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PHOTOGRAPHIC LEGACY P. 25 January 17-23, 2018 YES! WEEKLY

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JANUARY 17-23, 2018 VOLUME 14, NUMBER 3

22

JAN UARY

FR, JAN 19 • 8PM

THE BREAKFAST CLUB

SA 20 BOULEVARDS

W/KOOLEY HIGH/ LONNIE WALKER/ZENSOFLY

THEBBOYBALLET BREAKS OUT

TWO AMERICAN NIGHTS ! AQUARIUM 8P MO 29 BROCKHAMPTON @THE RITZ FR 26SA 27

F E B R UARY

FR 2 SA 3 TH 8 TH 8 FR 9 SA 10 SU 11 FR 16

KELLER WILLIAMS 8P PERPETUAL GROOVE 8P AJR: THE CLICK TOUR BIG GIGANTIC @ THE RITZ ID 8:00PM FAR TOO JONES 7P SLEIGH BELLS 7:30P THE SHAKEDOWN (PLAYS TOM PETTY)

SA 17 WHO’S BAD

5500 Adams Farm Lane Suite 204 Greensboro, NC 27407 Office 336-316-1231 Fax 336-316-1930 Publisher CHARLES A. WOMACK III publisher@yesweekly.com

“THEBBOYBALLET is a concept of dance more than an actual dance company,” Alexis said. “[It’s] the concept of what dance should be. It is a terminology thing. The “B” in BBoy stood for breaking, it was street terminology back in the day like when somebody is acting out of the ordinary, so that is where the breaking came from. It is more like the passion of the dance. It is like something inside of you broke so you have to dance.”

(MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE)

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SU 18 Y&T 7P FR 23 EMANCIPATOR ENSEMBLE 8P SA 24 WEEKEND EXCURSION 7P SU 25 ERIC JOHNSON

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W/ARIELLE 7P

AUSTIN KINDLEY artdirector@yesweekly.com

CO M I N G S O O N

JAZZ IS PHSH 8PM LOTUS 8PM J.J. GREY AND MOFRO BOWIE BALL 8PM KELLY HOLLAND MEMORIAL 4:30PM

3/16 J RODDY WALSTON & THE BUSINESS 3/21 NEW POLITICS W/DREAMERS AND THE WRECKS

3/23 COSMIC CHARLIE PLAYS “EUROPE 72” 8PM 3/25 BIG K.R.I.T & TY DOLLA SIGN @THE RITZ 8PM

3/27 BETTY WHO 4/6 RUNAWAY GIN 4/7 4/17 4/18 4/19 4/22 4/28 5/2 5/12 5/26 6/7

(TRIBUTE TO PHISH) 9P DAVID ALLAN COE 7PM TY SEGALL 7PM GHOST LIGHT 7PM OLD 97’S 7PM ANDERSON EAST 7PM

PIGEONS PLAYING PING PONG BLUE OCTOBER 7PM JUPITER COYOTE 7PM JAKE MILLER 8P TASH SULTANA 7PM

ADV. TICKETS @ LINCOLNTHEATRE.COM & SCHOOLKIDS RECORDS ALL SHOWS ALL AGES

126 E. Cabarrus St.• 919-821-4111 www.lincolntheatre.com

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Contributors JOHN ADAMIAN MARK BURGER JENNIFER ZELESKI DAVID BRADLEY JENNIFER BEAN BOWER MATT BRUNSON HEATHER DUKES

PRODUCTION Graphic Designers ALEX ELDRIDGE designer@yesweekly.com

WE 28 RAILROAD EARTH 7P 3/2 3/3 3/4 3/10 3/11

EDITORIAL Editor KATIE MURAWSKI katie@yesweekly.com

ADVERTISING Marketing BRAD MCCAULEY brad@yesweekly.com

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When you see a bright yellow vehicle barreling down the highway, it’s normally a school bus. An even weirder place to find one would be parked outside of a local brewery. Luckily, the vibrant yellow truck I was looking for wasn’t a school bus but rather the BAHTMOBILE, a Southeast Asian-inspired food truck, and it’s as awesome as it sounds. 10 It’s all about craft. Smooth, wellaged bourbons and whiskeys, signature cocktails made with fresh ingredients and local craft beers all blend into a Raleighbased bar called DRAM & DRAUGHT. D & D is expanding its vision of a well-crafted neighborhood bar with construction on the second location in Greensboro, and hope to be open in the spring of 2018. 11 SUMMER SHELTON, a 2008 graduate of the School of Filmmaking at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, has been nominated for the Piaget Producers Award from the Independent Spirit Awards, which will be presented March 3 in Santa Monica, California, and broadcasted live on IFC beginning at 5 p.m. that day.

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If you’ve been waiting for music that distills the deeply messed-up state of American politics over the past couple years into song, it’s here. GAR CLEMENS was already fed up with the Trump-era before it even began. 18 In these turbulent and trying times, a timid and largely ineffectual media is par for the course, feigning acts of hard-hitting journalism when maintaining some measure of the STATUS QUO is what’s really taking place. 19 Actor, comedian and humorist ROBERT DUBAC said the best way to describe himself is if Mark Twain and Lily Tomlin had a baby together. 24 Childhood friends Angel Howze and Dexter Porter have teamed up to bring big talent and SMOOTH SOUNDS to intimate venues in downtown Greensboro with 2nd Friday GSO. 20 Is it possible to travel through time? In regard to the past, the answer is yes. Thanks to photography and EDWARD FEATHERSTON SMALL, a trip to 19th-century Winston-Salem—particularly 1881 and 1882—can be achieved with relative ease.

TRAVIS WAGEMAN travis@yesweekly.com ANDREW WOMACK andrew@yesweekly.com TRISH SHROYER trish@yesweekly.com ANNA BROOKS anna@yesweekly.com Promotion NATALIE GARCIA

DISTRIBUTION JANICE GANTT JENNIFER RICKERT WILLIAM HEDRICK We at YES! Weekly realize that the interest of our readers goes well beyond the boundaries of the Piedmont Triad. Therefore we are dedicated to informing and entertaining with thought-provoking, debate-spurring, in-depth investigative news stories and features of local, national and international scope, and opinion grounded in reason, as well as providing the most comprehensive entertainment and arts coverage in the Triad. YES! Weekly welcomes submissions of all kinds. Efforts will be made to return those with a self-addressed stamped envelope; however YES! Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. YES! Weekly is published every Wednesday by Womack Newspapers, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. First copy is free, all additional copies are $1.00. Copyright 2018 Womack Newspapers, Inc.

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EVENTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS | BY AUSTIN KINDLEY

be there

LINDSAY STRAW FRIDAY

DAVID CHILDERS THURSDAY

TREE TOSS SATURDAY

THUR 18

FRI 19

SAT 20

DAVID CHILDERS

LINSDAY STRAW

TREE TOSS

WHAT: Widely regarded as one of the greatest singer-songwriters in North Carolina, David Childers will be returning to the Centennial Station to deliver songs from his latest album Run Skeleton Run which was released through Ramseur Records in May of 2017. Since the release of his latest album, which featured neighboring artists Scott Avett and Bob Crawford of The Avett Brothers, David has expanded his fan base across the country with his folk songs. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Centennial Station Arts Center. 121 S. Centennial Street, High Point. MORE: $5 admission.

WHAT: Ballads have been a source of inspiration for Lindsay Straw, her tender vocals and careful arrangements draw out the inner depths of these old songs, telling tales of women from beyond the ages. A ballad needs commitment to be told, a belief in the importance of its story. Straw proves that these stories ring with inspiration even today WHEN: 8 p.m. WHERE: Muddy Creek Music Hall. 5455 Bethania Road, Winston-Salem. MORE: $13-15 tickets.

WHAT: Tree Toss is a much-anticipated event that has become a tradition for our wild family. Each year, the friendly folks at Cranberry Tree Farm donate their unsold trees to the Center, and we give them to our animals as a special form of holiday enrichment. They love the strong scent of the pine and scratchy textures! If you’ve never seen wild animals receiving holiday trees, presents, and toys, don’t miss this chance. WHEN: 11:30 a.m. WHERE: Conservators’ Center. 676 E. Hughes Mill Road, Burlington. MORE: $20-26 admission.

SAT 20

MON 22

10TH ANNUAL ULTIMATE COMIC CHALLENGE

HPU INNOVATORS SERIES: MARC RANDOLPH

WHAT: This is it! A three month competition coming to an end! The playing field is down to 6 very talented comics competing for this year’s title of The Ultimate Comic and the $1000 prize! Come laugh with Alex Garretson, J.D. Etheridge, Dejahzh Hedrick, Dusty Cagle, Micah Hanner, and Mark Brady! Appearances by Steve Lesser and Jennie Stencel of The Idiot Box Comedy Club. WHEN: 8:30 p.m. WHERE: Carolina Theatre. 310 S. Greene Street, Greensboro. MORE: $10 tickets.

WHAT: As part of an ongoing commitment to community enrichment, High Point University will air its “Access to Innovators” speaker series at 7 p.m. each Monday from Jan. 15 through April 2 on WGHP Fox 8. This week features Marc Randolph, co-founder of Netflix, Silicon Valley entrepreneur and angel investor, and HPU Entrepreneur in Residence. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: WGHP Fox 8

University Concert and Lecture Series presents:

LimÓn Dance Company

Fri, January 19 UNCG Auditorium 8:00pm

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for more information and tickets, visit:

ucls.uncg.edu

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NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING ON JAN. 18 REGARDING THE PROPOSED WIDENING OF ARCHDALE ROAD (S.R. 1577 / S.R. 1004) FROM ROBBINS COUNTRY ROAD (S.R. 1567) TO NORTH MAIN STREET (S.R. 1009) IN RANDOLPH AND GUILFORD COUNTIES STIP Project No. U-3400 The N.C. Department of Transportation proposes widening Archdale Road (S.R. 1577 / S.R. 1004) from Robbins Country Road (S.R. 1567) to North Main Street (S.R. 1009) from existing three and two lanes to three lanes with a center turn lane in Archdale. A public meeting will be held at Archdale Public Library located at 10433 South Main Street on Thursday, January 18th, 2018 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

[SPOTLIGHT]

DIRTY DOGS SELF SERVICE DOG WASH & GROOMING BY KATIE MURAWSKI

You could say Tamra Dick has a way with the animals and is highly qualified to run Dirty Dogs Self Service Dog Wash & Grooming, located at 2511 Battleground Ave. Dick said she has worked in and out of veterinary medicine field for about 12 years at both Battleground Veterinary Hospital and North Elm Animal Hospital. She has also been in rescue work since 1993 and has worked with several rescue groups in town such as the SPCA of the Triad, Animal Adoption and Rescue Foundation in Winston-Salem and Almost Home Dachshund Rescue Society in Greensboro. “Animals have always been something that has been a part of my life,” Dick said. “I have eight dogs and four cats of my own— and a rabbit too.” After working with animals for over a decade, she decided to start her own business dedicated to keeping dogs healthy, clean and happy. “The best part about it is you guys just kind of walk out of the building and we do all the clean up for ya,” Dick said. There is also a full-service groomer, Heather Richardson from Grooming by Heather, for those who want to give their fur babies the full spa experience. Her package includes shampoo, conditioner, blow dry, ear cleaning, full grooms based on breeds, paw pad trims, nail trim and fragrance. Dick said for those interested in Richardson’s service, call for an estimate. A premium wash with Dirty Dogs is also available for those who are too busy to do it themselves. According to the WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Dirty Dogs website, that service includes shampooing, conditioning, 15-minute blow dry, 15-minute brush out, nail trim, ear cleaning and fragrance. Pricing for that depends on the weight of your dog. Prices start at $32 for dogs up to 20 lbs and ranges to $65 for dogs 150+lbs. Dick said she gives an $18 discounted rate for service dogs with assistance for their human with washing them. The pricing for the self-service dog wash, according to the website, is $20 for any size dog and it includes shampoo, conditioner, ear wipes, pre-pasted toothbrush, towels, forced air dryer, in-tub trays for smaller dogs and fragrance. This do-it-yourself dog wash at the moment is for dogs only. However, Dick said she is open to the idea of having a cat-only day where people can bring in their cats and wash them without the extra stress of dogs being around. Dick also said she would like to work with local rescue groups and have a rabies clinic at Dirty Dogs so people can vaccinate their fur babies at a low cost. Dirty Dogs is open Monday through Saturday from 9 a.m. until 7 p.m. and on Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. To learn more about Dirty Dogs visit the website (www. dirty-dogs.net), Facebook page (@dirtydogsgso), call (336) 617-7191 or go in and see for yourself. There is no appointment necessary for premium washes (however, appointments will take priority) and the last dog wash for the day is taken 45 minutes before closing. !

