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Yancey County News Brush Creek - Burnsville - Cane River

Crabtree - Egypt - Green Mountain - Jacks Creek

Pensacola - Price’s Creek - Ramseytown - South Toe

www.yanceycountynews.com vTo be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.v Sept. 26, 2013 W Vol. 3, No. 39 v Recipient of the E.W. Scripps Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment v

AMS students taking a hike to remember

Bee Log family of seven loses house to flames

Students and staff of the Arthur Morgan School in South Toe are spending six days enjoying some of the best hiking trails in Western North Carolina, including a walk from Celo to Asheville. Only the most advance hikers are chosen for this trip that leaves directly from AMS. Hikers don their packs and walk directly out of the school doors, over Mt. Mitchell to the Folk Art Center in Asheville. The hikers spend the evenings sleeping under the stars, and for some this is their first steps on the Appalachian Trail as they traverse over Roan Mountain and through Carvers Gap. The most challenging and sought-after trip, however, is the hike to Asheville. Strong hikers - those who can keep a determined attitude during long days and the possibility of rainy weather, are chosen for the hike, school leaders say. See Page 6

Jumping For Joy Photo by Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News

The clothes dryer sits in the yard at the destroyed Bee Log home of the Geraci family. The fire was apparently sparked by the dryer vent last Wednesday.

By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News A Bee Log family lost their home and family pets last Wednesday in a ferocious fire sparked by a burning dryer vent. The home of Matt and Velena Geraci, located off Bald Mountain Road, burned Wednesday afternoon while Velena Geraci was working on the third load of laundry of the day and caring for Ayla, their four-year-old, Matt said. They had a movie on for entertainment when something made her go check the laundry room. Black smoke poured out and the fire leapt through the house. “She barely had time to grab Ayla to get out side,” Matt said. As they ran from the house, he said large pieces of the ceiling were falling behind them. Matt, who works construction, and his mother, Karen Bach, arrived as Velena and Ayla stood in the yard watching the home burn. Karen, owner of the Music Box store in Photo by Brett Hopson Burnsville, was frantic as her two beloved dogs, Cougars were happy Friday as the varsity beat West Sugar and Jasmine, were in the burning house Henderson 47-31 at homecoming. See more sports as was the Geraci’s pet parrot. The pets were photos inside! lost in the flames.

Downtown regulars may remember Bach’s puppies, two Pomeranians, when they came to work each day with Bach. Word spread quickly through the closeknit Bee Log community, and buses took the family’s four other children to the home of another grandparent so they wouldn’t arrive on the bus as their home was burning. Other than Ayla, the children are Aaron, 14, Maya, 13, Summer, 10, and Hannah, age 8. Friends are offering shelter and a clothing collection at Guy’s General Store has resulted in boxes full of apparel being given to the family, but what they say the really need is the chance to replace their uninsured house. Matt has the skills to build a home, his mother said, and the family would appreciate donations of building materials or money in order to get back on their feet. “They’re so thankful for all the help they’ve already received,” Bach said. Those wishing to help the family can contact Bee Log Elementary, Jason at Guy’s General Store, or Karen Bach at the Music Box, 132 West Main St., Burnsville.

Ironwood Therapeutic Arts = Healing Arts Acupuncture • Therapeutic Massage • Chinese Medicines 131 N. Main St., Burnsville • Mon-Sat by appointment In the brick building across from Burnsville VFD

Eliza Wallace LMT • Jade Pierce L.Ac.

Open House

Sept. 28 noon-4


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What does a voucher accepting school look like?

Part III of an NC Policy Watch series Beginning in 2014, some North Carolina families will be able to use taxpayer dollars to send their children to private schools. School vouchers, formally known as ‘Opportunity Scholarships,’ are offered up by school choice advocates as the cure-all for underserved minority children who are failing in the public school system. Qualifying families will be able to use the vouchers seek out better educational alternatives in private schools offering smaller class sizes and more specialized instruction. Critics of the voucher system say the program will siphon desperately needed funds out of the public school system to offer what would effectively be a tax break to families who can already afford to send their children to private schools. That’s because at $4,200 per year, a school voucher isn’t enough to cover the cost of attendance at most private schools in the state. Truly lowincome families won’t be able to make up the difference between the voucher and the tuition, fees, and transportation costs. Following part I and part II of our series on school vouchers, today we look closely at some private schools that stand to benefit from the Opportunity Scholarship Program. *** New City Christian School, a K-6 private school in Asheville, is one of nearly 700 private schools (70 percent of which are religious institutions) in North Carolina that are eligible to receive students who have Opportunity Scholarships come 2014. According to New City’s website, the school was founded in 2006 in response to a persistent community problem in Asheville of an academic “achievement gap” between white and AfricanAmerican students. “Minority kids are not doing well in Asheville’s public schools,” New City’s executive director, Coral Jeffries, told NC Policy Watch. “Less than 50 percent of [minority] students pass the End of Grade (EOG) tests in many schools, and North Carolina’s EOGs are very easy.” To compare students’ academic performance at New City to that of students in Asheville City Schools is not easily done. Students at private schools in North Carolina are required by law to take a nationally-normed standardized in grades three, six and nine; students in public schools take End of Grade (EOG) tests, which are not nationally normed, in grades 3-8 and 10. Students at New City take the WoodcockJohnson III standardized test. According to the school’s website, 54 percent of African-American students who had attended at least one year at New City scored above the 75th percentile for Total Achievement, which tests students in reading and

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Yancey County News LLC 127 W. Main Street Burnsville, NC 28714 828-691-0806 or 691-0807 jonathan@yanceycountynews.com susan@yanceycountynews.com The Yancey County News (USPS publication No. 3528) is published weekly for $25 per year in Yancey County, $35 per year out of county. Published by Yancey County News LLC, Periodicals postage paid at Burnsville, NC. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Yancey County News, 127 W. Main St., Burnsville, NC 28714 Printed in Boone by the Watauga Democrat on recycled paper.

