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For the love of

Vinyl

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ALMA MEXICANA

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Record Store Day 2018 spins through the Triad EARTH DAY 2018

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NY PIZZA’S NEW START

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STEEP CANYON RANGERS & FRIENDS

with special guest STEVE MARTIN

get tickets now

KRIS KRIS TOF FERS ON

JAM EY J OHN SON

ROBERT EARL KEEN

THE MAV ERIC KS

RHIANNON GIDDENS

JIM LAUDERDALE, BUDDY MILLER, and NORTH MISSISSIPPI ALLSTARS

SAM BUSH

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THE DEVIL MAKES THREE

APRIL 26-29, 2018

MerleFest.org 800-343-7857 APRIL 18-24, 2018

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inside

w w w.y e s w e e k l y. c o m

APRIL 18-24, 2018 VOLUME 14, NUMBER 16

22 FOR THE LOVE OF VINYL April 21 marks the 10th official year of RECORD STORE DAY. At some locations, there will be sales, special releases (of both vinyl and CDs) as well as other promotional products. I went around to every Triad record store and asked what the businesses were doing to celebrate.

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5500 Adams Farm Lane Suite 204 Greensboro, NC 27407 Office 336-316-1231 Fax 336-316-1930 Publisher CHARLES A. WOMACK III publisher@yesweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor KATIE MURAWSKI katie@yesweekly.com Contributors KATEI CRANFORD JOHN ADAMIAN MARK BURGER JENNIFER ZELESKI BILLY INGRAM SAMMY FELDBLUM PRODUCTION Graphic Designers ALEX ELDRIDGE designer@yesweekly.com AUSTIN KINDLEY artdirector@yesweekly.com ADVERTISING Marketing BRAD MCCAULEY brad@yesweekly.com

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When deciding to go to a restaurant, one must practice a sort of divine timing. If the restaurant is new, popular or flat-out good, the chances of you getting a table promptly are low, if at all. This has been the case ever since ALMA MEXICANA, located at the Innovation Quarter in Winston-Salem, opened just two months ago. 10 FREDERIC CHURCH, a painter who deals most often in ecological splendor, did not forget humanity in his earthly wanderings. His eye for the man-made is on view now at Winston-Salem’s Reynolda House in a collection of work from a trip around the Mediterranean. 11 Green may act as the “tour guide,” but this is no mere travelogue. THE WORLD BEFORE YOUR FEET celebrates not only the landmarks of New York City but also its rich cultural and ethnic diversity. 12 Singer, banjo player, performer and educator LAURA BOOSINGER will play at MerleFest 2018, as she has most years. But this year Boosinger’s time on stage will represent only a small part of her involvement at the festival. APRIL 18-24, 2018

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...adults are encouraged to check out ISLE OF DOGS at their earliest convenience. Anderson’s first film since his grandly entertaining gem The Grand Budapest Hotel is a dazzling and heady achievement, employing quirky animation to relate its tale of a futuristic Japan... 19 THE LITTLE THEATRE of WinstonSalem is pleased to announce its 84th Season of live theatre productions. 24 Licorice Pizza, Oz, Wherehouse, Camelot, Coconuts, Turtles, Record Bar, Sam Goody, Strawberries, Tape Town, Big Daddy’s, Waxie Maxie’s — just a few of the weirdly named music chains of the 1970s & 1980s. Fondly remembered as some of those places were, they all paled in comparison to PEACHES RECORDS & TAPES. 26 Love it or hate it, the cultural impression NEW YORK PIZZA ingrained into Greensboro is undeniable. Through turbulent years of highs and lows and a round of new ownership, there’s a fresh set of NYPeeps at the helm, pressing forward with a new chapter (and a slew of shows) for the infamous spot at Tate and Walker.

TRAVIS WAGEMAN travis@yesweekly.com ANDREW WOMACK andrew@yesweekly.com ANNA BROOKS anna@yesweekly.com TRISH SHROYER trish@yesweekly.com Promotion NATALIE GARCIA

DISTRIBUTION JANICE GANTT JENNIFER RICKERT We at YES! Weekly realize that the interest of our readers goes well beyond the boundaries of the Piedmont Triad. Therefore we are dedicated to informing and entertaining with thought-provoking, debate-spurring, in-depth investigative news stories and features of local, national and international scope, and opinion grounded in reason, as well as providing the most comprehensive entertainment and arts coverage in the Triad. YES! Weekly welcomes submissions of all kinds. Efforts will be made to return those with a self-addressed stamped envelope; however YES! Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. YES! Weekly is published every Wednesday by Womack Newspapers, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. First copy is free, all additional copies are $1.00. Copyright 2018 Womack Newspapers, Inc.

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THE WOOD BROTHERS • JJ GREY & MOFRO ROBERT RANDOLPH & THE FAMILY BAND

THE MARCUS KING BAND x2 • BILLY STRINGS KING & STRINGS (MARCUS KING W/ BILLY STRINGS ) JERRY DOUGLAS BAND • TAUK • ZACH DEPUTY

SISTER SPARROW & THE DIRTY BIRDS • COLTER WALL • THE MANTRAS YARN • THE DUSTBOWL REVIVAL • TOWN MOUNTAIN • DANGERMUFFIN CRIS JACOBS • REV. PEYTON’S BIG DAMN BAND • THE SOUTHERN BELLES GRASS IS DEAD • RON HOLLOWAY • JEFF SIPE • JOSH SHILLING • FRONT COUNTRY VICTOR WAINWRIGHT & THE TRAIN • THE TRONGONE BAND • KAT WRIGHT • WILD PONIES

THE COMMONHEART x2 • FIRESIDE COLLECTIVE • ERIN & THE WILDFIRE • PORCH 40 • KENDALL STREET C0. SONGS FROM THE ROAD BAND • SANCTUM SULLY • JAY STARLING • WALLACE MULLINAX • PLUS MANY MORE!

Pop’s Farm • Martinsville, VA

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APRIL 18-24, 2018

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EVENTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS | BY AUSTIN KINDLEY

be there

LITTLE BIG TOWN THURSDAY THUR 19

THUR 19

MONEY MAN FRIDAY FRI 20

THE SONGS OF RODGERS AND LITTLE BIG TOWN HAMMERSTEIN WHAT: One of the most well-respected

WIL MARING & ROBERT BOWLIN

WHAT: A fun and lively show for all ages, Some Enchanted Evening weaves songs from well-loved musicals together in an intimate journey through the golden age of musical theatre. This will be The Little Theatre’s last mainstage performance on the Arts Council Theatre stage before the building is sold and the company moves to a new location. WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Arts Council Theatre of WinstonSalem. 610 Coliseum Drive, Winston-Salem. MORE: $27.50 tickets.

WHAT: As Wil Maring sat for long summer hours as a teenager at her familys roadside vegetable stand, picking out self-made tunes on her Sears guitar to pass the time, she never dreamed of the path she would one day follow. Robert Bowlin started at age 1 and a half playing the ukelele, graduated to his dads guitar at age 5, and has been creating unique and beautiful guitar music ever since. WHEN: 8 p.m. WHERE: Muddy Creek Music Hall. 5455 Bethania Road, Winston-Salem. MORE: $13-15 tickets.

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and beloved entertainers in music today, the genre-defying group, Little Big Town, has “expanded their audience beyond Tennessee” (USA Today) as well as “the definition of country music from the inside” (Newsday) since first entering the music scene more than 18 years ago. WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Greensboro Coliseum Complex Arena. 1921 West Gate City Blvd, Greensboro. MORE: $28+ tickets

FRI 20

SAT 21

MONEY MAN

PIEDMONT EARTH DAY FAIR

WHAT: With his soft, restrained delivery, Atlanta-based rapper Money Man tells straightforward tales about hustling and street life over trap beats. In 2016 he released three Black Circle mixtapes featuring guest appearances from Young Thug, Akon, Gucci Mane, and others, earning the rapper a significant following. WHEN: 9 p.m. WHERE: The Ramkat. 170 W 9th St., Winston-Salem. MORE: $20+ tickets.

WHAT: Support the planet and celebrate with the community at the largest Earth Day Fair in the region, hosted by Piedmont Environmental Alliance. Enjoy great food and music, activities for adults and kids, and wonderful earth-friendly exhibitors...all while learning about how you can support a greener city. The Piedmont Earth Day Fair is a FREE event, including free parking. WHEN: 10 a.m. WHERE: Winston-Salem Fairgrounds. Winston-Salem. MORE: Free entry.

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[SPOTLIGHT]

PREYER BREWING COMPANY’S BOLD THAI SHRIMP GOSE BY JENN ZELESKI

Preyer Brewing Company, located at 600 Battleground Ave. in Greensboro, has brought back a version of its standalone, award-winning beer. Thai Shrimp Gose was born in the summer of 2017 when the brewery was put to the test: add cucumber to its entry for the Inaugural Triad Brewing Championship. Never ones to shy away from a challenge, the brewing company decided to take it a step further. “We wanted to shake it up with an idea we had for awhile,” said Nicole Preyer, co-owner of Preyer Brewing Company. “A Gose is a traditional, sour German wheat ale brewed with sea salt and coriander. But so many traditional, preserved foods around the world are made by salt curing, and we wanted to start experimenting with using those instead of straight just sea salt.” So the brewing company decided on salted shrimp, threw in the cucumber, and added some grapefruit for a “citrus punch.” The idea turned into a successful reality — the brew took home first place. A few tweaks to the recipe lead to the brew’s comeback for the spring of 2018, which is now available on tap, in can and is found in Greensboro, Raleigh and Charlotte. For those who might still be a bit hesitant, Preyer said the flavor is hard to beat. “It has a very delicate, earthy sweet-

ness, with a background of umami from the shrimp. Layered over that is more dominant, refreshing cucumber, ending with the grapefruit,” Preyer said. “The beer is slightly salty and tart, which cleanses the palate, but also leaves you wanting more.” Other than the Thai Shrimp Gose, the brewery offers other options that push its flavor potential. The Miso Gose, also on the draft list, features red miso paste and lemongrass. But there are also steadfastsellers that Preyer suggests. “Our Harder Better Faster Lager is always a crisp, refreshing crowd pleaser, as is our Powder of Love NE IPA,” Preyer said.

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NCDOT TO HOLD PUBLIC MEETING APRIL 19 REGARDING PROPOSAL TO WIDEN I-40 FROM WEST OF N.C. 801 TO WEST OF HARPER ROAD DAVIE AND FORSYTH COUNTIES STIP Project No. I-0911 The N.C. Department of Transportation is proposing to widen I-40 from west of N.C. 801 in Davie County to west of Harper Road in Forsyth County. The purpose of this meeting is to provide interested citizens the opportunity to review maps of the project, ask questions and provide feedback. The open-house public meeting will be held in the Granary Building at WinMock at Kinderton, located at 168 E Kinderton Way in Bermuda Run from 4:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M. on Thursday, April 19, 2018.