The purpose of this meeting is to inform the public of the project and gather public input on the proposed design. Maps of the study area, environmental features and proposed typical sections will be available on the project website for public review and comment. The public may attend at any time during the public meeting hours. NCDOT representatives will be available to answer questions and receive comments. Comments and information received will be taken into consideration as work on the project develops. Written comments or questions can also be submitted at the meeting or later by February 8, 2018. Please note that there will not be a formal presentation. Project maps are available online at http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/publicmeetings/. For additional information contact Jeffrey L. Teague, PE, NCDOT Division 8 Project Manager by phone: (910) 944-2344 or via email at jlteague@ncdot. gov; or by mail: 902 N Sandhills Blvd., Aberdeen, NC 28315. NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this workshop. Anyone requiring special services should contact Tony Gallagher, Environmental Analysis Unit, at 1598 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-1598, by phone (919) 707-6069 or by e-mail at magallagher@ncdot.gov as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-233-6315. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-233-6315.

JANUARY 17-23, 2018

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triad foodies

EAT IT!

Saving the city one Asian dish at a time

W

hen you see a bright yellow vehicle barreling down the highway, it’s normally a school bus. An even weirder place to find one would be parked outside Jennifer Zeleski of a local brewery. Luckily, the vibrant yellow truck I was Contributor looking for wasn’t a school bus but rather the Bahtmobile, a Southeast Asian-inspired food truck, and it’s as awesome as it sounds. On Jan. 13, it was parked outside of Foothills Brewing Tasting Room, ready to serve visitors of any age, regardless of if another beer was making their customers’ stomachs growl. I have had very limited experience with food trucks; aside from accidentally finding myself in the middle of a food truck festival, spinning in circles like a child who lost their mom in an overcrowded mall during the holidays. This was a very different experience, and I was pumped. To address your potential preconceptions about food trucks and the instilled fear you might have with them, you’re not alone. In the short two decades of my life, I’ve watched food trucks go from terrifying to trustworthy, and with a 4.9-star review on Facebook, I figured this would be a safe spot to test my theory. Megan and Matt Pleasants newlyweds and co-owners of the Bahtmobile got the idea at the start of 2017. “Last January, Megan and I were in Thailand, kind of hanging out on a balcony on an island,” Matt said. “And I was like “why am I not cooking Thai food in North Carolina?” He had cooked for years in what he referred to as “other people’s houses,” and found a cost-effective way to do what he envisioned. Bahtmobile is hard to miss, with an iconic logo on the side that creates the Batman symbol out of two roosters. The menu board was propped up on a table decorated with two ceramic dishes filled with plastic sporks, a stack of wooden chopsticks and disposable Chinese soup spoons, a bottle of Sriracha and a cat statue that motioned a consistent wave. I ordered the Khao Soi, a chicken coconut curry dish served with egg

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noodles, red onions and fried wontons. My boyfriend ordered the Kimchi Fried Rice, which came with a fried egg, fresh cilantro and cotton candy pork. Starting with the Khao Soi, I relied on my familiarity with curry and figured it would be a good indication of the more traditional dishes Bahtmobile had to offer, which change consistently. “It’s super Thai, and you would find it in the streets in the Northern-most part of Thailand,” Matt said. “It’s the most northern-Thai chicken soup you could find.” It came in a small bowl packed with egg noodles and shredded chicken, topped with fresh bean sprouts, red onions, crunchy fried wonton strips and swimming in a thin green curry sauce. The sauce itself had the hint of coconut, and once you got a bite of the chicken, you could taste the warmth of the spice. The bean sprouts, cilantro and red onion, created an incredible combination of flavors, without being too overpowering in any regard. As for the Kimchi Fried Rice, just the look of it before digging in was nothing short of a work of art. The cotton candy pork, made with a dehydrator, had the taste and consistency of its namesake. The fried egg was nestled inside of the mound of rice that included edamame, bean sprouts and green cabbage. The flavor was addicting and almost tropical. The thought of kimchi can be intimi-

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Cheers

to 18 Years TO CELEBRATE OUR 18 YEARS IN BUSINESS, WE’RE BRINGING BACK A FEW OF YOUR FAVORITES THE CELEBRATION BEGINS ON JANUARY 18TH THROUGH JANUARY 31ST, 2018 CRAB DIP $9.95 crostini

SPINACH DIP $7.95 crostini

dating as is, but with cotton candy pork included, it could quickly turn someone away from the idea. But since it’s fried rice, something about it felt safe. That’s where the owners believe it’s about finding common ground with the customers. “With all of our dishes we try to put something out of your comfort zone, but within your comfort zone,” Matt said. “All of the dishes are about balance, there may be something new you’ve tried, but there’s always something that you can relate to with all of them.” Matt and Megan are looking forward to the future of the business, hoping to power through another summer, celebrate the first anniversary in July and eventually start to look for a permanent location. “We have so many ideas,” Matt said. “Whether we want it to be a noodle shop or a market/deli that has awesome banh mi sandwiches at lunch. We’re always thinking about what the next step is going to be, but we want it to always happen organically.” They have used inspiration and variety to change their menu often, even offering ramen for a bout of time until they decided they needed a change. “We’re seven months old,” Matt said. “A we’ve offered about 60 to 70 dishes since we’ve started.” To keep things fresh and enjoy their honeymoon after getting married on Jan. 6, the couple is headed to Thailand once WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

again for a month of relaxation and food investigation. “When you go and see, you kind of have your eyes open,” Matt said, “We have things we want to eat more of this time, and extra things we want to seek out.” If one thing is for sure, I will be sure to try anything they create from the inspiration they bring home from their trip, even if it’s something I could have never imagined. As for getting out of your comfort zone, “I’ve gotten my 70-year-old mom to try cool things that she would have never tried before,” Matt said. And if you’re still afraid of eating out of the food truck, take it from someone who took years to try guacamole: there really is no more risk than eating at a sit-down restaurant. “Everything’s cooked in a wok, or a pan, or a flat griddle,” Matt said. Once they return, you can find Bahtmobile’s location by following their updates on social media daily, where Matt and Megan will be “Beatin’ the Street,” once again. Until their honeymoon trip concludes, they’re the food truck WinstonSalem deserves, but not the one it needs right now. Follow Bahtmobile on Facebook and Instagram @bahtmobile. ! JENN ZELESKI is a student contributor to YES! Weekly. She is originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Communications at High Point University.

MARKET SALAD $10.95

grilled steak & shrimp skewers, onions & peppers over house salad

CHICKEN ALFREDO $14.95

grilled chicken, alfredo cream sauce, linguini

COLORADO CHICKEN $15.95

2 grilled chicken breasts with BBQ sauce, mixed cheese, pico, and scallions, served with one side item

GRILLED PORK CHOPS (2) $15.95

topped with peach chutney and served with one side item

PECAN CRUSTED SALMON $16.95

topped with orange marmalade and served with one side item

GILL AND GRILL $21.95

4oz seared ahi tuna, 4oz Certified Angus Beef® filet, served with one side item & salad

BANANAS FOSTER CHEESECAKE $6.95

& 914 MALL LOOP ROAD / HIGH POINT, NC / LIBERTYBREWERYANDGRILL.COM

JANUARY 17-23, 2018

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visions

SEE IT!

Well-crafted drinks are coming to the neighborhood

I

BY DAVID BRADLEY

t’s all about craft. Smooth, wellaged bourbons and whiskeys, signature cocktails made with fresh ingredients and local craft beers all blend into a Raleigh-based bar called Dram & Draught. D & D is expanding its vision of a well-crafted neighborhood bar with construction on the second location in Greensboro, and hope to be open in the spring of 2018. Large patio space for outdoor drinking will combine with a designed remodel of an old gas station at West Gate City Boulevard and Eugene Street, similar to the atmosphere of the original location in Raleigh. Proprietors and North Carolina natives, Drew Schenck and Kevin Barrett, both love whiskeys from around the world; Kentucky, Scotland and Japan, just to name a few. So, the whiskey-loving duo decided to create the bar out of love for the drink. The standard concept of a neighborhood bar would have a variety of these products, but D & D has concentrated more on the idea of antique whiskey products. “[An] unique thing that we offer that only a few places in the country offer, is we have a selection of antique bourbons,” Barrett said. “We have Dillon Hill from the mid-1940s, we have Old Grand Dad from the 1960s, we get the hard to get whiskeys. And we have antique bourbons that nobody gets.“ One barrel, in particular, is Buffalo Trace, a single barrel select, and it serves as the pour point for a 1940s-era drink that has aged in special barrels. The flavor gently seeps from the wood into the drink and creates different flavors each time it’s tasted.

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OLIVER RAMERO -TWO OWLS PHOTOGRAPHY

AARON DAMBOISE PHOTOGRAPHY

Kevin Barrett “Anything out of a barrel will continue to age,” Barrett said. “So, if I drink it today, and drink it a week from now, it will have changed ‘cause it’s sitting in the barrel, aging.” The “Draught” in the name comes from the additional emphasis on craft beers. Twelve taps are in both locations, with a variety of styles and flavors. Local brews, Barrett said, are definitely on the menu because there are so many breweries in North Carolina. Barrett said D & D is category-specific, and want the best beer of whatever flavor profile or category. “I’m a huge fan of Foothills,” Barrett said. “We have Foothills on 95 percent of the time, and see no reason to change that in Greensboro; we’ll take a look at more local beers around Greensboro and pay more attention to them also.” The plan will be for the brews on tap to present the range of flavors for every person, such as IPA’s, pilsners, tripels and

Drew Schenck (left) and Kevin Barrett (right) stouts. The variety will always include a dark beer, but the selections will regularly be mixed so that both the regular visitor and beer connoisseur will have new potential taste possibilities. As more producers are creating quality whiskey products, it can only enhance D & D’s selection of quality alcoholic drinks from around the world. The new Greensboro-based bar will be taking advantage of additional product lines with over 300 whiskeys from around the world, with drinks for the newbie drinker, as well as the more experienced. “You know, we have over 300 whiskeys from around the world, but we don’t have the super low-end stuff, there’s no reason for that,” Schenck said. “There has to be a certain level of quality. If there’s more of those [super ones] out there, that’s great.” A third idea in the craft concept is that of fresh ingredients. When asked about the various expressions of whiskeys that

NO JOINING FEE IN JANUARY – SAVE UP TO $75 8 Area YMCA Locations • YMCAgreensboro.org JANUARY 17-23, 2018

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have been created in the past several years, Schenck said their selection would not include “flavored whiskeys like Jack Daniels Cherry or Honey.” Ordinary cocktails are part of a standard bar, but D & D’s cocktails are composed of ginger, spices such as sage and other different and unique ingredients, Schenck said. “They’re doing things nobody else is doing,” he said. “It’s not every corner bar that’s doing what Kevin is bringing to the drink. He has a great reputation, [and] not in just the local market.” The various elements in the mix have been a winning combination for the D & D in Raleigh. Greensboro will soon be able to add to the downtown scene with a new neighborhood bar with crafted selections of antique bourbons and whiskeys, beers and signature cocktails, with a planned opening in the spring of 2018. !