To be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard. vRecipient of the 2012 Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism and the Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, integrity and tenacity in rural journalism v

math. That sounds better than the percentage of African-American students who pass End of Grade tests in Asheville’s public schools, which is as low as 32.8 percent at one elementary school – but how would a parent be able to truly compare? How rigorous is the Woodcock-Johnson III and how does its testing components compare to EOG testing? How would those private school students perform on public school EOGs after completing coursework at New City? It’s a guessing game. New City also does not accept students with severe learning disabilities. “We get no government funding for extra resources for truly special needs,” said Jeffries. “We do take students who have IEPs (Individual Education Plans), but it would be morally wrong to take students we can’t help,” Jeffries explained, meaning students who have significant learning needs. “We have no one on staff with a degree in special education.” While New City is able to provide smaller class sizes and “a spiritual focus to provide a hopeful framework for life’s challenges,” questions arise with regard to access and religion. The vision of New City is to “provide an education that is Christ-centered and academically rigorous.” To that end, the school’s philosophy of education embodies the following: “Since God’s truth is revealed in the scriptures as well as in all creation, the Christian worldview approach integrates the truth of scripture with learning in all subject matter.” Jeffries says none of that will change once 2014 comes and voucher-bearing students come to their doors. “We welcome anyone from any faith or no faith at all to our school,” said Jeffries. “But a parent has to understand that we will do certain things in certain ways. If they are not comfortable, they shouldn’t come to our school. No one is compelled to come to our school.” “We are not coercive,” Jeffries emphasized. “People who have been rescued by God understand that you don’t force it on someone.” New City charges tuition and fees to families on a sliding scale, taking into account household income and ability to pay. Jeffries says it costs roughly $6,600 to educate a child at New City, but few families are in a position to pay that amount, so the school raises money elsewhere, from local individuals who care about social justice to church meetings where a hat gets passed around. Jeffries has also been involved in lobbying efforts for the Opportunity Scholarship program, having donated $1,000 in 2012 to a political action committee called Partners for Educational Freedom. That PAC is associated with Parents for Educational Freedom North Carolina (PEFNC), an organization known for its involvement in school privatization and vouchers. In 2012, Partners for Educational Freedom PAC funneled more than $90,000 in campaign funds to lawmakers who would work to push school voucher legislation through the General Assembly. Rep. Marcus Brandon (D-Guilford), a key champion of the school voucher legislation, received campaign contributions totaling more than $10,000 from school choice proponents – approximately 25 percent of all donations he received. Jeffries said she made the $1,000 donation to support the passage of the school voucher legislation because she has firsthand experience with her private school. “To see the Opportunity Scholarship bill pass – that says no matter what your income is, you’re not stuck with what our government offers. It’s about justice,” said Jeffries. While not all leaders of other private religious institutions have embarked on lobbying campaigns to get school vouchers enacted into state law, it’s worth highlighting another one of those schools that stands to gain from the Opportunity Scholarship Program as an example of the lengths to which taxpayer funds will fund religious education. Bethel Christian Academy in Kinston serves grades K-12 and also houses a day care. Bethel bills itself as a fundamental Christian school whose purpose is to “provide its students with an educational program that in its entirety, exalts and

glorifies the Lord Jesus Christ by making Him the center of all things.” Admission is based on past report cards, performance on previous achievement tests and an entrance test, in addition to an interview. According to its handbook, Bethel uses textbooks that are “God-centered, teaching spiritual truths, morality, and patriotism.” The textbooks that Bethel uses include the A-Beka Book curriculum and books from Bob Jones University Press. These texts teach students Bible-based facts, including the following: dinosaurs and humans co-existed on Earth; slavemasters generally treated their slaves well; in some areas, the KKK fought the decline in morality by using the sign of the cross; and gay people have no more claims to special rights than child molesters or rapists. Bethel’s Standards of Conduct are peppered with Christ-honoring language. Notably, Bethel requires the following of each student, whether they are at school, home or elsewhere: “to refrain from participating in worldly activities such as swearing, indecent language, vandalizing of any property, trashing of any public or private property (i.e. “papering” a house), smoking, possession or use of alcohol, drugs or tobacco, gambling, viewing pornography, premarital or extramarital sex, homosexuality or other sexual perversions, and involvement in secular, non-Christ honoring music.” If you are a gay student or interested in listening to or creating secular music, that’s grounds for expulsion. School officials at Bethel Christian did not return calls for comment. *** Earlier this year, the Supreme Court in Louisiana ruled that state funding for vouchers was unconstitutional. The 6-1 ruling did not specifically strike down the voucher program on the basis of the First Amendment Establishment Clause, prohibiting the use taxpayer funds to support religious education. Instead the ruling more simply stated that public money then being used to pay private and religious school tuition should be going to public schools, as it was intended. Contesting the constitutionality of a school voucher program on the grounds that it violates the separation of church and state is tricky territory, according to first amendment lawyer Erwin Chemerinsky, Dean of the School of Law at the University of California-Irvine. “In 2002 case Zelman v. Simmons-Harris, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a 5-4 decision that allowed for school vouchers to go to religious schools. But only if many other alternatives, including secular schools, existed as options as well,” Chemerinsky told NC Policy Watch. Zelman v. Simmons-Harris specified that the following conditions must be met in order for a voucher program to be constitutional: • the program must have a valid secular purpose, • aid must go to parents and not to the schools, • a broad class of beneficiaries must be covered, • the program must be neutral with respect to religion, and • there must be adequate nonreligious options. So if there is a situation where in some rural areas only religious private educational options exist, that could be a scenario in which the constitutionality of the voucher program can be contested, said Chemerinsky. North Carolina’s state constitution does not have a clause that specifically addresses the separation of church and state, making a legal case on those grounds challenging. The state’s constitution does have a “uniformity clause,” however, requiring that the state provide a general and uniform system of free public schools. The school voucher program could be contested on those grounds, with the idea that spending taxpayer funds on private schooling inhibits the state’s ability to achieve those ends. Just after the passage of the budget proposal containing the school voucher provisions, the North Carolina Association of Educators (NCAE) notified members of the General Assembly that they plan to challenge the constitutionality of using taxpayer dollars to fund private education in court.


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Seven-year-old hunter: Two weeks, two rack Early success in hunting has a few different meanings. One way early success can be explained is a successful early part of the season in which the game pursued was taken in the beginning stages of the hunt. For instance, one who tags out on opening day has had early success. Another way early success can be achieved is if the hunter is successful at an early age. A hunt in which a youth is able to take a nice buck while hunting with his dad fits this scenario. Then there is one more. This is when both meanings overlap. On opening day of deer archery season Brayden Morris went out on a hunt with his dad, Kevin. The weather was nice with cooler temperatures and a new moon. Kevin had set up a box blind stand overlooking a pine thicket and knew deer frequented the area. Sure enough, around 7 a.m. deer begin entering the opening in the thicket. It did not take long for nearly one dozen deer to fill the area. Brayden, only seven years old, was not new to hunting. He had hunted deer since he was four. His experience allowed him to remain patient and wait for the big buck that was sure to follow the others out. And there he was. The largest deer Brayden