“We’ve always got something new, and we make sure to balance our ‘out there’ beers with some classic styles that are appealing to (almost) everyone.” Preyer said despite those “out-there” combinations, the feedback is overwhelmingly positive. “Our unique flavors definitely have their detractors - mostly online, where it’s easy to be keyboard critic - but we put a lot of thought into what we do, and we don’t make beers just for the wow factor,” Preyer said. “They are tested, vetted, and some of the duds don’t make it to market.” Whether you’re drinking or brewing, “There’s no right way to beer,” Preyer said. “It should be fun. !

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Interested citizens may attend at any time between 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. Please note that there will not be a formal presentation. NCDOT representatives will display maps and be available to answer questions and receive comments. Project maps are available online at http://www.ncdot.gov/projects/ publicmeetings/. For additional information contact NCDOT Design Build Project Engineer Malcom Watson, P.E. by phone at (919) 707-6614 or by email at mcwatson@ncdot.gov . NCDOT will provide auxiliary aids and services under the Americans with Disabilities Act for disabled persons who wish to participate in this workshop. Anyone requiring special services should contact NCDOT Senior Public Involvement Officer Diane Wilson by phone at (919) 707-6073 or by email at pdwilson1@ncdot.gov as early as possible so that arrangements can be made. Persons who speak Spanish and do not speak English, or have a limited ability to read, speak or understand English, may receive interpretive services upon request prior to the meeting by calling 1-800-481-6494. Aquellas personas que hablan español y no hablan inglés, o tienen limitaciones para leer, hablar o entender inglés, podrían recibir servicios de interpretación si los solicitan antes de la reunión llamando al 1-800-481-6494. APRIL 18-24, 2018

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triad foodies

EAT IT!

Alma Mexicana opens patio, serves local flavors

W

hen deciding to go to a restaurant, one must practice a sort of divine timing. If the restaurant is new, popular or flat-out good, the chances of you getJennifer Zeleski ting a table promptly are low, if at all. This has been the Contributor case ever since Alma Mexicana, located at the Innovation Quarter in Winston-Salem, opened just two months ago. This weekend, my boyfriend insisted that it was time to try the new restaurant. The owners, Claire Calvin and Matt Giegengack, already have a strong following at The Porch Kitchen and Cantina — including us. But their new endeavor is begging to be different, despite the similar cuisine. We were lucky enough to get a table on Saturday during the odd hours

when it is too late to call a meal lunch but too early to consider it dinner. To my initial dismay, the timing made us just a few minutes shy of being given the lunch menu. After studying it beforehand, I was planning on customizing my meal by building my bowl, fit with jasmine rice, spicy chicken, pineapple pico de gallo and anything else that sounded appetizing. But that would have to wait. The dinner menu was less customiz-

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able but much more substantial. Small disclaimer: most names of the items are in Spanish. But don’t worry, the descriptions below are helpful and self-explanatory. The Platitos section of the menu is your first stop if you’re visiting with friends. The plates are designed for sharing but are more filling than your normal appetizer. The menu offers something for everyone, ranging from lamb chops to skillet-baked chorizo, even shredded duck and pork tenderloin bites. Peyton quickly convinced me that we had to try something from the Platitos, and the frontrunner for us was the Queso de Oro, baked goat cheese and bacon skillet with Colony Urban Farm’s Oaxacan Honey and a Camino Bakery pan tostada. Just in this dish alone, it would be easy for locals to recognize some of the ingredients put on display. Colony Urban Farm is a less than 10-minute drive from Alma Mexicana, and Camino Bakery is a

short walk up Fourth Street. Once I noticed just a few of the local ingredients, I saw one highlighted in almost every menu item and raised my respect for Calvin and Giegengack. Not only did they want to create distinct and delicious food, but they also wanted to use ingredients that showcased what the community has to offer, whether it was fresh-cut meat, handpicked vegetables or freshly baked bread. Since we had decided on the Queso de Oro, I wasn’t sure how many other plates we would want to share, but I gave the Meriendas or “snacks with drinks” a glance. There were fried avocado wedges, corn fritters with Mexican cojita cream and fresh tortilla chips paired with spicy guacamole. As enticing as they sounded, Peyton and I trusted that we would be back to try them with friends. I was a little too excited to see the Las Favoritas, with barbacoa steak, crumbled queso fresco and blackberry pico de gallo.

Hops & sHop: A CAmel City CrAft fAir Foothills Tasting Room - 3800 Kimwell Drive - Winston-Salem, NC (Off Stratford Rd)

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The blackberry pico de gallo had a short, seasonal run at The Porch last summer and I was heartbroken when I missed the opportunity to try it. Now was my chance. Luckily, the menu is just a bit flexible when it comes to protein options, and I was able to swap the barbacoa steak with the spicy shredded chicken. At only $3 a taco, I tried to practice self-control and ordered two. Peyton went for one of the Las Favoritas with the steak, and the Taco Pacifico, featuring grilled salmon, tomatillo crema, pickled red onion and habanero. When our food arrived, it was safe to say we were happy with our choices. The skillet was served with two hefty portions of warm goat cheese, each of which was surrounded by heaps of chopped bacon and topped with two toasted pieces of Camino pan tostada. The first bite was better than any grilled cheese I’ve ever tasted. The bacon was sweet and almost caramel-like from the Oaxacan honey, and the goat cheese practically melted in your mouth. The cheese itself had a golden-look to it and was sprinkled with paprika for another subtle layer of flavor. The only disappointing aspect was that the two pieces of bread went quickly between the two of us, and without them, the goat cheese and bacon were a bit heavy on their own. I secretly wished the dish offered the entire loaf of Camino bread. Regardless, Peyton was sent to goat cheese heaven, and my expectations for other Platitos dishes were set for future visits. The tacos arrived at the table looking enticing. They came in corn tortillas, packed with shredded chicken, topped subtly with crumbled queso and covered in blackberry pico de gallo. As expected from prior experiences at The Porch, I was met with the perfect flavor combination for a fresh, mouth-watering taco experience. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

The shredded chicken was spicy, but not enough to give you a kick in the mouth. It had enough to make things interesting. The blackberry pico de gallo was the real winner though, consisting of blackberries, red onion, red bell pepper and cilantro. It was a vibrant contrast to the chicken and tortilla, and I tried to rid myself of the regret of not having it sooner. Both of our tacos were served with a spicy orange dipping sauce on the side, but the tacos had such solid flavor combinations that we both opted out of using it. When I was finishing up some of the fresh tortilla chips (which came as a side to our tacos) and Peyton was relishing in the last bit of goat cheese heaven, I noticed that each of the restaurant’s tables were full, and the dinner line had started to form. Aside from the food, the energy of the restaurant was great but could get a bit loud depending on the time of day. The interior design mimics the artsy feel of Winston-Salem, with brightly colored walls and large windows, contrasted by the high, plain wooden tables, modern stools and plastic chairs. For the upcoming summer months, visitors can now their new patio space, which made its debut on April 13. Overall the experience was better than I expected, and I was left with even more respect for Calvin and Giegengack, who graciously serve some incredible, localbased food in Winston-Salem. Whether or not you’re trying to celebrate Taco Tuesday, try your best to grab a table at Alma Mexicana, order a signature cocktail and let your taste-buds do the rest. !

Y T R A P T S E G THE BIGO WHEELS. ON TW ark P y e Bail

• 8 NIT 2 U 0 5 0 2 4 HE l Asylum T D May N A LL ou

E SS B S I N O JAS WARSKhiIDres BLUES ANODRE! COLDAmandCaolony TRAVELEeRstM.com e arsF Hous Guit : TICKETS

s Gear

And

JENN ZELESKI is a student contributor to YES! Weekly. She is originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and is currently pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Communications at High Point University.

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visions

SEE IT!

Frederic Church and the fall of civilizations

F

rederic Church, a painter who deals most often in ecological splendor, did not forget humanity in his earthly wanderings. His eye for the man-made Sammy Feldblum is on view now at Winston-Salem’s Contributing Reynolda House in a collection of work columnist from a trip around the Mediterranean. From 1867–1869, after losing his first two children to diphtheria, Church left the devastation of the war-ravaged United States for the balmier climes of Rome, Greece, and the Near East. He returned with a head full of sights to delight crowds back home. As curator and head of the department of American art at the Detroit Institute of Art Kenneth Myers, Ph.D., writes, Church was already “the most famous painter in America” by the time of his trip, renowned for his grand landscapes from his travels in South America. In a time before international news wires, his shows offered glimpses of exotic foreign lands to the public. One of his most famous natural scenes, “The Andes of Ecuador” (1855), is included in this show, and demonstrates many of Church’s trademarks: abundant, sylvan vegetation; relentlessly detailed canvasses with near everything in focus at once; and a sun painted so realistically that the viewer squints and diverts their eyes. Traveling through the Mediterranean, Church had his mind on questions of civilization, and more particularly its ruin.

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As with his landscapes, he massaged the components of these paintings into their most dramatic arrangements. In “Springtime in the Levant” (1878), the ruins do not correspond to any particular site, but instead are a jumble of what the painter encountered as he traveled through present-day Greece, Lebanon, Israel-Palestine and Jordan. Sketches for the standout “Jerusalem from the Mount of Olives” (1870) show Church orient an initially realistic portrait of the city with increasing flair. By Church’s final rendition, olive trees replace a stolid hillside at the painting’s bottom right, gnarled and glistening in his dotted sunlight. The hillside has cleaved into a tumbling valley. Catty-cornered, clouds rear up heavy as a crashing ocean wave above the old city. That theme—of humanity ravished by the natural world—reappears in “Evening on the Sea,” (1877-1878). A small barge belches a cloud of black smoke as night falls. But the barge is almost incidental to the larger drama of the picture—the warm embrace of clouds turned a rich salmon by sunset, the cool breath of a rising blue moon, a black ocean kissed by the reflection of the fire above. Church’s attention elsewhere on civilizations past was timely, the viewer imagines, with the American Civil War so fresh. A painting of the Parthenon from 1871 shows that magnificent building sitting dusty in the light of the golden hour, a great blue sky shining above. Curiously, a man in a clownish get-up leans on one marble piece, looking away from the Parthenon. With the magnificence of human ingenuity and its sad fate in the face of time in full evidence, the fool looks awkwardly away. Upon his return to the United States, Church built a structure to echo those he

(At left) Frederic Edwin Church’s “ Al Ayn (The Fountain)” 1882, oil on canvas. Mead Art Museum Amherst College,MA. Gift of Herbert W. Plimpton The Hollis W. Plimpton Class of 1915 Memorial Collection. (At right) Frederic Edwin Church’s, “Broken Columns, View from the Parthenon, Athens,” April 1869. Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. Gift of Louis P. Church. Both photos courtesy of reynoldahouse.org had found on his travels: Olana, a mansion of brick and stone sporting obvious Arabic architectural influences in upstate New York. Photographs of the mansion appear in the show. It sits atop a hillside, overlooking forested hills and the Hudson below. Through its windows, the glory of the natural world stares back. The second half of the exhibition is made up mostly of chopped and screwed stone ruins. “Ruins at Baalbek” (1868), softer than Church’s other largescale work, offers a haunting vision of three columns standing in an otherwise empty world. “Syria by the Sea” (1873), on the other hand, is Church gone maximal: he incorporates Greco-Roman temples, an Ottoman stone gate, a castle built by crusaders and his trademark gleam of light cutting through the middle of the architectural pastiche. Busy with so

many bygone civilizations, it reads like the fall of all humanity. But amid the ruination, a procession of people and camels trudges. The ghosts of the past loom gigantically, impossible and dreamlike. Below, in a more intimate setting, life goes humbly on. Reynolda House will host “The Finest Eye: A Symposium on Frederic Church” on April 21 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Myers will be joined by Jennifer Raab, Ph.D., and Timothy Barringer, Ph.D., both history of art professors at Yale University. Tickets are $15 for members and students and $30 for the general public. A light reception will follow. Frederic Church: A Painter’s Pilgrimage exhibition ends on May 13. ! SAMMY FELDBLUM lives in Asheville and writes across the region. Whenever he travels for work, he makes sure to bring his 102 Jamz super sticker along.

