground Ave | 336.378.0006

THE IdIoT Box comEdY cluB

502 N. Greene St | 336.274.2699 www.idiotboxers.com Feb 1: nc’s Funniest Feb 8: mello mike Feb 13: Wednesday open mic

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NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC FEBRUARY 5 REGARDING THE PROPOSAL TO WIDEN RANDLEMAN ROAD (S.R. 1007) FROM GLENDALE DRIVE TO WEST ELMSLEY DRIVE IN GUILFORD COUNTY STIP Project No. U-5850 The N.C. Department of Transportation proposes to widen Randleman Road (S.R. 1007) between Glendale Drive and West Elmsley Drive in Guilford County. A public meeting will be held from 4-7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 5 at New Goshen United Methodist Church located at 3300 Randleman Road in Greensboro. The purpose of this meeting is to inform the public of the project and gather input on the proposed design. As information becomes available, it may be viewed online at the NCDOT public meeting webpage: https://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings. The public may attend at any time during the public meeting hours, as no formal presentation will be made. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and receive comments. The comments and information received will be taken into consideration as work on the project develops. The opportunity to submit written comments will be provided at the meeting or can be done via phone, email, or mail by Feb. 19, 2019. For additional information, please contact Brian Ketner, NCDOT Division 7 Project Engineer at P.O. Box 14996, Greensboro, NC 27415-4996, (336) 487-0075 or, bkketner@ncdot.gov. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this workshop. Anyone requiring special services should contact Tony Gallagher, Environmental Analysis Unit, at 1598 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1598, at (919) 707-6069 or magallagher@ncdot.gov as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494. JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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24

thE W BIStRO & BAR

Feb 8 : Rockit Science Feb 9 : Soul Central Feb 14 : Anti valentine featuring trish Delish Feb 15 : Big Daddy Mojo Feb 16 : the Plaids Feb 22 : Stereo Doll Feb 23 : Radio Revolver

324 Elm St | 336.763.4091 @thewdowntown Jan 31: Karaoke Feb 1: Live DJ Feb 2: Live DJ

high point

AFtER hOuRS tAvERn

1614 N Main St | 336.883.4113 afterhourstavern.net Feb 24: Desired Redemption, Divine treachery, Mad Loco Motives, Crimson Soil, Skulls & Whiskey

GOOFY FOOt tAPROOM 2762 NC-68 #109 | 336.307.2567 Feb 2: Dave Moran Feb 7: Into the Fog

hAM’S PALLADIuM 5840 Samet Dr | 336.887.2434 hamsrestaurants.com

jamestown

kernersville

DAnCE hALL DAzE

612 Edgewood St | 336.558.7204 dancehalldaze.com Jan 25: the Delmonicos Jan 26: Ambush Feb 1: Skyryder Feb 2: William Willard & Country Storm Band Feb 8: the Delmonicos Feb 14: Skyryder Feb 15: Kye & the horizon Band Feb 16: the Delmonicos Feb 22: the Delmonicos Feb 23: Ambush

BREAthE COCKtAIL LOunGE

thE DECK

221 N Main St. | 336.497.4822 facebook.com/BreatheCocktailLounge Feb 2: DJ Mike Lawson Feb 9: DJ Mike Lawson

118 E Main St | 336.207.1999 thedeckatrivertwist.com Feb 1 : Crossing Avery Feb 2 : Lilly brothers

“Your One Stop Hemp Shop”™

Food - Fiber - Health & Beauty Come see what the excitement is all about!