1611 E Bessemer Ave Greensboro, NC 27407 (336) 275-0985 2922 W Gate City Blvd Greensboro, NC 27403 (336) 268-9024 926 Summit Ave Greensboro, NC 27405 (336) 897-0653 @bestxwireless 2204 E Market St Greensboro, NC 27401 (336) 574-2038

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UNCSA graduate Summer Shelton nominated for prestigious prize Summer Shelton, a 2008 graduate of the School of Filmmaking at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts, has been nominated for the Piaget Producers Award from the Mark Burger Independent Spirit Awards, which will Contributing be presented March 3 in Santa Monica, columnist California, and broadcasted live on IFC beginning at 5 p.m. that day. Film Independent has recognized and celebrated artist-driven filmmaking since 1980, its members being filmmakers, industry leaders, and film lovers. For 21 years, the Piaget Producers Award honors emerging producers who, despite budget limitations, have demonstrated the creativity, tenacity, and vision required to produce quality independent films. The award includes an unrestricted grant of $25,000 sponsored by Piaget. “The members of Film Independent are professionals with unique vision and passion for storytelling,” Susan Ruskin,

dean of the School of Filmmaking, observed. “That perfectly describes Summer Shelton, who has produced films that are incredibly well-crafted. This nomination by her peers is richly deserved, and we wish her the best.” Shelton, a native of Mount Airy, began her professional career as associate producer on Ramin Bahrani’s award-winning 2008 drama Goodbye Solo (which was filmed in Winston-Salem), followed by Bahrani’s 2009 short Plastic Bag (the opening-night short at the Corto Cortissimo in the Venice Film Festival) and Himkar Tak’s award-winning short Medicine Man the same year, then re-teaming with Bahrani in Sigur Ros: Eg anda (2012). Shelton was the associate producer of Bahrani’s 2012 feature At Any Price and co-producer of director Scott Coffey’s Adult World (2013), both of which she also appeared in. She co-produced Goodbye to All That (2014), the feature directorial debut of acclaimed playwright/screenwriter Angus MacLachlan (also a UNCSA graduate), followed by Little Accidents (2014), the award-winning feature debut of writer/director Sara Colangelo, which had its world premiere at Sundance. Her subsequent credits include writer/ director Jim Strouse’s award-winning

comedy People Places Things (2015), the short Icarus (2015), and Andrew Jarecki’s Emmy-winning HBO mini-series documentary The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst (2015), which resulted in the arrest of its subject in New Orleans prior to the final installment’s broadcast. Last year, Shelton produced writer/ director Rachel Israel’s debut feature, Keep the Change, an expansion of her 2013 short of the same name, which won a FIPRESCI Critics’ Prize at the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival and the Tribeca Film Festival’s award as Best Narrative Feature. Shelton’s most recent credit is writer/director Matthew Brown’s Maine, starring Laia Costa and Thomas Mann, due for release this year. This is only the latest recognition Shelton has received, having been the recipient of the inaugural Bingham Ray Creative Fellowship from the Sundance Institute in 2012, so named for the renowned film executive who co-founded October Films and championed independent filmmakers; a Rotterdam Producing Fellowship in 2013, and Film Independent Sloan Producing Fellowship in 2014. For information about all the goings-on at UNCSA, visit the official website: www. uncsa.edu. !

Revisiting Tinseltown luminaries of yesteryear YOU AIN’T HEARD NOTHIN’ YET: Interviews with Stars from Hollywood’s Golden Era by James Bawden and Ron Miller. Published by University Press of Kentucky. 432 pages. $36.95 retail. Former Toronto Star T.V. columnist James Bawden and long-time San Jose Mercury News T.V. editor and syndicated Knight-Rudder columnist Ron Miller have pooled an extensive collection of showbiz interviews they’ve conducted over the years in the star-studded You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet, an easy, breezy read for movie buffs and nostalgia junkies. In terms of star power, You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet is jam-packed: James Stewart, Bette Davis, Henry Fonda, Buster Keaton, Anthony Perkins, Rod Steiger, Ernest Borgnine, Janet Leigh, Boris Karloff, Patricia Neal, Elizabeth Taylor (if only briefly) and WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Lee Marvin, whose chapter is made all the more entertaining by the calamitous hurdles Miller faced trying to make the appointment. Of the luminaries (all deceased), some enjoyed long careers while others didn’t – some by design, others by the fickle nature of Hollywood. Bonita Granville, Joan Leslie, Anne Shirley and Johnny Sheffield found fame early, then opted to step back – or out entirely. Others, such as Robert Young, Jane Wyatt and Raymond Massey, enjoyed successful screen careers but are best remembered for television. Actor Anthony Dawson received considerable attention for his starring debut in Valentino (1951), but that remained his claim to fame. Needless to say, these aren’t probing interviews, mostly conducted at promotional junkets or one-on-one, but they’re

comprehensive enough, especially in terms of the newspaper and magazine format that most would appear in. For all the classic films revisited, the authors will occasionally ask about an obscurity or forgotten gem. Each chapter is prefaced with a brief bio of the subject and the circumstances or setting of the interview. Of course, with Bette Davis on hand, there’s bound to be gossip, but it’s not excessive or salacious. The overall tone isn’t fawning, but an undeniably affectionate, leisurely stroll down memory lane, told in a relaxed, conversational style that goes down very easily. The official University Press of Kentucky website is kentuckypress.com. ! See MARK BURGER’s reviews of current movies on Burgervideo.com. © 2018, Mark Burger.

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11


tunes

HEAR IT!

Greensboro-based songwriter Gar Clemens releases new record

I

f you’ve been waiting for music that distills the deeply messed-up state of American politics over the past couple years into song, it’s here. Gar John Adamian Clemens was already fed up with the @johnradamian Trump-era before it even began. ClemContributor ens, a Greensborobased songwriter who moved down to North Carolina from Chicago at the start of 2016, just released Full Buck Moon, a record that he recorded and mostly wrote here. I spoke to Clemens by phone earlier this week about his songs and how he ended up in North Carolina. The first song on the new record, “I Could Cry My Eyes Out,” is a stomping rocker of smoldering rage. The second verse contains these lines: “And the in-

bred, born rich, bastard grins/And his little hands make little fists/And give AR-15s to blue-eyed kids” before kicking into the memorable chorus: “Honey, I could hit the streets in rage/For blood I could lash out/ Honey, I could cry my eyes out/For cryin’; out loud.” That mix of face-curling anger and bone-deep sadness is something that a lot of people can relate to these days. Clemens, 32, wrote that before the election. “All that rhetoric was coming out of the woodwork,” Clemens said. “That was kind of a bummer. I was hoping that it wasn’t gonna be as literal as it turned out to be [after the election].” From there, Clemens slides into a bit of Southern-rock with a touch of amped-up country-soul on “Self-Righteous Blues,” a song about hypocrisy and fear playing out in the mind of an opioid-crisis casualty. “Y’all must be wrong ‘cause I’m always right,” sings the “self-righteous sinner” telling the story. The record closes out with “Black Flag Patch,” a song about a different kind of character, a half-drunk train punk who’s

NOVEMBER 17- JANUARY 28

riding the rails wondering where his onetime girlfriend might have gone off to. It’s a song about love, romance and loss in extreme times and circumstances, about whether people can hold on to each other when they’re pushed to the edge and they don’t have much else. Clemens wrote that song at a motel in Georgia, where he was doing the industrial building painting work that he sometimes does as a day job. He says the rootlessness of the work may have spurred him to feel a kinship with the subject of the song.

Clemens’s songs and his singing can bring to mind the Drive-By Truckers, Steve Earle, Drivin’ and Cryin’, Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan. He’s got an ear for American stories and social justice, for people whose lives are coming apart for one reason or another. There’s an appealing drawl to Clemens’s singing, a way of stretching out syllables and rounding off consonants. His voice is warm and expressive of pent-up feeling. “I grew up like a punk rock guy,” said Clemens of how he eventually found his

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way to songwriting and his country-tinged sound. “I guess I was trying to rip off my favorite singers, and they were all from the South.” The punk connection is partly what led Clemens to the Greensboro. He knew some of the guys from the local band Old Heavy Hands from their days having crossed paths touring and playing in bands. Clemens has also recently started playing bass in Old Heavy Hands, further cementing the connections he had with the band. Members of the Ends and House of Fools make up part of Clemens’s backing band on the record. Clemens and others who’ve gone back and forth jokingly refer to the fruitful linkage between North Carolina and Chicago as the Michael Jordan Highway. Clemens’s previous record, 2016’s Cricket Hill, was made in Chicago, and there’s a marked difference between it and Full Buck Moon. Clemens was operating in more of an acoustic folk-singer mode, with a clearer debt to early Dylan, and with layers of reverb to add a spectral quality to things. On the one hand, a lot has happened since 2016, just in the world, and that might help explain any shift in style or emphasis, but Clemens said that moving to North Carolina coincided with other changes in how he was living his life. “I’m a different person than I was,” Clemens said. “I spent a lot of time in bars in Chicago. While I haven’t been an angel WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

since I’ve moved to North Carolina, I’ve changed a lot of my habits. My day-today life is much different. It’s centered on writing.” Writing is a mysterious, hit-or-miss game, Clemens said. “I’ve been trying to figure out this songwriting thing for a long time, and I still haven’t figured it out, but I’ve gotten better at my process,” he said. Clemens said that keeping notebooks filled with lyric fragments and guitar always at the ready allows him to tinker and experiment with mixing and matching, knocking a few words against a set of chord changes, playing lines off each other. He likens the process to that off rummaging around in a junkyard, trying to find the right door or mirror for your old car. Having worked in restaurant kitchens, Clemens compares writing to cooking, too. The chords and guitar parts are like the skillet, and you have to be ready to throw in whatever tasty pieces you have on hand — a verse or a melody — and turn up the heat to see what happens. Catch Gar Clemens performing around the area this spring in support of Full Buck Moon, which is available on streaming services and through Bandcamp. ! JOHN ADAMIAN lives in Winston-Salem, and his writing has appeared in Wired, The Believer, Relix, Arthur, Modern Farmer, the Hartford Courant and numerous other publications.