2018 Annual Used Booksale May 3 & 4, 9aM-9pM | May 5, 8aM-2pM

Free Admission and Parking!

A book sAle with A purpose!

education Building Winston-Salem Fairgrounds All proceeds of the sale benefit the ministry’s programs and services for older adults in our community. For more information contact the shepherd’s Center at 748-0217 or visit www.shepherdscenter.org. APRIL 18-24, 2018

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RiverRun International Film Festival 2018 reviews And Then I Go ( ): Directed by Vincent Grashaw. A powerful and timely adaptation of Jim Shepard’s novel Project X, scripted by the author and University of North Carolina School Mark Burger of the Arts School of Filmmaking Contributing graduate/executive producer Brett Haley columnist (The Hero), this a dark and compelling exploration of adolescent rage, persuasively directed by Vincent Grashaw, with School of Filmmaking alumna Rebecca Green as a producer. Arman Darbo and Sawyer Barch give vivid performances as Edwin and Flake, best friends bonded by their constant bullying at school. The film is sympathetic to their angst and frustration. Both boys are bright, and Edwin displays burgeoning artistic talent, but they don’t fit in with the popular crowd, which essentially suits them just fine. They’d prefer to be left alone, but too often find themselves bearing the brunt of bullying. The suspense is considerably ratcheted when Flake surreptitiously shows Edwin his father’s stash of firearms and ammunition. Flake reasons this is the best – and perhaps the only – way to strike back against the treatment they’ve received. Edwin clearly has a broader perspective, but Flake is so consumed by anger that he refuses to even consider any other alternative. There are those who will say that And Then I Go is exploitation, but given the spate of school-related violence it’s more a cautionary exploration of what can hap-

And Then I Go pen, and tragically it has – more than once. This is a sad, powerful, and even important film – bound to provoke debate and discussion, from which perhaps some good can come. – And Then I Go screens 4 p.m. Saturday, April 28 at UNCSA Main Theatre. Moss ( ): Directed by Daniel Peddle. As he demonstrated in his narrative debut feature, 2015’s Sunset Edge (which was filmed in and around his hometown of Winston-Salem), filmmaker Daniel Peddle has an affinity for characters who exist on the periphery of conventional society, people whose lives are simple and uncomplicated, but scarcely insignificant. That aspect certainly applies to Moss, a coming-of-age/slice-of-life tale focusing on the title character (Mitchell Slaggert), who has just turned 18 – an age when you may think you know everything, when in reality, you’ve still got a long ways to go. Moss is restless, contemplative, and sometimes cocky. His relationship with his widowed father (Billy Ray Suggs) is occasionally prickly and argumentative, but there’s an unmistakable – if slightly grudging – love between them. Throughout the day, Moss paddles along the coast of Carolina Beach, taking in the sights and sounds, hanging out with his best bud (Dorian Cobb), a laid-back and

Moss

The World Before Your Feet

likable drug dealer aptly named “Blaze.” He also enjoys a romantic tryst with Mary (sultry Christine Marzano), the quintessential older woman (all of 30), fueled by magic mushrooms. The ensemble cast is all the more impressive as Moss marks the feature debuts of Slaggert, Suggs and Cobb – all of whom are effortlessly believable. Marzano has a handful of big-screen credits but this is by far her best role to date, and she makes the most of it. Peddle immediately immerses the viewer into the remote region he’s chosen, with first-timer Juri Beythien’s awardworthy cinematography a standout. The location seems to come alive, even those little corners that aren’t necessarily picturesque. This is a film steeped in atmosphere and heart. – Moss screens 8:30 p.m. Friday at UNCSA Babcock Theatre and 7:30 pm Saturday at a/perture cinemas.

aren’t so mean, after all. Actually, they’re brimming with life, color and/or historical significance – even where you’d least expect it. Green may act as the “tour guide,” but this is no mere travelogue. The World Before Your Feet celebrates not only the landmarks of New York City but also its rich cultural and ethnic diversity. Vastly enlightening and entertaining, this may be Workman’s best film to date, as well as one of his most accessible. Even when the film backtracks, so to speak, delving into Green’s personal life, it never once loses its overall momentum. Wherever Green goes, Workman’s camera is right there with him. Beyond a doubt, the results were worth it. – The World Before Your Feet screens 4:30 pm Thursday, April 26 at a/perture cinemas, 7:30 pm Friday, April 27 at a/ perture cinemas, and 4:30 pm Saturday, April 28 at a/perture cinemas. !

The World Before Your Feet ( ): Directed by Jeremy Workman. Both literally and figuratively, documentary filmmaker Jeremy Workman follows Matt Green; an all-American everyman determined to walk every street in New York City. A journey of approximately 8,000 miles, on his ongoing journey through the Big Apple. Along the way, he – and we – discover that the streets of New York

See MARK BURGER’s reviews of current movies on Burgervideo.com. © 2018, Mark Burger.

WANNA

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The 20th annual RiverRun International Film Festival runs April 19-29. For a complete schedule, advance tickets or more information, call 336.724.1502 or visit the official RiverRun website: http://riverrunfilm.com/.

Anniversary Season 1978-2018

40th Anniversary Celebration April 29, 2018, 3:00 PM

First Presbyterian Church, 300 North Cherry Street, Winston-Salem, NC SPONSORED BY BAILEY & THOMAS, Attorneys & Counselors at Law

For tickets and more information, call (336) 722-4022 or visit our site at www.piedmontchambersingers.org WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

APRIL 18-24, 2018

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11


HEAR IT!

tunes

S

Laura Boosinger deepens North Carolina ties at MerleFest

inger, banjo player, performer and educator Laura Boosinger will play at MerleFest 2018, as she has most years. But this year Boosinger’s time on stage will John Adamian represent only a @johnradamian small part of her involvement at the festival. Contributor Each year worldclass acoustic, bluegrass, old-time and roots musicians come from all over to play MerleFest, which unfolds over four days starting on April 26 and running through April 29. But the festival, which celebrates its 30th year in 2018, has always taken its North Carolina origins seriously, and this year, with assistance and creative energy from a variety of sources, the connections to the state and to the Blue Ridge region will be even more pronounced. The festival was founded in 1988 in memory of guitarist Eddy Merle Watson, the son of guitar legend Doc Watson. “The biggest thing I’m actually doing at MerleFest is helping with the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources and the Blue Ridge Music Trails,” Boosinger said. “They’re sponsoring some sets to showcase North Carolina artists who live in the

12 YES! WEEKLY

APRIL 18-24, 2018

blueprint of the Blue Ridge Music Trail.” A two-hour slot running from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on that Friday at the Plaza Stage will feature four sets by different artists who come from the officially designated Blue Ridge National Heritage Area and some adjoining regions. Another two-hour slot featuring three sets by different artists will take place at the Plaza Stage on Saturday starting at 5 p.m. North Carolina Heritage Award winner Tony Williamson will perform with his band on Saturday at 4 p.m. on the Traditional Stage. Boosinger is the director of the Madison County Arts Council, in the Western part of the state, just North of Asheville, a region that is rich with musical and particularly old-time history. North Carolina music legend Bascom Lamar Lunsford came from Madison County and many of the people that he spent his life learning old songs from came from there as well. His 1928 recording of the song “I Wish I Was A Mole In the Ground” was included on Harry Smith’s “Anthology of American Folk” in 1952. The song has become a cen-

tral piece of American music. Lunsford, who died in 1973 and was known as “the Minstrel of the Appalachia,” organized the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival that started in Asheville in 1928. That event is often called the first to be billed as a folk festival, and it might be considered an ancestor of MerleFest. In her career, Boosinger has delved deep into the musical heritage of Western North Carolina. She’s played and studied with musical families that have legacies and repertories extending back generations. Boosinger became obsessed with Appalachian music when she was a student at Warren Wilson College in the 1970s and where she started taking banjo lessons with musician, educator and T.V. host David Holt, who was the director of the Appalachian Music Program there at the time. (Warren Wilson College, incidentally, is in Swannanoa, just east of Asheville, and Lunsford recorded a song called “Swannanoa Tunnel.”) It was at that time that Holt, with the help of students like Boosinger, started the Mountain Music Archives at the college, which made and maintained rare recordings of traditional music from the Blue Ridge Mountains. Holt will be performing several sets during MerleFest: three solo sets, and two as a duo with fiddle player Josh Goforth. “There were still people who were living who had been around during the early ‘20s,” said Boosinger of the connections she made then. “There were people who were in the early recording industry.” Getting college credit for taking banjo lessons was a fairly radical proposition, especially in the 1970s, before the hey-day of American Studies, and the experience opened Boosinger up to a sense of local history, community and culture that’s woven through her life since then. “I essentially made up my entire college major around traditional music and Appalachia,” Boosinger said. At Warren Wilson, Boosinger also took an interest in shaped-note singing, a vocal

tradition in which she regularly performs and conducts workshops. She studied with Quay Smathers, a noted musician and shaped-note singer and singing leader who also taught at Warren Wilson. Like many musicians that play Appalachian traditions, Boosinger straddles the sacred-secular divide. “I liked singing, and I liked hymn singing, and I liked gospel,” said Boosinger of how she came to the tradition. She also remembered her mother having mentioned “all-day singing on the grounds,” and wanted to know more about the groupsinging events and practice. Boosinger will lead a shaped-note singing set at MerleFest on April 29 at 9:30 a.m. on the Traditional Stage. And, even beyond the Saturday-night/ Sunday-morning distinctions between party music and praise music, the dividing lines between regional genres and playing styles were something that Boosinger learned to blur by studying and performing with musicians from Western North Carolina. In the ‘80s Boosinger played banjo with the Luke Smathers Band, from Canton, a string group that boldly mixed old-time, ‘20s jazz, gypsy music, western swing, honky-tonk, old pop standards and a lot of other musical threads. For Boosinger, the years spent steeping in the music and the communities of people who make it has only driven home the wealth of history and culture in the state, and the degree to which North Carolina is a source of musical brilliance that radiates out through American music and beyond. MerleFest draws players and fans from all over the world to Wilkesboro, and it’s the generations of music-making families and their ties to the geography that makes it all deeply meaningful. “People need to recognize that these musicians are the basis of this whole thing,” Boosinger said, “and North Carolina is the breeding ground of this whole music.” ! JOHN ADAMIAN lives in Winston-Salem, and his writing has appeared in Wired, The Believer, Relix, Arthur, Modern Farmer, the Hartford Courant and numerous other publications.