LOCATIONS 1633 New Garden Rd. Greensboro, NC 27410 336-907-7148

405 E Dixie Dr., Suite A Asheboro, NC 27203 336-629-4367

5870 Samet Drive, Suite 115 High Point , NC 27265 336-875-4255

117 North Pilot Knob Road Suite 104 Denver, NC 28037 704-951-8352

3876 Oxford Station Way Winston Salem, NC 27103

3186 Walden Lane Burlington, NC 27215

www.everythinghempstore.com www.foundershemp.com

lewisville

OLD nICK’S PuB

191 Lowes Foods Dr | 336.747.3059 OldNicksPubNC.com Fri. 1: Music Bingo Feb 2: Soul Jam Feb 8: Karaoke Feb 9: under the Gun Feb 15: Music Bingo Feb 16: Exit 180 Feb 22: Karaoke Feb 23: Lasater union

thomasville

COACh’S nEIGhBORhOOD GRILL

1033 Randolph St. Suite 26 | 336.313.8944 coachsneighborhoodgrill.com

winston-salem

SECOnD & GREEn

207 N Green St | 336.631.3143 2ngtavern.com

BuLL’S tAvERn

408 West 4th St | 336.331.3431 facebook.com/bulls-tavern Feb 2: Little Stranger Feb 9: uncle John’s Bone Presents Feb 15: the Plaids Anti valentine Party Feb 21: Jukebox Rehab Feb 22: Souljam Feb 23: Brother’s Pearl Mar 2: Whiskey Foxtrot Mar 8: Jukebox Rehab Mar 9: the Good Dope

BuRKE StREEt PuB 1110 Burke St | 336.750.0097 burkestreetpub.com

CB’S tAvERn

3870 Bethania Station Rd | 336.815.1664 Feb 23: Incognito

FIDDLIn’ FISh BREWInG COMPAnY 772 Trade St | 336.999.8945 fiddlinfish.com Feb 1: Circus Mutt Feb 4: Old time Jam

FInnIGAn’S WAKE

620 Trade St | 336.723.0322 facebook.com/FinnigansWake

FOOthILLS BREWInG

638 W 4th St | 336.777.3348 foothillsbrewing.com Jan 30: Destination Bluegrass Band Feb 2: William hinson Feb 3: Sunday Jazz Feb 6: hazy Ridge Bluegrass Band

JOhnnY & JunE’S SALOOn

2105 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.724.0546 johnnynjunes.com

MAC & nELLI’S

4926 Country Club Rd | 336.529.6230 macandnellisws.com

MILLEnnIuM CEntER 101 West 5th Street | 336.723.3700 MCenterevents.com

MILnER’S

630 S Stratford Rd | 336.768.2221 milnerfood.com Feb 3: Live Jazz Feb 10: Live Jazz

MuDDY CREEK CAFE & MuSIC hALL

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 Jan 31: Old Salt union Feb 2: the Gravy Boys Feb 3: tom’s handgun, Bristolina Feb 9: Daniel Champagne Feb 10: Ashley heath, Corey hunt, Emily Musolino, tyler hatley Feb 14: Jonathan Byrd & the Pickup Cowboys Feb 16: Brian Grilli, tupelo Crush Feb 17: Wayne henderson & Presley Barker, Rob Ickes & trey hensley Feb 21: Jerry Garcia Band Cover Band Feb 22: Mel Jones & his Bag O’Bones w/ John hofmann Mar 2: time Sawyer

thE RAMKAt

170 W 9th St | 336.754.9714 Feb 2: Who’s Bad: the ultimate Michael Jackson Experience Feb 7: Drivin’ n’ Cryin’, Lauren Morrow, Possum Jenkins Feb 8: the Blue Dogs, Matthew Mayes, Mark Kano & Mike Garrigan Feb 16: the Funky Knuckles, Jonathan Sclaes Fourchestra, John Ray trio Feb 21: Corey Smith

WISE MAn BREWInG

826 Angelo Bros Ave | 336.725.0008 Feb 8: the trongone Band

These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. All CBD and food or dietary supplement products are grown and/or processed in the US in compliance with the 2014 Federal Farm Bill.