Bill Howard’s

Outdoors

would have an opportunity for. It did not wait. No, it headed straight in. The other deer cleared the way knowing this buck was in charge. Brayden had other plans though. This seven-year-old set the sights of the Striker 380 crossbow upon the buck’s shoulder. He gently moved his fore finger to the trigger and lightly squeezed. He hit his mark, and there lay the biggest buck of Brayden’s early hunting

career: A beautiful eight pointer measuring near 118 inches and weighing 150 pounds. Early success. One week later, Brayden and his dad set up in the same stand once again. And just like before, the thicket filled with whitetail shortly after sun up. And there he was. A larger buck than before. Again, a dominate buck made his way through the thicket to the ambush area. Unlike the one before, Brayden just could not get a clear shot. Three times over the next 20 minutes Brayden would set up for the shot only to have the wrong angle or another deer in the way. But the boy’s experience, patience, and nerves of steel allowed him to wait for the right time. The right time would come. Brayden once again set the sights of his crossbow upon the shoulder of the buck. Breathe. Exhale. Squeeze. Kevin and Brayden tracked the blood trail and came upon the downed creature. This one’s antlers were still covered in velvet. A mainframe nine with a kicker that rough measured 124 inches and weighed the same as the first, Brayden had just filled both of his antlered buck tags in the first week of the season. Each deer set Brayden’s personal best. With that, this boy achieved what some adult hunters take years to accomplish: the full meaning of early success. Bill Howard teaches hunter education (IHEA) and bow hunter education (IBEP) in North Carolina. He is a member of North Carolina Bowhunters Association and Pope & Young, and is an official measurer for both. He can be reached at billhoward outdoors@gmail. com.

Yancey youth soccer league play gets under way

We are a couple weeks into the fall season and the kids are having lots of fun. Around 150 children from age 4 to 13 years old are playing on one of 18 teams as part of the Yancey County Youth Soccer League. Games are played each Saturday from 930 a.m. till around 1 p.m. so come over to Cane River Park and enjoy some soccer. The U10, U12 and U14 teams have also been playing games in the Asheville Area to provide even more playing opportunities. We are still needing some sponsors for some of our teams, so if you’d like to help out contact Kelly Peterson @ 2089467. Thanks to all of the businesses and individuals who have already sponsored a team.


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Playhouse features ‘new’ Sherlock Holmes Parkway Playhouse’s Sherlock Holmes Returns continues through Oct. 5 Parkway Playhouse, with performances scheduled on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays. Sherlock Holmes Returns is a new play, written by Western North Carolina area playwright and broadcast radio personality, Jeff Douglas Messer. Messer has been active with Parkway Playhouse since 2004, when he appeared as the lead in Parkway Playhouse’s production of The Foreigner. He has been involved in every season since. Sherlock Holmes Returns is his second world-premiere as playwright. In 2009, Messer wrote Esley: The Life and Musical Legacy of Leslie Riddle which focused on Burnsville legend Leslie Riddle. A passionate fan, and an avowed “Geek” Messer’s other plays have included plays about Robin Hood and Dracula. Sherlock Holmes fits right in. The set up for this new adventure begins when dangerous inmate escapes from an asylum and makes his way to London; where a series of grisly murders that spark fears that Jack-the-Ripper has resumed stalking the streets; dead bodies have go missing from the morgue; and a mysterious, but cursed jewel, from Transylvania has disappeared inexplicably. Is “world’s greatest detective”, Sherlock Holmes, himself presumed dead for three years, after a confrontation with the evil genius Professor Moriarty took them both over the steep drop off of Reichenbach Falls, somehow connected to this string of horrific and bizarre crimes? “What is fun about this Sherlock Holmes

adventure is that it is gloriously melodramatic. It is a throwback to the legendary Hammer Films, which were noted for their highenergy takes on vampires, monsters, and Holmes. ” commented P a r k w a y Playhouse Producing Artistic Director, Andrew Gall. “It has all the things you love about Sherlock Holmes, including a particularly nasty villain, a damsel in distress, a complicated mystery. There are a lot of dead bodies and a host of bizarre characters.” In the title role of Sherlock Holmes, is Parkway Playhouse veteran Rob Storrs, who has previously played Holmes in Parkway Playhouse’s 2008 production of Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure. In the critical role of Dr. Watson, Holmes’s faithful friend and sidekick is Messer, himself, pulling double duty as an actor. Also appearing, is Gall, who appears as the twisted Professor Moriarty. Gall, Messer, and Storrs, are all observing their tenth

Tipton reunion set for Burnsville

The Tipton Family Association of America will hold its 2013 meeting on October 12th at the Yancey County Public Library in Burnsville, North Carolina. The meeting is a one day event; registration is at 9am. The meeting is free and open to anyone interested in attending. The Library is located at 321 School Circle. At 10:30, Elaine McAlister Dellinger and Grant B. Ward will present the program Wiley, John D. and Various Tiptons: Fact

and Fiction. Elaine Dellinger is a noted author, historian and genealogist of Yancey County and western North Carolina. Grant Ward is the expert on the Lost Cove ghost town located on the borders of Yancey and Madison Counties in North Carolina near Unicoi County, Tennessee. The meeting will include question and answer periods allowing the participants to share their Tipton genealogy and family lore plus time for

Mrs. Dellinger and Mr. Ward to answer questions. At 4:30 p.m., the short film Sycamore Shoals: Story of the American Spirit about the OverMountain Men who rode to defeat the British in 1780 will be shown. The film is a production of Sycamore Shoals State Park on the Watauga River in Elizabethton, Tennessee. For more information, contact John Parrish, TFAA President by email at Parrish968@aol.com

consecutive season with Parkway Playhouse. The rest of the cast of Sherlock Holmes Returns features Daniel Moore, Scott Keel, Trinity Smith, Doug Shaw, Logan Walden, and Mary Katherine Smith-Gall; all veterans of previous Parkway Playhouse productions. Tickets for the production range from $10-$20 with a wide variety of discounts available for students, seniors, active/retired military, groups and more. Tickets and more information about performances can be found on Parkway Playhouse’s website at www. parkwayplayhouse.com or by calling 828-6824285.

LEGAL NOTICE

BURNSVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF MUNICIPAL ELECTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN A Municipal Election will be held on November 5, 2013 in the Town of Burnsville, North Carolina to vote on (1) Mayor for a four year term, (2) Two Town Council Seats for a four year term each. Polls will be open from 6:30 AM until 7:30 PM. The polling place will be located at: Burnsville Town Center 6 South Main Street Area “C” Burnsville, NC 28714 Absentee ballots are not allowed. All residents of the Town of Burnsville who are registered to vote with the Yancey County Board of Elections may vote in this election. Voters who are previously registered need not re-register for this election. Those residents of the town who are not registered to vote must register on or before 5:00 PM, October 11, 2013, in order to be eligible to vote in this election. Any voter who has moved outside his or her precinct but within the county since the last election should notify the Yancey County Board of Elections in writing by 5:00 PM, October 11, 2013. For additional information contact the Yancey County Board of Elections at 828-682-3950 or by email at yancey.boe@gmail.com. By the order of Yancey County Board of Elections, Marvin Holland, Chairman Published Sept. 20, 27, October 4 and 11, 2013

Attention! To all Celo Health Center patients: Celo Health Center will be having its Flu Shot Clinic on Monday, Sept. 30, 8 a.m. – noon and 1 p.m. – 4 p.m. THIS FLU SHOT CLINIC IS FOR CELO HEALTH CENTER PATIENTS ONLY. No appointment necessary. For more information call the office at 675-4116.