WANNA

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MerleFest runs April 26 through April 29 on the campus of Wilkes Community College. For more information visit merlefest.org.

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Upcoming Events

July 11

Friday June 22

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Submissions should be sent to artdirector@yesweekly.com by Friday at 5 p.m., prior to the week’s publication. Visit yesweekly.com and click on calendar to list your event online. HOME GROWN MUSIC SCENE | Compiled by Austin Kindley

ASHEBORO

FOUR SAINTS BREWING

218 South Fayetteville St. | 336.610.3722 foursaintsbrewing.com Apr 20: Casey Noel Apr 21: Robert Mabe Apr 27: Couldn’t Be Happiers Apr 28: 80’s Unplugged May 4: Wolfie Calhoun May 5: Bear Stevens

CLEMMONS

VILLAGE SQUARE TAP HOUSE

6000 Meadowbrook Mall Ct | 336.448.5330 Apr 20: Whiskey Mic Apr 21: Funehtik Union Apr 27: DJ Bald-E Apr 28: The Clanky Lincolns May 4: Whiskey Mic

DANBURY

GREEN HERON ALE HOUSE 1110 Flinchum Rd | 336.593.4733 greenheronclub.com Apr 21: Hot Trail Mix Apr 28: Alicia B., The Now May 5: Will Easter, The Nomads May 12: Alex Culbreth May 19: Kennewick

GREENSBORO

ARIZONA PETE’S

2900 Patterson St #A | 336.632.9889 arizonapetes.com Apr 20: 1-2-3 Friday Apr 22: Tesseract, Plini, Astronoid May 8: The Wonder Years. Tigers Jaw, Tiny Moving Parts, Worriers

[POWERMAN 5000] April 25 - The Blind Tiger

BARN DINNER THEATRE

ARTISTIKA NIGHT CLUB

120 Stage Coach Tr. | 336.292.2211 Jun 30: Wonderwall: A Tribute to The Beatles

523 S Elm St | 336.271.2686 artistikanightclub.com Apr 20: DJ Dan the Player Apr 21: DJ Paco and DJ Dan the Player

BEERTHIRTY

505 N. Greene St Apr 20: Leather and Lace Apr 27: Brittany Davis May 4: Gerry Stanek May 11: Leather and Lace

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thE blind tigEr

1819 Spring Garden St | 336.272.9888 theblindtiger.com Apr 19: little big town Afterparty w/ Corey hunt band Apr 20: 420 Party w/ imperial blend Apr 24: Jeremy garrett of the infamous Stringdusters Apr 25: Powerman 5000, lullwater, A light divided, Shun the raven, Murder Maiden Apr 26: Abe reid and the Spikedrivers w/ the twin City bombers Apr 27: gSO Fest 2018 presents Cover band Explosion Apr 28: railroad Earth w/ Shannon Mcnally Apr 29: Shovels and rope May 1: tAUK - Shapeshifter tour w/ the Fritz May 3: Obituary, Pallbearer, SKElEtOnWitCh, dust bolt

thE bOilEr rOOM

May 10: high Valley May 12: born of Osiris May 18: theory of a deadman May 29: ledisi

grEEnE StrEEt ClUb 113 N Greene St | 336.273.4111

hAM’S nEW gArdEn

1635 New Garden Rd | 336.288.4544 hamsrestaurants.com Apr 20: Matt Sickels Apr 21: Second glance Apr 27: tyler Millard trio Apr 28: Cory luetjen & the traveling blues band

SOMEWhErE ElSE tAVErn

5713 W Friendly Ave | 336.292.5464 facebook.com/thesomewhereelsetavern Apr 28: Mechabull

113 W McGee St | 336.790.8300 Apr 27: nuff gyal: the hip hop dance hall

SPEAKEASY tAVErn

ChUrChill’S On ElM

thE idiOt bOx COMEdY ClUb

213 S Elm St | 336.275.6367 churchillscigarlounge.com Apr 21: Jack long Old School Jam May 12: Sahara reggae band May 19: Jack long Old School Jam

thE COrnEr bAr

1706 Battleground Ave | 336.378.0006

2134 Lawndale Dr | 336.274.2699 www.idiotboxers.com May 5: Stand Up Comedy Workshop

high point

1700 Spring Garden St | 336.272.5559 corner-bar.com Apr 19: live thursdays Apr 29: gSOFest Sunday Part 2: harrison Ford Mustang, totally Slow, Ebon Shrike

1614 N Main St | 336.883.4113 afterhourstavern.net Apr 13: Karaoke - dJ dance

COMEdY zOnE

235 Cornell Dr | 336.543.4799 May 31: Magic Male xxl the Show

1126 S Holden Rd | 336.333.1034 thecomedyzone.com Apr 20: Spanky brown Apr 21: Spanky brown Apr 27: trenton davis Apr 28: trenton davis

COMMOn grOUndS

11602 S Elm Ave | 336.698.3888 Apr 20: threadbare trio+1, bryan toney w/ Chris nelson and Eddie Mcgee Jul 21: Couldn’t be happiers

COnE dEniM

117 S Elm St | 336.378.9646 cdecgreensboro.com Apr 21: the Monster Energy Outbreak w/ SmokePurpp Apr 25: Stars and guitars Apr 26: beatles vs. Stones Apr 27: Jackyl May 4: Who’s bad www.yesweekLy.com

AFtEr hOUrS tAVErn

bAr 65

hAM’S PAllAdiUM 5840 Samet Dr | 336.887.2434 hamsrestaurants.com Apr 20: Jukebox Junkie Apr 21: Stephen legree Apr 27: the dickens Apr 28: Stereo doll

jamestown

thE dECK

118 E Main St | 336.207.1999 thedeckatrivertwist.com Apr 20: radio revolver Apr 21: Corey luetjen traveling blues band Apr 27: Jaxon Jill Apr 28: Megan doss band

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16 YES! WEEKLY

kernersville

dancE hall dazE

612 Edgewood St | 336.558.7204 dancehalldaze.com apr 20: Silverhawk apr 21: The delmonicos apr 27: The delmonicos apr 28: cheyenne

BREaThE cockTail loungE

221 N Main St. | 336.497.4822 facebook.com/BreatheCocktailLounge apr 21: Freddie Fred Saturdays May 10: cabell Wilkinson

lewisville

old nick’S puB

191 Lowes Foods Dr | 336.747.3059 OldNicksPubNC.com apr 21: Exit 180 apr 28: The Shelter Band May 5: The Bo-Stevens Band

randleman

RidER’S in ThE counTRY 5701 Randleman Rd | 336.674.5111 ridersinthecountry.net

winston-salem

SEcond & gREEn

207 N Green St | 336.631.3143 2ngtavern.com apr 28: perpetual groove & Marvelous Funkshun

Bull’S TavERn

408 West 4th St | 336.331.3431 facebook.com/bulls-tavern apr 20: Twisted River Junction apr 27: lilly Brothers apr 28: Fruit Smoothie Trio May 10: Something like Seduction May 11: little Stranger May 12: Brothers pearl May 18: Friday night Music club

cB’S TavERn

3870 Bethania Station Rd | 336.815.1664 apr 20: Steve Moss apr 27: phase Band

Finnigan’S WakE

620 Trade St | 336.723.0322 facebook.com/FinnigansWake

FooThillS BREWing 638 W 4th St | 336.777.3348 foothillsbrewing.com apr 18: david via apr 19: James vincent carroll apr 21: Southern Eyes APRIL 18-24, 2018

apr 22: Sunday Jazz apr 25: Bluegrass Sweethearts apr 28: violet Bell apr 29: Sunday Jazz May 2: John The Revolver May 6: Sunday Jazz

JohnnY & JunE’S Saloon

2105 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.724.0546 johnnynjunes.com

Mac & nElli’S

4926 Country Club Rd | 336.529.6230 macandnellisws.com apr 19: Jukebox Rehab apr 20: Stephen henson, James vincent carroll apr 21: Whiskey Mic apr 23: Elliot humphries apr 26: darrell hoots apr 27: Stephen henson, dJ parrothead apr 28: Jay liddle apr 30: Jamaican Johnny

MillEnniuM cEnTER

101 West 5th Street | 336.723.3700 MCenterevents.com May 19: 27th annual Magnolia Ball “Fire and ice”

MilnER’S

630 S Stratford Rd | 336.768.2221 milnerfood.com apr 15: live Jazz apr 22: live Jazz

MuddY cREEk caFE & MuSic hall

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 apr 19: open mic w/ country dan collins apr 19: Elonzo Wesley, Shiloh hill apr 20: Fiddle & Bow presents Wil Maring & Robert Bowlin apr 21: usual Suspects apr 21: Shellem cline apr 22: phillip craft apr 22: che apalache apr 22: idlewheel feat. Jack Sundrud (From poco) apr 26: open mic w/ country dan collins apr 26: Jeremy garrett (The infamous Stringdusters) apr 27: alliance Repertory Theatre company apr 28: The Soul purpose Band apr 29: alliance Repertory Theatre company May 3: open Mic w/ country dan collins May 3: Mystic chicken, Wild Blue Elixer May 4: Fiddle and Bow: andrew collins Trio

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Opportunities for community to take action and learn at this year’s Piedmont Earth Day Fair

rs Together we can make ou

A CLEANER, HEALTHIER AND SAFER EARTH

APRIL 22

EARTH DAY 2018

THE PROBLEM WITH PLASTICS & WHAT YOU CAN DO ABOUT IT On Sunday, April 22, Americans will join the rest of the world in recognizing Earth Day. This year, the Earth Day Network is promoting the theme Ending Plastic Pollution. The manufacturing of plastics results in significant carbon emissions and uses up eight percent of the oil produced in the world. Twenty billion barrels of oil are required to make the more than 50 billion plastic water bottles disposed of by Americans each year. But in addition to generating greenhouse gases, plastics are also a pollutant affecting the health of people and the planet. In 2015 alone, 448 million tons of plastic was created, and roughly 90 percent of it ended up in landfills, streets, rivers, beaches and oceans. The amount of plastic in the world’s oceans has reached epic proportions, so much so that if things don’t change, there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish by 2050. www.yesweekLy.com

STEPS YOU CAN TAKE Solving the problems associated with plastics will require action on the part of governments, corporations and communities. However, individuals can definitely help. Here are some of the ways you can make a difference. • Use a refillable water bottle. • Use reusable cloth bags instead of disposable plastic ones for shopping. • Carry and use your own utensils and portable coffee cups. • Skip the straw. • Choose products that use cardboard or glass packaging rather than plastic (detergents, food items, etc.). • Bring your own garment bag to the drycleaner. • Buy from bulk bins. • Use your own containers when ordering takeout or bringing home leftovers from restaurants. • Reconsider how you pack food in your lunch, opting forreusable items as much as possible.