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Submissions should be sent to artdirector@yesweekly.com by Friday at 5 p.m., prior to the week’s publication. Visit yesweekly.com and click on calendar to list your event online. home grown muSic Scene | compiled by Austin Kindley

ASHEBORO

FOUR SAINTS BREWING

218 South Fayetteville St. | 336.610.3722 foursaintsbrewing.com Jan 19: Shiloh Hill Jan 20: Graymatter Jan 21: The Randolph Jazz Band

clEmmOnS

VILLAGE SQUARE TAP HOUSE

6000 Meadowbrook Mall Ct | 336.448.5330 Jan 26: Whiskey Mic Feb 9: Whiskey Mic Feb 23: Whiskey Mic

dAnBuRy

GREEN HERON ALE HOUSE 1110 Flinchum Rd | 336.593.4733 greenheronclub.com

gREEnSBORO

ARIzONA PETE’S

2900 Patterson St #A | 336.632.9889 arizonapetes.com Jan 19: 1-2-3 Friday Feb 10: August Burns Red

ARTISTIkA NIGHT cLUB

523 S Elm St | 336.271.2686 artistikanightclub.com Jan 19: DJ Dan the Player Jan 20: DJ Paco and DJ Dan the Player

BARN DINNER THEATRE 120 Stage Coach Tr. | 336.292.2211 May 13: Stephen Freeman: Elvic Tribute

14 YES! WEEKLY

January 17-23, 2018

BEERTHIRTY

505 N. Greene St Jan 19: Mix Tape Jan 26: Leather and Lace

THE BLIND TIGER

1819 Spring Garden St | 336.272.9888 theblindtiger.com Jan 17: The Grass Is Dead Jan 18: Juice Jan 19: Dirt Monkey, DMVU, B2B, Digital Ethos w/ cut Rugs, DYS, Spokes Jan 26: The Breakast club (80’s Tribute Band)

cHURcHILL’S ON ELM

213 S Elm St | 336.275.6367 churchillscigarlounge.com Jan 20: Jack Long Old School Jam Feb 10: Sahara Reggae band Feb 17: Jack Long Old School Jam

THE cORNER BAR

1700 Spring Garden St | 336.272.5559 corner-bar.com Jan 18: Dc carter Jan 25: 9 Day Trip Feb 1: The kneads Feb 8: corey Luetjen Feb 15: Dc carter Feb 22: Night Sweats Mar 1: Lisa Saint Redding

cOMEDY zONE

1126 S Holden Rd | 336.333.1034 thecomedyzone.com Jan 17: HodgeTwins Jan 19: Bruce Bruce Jan 26: Mutzie Jan 27: Mutzie Feb 2: James Sibley Feb 3: James Sibley Feb 9: Sid Davis

cOMMON GROUNDS 11602 S Elm Ave | 336.698.3888 Jan 19: Swingin’ Hammers Jan 26: Bigdumbhick Feb 1: Devon Gilfillian Feb 12: Jenny & Tyler

cONE DENIM

117 S Elm St | 336.378.9646 cdecgreensboro.com Jan 27: colt Ford Feb 9: Lalah Hathaway Feb 17: Jon Langston Mar 2: Eli Young Band Apr 14: Judah & The Lion: Going To Mars Tour

GREENE STREET cLUB 113 N Greene St | 336.273.4111

HAM’S NEW GARDEN

1635 New Garden Rd | 336.288.4544 hamsrestaurants.com Jan 19: Lasater Union Jan 26: Jukebox Revolver

LOck’S TAVERN

3720 Holden Rd Jan 20: Billy creason and the Damfino Band Jan 27: Southbound 49 Feb 3: Misbehavin Feb 10: chasin the Rain Feb 17: kwik Fixx Feb 24: D-Railed

SOMEWHERE ELSE TAVERN

5713 W Friendly Ave | 336.292.5464 facebook.com/thesomewhereelsetavern Jan 27: Greg Moore Feb 24: Murder Maiden

SPEAkEASY TAVERN

1706 Battleground Ave | 336.378.0006

THE IDIOT BOx cOMEDY cLUB

2134 Lawndale Dr | 336.274.2699 www.idiotboxers.com Jan 26: chanel Ali Feb 19: Sally Ann Feb 19: zo Myers and Friends

HigH pOint

AFTER HOURS TAVERN 1614 N Main St | 336.883.4113 afterhourstavern.net Jan 19: karaoke - DJ Dance

BAR 65

235 Cornell Dr | 336.543.4799 Jan 20: Madhouse

HAM’S PALLADIUM 5840 Samet Dr | 336.887.2434 hamsrestaurants.com Jan 19: Splash Jan 20: Bad Romeo Jan 26: The Dickens Jan 27: Brothers Pearl

jAmEStOwn

THE DEck

118 E Main St | 336.207.1999 thedeckatrivertwist.com Jan 19: Big Daddy Mojo Jan 20: Spare change Jan 26: Radio Revolver Jan 27: Stereo Doll Feb 2: Jukebox Rehab Feb 3: Brothers Pearl Feb 9: Jukebox Junkies

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Feb 10: Soul Central Feb 16: Jaxon Jill Feb 17: Corey Luetjen Traveling Blues Band Feb 24: Hip Pocket

KERNERSVILLE

FINNIGAN’S WAKE

OAK RIDGE

620 Trade St | 336.723.0322 facebook.com/FinnigansWake Feb 7: Bedlam Boys Mar 7: Bedlam Boys

JP LOONEY’S

2213 E Oak Ridge Rd | 336.643.1570 facebook.com/JPLooneys Jan 18: Trivia

FOOTHILLS BREWING

RANDLEMAN

DANCE HALL DAZE

RIDER’S IN THE COUNTRY

612 Edgewood St | 336.558.7204 dancehalldaze.com Jan 19: Silverhawk Jan 20: The Delmonicos Jan 26: The Delmonicos Jan 27: Time Bandits

5701 Randleman Rd | 336.674.5111 ridersinthecountry.net

WINSTON-SALEM

SECOND & GREEN

BREATHE COCKTAIL LOUNGE

207 N Green St | 336.631.3143 2ngtavern.com Apr 28: Perpetual Groove & Marvelous Funkshun

221 N Main St. | 336.497.4822 facebook.com/BreatheCocktailLounge Feb 1: Thunder Snow Cone: Love Hurts Freakshow Kinkshow

OLD NICK’S PUB

191 Lowes Foods Dr | 336.747.3059 OldNicksPubNC.com Jan 19: Karaoke w DJ Tyler Perkins Jan 20: Chasin Fame Jan 26: Karaoke w DJ Tyler Perkins Jan 27: Dante’s Roadhouse

JOHNNY & JUNE’S SALOON

408 West 4th St | 336.331.3431 facebook.com/bulls-tavern Jan 19: Gipsy Danger

2105 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.724.0546 johnnynjunes.com Jan 19: Cooper Alan Jan 26: Studs of Steel Jan 27: The LACS

CB’S TAVERN

MAC & NELLI’S

BULL’S TAVERN

LEWISVILLE

638 W 4th St | 336.777.3348 foothillsbrewing.com Jan 17: David & Masion Via Jan 20: Marcus Horth Band Jan 21: Sunday Jazz Jan 24: Shiloh Hill Jan 27: The Fustics Jan 28: Sunday Jazz Feb 4: Sunday Jazz Feb 11: Sunday Jazz

3870 Bethania Station Rd | 336.815.1664

4926 Country Club Rd | 336.529.6230 macandnellisws.com

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MILNER’S

630 S Stratford Rd | 336.768.2221 milnerfood.com Jan 21: Live Jazz Jan 28: Live Jazz

MUDDY CREEK CAFE & MUSIC HALL

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 Jan 18: Open Mic w/ Country Dan Collins Jan 19: Fiddle & Bow presents Lindsay Straw Jan 20: The Country Dan Collins Band Jan 20: Groove Fetish Jan 21: Couldn’t Be Happiers Jan 24: The Steel Wheels Jan 25: Open Mic w/ Country Dan Collins Jan 26: Rachel Baiman Band w/ Amber Ikeman Jan 27: Ash’s B-Day Bash w/ Gypsy Mountain Rose Jan 27: The Sam Frazier Band Jan 28: Elliot Humphries Feb 1: Open Mic w/ Country Dan Collins

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GreensboroColiseum

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Upcoming Events March 23

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January 27-28 Saturday March 24 Feb 2

Basketball vs. The Citadel > Jan. 18 ALSO -- UNCG Green & Growin’ Show > Jan. 18-19 COMING: - UNCG Basketball vs. Mercer > Jan. 20 www.greensborocoliseum.com

16 YES! WEEKLY

1-800-745-3000

- North Carolina Scholastic Classic > Jan. 20 - Greensboro Gun & Knife Show > Jan. 27-28 - Carolina Weddings Show > Feb. 3

Event Hotline: (336) 373-7474 / Group Sales: (336) 373-2632

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January 17-23, 2018

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[ConCerts] Compiled by Alex Eldridge

Dpac

cary

booth amphithEatrE 8003 Regency Pkwy | 919.462.2025 www.boothamphitheatre.com

charlotte

bojanglES coliSEum

high point thEatrE

220 E Commerce Ave | 336.883.3401 www.highpointtheatre.com jan 20: john Sebastian & David grisman jan 27: american Spiritual Ensemble Feb 1: golden gates Feb 3: Kit & the Kats Feb 14: Emile pandolfi w/ Dana russell Feb 16: al Stewart

greensboro

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.bojanglescoliseum.com

carolina thEatrE

cmcu amphithEatrE former Uptown Amphitheatre 820 Hamilton St | 704.549.5555 www.livenation.com

thE FillmorE

high point

123 Vivian St | 919.680.2787 www.dpacnc.com Feb 7: the temptations & the Four tops Feb 10: jason isbell & the 400 unit Feb 17: Diana Krall

pnc muSic pavilion 707 Pavilion Blvd | 704.549.1292 www.livenation.com

1000 NC Music Factory Blvd | 704.916.8970 www.fillmorecharlottenc.com jan 19: Enrage against the machine jan 20: jackyl jan 20: rebelution jan 26: nghtmrE jan 27: black rebel motorcycle club jan 28: Starset jan 30: nF jan 31: Keys n Krates jan 31: Killswitch Engage & anthrax Feb 2: big head todd & the monsters Feb 2: Kacht rock revue Feb 8: Excision Feb 9: big gigantic Feb 10: ajr Feb 10: george clinton & parliament Feb 13: less than jake Feb 13: Fetty Wap Feb 16: trial by Fire Feb 16: tonight alive & Silverstein Feb 17: the marshall tucker band Feb 17: Drezo Feb 20: of mice and men Feb 22: molotov Feb 22: Emancipator Ensemble Feb 23: Who’s bad Feb 23: mako

ovEnS auDitorium

2700 E Independence Blvd | 704.372.3600 www.ovensauditorium.com Feb 11: robert plant & the Sensational

tWc arEna

333 E Trade St | 704.688.9000 www.timewarnercablearena.com jan 21: Winter jam jan 30: lana Del ray Feb 9: andrea bocelli Feb 10: Kid rock

durham

carolina thEatrE

309 W Morgan St | 919.560.3030 www.carolinatheatre.org jan 25: William bell, bobby rush, & Don bryant Feb 2: aimee mann Feb 10: arlo guthrie Feb 12: marillion Feb 13: the langston hughes project Feb 15: Earls of leicester Feb 16: trey anastasio Feb 18: Four resplendent gems

310 S Greene St | 336.333.2605 www.carolinatheatre.com jan 23: neko case Feb 1: the Wailin’ jennys Feb 8: art garfunkel

raleigh

ccu muSic parK at Walnut crEEK

grEEnSboro coliSEum

3801 Rock Quarry Rd | 919.831.6400 www.livenation.com

1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com Feb 2: rhythms of triumph Feb 24: Winter jam

rED hat amphithEatEr 500 S McDowell St | 919.996.8800 www.redhatamphitheater.com

WhitE oaK ampithEatrE

pnc arEna

1921 W Gate City Blvd | 336.373.7400 www.greensborocoliseum.com

1400 Edwards Mill Rd | 919.861.2300 www.thepncarena.com

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17


SCREEN IT!

flicks

I

Full-court press: Spielberg vs. The White House liaison, and Bruce Greenwood as Robert McNamara, the former Secretary of Defense who’s seen as both combative and morally compromised. In an awards season in which most of the players are either cutting-edge endeavors or indie darlings, The Post seems comparatively old-fashioned in its content and its execution. That’s hardly a criticism, though. Blessed with veterans on both sides of the camera, here’s a classically trained piece that manages to be both robust and rousing.