YES! WEEKLY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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[CONCERTS] Compiled by Alex Eldridge

CARY

BOOTH AMPHITHEATRE 8003 Regency Pkwy | 919.462.2025 www.boothamphitheatre.com

DURHAM

CAROLINA THEATRE

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.bojanglescoliseum.com

309 W Morgan St | 919.560.3030 www.carolinatheatre.org Feb 9: The Fab Four Feb 15: Susana Baca Feb 21: Johnny Cash at San Quentin: Johnny Folsom 4 & Friends Feb 28: Aaron Lewis Mar 3: Justin Hayward

CMCU AMPHITHEATRE

DPAC

CHARLOTTE

BOJANGLES COLISEUM

former Uptown Amphitheatre 820 Hamilton St | 704.549.5555 www.livenation.com

THE FILLMORE

1000 NC Music Factory Blvd | 704.916.8970 www.fillmorecharlottenc.com Jan 30: Locash Feb 1: Shoot To Thrill - All Female AC/DC Tribute Feb 4: Kongos Feb 8: Walk The Moon Feb 8: The Sweet Spot Feb 9: Bryce Vine Feb 10: Yung Gravy Feb 12: St. Paul & The Broken Bones Feb 18: In Flames Feb 18: YNW Melly Feb 19: Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals Feb 20: Alan Walker Feb 21: ThouxanbanFauni Feb 22: Mike Stud Feb 22: Who’s Bad Feb 23: Dylan Scott Feb 23: Off With Your Radiohead Feb 24: The-Dream Feb 25: Wet & Kilo Kish Feb 26: Gin Blossoms Feb 28: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie Mar 1: West Coast High 2019 ft. Cypress Hill & Hollywood Undead Mar 5: Citizen Cope Mar 6: Subtronics w/ Blunts & Blondes Mar 7: Whiskey Myers

PNC MUSIC PAVILION 707 Pavilion Blvd | 704.549.1292 www.livenation.com

OVENS AUDITORIUM

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.ovensauditorium.com

SPECTRUM CENTER

333 E Trade St | 704.688.9000 www.spectrumcentercharlotte.com Feb 24: Fleetwood Mac Mar 9: P!nk WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

RALEIGH

CCU MUSIC PARK AT WALNUT CREEK

3801 Rock Quarry Rd | 919.831.6400 www.livenation.com

RED HAT AMPHITHEATER 500 S McDowell St | 919.996.8800 www.redhatamphitheater.com

PNC ARENA

1400 Edwards Mill Rd | 919.861.2300 www.thepncarena.com

WINSTON-SALEM

WINSTON-SALEM FAIRGROUND 421 W 27th St | 336.727.2236 www.wsfairgrounds.com

123 Vivian St | 919.680.2787 www.dpacnc.com Jan 31: Toni Braxton Feb 1: Mandolin Orange Feb 20: Alan Parsons Feb 21: The Piano Guys Feb 22 & 23: Rock of Ages Mar 5: James Bay

GREENSBORO

CAROLINA THEATRE

310 S Greene St | 336.333.2605 www.carolinatheatre.com Feb 1: Arlo Guthrie Feb 3: Chatham Rabbits Feb 7: Drew & Ellie Holcomb Feb 10: The UNC Clef Hangers’ Feb 10: Joe Pug Feb 16: Seth Walker Mar 2: Desmond Jones Mar 6: Travis Greene Mar 7: The Chieftains Mar 8: Puddles Pity Party

GREENSBORO COLISEUM 1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com Feb 2: Luke Combs Feb 23: Winter Jam

WHITE OAK AMPITHEATRE

1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com

HIGH POINT

HIGH POINT THEATRE

220 E Commerce Ave | 336.883.3401 www.highpointtheatre.com Feb 14: Branford Marsalis Quartet Feb 15: Al Di Meola Mar 8: Gina Chavez Mar 10: The Queen’s Cartoonists

!

CHECK IT OUT!

Click on our website, yesweekly.com, for more concerts. JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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photos

26

VISIT YESWEEKLY.COM/GALLERIES TO SEE MORE PHOTOS!