More than 10,000 people are expected at the 13th Annual Piedmont Earth Day Fair on Saturday, April 21 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Winston-Salem Fairgrounds. This family-friendly FREE event hosted by Piedmont Environmental Alliance (PEA) combines fun and educational activities, live entertainment, and exhibitors with the goal to cultivate a passion for the environment in fairgoers of all ages. The theme of this year’s fair is Roots of Change. Top sponsors of the fair include Volvo Group of Companies and the City if Winston-Salem. “Now more than ever, people are looking for local ways to take action and build community,” said Piedmont Environmental Alliance Executive Director Jamie Maier. “The Earth Day Fair is a fun way to engage with and learn about PEA’s efforts to create a healthier, more economically vibrant and sustainable community.” Children’s activities at the fair include arts and crafts, dance, facepainting, yoga, and a “Children’s Corner,” featuring special activities hosted by Art for Art’s Sake, Kaleideum, and Sawtooth School for Visual Art. School-aged kids can also participate in this year’s Earth Day Fair Art Contest, in which they create a work of art that expresses what Earth Day means to them. Adult fairgoers will enjoy free more than 100 exhibitors; a full and diverse music line-up provided in part by the North Carolina Songwriter’s Co-op, and environmentally-themed demonstrations that provide practical tips and information for living a more environmentally sustainable lifestyle - including how to start composting, backyard bee-keeping, and natural gardening. At the Swap Shop, attendees can trade gently used books, jewelry and clothing and receive new (to you) items for free. “With more than 100 earthfriendly exhibitors, great music, delicious food, and engaging programs, we hope the Piedmont Earth Day Fair will inspire people to take action for a more sustainable community this Earth Day,” said Maier. APRIL 18-24, 2018 YES! WEEKLY

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flicks

I

SCREEN IT!

Animal acts: Between The Rock and a good movie

BY MATT BRUNSON

t probably doesn’t need to be reiterated, but here goes anyway. Despite a rating that allows for the admission of children, despite the animated nature of the piece, and despite the focus on our cuddly canine companions, Isle of Dogs ( ) is decidedly not one for the kiddies. In a pinch, parents are in fact probably better off taking their youngsters to Fifty Shades Freed than the latest from Wes Anderson — at least in that film, there are no shots of a dog’s skeletal remains, the result of nobody being able to get the poor mutt’s locked cage door open. On the other hand, adults are encouraged to check out Isle of Dogs at their earliest convenience. Anderson’s first film since his grandly entertaining gem The Grand Budapest Hotel is a dazzling and heady achievement, employing quirky animation to relate its tale of a futuristic Japan in which all dogs have been confiscated to nearby Trash Island after a canine-related virus has swept through

the country. The fascistic ruling class ultimately seeks to kill, not just quarantine, all dogs, with only a pro-dog professor (Akira Ito), his dedicated assistant (Yoko Ono!) and his courageous students seek-

FIRST COMES LOVE. THEN COMES MARRIAGE. THEN COMES MURDER. Triad Stage returns to Hawboro, this time to the wrong side of the tracks. A young woman beleaguered by her husband and terrorized by her mother-in-law nds comfort in the arms of another man. They carry out a plot meant to free Teresa, but the repercussions of their actions haunt them and threaten to drive them to madness. For mature audiences.

WORLD PREMIERE | APRIL 29-MAY 20 BUY TICKETS TODAY! 232 S. ELM STREET | GREENSBORO | 336.272.0160 | TRIADSTAGE.ORG

18 YES! WEEKLY

APRIL 18-24, 2018

ing to thwart this insidious agenda. For his part, a little boy named Atari (voiced by Koyu Rankin) misses his dog Spots and sets out to Trash Island on a rescue mission. Upon arrival, he encounters resistance from a gruff stray named Chief (Bryan Cranston) but receives assistance from a quartet of former pets (Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum and Bob Balaban). Naturally, the one student who rallies the others to save the dogs is American (Greta Gerwig), but aside from this opening for charges against the usual “white savior” syndrome exhibited in movies, Isle of Dogs is otherwise too fantastical to be compared to any real-world parallels. The stop-motion animation is even more impressive than that displayed in Anderson’s previous romp in this realm, 2009’s Fantastic Mr. Fox, and the multi-faceted plot continually branches out in imaginative and unexpected ways. Canines will understandably object to the phrase, but Isle of Dogs is clearly the cat’s meow. CRITICS HAVE OFTEN been accused of unfairly dissing a movie because it’s not the one they imagined in their head, placing the finished product at a disadvantage for not satisfying any preconceived notions of where the story should have gone. Perhaps there’s some validity in that charge. Take, for instance, the new Dwayne Johnson action spectacular Rampage ( ). It’s based on a 1980s video game in which an enormous ape, an oversized wolf and a gigantic reptile wreak havoc on various American cities.

A film version is naturally going to follow suit, but that nevertheless didn’t prevent me from wanting the filmmakers to retain the gorilla and axe the other critters. It wouldn’t have made for a very faithful movie, but it might have made for a more involving one. That’s basically because the heart of this picture rests in the relationship between Davis Okoye (Johnson), a primatologist at the San Diego Wildlife Sanctuary, and George, an albino silverback gorilla who basically qualifies as the humanhating Davis’s BFF. Through some serious pilfering from Mighty Joe Young, the early sequences establish a nice rapport between Davis and George (Jason Liles is the actor under the motion-capture CGI), and watching these two pal around in the manner of Clint and Clyde in Every Which Way But Loose wouldn’t be the worse way to spend two hours (and like Clyde, George also has a predilection for flipping that middle finger). Unfortunately for George, he’s exposed to a serum initially developed by Dr. Kate Caldwell (Naomie Harris) to aid humankind but nabbed by ruthless CEO Claire Wyden (Malin Ackerman) to sell as a biological weapon. The serum, which not only super-sizes its recipients but also triggers rage, ends up also infecting a wolf and an alligator. The three beastly behemoths then head to Chicago, with only Davis, Kate and a gregarious government agent (Jeffrey Dean Morgan, pouring a thick Southern accent onto his characterization as if it were syrup on pancakes) there to stop them from completely leveling the city. As far as video-game adaptations go, Rampage is one of the better ones, although that of course isn’t really saying anything. An amusing gag or quip manages to occasionally stick the landing, but the plot particulars are rarely more developed than those found in, well, an arcade game. Johnson coasts on his charm, the talented Harris (superb in Moonlight) is largely wasted, and Ackerman is an interesting choice to play a villain (far less successful is Jake Lacy as her simpleminded brother and partner-in-crime). George is a magnificent visual effect, but the other monsters are rather ridiculous, and watching them demolish buildings (and each other) during the climax makes for a particularly protracted slog. Rampage aspires to be dumb fun, and that’s fine — we can always use films of that nature. It’s just a shame the fun too often takes a backseat to the dumb. !

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theatre

STAGE IT!

The Little Theatre of Winston-Salem announces its 84th season

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T

he Little Theatre of WinstonSalem is pleased to announce its 84th Season of live theatre productions. Between September 2018 and June 2019, the theatre company will offer a wide array of plays and musicals, taking audiences on a thrilling ride through time and space, journeying from the 16th to the 21st centuries, and landing in locations as diverse as Great Britain, Transylvania, Spain and Texas. Along the way, heroes and heroines will stand up against adversity and charge ahead, making great things happen. Accordingly, the season is themed “Seize the Day!” After 60 years as the resident theatre company at the Arts Council Theatre on Coliseum Drive, this will be The Little Theatre’s first season performing entirely in other venues. Four of the productions will be produced at the McChesney Scott Dunn Auditorium at the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, and two will be performed at the Hanesbrands Theatre in downtown Winston-Salem, where they already perform each season. The 84th Season will begin with Calendar Girls by Tim Firth, a heartwarming comedy based on the true story of a group of women who convinced themselves to pose au natural for a calendar fundraiser benefitting the Leukemia Research Fund (Sept. 21-23 & 27-30, 2018; SECCA). In November, The Little Theatre will present the monstrously funny Mel Brooks musical, Young Frankenstein, with book by Mel Brooks and Thomas Meehan, and music and lyrics by Mel Brooks (Nov. 2-4 & 8-11, 2018; SECCA). The theatre company will be producing a Christmas play in December and plans to reveal the title early this summer. “We have exciting news to share about our new holiday tradition this year,” commented Executive Director Lane Fields. “We promise it’s a Christmas classic you’ll want to share with your whole family.” (Dec. 7-9, 13-16 & 20-22, 2018; SECCA). In 2019, the season will continue with WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Apr 20-26

RAMPAGE (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 12:00, 2:25, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:00, 2:25, 4:55, 7:30, 9:55 ISLE OF DOGS (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Thu: 11:50 AM, 2:10, 4:30, 7:00, 9:20 CHAPPAQUIDDICK (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri - Wed: 11:35 AM, 2:05, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40 Thu: 11:35 AM, 2:05 SUPER TROOPERS 2 (R) Fri & Sat: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:20, 7:10, 9:35, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 11:40 AM, 2:00, 4:20, 7:10, 9:35 I FEEL PRETTY (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 11:45 AM, 2:20, 4:50, 7:35, 10:05

Shakespeare in Love by Tom Stoppard, Marc Norman and Lee Hill. In this funny and poignant play, a young Will Shakespeare faces writer’s block until he meets a young noblewoman, who inspires him to write the greatest love story of all time (March 8-10 & 14-17, 2019; SECCA). Next, The Little Theatre will present one of the most enduring works in musical theatre history, Man of La Mancha, with book by Dale Wasserman, music by Mitch Leigh, and lyrics by Joe Darion, and inspired by Miguel de Cervantes’ 17th century masterpiece, Don Quixote (May 3-5 & 9-12, 2019; Hanesbrands Theatre). The season will conclude with a fast-paced, country western musical comedy, Das Barbecü, by Scott Warrender and Jim Luigs (June 21-23 & 27-30, 2019). Season memberships are $125 and include six flexible admission tickets, good for any of the shows the theatre offers during the 2018-19 season, along with additional benefits, such as discounted single tickets, early reservations and discounts on acting classes. Those purchasing a season membership by August 1, 2018, will receive an additional $10 off. Single tickets, which will not be offered until August 15, will be $24, including taxes and facility fees. !

BLUMHOUSE’S TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 12:15, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:45, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:15, 2:35, 5:00, 7:25, 9:45 MARROWBONE (R) Fri - Thu: 12:05, 10:10 BLOCKERS (R) Fri: 11:45 AM, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30, 11:55 Sat - Thu: 11:45 AM, 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30 A QUIET PLACE (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:55 AM, 2:05, 4:15, 7:15, 9:25, 11:35 Sun - Thu: 11:55 AM, 2:05, 4:15, 7:15, 9:25 THE LAST MOVIE STAR (R) Fri - Thu: 2:45, 5:15, 7:35 TYLER PERRY’S ACRIMONY (R) Fri - Thu: 12:30, 3:30, 7:00, 9:40

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READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:40 AM, 2:40, 5:40, 8:40, 11:40 Sun - Thu: 11:40 AM, 2:40, 5:40, 8:40 MIDNIGHTERS () Fri & Sat: 12:10, 9:50, 11:55 Sun - Thu: 12:10, 9:50 BLACK PANTHER (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:30 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:30, 11:30 Sun - Thu: 11:30 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:30 PETER RABBIT (PG) Fri - Thu: 11:55 AM, 5:05 BEIRUT (R) Fri - Thu: 2:20, 7:20, 10:00 JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 2:35, 5:10, 7:40

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On Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, a home rental agreement took an X-rated turn when Leah Bassett, artist and longtime resident of Aquinnah, unknowingly Chuck Shepherd leased her home to an employee of Mile High Distribution Inc., a pornography production company. In September 2014, the Boston Globe reported, Joshua Spafford approached Bassett about renting her home from October through May 2015. In March 2015, Spafford informed Bassett he had left the house because he was fired, prompting Bassett to ask her parents to stop by and check it out. They were “shocked by the deplorable state of condition in which they found their daughter’s personal residence,” according to court documents. As “circumstances evolved,” Bassett began reviewing internet sites maintained by Mile High, which “publicly boasted about their porn shoots on chic and tony Martha’s Vineyard.” Bassett filed suit in late March in U.S. District Court, alleging the sites featured photos showing her home, artwork and furnishings, “utilizing nearly every room of her home” including scenes on top of her dining room table, sofas and in her laundry room. Defense lawyer Stephen A. Roach said the suit “arose out of a basic landlord-tenant dispute.”