BY MATT BRUNSON

n these turbulent and trying times, a timid and largely ineffectual media is par for the course, feigning acts of hard-hitting journalism when maintaining some measure of the status quo is what’s really taking place. (Latest of many cases in point: Even with that offensive “shithole” comment added to countless other affronts, the major mainstream outlets still refuse to directly call that Cretin-in-Chief Trump a racist, couching his vileness in less threatening terms like “racially tinged” and “controversial.”) Three cheers, then, for Steven Spielberg’s The Post ( ), which not only recalls a more honest, more efficient and more courageous period for the American newspaper but also serves as a throwing down of the gauntlet for the modern counterpart. The Post may not match the brilliance of 1976’s All the President’s Men, but it still serves as a potent reminder of the potential power of the press. As with that look at the Watergate scandal and the

toppling of a U.S. president, this one also involves the Washington Post and editor Ben Bradlee. Jason Robards won an Oscar for portraying Bradlee in All the President’s

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Men; Tom Hanks probably won’t enjoy comparable awards glory, but he’s nevertheless excellent in the role, seen ordering his troops to find out what bombshell the New York Times planned to explode on its cover in June 1971. It turns out to be some of the pages of the Pentagon Papers, leaked by analyst and activist Daniel Ellsberg (Matthew Rhys) to alert the nation to the lies spun by several administrations regarding to the Vietnam War. Once the Nixon White House manages to obtain a temporary court injunction against the Times, preventing it from publishing any more pages, Bradlee sees this as the Post’s opportunity to pick up the baton. But to do so, he needs the approval and authorization of Post publisher Katharine “Kay” Graham (Meryl Streep), already in the spotlight as the sole female boss of a major American newspaper. Armed with a stellar screenplay by Liz Hannah and Josh Singer, Spielberg responds by serving up his best picture in 15 years. Clearly energized by the urgency and import of the piece, the director has fashioned an engrossing film that functions as both a historical record (with the usual allowances for Hollywood embellishments, of course) and a cautionary tale. He’s backed in his zeal by a note-perfect cast — Streep and Hanks, of course, but also a supporting line-up that runs especially deep. Particularly of note are Tracy Letts (also terrific in Lady Bird) as Fritz Beebe, Graham’s sensible friend and advisor, Better Call Saul’s Bob Odenkirk as Ben Bagdikian, the Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter who became Ellsberg’s Post

Planes, Trains and Automobiles might be the name of a beloved John Hughes flick from the 1980s, but it’s also Liam Neeson’s preferred modes of transportation en route to dispatching various baddies with bone-crunching determination. Under the watchful eye of director Jaume Collet-Serra, Neeson has taken to cars in Unknown, an airplane in Non-Stop, and now a locomotive in The Commuter ( ). (In their joint offering Run All Night, the actor was content just to hoof it.) In The Commuter, Neeson plays Michael MacCauley, a former cop who has spent the past decade working as an insurance salesman. Unexpectedly losing his job, Michael’s in a vulnerable state, which largely explains why, on his train ride home, he accepts a mysterious offer from a complete stranger (Vera Farmiga): Locate a certain person on the train and earn an easy $100,000. Michael takes the bait, but once he realizes that the individual he’s expected to expose is being targeted for assassination, he spends the rest of the commute trying to figure out how to thwart the killers. The January-February stretch of any new year is often a dumping ground for the studios’ tax write-offs, but that’s clearly not the case when it comes to Liam Neeson action vehicles — here, it’s a matter of strategic scheduling, as most have tended to do quite well at the box office against limp competition. The Commuter similarly gets the job done, with Neeson’s committed performance providing a strong center to an increasingly outlandish storyline. The identity of the “surprise” villain was obvious before the script was even written (and the way he trips himself up is daft beyond compare), and late innings find Neeson’s Everyman engaged in death-defying activities that would give even Superman pause. But for those looking for a reasonably satisfying mix of mystery and muscle, The Commuter should be just the ticket. !

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STAGE IT!

theatre

Robert Dubac’s The Book of Moron comes to Greensboro

Katie Murawski

Editor

Actor, comedian and humorist Robert Dubac said the best way to describe himself is if Mark Twain and Lily Tomlin had a baby together. Dubac is returning to the Greensboro Coliseum Complex’s Odeon Theatre from Jan. 18 through 21 to show off his newest one-person show, The Book of Moron. I spoke with Dubac by phone on Jan. 10. He said The Book of Moron is about the current culture of America. “I wrote this show about five years ago, but its all caught up now,” Dubac said. “Maybe I kind of second guess things five years ago when I first started doing it. It is basically about everyone who is so confused, and we don’t know what is true and what is not true.” Dubac describes The Book of Moron as having a “real smart, intelligent kind of humor.” He said it is more along the lines of Mark Twain rather than Louis C.K. “I think when you go to the theater, and you do something poignant and provocative,” he said. “It does have to be smart, so people will think that they are getting their money’s worth.”

Jan 19-26

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Thu: 11:35 AM, 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:15 THE SHAPE OF WATER (R) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Thu: 11:30 AM, 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10 THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Thu: 11:55 AM, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 9:55 DEN OF THIEVES (R) Fri & Sat: 11:35 AM, 2:35, 5:35, 8:35, 11:35 Sun - Thu: 11:35 AM, 2:35, 5:35, 8:35 THE COMMUTER (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 11:55 Sun - Wed: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 Thu: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:30 LOVER FOR A DAY (L’AMANT D’UN JOUR) Fri & Sat: 12:10, 2:00, 3:50, 5:40, 7:30 WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

In the show, Dubac said he becomes different characters that help solve the problem of stupidity. “All those characters are stupid as well as smart, so we can see ourselves as anyone up there on stage,” he said. Dubac said that this show is for all ages, and he especially wants to see teenagers at the show. “We are trying to get them in there before they watch too much T.V. and get stupid,” he said. Dubac said that if any teenager ages 13 to 19 want to attend the show, they can come for free if there are available seats. All they have to do is go to “Robert Dubac- The Book of Moron” (@ thebookofmoron) Facebook page and send him a message with their name. Dubac said teenagers do not have to come with their parents; they can just be dropped off to watch the show. “I’ll babysit your teenagers,” Dubac said. “Just don’t [be upset] when they come home with a different point of view.” Tickets can be purchased at Ticketmaster (www.ticketmaster.com/venueartist/115378/2394326) or call the box office at 336-373-7400. !

[RED] 9:20, 11:10 Sun - Thu: 12:10, 2:00, 3:50, 5:40, 7: 30, 9:20 PADDINGTON 2 (PG) Fri: 11:45 AM, 2:05, 4:35, 7:10, 9:25, 11:50 Sat - Thu: 11:45 AM, 2:05, 4:35, 7:10, 9:25 INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY (PG13) Fri & Sat: 12:00, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:4 0, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:00, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40 MOLLY’S GAME (R) Fri & Sat: 11:30 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:30, 11:30 Sun - Wed: 11:30 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:30 Thu: 2:30, 5:30, 8:30 THE POST (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 11:50 AM, 2:25, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15 ALL THE MONEY IN THE WORLD (R) Fri - Thu: 11:40 AM, 5:30 PITCH PERFECT 3 (PG-13)

[A/PERTURE] Fri - Thu: 12:00, 5:15, 7:20 TIGER ZINDA HAI (NR) HINDI Fri - Wed: 2:10, 9:30 Thu: 2:10 PM KILLING FOR LOVE (R) Fri - Thu: 12:05, 10:00 I, TONYA (R) Fri - Thu: 11:35 AM, 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 DARKEST HOUR (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:50 AM, 2:40, 5:25, 8:10, 11:00 Sun - Thu: 11:50 AM, 2:40, 5:25, 8:10 THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI (R) Fri & Sat: 2:35, 8:25, 11:20 Sun - Thu: 2:35, 8:25 THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) Fri - Thu: 2:45, 5:15, 7:35 THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) Sat: 11:55 PM

Jan 19-26

PHANTOM THREAD (R) Fri: 3:00, 5:45, 8:30 Sat: 9:30 AM, 12:15, 3:00, 5:45, 8:30 Sun: 11:00 AM, 1:45, 4:30 Mon: 5:30, 8:15, Tue: 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 Wed & Thu: 5:30, 8:15 I, TONYA (R) Fri: 3:30, 6:15, 8:45 Sat: 10:00 AM, 3:30, 6:15, 8:45 Sun: 10:00 AM, 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 8:45 Mon: 6:00, 8:45, Tue: 3:15, 6:00, 8:45 Wed & Thu: 6:00, 8:45 CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (R) Fri: 4:00, 6:45, 9:30 Sat: 10:30 AM, 1:15, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30 Sun: 10:30 AM, 1:15, 4:00, 6:45 Mon: 6:15, 9:00, Tue: 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 Wed & Thu: 6:15, 9:00

LADY BIRD (R) Fri: 2:45, 5:30, 8:00 Sat & Sun: 9:45 AM, 12:00, 2:45, 5:30, 8:00 Mon: 6:30, 9:15 Tue: 4:00, 6:30, 9:15 Wed & Thu: 6:30, 9:15 EXHIBITION ON SCREEN: CANALETTO AND THE ART OF VENICE Sat: 12:30 PM Sun: 7:30 PM

[PLAYBILL] by Heather Dukes Triad Stage proudly presents one of the greatest American play ever written, Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun. In a cramped apartment on the South side of Chicago, a struggling family awaits a life insurance payment that could change their circumstances. A Raisin in the Sun runs Jan. 28 – Feb. 18. at The Pyrle Theater in downtown Greensboro. Opening Night is Friday, Feb. 2 at 8 p.m. Pay-What-YouCan performances are Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 6 and 7. Wine Tasting is Friday Feb. 9, prior to the evening’s 8 p.m. performance. Showtimes for A Raisin in the Sun are 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday evenings. Sunday matinees are at 2:00 p.m. Sunday evening shows are at 7:30 p.m. The last show is a matinee performance on Sunday, Feb. 18 at 2 p.m. There will not be an evening performance. There are no matinee performances during previews. High Point Theatre will be performing Musical Thrones- A Parody of Ice and Fire on Thursday, Jan. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at the High Point Theatre, located at 220 E. Commerce Ave. Composed by the hysterical mad men behind the long-running Silence! The Musical, Jon and Al Kaplan, Musical Thrones: A Parody of Ice and Fire brings your most beloved and behated characters to life as you journey through seven seasons of the Emmy Award-winning Game of Thrones series. The cost of tickets for the front orchestra reserved is $45, for the rear orchestra and balcony reserved is $40. Room and show packages are available for this performance. Odeon Theatre at the Greensboro Coliseum will be performing Robert Dubac’s The Book of Moron Jan. 18-21, (five shows) at Greensboro Coliseum. The Book of Moron, has been described as one of the most “hilarious” “intelligent” and “scorching” satirical attacks on idiocracy since Mark Twain. (And “idiocracy” isn’t even a word. How dumb is that?) Tickets are $55 and the first show on Jan. 18 starts at 8 p.m. Visit the Greensboro Coliseum Complex’s website, www.greensborocoliseum. com, for more information. Community Theatre of Greensboro will perform Women in White directed by Justin Bulla on Jan. 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 27 at 7:30 p.m. and on Jan. 21, 28 at 2 p.m. at Community Theater of Greensboro. “We are excited to present this comedy with a murder mystery twist.” Tickets range from $10-$30 (plus North Carolina sales tax and a $2 restoration fee). Visit ctgso.org or call 336-3337469 for more information. !