[FACES & PLACES] by Natalie Garcia

AROUND THE TRIAD YES! Weekly’s Photographer

YES! WEEKLY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Wise Man Brewing 1.26.19 | Winston-Salem

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hot pour PRESENTS

[BARTENDERS OF THE WEEK | BY NATALIE GARCIA] Check out videos on our Facebook!

BARTENDER: Kayla Grubbs BAR: Burke Street Pub

Blu Velvet Lounge 1.26.19 | Winston-Salem

WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

AGE: 24 WHERE ARE YOU FROM? Winston-Salem, NC HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN BARTENDING? 3 years! I got lucky. I started the week I turned 21. HOW DID YOU BECOME A BARTENDER? I’ve been working in the service industry since I turned 18 and always wanted to bartend. I was working at Hooters and Hickory Tavern at the time and they both started training me the week after my 21st birthday! WHAT DO YOU ENJOY ABOUT BARTENDING? I am a huge people person. I have made so many friends and memories since I’ve started bartending. Honestly, the best part about bartending is the fact that it is my job to make sure everyone is having a good time and I have a blast while I’m doing it too. I love to people watch and y’all — my friends and guests are hysterical. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE DRINK TO MAKE? It’s my favorite and also least favorite... the Burke Street Astropop Shot. It’s a pain in the ass to make, but people light up when they see it made!

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE DRINK TO DRINK? VEGAS BOMBS! Anyone that knows me knows that! WHAT WOULD YOUR RECOMMEND AS AN AFTER-DINNER DRINK? Personally, I think a good porter or stout is best. Try a Heretic Chocolate Hazelnut Porter. WHAT’S THE CRAZIEST THING YOU’VE SEEN WHILE BARTENDING? Good lord. I could write a book. I will have to go with the night a young lady peed herself while sitting at the bar. To make things worse, she kept eye contact with Lauren (the bartender working that night) THE. ENTIRE. TIME. WHAT’S THE BEST TIP YOU’VE EVER GOTTEN? Material-wise...a pair of diamond earrings. Insanity, right?

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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Vintage Sofa Bar 1.26.19 | Winston-Salem

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Burke Street Pub 1.26.19 | Winston-Salem

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mwww.YEswEEklY.com

NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC FEBRUARY 7 IMPROVEMENTS TO THE INTERSECTION OF AIR HARBOR ROAD AT LAKE BRANDT ROAD IN GREENSBORO, GUILFORD COUNTY STIP Project No. U-6019 The N.C. Department of Transportation is proposing to make improvements to the intersection of Air Harbor Road and Lake Brandt Road in Greensboro. An open-house public meeting will be held at Covenant Grace Church located at 1414 Lake Brandt Road in Greensboro from 4-6:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 7, 2019. The purpose of this meeting is to provide interested citizens the opportunity to review maps of the project, ask questions and provide feedback. Interested citizens may attend at any time between 4 and 6 p.m. Please note that there will not be a formal presentation. Maps of the proposed improvements will be displayed at the meeting and staff of NCDOT will be on hand to provide information and answer questions. A map of the proposal is available online at http://www.ncdot.gov/news/public-meetings/. For additional information please contact NCDOT Project Engineer, Jennifer Evans, PE, (336) 487-0075 or jenniferevans@ncdot.gov. Comments will be accepted at the meeting, by mail or email, and should be submitted by March 1, 2019. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this workshop. Anyone requiring special services should contact Lauren Putnam, (919) 707-6072 or Lnputnam@ncdot.gov as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas que no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494. JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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last call

30

[HOROSCOPES]

[LEO (July 23 to August 22) A family matter needs to be dealt with at the start of the week. Once it’s resolved, the Big Cat can devote more attention to that new opportunity that seems to hold so much potential.

[LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A business venture might need more of your attention than you are able to provide. Consider asking a trusted friend or family member to help you work through this time crunch.

[SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) A very close friend (you know who that is!) has advice that could help you work through a confusing situation. So put your pride aside and ask for it. You’ll be glad you did.

[VIRGO (August 23 to September 22)

[SCORPIO (October 23 to November

[CAPRICORN (December 22 to Janu-

Pay attention to those niggling doubts. They could be warning you not to make any major decisions until you’ve checked them out — especially where money matters might be involved.

21) A more-positive aspect helps you get a clearer focus on how to handle your time so that you can deal with several responsibilities that are just now showing up on your schedule.

ary 19) A workplace situation could turn a bit tense. The best way to handle it is to confront it and deal with it openly. Doing so can help reveal the underlying reasons for the problem.

[AQUARIUS (January 20 to February

HALF HOUR FREE

18) A colleague’s remarks appear to be especially cutting. But don’t waste your time or your energy trying to deal with the situation. You have more important things to do.

[PISCES (February 19 to March 20)

Support for your work comes as a surprise from someone you thought was critical or, at least, indifferent. Your spouse or partner has big plans for the weekend.

REAL CHAT WITH REAL MEN

FREE TRIAL

by Samantha Weaver

* It was 20th-century American author Margaret Mitchell — best known, of course, for her Civil War-era novel “Gone With the Wind” — who made the following sage observation: “Until you’ve lost your reputation, you never realize what a burden it was or what freedom really is.” * In rural Wisconsin in 1921, two thirdgrade students in a one-room school-

Real hot chat now.

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704-943-0057

More Numbers: 1-800-700-6666 Redhotdateline.com 18+ FREE TRIAL

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Discreet Chat Guy to Guy

980.224.4669

house became sweethearts. At the end of the school year, Lorraine Beatty and Mac McKitrick lost touch with each other. This story would be unremarkable, except for what happened 87 years later. In 2009, their brothers, who had become friends, brought the couple back together. Shortly thereafter, the couple married and moved in with each other in a retirement home. * The Sphinx in Egypt is the only one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World still in existence. * According to tradition, a bride whose dress is made of silk will have good fortune in her marriage. A woman who wears velvet to her wedding will face poverty, and a satin wedding gown will bring bad luck. * Reportedly, anyone caught in the jaws of a crocodile can release him- or herself instantly by pressing on the animal’s eyeballs (though I cannot personally attest to the veracity of this claim).

Who are you after dark?

18+ MegaMates.com

[CANCER (June 21 to July 22) If you still have a problem getting that information gap closed, you might consider asking a higher authority to resolve the matter, leaving you free to move on to another project.

[STRANGE BUT TRUE]

More Numbers: 1-800-926-6000 Livelinks.com, 18+

Playmates and soul mates...

1-980-224-4667

[GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) It might be best to put off an important decision until a fluctuating situation becomes more stable. Recently received news could help resolve a long-standing family matter.

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Charlotte:

[TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You’re eager to take on new responsibilities. But before you do, you might want to check out exactly what would be required of you so that you don’t face any “surprises” later.

© 2019 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

1-704-943-0051 MORE NUMBERS:1-800-777-8000 GUYSPYVOICE.COM

[ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Doing something nice for others is typical of the generous Arian. But be prepared for some jealous types who might try to question one of your more recent acts of kindness.

30 MINUTES FREE TRIAL

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Thought for the Day: “A consensus means that everyone agrees to say collectively what no one believes individually.” — Abba Eban © 2019 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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[THE ADVICE GODDESS] love • sex • dating • marriage • questions