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Fort Pierce, Florida, police pulled over a car on March 21 after observing it swerving down the roadway. As they approached, they smelled marijuana, and during the ensuing search, passenger Kennecia Posey, 26, was shocked — shocked! — when police found two bags in her purse: one containing marijuana, the other cocaine. WPLG TV reported that Posey admitted the marijuana was hers, but told officers: “I don’t know anything about any cocaine. It’s a windy day. It must have flown through the window and into my purse.” Posey was charged with felony possession of cocaine and misdemeanor possession of marijuana.

QUESTIONABLE JUDGMENT

On March 20, the U.S. Marine Corps fired Navy Cpt. Loften Thornton, serving as a chaplain for the Marine Forces Reserve in New Orleans, after Thornton was captured on video having sex with a woman on the street in front of the Crown & Anchor Pub, according to USA

Today. Marine Reserve spokesman Lt. Col. Ted Wong said only that Thornton had been fired for “loss of trust and confidence.” According to the Navy’s strategic plan for religious ministry, chaplains “provide a source of comfort and refuge” to service members, which Thornton had apparently extended to members of the general public.

DANGEROUS FOOD

Some people don’t like ham. When Beverly Burrough Harrison, 62, received a gift of ham from her family on Feb. 12, she waited until they left, then set it on fire and threw it in a trash can at the Bomar Inn in Athens, Alabama, where she was living. As smoke filled the room, AL.com reported, Harrison took her dog and left without alerting anyone to the fire. As a result, she was spared from being a victim of the ham bomb that blew out the front wall of the room when a can of butane fuel was ignited. Harrison was held at the Limestone County Jail on a felony arson charge and could face life in prison if convicted.

FAILURE TO COMMUNICATE

Things went from bad to worse for soccer player Sanchez Watt during a match in Hertfordshire, England, on March 6. Awarded a yellow card, Watt was asked his name by referee Dean Hulme, who mistook “Watt” for “What.” As Watt repeated his name over and over, the referee became perturbed and changed the yellow card to red for dissent, BBC Sport reported. Hulme rescinded the card when someone explained the mixup. “I think everybody found it amusing afterwards, including the referee,” said team chairman Dave Boggins. “He was very apologetic.”

OUR WEIRD ADDICTION

On March 6, Royal Canadian Mounted Police participating in an awareness campaign set up several large electronic signs in North Vancouver, British Columbia, that warned drivers: “POLICE AHEAD — STAY OFF YOUR PHONE.” Despite that, within just two hours, officers ticketed 89 drivers, 74 of them for distracted driving, which results in a $368 fine, plus a $175 penalty payment on a first offense. “It is evident there is still more education and enforcement needed to make our roads safer,” remarked Cpl. Richard De Jong to CTV News. !

© 2018 Chuck Shepherd. Universal Press Syndicate. Send your weird news items with subject line WEIRD NEWS to WeirdNewsTips@amuniversal.com.

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feature

For the love of vinyl: Record Store Day 2018 in the Triad

S

ome things will never go out of style, no matter how much technology progresses. April 21 marks the 10th official year of Record Store Day, or “RSD.” According to Katie Murawski its website (www. recordstoreday.com), 1,400 independent Editor record store owners came together and conceived the idea for RSD in 2007 and on April 19, 2008, the first one took place. At some locations, there will be sales, special releases (of both vinyl and CDs) as well as other promotional products. I went around to every Triad record store and asked what the businesses were doing to celebrate.

JAMESTOWN Vintage Audio Exchange 702 W. Main St.-F Ed Parks used to be an employee of North State Communications. After being let go, he decided he was going to do something he liked. “This was a hobby my entire life,” Parks said. “So I turned a hobby into a job that I enjoy. I am not here seven days a week, and I don’t plan to be. It is a Wednesday through Saturday shop, and a one-manshow. So I got no one to blame except myself.” Vintage Audio Exchange’s specialty is in audio equipment, but records have been added out of popular demand. The shop

Amy Ray of McKay’s in Greensboro

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does not sell new releases, just about 35,000 used and vintage records. Parks said the forte of the shop is classic rock through the 1970s. Parks said the typical customer ages range from 16 to 80 years old. He said there is so much history in his store. He has records that date back to the 1930s all the way to the early 1990s. For RSD, there will be some discounts although, Parks said he is not sure what kind of discounts he will have. You’ll have to come out and see for yourself. “We have the equipment here to provide a great sound for your records,” he said. “We service and sell turntables and speakers. And we are a consignment shop for our records and equipment.”

GREENSBORO McKay’s 1607 Battleground Ave. Amy Ray is the media manager of McKay’s, and she has organized RSD over the last couple years. She said McKay’s has 8,000 to 10,000 records in its inventory, and that number is steadily growing. “We do have a lot of music clientele because our CD selection is the biggest in Greensboro,” Ray said. “So we have a lot of people that come here specifically for music, and our vinyl inventory has just grown and grown. It is still rising, and it is not something that has dropped off.” Ray said RSD is huge for McKay’s because it brings in customers that would not ordinarily come to the shop. “I think there is a different sound that comes from vinyl that doesn’t come from CD,” she said. “I listen to vinyl at home, and I just love how it sounds, I love how the covers are so pretty and just the art-

work in general. I just think it is more like a nostalgia thing, for a lot of people.” Ray said McKay’s would be “spinning vinyl all day” and will provide pastries, coffee and other “goodies” for customers. She said the store would open at 8 a.m., but there will be a line formed around 7:30 a.m. “We have raffles; there are some T-shirts that we are going to raffle off, and there is trade credit that I have been authorized to give away for use in the store,” she said. “Trade credit is when people sell us things and if they want to get trade credit versus cash and it’s good for anything in the store.” Hippo Records 2823 Spring Garden St. Patrick Lemons is the owner of Hippo Records and has been in business for four and a half years on Spring Garden Street. Lemons said the typical customer he has noticed is everyone from 14 to 70-yearolds. Lemons said he has 30,000 records in stock at Hippo Records. He said Hippo Records “already have the best prices in town” so there will not be any RSD sales. But Lemons said that wouldn’t stop his customers from lining up the night before (and even camping out) just to get in when it opens. “It is cool because it is the one day a year where record stores were like they were in the ‘90s,” Lemons said. “People really care, they come out, and it’s just really a push and appreciation for recorded music. It makes people more enthusiastic like in the glory days of CDs or records, where people went out to a store and purchased a physical object. It is very nice seeing that.”

Center For Better Grooves 1827 Spring Garden St. Ian and Becky Wagner run the Center For Better Grooves inside the Hookah Hookup building. The Wagners had to scale back their collection (due to spacing) to only about a couple thousand records. By the end of the year, they hope to have their own space close to the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Ian said there are two types of customers at CFBG: audiophiles, old-school folks looking for a particular pressing of a record, and what he refers to as “meat and potato” customers looking for Boston, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd and other standard pressings. Ian said most of his customers are young people from the college. For RSD, Wagner plans to have his own mini-version of it, including $1 record bins, “a couple bucks off ” records and a small selection of RSD merchandise. Ian said CFBG’s RSD is somewhat linked to what Harley Lyles at Soul Relief Records is doing for Saturday. “What I focus on more is just bringing people into the store, which was the original idea for Record Store Day.” Ian said vinyl is still relevant because people love the gratification of having a hard copy of their music. “If you listen to vinyl, you know the difference,” Ian said. “There’s just something particular about vinyl that is hard to quantify.” He said that if vinyl weren’t still relevant, it would have died already. “Cause they made every attempt to kill vinyl, and it is the same thing they are doing now with CDs,” he said. “Why would a generation now be into vinyl? It doesn’t

Patrick Lemons of Hippo Records in Greensboro

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Ian Wagner of Center For Better Grooves in Greensboro really make sense other than having an intrinsic worth, in terms of the sound, or ‘the warmth’ as they say.” Soul Relief Records 934-A S. Chapman St. Harley Lyles is the owner of Soul Relief Records and will be officially opening his doors on RSD this year. Lyles has been in the vinyl business since 2000. He has bought and sold privately, and he has worked at record stores as a stocker. Of all the record stores I went to in Greensboro, Lyles is the only one who plans to have DJs and live music (WinstonSalem’s punk band J.D. Power and The Associates will play around 5-6 p.m.) to celebrate both his opening and RSD. Lyles said there would also be new releases of records as well as a “thousands” of $1 records available. Lyles describes his 10,000+ inventory as eclectic with “artists you’ve probably never heard of.” But he also sells all types of music such as rock, reggae, Latin and world music. “The typical clientele are the people who are into jazz and used records,” he said. “It is really young and old.” He said young people are into vinyl these days because most don’t like “what is being pushed down their throats.” “The industry is so powerful now; they take anything artists have and try to mass market it, and overproduce it,” he said. Lyles said vinyl is still relevant in this day and age because there is still so much to learn from it. He likens the love of vinyl to be a more educational and experimental experience. “If you become a student and stay a student of it, it becomes an endless road.” Remember When Records & Videos 2901 High Point Rd. Owner of Remember When Records & Videos John Hiatt Jr. has been in business for almost 30 years. Hiatt said he has over 150,000 items in inventory and each record has been cleaned and graded. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Hiatt said there are thousands of collectible records at Remember When as well as records from local artists such as Billy “Crash” Craddock and The dB’s. Hiatt said people as young as 13 to those as old as 102 are the typical customers at Remember When. Hiatt isn’t a fan of “digital records,” and Remember When does not sell any newly released records. Everything in stock is either used or unsealed. Hiatt said he is not doing anything special for RSD, but vinyl enthusiasts might check out Remember When on Saturday for its sheer volume of inventory.