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JANUARY 17-23, 2018

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leisure

[NEWS OF THE WEIRD] WEIRD CHEMISTRY

In Lawrence County, Tennessee, law enforcement officials are confronting the fallout from a new drug known as “Wasp” (crystallized wasp repellant Chuck Shepherd mixed with methamphetamine). To wit: On Dec. 18, as the Johnson family baked Christmas cookies in their Lawrenceburg kitchen, Danny Hollis, 35, walked into their home and asked for help. NewsChannel 5 in Nashville reported Hollis poured himself a glass of water from the sink before grabbing a knife and cutting across his throat. Teenage son Canaan Johnson said Hollis then ran up to the second floor, heaved an oak dresser down the stairs, and jumped out a window onto a gazebo below, seriously injuring his neck. The Johnsons, meanwhile, had retreated to their car, where they called 911. Hollis chased the car down the street, but got hung up on a barbed wire fence, then stripped naked to free himself and climbed a nearby tree, where officers found him, according to

police reports. Hollis fought them off by allegedly throwing his own feces at them, as they tased him out of the tree. Hollis was booked into the county jail on numerous charges.

OOOH, WISE GUY, EH?

Khaled A. Shabani, 46, a hairstylist in Madison, Wisconsin, was arrested on a tentative charge of mayhem and disorderly conduct while armed after an altercation with a customer on Dec. 22. Shabani scolded the 22-year-old customer for fidgeting, then taught him a lesson by using the “shortest possible attachment” to “run down the middle of the customer’s head,” reported the Wisconsin State Journal, and “leaving him looking a bit like Larry from ‘The Three Stooges,’” police spokesman Joel DeSpain said. Shabani also clipped the customer’s ear with scissors. “While it is not a crime to give someone a bad haircut,” DeSpain noted, “you will get arrested for intentionally snipping their ear with a scissors.” Shabani said the snip was an accident, and his charge was later reduced to a ticket for disorderly conduct.

BRIGHT IDEAS

— Polk County (Florida) Sheriff ’s officers responded to an unusual 911 call on New Year’s Eve: Michael Lester, 39, of Winter Haven, started off by telling the dispatcher, “Umm, I’m drunk. I don’t know where I’m at. I’m just drunk driving.” The dispatcher urged Lester to pull over and park, but he explained that he was driving on the wrong side of the road near a Publix and wondered where the police were. WTVT reported that officers finally caught up with Lester, who helpfully explained he’d had several beers, hadn’t slept much and had taken methamphetamine earlier in the day; he was jailed on a DUI charge. Officers later posted on their Facebook page that “in this particular incident, nobody was hurt, so we couldn’t help but LOTO (that means we Laughed Our Tasers Off).” — Disgruntled driver Matthew Middleton, 49, of Peterlee, England, spotted a speed camera near Hartlepool Rugby Club in October and decided to take a stand. He got out of his car and stood in front of the camera, blocking it, until police arrested him. Middleton further antagonized the officer by calling him a “pig” and giving his name as Elvis Presley. “They acted like what I did was the crime of the century,” Middleton told Metro News. “I know I shouldn’t have done it. People have just been laughing about it ... well, apart from my wife.” Middleton was fined about $54 plus court costs for his antics.

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When Dustin Johnson, 22, of Minot, North Dakota, tried to steal $4,000 worth of merchandise from a local Hobby Lobby, he failed to take into account that shopping carts don’t have snow tires. The Grand Forks Herald reported that over a seven-hour period on Jan. 3, Johnson filled a cart then fled the store — where the cart became stuck in snow in the parking lot and flipped over. Johnson fell down, then got up to run, leaving behind his wallet with photo ID matching the shoplifter’s description. Minot police caught up with Johnson at his home.

EXTREME CLIMATE NEWS

It may be cold where you are, but it’s hot in Broadford, a small town about an hour from Melbourne, Australia, where on Jan. 5, the highway began melting. Temperatures of 100 degrees Fahrenheit and higher reactivated an ingredient in the road surface, turning it into a sticky mess on the Hume Freeway, 9News reported. Motorists were warned by Victoria police to avoid the right lane and expect delays over a 10km stretch. Officials also put in

place a fire ban and urged people to stay indoors until the heat abated.

SMOKE ‘EM IF YOU GOT ‘EM

Christians in a Portuguese village carry on a curious tradition during Epiphany: They encourage their young children to smoke cigarettes. Vale de Salgueiro locals told Fox News that nobody is sure what the smoking symbolizes, but the centuries-old tradition persists. And Portuguese authorities don’t intervene, despite the fact that the legal age to purchase tobacco in Portugal is 18. Writer Jose Ribeirinha researched the tradition and said that since Roman times, villagers in the region have done things that were out of the norm during winter solstice celebrations.

THE LITIGIOUS SOCIETY

Siera Strumlauf and Benjamin Robles of California, and Brittany Crittenden of New York, saw their complaints go up in steam on Jan. 5 when U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers dismissed their lawsuit against Starbucks for underfilling its lattes and mochas. According to Reuters, the judge cited lack of evidence brought by the plaintiffs, who accused the coffee chain of fraud by making its cups too small and instructing baristas to skimp on ingredients and adhere to low “fill-to” lines on milk pitchers. The suit also claimed milk foam should not be counted toward advertised volumes, an opinion Rogers said reasonable customers do not hold. Starbucks and the plaintiffs had no comment.

WEIRD SCIENCE

Researchers have discovered that 99 percent of green sea turtles born in the northern parts of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef are now female. Sea turtles’ gender is determined by the temperature at which the eggs are incubated, and warmer temperatures reduce the number of male hatchlings. The author of a new study, marine biologist Michael Jensen, told The News York Times the shift in gender suggests climate change is having a more dramatic effect on sea turtle populations than scientists realized. “We’re all trying to wrap our heads around how these populations are going to respond to those changes,” he said. Researchers warn that continued global warming will threaten the persistence of these populations. !

© 2018 Chuck Shepherd. Universal Press Syndicate. Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com.

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[KING Crossword] ACROSS 1 5 9 13 19 20 21 22 23 26 27 28 29 31 32 34 35 40 44 45 46 47 48 49 53 56 58 59 60 62 66 67 68 73 76 77

Opera start “Yes, yes, Juan!” Take — (taste some) Cheeky type Road, in German Foretoken Lovett of country No longer surprised by Ram forcefully? Frito Lay chip December mall hirees Teeny Greeting sent by a cosmetics company? “Agnus —” Cache Southeast Kansas city Where lots of mail deliverers scuba-dive? Not at all nigh Most robust Kazan of film directing Hilo “hello” In days past “Lo-o-ovely!” Set crossword hints to music? Prefix with pathology The Big Apple, briefly Fissile rock Midday sleep Divide by type Contract out TV title alien Water whirl Required maintenance items? Face cover From — Z Big fair

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Character “Scat!” Prologue Upsilon’s follower Qdoba treats Inelegant five-member band? 66-Across et al. Salt’s “Help!” Muslim palace area Haul around Number of magazine subscribers, e.g. Writer Haley Long to look at a periodic table? Feng — Poetry Muse White-haired Library cubicle in which Chablis is served? Jackie O.’s “O” New York state prison Is wild for Writes hacky computer programs? Chemist’s “I” Nursing school subj. Bit of help In awe Naval units Car-lot sticker abbr. Barley brews Guru’s discipline

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Essentials “Fame” star Irene Very loud Alternatively — -chef

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Unruly kid Fit for sailing Ready to be driven Pugilist Muhammad Harmony 1942 role for Ingrid “The Dick Van Dyke Show” surname Ballet dancer Nureyev “Sitting on — ...” (“Mrs. Robinson” lyric) Blood bank fluids Nero’s 404 Quintillionth: Prefix “Crazy” bird Aristide’s land Eagles’ nests Female deer Is sporting Hoagie shop Its capital is Accra Is very angry Co. kahuna — Tin Tin Tatty cloths Exclusively Ran across In the future Harsh-toned Top gun Spicy cuisine Stop moving Pixieish Stone — pro nobis Amigo of Fidel Sedative drug, informally Berg stuff Stout of mysteries Seer’s skill

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This, to Pedro Dying rebuke “Me neither” Sponge up Scarf down Coffee flavor Auditory Rubberneck West Coast coll. in La Jolla Hen’s perch Swirly letters Suffix with 90-Down Being aired, in a way Like religious dissenters Writer Calvino Gender Tip of a sock Suffix with major Azadi Tower locale Holy Fr. woman Ham it up City-circling route Goes after 1921 Karel Capek play Stability-improving auto part Vocalist Kitt Hound’s trail Homeless kid Sacred cow Center point The “E” of HOMES Practically forever Jet name Gets the total Stop up Kelp, e.g. Brand of motor oil A single

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feature

TheBBoyBallet promotes community through dance

D

om-Sebastian Alexis pulls out his phone and looks up break dancing positions. As he looks intently at the photos, he is mentally arranging Katie Murawski his body into the seemingly difficult positions, such as a Editor headstand with his arms perched on his hips. After taking less than a minute to calibrate his body and mind to produce the move on the screen, he hops onto the freezing cold metal train track in downtown Greensboro. He counts down, and I snap photos on my camera repeatedly as he balances his body weight, on one hand, bearing the frigid elements. It occurred to me at our photoshoot that Alexis is not just someone with a college degree in dance. He is a natural dancer, and he thrives through movement. Alexis co-founded TheBBoyBallet and the Gate City Breakers and is a shameless promoter of the Greensboro artistic community. “TheBBoyBallet is a concept of dance more than an actual dance company,” Alexis said. “[It’s] the concept of what dance should be. It is a terminology thing. The “B” in BBoy stood for breaking, it was street terminology back in the day like when somebody is acting out of the ordinary, so that is where the breaking came from. It is more like the passion of the dance. It is like something inside of you broke so you have to dance.” Now ballet, he said, is more of the vocabulary of dance. He said with ballet; there has to be a spectacle, it is not just dancing it is the “whole aesthetic, the outward part of dance.” “So I bring those two things together,” he said. “That is why it’s called TheBBoyBallet; it’s the internal spectacle externalized almost.” Alexis thinks about dancing all the time, so much so that he does it all the time, everywhere he goes. His moves caught my eye one day when he tagged YES! Weekly in one of his videos on Instagram. In that video, he is dancing beside a YES! Weekly newsstand. He said he uses videos not only as a source of promotion but also as a way to self-reflect and improve his movements.

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Dom-Sebastian Alexis of TheBBoyBallet “breaking” on the train tracks in downtown Greensboro.