AREOLA 51

A lot of women are posting pix of themselves on Instagram in very skimpy attire. I don’t feel comfortable doing that (though I’m in great shape), because I’m single Amy Alkon and I’m afraid men would think I’m Advice “easy.” Am I right in thinking men don’t Goddess take you seriously as relationship material if you post this type of pix? Or am I prudish and out of touch? — Curious Ideally, if you tell somebody you have a few more weeks out on disability, they don’t immediately assume it’s because you got really bad friction burns working the pole. Evolutionary psychologist Cari Goetz and her colleagues note — not surprisingly — that men see skimpy attire on a woman as a signal that they can manipulate her into casual sex. (Women in their research also understood that men perceive skimpy attire this way.) But who actually ends up manipulating whom? Just like in the advertising world, in the natural world, there are many, shall we say, less-than-truthful messages — from humans, animals, and even some nasty little con artists of the plant world. Take the flower Ophrys apifera, aka the bee orchid. The bee orchid puts out fake female bee scent, and it’s got markings and a

slight coating of “fur” like female bees. The poor little sex-mad male bees try to hump the bee orchids and, in the process, pick up orchid pollen that they end up transferring when they try their luck with the next orchid in a lady bee suit. Goetz and her team speculate that some women — especially those who perceive themselves to be “low in mate value” — use revealing attire to advertise what seems to be their hookupability and other “exploitability cues.” However, these seemingly poor, defenseless sex bunnies may actually be looking to “advance their own mating and relationship goals.” As for how this might work, if a man likes the casual sex and keeps coming back for more, maybe, just maybe, she can draw him into a relationship. (Hookupily ever after?) However, this approach is a risky strategy because, as Goetz and her colleagues point out, “men found women displaying cues to sexual exploitability to be attractive as short-term mates, but, importantly, not attractive as long-term mates.” As for what you might make of all this, it’s best to avoid clothes with coverage just this side of G-strings and nipple tassels, as well as overtly sexual poses (like sucking on a finger...subtle!). However, you can take advantage of evolutionary psychology research that finds that men are drawn to women with an hourglass figure (as well as...heh...women who use deceptive undergarments to fake having one). In short, your best bet is posting shots of yourself looking classysexual. This means wearing clothes that reveal

answers [CROSSWORD] crossword on page 15

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[WEEKLY SUDOKU] sudoku on page 15

your curves to a man — but not your medical history: “I don’t know her name yet, dude, but I can tell you that she had her gallbladder removed.”

A CZAR IS BORN

I love my girlfriend, but she has some weird rules about her place: no shoes inside, cabinets can’t be left open, etc. We’ve gotten in fights when I’ve forgotten to do this stuff and then mentioned how ridiculous I find it. Should I have to do things I think are stupid? — Besieged Your girlfriend reminds you of a wellknown television star. Unfortunately, it’s Judge Judy. You, like many people in relationships, have the expectation that your partner’s requests should make sense. This is where you go wrong. To be human is to be kind of an idiot. We’re all idiots on some level — meaning that we all say and do things that make sense to us but that others would reasonably find utterly idiotic. That said, our idiocy is not without benefits. Economist Robert H. Frank observes that we evolved to sometimes

behave in “seemingly irrational” ways that actually serve our interests. An example would be acting out in ways that test others’ commitment to us (though, typically, we don’t see it that way and may not even intend to do that). So, though your girlfriend would probably list reasons for each of her rules — reasons you might find silly — what isn’t silly is her caring about your following them or at least caring enough to try. In short, you don’t have to endorse her ideas to try to act in accordance with them and to treat her kindly when she gets upset that you’ve forgotten. (For example, you could say: “I’m sorry. I know it’s important to you that I do this.”) This would be a signal that you care deeply about her — that you love her enough to do ridiculous things just to make her happy...maybe even to the point of handing her a shopping bag: “Look, honey! There was a sale at Prada on surgical shoe covers!” ! GOT A problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol. com (www.advicegoddess.com) © 2019 Amy Alkon Distributed by Creators.Com.

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FREE LIMO PICK-UP AND DROP OFF!

7806 BOEING DRIVE Greensboro (Behind Arby’s) • Exit 210 off I-40 • (336) 664-0965 TREASURECLUBGREENSBORONC • thetreasureclubs.com • TreasureClubNC2 JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

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