WINSTON-SALEM McKay’s 115 Oakwood Dr. According to the press release, the Winston-Salem location will be participating in RSD and will open at 8 a.m. The press release stated that the Winston-Salem location will feature live music from noon to 4 p.m. from Joe Blevins and Ezra Noble. For those that get there early, there will be some giveaways and exclusive Record Store Day content will be available for purchase. “As an official RSD participant, McKay’s will have [hundreds] of exclusive releases on top of its regular vinyl inventory, which includes many rare and unique albums,” the press release stated. “McKay’s has more to offer than RSD albums. Their already broad record selection is growing every day, with genres ranging from classic rock to country to classical and everything in between. McKay’s also boasts a variety of 45s and CDs.” Earshot Music 3254 Silas Creek Pkwy. “Vinyl is one thing, I think people are just getting back into getting hard copies of stuff,” owner and long-time manager of Earshot Music Phred Rainey said of vinyl. “You are more apart of the experience.”

Ed Parks of Vintage Audio Exchange in Jamestown Rainey said younger and younger people are coming in and shopping his 7,000 plus inventory. “Anywhere from 14 or so to 75,” he said. “I’ve got older people coming in here who have never stopped collecting music. The median would probably be in the mid30s.” Rainey said the popularity of vinyl is growing and the convenience of buying music online instantly has overwhelmed many people. He said vinyl makes people feel more involved and connected with the music they are listening to. “People are really feeling a need to get back to the past,” he said. “It really is a connection with a particular era.” For RSD, Earshot Music will open at 8 a.m., and Rainey will focus on the exclusive items that will be released for RSD. He also said Earshot Music would have a storewide sale of 25 percent off used LPs and CDs, and 15 percent off new LPs and CDs (that aren’t new RSD merchandise). “Recorded music is meant to be shared; it is meant to be enjoyed publically,” he said. “It is a manifestation of the experience. Music, when you listen to it either by yourself [or with others], there is a huge connection to your emotions, what you love, what you don’t and what you share with other people. It is just great there is more of an interest in getting back to having hard copy (could be CDs, LPs and I even still sell cassettes) and having the musical experience.” Underdog Records 835 Burke St. Jonathan Hodges is the owner and sole operator of Underdog Records. Hodges said his customers are largely male, but the age ranges from 14 to 70. He said the claim that the popularity of vinyl is a “hipster-driven moment” is unfounded. “People just got sick of the digital age where they don’t own anything tangible,” Hodges said. He said the reason he still cares about

vinyl is because of its sound quality. Customers overhearing our conversation chimed in and said the reason why they still care is for the nostalgia and the artwork. “My husband schedules his whole year around [Record Store Day],” said Tyler Beyea, a customer “every Saturday” at Underdog. Hodges said he has no idea how many records he has in stock, and he prides himself on not being a “niche store.” He said he tries to carry a little bit of everything, and most of the inventory on the floor is just “the tip of the iceberg.” For RSD, Underdog will open at 8 a.m. and will have the exclusive releases that will be on a first-come, first-serve basis. There will be campers who plan to stay the entire night, and Hodges said there would be a line wrapped around Brookstown Avenue that morning before opening. There won’t be any live music this year, but there will be a store-wide sale on non-RSD merchandise. Hodges said the sale would include 10 percent off new, 15 percent off used and half-off $1 albums. “From a store’s standpoint, it is our Christmas,” Hodges said of RSD. “As much work that goes into it (which is an insane amount) it is always incredibly rewarding, and the thing I like about Record Store Day is when you have these people in line, that have these lists of titles that they are determined to have. Everyone is collaborative; it is not like Black Friday at Walmart, people aren’t coming in elbowing and competitive. Everyone is collaborative. People make friendships in line. It is always a really positive energy, and quite frankly, having to always work Record Store Day I am a little jealous I haven’t had the customer experience.” ! KATIE MURAWSKI is the editor of YES! Weekly. She is from Mooresville, North Carolina and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in journalism with a minor in film studies from Appalachian State University in 2017.

APRIL 18-24, 2018

YES! WEEKLY

23


Hot wax and 8-tracks: When everything was Peaches Licorice Pizza, Oz, Wherehouse, Camelot, Coconuts, Turtles, Record Bar, Sam Goody, Strawberries, Tape Town, Big Daddy’s, Waxie Maxie’s — just a few of the weirdly named Billy Ingram music chains of the 1970s & 1980s. Contributing Fondly remembered as some of those columnist places were, they all paled in comparison to Peaches Records & Tapes. In the early 1970s, your average LP sold for $4.99, 8-Tracks $5.99. That’s $20-$25 today, adjusted for inflation. Record companies, wholesalers and retailers, were awash in cash. Even so, local record stores were reliant on a hopelessly antiquated distribution system devised decades earlier. At Greensboro Record Center, with locations downtown and Plaza Shopping Center, if an album wasn’t in stock and had to be special ordered it could take weeks, even months to arrive. In 1974 Los Angeles, street-level record hustler Tom Heiman opened his first Peaches Records & Tapes on Hollywood Boulevard, followed the next year by an Atlanta superstore. That palace on Peachtree was legendary for its exhaustive back catalog; music lovers made pilgrimages from neighboring states to acquire albums that had long escaped their grasp. In 1978, a million dollars (huge money then) was expended to construct and

Photos of Peaches Record & Tapes crates that were used to store LPs stock Peaches Records & Tapes’ 29th appendage in Greensboro on a stretch of High Point Road just past Merritt Drive. Reserved for mobile home dwellers and sellers.

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Jim Vestal was there from the beginning, hired before the 16,500 sq. foot outlet opened. “Other record stores at the time paled in comparison to Peaches,” he said. “They

had an enormous selection of imported discs, classical, jazz, anything you could want that you had never been able to get here.” With 40 employees, the Greensboro store was the largest in the Peaches chain.

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Tanya Tucker sporting a Peaches Records & Tapes T-shirt At 10 a.m. on July 7, Warner Bros. recording artist and future Christian rock star Mylon LeFevre cut a ribbon covering the front door, allowing over a hundred customers to pour in. As it happened, a barely visible chemical cloud hung in the air. Raymond Tucker was a teenage holiday hire in 1978, “Apparently, they didn’t properly season the wood before fireproofing. Some people couldn’t stand being in the store for more than a few minutes. That odor lasted for at least a couple of years.” Like everyone I interviewed, Tucker thoroughly enjoyed the experience. “Most of the people there were super die-hard music fans, so we always had something to talk about. It was like family; we were all friends. When we’d do inventory, it was like a big party, music playing full blast.” This was a transitory period for the music industry as Tucker explained, the

store started at “the beginning of the end for disco.” “When disco was big, just by having a [disco] record in the store you had a 90 percent chance you’d sell it. People were going crazy for disco. By the late-70s, record sales started dropping off, disco began waning in popularity, and nothing else was really there to pick up the slack.” ‘Tapes’ in the Peaches logo referred to 8-Tracks, the cassette’s bloated, wounda-bit-too-tight older cousin, arguably the clumsiest musical delivery device of all time. Sure, it made albums portable for the first time, you couldn’t very well bolt a turntable to your car’s dashboard (don’t think it wasn’t tried), but 8-Tracks were prone to breakage and warping, not to mention the tape itself unspooling then wrapping tightly around the player’s heads. The lasting genius of the chain were its crates. Wood slatted fruit crates, like those used by farmers, were perfectly proportioned for storing LPs. For $2.98 you could purchase Peaches crates emblazoned with a logo rendered by John Alford. Sales were so strong in Greensboro a Winston-Salem location was added to the grove. While all was peachy keen on the outside looking in, the retailer had adopted an untenable business model. “They would order 500 copies of an album where I would have ordered five and still be worried about how many I’d have to return,” Vestal explained. “We had mountains of inventory that had to be sent back to the manufacturers because we couldn’t possibly sell it. It got to be ridiculously expensive.” Vestal resigned in 1980, “The day my paycheck bounced.” Forced into bankruptcy in 1981, investors swooped in to

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purchase only the most profitable outlets scattered around the South and Southeast, who continued doing business as Peaches Records & Tapes. NEW WAVE Peaches Records & Tapes, under new management in 1982 and are now based out of Florida, allowed their 15 remaining affiliates a great deal more independence, with almost total control over what music they ordered. A Peaches employee from 1986 to 1991, Jeff Rainey was in charge of ordering the 12” singles. “That’s when discos and clubs were real popular; I had DJs all over the city that I would set aside remixes for.” Eugene Sims started at Peaches Greensboro in 1986. “There were already CDs in the store, and they were taking off, but when I started it was full-on LPs,” he said. “I got to watch as the LP section kept getting smaller and smaller. The only thing that really stuck around were the 12-inch remixes.” One of the side benefits Sims and company enjoyed was getting concert tickets from the Elektra Representative. “I got into some of the best damn shows in my life,” Rainey agreed. “It was like being a rock star back in the ‘80s, working for Peaches.” A close-knit bunch, Peaches’ employees often socialized after hours. “We were young, we wanted to hit the local clubs, that’s what we did,” Sims said. “Somewhere Else Tavern, Miracle House of Rock, Jeff Rainey used to work at the gay bar down the street, XTC, sometimes we’d go hang out with him. College Hill was always the thing.”

Jeff Kay kept bugging store overseer Jeff Smith for a job, eventually getting hired part-time in 1985. Within months, Kay was a night manager. “[Smith] saw something in me that I really appreciated, it gave me a lot of confidence in myself.” Kay remembers his coworkers as “a great group,” and is still in contact with them today. He left town in 1989 but he “used my experience as a buyer at Peaches to get a job as a buyer at WEA [Warner Elektra Atlantic]. Between WEA and Warner Home Video, I was there for 17 years. So it set me up for a pretty nice career.” Attempting to adapt to changing tastes and technology, Peaches Records & Video limped into the 21st century; when a mobstyle bust out got underway, closing stores and liquidating inventory for quick cash to prop up the few profit centers left. In January of 2001, there were 10 (out of 45) franchisees left, including Greensboro’s. By the end of the year, every outlet had been shuttered. A reunion of Greensboro Peaches employees was held recently at College Hill. “We had a great, great time,” Sims told me by phone. “We’re thinking about doing another one. There’s a concert coming up with Dwight Yokum, Lucinda Williams and Steve Earl. We’re talking about meeting and going down for that show because they are three artists that we all made it a point to see.” It’s all about the music and comradery, same as it ever was. ! A key member of ‘The New York Yankees of Motion Picture Advertising,’ BILLY INGRAM is the author of PUNK, a memoir of his time writing about the East LA punk scene from 1980-1983. Thanks to David Gwynn and groceteria. com.