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Obituaries William Rodney Howell

William Rodney Howell, 71, formerly of Burnsville, passed away Friday, September 22, 2013. A native of Yancey County, he was a son of the late John Roy and Margie Huskins Howell and was also preceded in death by a brother, Kenneth E. Howell. He was an Air Force veteran. He is survived by his siblings: James R. Howell, Dennis R. Howell, Diane Richards and John T. Howell. At his request, no services are planned. Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home is assisting the Howell family.

Ed Lewis McKinney Ed Lewis McKinney, 82, of Redwood Rd, Bakersville, passed away September 22, 2013, at his home. A native of Mitchell County, he was a son of the late Gaither and Eva McKinney. He was a retired Army veteran with service in Vietnam and Korea. He was a member of McKinney Cove Baptist Church. Ed enjoyed playing golf and also playing his guitar. He was preceded in death by one daughter, Victoria McKinney, two sons, Ray and Mark McKinney, a sister; Opal McKinney, and three brothers: Ray, Jack, and JB McKinney. Survivors include his wife of 25 years, Betty Grindstaff McKinney, of the home, one daughter, Veronica McKinney Kern

Corrections A recent article about a lawsuit over

the death of a woman in the McDowell Jail incorrectly suggested the woman died in 2013. She died in 2010. A feature last week about a Vietnam veteran said he interacted with a North Korean. He actually interacted with a South Korean.

“Mountain Crafters’ Co-op

now provides retail space for local farmers to sell their meats, eggs and produce. We also can sell baked goods and value-added products made in a state approved facility. Please drop by 127 West Main Street, Burnsville, or telephone 828.678.3526, between 11 am and 5 pm Monday through Saturday to discuss details. We look forward to working with you!”

(Ronald), of Taylorsville; one son, Ed McKinney Jr, of Arizona, two sisters; Barbara Yelton, of Hickory, , and Winnie Bridge, of Bakersville, two brothers; Bill McKinney, of Newton, and Clay McKinney, of Bethlehem; three stepchildren: Fran Buchanan and Joey Yelton of Spruce Pine, and Johnny Yelton, of Hickory; five grandchildren, six great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, September 25, 2013, at 3 p.m. in McKinney Cove Baptist Church with the Rev. Todd Ayers, the Rev.Vernon Buchanan, and the Rev. Don Ford officiating. The family will receive friends two hours prior to the service. Interment will follow at Green Young Cemetery. Flowers are appreciated or memorials may be made to McKinney Cove Baptist Church.

Butch Powell Butch Clarence Powell, 68, of Spruce Pine, died Friday, September 20, 2013, at his residence. Funeral arrangements are incomplete at this time, but will be announced later by Webb Funeral Home. Words of comfort may be e-mailed by going to our website; www.webbfh. com., selecting Mr. Powell’s name and then clicking on his name and signing his guestbook. Webb Funeral Home in Spruce Pine, NC is assisting the Powell family.

Lucille Wilson Cate Lucille Wilson Cate, of the Pensacola Community, passed away Tuesday, September 17, 2013, at Blue Ridge Regional Hospital in Spruce Pine. A native of Yancey County, she was a daughter of the late Frank E. and Inez Sturgill Wilson. She was also preceded in death by a sister, Louise Wilson Pruett and brother-in-law, Olden Pruett. Lucille retired from Sealtest-Kraft Foods after twenty years service in Asheville and ten years service in Charlotte. She attended Pensacola United Methodist Church. Surviving are a sister, Ruby Styles and husband, Jay; and a brother, Jerry Wilson and wife, Betty, of Pensacola; a nephew, Dennis Pruett and wife, Carolyn, of Knoxville; nieces: Debby Graham and husband, Bill, of Weaverville, Mary Beth Thurman and husband, David, of Charlotte; great nephews: Jason Pruett of Knoxville, Will Graham and wife, Shelley, of Weaverville and Thomas Thurman of Charlotte; and great nieces: Deborah and Mary Thurman of Charlotte. Funeral services was Friday in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home. Pastor A. J. Moore will officiate. Burial was in the Big Tom Wilson Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Hospice of Yancey County, 856 Georges Fork Road, Burnsville, NC 28714 or Pensacola United Methodist Church, 9255 State Highway 197S, Burnsville, NC 28714.

Hepburn home included on Mayland home tour

The public is invited to join the Mayland Community College Foundation on Saturday, Oct. 12, for the 2013 Yancey County Dream Home Tour! This one-day self-guided tour features five unique and beautiful homes located in Yancey County. Each of the homes on this year’s tour defines its homeowner’s dreams - and Yancey County - in its own special way. The home of Pat and Janet Hepburn will be featured on the 2013 tour. The original log cabin style home was built by author Malcolm Ross and was featured in the June 1958 National Geographic. The Hepburns purchased the cabin in 1982, and the family renovated it including banks of windows to showcase views featuring the surrounding landscape and the splashing branch. They also added

wraparound decks and love to call their secluded retreat, just one mile from town, home. Additional homes from the Mountain Air home of Darrell Heasley and Rebecca Schmidt to Michael and Patte Myers’ old log cabin, River Run, to other homes featuring panoramic views and unique samplings of Yancey County history complete t h i s f a l l ’s tour. Proceeds from the Ya n c e y C o u n t y D r e a m Home Tour benefit scholarships for Yancey C o u n t y students at Mayland Community College. The tour funds the Intelligent Choice Scholarship for a graduating

senior from Mountain Heritage High School. “Each year, the Yancey community really comes together for the tour. The tour would not be possible without the support of over 75 volunteers. The great thing is that the proceeds stay local to help our students,” said veteran tour organizer and MCC Foundation Board member Bill Baker. Tickets now available! Ticket prices and details c a n b e f o u n d a t w w w. maylandfoundation.org or by calling 1-800-4-MAYLAND or 828-766-1233. Tickets are available at the Mayland Community College Foundation, Mayland’s Yancey Learning Center, A Touch of Cass and Ye Olde Country Store in Burnsville and at the OOAK Gallery in Micaville. Advance ticket prices available through Oct 1.

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Middle School volleyball

Students from Arthur Morgan School on their six-day hikes.

