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YES! WEEKLY > APRIL 19-25, 2017 > VOLUME 13, NUMBER 16

5500 Adams Farm Lane Suite 204 Greensboro, NC 27407 Office 336-316-1231 Fax 336-316-1930 Publisher CHARLES A. WOMACK III publisher@yesweekly.com

GLENWOOD

EDITORIAL Editor JEFF SYKES jeff@yesweekly.com Contributors KRISTI MAIER JOHN ADAMIAN RICH LEWIS STEVE MITCHELL BILLY INGRAM ALLISON STALBERG IAN MCDOWELL DEONNA KELLI SAYED MIA OSBORN

The railroad tracks that run along Oakland Avenue once separated UNCG’s campus and downtown Greensboro from the GLENWOOD neighborhood. It can be easy and convenient for UNCG students to forget that just across the street from their beautiful and expanding campus live many of the city’s working class and less fortunate.

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Movies MARK BURGER marksburger@yahoo.com

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Theatre LENISE WILLIS lenise@yesweekly.com PRODUCTION Graphic Designers ALEX ELDRIDGE designer@yesweekly.com AUSTIN KINDLEY artdirector@yesweekly.com ADVERTISING

Advertising Manager KATHARINE OSBORNE

kat@yesweekly.com Marketing BRAD MCCAULEY brad@yesweekly.com TRAVIS WAGEMAN travis@yesweekly.com CLAUDIA BURNETT claudia@yesweekly.com KAREN SCOTT karen@yesweekly.com Promotion NATALIE GARCIA

DISTRIBUTION JANICE GANTT We at YES! Weekly realize that the interest of our readers goes well beyond the boundaries of the Piedmont Triad. Therefore we are dedicated to informing and entertaining with thought-provoking, debate-spurring, in-depth investigative news stories and features of local, national and international scope, and opinion grounded in reason, as well as providing the most comprehensive entertainment and arts coverage in the Triad. YES! Weekly welcomes submissions of all kinds. Efforts will be made to return those with a self-addressed stamped envelope; however YES! Weekly assumes no responsibility for unsolicited submissions. YES! Weekly is published every Wednesday by Womack Newspapers, Inc. No portion may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. First copy is free, all additional copies are $1.00. Copyright 2017 Womack Newspapers, Inc.

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You might have seen the phrase “FISH TABLES” on strip mall signs in the Triad. Earlier, we visited the Market Street one so Vlad’s friend and co-worker Cheyenne could play the tables there. 11 THE GREENSBORO SCIENCE CAFE seeks to deepen the average person’s involvement with science content by holding live scientific debates open to the public. Their next topic: the possibility of American households getting free money from oil companies through carbon fee dividends.

voices 12

Why would North Carolinian Elizabeth Kostova, who is a New York Times No.1 bestselling author, set her action-packed novel in Bulgaria?I will give you an answer in a minute. But first, a little bit about her new book, “THE SHADOW LAND.”

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LEBARON is a band that knows how to balance the extremes of sonic sludge and forceful body-blow low-end with up-front vocals and sometimes gleaming guitar sounds.

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Part family drama, part African fable and part Picasso, IN THE RED AND BROWN WATER is a dynamic thought-provoking piece that challenges both its audience and its actors. And the students of North Carolina A&T State University are ready to accept it. 30 We are stuck in an age of DICHOTOMY. So easily the haves are separated from the have nots; the black from white; the blue from red; the city from country. 31 As part of the UNCG Campus Moviefest competition, sophomore Brendan Moore wrote and directed the film short FOODIE in a week’s time. 34 I have to admit. I was unaware until early this year that a big JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE was going up on Hanes Mall Boulevard. And once I learned a bit more, I truly was curious.

APRIL 19-25, 2017

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Zac Brown Band Transatlantic Sessions with Jerry Douglas and Aly Bain featuring James Taylor and more!

Marty Stuart & His Fabulous Superlatives

Del McCoury Band

The Avett Brothers

The Earls of Leicester feat. Jerry Douglas

Bela Fleck

Sam Bush Band

Sam Bush Band Leftover Salmon

P l u s M a ny M o r e Pe r fo r m e r s ! 13 Stages of " Traditional Plus " Music!

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ON THE CAMPUS OF wilkes community college wilkesboro, NC

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Fracking is Accelerating the Climate Crisis at the US h t d e n r a le e v a Scientists h become a s a h m o o b s a g fracked global t n e c e r f o r e iv r leading d heat records. – from s n io s is m e e n a h Reducing met y to power a w e h t ll a s ll e fracking w vital to d n a e iv t c e ff -e t plants – is cos e change. t a m li c y a w a n u averting r ch brothers o K e h t d n a y g r Duke Ene e fracking h t d in h e b s e c r are driving fo ppressing u s e ’r y e h t d n a boom – public debate. e ergency Methan m E r u o t u o b a re Learn mo arn.org/ema cw n : n ig a p m ca Action

Stopping the su per-potent meth ane spewing fro the fracked gas m throughout system is crucia l to averting run chaos. Low-wea away climate lth communities and people of co responsible for lor are least global warming pollution but are suffering disproportionate ly.

The Path to Slowing the Climate Crisis Join us to discuss your role in stopping methane emissions and promoting a cheaper clean-energy path that benefits all North Carolinians! Monday, April 24th at 7:00p.m. I Green Street United Methodist Church, 639 S. Green St., Winston-Salem • Discuss the new statewide campaign to ban the use of fracked gas, our feasible – and vital – opportunity to prevent runaway global warming and rising sea levels. • Share thoughts on climate change’s impacts on North Carolinians – through flooding, heat waves, air pollution, wildfires – and the economic injustice of spiraling electricity rates to pay for unneeded fracked gas pipelines and power plants. • Join the clean energy revolution by promoting the new Faith in Solar campaign.

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Free and open to the public. More details at ncwarn.org/events.

Building People Power for Climate & Energy Justice

Find us on Facebook & Twitter ncwarn.org • 919-416-5077 • Paid for by NC WARN APRIL 19-25, 2017

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BE there

TONEY ROCKS THURSDAY

EVENTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS | BY AUSTIN KINDLEY ENT MT

ART

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CAMEL CITY 420 FEST THURSDAY WEDNESDAY

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BEN FOLDS THURSDAY THURSDAY

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ACTIONS AND OBJECTIVES

CAMEL CITY 420 FEST

BEN FOLDS: BENEFIT GALA

WHAT: Triad Stage returns audience to the fictional town of Hawboro as a new theater company announces plans to develop a play to celebrate the town’s founding. As they probe the official story and rehearse the drama, the concerns of the artists and the community begin to parallel the struggles of the city’s first citizens. WHEN: 7:30 p.m. WHERE: Triad Stage at the Pyrle. 232 S. Elm Street, Greensboro. MORE: Tickets start at $10.

WHAT: Feat. Roots Of A Rebellion, Elusive Groove, & TreeHouse! Come celebrate Winston-Salem’s own, Elusive Groove’s debut album release on Thurs. April 20th at The Official Second & Green Tavern for Camel City 420 Fest! WHEN: 4 p.m. WHERE: Second & Green Tavern. 207 North Green Street, Winston-Salem. MORE: $5 advance | $7 Day of show

WHAT: The Carolina Theatre of Greensboro will present the 6th Annual Command Performance Benefit Gala on Thursday, April 20, featuring Ben Folds. Guests will have the option of purchasing show tickets to the Ben Folds and a Piano concert at 8:00pm, or to the pre-concert cocktails and gourmet dinner starting at 5:30pm. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Carolina Theatre. 310 S. Greene Street, Greensboro. MORE: $25-$250 tickets.

WHAT: On the Spring leg of a U.S. tour, Toney Rocks rolls through Winston-Salem for a soul stirring solo acoustic concert presented by Muddy Creek Music Hall. Performing songs from his latest album as well as his new single ‘Run to the Night’, Rocks will burst into a diverse set of solo acoustic blues, rock and americana influenced songs. WHEN: 8 p.m. WHERE: Muddy Creek Music Hall. 5455 Bethania Road, Winston-Salem. MORE: $12-$15 tickets.

FRIDAY

21 LUNAFEST FILM FESTIVAL WHAT: Support Hirsch Wellness and join us for Greensboro’s 8th Annual Lunafest Short Film Festival. This season’s program of Nine select short films will compel discussion, make you laugh, tug at your heartstrings and motivate you to make a difference in your community. WHEN: 7 p.m. WHERE: Revolution Mill. 1250 Revolution Mill Drive, Greensboro. MORE: $20 admission.

WHAT OUR CLIENTS SAY! “Thank you for all you do. YES! Weekly knows it's about partnerships and not just taking money to place an ad. You work to help your customers succeed and get noticed. It matters. You think of ways to help and provide opportunities to broaden awareness. You have the right formula.” 6 YES! WEEKLY

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NISHAH DIMEO SATURDAY

FRIDAY FRIDAY

21 PETER PAN WhAT: Based on J.M. Barrie’s classic tale and featuring an unforgettable score, Peter Pan is one of the most beloved and frequently performed family favorites of all time for 60 years. Featuring the iconic songs ‘I’ve Gotta Crow,’ ‘I Won’t Grow Up,’ and a rousing book full of magic, warmth, and adventure, Peter Pan is the perfect show for the child in all of us who dreamed of soaring high and never growing up. When: 7 p.m. WheRe: Community Theatre of Greensboro. 520 South Elm St., Greensboro. MoRe: $10-$30 tickets.

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KRAVE KAVA BAR NISHAH DIMEO PIEDMONT EARTH DAY FAIR GRAND OPENING AND FRIENDS

ANNUAL SPRING PLANT SALE

WhAT: Support the planet and celebrate

WhAT: The public is invited to attend the Go Green Annual Spring Plant Sale at the Greensboro Farmers Curb market from 9am – 2pm. The event features spring plants, potting soil, hanging baskets, tools, garden art and services with a wide appeal, from the home patio gardener to the budding urban farmer. When: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. WheRe: Greensboro Farmers Curb Market. 501 Yanceyville St., Greensboro. MoRe: Free entry.

with the community at the largest Earth Day Fair in the region, hosted by Piedmont Environmental Alliance. Enjoy great food and music, activities for adults and kids, and wonderful earth-friendly exhibitors...all while learning about how you can support a greener city. When: 10 a.m. WheRe: Winston-Salem Fairgrounds. 300 Deacon Blvd., Winston-Salem. MoRe: Free.

LUAU

WhAT: Krave Kava Bar & Lounge will host a grand opening luau on Saturday, April 22. The party goes on all day during the hours Krave is open from 12 noon to midnight. Enjoy free samples, and complementary food. When: 12 p.m. WheRe: Krave Kava Bar & Lounge. 202 Exchange Place, Greensboro. MoRe: Free entry.

WhAT: Nishah DiMeo has become a fan favorite at our Thursday night Cocktails & Jazz, where she has been a performer since we started things up! Her rich voice and dynamic range will bring you to the edge of your seats, wanting more. Together, this group will be a jazz force to be reckoned with. When: 6:30 p.m. WheRe: O.Henry Hotel. 624 Green Valley Road, Greensboro. MoRe: Free entry.

30th Annual Used Book Sale May 4 & 5, 9aM-9pM | May 6, 8aM-2pM Parking and Admission are FREE! lARgEst book sales in the triad with an attendance in the thousands! Education Building at the Winston-salem Fairgrounds gate 5 from Deacon Blvd All proceeds of the sale benefit the ministry’s programs and services for older adults in our community. For more information contact the Shepherd’s Center at 748-0217 or visit www.shepherdscenter.org.

April 19-25, 2017

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[LOCAL TALENT]

DEVON SMITH-HAPPY BEHIND THE CAMERA BY ALLISON STALBERG

Not even a full year into his job as a producer with the Greensboro Television Network, Devon Smith has won a Telly Award for his work. “The Telly Awards is a national competition and recognizes excellence in broadcast production in local, regional and cable TV commercials,” wrote Jake Keys with the City of Greensboro. “This is the first Telly Award for Smith and the 32nd award won by GTN since 2000.” Smith won his Telly Award for Zoning Man. “We got a video request from our zoning neighborhood development department and they wanted to help residents understand the zoning process,” Smith said. “So we tried to think of funny, friendly, but kind of cheesy-type things too. “So we came up with a superhero called Zoning Man. It took a couple weeks, we wrote out a script and we took a half a day to shoot it and took some time putting it together. I thought it would be cool to kind of put a comic book feel to it.” The first time Smith wanted to work with TV and film was in the sixth grade. “I went to a teacher/parent conference for my older brother and sister. The high school that we all went to had a TV program and I remember I just fell in love with all the gadgets. “I spent the next three years of my life through

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middle school thinking that I wanted to be a lawyer until I saw a camera again. I was like ‘No, that’s what I’ve been wanting to do.’ I followed my dreams. I want to North Carolina A&T and graduated about two years ago with a mass communications degree.” Today, Smith says his inspiration for everything he does is for his family, especially his baby son and fiancé. “It also wasn’t all me. Mike Kirkman and the zoning department were very hands on; and I had a ton of help from our other producers, Carlos Castellanos...and Josh Johnson. Lastly, thank you to David Brown the station’s supervisor for the opportunity to be a part of GTN.” Smith hopes in the long-term that he may one day be the CEO of a production company. “I just want to stay in my lane, and as long as I’m behind the camera, I’m happy.” To learn more, go to www.Greensboro-nc.gov/ gtn. !