He said he tries to incorporate things he likes in his community and then promote it at the same time as he is dancing. “So that is how the YES! Weekly thing started,” he said. “I just always see [it] around, and I would see articles in it, and it’s like people that I know that is in it, so it’s like I feel connected to it in a sense. It feels like it’s something I should have done anyway because YES! Weekly is so ingrained in like the whole Triad. It is [interwoven] in everything you see everywhere; they are always around in the community. Black people know about

things like that, so it was one of those things like ‘this will be a cool little paying homage type of video.” Alexis graduated the University of North Carolina Greensboro in December 2015 with a Bachelor’s of fine arts in choreography and a minor in drama. Post graduation, Alexis worked at Home Depot and then went into construction work. All the while, he was still teaching dance classes. “Then I made the decision,” he said. “I said, ‘you know what, I need to focus all on dance.’” Ever since June 2017, he’s been dancing full time. At first, Alexis and his crew would go out on first Fridays and food truck festivals to dance; then they did a TEDx Greensboro talk in April. Now, he teaches at various studios around town, collaborates with Greensboro Ballet, and works with

Durham school system for Arts in Action. Despite dancing full-time, Alexis admits that he still gets nervous and exclusively nervous when he is performing for the community. “We’ve mainly been doing community-based things,” he said. “I get more nervous and bent out of shape when I am performing for the community. I have performed in stadiums before and like I am never nervous, but whenever I am home or am doing something for like the community, I am more nervous there than in front of a couple thousand.” Alexis describes TheBBoyBallet’s style of dance as neo-contemporary. “I consider street dancing itself to be contemporary dance,” he said. “But then again, my dance form is a juxtaposition of street dance and classical dance, and it’s

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a hybrid of movement, so that is why I call it neo-contemporary. Because although it’s contemporary, it’s still a new approach to what is already there. I would even go as far as not even calling it dance and call it neo-contemporary movement because dance sometimes implies that there is music involved. But like movement is more just something that is coming from you without having a catalyst of sound to drive it.” As far as why he dances, Alexis said it just has always been that way. “There is not a why,” he said. “I think if I gave a why it would just be forcing out an answer for an article.” Although dancing is his passion, he admitted that he did not initially want to go to school for dance. His dream was to make T.V. commercials, but after getting into marketing at Guilford Technical Community College, that dream was eclipsed by going to the club and dancing. “I found myself going to the clubs all the time and I was there for the music,” he said. “I wasn’t even hollering at anybody, like most people go and try to socialize but my main focus was like, alright today I want to work on a six-step or today when I got to the club I want to work on my popping, and I am like ‘hey, I go there all the time not really drinking that much just here to dance, so I might as well gotten a degree in it.’” Dance comes so naturally to him, Alexis said that he even starts dancing before he wakes up in the morning. “I just do it. I am always dancing. Sometimes I start dancing before I even open my eyes. I am in bed and then it starts in my shoulder and it’s like I am up. That is the why I guess.” WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Through his dancing, he said he could make videos and promote various people he likes through the community. In a way, he is fulfilling his first dream of marketing with his passion and natural gift of movement. “Through my dancing, I could still fill that void in life,” he said. Alexis was born in Texas and then moved to Greensboro when he was young. “I claim Greensboro like wholeheartedly,” he said. “After you have been here for like over 10 to 15 years and you don’t claim Greensboro it’s cause you are holding on to something that is not there.” He said Greensboro is a great city to stay in, but it took him a while to get into that mindset because external forces tried to talk down on Greensboro. “After, I like took a step back and looked at my city,” he said. “I went to Los Angeles, and I was there for three weeks, and when I went to New York I was there for like a couple weeks, and after three or four days of being there I was thinking about Greensboro. And then I am like, ‘why are you thinking about Greensboro if you want to leave this place?’ The biggest thing was when I was in Paris; I was [there] for like three days and then like after day two I was like ‘alright I am ready to go back to Greensboro.’ We have some of the best food, best people and best people politically trying to make things happen.” Why does he love Greensboro so much? Because he said, this is where diversity started with the Greensboro Four and the sit-ins that sparked the Civil Rights movement. “The history of diversity starts here, diverse dance starts here,” he said. “Any-

thing that is a turning point for creativity or diversity or socially should be starting here because that is where it started. You are only as strong as your foundation. Why not Greensboro? So many awesome things have already happened here like the only thing that is going to happen is another awesome thing after another awesome thing, that is the foundation. We are the ones that catapulted this whole movement. So even if it’s New York, Cali, Charlotte, Raleigh, at the end of the day about an hour away, it started here. No matter how diverse you are, don’t forget who started this whole movement it’s us, 336. Triad. Gate City. Greensboro.” Alexis said that despite having connections and friends who dance for well-known artists such as Taylor Swift and Beyonce, he does not want to leave Greensboro. He said he has to think about what his dream is; he does not want to adopt the dream of someone else. He wanted to take a different route; he likes the thought of dance education, teaching and coming up with different ideas to approach his style of dance. “I can do that in a bigger city, but I could also do that here and like still like have a cheaper rent and have friends I know and build a community,” he said. “Why would I go to New York or any other big city and build a community and make them more diverse [when] I could start at home and just build something there and be comfortable doing it with less stress and more focus on my art.” Recently, The Gate City Breakers of TheBBoyBallet performed the halftime show at the North Carolina State Basketball game against Clemson University on Jan. 12. Coming up, the company will be

performing at the Fringe Festival on Jan. 25 at 8 p.m., Jan. 26 at 8 p.m. and Jan. 27 at 6 p.m. at the Stephen D. Hyers Studio Theatre. According to the website (www. thebboyballet.com), TheBBoyBallet offers kid and adult classes at the Greensboro Dance Theatre (located at 2604 Battleground Ave.) and The Greensboro Cultural Center which houses The Dance Project (located at 200 N. Davie St.), respectively. On Tuesdays at the Greensboro Dance Theatre from 4 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. for ages 5 to 7, there is a hip-hop dance class; and there is another hip-hop class from 4:45 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. for ages 8-11. On Fridays from 4 p.m. until 4:45 p.m. there is also a boys hip-hop dance class. For adults at the Greensboro Cultural Center, on Mondays from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. for ages 18+ there is a hip-hop dance class and on Fridays from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. for ages 13 and up, there is a breaking dance class. As for the future and beyond, Alexis said he is not looking for fame, he “just wants to be great. I don’t have to be seen I just want to know that I can do it,” he said. He has an ambitious plan for 2018: to make one million dollars, “because why not,” he said. To affirm this goal, in almost every post he makes on Instagram, he includes his mantra: Step 1: Have a plan, Step 2: Do it, Step 3: Repeat Step 1. To check out more information about TheBBoyBallet visit the website (www. TheBBoyBallet.com), Facebook (/TheBBoyBallet) and Instagram page (@thebboyballet). ! KATIE MURAWSKI is the editor of YES! Weekly. She is from Mooresville, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a minor in film studies from Appalachian State University in 2017. JANUARY 17-23, 2018

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Duo brings older crowd, ‘90s R&B music to Downtown Greensboro Childhood friends Angel Howze and Dexter Porter have teamed up to bring big talent and smooth sounds to intimate venues in downtown Greensboro with 2nd Friday GSO. National Chanel R. Davis recording artist Tony Terry and renowned Contributor DJ Triple J kicked off the 2nd Fridays GSO launch on Jan. 12 at One17 Sofa Bar and Lounge, located at 117 N. Green St. Terry debuted his new single “Take Me” at the launch event. “It’s a place for the middle-age adults to come,” Howze said. “Those who are not club heads anymore, but still want a place where you can come and listen to music, have drink and enjoy yourself. We wanted to create an environment for the working, family individual that still wanted to go out and enjoy themselves.” Howze, the founder of Vmac515, has a startup company in the Triad area that provides stage and production management, casting and front of house management. Porter, the founder of the Atlanta-based Osiris South Records, has roots in artist management and promotion. Each 2nd Friday GSO event will include live North Carolina native and national recording jazz, R&B, soul and poetry artist Tony Terry. performances. While the target audience is the 30+ crowd, Howze said she Angel and Dexter [are] doing. I almost forwouldn’t discriminate against those who got how great Tony Terry’s career was. He like good music. had a 30-year run with one song. People “Those who enjoy the old school sound got married to that song, and it’s people’s are more than welcome,” she said. favorite. I’m looking forward to [Howze Sterling Holland, owner of One17 Sofa and Porter] bringing other artists of that Bar and Lounge, said that he is excited stature, and excitement, to this venue.” about the new venture and looks forward North Carolina native, Terry has been to more successful events from Howze performing since he was a young child. and Porter. His talent has garnered him multiple “I think it’s something the city needs Billboard chart-topping hits like “Forever and it’s a void that needs filling,” Holland Yours” and “Everlasting Love.” The 1990 said. “The age group is almost a forgotten hit “With You,” which was on Terry’s selfmarket. I’m excited about the work that

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From left: Sterling Holland, owner of One17 Sofa Bar and Lounge; Angel Howze, owner of Vmac515; national recording artist Tony Terry titled second album, catapulted him into the spotlight, leaving an impact on many couples – and their weddings – along the way. “It’s humbling,” Terry said. “I’m fortunate to have a song that has become a part of the fabric of so many people’s lives. It’s really humbling. I don’t take it for granted.” The album landed on the Top 20 of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and the Top 10 on the R&B chart. In 1991, he was also nominated for two Soul Train Music Award nominations: Single of the Year and Artist of the Year. The single, “With You”, also received an American Music Award nomination. “There was a five-year span where I didn’t’ want to sing that song anywhere because everywhere I went I was asked to sing it. If I was asked to participate in a musical, play or a theatrical piece, they would put the song in whether it had anything to do with it or not,” Terry said. “So, I just started feeling some type of way about it. Now when I think about it, that song is one of the things that has kept me working over the years, so I embrace it.” Terry is working on new music and will be starring in a new reality show on Bravo called “The Circuit.” The show is about life on the road in the theater world and fol-

lows the cast for eight weeks as they put shows together. Terry is no stranger to the stage, though few know that his career began in theater. He was in “Sisterella,” co-produced by Michael Jackson, ‘Mama I Want to Sing’ and David E. Talbert’s ‘His Woman, His Wife,’ co-starring Grammy-award winning Stephanie Mill, to name a few. “I didn’t realize how big it was at the time,” Terry said about his part in ‘Sisterella.’ “Michael Jackson would come in and sit in the back with a mask on and slip out before the show was over. I was just having fun. It was just a gig at the time. In retrospect, I look back and think that was really something. At the time I didn’t get it.” Howze said that she’s heard great feedback and is already planning for February. She’s planning to do a tribute to Gerald Levert, and it will feature performances from R&B groups Rude Boys and Men at Large. The event is scheduled for Feb. 9 at 9 p.m. For more information or tickets, visit 2ndFridaysGSO.eventbrite.com. ! CHANEL DAVIS, a journalism graduate from N.C.A&T SU, is a freelance journalist based in High Point who has worked in the industry for the past five years.

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The photographic legacy of Edward F. Small BY JENNIFER BEAN BOWER Is it possible to travel through time? In regard to the past, the answer is yes. Thanks to photography and Edward Featherston Small, a trip to 19th-century Winston-Salem—particularly 1881 and 1882—can be achieved with relative ease. In the summer of 1881, Edward F. Small rolled his mobile photography studio into the bustling town of Winston. Born in Beaufort County, North Carolina, he was a talented artist and a brilliant salesman. As a photographer, Small did not focus on portraits, but instead captured scenes that were best-suited for a frame or stereoscope—a device that allows two photographs to be seen as a singular, three-dimensional image. As a salesman, he peddled those views to the public. Small had only been in town a short while, when he partnered with photographer M. C. Teague. To promote the partnership, the men presented examples of their work to the Winston Leader and secured the following announcement on July 5: Good Pictures. An opportunity is afforded the citizens of Winston to secure fine views of their residences and business houses by Messrs. Small & Teague. We have seen their work in this line and it is first class. Sales must have proved profitable, as a few weeks later the photographers advertised a want of “10,000 BABIES” at their newly opened, storefront studio. Although their request was in jest—considering the number was greater than the combined population of Winston and Salem—there is no doubt the advertisement drew attention to their business. Yet, despite having a physical presence in town, Small and Teague did not cease operation of their mobile studio and on Nov. 29, a reminder of that service appeared in the Winston Leader: Out Viewing. If you see a little blue hand cart, with a miniature house thereon…It is Messrs. Small & Teague’s scenery gallery, on wheels…Prepare your premises for they will call round and “take a view.” They are well prepared… and take excellent pictures…” Small and Teague prospered in 1881 and likely envisioned greater success in the new year. But, on Jan. 8, 1882, their business—and any dreams associated with it— collapsed. Early that morning, a general merchandise store caught fire. Flames raged as one building was consumed after another. In an effort to create a fire block and prevent further destruction, the mayor ordered several structures—includWWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Collection of Old Salem Museums & Gardens.