A hike that binds

From the front Alumni of the hike will tell you the deep sense of pride they feel afterwards is well worth the effort. Ninth grader Asher Doyle has been looking forward to the trip with a mix of anticipation and trepidation. “I really don’t like hiking, but I have a good time. We play games and people laugh a lot. You get really close to everybody.” Getting outside, experiencing a real physical challenge and being slightly uncomfortable is really what the trips are all about, said Admissions Coordinator Bridget O’Hara. The trips bond the students and staff together in a tangible way. Hikers are dirty, hungry, sore and tired and still having a great time together. That rapport carries over to their friendships and the classroom, O’Hara

said. “When students come back to school and they get frustrated with a writing assignment or a math problem we remind them about the difficulties they personally overcame on the hike,” O’Hara said. “ Yo u f i n d o u t more about yourself than you knew, you get time completely by yourself and get sweaty gross and hot,” said eighth grader Miranda Klein. “When you get to the top and there’s a gorgeous view, it’s just the most amazing feeling to be up there. There is just something I keep with me and think about later when other things are hard,” A r t h u r M o rg a n School is a progressive boarding and day school. Enrollment is 27, co-ed, with Montessori education and Quaker values, located in the Celo Community.

No, you aren’t seeing double! My name is Lenny and behind me is my pal, Otis. We are the best PHOTOS BY BRETT HOPSON of friends and even Mountain Village Apartments share the • Must be 62 or have disabling condition to qualify • Section 8 Housing • Green Certified Building same good • Equal Housing Opportunity looks. If 12 New in 20 you want s it un C TA •P •Toilets to see dou•Windows Vanities •Bathroom Light ble every •Faucets & Fixtures single day 200 West Main St. • Burnsville, NC then come Phone(828) 682-7411 • Fax (828) 682-0931 to YHS to take us home. Well, I don’t have a twin, but I can play as much as two dogs put together! My name is Iggy, a beautiful black lab mix. If you think you can keep up with me, hurry in to make me your dog!

Homemade bread, desserts and specials every day!

Call the shelter at 682-9510 for more information on these or other pets, or plan to visit us at 962 Cane River School Road.

Breakfast 7-11 a.m. Mon.-Sat. Lunch 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. M-Fri. (11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sat.)

Now open for dinner

Wednesday, Thursday, Fri. & Sat. 5-9 p.m.

Entertainment

Introducing Balayage by Rebecca!

The newest highlight technique. Available at Sharon’s Salon.

Sharon Morrow - Owner

Tami McMahan - Stylist

Typical Mountain Boys, Bluegrass at it’s best! Friday 12-2 pm

Open Mic Night - Fri 7-9 This Saturday 7-9 pm

Ron and Minnie Powell!

114 East Main St.

678-9362 For Reservations


sept. 26, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 7

Aaron Laughrun & Gina Maira

Alex Greene & Cierra Riddle

Austin Styles & Mariah Gouge

Caden Fox & Lilndsey Autrey

Fabian Hughes & Scarlett McCandless

Felix Stith & Julianne Yuzuik

Grant Buckner & Lily Bartleson

Issac Ashcraft & Emily Tipton

Jairus Seaton & Gressa Cedegren

Zar Howard & Payton Peterson

Mark Miller & Kierstin Thompson

Noah Casper & Danielle Hughes

Robin Stith & Gabrielle Maxwell

Kaleb McCurry & Molly Riddle

Homecoming Queen Scarlett McCandless

Mountain Heritage

Homecoming Court 2013 King Grant Buckner & Queen Scarlett McCandless

Princess Gina Maira & Prince Zar Howard

Photos by Brett Hopson


8

sept. 26, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Most children will ‘push back’ if you let them A journalist recently asked “What is the biggest mistake parents make?” I had to think about that. Which parents? The biggest mistake made by some parents is they pay entirely too much attention to and do entirely too much for their children. These children usually, but not always, end up as spoiled brats. Why not always? Because some children, by mysterious means, manage to do well in spite of less-than-optimal parenting. The notion that one is produced by the manner in which one is raised is belied by the many exceptions, including children who do well despite bad upbringings and children who do badly in spite of good upbringings. On the other hand, some parents’ biggest mistake is that they pay entirely too little attention to their kids. Those folks are not generally found reading parenting columns, so I will not belabor their misdeeds. It would only serve the purpose of giving my regular readers reason to celebrate themselves, which is an

Living

with

children

untoward thing to do under any circumstances. The biggest mistake made by still other parents is that they think the misbehavior of a toddler is cute, or they rationalize their failure to discipline at that critical state by saying such things as “He’s only 20 months old, after all” and “It’s just a stage … he’ll grow out of it.” Parents of the pre-psychological era understood the need to nip misbehavior in the proverbial bud, when it first reared its ugly little head. Today’s parents lull themselves into dangerous inaction with such fluffy, largely meaningless homilies as “Don’t sweat the small stuff” when in fact all of the big stuff begins as small stuff. Without early correction, you may check out for tantrums grow into rages, disobedience grows one week with your into defiance, occasional disrespect grows into library card. belligerence, and not picking up one’s toys Family psychologist John Rosemond grows into refusal to do one’s schoolwork. Upcoming at the The biggest mistake made by lots of answers parents’ questions on his web site at library: parents is they combine wordy explanations www.rosemond.com. Monday, September 30—Preschool Story Hour at 11:00 am AvocAdo, PotAto, And Grilled Saturday, October chicken SAlAd 5—Keeping your child healthy through complementary Fresh avocado with red potatoes, chicken, and a lemon-yogurt medicin. dressing are a winning combination for this main-dish salad. You must register for this class on or Preparation time: 45 minutes before Oct. 1. Serves: 4

Connect@your library If you are too busy to read a book, how about listening to one on your car’s CD player while you drive? We have CDs for all ages and tastes, both books and music, as well as some very entertaining 50 minute lectures about literature by Elliot Engel, and some Great Study Courses by college professors. We also have DVDs

with instructions, as in “Honey, a friend of mine is coming over and I’d like to serve coffee in this room, so I need you to pick up these toys and move them somewhere else, okay?” Explanations invite push-back, as in “I was here first! Why can’t you and your friend use the kitchen?” These parents tell me their children are argumentative, which simply means that they, the parents, combine explanations with instructions. Under those conditions, all children, being clever, will seize the opportunity to push back. In this example, the proper form is “I want you to pick up these toys and move them somewhere else, right now,” and the proper response to “Why?” is “Because I said so.” And then, as in the above example, the biggest mistake made by some parents is attaching “okay?” on to the end of what they think are instructions. This quickly becomes a bad habit. I once had a parent count the number of times she did that in a day. She reported over 50, telling me that even though she was counting, she couldn’t make herself stop. “Okay?” is not an instruction. It is a nambypamby request, a petition made to the resident prince or princess of petulance. It deserves to be ignored, which is what usually happens.

inGredientS: • • • • •

Buy Yancey County News at Mitchell-Yancey Habitat for Humanity Restore 563 Oak Ave., Spruce Pine and Habitat keeps half of the money! Open Tues – Fri, 9-5; Sat 9-2 “Mountain Crafters’ Coop now provides retail space for local farmers to sell their meats, eggs and produce. We also can sell baked goods and value-added products made in a state-approved facility. Drop by 127 West Main Street, Burnsville, or telephone 828.678.3526, between 11 am and 5 pm Monday through Saturday to discuss details. We look forward to working with you!”