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[SCUTTLEBUTT] Items from across the Triad and beyond

WS POLICE CHIEF BARRY ROUNTREE ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT PLANS

Barry D. Rountree, Winston-Salem’s chief of police since 2013, announced today that he will retire Sept. 1, having served the citizens of Winston-Salem for 29 and a half years. “I have had a very rewarding career,” Rountree said. “I have been able to serve in nearly every sworn position in the department, and now it is time to turn the reins over to the next generation of leadership.” Rountree started his career as a police officer on Jan. 25, 1988. He was promoted to senior police officer (today’s rank of corporal) in 1992, sergeant in 1996, lieutenant in 2000, captain in 2004 and assistant police chief in 2007. Over these years he served in the Field Services Bureau, the Investigative Services Bureau, the Support Services Bureau, and the Professional Standards Division. Rountree said he has been blessed to have served without any serious injuries. “Many have not been as fortunate as I and suffered serious injuries,” he said, “and during my career with the police department I have seen eight coworkers lose their lives while serving. They are a constant reminder to all police officers of the risks they take to ensure the public safety.” Rountree is a North Carolina state-certified Basic Law Enforcement Training general instructor and holds an Advanced Law Enforcement Certificate from the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Standards Training Commission. Rountree has a bachelor’s degree

in business administration from Winston-Salem State University and a master’s in public affairs from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Rountree also is a graduate of the Administrative Officers Management Program at North Carolina State University and the Municipal Administration program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Rountree said he is most proud of trying to make the Winston-Salem Police Department better for employees, and for improving service delivery to the citizens. “We have worked diligently to improve community relations and promote WSPD’s ‘brand,’ ” he said. City Manager Lee Garrity said that Rountree had done a remarkable job of leading the police department. “With a steady hand and a firm belief in serving all, Chief Rountree has enhanced public safety while avoiding the community-trust challenges that other communities have faced,” he said. Garrity said he will begin the process to select the next chief by consulting with the mayor, members of the City Council, police employees and community leaders.

BATTLEGROUND VILLAGE UPGRADES NEAR COMPLETION

Branch Properties, an Atlanta-based private real estate investment firm, announces notable progress on its Battleground Village project in Greensboro, NC. Branch Properties purchased the 74,701-square-foot center in early 2014 and, as a value-add property owner, has been

working diligently to reposition the center. To date, the real estate firm has significantly increased occupancy, partnered with national retailers to develop prototype stores, and is near completion on an exterior renovation. Today, Battleground Village boasts a 97 percent occupancy rate, which is an impressive increase over the 84 percent rate the company inherited at the time of purchase. Anchored by Earth Fare and Starbucks, Battleground Village is home to service-oriented tenants like Sola Salon Studios and the U.S. Post Office, along with quick-serve restaurants Jersey Mike’s and Hungry Howies Pizza. Currently, one 1500 SF space is available for lease. Branch Properties is working with Starbucks to redevelop its current space. The brand new prototype store is scheduled to open in May 2017 and will offer drive-through service, which will be a great addition for the community. “The former Starbucks location was very dated and without a drive-through. This new location is unique to the greater Greensboro area as well as to the Southeast. There are only one or two of these prototype stores in the region and the drive-through will serve as a great advantage to Starbucks customers in the area,” said Brett Horowitz, Asset Manager of Branch Properties. One of the property’s earliest tenants, Earth Fare, is undergoing a complete renovation of its 27,887 SF space. The organic food supermarket is upgrading its interior and exterior, and will debut a new open and modern prototype this Summer. !

GEARS & GUITARS MUSIC FESTIVAL May 26–29 COLLECTIVE SOUL

COREY SMITH

TONIC THE BLUE STONES

May 26, gates open at 6 p.m.

May 27, gates open at 5 p.m.

Photo: Joseph Guay

MUSCADINE BLOODLINE ERIC DODD

FREE MEMORIAL DAY CONCERTS Food Trucks, Family Activities, and Walk & Roll

BARENAKED LADIES

MIPSO

EDWIN MCCAIN SUSTO

THE PLAIDS Photo: Sasha Israel

May 28, gates open at 6 p.m.

CLAY HOWARD AND THE SILVER ALERTS HANK, PATTIE & THE CURRENT

May 29, 1 – 7 p.m.

All Performances are at Bailey Park · Rain or Shine · Food and Beverages Available for Purchase

GearsandGuitars(9.9x5print)YesWeekly.indd WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Tickets at gearsandguitarsfest.com or Ticketmaster 1

APRIL 19-25, 2017

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POLITICS, UPDATES, TRENDS AND OTHER VITAL INFORMATION

Checking out Fish Tables in Greensboro BY IAN MCDOWELL

M

y friend says don’t use his real name, but nixes my suggestion of calling him Ivan “Guy running the competition is named that. Whenever there’s money made, there’s an Ivan in the game.” He suggests Vlad. “Because I’m always Putin it out there.” Like right now, bringing a writer to the Fish House where he’s Pit Boss. A Fish House isn’t a restaurant, but Vlad is grilling tonight on the sidewalk of this strip mall where every other store front is dark; chicken, burgers, dogs and brats, all free for high-rollers. “We’re the only Fish Tables place in Greensboro to have hot food rather than cold pizza. The guys who have money tied up in this place know you have to spend it to make it. They also know the value of name brands. That’s why we serve Pepsi instead of Sam’s Cola.” You might have seen the phrase “Fish Tables” on strip mall signs in the Triad. Earlier, we visited the Market Street one so Vlad’s friend and co-worker Cheyenne could play the tables there. Cheyenne, unlike Vlad, freely admits being addicted. “If you’ve never played this game, don’t start, ‘cause you’ll always be chasing the high.” Vlad claims that Cheyenne made four hundred bucks at the Market Street place last night, but say she may lose just as much today. “Nah,” she says, “I’m not dropping more than forty.”

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Tonight, I drop two bucks and make ten following Cheyenne’s advice about the computer-animated sea creatures undulating across the tabletop. “Don’t aim, just spray.” I don’t know what all the buttons do; the instructions are in Chinese. Nor do I know which of the dodging and weaving fish, whales, crocodiles and dragons I can “kill” with my beginner’s level weapon, a double-barreled cannon that fires nets that have no effect on the biggest or fastest targets. But I aim at smaller slower ones with the joystick and keep pressing the “shoot” button and my two-dollar credit dips to $1.25, rises to $2.50, dips to $2.05, rises to $2.80, and so on, up and down, and in ten minutes, is at $10.85. The sign on the wall says there’s a ten-dollar minimum cash-out. The siren song of the digital killing-spree sea is strong, and I continue firing at the next school of fish, hoping I can jack my score to twenty bucks. Instead, I drop to ten even. Taking this as my cue, I wave at the nearest hostess. “Cash out, sweetie?” I nod. She presses a button on the console, prints a ticket hands it to another hostess with more bosom and tattoos. Bosom gal gives me a ten-dollar bill. When I ask for a Pepsi, I’m unsure if I’m supposed to pay for it, but offer the ten spot. She asks how much I want back. I tell her keep five and go out to talk to Vlad. While grilling, he eyes the bushes. “Time I got jacked, I’m pretty sure they came out of there. I went to check the

lot and had a bad feeling, but didn’t see anybody. I think they’d jumped the back fence and were hiding in those bushes. Minute I went inside, they bum-rushed the door, three of them in ski masks with Glocks. Most of the money was in the machines, but I gave them what we had in the back. I heard that crew hit a couple of other places, and somebody in Kernersvile shot one of them. Don’t know if it’s true.” When we first arrived, there were nine gamers at the tables, pretty evenly mixed between men and woman, whites and African-Americans. Except for a dour Ron Jeremy lookalike and a graying good old boy pimp who claims his daddy was Johnny Carson’s pilot, they appeared anywhere from their early twenties to their mid-thirties. “Lower-class people with money,” says Vlad. “Not saying you can’t get high-class people into a Fish House, but it has to be owned by one of them, or by somebody who’s played golf with them for years.” Later, the demographic tips entirely Asian and largely male; nine young men, a young woman, a middle-aged woman and a granny. I figure them for Thai or Laotian, maybe Vietnamese. But one guy, tall and handsome, wearing a baseball cap with a shiny silver DOPE on it, resembles the Hong Kong superstar Andy Lau circa 1996, and when he gets excited, yells “wei-wei-wei!,” all-purpose Cantonese for everything from “shit!” to “duuuuude!”

After he’s cashed out, he comes for a chicken leg. “You made a thousand dollars tonight, I bet,” says Vlad. “A little less,” says the young man. I can’t tell if his grin is sly or shy as he shows his wad of bills. “How about you tip your waiter?” The young man laughs and gets into his car without peeling off any twenties. Vlad clearly didn’t expect him to. I don’t ask him what he makes in a night, doing this. I don’t ask him how much of it he spends at his tables or those elsewhere. I imagine it’s less than Cheyenne does. She didn’t come back with us from the place on Market Street. Vlad says she’s probably still playing there, or at another one, and won’t be back until her shift as Pit Boss tomorrow. The Asians leave around ten like there’s a curfew. The next wave of gamers are African-American, three men and seven women. I talk to a big guy about last night’s forty-person brawl at the club where he bounces, eat some chicken and a brat and go home. I’ve been gone all night and my cats haven’t had their supper. They greet me like Victorian children who’ve been starving while their errant father gambles. !

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Debating Carbon Dividends at the GSO Science Cafe BY MIA OSBORN The future is now. Google plans to put its first self-driving cars on the roads this summer. Diseases that once meant certain death can be fixed with a visit to the pharmacy. Still, many Americans don’t have time to appreciate these advancements in their daily lives beyond sharing an article on Facebook or scrolling political Twitter fights on the reality of climate change. The Greensboro Science Cafe seeks to deepen the average person’s involvement with science content by holding live scientific debates open to the public. Their next topic: the possibility of American households getting free money from oil companies through carbon fee dividends. It might sound unlikely, but not long ago, so did the self-driving cars. Science cafes have popped up all over the world. The Greensboro Science Cafe was co-founded in 2013 by physicist Diedrich Schmidt and Randall Hayes, Ph.D., a neuroscience teacher at the Governor’s School of North Carolina. Hayes explained that what sets science cafes of the world apart from TED Talks and other popular lecture series is the audience participation. “It’s designed to be the opposite of an academic lecture,” Hayes said. “With an academic lecture, you would have 45 or 50 minutes of talking and maybe 10 minutes of questions. We reverse that: the speaker gets 10 minutes of intro material, just to set the parameters of the discussion, then 45 or 50 minutes of Q&A.” On April 27, the cafe will host a panel of experts from many fields, including economics, business, and sociology, to debate the best way to implement a carbon dividends program in the United States. When carbon dividends are brought up, most Americans think of Alaska. Alaskans have received money from the state’s oil industry via the Permanent Fund Dividends program since 1976. However, Alaska’s funding comes from its oil drilling revenue, while carbon fee dividends come from a tax paid by oil companies, based on how many tons of CO2 they produce. “This is designed to phase out fossil fuels because as the price increases over time and people use less of it, you should have fewer emissions; whereas the Alaska program is basically designed to get the citizens to support as much drilling as possible,” said Hayes. WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

Between lowered emissions and dividends that would disproportionately benefit America’s poorest, the fee and dividend model has gained popular support. It is also gaining traction on both sides of the political aisle. But while conservatives and liberals agree that carbon fees and dividends could benefit Americans as well as the rest of the world, they disagree on how to get there. In recent months, the conservative-backed Climate Leadership Council (CLC) and the Citizen’s Climate Lobby (CCL) both proAccording to Hayes, the plans’ differposed versions of a nationwide carbon ences have less to do with climate change fee and dividend program. The CCL is an and more to do with the values of the international group that describes itself people behind each. as nonpartisan, but its plan emphasizes “As nonpartisan scientists, we want to creating clean energy jobs and empowerlook at plans that come from both of the ing individuals to connect with and their two major groups. Otherwise, it just looks representatives to create policy change at like you’re lobbying,” he said. a local level. At the next Greensboro Science Cafe, The initial steps of both plans are nearly both plans will be laid out in detail by identical: multiple speakers, who will then give the 1. Oil companies pay a fee that grows floor to the audience for what’s sure to slowly over time, starting anywhere from be a lively question and answer session. $15 to $40 per ton of CO2. Hayes expects the meeting will run over 2. Fee money is given to the public the usual hour limit. That’s okay; a biparthrough dividends. tisan move to aid Americans while helping 3. Countries that don’t use the fee and the Earth is news worth talking about. dividend system will be hit with a border The panel will start at 7 p.m. on Thurstax before they can import oil to the US. day, April 27 at Gibb’s Hundred Brewing This is meant to encourage other counCompany on West Lewis Street. For more tries to take on the same system and information, visit the Greensboro Science discourage US companies from moving Cafe on Facebook: www.facebook.com/ overseas to avoid the carbon tax at home. GreensboroScienceCafe. ! The CLC plan has a fourth step: removing the power of the Environmental Protection Agency to regulate carbon emisMIA OSBORN is a Greensboro-based freelance writer sions, on the grounds that oil companies who hails from Birmingham, Alabama. will have the threat of higher fees to keep their emissions low without federal involvement. “That’s the red meat to get conservatives on board with the plan,” said Hayes. MIDWEEK MARKET GO GREEN ANNUAL The CCL plan doesn’t GRAND REOPENING SPRING PLANT SALE have an official fourth Wednesday, April 19 — 8am - 1pm Sunday, April 23 — 9am - 2pm step, but they do want Fresh and local from 25 vendors. You’ll find a variety of plants, From hot donuts to just picked tools and crafts for the patio the dividends to be produce and flowers. gardener to budding urban farmer. adjusted for population Shop directly from the farmer! Shoppers can enjoy fresh goodies! control, so that families Proceeds benefit the growers. can only receive increased dividends for their first 501 Yanceyville St. • Greensboro, NC two children. WWW.GSOFARMERSMARKET.ORG

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A North Carolina mountain woman’s adventure in Bulgaria