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A new start at ol’ New York Pizza

Katei Cranford

Contributing columnist

Love it or hate it, the cultural impression New York Pizza ingrained into Greensboro is undeniable. Through turbulent years of highs and lows and a round of new ownership, there’s a fresh set of NYPeeps at the helm, pressing forward with a new chapter (and a slew of shows) for the infamous spot at

Tate and Walker. On April 20, NYP-veterans Corporate Fandango headline a heady show with Elusive Groove, Sibannac, The Madd Hatters, Murdub and Creekwood. On April 21, the corner plays double-duty with a rock ’n’ roll video shoot for Trailer Park Orchestra during the day. And later that night it’ll host a hip-hop show with Dope KNife, Eric Isn’t, Dopey Graham, ILLPO, OC Taylor and Ahken Rah. There’s a lotta layers of the onion that is New York Pizza, the flavors of which have waxed and waned cyclically over the past 40-some years. The place could easily boast a local bar creed akin to the Postal Service: wind or rain, sleet or snow, NYP is there...until an abrupt day in February when a sign on the door read: closed indefinitely. “We were closed for 23 days,” said bartender and booker Mia Aranda. “The new owners had to renovate and meet code.” Word of the closure reverberated through local Facebook channels, particularly for folks who had shows booked. “We managed to keep most of our shows but moved them around to other bars. We have a great support system throughout Greensboro.” The closure came on the heels of new ownership months before in the face of controversies brewing years before that. It’s not hard to speculate problems in the operation. The show space came together as we know it now around 2011 under the guise of bar-angel Rosie Fernandez who suddenly left in late 2016 (she moved to Boxcar and hosts a Saturday afternoon show series). Matty Sheets followed-suit in early 2017, moving his Tuesday Open Mic to Westerwood. The 2016 patio dilemma continues to this day as the new crew learns to wrangle a tricky spot like New York Pizza. Clearly, issues plaguing the place go beyond renovating restaurant equipment.

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New York Pizza as seen from WUAG in Winter 2016

Tate Street Fest 2011

New York Pizza patio 2014

New York Pizza patio 2014

Aranda understands the work ahead. “I love every show we put together, even when the outcome isn’t what we hoped. Bands have a great time, as does whatever crowd comes through,” she says optimistically. “It’s really cool to see the dynamics between the different friend groups, and the way everyone kind of merges together as ‘NYP family.’ It’s one of the most inclusive, accepting places I’ve ever seen, which is what kept me coming back; and is why I wanted to work here. It’s what I want to build.“ Aranda isn’t alone. At her side is fellow NYP booker Luke Williams who sees success in the team they’ve built. It’s that sort of attitude bar-manager Jeff Losh acknowledges as necessary, “Luke and Mia have been a huge help, without them there would be no NYP as it exists today.” Of the pair’s progress, Williams notes, “working together kicked us into overdrive.

We’re booked out months in advance at this point.” All three see operations of New York Pizza going beyond just hosting shows at a bar. For Aranda, “NYP is more about the companionship. We just want to have a good time and support the arts, especially on a local level.” Williams reinforces ideals of artistic support, “we’re trying to provide a place for bands to come that wouldn’t be able to otherwise. We have a serious lack of smaller-sized venues. But here, we’ve been able to start fostering community. 100 percent of the door goes to the bands, always. Hospitality is key.” Beyond show dynamics, the patio situation has been a revolving headache for staff and patrons alike. Losh is quick to address the “Patiogate” saga, hyping plans for “dope seating both inside and out,” and bringing former barkeep Eric Moss

back for exterior design alongside fellow artist Lennie Alehat. While Tate Street morphs into a rising sea of chain restaurants, NYP serves as an anchor to the weirdos and music community of Greensboro. Pizza Pile, a weekly jam session, remains in full effect. Host Charles Frank regards NYP as a “haven for the counterculture and alternative communities of Greensboro and of the UNCG area.” It’s that haven Aranda hopes to uphold in this new chapter for NYP, “I’ve seen people give their last dollars to make sure someone else ate for the day. I love this place, and want nothing more than to see it be successful.” ! KATEI CRANFORD is a GSO rock-n-roller, NC mover-nshaker, and all-around Triad music aficionado. She chats up tunes and towns as hostess of Mostly Local Monday, a radio show that runs like a mixtape of bands playing NC the following week. You can catch her on WUAG 103.1FM every Monday from 5-7pm or via live stream at www.wuag.net. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM


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BARTENDER: Philip Schmid BAR: Corner Bar AGE: 28 Years Young Where are you from? Upstate New York How long have you been bartending? A year or so. How did you become a bartender?

Someone couldn’t cut limes, so it was the right bar at the right time. What do you enjoy about bartending? It’s like a reality TV show. You get the drama, the fights and the love making all in one bar. What’s your favorite drink to make? Russian Qualude (Thanks Bri)

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THU 4/19

LITTLE BIG TOWN AFTERPARTY W/ COREY HUNT BAND

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Corks & Crafts Spring Fling @Westbend Winery and Brewery 4.13.18 | Greensboro

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Groundbreaking & Naming of High Point Multi-Use Stadium 4.13.18 | High Point

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HALF HOUR FREE

last call

[HOROSCOPES]

[LEO (July 23 to August 22) While you’re still riding that high-powered beam, you might begin to lose focus by week’s end. Could be that you’ll need to do a little cat-napping to restore your spent energies. [VIRGO (August 23 to September 22)

An unexpected development creates a lot of excitement. Where it takes you is your decision. Check out the possibilities, then decide if you want to go with it or not.

[LIBRA (September 23 to October 22)

Although your supporters help you squash an unfair claim against you, don’t let this go unchallenged. You need to learn more about the motives of those behind it.

[SCORPIO (October 23 to November

21) There still are some tasks to clear up by midweek. Then you can welcome the new month on a high note. A friend brings surprising but very welcome news.

[AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Be careful not to move so quickly that you miss possible warning signs that could upset your plans. Slow down. Your supporters will continue to stand by you. [PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Your generosity in sharing your time and wisdom with others leads to an intriguing development that could have you considering some interesting choices. [ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Don’t waste your time and energy fretting over remarks you consider unnecessary or unkind. Best advice: Ignore them, and just keep doing your usual good job. [TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Getting that new perspective on a workplace situation could lead to a solution everyone will accept. Meanwhile, make time to keep up with your creative pursuits.

December 21) You might want to change your plans before they’re set in cement. Consider advice from colleagues. But remember that, ultimately, it’s your choice.

[GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Those changes you planned to implement in early summer might need to be reassessed. But don’t make any moves until you’ve discussed this with someone you trust.

[CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) A difficult situation is working itself out. Lingering problems should be resolved by week’s end, allowing the Goat to enjoy a calmer, less stressful period.

[CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your aspects favor harmony, making this a good time to work out problems in relationships — whether personal or professional, big or small. An old friend comes back.

[SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to

© 2018 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

[STRANGE BUT TRUE] by Samantha Weaver

* It was Hungarian psychiatrist Thomas Stephen Szasz who made the following sage observation: “If you talk to God, you are praying. If God talks to you, you have schizophrenia.”

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* That iconic symbol of the Old West, the Pony Express, was based on the mail system used throughout the Mongol Empire in the 13th century. However, the Mongol riders often covered 125 miles in a single day, which was faster than the best record held by a Pony Express rider. * What’s in a name? A great deal, it turns out, if you’re talking about housing prices. Those who study such things say that a house on a “boulevard” is valued at over one-third more than the same house that has “street” in its address. * Confectioner Milton Hershey suffered through founding two candy companies that ended in failure, then succeeded

on his third attempt, and finally sold that company and used the proceeds to found the Hershey Company. After all his hard work, though, he seemed to be less interested in enjoying the fruits of his labors than in helping others. In 1909 he established the Hershey Industrial School for Orphaned Boys, and 10 years later he donated control of the company to a trust for the school. Today the institution is called the Milton Hershey School, and it continues to have a controlling interest in the candy company. * Southern California has more cars than India has cows. If cows are sacred in India, what does that say about how Californians feel about their automobiles? Thought for the Day: “Men are not against you; they are merely for themselves.” — Gene Fowler © 2018 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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[THE ADVICE GODDESS] love • sex • dating • marriage • questions

HIPSTER REPLACEMENT

I’m a 57-year-old lesbian, and I’m only attracted to much younger women (very early 20s). We’re obviously in very different places in our lives, and Amy Alkon these “relationships” don’t last very long. I Advice also get a lot of grief Goddess from my friends. I can’t change whom I’m attracted to, but I would like a long-term relationship. — Seeking Your previous girlfriend probably remembers prom like it was yesterday — because, for her, it kinda was. Making matters worse, millennials and post-millennials (generally speaking) are the most overprotected, overparented generations ever — to the point where university administrators probably have stern talks with at least a few parents: “Your son is a freshman in college. You can’t be sneaking into the dining hall to cut his food for him.” Sure, there are probably some precociously mature 20-somethings out there. However, it usually takes a chunk of life experience — and relationship experience — for a person to grow into who they are and figure out what they want in a partner. So, as a 57-year-old woman, you’re probably as well-paired with the average 22-year-old as you are with the average

head of lettuce or desk lamp. But say — one day while you’re cruising the aisles at Forever 21 — you find the 20-something lady Socrates. There’s still a problem, and it’s the way society sneers at a big age gap between partners. The thumbs-downing comes both from a couple’s “own social networks” and from “society at large,” finds social psychologist Justin Lehmiller. However, “perceived marginalization by one’s social network” appears to be most damaging — “significantly” predicting breakups. Granted, it’s possible that you have some rigid age cutoff in the regions of your brain that do the “hot or not?” calculations. If that’s the case, simply finding a woman who’s young-looking is a no-go. (When she starts to get those little laugh lines around the eyes, will you put her out on the curb with that aging TV from the guest room?) But ask yourself whether you simply prefer the springier chickens and are actually just afraid of the emotional risks (as well as the emotional adulthood) required in being with somebody closer to your age. That’s something you can work to correct. Ultimately, if you want a relationship, the answer to your “Hey, babe...where have you been all my life?” shouldn’t be “Um...waiting for my parents to meet so I could do the fun stuff fetuses do, like kickboxing in the womb and giving my mom gestational diabetes.”

THE CUSTOMER IS ALWAYS FRIGHTENED

I’m a 36-year-old single woman. I’ve noticed that the more I like a guy the more

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Your cocktail party conversation shouldn’t translate to “I mean, come on... do I really seem like a danger to myself and society?!” To calm down so you can talk like a person instead of a scary person, it helps to understand — as I explain in my new “science-help” book, “Unf*ckology” — that “emotions aren’t just thinky things.” They have a basis in the body. For example, in the case of fear, your heart pounds, you breathe faster, and adrenaline surges — whether what you’re afraid of is physical death or just, say, dying onstage while giving a talk — as you watch 43 people simultaneously yawn and pull out their phone. The human brain is a marvel, but we can take advantage of how it’s also about as easily tricked as my dog. Take that bodily reaction of fear — pounding heart and all — which also happens to be the bodily reaction of being excited. Research by Harvard Business School’s Alison Wood

Brooks finds that you can “reappraise” your fear as excitement — by repeatedly saying aloud to yourself, “I am excited” (to talk with some guy, for example) — and actually shift yourself from a “’threat’ mind-set” to an “’opportunity’ mind-set.” Also, assuming the current weather isn’t “nuclear holocaust with a chance of rain,” some dude you’re flirting with probably isn’t the last man on the continent. Keeping that in mind, reframe your interaction as a mere opportunity for something to happen with him — and an opportunity to figure out whether it’s a good idea. You do that not by selling yourself like it’s 4:56 p.m. on Sunday at a yard sale but by asking him about himself. Counterintuitively, you’ll probably be at your most attractive by leaving a man guessing about you — as opposed to leaping to conclusions, like that you were the little girl who beheaded all the other little girls’ Barbies. ! GOT A problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com) © 2018 Amy Alkon Distributed by Creators.Com.

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