3-4 medium red potatoes 1 fresh, ripe avocado* 1 tsp lemon juice 4 green onions, chopped ½ medium red bell pepper, chopped • 8 oz frozen pre-cooked grilled chicken strips (about 8 strips), thawed, cut into bite-size pieces

• • • •

1 tbsp olive oil 1 tbsp cider vinegar ½ cup lemon non-fat yogurt 1/8 tsp ground black pepper

directionS:

Food Group Amounts - -

1. In a medium sauce pan, boil potatoes about 20 minutes, until just tender; run under cold water to cool, and cut into chunks. 2. Peel avocado and cut into chunks; coat with lemon juice. 3. Whisk olive oil, vinegar, yogurt, and pepper in a small bowl. 4. Place all ingredients in large bowl. Gently toss.

1/4 cup

Serving Suggestions:

- -

Serve with an 8 oz glass of non-fat milk, 1 slice of rustic whole-grain bread or a whole-grain roll, and apple slices, about ½ apple.

2 oz

1/4 cup

*Large avocados are recommended for this recipe. A large avocado averages about 8 ounces.

Recipe Submitted by Produce For Better Health Foundation United States Department of Agriculture

June 2013 Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion


CLASSIFIEDS

sept. 26, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 9

CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS • CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS

EMPLOYMENT

Opening for licensed cosmetologist and nail technition in nice salon. Located in busy shopping center with lots of foot traffic and plenty of parking. Call Sharon, 682-1288.

Tri-County Oil Company hiring tank wagon driver. Must be at least 21 years of age, possess at least a valid Class B CDL with min. 2 yrs. experience & hazmat endorsement • Must comply with applicable US DOT regulations and have a clean MVR • Ability to pull heavy hose • Possess good written and oral communication skills and have the ability to read & write • Excellent customer service skills required • Ability to maintain regular attendance • Must have NO drug test refusals or failed drug tests • No terminations from previous employerordishonorabledischarge from military service • No Felony Convictions •Verifiablepastemploymenthistory • Must be an area resident and knowledgeable of area roads

• Salary based on experience • Co. benefits • M-F work week, some OT in winter months Qualified candidates apply in person at 67 Highland Avenue, Spruce Pine NC or submit resume’ via fax to: (828) 697-6751 or email to: dgould@casonbuildersupply. com

FOR RENT For Rent In town, 3 BDRM, 2 Bath, 2 story house, large BM, Fireplace, Central Cooling/Heating Pump, Garage, Decks, Balconies/ Patio, Fully Fenced, Appliances with Washer/ Dryer. $900/Month. No pets preferred. Call (828) 682-7499 . For Rent One bedroom in town of Burnsville, Quiet secure location, Background check required, 6 month lease, private entrance, $300.00 per month, call 865-306-0111.

LAND FOR SALE

SOUTH TOE LAND FOR SALE

Visit these fine establishments for your copy of the

Yancey County News Guy’s General Store • Poplar Grove • Appalachian Java • B&B Convenience Store in Hamrick • Mountain Energy • Felicity’s Closet • Samir’s Convenience Store • Cruz Thru • Whitson’s General Store • Efflers Store • Westall Grocery • Riverside Grocery • Habitat Store in Spruce Pine Pine • Stamey’s in Spruce Pine

Towing Service with Rollback Truck!

I Buy Junk Vehicles! Pay Fair Price Will Pick Up Vehicle

828-208-7522

828-675-0809

5.5 acres off Colberts Creek Road. Creek frontage, borders N a t i o n a l F o r e s t , p r i v a c y, mixture of lush rhododendron, pines and hardwoods, level to moderate grade, south/southeast exposure, garden spot, view of Black Mountains, beautiful rock formation, active springs with spring boxes and pipe, and close proximity to South Toe River and Carolina Hemlock Recreation Area. At least 3-4 potential house sites. Transferable septic permit already obtained. Electric close by. We are selling in order to buy a larger parcel (10-15 acres) and will

the opportunity to take care of yourself and things you need to do without worry. Qualified/caring staff. Grants available. For information please call 828-682-1556

consider land swap option. Asking price: $84,900. We would love to answer any questions you have or meet with you to show you this beautiful property. Contact Lisa at 828-208-1221.

ITEMS OR SALE Free Manure – Will Clear Creek Week of 9/23/13 - 9/29/13 Boxwoods for Sale. $10 load. Roof Leak? Call Brad at Tip Top Roofing, 25 years+ experience. Residential, commercial roof repair and maintenance, roof coatings, gutter repair, roof inspection. References. 682-3451

SERVICES

ADULT DAY CARE

Heritage Adult Day Retreat located just west of Burnsville offers low cost affordable quality day care for your loved one giving you

DOWN 1 Tufted plant 2 Medicinal herb 3 Pulled up stakes 4 Abhorrent

1

2

3

Low Interest Loans to Qualified Home Owners for Any home improvement projects. 828-273-0970

Ranch. Please call 675-4510

each. 828.208.0406. MOVING: Miscellaneous FurnitureforSale.Ongoing.Please call 828-688-4161 .

Will clean your home or business. Call 208-3688.

Sewing alterations. Call 208-3999.