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hy would North Carolinian Elizabeth Kostova, who is a New York Times No.1 bestselling author, D.G. Martin set her actionpacked novel in Bulgaria? Contributor I will give you an answer in a minute. But first, a little bit about her new book, “The Shadow Land.” Its main character is a young North Carolina mountain woman, Alexandra Boyd. On her first day in the country she meets a small Bulgarian family group. They tell her they are on the way to a beautiful monastery and suggest she consider visiting it later. After they part ways, Alexandra finds that she has a satchel that belongs to the Bulgarian group. A young taxi driver called Bobby befriends her as she seeks to find the satchel’s owners. In the satchel is a wooden urn, containing ashes and inscribed with the name Stoyan Lazarov. She and Bobby report the incident to the local police. They give them an ad-

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dress for Lazarov. First, they rush to the monastery and search for the Bulgarian group, but find no one. As they prepare to leave, they realize that they have been locked in a room. Alexandra thinks, “nothing in her previous experience had prepared her for the feeling of being suddenly locked in a monastic room with a stranger five thousand miles from the Blue Ridge Mountains, holding an urn containing the ashes of another stranger. In addition to being tired and afraid, she was suddenly a thief, a vagrant and a prisoner.” Although they escape from the monastery, they cannot escape a growing

awareness that they are being followed and that possessing this urn has put them in danger. Nevertheless, the next day they go to the address the police had provided. The house is empty of people, but photos and papers there confirm that the urn’s owners had lived there. A neighbor gave them another address elsewhere in Bulgaria. Before they leave town, they adopt a stray dog, which becomes an important character with a major role in one of the concluding scenes. Kostova introduces other people, including an older, wealthy businessman-turned-politician named Kurilkov and known as “The Bear.” He is seeking to win the next election on the promise of “non-corruption.” There are growing and inexplicable dangers: vandalized cars, threats, murder and kidnapping. Only if the urn contains some valuable secret can there be an explanation for this unsettling situation. An explanation of the urn’s secret and its dangerous value becomes the spine on

which Kostova builds the book’s surprising and violent resolution. On that same spine she attaches another story, that of Stoyan Lazarov, a talented violinist, lover of Vivaldi, loving husband and father, who ran afoul of Bulgaria’s postWorld War II brutal communist dictatorship. He was confined for many years in a torturous labor camp where work conditions and weather almost killed him and destroyed his health and his prospects for a fulfilling musical career. At the work camp, he met two men, one a friend and fellow inmate, and the other a guard who becomes a heated enemy. Both characters play a major part in the book’s dramatic conclusion. Why then did Kostova set this book in Bulgaria? Explaining her fascination for that nation, she writes about her first visit, when she first came to “this mysterious country, hidden for so long behind the Iron Curtain,” and she felt, “I had somehow come home.” Kostova’s novel takes her readers on a tour of Bulgaria, its mountains, its cities and villages its forests and seashores. Her poetic descriptions of Bulgaria’s landscapes and people made this reader want to see for myself the country she loves so much. ! D.G. MARTIN hosts “North Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs Sundays at noon and Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UNC-TV. Preview the upcoming program on Preview the upcoming program on UNC-TV’s North Carolina digital channel (Spectrum-Time Warner #1276) on Fridays at 8 p.m. This Thursday’s (April 20) guest is Nancy Peacock, author of “The Life & Times of Persimmon Wilson.” Next week’s (April 23, 27) guests ware Richard Rosen and Joseph Mosnier, authors of “Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights.” To view prior programs: http://video.unctv.org/program/ nc-bookwatch/episodes/ For upcoming programs: www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch Thursday 5pm April 13 Tim Tyson, author of “The Blood of Emmett Till” Sunday noon April 16 and Thursday 5pm April 20 Nancy Peacock, author of “The Life & Times of Persimmon Wilson” Sunday noon April 23 and Thursday 5pm April 27 Richard Rosen and Joseph Mosnier, authors of “Julius Chambers: A Life in the Legal Struggle for Civil Rights” Sunday noon April 30 and Thursday 5pm May 4 Matthew Griffin, author of “Hide”

APRIL 19-25, 2017

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ACROSS

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42 43 44 48 50 51 53 57 60 66 67 68 69 70 75 76 79 80 82 86 87

Sinks in mud Baloney Place to exit As a whole Information collection Jumbo size at Starbucks College for chumps? Keep in custody “The plan was OK’d” Race pace Clark of film Classic Olds Like a bathing fish? “... unless I’m wrong” “It’s — bet” (“You can’t lose”) Musical knack “... — ye be judged” Pudgy bodies? Steeped drinks Pitcher Warren Mauna — City in Southern Iraq — -faire (tact) House with a leaky roof? Make revisions to Sea, to Jules Obscure Wine cask Fighter giving people the willies? Santa — Mountains Some raincoats Nickel source, e.g. Frequently Drink mishap in a Silicon Valley office? Gleaming New Mexico or Colorado county

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DOWN

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LAX takeoff guess Kind of shorthand Marketing of goods in stores, usually Authorize Makes silent Most sound Tel. book listings “How’s —?” Curse word Organized bodies: Abbr. “— -leeze!” (“Spare me!”) Time span Funds added to a bank acct. Afore Director Welles Slightly warm Alpine river Giant Manning Junior, often Help in crime James with a 1958 Pulitzer Tiers “Oh, God!” director Carl Obscure Starts, as a task Charm Grand Canal city Trauma-trained pro Long, thin fish Hosp. area Wichita-to-Houston dir. Bounce “— Mir Bist Du Schoen” (1938 hit) Brow’s curve Romanov title Shout, in Lille

74 77 78 80 81 83 84 85 86 90 92 93 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 105 109 110 111 112 117 118 120 122 123 124 125 126

Family mem. Six-time U.S. Open winner Radio tuner Eyes Bone cover — Vegas “Quiet!” Janet of “Psycho” Pound noise Year, to Livy Equal: Prefix Feng — Radio spots On Soc. Sec., say Greek letters Bitter-tasting chemical salt “Madagascar 3: — Most Wanted” (2012 sequel) “CSI” procedure More banal Kingly home Tarzan, e.g. Conductor Toscanini Gossipy type Two-legged creature Op-ed piece Large playing marble Skiing base 1980s Chrysler — Aviv Carders ask to see them Two, to Juan Eden exile Actress Susan Choice words?

Downtown Greensboro’s newest recording studio is looking for recording engineers! Must be proficient in pro-tools combined with an Apollo D.A.W. Only serious applicants need apply. If you are interested in filling a part time or full time position please contact Basil Agapion at basilagapion@gmail.com for job details.

April 19-25, 2017

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Governor’s Lifetime Service Award Grace Lutheran Church on Washington Street in Greensboro received a letter from the office of Governor of the State of North Carolina from Roy Cooper, congratulating one of our own. A member of Grace Lutheran was to receive the Governor’s Lifetime Service Award for Volunteerism. This letter came as a huge surprise to long time member of the church, sister Shirley Mceachirn. While volunteering in the community she ensured the distribution of food, clothes, and being a known advocate for those less fortunate. Mceachin says that she was overjoyed and found it a pleasure to be o. At this time in her life she plans to do nothing more than to continue helping and supporting community member based activities.

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The Sportscenter Athlectic Club is a private membership club dedicated to providing the ultimate athlectic and recreational facilities for our members of all ages. Conveniently located in High Point, we provide a wide variety of activities for our members. We’re designed to incorporate the total fitness concept for maximum benefits and total enjoyment. We cordially invite all of you to be a part of our athletic facility, while enjoying the membership savings we offer our established corporate accounts. Visit our website for a virtual tour: sportscenterac.com/sportscenter-virtual-tour Contact Chris King at 841-0100 for more info or to schedule a tour!

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HPU sorority raises $28,000 for Breast Cancer Education and Awareness High Point University’s Zeta Tau Alpha Sorority hosted its 12th Annual Crown Classic Golf Tournament, raising $28,000 for Breast Cancer Education and Awareness. Each year the sorority invites the community to take part in the tournament, with all proceeds going to the Zeta Tau Alpha foundation and its efforts to support educational programming, scholarships, leadership development and the organization’s national philanthropy – Breast Cancer Education and Awareness. “The golf tournament was an absolute success, and we are so grateful for those who continuously support our organization and fundraising efforts,” said Lauren Fischetti, vice president of ZTA at HPU. “Everyone knows someone who has been affected by breast cancer, so to raise this amount for such a great cause is truly moving. We are eager to support our philanthropy and its efforts toward finding a cure.” The tournament included complimentary gifts and lunch for the players. The sorority also collected contributions from individuals who sponsored a hole, purchased a sign in memory/honor of loved ones or donated to the cause, culminating in the largest amount of money the event has ever raised. Zeta Tau Alpha has a longstanding tradition of promoting breast cancer awareness on the HPU campus and fundraising to support the cause. In addition to the annual golf tournament, the sorority also hosts Seeds of Hope, Big Man on Campus and Think Pink Week. !

(Above) Members of HPU’s Zeta Tau Alpha sorority host the 12th Annual Crown Classic Golf Tournament, raising $28,000 for Breast Cancer Education and Awareness. (At left) Zeta Tau Alpha member Erin Murphy high fives her father, who participated in the golf tournament.

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THE ONCE AND FUTURE OF

PHOTOS BY JEFF SYKES

By C H A R LEs WO O D

T

he railroad tracks that run along Oakland Avenue once separated UNCG’s campus and downtown Greensboro from the Glenwood neighborhood. It can be easy and convenient for UNCG students to forget that just across the street from their beautiful and expanding campus live many of the city’s working class and less fortunate. The crime rate of Glenwood is nearly double that of Greensboro as a whole. Property crimes, such as larceny, burglary, and theft are the most prevalent and makeup roughly seventy percent of the crime rate with drugs and prostitution making up for most of the remainder. The high number of abandoned and undermaintained homes that line the streets can easily overshadow the beautiful and

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historic homes in the neighborhood. The relatively high crime rate, low property value, as well as its proximity to campus are what makes the Glenwood neighborhood so attractive to UNCG. Glenwood is home to a tight-knit, multicultural community who thrive despite, or possibly because of, adversity of all kinds. Where are members of this community supposed to go when they are being systematically separated from their homes and businesses in the name of prosperity? Many residents of the community are members of the Greater Glenwood Neighborhood Association, a non-profit organization open to, “property owners, residents, renters, business owners, the clergy of faith-based groups in Glenwood, and friends of the neighborhood.” The mission of the GGNA is to, “conserve and

enhance our neighborhood’s aesthetic appeal, safety, and community character; including our historic buildings, parks, and open spaces.” The GGNA have worked with and against UNCG, with varying levels of success, in recent years over the campus’s plans for further expansion into the Gate City Blvd corridor and Glenwood area. UNCG, in response to a projected increase in enrollment, have invested hundreds of millions of dollars in the construction of Spartan Village as well as a new Rec Center. These developments have brought a number of changes to the historic Glenwood neighborhood. Many of Glenwood’s residents are not happy with UNCG’s expansion. Elizabeth L. Keathley, is a both a resident of Glenwood since 2002 and an Associate Profes-

sor of Historical Musicology and Women’s and Gender Studies at UNCG. According to Keathly, “Enrollment has been greatly overestimated yet development continues undeterred.” Keathly adds, “A student rec center no one wants costs $191 million dollars and will be paid by student fees.” The student fees Keathly mentioned will be between $435 to $600 per student and that just goes to pay off the interest. The rising student fees and price of tuition in turn only price out potential students and thus deter enrollment even further. Forty houses in Glenwood were destroyed in order to make room for UNCG’s expansion. Four of those houses were burnt down to the foundation. In 2012 UNCG called the Greensboro Fire Department and had them burn down the homes for practice. The practice was

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A row of remodeled houses on Haywood Street show signs of renewal just a block south of UNCG’s expansion into the Glenwood neighborhood.

much needed, apparently, because neighboring houses and trees were singed. The smoldering rubble wasn’t removed for months later. The majority of the houses were bought up in 2010 and 2011. Many of these houses were purchased by an LLC working in secret for UNCG. Though many of the houses were unoccupied, several still were homes to families. The rent on these houses was raised by two hundred dollars a month so the inhabitants could no longer afford to live there and were forced to move. Many of the houses purchased by UNCG were boarded up at the time of sale because investors who were just waiting to sell the property for a profit bought them up. In addition to the homes, one hundred and forty-seven trees across nearly fourteen acres have been destroyed by UNCG. In 2005, Glenwood won the first “Neighborwoods” grant from Greensboro Beautiful and the City of Greensboro due to the neighborhood’s beautiful tree cover. Eighty trees were planted as a result of the grant. UNCG, however, couldn’t care less about Glenwood’s Fauna. Fifty-two trees were cut down to clear a space for the rec center. Of these fifty-two trees, four were large oak trees over a century old. The date this happened, April 29, 2014, has been declared the Day of Abomination by the GGNA. The trees had helped to dampen the sound coming from the train when it passed on the tracks across Gate City Blvd and Glenwood Avenue. However, in the absence of the trees, the buildings now echo and amplify the sound. The absence of trees has also made the area hotter WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

and there is no way to measure the effect the trees removal has had on the air quality of the neighborhood. To understand why the neighborhood is held dearly in the heart of many of Glenwood’s residents you first have to understand its history. Glenwood may not be the most respectable community in Greensboro but it hasn’t always been that way. In the 1920s, Glenwood was among the most vibrant and thriving communities in the city. The area that would eventually become Glenwood was originally farmland just outside Greensboro city limits. Plans to turn the land into a neighborhood first began in 1908 and The Carolina Real Estate and Investment Company began construction of the first 50 homes in the neighborhood in 1909. The first school was built in 1912, the same year the Titanic sank. Glenwood was a thriving hub of commercial activity from the time the neighborhood was first established until the 1960s. Annexation of the neighborhood by Greensboro began in 1923 and was completed by 1957. The neighborhood was once the home of Telfair Sanitarium. The Sanitarium was moved from Asheville to 1305 Glenwood Avenue in 1907. The Telfair Sanitarium changed its name to Glenwood Park Sanitarium in 1918. The institution was established “for the care and treatment of mild mental, nervous, and habit cases” and was meant to be an idyllic slice of life free from the stress of city life. In addition to a sanitarium, Glenwood was also once home to a trolley system.