The red tannery complex, which was a highly successful business in Salem, was photographed by Edward F. Small in 1882. ing Small and Teague’s studio—to be torn down. Deemed a “Night of Horror” by the Winston Leader, the inferno had reduced an entire city block to a pile of ash and rubble. As reported in the Jan. 12, 1882, edition of the Union Republican: [Small and Teague] lost…everything… except their instruments, which were also much damaged…No insurance. Loss about $400. This loss falls particularly heavy on them, as they had established a good business in our city and lost many valuable negatives for which they had orders in hand to supply pictures. Two weeks later, Small and Teague dissolved their business. Although the fire had destroyed a studio and partnership, it did not put an end to Small’s work. Instead, he salvaged what he could, made repairs and rolled his mobile studio into the neighboring town of Salem. On Feb. 16, 1882, as reported by the People’s Press, Small was hard at work in Salem and “had taken some splendid views of a number of buildings.” The newspaper also noted that “city view photographing” was his “specialty.” And indeed it was. From January to June 1882, Small carted his camera around Salem where he photographed businesses like the pottery, tannery and tavern. He documented workers, residents, homes, gardens and conveyances. No matter the subject, it was game for Small’s lens. By the end of June, Small felt his work in Salem was done and he left for Greensboro. The People’s Press reported that he intended to photograph “all the principal towns in the state” and they, along with

Edward Featherston Small Papers, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

Photograph of Edward Featherston Small, date unknown. Collection of Old Salem Museums & Gardens.

The Heinrich Schaffner-Daniel Krause pottery was Salem’s largest commercial enterprise. It was documented by Edward F. Small in 1882. the Winston Leader, wished him great “success.” Whether or not Small visited all of the “principal towns” in North Carolina is unknown, but he did travel to Durham and photograph a W. Duke, Sons and Company tobacco factory. The image was printed on the company’s letterhead, Small was hired as a tobacco salesman and his camera was set aside. Although Small worked in Winston and Salem for a short period of time, his photographs endure. At Old Salem Museums & Gardens a collection of Small’s work has been preserved, catalogued and digitized. His photographs have been utilized in restoration projects, studied by historical researchers and exhibited to the

public. Through his lens, a brief moment in Winston-Salem’s past was captured and can be visited again and again. At Digital Forsyth, which is “the definitive online collection of historical photographs of Forsyth County, N.C.,” photographs by Edward F. Small can be examined any time, day or night. Make the journey to www.digitalforsyth.org/ and enjoy your trip to the past. ! JENNIFER BEAN BOWER is an award-winning writer, native Tar Heel and graduate of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. While working as the associate curator of photographic collections at Old Salem Museums & Gardens, Bower researched local tragedies and composed the book Winston & Salem: Tales of Murder, Mystery and Mayhem. JANUARY 17-23, 2018

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BARTENDERS OF THE WEEK | BY NATALIE GARCIA Check out videos on our Facebook!

BARTENDER: Phil Blattenberger BAR: Davidoff Lounge at Havana Phil’s Cigar Company AGE: 32 HOMETOWN: Nowhere. I’ve lived and traveled in 38 states and 31 countries, but I consider Greensboro home. BARTENDING: I’ve been bartending for nine years, in three countries and through two undergrads and a master’s program. I’m about to hang it up and go into film full time. Q: How did you become a bartender? A: I got into bartending after I got stranded in Thailand with $1.50 to my name, living off my guitar in night markets. I realized I needed to start traveling with more money and picked up the most flexible and well-paying

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gig I could find, which was bartending. Q: What’s your favorite drink to make? A: I make a great old fashioned. Best in Greensboro. But I earned my stripes club bartending and to this day I love flipping tins en route to a top shelf Long Island iced tea. Nobody knows how to make ‘em right. I make the best in the city, bar none. There’s a secret to it. Q: What’s your favorite drink to drink? A: I probably drink less than any bartender in Greensboro, but I stumbled on a fantastic drink called a Pisco Sour when backpacking in Peru a number of years back. I returned a few years later on an archaeological expedition and drank them like water. Simply incredible, like a whiskey sour from god. Q: What’s the craziest thing you’ve seen while bartending?

JANUARY 17-23, 2018

A: I guest bartended drunk at a high volume bar in Phnom Penh, Cambodia during a break from directing a Vietnam War film. It was low season and as soon as they learned the house tab was on me, every bar girl in town converged on the place and I got mobbed. My bar tab was unspeakable, but thankfully drinks are about a dollar in Cambodia. Q: What’s the best tip you’ve ever gotten? A: I made two grand my last night bartending at a high end martini lounge and most of it was from one guy who loved the hell out of one of those Long Islands. Q: How do you deal with difficult customers? A: There are no difficult customers, only uncreative bartenders. Q: Single? A: Single dad to the world’s most incredible four year old.

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January 17-23, 2018

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last call

[THE ADVICE GODDESS] love • sex • dating • marriage • questions

VENUS ENVY

I’m a 30-something woman, tall and thin, whom friends describe as beautiful. Perhaps for this reason, I’m often confronted with rude social assaults by people Amy Alkon who assume things are handed to me Advice on a silver platter. Goddess I am financially independent and have a full-time job and own a home and car. I dress and act modestly. Yet, I’m repeatedly insulted by people who suggest I got my job and other benefits because of my looks. What can I do to avoid or deflect these demeaning insinuations? — Not Just Skin Deep Inner beauty, unfortunately, only turns heads of people with X-ray vision: “Excuse me, miss, but has anyone ever told you that you have a very pretty appendix?” Sadly, complaints about the difficulty of being eye candy in a world of eye kale tend not to engender much sympathy, and researchers haven’t helped matters. There’s a considerable pile of research that has found a “beauty premium” (especially for women) — a bias toward hiring and promoting the hotties of the workforce — and, depressingly, an

“ugliness penalty” holding back the more Shrekalicious among us. But it turns out that the methodology behind this slew of findings — and the conclusion that simply having cheerleader good looks acts as a sort of express elevator for your career — was a bit overly broad. According to a 2017 paper by evolutionary psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa and sociologist Mary Still, once you drill down into the details — control for health, intelligence, and personality characteristics (along with some other individual differences) — you see a more nuanced result: “It appears that more beautiful workers earn more, not because they are beautiful, but because they are healthier, more intelligent,” and have more desirable personality traits: more conscientiousness and extroversion and less neuroticism. Sure, this probably sounds absurd — this association of good looks with intelligence, a winning personality, and good health. However, take that last one. It turns out that beauty is more than nice human scenery; it’s also advertising for what’s on the inside. For example, consider the preference across cultures for faces with “bilateral symmetry.” “Facial bilateral symmetry” is anthropologist-ese for both sides of a person’s face being a strong match — meaning, for example, that one eyelid isn’t a little droopier than the other. Facial or bodily asymmetry is an indicator of the presence of parasites or disease, and we evolved

to be drawn to healthy people — though we just think, “What a pretty face!” not “There’s someone who isn’t a foster home for tapeworms!” I don’t want to go too far into the weeds on why outer beauty might reflect good stuff on the inside. However, for one more example, Kanazawa and Still speculate about the personality benefit associated with being pretty (referencing evolutionary psychologist Aaron Lukaszewski’s research): “Because physically attractive children are more likely to experience positive feedback from interpersonal interactions,” they’re more likely to develop an extroverted personality than less physically attractive children. Getting back to you, just as previous research on “the beauty premium” failed to zoom in on the details, there’s a good chance you’re seeing your problem a little too broadly — seeing “people” engaging in the “rude social assaults.” Research on sex differences in competition by psychologist Joyce Benenson suggests it’s probably women who are doing most or all of the sneering. Men — from childhood on — tend to be comfortable with hierarchy and openly duking it out for top spots in a way women are not. Women tend to engage in covert aggression — like with frosty treatment and undermining remarks — in hopes of making another woman dim her own shine and voluntarily relocate lower down the ladder.

The best way to combat such sniping in the moment is to go placid pokerface, treating their comments like lint to brush off. (There’s little satisfaction in verbally battering somebody who doesn’t appear to care.) In the long run, however, your best bet is being somebody who’s hard to hate. Research by behavioral economist Ernst Fehr suggests it’s in our self-interest to be altruistic — to engage in behavior that’s somewhat costly to us (in, say, time or energy) in order to benefit other people. This means, for example, developing a reputation as someone who’s always looking out for your colleagues’ interests — like by tipping off co-workers about opportunities and publicly cheering colleagues’ achievements. Finally, if I’m right that women are your main detractors, consider Benenson’s observation that women show each other they aren’t a threat through sharing vulnerabilities — revealing weaknesses and problems. Ideally, of course, these should be difficulties along the lines of “Sorry I’m late. My car’s a useless piece of tin” and not “Sorry I’m late. ANOTHER guy drove into a pole looking at me, and I had to wait with him for the ambulance.” ! GOT A problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com) © 2018 Amy Alkon Distributed by Creators.Com.

[HOROSCOPES] [LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your achievements are admirable as you close out the month with a roar. Now you can treat yourself to some well-earned time off for fun with family or friends. (Or both!) [VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Be sure you know the facts before you assume someone is holding back on your project. Try to open your mind before you give someone a piece of it. [LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might feel comfortable in your

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18+

JANUARY 17-23, 2018

familiar surroundings, but it might be time to venture into something new. There’s a challenge out there that’s just right for you.

[SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Your love of things that are new gets a big boost as you encounter a situation that opens up new and exciting vistas. How far you go with it depends on you. [SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) That recent workplace shift might not seem to be paying off as you expected. But be patient. There are

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changes coming that could make a big difference.

ary. Now all you need to do is resist quitting too early. Do your best to stay with it.

[CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) While few can match the Goat’s fiscal wizardry, you still need to be wary in your dealings. There might be a problem you should know about sooner rather than later.

[TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Doff a bit of that careful, conservative outlook and let your brave Bovine self take a chance on meeting that new challenge. You could be surprised at how well you do.

[AQUARIUS (January 20 to February

18) Easy does it when it comes to love and all the other good things in life. Don’t try to force them to develop on your schedule. Best to let it happen naturally.

[PISCES (February 19 to March 20) A

surprise decision by someone you trust causes some stormy moments. But a frank discussion explains everything, and helps save a cherished relationship.

[ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You’re

[GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You might not want to return to the more serious tasks facing you. But you know it’s what you must do. Cheer up. Something more pleasant soon will occupy your time. [CANCER (June 21 to July 22) As you dutifully tidy up your end-of-the-month tasks, your fun self emerges to urge you to do something special: A trip (or a cruise, maybe?) could be just what you need. © 2018 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

eager to take on that new opportunity opening up as January gives way to Febru-

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