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Shopping mecca 5 Rugged rock 9 Map collection 14 Toast topper 15 Political contest 16 Little bit 17 Bed for some overnight guests 18 ____ arms (2 wds) 19 Church contribution 20 Pay a claim 22 Disinterested 24 Furillo's street 26 Cut of lamb 27 Humiliate 30 Disconcert 32 Cut the grass 35 Usable asset 37 Celestial being 39 Cup edge 40 Like Poe's prose 42 One opposed 43 Difficult experience 45 Diverse 47 Sandwich bread 48 Social class 50 Conduct a class 51 Small particle 52 Inventory unit 54 Lazy 58 Irrational fear 62 Miss Frank's work 63 Journey 65 ___ and board 66 Group of eight 67 Small brook 68 Internet destination 69 Renter's contract 70 Cross bar 71 Enthusiasm

Yummi Yarns! Learn to knit or crochet for FREE! Walk in at your convenience daily at our new location 17 West Main Street Burnsville. Call for more information. 828-678-9890

by Margie E. Burke

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Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate

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More than mean Jay-Z's genre LSD Taxonomic category Diplomat Feat of magic Strip of wood Longing Bird feeder filler In ___ of flowers... Grad cap ornament Shoe string Wheel shaft Rasp ending In reserve Round cloth cap Southwestern blanket Vision-related Relative pronoun Narrate Derby contender Slushy drink Priest's helper

46 Engrave with acid 49 Guard at the gate 51 Accepted customs 53 Fruit for pies 54 Object of worship

55 "Treat Me ___" (1957 Elvis song) 56 Computer input 57 Group of three 59 Skin swelling 60 Small amount 61 Prayer closing 64 Type

Answer to Last Week's Crossword A M M O

T O A D

A D O B E

B R U I N

O U T O F S O R T S

T A P S

R I L E

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P E E R L E S S C A U S A L

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O O T A R E T E D S B R Q U A B U N G L A D E A R Y S T S E W A P A T O R I E B I T I D E T E R

A R M A D A S T R I N G E R

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10 sept. 26, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Playhouse auditions for ‘Carol’ The Parkway Playhouse will hold open auditions for its 2013 Holiday production of A Christmas Carol on September 28 and October 1. The auditions will be held at the Parkway Playhouse /Mountain Heritage Center campus located at 202 Green Mountain Drive on Saturday, September 28 starting at 10am through 12pm and then on Tuesday October 1 starting at 6pm and going through 8pm. Performances are planned for MidDecember at Mountain Heritage High School’s Tomberlin Auditorium. The production is a direct adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic about a miser named Ebeneezer Scrooge who has lost all sense of humanity, to say nothing of Christmas spirit. Scrooge is visited by the ghost of his longdead business partner, Jacob Marley, who warns him he must change his ways if he hopes to avoid damnation in the afterlife. Scrooge is then haunted by more ghosts who ultimately lead Scrooge to one of the most profound and heartwarming transformations in literary history. The cast for the Parkway Playhouse production calls for a cast of 20-30 performers aged 6 and up. There are numerous speaking roles and singing roles for adults and children. The score for the show includes some of the most wellknown holiday music of all time, including songs like The Carol of the Bells, God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen, Joy to the World, Deck the Halls, and more. The production is being directed by Parkway Playhouse Producing Artistic Director Andrew Gall and will have musical direction by Burnsville native, Andrea Bailey.

Alex Biggerstaff featured in b-ball promotion Fomer Mountain Heritage star Alex Biggergstaff is featured on a UNC Asheville promotion touting the coming basetball season. Biggerstaff, who redshirted last season for the Bulldogs, is expected to contribute as a shootign guard/ small forward swing man on the Division 1 basketball team. The Bulldogs will face national power Duke in the first round of the Preseason NIT at historic Cameron Indoor Stadium on Monday, Nov. 18. You can see the ad featuring Biggerstaff to the right.

Asheville prof lauded for discovery of Lincoln photo The discovery of Abraham Lincoln in a rare photo at the scene of the Gettysburg Address has put Christopher Oakley, UNC Asheville assistant professor of new media in the national spotlight as the 150th anniversary of Lincoln’s famed oratory approaches. Smithsonian magazine and USA TODAY both featured Oakley in articles published Tuesday. Smithsonian asserts that Oakley’s discovery “looks to be the most significant, if not the most provocative Lincoln photographic find of the last 60 years.” Controversy exists because just six years ago, USA TODAY, on its front page, featured claims that a different man in the same photo is Lincoln. Oakley, an animation

professional and selfdescribed Lincoln nut, used a combination of historical records, other photos and portraits, high-tech new media tools and software, computer science and physics to convince many leading Civil War photography scholars that his man is Lincoln. Oakley’s discovery grew out of the “ Vi r t u a l L i n c o l n

SUBSCRIBE and get the ONLY locally owned Yancey County newspaper! You can subscribe online at www.yanceycountynews.com

dignitaries led to photos, I could see close examination of Seward from the side the rare 1863 photos and I knew who was – only six taken at around him. And in the cemetery that the second Gardner day are known to photo, someone new exist. had entered. My eye I t w a s h i s drifted to him, and it i n t i m a c y w i t h hit me. I jumped up Lincoln’s facial saying ‘No way – it features that led can’t be!’ I’ve been Oakley to spot his staring at Lincoln’s bearded profile – face for decades, and quite fuzzy even that night, he looked when magnified back.” many times – in Oakley says, “The one of the photos next piece is to go of the scene taken back to the cemetery from a distance by and go old school – to Project,” a multiAlexander Gardner. take everything we’ve year effort he has led “I was looking at learned with our new with UNC Asheville Seward [Lincoln’s media technology, our new media studentsWeek Secretary of State] in science, and go test it of 9/23/13 - 9/29/13 to produce a lifelike the picture and I was with props and sets, 3-D re-creation of not looking for Lincoln the camera equipment Lincoln delivering the at all,” said Oakley. of the time and see if Gettysburg address. “As an animator, I’m we can recreate that Efforts to correctly trained to look at and moment and those portray every detail s t u d y m o v e m e n t . photos,” he said. o f t h e c e m e t e r y And in the first of “That will tell us if setting and crowd of Alexander Gardner’s we’re right or wrong.”



Edited by Margie E. Burke

HOW TO SOLVE:       

Difficulty : Medium

 

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       

Answer to Last Week's Sudoku

       Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate

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        

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        

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sept. 26, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 11

What’s to eat at the elementary schools? Friday, Sept 27

Monday, Sept 30

Tues, Oct 1

Breakfast

WG Cereal/Toast Juice Mandarin Oranges Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast Juice/Peaches Milk

WG Cereal WG Toast Mandarin Oranges Juice/Milk

Lunch Chix Pie/BBQ Rib S’wich Sunbutter S’wich Baked Potatoes Glazed Carrots Man. Oranges Fruit/Milk

Lunch Hamburger/BBQ Chix S’wich Sunbutter S’wich Carrot Stix/Potato Rounds/Baked Apples/Pineapple Bits/Milk

Lunch Beef Nachos/Corn Dog/ Sunbutter S’wich/Cali Blend Veggies/Sweet Potato Souffle/Peaches Pears Milk

Lunch Pork BBQ S’wich Fish S’wich Sunbutter S’wich Slaw/Baked Beans Applesauce Mandarin Oranges Milk