An abandoned house at the end of Haywood Street was torn down recently.

Electric streetcar service was brought to Greensboro via the New York financed Greensboro Electric company in 1902. People were excited to have such easy access to the home of the Greensboro Patriots, a minor league baseball team at the time, on Summit Avenue. Tracks led all across town with tracks to Lindley Park, Greensboro College, State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG), and by many mills and homes thus providing affordable transportation to and from work for many of Greensboro’s residents. The W. N. Coler Company of New York City purchased the streetcar system, including eleven miles of track, as well as the gas and utilities of Greensboro, in 1909. In 1915 the line expanded to the Irving Park neighborhood. Ownership of the streetcar system changed hands once again in 1926 when the North Carolina Public Service Company was purchased by what is now Duke Power Company of Charlotte. A trackless trolley service replaced the streetcar system in 1934. The new service included a route that led to downtown and Glenwood. It was during this time that Glenwood experienced it’s golden era. With the trolley system came shoppers and several small grocery stores opened throughout Glenwood as a result. Brick commercial buildings began popping up around Glenwood in the 1920s and were home to businesses like drug stores, dry cleaners, barber shops, butcher shops and cafes. The businesses were often on the ground floor of these brick two-story buildings with apartments taking up the remaining upper floor. These establish-

ments thrived for several years and the Glenwood and Grove Street areas became a buzzing hive of social and commercial activity. Unfortunately, everything came to an end in 1956 when Duke Power replaced the trolley system with diesel-powered buses. Glenwood began to slowly deteriorate once it was cut off from this vein to downtown. The removal of the trolley system led to falling property values, which in turn led to more and more abandoned, under used and poorly maintained houses. From 1990 to 2000, the percentage of residents living below the poverty line raised from 16.9 percent to 17.6 percent. Household income has increased but has barely kept pace with inflation. The percentage of residents with a high school diploma or GED has increased but the number of residents with a college degree has decreased. Nearly eighty percent of the homes in Glenwood were built prior to 1970 whereas the percentage for the rest of Greensboro is around forty. The majority of these properties are made up of small, single family homes. Only forty percent of Glenwood residents own their own homes. Housing code and public health violations are elevated in the neighborhood and violators are rarely reported, much less fined. These are both the symptoms and cause in the area’s crime rate, perceptions of danger, and unfavorable neighborhood image. “For a long time the city wasn’t enforcing housing standards,” said Patricia Wisneski, a neighborhood resident. “The APRIL 19-25, 2017

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A boarded up house on Grove Street was littered with trash in its yard. A sign on the wall warns trespassers not to drink on the premises.

city had to hire two people to spearhead repairing the system.” The two people Wisneski mentioned are Beth Benton, who is the Division Manager of the Code Compliance Division, and Mark Wayman, Compliance Code Field Supervisor. It is because of those two that residents who are renters now have somewhere to turn when confronting negligent landlords who allow their homes to fall into disrepair. There have been several revitalization projects started in Glenwood, especially in the 1970s and 80s. The Glenwood Neighborhood Watch program was established in 1977 by Janette Miller and was the first of its kind in Greensboro. The organization led to the formation of what would become the GGNA in 1981. The first UNCG Master Plan was completed in October 1984. This Plan has been updated in 1995, 2001, 2007, and, most recently, in 2014. The updates have stated the overall goals of UNCG, how UNCG plans to achieve these goals, an estimation of how much these goals will cost, how to pay for them and how long it will take to implement them. The stated goals of the 2007 UNCG Master Plan were to provide a strategy for accommodating a projected increase in enrollment, provide overall guidance for the design and construction of new and renovated facilities that meet the goals of the university, and, lastly, to maintain and enhance the aesthetic appeal of the

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campus. It was here in the fine print of these documents that implied buying up properties along what was then the Lee Street Corridor (now Gate City Boulevard) and expanding into Glenwood. On February 19, 2008, the GGNA adopted its Glenwood Neighborhood Plan. This plan was amended on September 13, 2011. The introduction to this plan states how, “Over the years, much of Glenwood’s original luster has faded...” and goes on to say, “Quality of life in Glenwood has been eroded, but the memories of many long time residents, former residents, and business owners agree that Glenwood was once a great place to live and work.” The overall goal of the Glenwood Neighborhood Plan is to “present practical strategies and policy recommendations for enhancing desirable conditions and reducing the undesirable conditions currently found in the neighborhood.” In order to achieve this, the Plan wishes to increase home ownership and maintenance, improve both walk-ability and bike-ability, promote desirable infill development, reduce crime and perceptions of danger, promote vibrant retail and services, and strengthen the community fabric. Beginning in 2010, representatives from UNCG began inquiries with the GGNA Boards, as well as City staff, in regards to the expansion of UNCG campus south, past the railroad tracks, into northern Glenwood. These inquiries led to a major

Back on the north side of Glenwood, very few of the neighborhood’s mature trees were left in the area of UNCG’s expansion along Silver Street. public engagement process through which UNCG collaborated with the neighborhood to craft a cooperative agreement for developing the campus expansion in harmony with the intent of the Glenwood Neighborhood Plan. This was followed by a rezoning and an amendment to the Glenwood Future Land Use Map, which was adopted by the Greensboro City Council in September 2011. It was during this period that UNCG acquired over 100 individual properties in preparation for the construction of Phase One of its Spartan Village Campus Expansion Project. This project broke ground in 2012. Conflicts between the goals of the GGNA, the UNCG Master Plan, as well as the interests of UNCG and those of Glenwood’s residents led to the formation of the Memorandum of Understanding between UNCG and the GGNA, or MOU, in 2012. The purpose of the MOU was to “establish a mutually agreeable framework for cooperatively addressing the short and long-term effects of UNCG’s expansion into the Glenwood Neighborhood.”

Some of the terms of the MOU included UNCG agreeing to “...develop in a manner consistent with the Neighborhood Plan and amendments thereto when adopted” and “..it will not acquire, for the purposes of trading, any property outside the RVP footprint with the potential for exception resulting from existing contingent agreements already in place.” UNCG also agreed to offer appropriate compensation for anybody displaced or relocated by the expansion, to not enact eminent domain to acquire property, and to not build any properties above four stories. All of those terms seem very reasonable, unfortunately, however, UNCG has been incredibly selective about what terms it chooses to honor and what terms it chooses to ignore. One of the most disputed clauses is item 23 of the MOU. Item 23 states that buildings 1,2, 5, 6, and 7 have been coded for commercial use and will be geared and marketed to the residents of Glenwood. It goes on to say that preference for the retail spaces will be given to local small business and the properties will have attractive lease rates.

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Grove Street is home to an organic commercial district in the heart of Glenwood just north of Florida Street.

Mike Byers, the former Associate Vice Chandler for Business Affairs at UNCG, was instrumental in the design and implementation of the MOU and UNCG Phase 1. It was during these talks that he assured a member of the GGNA that, “we are going to be sipping a beer here next year looking at the whole thing.” Byers heavily implied at times and other times said directly that the above mentioned mixed-use retail spaces will include table service restaurants as well as grocery stores that would serve adult beverages such as beer and wine in order to appeal to Glenwood residents. Tensions over the mixed-use retail space led to GGNA member Brain Higgins compiling a list of MOU violations committed by UNCG. The GGNA and UNCG met in 2015 via a third party mediator, as called for in the MOU. During this meeting, Chancellor Brady not only dismissed the concerns of the GGNA but condemned and mocked supporters by claiming it would be irresponsible to serve beer in a campus residential building. UNCG hired HR&A advisers, “an industry-leading urban development consulting firm with over 30 years of experience leading complex mixed-use strategic projects” to do some market research for the mixed-use retail spaces. HR&A released their UNCG/Glenwood Mixed-Use Village Retail Development Analysis Final Report on June 6, 2011. In their findings, HR&A compared the type of grocery store they WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

thought would best meet the needs and goals of UNCG to Best Way, a small grocery store on Walker Avenue known for it’s beer selection. The reports recommended that the spaces be used for at least five sit down, table service restaurants and grocery stores. In the report, HR&A also recommended opening up a brewpub. Despite these findings, as well as the wishes from the GGNA, UNCG decided to ignore the report. “The one thing I think everybody wanted was a thriving retail development,” said one member of the GGNA. Apparently, UNCG and Glenwood residents have conflicting ideas on how to accomplish that. Tensions between different parties within the GGNA threatened to tear the organization apart during the creation and adoption of the MOU. Patricia Wisneski, a GGNA member and Glenwood resident since the year 2000, experienced the process of adopting the MOU. “UNCG did a bunch of public meetings after it announced it was planning to expand into Glenwood,” Wisneski said. “This caused many members of the GGNA to become uncomfortable. I think the GGNA didn’t want to feel powerless to UNCG and wanted to have some say so in it’s future.” Wisneski goes on to say, “The process was horrible. We lost a lot of members during that time. Loud voices put out quieter voices.” “There are two Glenwoods, divided

A mural along Grove Street brought a sense of renewal to the block but it’s unfortunately been defaced with graffiti.

based on class, race, and language. Rarely do the two meet,” said Casey Thomas, a Glenwood resident of four years and a member of the GGNA. “Glenwood was historically a white, working-class neighborhood. The children of those people moved out and now there are many vacant houses. With so many empty houses and with home prices so low, land developers came in and bought up houses like hoarders, sometimes buying dozens of homes at a time.” While the cost of buying a home has remained stable, the cost of rent in the neighborhood has continued to escalate over the past few years. Thomas says that this “adds to the continual shuffling of low-income people of color from one neighborhood to another.” Thomas and Wisneski are also worried about the possible gentrification of the neighborhood. “Gentrification is a word that encompasses all kinds of sins,” Thomas said. “I’m worried about Glenwood becoming a lower part of Brice Street.” Thomas is also interested in the rising number of college students moving into the neighborhood and whether this might lead to a spike in petty crime as unsuspecting students get mugged over their laptops and iPhones. The elevated crime rate and abundance of uninhabited and under-maintained housing do not help Glenwood’s image in the eye of the public. How can this be fixed?

“I don’t think the question is how to improve Glenwood’s image as much as it is ‘how do we make life better,” said Thomas. “We need to start making landlords accountable.” There have been some positive changes to Glenwood in recent years. “I’d like to call out the Zetas from UNCG. They pick up trash on Aycock Street and helped with the community gardens,” said Thomas. Wisneski quotes the addition of the Hope Academy and Tutoring Program as another positive recent change. Hope Academy is in the education wing of Florida Street Baptist Church and is located at the intersection of Florida and Aycock Street. The Academy started in the home of the pastor of Grace Church and grew to include a middle school. It boasts a free tutoring program and has a dance program. UNCG students also volunteer at the Academy. Wisneski and Thomas are both cautiously optimistic of how UNCG’s expansion into Glenwood is going to affect the neighborhood. “I believe most of the confusion has been more misinformation than intentional,” says Wisneski. Thomas agrees and adds, “Lately, UNCG has been more upfront and transparent. That level of clarity makes it easier to work together. A lot of people have hope for positive economic development.” !

APRIL 19-25, 2017

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Submissions should be sent to artdirector@yesweekly.com by Friday at 5 p.m., prior to the week’s publication. Visit yesweekly.com and click on calendar to list your event online. home grown muSic Scene | compiled by Austin Kindley

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218 South Fayetteville St. | 336.610.3722 foursaintsbrewing.com Apr 19: Irish/Celtic Music Session Apr 22: James Vincent Apr 29: Bonnie Allyn Band May 5: Wolfie Calhoun May 12: Josh Marlowe May 13: Delta Son May 17: Irish/Celtic Music Session May 19: Shiloh Hill May 20: Reed Turchi

clEmmOnS

RIVER RIDGE TApHOUSE 1480 River Ridge Dr | 336.712.1883 riverridgetaphouse.com Apr 21: Southern Eyes Apr 28: Big Daddy Mojo May 5: Nine Lives May 12: pop Guns! May 19: Exit 180

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6000 Meadowbrook Mall Ct | 336.448.5330 Apr 22: Lasater Union Apr 29: ABC Trio May 6: Big Daddy Mojo May 13: Exit 180 May 20: Southern Eyes Jun 3: Shmack Daniels Jun 10: Lasater Union Jun 17: DJ Baldee

20 YES! WEEKLY

dAnBuRy

GREEN HERON ALE HOUSE 1110 Flinchum Rd | 336.593.4733 greenheronclub.com

gREEnSBORO

BUCkHEAD SALOON

1720 Battleground Ave | 336.272.9884 buckheadsaloongreensboro.com Apr 21: Jukebox Revolver Apr 22: Tyler Millard Band Apr 28: Chasin Flame Apr 29: Bad Romeo

ARIzONA pETE’S

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ARTISTIkA NIGHT CLUB

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BIG pURpLE

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2900 Patterson St #A | 336.632.9889 arizonapetes.com Apr 21: 1-2-3 Friday Apr 28: 1-2-3 Friday 523 S Elm St | 336.271.2686 artistikanightclub.com Apr 21: DJ Dan the player Apr 22: DJ paco and DJ Dan the player 812 Olive St. | 336.302.3728 May 25: Dave Cecil Band

THE BLIND TIGER

1819 Spring Garden St | 336.272.9888 theblindtiger.com Apr 20: Create, Warez w/ Two Face, Snyder, Fluxxy, Icex Apr 21: pure Fiyah Reggae Band Apr 22: Larry keel Experience with Jon Stickley Trio Apr 28: Imperial Blend Apr 29: The Brothers pearl May 2: Mick Jenkins with Special Guests May 3: Reading Day party with the Wright Avenue

2223 Fleming Road | 336.500.8781 burkestreetpizza.com Apr 19: Sam Foster Apr 26: James Vincent Carroll

213 S Elm St | 336.275.6367 churchillscigarlounge.com May 13: Sahara Reggae Band May 20: Jack Long Old School Jam 1700 Spring Garden St | 336.272.5559 corner-bar.com Apr 20: Live Thursdays Apr 27: Live Thursdays

COMEDY zONE

1126 S Holden Rd | 336.333.1034 thecomedyzone.com Apr 21: J. Bliss Apr 22: J. Bliss Apr 28: Bodacious Apr 29: Bodacious May 5: Jody kerns May 6: Jody kerns May 11: Julie Scoggins May 12: Jerry Farber May 19: Spanky Brown

COMMON GROUNDS

11602 S Elm Ave | 336.698.3888 Apr 19: Rinaldi Flying Circus, Charming Disaster, Shiloh Hill May 26: Andrew kasab

CONE DENIM

117 S Elm St | 336.378.9646 cdecgreensboro.com Apr 21: Blues Traveler Apr 22: Who’s Bad: The Ultimate Michael Jackson Experience Apr 27: Marsha Ambrosius & Eric Benét May 6: Trial By Fire: Tribute To Journey May 12: Chase Rice May 19: NF

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HAM’S NEW GARDEN

1635 New Garden Rd | 336.288.4544 hamsrestaurants.com Apr 21: Disco Lemonade Apr 28: Freddy Adkins Acoustic

SOMEWHERE ELSE TAVERN

5713 W Friendly Ave | 336.292.5464 facebook.com/thesomewhereelsetavern Apr 29: Desired Redemption, Ascentia, Key Of Betrayal, Impersona, Faces Unturned, A Young Man’s Burial May 12: 8 Vacant Graves, Bleedseason May 19: The Culturalist May 20: Mirada, Headfirst For Halos, Reason|Define, Fall River Massacre May 27: Sixth Sense, Education in Reverse, Antenora, Discoveries, Days To Break, Deep Hollow Jun 3: The Norm Jun 10: Mirada, Breathing Serenity, Visions of Beauty

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914 Mall Loop Rd | 336.882.4677 hghosp.com

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THE DECK

118 E Main St | 336.207.1999 thedeckatrivertwist.com Apr 21: The Plaids Apr 22: Disco Lemonade Apr 23: Spare Change Apr 28: Radio Revolver Apr 29: Stereo Doll

KERNERSVILLE

1706 Battleground Ave | 336.378.0006 Apr 21: Chris Duncan Apr 28: Private Party / no band May 5: Rube May 12: Julian Sizemore May 19: Southern Fiction May 26: Pay Rock & David McLaughin

DANCE HALL DAZE

THE IDIOT BOX COMEDY CLUB

THE EMPOURIUM

2134 Lawndale Dr | 336.274.2699 www.idiotboxers.com Apr 14: Mo Alexander Jun 23: Sean Patton

WORLD OF BEER

1210 Westover Terrace | 336.897.0031 worldofbeer.com/Locations/Greensboro Apr 29: WOB NC Beer Fest

HIGH POINT

AFTER HOURS TAVERN

612 Edgewood St | 336.558.7204 dancehalldaze.com Apr 21: Crimson Rose Apr 22: Silverhawk Apr 28: Skyryder Apr 29: The Delmonicos

8pm, Westover Church Take an epic journey to a galaxy far, far away as the Greensboro Symphony guides you through space and time with sci-fi favorites like Star Trek, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 2001 Space Odyssey and Star Wars. Plus a special tribute to Carrie Fisher aka Princess Leia!

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LEWISVILLE

OLD NICK’S PUB

191 Lowes Foods Dr | 336.747.3059 OldNicksPubNC.com Apr 21: Exit 180 Apr 28: Karaoke w/ DJ Tyler Perkins May 5: Evan & Dana May 6: Karaoke w DJ Tyler Perkins

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JP LOONEY’S

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April 29, 2017

734 E. Mountain St. | 336.671.9159

1614 N Main St | 336.883.4113 afterhourstavern.net Apr 29: The Norm, The Terrible Twos, Somewhat Forgotten May 27: Louder, Kwik Fixx, Dog Daze Jun 10: Mightier Than Me 1310 N Main St | 336.882.2583 reverbnation.com/venue/bluebourbonjacks Apr 24: Jukebox Revolver Apr 29: Southbound 49 Jun 9: Southern Eyes Jun 23: Southbound 49

Conductor Nate Beversluis

2213 E Oak Ridge Rd | 336.643.1570 facebook.com/JPLooneys Apr 20: Trivia

RANDLEMAN

5701 Randleman Rd | 336.674.5111 ridersinthecountry.net Apr 21: Eyecon Apr 22: Darrell Harwood Apr 29: Black Glass May 5: Chasing Fame May 6: Huckleberry Shyne

APRIL 19-25, 2017 YES! WEEKLY

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207 N Green St | 336.631.3143 2ngtavern.com apr 20: 420 Fest: roots of a rebellion, Egroove, Treehouse

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408 West 4th St | 336.331.3431 facebook.com/bulls-tavern apr 20: SoPoz apr 21: gypsy danger apr 22: The Chit nasty band apr 27: Samuel & brett of Elusive groove apr 28: Of good nature apr 29: Fruit Smoothie Trio May 4: J Timber & Joel Henry

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3870 Bethania Station Rd | 336.815.1664 apr 21: Just uS apr 22: Tanya ross May 5: Phase band May 12: Confuzion May 19: Jack of Clubs May 26: dustin York Jun 16: dom McManus

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638 W 4th St | 336.777.3348 foothillsbrewing.com apr 19: The ruckus apr 26: Hazy ridge apr 29: woodie and the String Pullers apr 30: Sunday Jazz May 3: bluegrass Sweethearts

THE garagE

110 W 7th St | 336.777.1127 the-garage.ws apr 21: ancient Cities & See gulls apr 24: Shana Falana, drag Sounds, Foxture apr 28: lacy Jags, Shelles May 5: bless These Sounds under The City, Melt

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206 Harvey St | 336.760.0362 thehickorytavern.com apr 20: Megan doss apr 21: Sarah Tomey apr 22: live Music apr 24: groove Food April 19-25, 2017

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2105 Peters Creek Pkwy | 336.724.0546 johnnynjunes.com apr 28: demun Jones May 6: Eyecon Jun 24: The lacs, Crucifix, and Southern Eyes Jun 27: Otherwise, righteous vendetta, Through Fire, a light divided

laugHing gaS COMEdY Club 2105 Peters Creek Pkwy laughingas.net apr 21: Jon reep apr 22: Jon reep

MillEnniuM CEnTEr 101 West 5th Street | 336.723.3700 MCenterevents.com Jun 11: Shovels and ropes

MilnEr’S

630 S Stratford Rd | 336.768.2221 milnerfood.com apr 21: live Jazz

MuddY CrEEk CaFE

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 apr 23: Horseshoe bend band apr 28: russell lapinski apr 29: The usual Suspects

MuddY CrEEk MuSiC Hall

5455 Bethania Rd | 336.923.8623 apr 20: Toney rocks apr 21: diana Jones apr 22: The guvner’s band apr 23: andrew Finn Magill with Paul Mckenna/bonnie bows apr 27: ray Scott with landon wall apr 28: June rise

PiEdMOnT MuSiC CEnTEr 212 N Broad St apr 14: Jazz w/ ron rudkin & Emile worthy

QualiTY inn

2008 S. Hawthorne Rd | 336-765-6670

THE QuiET PinT

1420 W 1st St | 336.893.6881 thequietpint.com

TEE TiME SPOrTS & SPiriTS

3040 Healy Dr | 336.760.4010 apr 15: Exit 180 band May 13: big daddy Mojo Jun 3: Honky Tonk Outlaws Jul 15: Jaxon Jill aug 19: Fuhnetik union

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tunes

HEAR IT!

Greensboro’s LeBaron prepare full-length debut: Shoegaze-y four-piece makes music that blossoms in a studio setting

C

BY JOHN ADAMIAN

larity in music isn’t always a virtue. Sometimes a little murkiness and mud makes all the crystal-clear moments stand out that much more in contrast. A flash of obscurity can make you pay more attention. LeBaron is a band that knows how to balance the extremes of sonic sludge and forceful body-blow low-end with up-front vocals and sometimes gleaming guitar sounds. The Greensboro band is set to release Perfect Destroyers, their debut full-length. LeBaron made the vocals up-front on the record, a choice that’s both about studio engineering and aesthetics. Many bands making this kind of music would have shrouded the singing in a hazier wash of other sounds or submerged the vocals in the mix. I spoke with guitarist/ singer Hanson King and drummer Owen Burd last week about the band and about how the songs take shape. LeBaron plays Thursday, April 20 as part of GSO Fest. Burd and King have been making music together for about 10 years. They both have experience with engineering in the studio. And King ran Bit Heart, a small grass-roots label, for a while, as well. LeBaron took a kind of shape when their friend, bassist/vocalist Kate Weigand, wanted to start a new project about two years ago. Guitarist Matt Lovett adds another layer of fuzz and filigree to LeBaron’s sound. “We just started bashing away writing some music,” says Burd. They trashed a lot of what they made and started over a bunch, but it all came together organically. The layers of saturated and carefully overdriven guitar sounds, blankets of reverb, ripples of delay, and yawning pitchsliding textures bring to mind bands that sometimes fall under the shoegaze tag, which is basically a swirl of psychedelic but abrasive post-punk and indie rock. “A fair amount of my favorite music when I was a teenager was in fact what is considered shoegaze music — My Bloody Valentine records, Ride records, that type of thing,” says Burd. “That said, I don’t think that any of us, in any conscious way, really care about trying to recreate that. But it is certainly an influence.” Distortion — controlled or not — and

24 YES! WEEKLY

APRIL 19-25, 2017

the physical force of sound waves can be as mesmerizing as virtuosity; patterns emerge that are like the patterns we hear in rhythms, harmonies and melodies. The textural patterns of a distorted guitar might have qualities of all three of those musical elements. LeBaron play with all that, but it’s not just about the guitar. The vocals sometimes have a slight smudge, or a quiet echo that almost serves as a kind of staggered harmony, like on the song “Nowhere’s Static.” And then real actual vocal harmonies get added to the mix on the refrain. This is heavy-leaning music. Burd frequently avoids the predictability of a backbeat, and there’s plenty of oddtime asymmetry to this music, giving it a math-rock/prog vibe in places. They remind me of both Polvo and Soundgarden (minus the operatic screaming) in places. Sometimes LeBaron brings to mind the excellent and difficult-to-pigeonhole band Pretty Girls Make Graves who made music filled with raw emotion and strange jagged artiness. There’s a muscularity to the songs on Perfect Destroyers that’s yet another kind of contrast within the music. Weigand’s songs, like “Owl, Moth, Cat, Crab,” create

little hypnotic oases on the record. The shoegaze sensibility usually suggests dreamy abstraction, a willingness to get lost in a sonic fog. But LeBaron manage to create both the sort of warped surface appeal of distended signals and spiraling atmosphere while keeping sturdy drums and spotlit vocals piercing through it all. This isn’t accidental. King says that, as someone who’s been making music and recordings for a while, he’s seen his share of projects that seemed to meet with bewilderment or frustration from people — critics, sometimes — who couldn’t understand or make out the vocals. “I don’t know if I would call it maturity or a concession — but people like loud vocals, I get it,” says King. There’s a song on the record called “Another Knife” that almost sounds like you could read it as a rocking riff on the state of people’s musical expectations. “They want something, something that’s trivial/ That they can chew up and force down,” goes the memorable refrain. It’s easy to get dazzled by the sound of the record and to focus solely on the textures, effects and dynamic contrasts of things, but King points out that these are

songs. Part of the process of assembling the pieces might happen in the studio, aided by technology and group improvisation, but the writing is still a product of personal musical drive and spark. “I think they come together in our brains first,” says King. “We’re writing the songs that are coming out of us. I’ll just wake up with a song in my head, and I’ve got to work it out. It’s the same way that Jackson Browne used to do it.” It’s hard to know if King’s reference to Laurel Canyon singer/songwriters is in jest, or another pointed contrast. Or maybe it’s just that — these are songs are like every other song: they emerge in semimysterious ways, with a mix of nudging and sitting back and waiting. The members of LeBaron want the music they’re making to be heard. They want it to be something that rewards repeated listenings. They want a listener to pay attention and catch new details over time. “A record’s only good if you’re hearing new stuff on it,” says King. “If no one wants to listen to it, you’re doing something wrong.” LeBaron play GSO Fest Thursday, April 20, at Hellraiser Haus. For more information visit gsofest.com. !