Lunch BBQ Grilled Chix Roll/Lasagna/Peas Tossed Salad Fruit Fruit Cocktail Milk

Friday, Sept 27

Monday, Sept 30

Tuesday, Oct 1

Wed, Oct 2

Thurs, Oct 3

Breakfast

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast Juice/Peaches Milk

Breakfast

Breakfast

Lunch Hamburger/BBQ Chix S’wich Carrot Stix PotatoRounds Baked Apples Pineapple Bits Milk

Lunch Beef Nachos/Corn Dog/ Cali Blend Veggies/Sweet Potato Souffle/Peaches Pears Milk

Breakfast Pizza

Wed, Oct 2 Breakfast

Breakfast Pizza

Thurs, Oct 3 Breakfast

Pancake&Sausage Stix

WG Cereal WG Toast Fruit Cocktail Juice/Milk

Friday, Oct 4 Breakfast

Scrambled Eggs Sausage Patty

WG Cereal/Toast Juice/Pears Milk Lunch Chix Fillet S’wich Chix Quesadillas Sunbutter S’wich Broccoli/Pinto Beans/Peaches Pears Milk

Food for thought for middle school Breakfast Pizza

WG Cereal/Toast Juice Mandarin Oranges Milk Lunch Chix Pie/BBQ Rib S’wich Baked Potatoes Glazed Carrots Man. Oranges Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pizza

WG Cereal WG Toast Mandarin Oranges Juice/Milk Lunch Pork BBQ S’wich Fish S’wich Mega Pizza Slaw/Baked Beans Applesauce Mandarin Oranges Milk

Pancake&Sausage Stix

WG Cereal WG Toast Fruit Cocktail Juice/Milk

Friday, Oct 4 Breakfast

Scrambled Eggs Sausage Patty

WG Cereal/Toast Juice/Pears Milk

Lunch BBQ Grilled Chix Roll/Lasagna Chix Tenders Peas Tossed Salad Fruit Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Chix Fillet S’wich Chix Quesadillas Broccoli/Pinto Beans/Peaches Pears Milk

Thurs, Oct 3

Friday, Oct 4

Chowing down at Mountain Heritage Friday, Sept 27

Monday, Sept 30

Tuesday, Oct 1

Breakfast

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast Juice/Peaches Milk

Lunch Hamburger/ Cheeseburger BBQ Chix S’wich Ch. Garlic Flatbread Carrot Stix/Potato Rounds/Baked Apples/Pineapple Bits/Milk

Lunch Beef Nachos/Corn Dog/Chix Fillet S’wich Cali Blend Veggies/Sweet Potato Souffle/Peaches Pears Milk

Breakfast Pizza

WG Cereal/Toast Juice Mandarin Oranges Milk Lunch Chix Pie/BBQ Rib S’wich Ch. Garlic Flatbread Baked Potatoes Glazed Carrots Man. Oranges Fruit/Milk

The Burnsville Town Council will hold a Public Hearing at 5:45 p.m.,Thursday, October 3, 2013, in the upstairs boardroom at the Town Hall. The purpose of the hearing is to consider the establishment of a Design Review Board for the Town of Burnsville. All citizens are invited to participate and offer input at the hearing.

Come ride

with us!

Oct. 4 - Apple Festival, Unicoi, Tennessee Oct. 11 - Quilter’s Guild, Maggie Valley Oct. 12 - Hominy Valley Singing Oct. 24 - Asheville Mall

Call Lynn Austin 828-682-6144

Wed, Oct 2 Breakfast

Breakfast Pizza

WG Cereal WG Toast Mandarin Oranges Juice/Milk Lunch Pork BBQ S’wich Fish S’wich Chix Quesadillas Slaw/Baked Beans Applesauce Mandarin Oranges Milk

Breakfast

Pancake&Sausage Stix

WG Cereal WG Toast Fruit Cocktail Juice/Milk

Lunch Grilled Chix S’wich Roll/Lasagna Chix Tenders Peas Tossed Salad Fruit Fruit Cocktail Milk

Breakfast

Scrambled Eggs Sausage Patty

WG Cereal/Toast Juice/Pears Milk Lunch Chix Fillet S’wich Chix Quesadillas Mega Pizza Broccoli/Pinto Beans/Peaches Pears Milk

Teachers, do you want another way to show how great your students shine? Then send the news of their success to this newspaper, your local newspaper! Send news and photographs to Jonathan@yanceycountynews.com


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98 ea.

$

LAY’S POTATO CHIPS 9.5-10.5 Oz. All Varieties SAVE 2.31 ea.

PEPSI FAMILY OF PRODUCTS 2 Liter SAVE UP TO .96 ON 2

PEPSI FAMILY OF PRODUCTS Limit 4 12 Pack Cans SAVE UP TO 8.92 ON 4

SAVE 1.10 Lb.

5

for

128

$

HONEYSUCKLE WHITE FROZEN TURKEY BREAST

2/$

OLD ORCHARD OR HEALTHY BALANCE JUICE 64 Oz. Selected Varieties SAVE 2.98 ON 2

MILLSTONE GROUND COFFEE 12 Oz. Selected Varieties SAVE 8.98 ON 2

98 ea.

FRIENDLY’S ICE CREAM 48 Oz. Selected Varieties SAVE 2.96 ON 2

Lb.

for

KRAFT CHEESE 8-12 Oz. Selected Varieties SAVE UP TO 3.56 ON 2

SAVE 2.00 ea.

28

2/$

SARA LEE CLASSIC WHEAT BREAD 20 Oz. SAVE 2.94 ON 2

3

$

NORTH CAROLINA GOLD APPLES 5 Lb. Bag

ea.

required.

*$5 Individual membership fee per year *$10 family membership fee per year

30 DAY SUPPLY

Over 400 Generic Prescriptions!

See Pharmacist for complete details!

Prices good September 22 through September 28, 2013. American Owned & Operated!

Visit Us At www.ingles-markets.com or

Don’t Forget To Relink Your Ingles Advantage Card To the School Of Your Choice! www.ingles-markets.com

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

SEPT

SEPT

SEPT

SEPT

SEPT

SEPT

SEPT

22

WE ACCEPT:

23

24

25

Reusable Gift Card

FIND US ON FACEBOOK!

FIND US ON TWITTER!

For Store Locations, Or For Store Numbers Visit: www.ingles-markets.com Or Call Our Customer Service Number : 1-800-635-5066 NONE SOLD T0 DEALERS. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES AND CORRECT TYPOGRAPHICAL AND PHOTOGRAPHIC ERRORS.

26

27

28

UP TO 50¢ DOUBLE COUPONS EVERYDAY

For complete Double Coupon Policy See store for details. Certain other restrictions and limitations apply.

Sept 26 edition of Yancey County News  

The only locally owned and independent newspaper in Yancey County! Owned by locals, about locals. "To be a voice, and to allow the voices of...

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