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Saturday July 29

Saturday

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- AAU Basketball District Championship > May 6-7 - Unity in the Pet Community > May 6 - GTCC Commencement > May 11 1-800-745-3000

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Event Hotline: (336) 373-7474 / Group Sales: (336) 373-2632

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One week until the 30th celebration of Merlefest: Early Sat Bird discount available through April 26

Y&T

www.lincolntheatre.com APRIL

We 19 DEVIOUS w/Eight Bit Disaster

/Gifted6 / Mr. Monopoly 9p Fr 21 JONNY LANG w/Quinn Sullivan 7p

Apr 22

Fri Apr 28

Sa 22 Y&T 8p Th 27 CODY JINKS

w/Ward Davis / Colter Wall

Fr 28 THE MANTRAS w/Dr. Bacon 8p Sa 29 DANGERMUFFIN Album Release w/ Dark Water Rising

Fr 5 Sa 6 Su 7 Fr 12 Fr 12

MAY

MINGO FISHTRAP 7:30p SPRINTER METALFEST 7p LIVE/DEAD ‘69 7p PULSE: Electronic Dance Party GREENSKY BLUEGRASS

Saturday Apr 29

9p

w/Joshua Davis This Show is @ THE RITZ RALEIGH Sa 13 MOTHERS FINEST w/Doby 7p Mo 15 REAL ESTATE w/Frankie Cosmos

We 17 MAYDAY PARADE

w/Knuckle Puck / Milestones 7p

Sa 20 BETTER OFF DEAD

With only one week until the start of MerleFest 2017, presented by Window World, the campus of Wilkes Community College in Wilkesboro, N.C. is buzzing with activity. Starting next Thursday, April 27, at 2:30 p.m., and running through Sunday, April 30, an estimated 75,000 participants will gather at this year’s 30th homecoming of musicians and music lovers to celebrate the world renowned MerleFest. With over 100 artists performing on 13 stages spread across campus, MerleFest fans have come to expect the unexpected. Late night jam sessions, band competitions, special guests onstage, impromptu dance parties and one-time-only musical collaborations are all a part of the fabric of MerleFest – and a testament to the enduring vision of Doc Watson and the Watson family. A key part of this vision is Doc’s love of “traditional plus” music. He created the moniker “traditional plus” to describe a unique mix of music based on the traditional, roots-oriented sounds of the Appalachian, including bluegrass and old-time, and expanded to include Americana, country, blues, rock and “whatever other styles we were in the mood to play,” as Doc put it. Today this “traditional plus” spirit means that country music star Zac Brown will rub shoulders with young bluegrass visionary Sierra Hull or Steep Canyon Rangers will share the stage with bluegrass legend Del McCoury. As the nation’s largest roots and Americana festival, MerleFest has room for all those who treasure the American traditions. The 30th celebration of MerleFest is a milestone that brings many MerleFest artists back to the festival’s stages for fresh collaborations and special events. Notably, The Transatlantic Sessions Tour will come to MerleFest – and the U.S. – for the first time ever, bringing hosts Aly Bain and perennial MerleFest performer Jerry

Dangermuffin Fri May 12

w/Moon Water

Th 25 FRANZ FERDINAND JUNE

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The Mantras

w/Cordovas

OLD 97’s LUCERO w/Banditos 8p INTERSTELLAR BOYS 8P HELLYEAH w/Kyng / Cane Hill 8p

Greensky @The Bluegrass Ritz

Mothers Finest Sat May 13

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Jonny Lang Adv. Tickets @Lincolntheatre.com & Schoolkids Records All Shows All Ages

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26 YES! WEEKLY

St.

APRIL 19-25, 2017

Real Estate Mon May 15

Douglas and guests folk-rock legend James Taylor, Sarah Jarosz, Maura O’Connell, Declan O’Rourke, Karen Matheson and Joe Newberry among others. Additionally, The Reunion Jam at the Watson Stage on Saturday will feature three-fourths of the legendary progressive bluegrass band Newgrass Revival, which includes 30-year MerleFest veteran Sam Bush. As well, the new MerleFest Museum will be open to offer festivalgoers the chance to appreciate these performances in MerleFest’s deep-rooted history. “We focused the MerleFest 2017 lineup on honoring artists who have performed with Doc Watson over the last 30 years of the festival,” said Steve Johnson, artist relations manager for MerleFest. “This was also a way to showcase the bands our fans have continuously requested over the years. The 30th celebration goes back to the 1988 Flatbed Trailer Jam at MerleFest. We ‘reunited’ as many of the musicians as we could get from that first jam, like Sam, Jerry and Béla, and added Mark Schatz and Bryan Sutton. We are indeed very excited to have a few new things to bring to the stages like The Transatlantic Sessions Tour with Jerry Douglas and Aly Bain featuring James Taylor and other guests of that set. It’s sure to be a special celebration of 30th years of MerleFest and we hope something that would make Doc, RosaLee and Merle proud.” The complete lineup and stage schedules are posted at merlefest.org/lineup and available on the MerleFest mobile app, which includes festival updates in real time. Updates are also delivered via Twitter (@MerleFest) and Facebook. Use hashtag #MerleFest to connect with other festivalgoers on social media, and be sure to take a picture with Flattop, MerleFest’s raccoon mascot, to share on social channels. Returning band members of Front Country are proud to be a part of MerleF-

est’s 30th celebration. “It’s Front Country’s second time at MerleFest, and we are honored to be playing the Watson Stage and to be busting out some special guests and surprises for our Saturday Night Dance Tent set,” said singer Melody Walker. “In the spirit of the ‘MerleFest Moment,’ we will be trying something crazy that we’ve never tried before at that set.” Hosted this year by Mipso and sponsored by The Bluegrass Situation, the Midnight Jam gathers many performers from the festival’s lineup for impromptu artistic collaborations and one-of-a-kind superstar jams. A separate ticket is required and available for purchase by four-day, threeday and Saturday ticketholders. Mipso has invited Jim Lauderdale, Donna the Buffalo, Peter Rowan, Sierra Hull, Celia Woodsmith of Della Mae, and others to take part in the hootenanny. This year’s guest voice for The Hillside Album Hour, hosted by The Waybacks, will be Della Mae lead singer Celia Woodsmith. The Waybacks and MerleFest have been leaking hints as to which classic album will be reinterpreted for the HAH, but the album in question will remain a mystery up until the start of the set on the Hillside Stage on Saturday at 4:15 p.m. In addition to musical performances, MerleFest offers special activities and unique shopping options. The Shoppes at MerleFest is a centrally-located shopping village that features demonstrating artisans, vendors, convenience foods, official MerleFest memorabilia and services such as first aid, lost and found, and Internet access. Tickets for MerleFest 2017 are on sale now and may be purchased at Merlefest.org or by calling 1-800-343-7857. An advance ticket discount runs through April 26, 2017. Gate pricing begins on the first day of the festival. !

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[PLAYBILL] by Lenise Willis

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STAGE IT!

Picasso and African myth unite in In the Red and Brown Water at NC A&T

P

art family drama, part African fable and part Picasso, In the Red and Brown Water is a dynamic thought-provoking piece that challenges both its audience and Lenise Willis its actors. And the students of North Contributing Carolina A&T State University are ready columnist to accept it. “West African Yoruba mythology is critical to this piece,” said director Dr. Darius Omar Williams, who is also the new theatre program director as of last August. “McCraney tells a modern-day story set in the Bayou of Louisiana while also remaining true to the original myth. The story is inspired by Frederico Garcia Lorca’s 1934 play, Yerma.” The piece, written by Tarell Alvin McCraney, is steeped in West African influence and is the first in a trilogy. It highlights a talented African-American track runner, Oya, who grows up in the projects of Louisiana and ultimately sacrifices her full-ride scholarship and future to stay at home with her dying mother. What ensues is a love triangle between her, a stable man with a stutter, Ogun, and the bad boy Shango. Through it all, Oya learns not only has she given up her chance at a successful career, but she also is unable to have children. Feeling though she has no place in society— either as a mother or career woman—she’s driven mad and even cuts her own ear off. Williams says the characters, Oya, Aunt Elegua, Mama Moja, Nia, Shun, Elegba, Shango, Ogun and O Li Roon, are also names of West African spirits. “West African deities are similar to Greek gods and goddesses,” he explained. “McCraney’s work functions both in and outside the traditional classical model. According to the Yoruba pantheon, the characters in the play are messengers (Orishas) and the embodiment of ashe, or the spiritual command also known as the power to make things happen.” McCraney’s In the Red and Brown Water wasn’t what the school had planned for its next production, but difficulties over rights and royalties forced the prgoram to switch at the last minute. “Unfortunately, that is the nature of both academic and professional theatre,” Williams said. “Sometimes

(Left to Right) Director Dr. Darius Omar Williams, Joseph Johnson playing Shango, and April Davis playing the lead role of Oya. changes have to be made. When I agreed to step in as director at the last minute, my primary concern was ensuring that the students would have an opportunity to execute and tell a good story in such a short turn around.” The cast and crew hit the ground running and Williams says the entire play was blocked in less than two weeks. Plus, because the new production requires a scaled back, minimalistic set, it allowed the actors to begin working in the Paul Robeson theater space early on. “It’s been a huge advantage for us in terms of acclimating their bodies in the space well in advance,” Williams said. Besides it’s logistical advantages, Williams loves the McCraney production because of his stimulating language, which is “universal and strongly grounded

in classical tradition.” “The New York Times describes this play as a ‘work of rare lyricism,’” he said. “My favorite aspect about it is that, ultimately, not only does this production of In the Red and Brown Water help to break down the boundaries and limitations of what we define as classical work, it also continues to challenge our students with a certain set of competencies that all professional theatre majors should possess. !

WANNA

go?

NC A&T State University will present In the Red and Brown Water Thursday through Sunday and April 27-30 at the Paul Robeson Theatre, 1601 E. Market St., Greensboro. Tickets are #17. For tickets and more information call 336-334-7749 or visit ncataggies.com.

Triad Stage’s Preston Lane awarded international playwriting residency Known for his beautiful artistic visions, Preston Lane is one of our own local claims to fame. He not only runs Greensboro’s only professional theatre, but has written 20 original to productions and adaptanL tions, including Common an e Enemy, Don Juan and one of my personal favorites, Tennessee Playboy. Lane’s work is regularly celebrated, but this week is cause for an extra big celebration. Lane is one of four playwrights in the world selected for a Literary Arts Fellowship from the Sally and Don s Pre

This is the last week of Triad Stage’s original production, Actions and Objectives, by Preston Lane. Set in a small town, the play highlights the community’s struggles, from Reconstruction to Black Lives Matter, while a local theatre company digs up the past and prepares a play for the town’s sesquicentennial. Meanwhile, the theatre’s WinstonSalem location (operating out of Hanesbrands Theatre) will present another thought-provoking drama on societal issues: And So We Walked. With previews beginning this Wednesday, the drama features a Native American woman (the very playwright) who traces her ancestry to the Trail of Tears. Production continues through April 30. Also new this Wednesday is North Carolina A&T University’s In the Red and Brown Water, a powerful story of a woman driven to a tragic, horrific act. Running through Sunday and then again April 27-30, the family drama is told in a unique way, weaving fables with realism. The Drama Center of City Arts also presents food for thought this week, but in a more playful manner, with More Fun than Bowling by Steven Dietz, a philosophical comedy, which uses the game of bowling as a metaphor for life. Play runs Wednesday through Sunday and April 27-30. See Theatre Alliance director Jamie Lawson make a rare appearance on stage this Friday through April 30 in the production Flames, a threeman suspense thriller. One year ago Edmond died in a horrible fire and took with him the dreams of his fiancée, the trust of his best friend, and the answers to the questions revolving around his death and the terrible crime he committed. But on a stormy night at the cemetery where he rests, the secrets from his past are revealed. Community Theatre of Greensboro’s production of Peter Pan opens this Friday and runs through May 7 at its Starr Theatre. On Saturday, the theatre is hosting a special event, An Evening in Neverland, an annual fundraiser for the theatre and its youth programs. The event includes the production, as well as a silent auction, food and live music at the Cone Event Center. Visit ctgso.org for more information. !

drama

Lucas Artists Program at the Montalvo Arts Center in Saratoga, Calif. Fellowships are awarded every three years, and candidates must be nominated and pass through a highly selective jury process. Lane is among 25 writers from a variety of forms and genres who will participate in the residency for three months over three years, from 2017-2020. Lane received his MFA in Directing from the Yale School of Drama, where he met Triad Stage co-founder Richard Whittington. ! APRIL 19-25, 2017

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flicks

SCREEN IT!

Once more into the screech, dear friends...

It’s time for yet another round of brainless, mechanized mayhem in The Fate of the Furious. This is the eighth in the inexplicably popular franchise, and since “fate” rhymes with “eight” … Let’s just say that if you liked the others, you’ll probably like this one. And if you didn’t, you needn’t bother. These films do tend to run Mark Burger together in the memory, even immediately after just seeing one. Of course, much of the old gang’s Contributing back: Vin Diesel (also a producer), columnist Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez, Tyrese Gibson, Chris “Ludacris” Bridges and Nathalie Emmanuel. Kurt Russell, last seen bleeding by the side of the road in Furious 7 (2015), has sufficiently recovered to reprise his role as the bemused government spook Mr. Nobody, accompanied this time by Scott Eastwood as Little Nobody, who is frequently the butt of jokes but, inevitably and predictably, prove his mettle behind the wheel. The story, such as it is, concerns the seeming betrayal of the “family” by Diesel’s Dominic Toretto, who’s been coerced by glamorous cyber-terrorist Cipher (Charlize Theron) to work on her behalf. (“Act” would be too strong a word, especially in light of Diesel’s stone-faced turn.)

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APRIL 19-25, 2017

This turn of events will require previous baddie Jason Statham to become part of the team. And, of course, it will require considerable automotive and property destruction on a grand scale. On that count, the special effects and stuntwork are up to the series’ par. But, let’s face it, there are no surprises here. Does anyone think that Dominic has truly gone rogue? Does anyone really care? Gibson and Bridges trot out their “comic” banter, which was never particularly funny to begin with, once more – to less effect than ever. Rodriguez and Eastwood are actually pretty good here. Kristofer Hijvu (of “Game of Thrones”) glowers and glares as Cipher’s right-hand man, Luke Evans and Elsa Pataky briefly encore from previous installments, and Helen Mirren has a high, hammy time in a cameo appearance. Theron, taking her role way too seriously, is arguably the most verbose screen villains in recent memory, as if delivering scads of dialogue could somehow elicit a reaction from Diesel, of which there is no chance. Indeed, the film is rife with meandering exposition and idle chitchat, making one extremely impatient for the demolition derby. The Furious films have never been strong on talk, and never has that been more evident than in The Fate of the Furious. Oh, in case you were wondering, the door is left wide open for future installments. Ain’t life grand? !

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Casualties of war Francois Ozon’s Frantz is set in the days following World War I. Anna (Paula Beer), a German villager griefstricken over the death of her fiancee Frantz during the conflict, lives with his parents (Ernst Stotzner and Marie Gruber), who are similarly pained. One day, Anna glimpses Adrien (Pierre Niney) placing flowers on Frantz’s grave. Intrigued, she learns that Adrien and Frantz knew each other in Paris. Reflective of the widespread lingering anger, Frantz’s father initially dismisses Adrien because he is French, but his stories about Frantz give them all comfort, and a sense of closure that ultimately turns out to be illusive. Adrien’s true connection to Frantz is revealed about halfway through the narrative, and it’s not altogether surprising. Yet it’s how Anna reacts to it, and the actions she subsequently takes, including a visit to Paris to reconnect with Adrien, where she herself experiences the festering hatred that exists – except from the other side. The film, which is graced by Pascal Marti’s exquisite, award-winning cinematography, is based on Ernst Lubitsch’s

Apr 21-27

[RED]

THE PROMISE (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 11:35 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:25, 11:25 Sun - Tue: 11:35 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:25 Wed: 11:35 AM, 2:30 Thu: 11:35 AM, 2:30, 5:30, 8:25 GIFTED (PG-13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:30, 11:45 Sun: 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:30, Mon: 12:10, 2:25 Tue - Thu: 12:10, 2:25, 4:55, 7:15, 9:30 GIFTED (PG-13) Mon: 4:55, 7:15, 9:30 FREE FIRE (R) Fri & Sat: 11:40 AM, 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:40, 1 1:50, Sun: 11:40 AM, 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30 Mon - Thu: 11:40 AM, 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:40 THE LOST CITY OF Z (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:35 AM, 2:30, 5:25, 8:15, 11:10 Sun - Thu: 11:35 AM, 2:30, 5:25, 8:15 PHOENIX FORGOTTEN (PG-13) Fri & Sat: 11:45 AM, 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45, 11:45, Sun: 11:45 AM, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45 Mon - Thu: 11:45 AM, 1:45, 3:45, 5:45, 7:45, 9:45 KABANERI: THE IRON FORTRESS - EXCLUSIVE THEATRICAL RELEASE (NR) Wed: 7:00 PM THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS (PG13) LUXURY SEATING Fri & Sat: 11:30 AM, 2:20, 5:10, 8:00, 10:50 Sun - Thu: 11:30 AM, 2:20, 5:10, 8:00 THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:50 TOMORROW (DEMAIN) (NR) Fri - Thu: 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:35, 10:05

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1932 film Broken Lullaby, an adaptation of Maurice Rostand’s play L’homme que j’ai tue. To some extent, Ozon (who also scripted with Philippe Piazza) sacrifices pacing for poetry. As a result, some of the story’s potential for suspense is hindered. Nevertheless, he coaxes first-rate performances from Niney, who appears almost preternaturally boyish, and especially Beer, who dominates the film with a low-key but assured performance. Both convincingly convey their grief and guilt through subtle gestures and glances. If the eyes aren’t the window to the soul, in both Beer and Niney’s case they are the window to the damage their souls have endured, due to circumstances beyond their control – damage that can never be repaired. (In French and German with English subtitles) !

GROW HOUSE (R) Fri & Sat: 2:30, 4:20, 7:00, 11:40 Sun - Thu: 2:30, 4:20, 7:00 GOING IN STYLE (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 12:35, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00 YOUR NAME. (KIMI NO NA WA.) (PG) DUBBED Fri & Sat: 2:25, 11:55, Sun - Thu: 2:25 PM YOUR NAME. (KIMI NO NA WA.) (PG) SUBTITLE Fri - Sun: 4:45, 7:05, Mon: 4:45 PM Tue - Thu: 4:45, 7:05 THE BOSS BABY 3D (PG) Fri - Thu: 11:50 AM, 4:45 THE BOSS BABY (PG) Fri - Thu: 2:10, 7:10, 9:35 T2 TRAINSPOTTING (R) Fri - Sun: 12:00, 9:30, Mon: 12:00 PM Tue - Thu: 12:00, 9:30 THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE (PG-13) Fri - Thu: 11:40 AM, 2:15, 4:50, 7:25, 10:00 POWER RANGERS (PG-13) Fri - Sun: 11:55 AM, 9:25, Mon: 11:55 AM Tue - Thu: 11:55 AM, 9:25 PERSONAL SHOPPER (R) Fri & Sat: 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:20, 9:35, 11:50 Sun - Thu: 12:20, 2:40, 5:05, 7:20, 9:35 LOGAN (R) Fri - Thu: 11:45 AM, 9:00 GET OUT (R) Fri & Sat: 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 11:55 Sun: 2:35, 4:55, 7:20 Mon: 2:35 PM, Tue - Thu: 2:35, 4:55, 7:20 THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (R) Fri & Sat: 11:55 PM

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CHASING TRANE: THE JOHN COLTRANE DOCUMENTARY Thu: 7:30 PM FREE FIRE (R) Fri: 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Sat: 11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30, 9:00 Sun: 11:00 AM, 1:30, 4:00, 6:30,Mon: 6:30, 9:00 Tue: 4:00, 6:30, 9:00, Wed & Thu: 6:30, 9:00 THE LOST CITY OF Z (PG-13) Fri: 2:45, 5:45, 8:45 Sat & Sun: 11:45 AM, 2:45, 5:45, 8:45 Mon: 5:45, 8:45, Tue: 2:45, 5:45, 8:45 Wed & Thu: 5:45, 8:45 THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE (PG-13) Fri: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00, Sat & Sun: 10:00 AM, 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Mon: 5:30, 8:00, Tue: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 Wed: 5:30, 8:00, Thu: 4:30 PM FRANTZ (PG-13) Fri: 4:15 PM, Sat & Sun: 11:15 AM, 4:15 Mon: 9:15 PM, Tue: 4:15, 9:15 Wed & Thu: 9:15 PM THE LAST WORD (R) Fri: 6:45, 9:15, Sat: 1:45, 6:45, 9:15 Sun: 1:45, 6:45, Mon - Thu: 6:45 PM

311 W 4th Street Winston-Salem, NC 27101 336.722.8148

Hop on the “Triple T” Express and let us transport you to  Willow's Bistro in Winston-Salem where Chef Travis Myers will  curate a dinner for 14. Triad Touring Tasters, is set to  launch on April 25, starting with a glass of wine at Zeto wine  and cheese shop in Greensboro, traveling to Willow's Bistro for  dinner, and returning to Zeto. Ticket sales include transportation,  meal,  meal and one complimentary glass of wine; additional beverages  and tip not included. Bon Appetit! Tickets available at: https://tttgoestowillowsbistro.eventbrite.com APRIL 19-25, 2017

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29


visions

SEE IT!

The dangerous dance of friendship BY BRIAN LAMPKIN A Review of Swing Time, by Zadie Smith (Penguin Press, 2016. $27.00)

W

e are stuck in an age of dichotomy. So easily the haves are separated from the have nots; the black from white; the blue from red; the city from country. The novelist Zadie Smith is ill-inclined to let dichotomy have its day. Her latest work, Swing Time, sweeps across the supposed dividing lines between culture/race/class and obliterates difference in a cloud of confused dust. Issues of race, gender and class are important to Smith (she doesn’t sweep the apparent difficulties under the rug of indifference), but she refuses the cliches of pigeon-holing any character to the cultural expectations of their race, gender or class. The two main characters (we meet them as young elementary school dancers) are both

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the

“brown”—daughters of white and black parents. Zadie Smith has used similarly parented characters in other novels and Smith herself is the daughter of a black Jamaican mother and white English father. Smith was also a young dancer and this novel—her first first-person work—has the sense of autobiography, however artfully employed. And while I can’t know if a young Zadie Smith was a lover of Fred Astaire movies, it is interesting to find these two young dancing girls enthralled by the silky moves of Astaire. Their passion is so convincing that it pushed me to YouTube to look at some old Astaire clips, and wow, what a thrill. This clip from the 1936 film Swing Time shows Astaire and Ginger Rogers at the height of their powers: https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=mxPgplMujzQ. Of course, Smith is fully aware of the racial history of dance and of the complications of cultural appropriation (es-

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pecially around tap dance), but she lets that history play out within the confines of the awareness of two brown preteen girls growing up in lower class London public housing. And if you’re on YouTube already, Smith leads you to the great Nicholas Brothers https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=LBQOfyR75vY and the history of moonwalking https://www. youtube.com/watch?v=hZHS-JKRuzw. Swing Time just won’t let the reader get comfortable with the dogmas of predetermined taste and aesthetics, or even with the predetermined notions of color. The unnamed main character is perceived as “black” in England, but is read as “white” when she travels to Africa as an aide to a pop culture icon—a one-named star reminiscent of Madonna. Race is malleable, it swings back and forth based on the uses and prerogatives of a dominant culture. And the novel swings across time and travels back and forth between countries and the metaphor extends toward the sky and nearly breaks at the apex. The scenes in Togo with the naively dogooding pop star are less effective than the superbly drawn English family lives and the exquisitely painful friendship between the two girls. But it is a big 452page novel with lots of room for side trips and slippery slopes. Zadie Smith always provides serious issues to ponder in her novels—from the immigration and colonization concerns of White Teeth to the aesthetics of On Beauty and the formal experiments

of NW. But what lifts her fiction to the extraordinary is the complete range of love and resentment, hate and resilience that informs her depictions of friendships. In Swing Time, we watch the young friends Tracey and the unnamed narrator go through years of attachment and distance along with dependence and disdain. In Smith’s world, friendships are necessary and even a means of survival, but also life-threatening and soul-destroying. We glimpse moments of bonding between them and witness their understanding of being known like no other person can know you, but the fact of this knowing creates vulnerability and fear. Friends are dangerous, and Zadie Smith uses that danger to heighten the vibrating tension in all her novels. Swing Time makes me think of the friendships of my grade school years— some of which have survived into my fifties. They’re all fraught with too much knowledge of each other, but also resilient in a way that makes no real logical sense. The two “brown” girls in Swing Time remain wary of each other even as Smith takes us through their adult years. Swing Time is the next book in the WFDD/Scuppernong Book Club. We will meet on Saturday, May 13 at 2:00 at Scuppernong to discuss the book, listen to some Zadie Smith interviews and maybe even dance. All are welcome. !

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A French connection, an Emmy nomination, and a brainy broadcast As part of the UNCG Campus Moviefest competition, sophomore Brendan Moore wrote and directed the film short Foodie in a week’s time. Foodie would go on to win the Audience Mark Burger Award, Silver Tripod Award for Editing Contributing and was one of four finalists to receive columnist the event’s Jury Award. Now, taking it to the next level, the film was selected to be included in the Campus MovieFest (CMF) program at the Cannes Film Festival next month. Each year, the CMF program screens hundreds of submissions from student filmmakers around the United States, then screens them as part of the Short Film Corner program. Therefore, Moore and producer Alex Suggs, both undergraduate media studies majors, will be going to France to present their film to an international audience, and to interact with the other student filmmakers whose work was accepted into the program. For more information about the Campus MovieFest program, visit the official website: http://www.campusmoviefest. com/cannes/ Benjamin Hoff, a 2016 graduate of

the UNCSA School of Filmmaking in WinstonSalem, has received a College Television Award nomination – commonly known as a “Student Emmy” – for the score he wrote for the 2016 fourth-year film Parchment Wings, directed by Fernando Andres Medina. Shortly after receiving his MFA in film music competition, Hoff was awarded a music internship with the Academy of Television Arts and Science Foundation, interning over the summer with composer Bear McCreary, known for his work on the Marvel superhero series UNCSA School of Filmaking graduate Benjamin Hoff “Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and AMC’s blockbuster music composition program, as Nathan hit “The Walking Dead,” as well as such Fenwick Smith won for his score of The feature films as Europa Report (2013) and Collection in 2014, the same year he 10 Cloverfield Lane (2016). graduated with an MFA. In an official statement, School of Both Hoff and Heckman studied with Filmmaking dean Susan Ruskin said: “We Chris Heckman, who graduated from the could not be happier for Ben. His nominaprogram and is now its director. “Contion for a Student Emmy is quite an honor, gratulations to Chris for the continuous and we hope he wins. With this nominaachievements of his students,” Ruskin tion and his internship, he is well on his added. “Nothing is more rewarding for a way to a very successful and rewarding professor than to see his students succareer.” ceed.” Were Hoff to win the award, he would The 38th College Television Awards will be the second winner from UNCSA’s film

be presented at a ceremony in Los Angeles on May 24, and the awards telecast will be streamed live at TelevisionAcademy.com/CTA. The official UNCSA website is www. uncsa.edu/. My Love Affair with the Brain: The Life and Science of Dr. Marian Diamond, which won the Audience Award “Best of Fest” at the 2016 RiverRun International Film Festival, will make its debut 9 pm Thursday on the NC Channel (one of the channels of PBS affiliate UNC-TV). Narrated by actress Mayim Bialik (fourtime Emmy nominee for CBS’ “The Big Bang Theory”), the film was directed and produced by Emmy winners Catherine Ryan and Gary Weimberg, with WinstonSalem resident Millie Borowiak serving as associate producer. It was Borowiak who’d wanted to tell the story of Dr. Diamond, a UC Berkeley professor and pioneer in the field of modern neuro-science, for many years. The film covers Dr. Diamond’s many accomplishments while also offering an intimate portrait of a woman who describes her 60-year career researching the human brain as “pure joy” and continues to pursue her career with an infectious zeal and passion. During its festival run, My Love Affair with the Brain racked up six awards, including two Audience Favorite selections. The official website for the film is: lunaproductions.com/marian-diamond/. !

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chow

EAT IT!

UMI Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Lounge lights a fire in WS

I

BY KRISTI MAIER | @triadfoodies

have to admit. I was unaware until early this year that a big Japanese Steakhouse was going up on Hanes Mall Boulevard. And once I learned a bit more, I truly was curious. Even more so when I found out that this type of restaurant would be the first of it’s kind in Winston-Salem—an actual, locally owned Japanese hibachi style steakhouse that also serves entrees and sushi. You know you love it. Sitting around an eight-person table while spatulas fly and knives cut effortlessly through thick pieces of steak and butterfly the shrimp and cube the chicken. You might smell like oil and onions for the rest of the day, but it’s fun and festive and communal and that’s what keeps folks going back to places like this. Big, soothing plates of piping hot rice with that sweet sauce don’t hurt either. UMI opened in early March and is owned by Ryan Li and Vince Li, who owns several similar restaurants in Ohio. Vince Li says Ryan encouraged him to consider Winston-Salem for his newest venture

and not only did he choose the city for his restaurant, but also his future home for his family. Early on, some members of the press got a bit of a preview during VIP night. We were unable to attend, so a few days later, we accepted an invitation to lunch to take some photos and get an idea of what’s on the menu.

When you enter UMI, you’ll find an inviting bar that can open up to an attached patio that also has a bar with screens. It’s vast and can seat 500 people with private dining rooms available. The front portion of the restaurant also has what’s described as “intimate dining,” for those who forgo the hibachi experience. You can order entrees, like bass, appetizers, bento boxes, as well as sushi here. But hibachi is super fun. And you can gather around the table and still have all the choices of the entrees and sushi. So it’s like the best of all worlds.

Li and his team let us just pick our pleasure, if you will. One of our littles especially loves gyoza. We were lucky enough to steal a piece from her plate, as she’ll tend to make it her entree. The steamed gyoza had the perfect sear. The sauce could’ve had a bit more sweetness to it but she was a fan and if that’s the case, we’re happy. The vegetable tempura that arrived next was perfectly prepared and included some tempura broccoli, to my delight. It’s served with a similar sauce as the gyoza.

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We are sushi lovers and really enjoyed the Winston Roll, with spicy tuna, tempura crunch and raw eel. The fish was fresh and it was beautifully prepared. Li then brought out some sashimi and nigiri pieces of sushi and proudly unveiled the Sea Bass entree, which is featured on the regular menu. It was beautiful with a bright selection of seasonal vegetables (asparagus, onions, peppers) served with black bean sauce. The entree menu includes udon (thick rice noodles), katsu and a number of tempuras. But most folks who visit restaurants like UMI are all about that hibachi. Each entree comes with the customary soup and salad. You don’t get a lot of choices of dressing but we highly recommend you go with it and get the ginger dressing. We let the kids share a child’s portion while my husband and I ordered steak and shrimp. And to our delight and increasingly full tummies, the chef let us try just about every protein option there is. Filet, shrimp, chicken, scallops, snapper, lobster and salmon even. All the typical fun elements are there. But what stood out to us was the welcome inclusion of broccoli and carrots and mushrooms to the usual suspects of onions and zucchini. A happy colorful plate of veggies. The hibachi chef was fun and from what I can tell, most can perform all the tricks that make hibachi what it is. We had so much left over and enjoyed every last bit of it. Our daughter was so pleased with the overall experience that WWW.YESWEEKLY.COM

she requested UMI for her birthday. So we returned a few weeks later with extended family and everyone ordered hibachi this time. Once again, we had the complete experience with a fun chef who enjoyed tossing food at us to catch in our mouths. We did have a moment of a mini-crisis when he realized his cook top hadn’t been prepped and wasn’t hot. But he entertained us with his spatula antics and his reassuring chatter. The colorful veggies, perfectly prepared rice and protein choices all stayed true to form and preparation. There are many meat combos to choose from and they encourage the guest to create any combo they like and they’ll accommodate. So all in all, I think Winston-Salem has a winner with UMI. As we have mentioned before, with any new restaurant, all those kinks need to be worked out. We’ve had excellent service each time, realizing the first time around was a special invite but the real test is when you go in with your people, some of them a bit hard to please and big time fans of Japanese-style steak houses. And all the members of our group left full and satisfied. !

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UMI Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Lounge is located at 1280 Creekshire Way off Hanes Mall Boulevard in Winston-Salem. Visit umihibachi.com for more information. Open for lunch and dinner, seven days a week. Reservations are accepted. APRIL 19-25, 2017

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photos [FACES & PLACES] by Natalie Garcia

AROUND THE TRIAD YES! Weekly’s Photographer

Jake’s Billiards Greensboro | 4.15.17

presents

hot pour BARTENDERS OF THE WEEK | BY NATALIE GARCIA Check out videos on our Facebook!

BARTENDER: James “El” Primitive BAR: The Empourium, Kernersville AGE: 25 HOMETOWN: Grew up in Carrboro and moved here from Asheville. BARTENDING: Almost a year Q: How did you become a bartender? A: Dumb luck, great friends and musical ability.

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Q:What’s your favorite drink to make? A: Definitely my Bloody Mary. We make the best ones in the Triad. Two words: Bacon. Vodka. Q:What’s your favorite drink to drink? A: I love my cocktails, but a cold, hoppy/citrus beer off the tap is the best drink. Q:What’s the craziest thing you’ve seen while bartending? A: Saw a UFO. A light ducked

APRIL 19-25, 2017

throught the clouds and then back up. I begged them to take me with them, but they kept going. Q:What’s the best tip you’ve ever gotten? A: $120 Q: How do you deal with difficult customers? A: With compassion and understanding, at least until it’s time for them to leave. Q: Single? A: No, I’d like a double please. No ice.

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VISIT YESWEEKLY.COM/GALLERIES TO SEE MORE PHOTOS!

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UNITED WE FIGHT. UNITED WE WIN. U

nited Way fights for the health, education, basic needs, and financial stability of every person in our community. We win by living United. By forging unlikely partnerships. By finding new solutions to old problems. And by inspiring individuals to join the fight in our community’s most daunting social crises. When we Live United, we take on the hardest challenges and tackle problems others shy away from. Here are just a few of the ways we are changing our community for the better:

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Burning Down The Triad 7 @ The Empourium Kernersville | 4.15.17

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APRIL 19-25, 2017

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last call

[HOROSCOPES]

[TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A lightbulb may turn on for you this week. It is possible that the way to solve a creative dilemma drops into your head. It may have to do with color and design. At minimum, the path becomes easier to access. Romantic and creative life are turning in the right direction.

[LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You have been hesitating to commit yourself for several weeks. This might be over a relationship or an important purchase. Venus, your ruling planet, turns direct this week and gives you a nudge forward. It will soon be time to commit or bring this long-standing issue to a close.

[GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Listen carefully this week for intuitive guidance. Your unconscious is “in touch” with your lifepath and it will guide you. Clear out the mind/ego chatter as well as you can, and accept that which does not flatter the ego. There you will find real wisdom that makes sense.

[SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) This is a fine time for you and a partner to discuss any issues between you. It is a good period for coming to agreement on circumstances that have been issues in the past. You may be especially enjoying music or the arts together. Intimacy brings you closer together now.

[CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You are in a reasonably good place with yourself at this time. Your heart and mind are flowing together. You have no conflict between your feelings and your thoughts about those feelings. This is a time for reflection on important subjects. You can make good decisions now.

[SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) At this time a project begun in November is showing signs of growth and development. Now it points toward manifestation, although it needs more work. This is part of the greater need to reinvent yourself which began in 2015.

[LEO (July 23 to August 22) You have

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the opportunity to speak out on behalf of the group at this time. You come across as one who has a vision of the future and others will listen to you because your commentary is persuasive. Your mind is both steady and imaginative now.

[VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Day to day life is favorable at present. There are no big conflicts between you and anyone of importance. Social life is favored with partner, friends, and neighbors. Short trips to interesting nearby places could prove refreshing and educational.

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[CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Activities related to home, hearth, and family are supportive to your sense of stability now. Anything that suggests remodeling or updating is refreshing to you. It could be property or your personal office. It might involve “updating” your knowledge of the technology necessary to accomplish a goal. [AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Listen closely to your inner self. If you have tolerated a rule well beyond its time, you may rebel and demand to do something different now. Plan a few hours of refreshing change. Try something new. [PISCES (February 19 to March 20) The goddess of love, Venus, is turning direct in your zodiac sign this week. This suggests that you now feel able to move forward in matters of love and romance. She also represents expenditures which are luxurious. Venus also favors the arts. You may feel free to treat yourself after a long, dry period. [ARIES (March 21 to April 19) A project begun in January is showing signs of growth and development. Although it needs more work, at this point it appears to be manifesting. You may be in the midst of persuading others to your point of view. (3rd house) They are listening, so carry it further. Your mind is both steady and imaginative now. Are you interested in a personal horoscope? Vivian Carol may be reached at (704) 366-3777 for private psychotherapy or astrology appointments. There is a fee for services. Website: http//www.horoscopesbyvivian.com

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[THE ADVICE GODDESS] love • sex • dating • marriage • questions

LOOT CONQUERS ALL

Nobody expects a free meal from a restaurant. So what’s with wedding guests who think it’s acceptable to give no gift or just $100 Amy Alkon from two people? My understanding is that you are Advice supposed to “cover Goddess your plate” — the cost of your meal (at least $100 per person). If you can’t, you shouldn’t attend. I’m planning my wedding and considering not inviting four couples who gave no gift at my two siblings’ weddings. Upsettingly, most are family members (and aren’t poor). I’d hate to cut out family, but if they won’t contribute, what else can I do? — Angry Bride If gift price is tied to meal price, it seems there should be a sliding scale. Uncle Bob, who’ll singlehandedly suck down 16 trays of canapes and drain the open bar, should pony up for that Hermes toaster oven. But then there’s Leslie, that raw vegan who only drinks by licking dew off leaves. Whaddya think...can she get by with a garlic press and a handmade hemp card? The truth is, this “cover your plate” thing is not a rule. It’s just an ugly idea that’s gained traction in parts of the country — those where bridezillas have transformed getting married into a fierce social deathmatch, the wedding spenda-

thalon. What gets lost in this struggle to out-lavish the competition is the point of the wedding — publicly joining two people in marriage, not separating their friends and relatives from as much cash as possible. And though it’s customary for guests to give gifts, The Oxford English Dictionary defines “gift” as “a thing given willingly” — as opposed to “a mandatory cover charge to help fund the rented chocolate waterfall, complete with white mocha rapids and four-story slide manned by Mick Jagger and Jon Bon Jovi.” But because you — incorrectly — believe that guests owe you (more than their company), you’ve awakened your ancient inner accountant, the human cheaterdetection system. Evolutionary psychologists Leda Cosmides and John Tooby describe this as a specialized module the human brain evolved for detecting cheaters — “people who have intentionally taken the benefit specified in a social exchange rule without satisfying the requirement.” Identifying and punishing freeloading slackers was especially vital in an ancestral environment, where there weren’t always enough grubs to go around. These days, however, maybe you have the luxury to do as I advise in “Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck”: refuse to let a few (apparent) Stingy McMingies shape “who you are — which is created through ... how you behave.” Instead of grinding down into tit for tat, you can decide to be generous. It’s a thematically nice way to start a marriage — in which 50/50 can sometimes be 95/”Hey, don’t I at least get your 5 percent?” It also makes for a far less

cluttered invitation than “RSVP...with the price of the gift you’re getting us — so we know whether to serve you the Cornish game hen at the table or the bowl of water on the floor. Thanks!”

HELLO HATH NO FURY

Though my boyfriend is loving and attentive, he’s bad at responding to my texts. He’s especially bad while traveling, which he does often for his work. Granted, half my texts are silly memes. I know these things aren’t important, so why do I feel so hurt when he doesn’t reply? — Waiting You’d just like your boyfriend to be more responsive than a gigantic hole. (Yell into the Grand Canyon and you’ll get a reply. And it isn’t even having sex with you.) What’s getting lost here is the purpose of the GIF of parakeets re-enacting the Ali/Frazier fight or the cat flying through space on the burrito. Consider that, in the chase phase, some men text like crazy, hoping to banter a woman into bed. But once there’s a relationship, men (disproportionately) use texting as a logistical

tool — “b there in 5” — while women continue using it as a tool for emotional connection. That’s probably why you feel so bad. Feeling ignored is also not ideal for a relationship. In research psychologist John Gottman did on newly married couples, the newlyweds who were still together six years down the line were those who were responsive toward their partner’s “bids for connection” — consistently meeting them with love, encouragement, support, or just attention. Explain this “bids for connection” thing to your boyfriend. (That mongoose in a dress is just meme-ese for “Yoo-hoo! You still there?”) However, especially when he’s traveling, a little reasonableness from you in what counts as a reply should go a long way. Maybe tell him you’d be happy with “Ha!”, “LOL,” or an emoji. You’d just like to see more than your own blinking cursor — looking like Morse code for “If he loved you, he’d at least text you that smiling swirl of poo.” ! GOT A problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com) © 2017 Amy Alkon Distributed by Creators.Com.

W E L C O M E F URNI T URE MA RK E T

TR ASURE CLUB

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[WEEKLY SUDOKU] sudoku on page 14

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Yes! Weekly - April 19, 2017  
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