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Yancey County News Brush Creek - Burnsville - Cane River

Crabtree - Egypt - Green Mountain - Jacks Creek

Pensacola - Price’s Creek - Ramseytown - South Toe

www.yanceycountynews.com vTo be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.v April 26, 2012 W Vol. 2, No. 17 v Recipient of the 2011 E.W. Scripps Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment v

County may provide for TRAC gallery site By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News County Commissioners all seem to agree that they might be able to help keep the Toe River Arts Council gallery in Burnsville. “It started here; we certainly d o n ’t n eed to lo s e th e m, ” Commissioner Marvin Holland said during a budget meeting

Monday. Others seemed to agree, and County Manager Nathan Bennett said he would “be happy to have the conversation” with TRAC leaders to keep an art gallery open and available in downtown Burnsville. See Page 6

County leaders say the old library building, which the county leases, might be the perfect location for a Toe River Arts Council Gallery in Burnsville.

Conservancy signs protection for parcel off of the Cane River

A

landowner has helped the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy establish another conservation easement in Yancey County. The 192 acres hold spectacular northerly views over the Black Mountains and sit close to several other prominent conservation easements, including the Big Tom Wilson Preserve. See story on page 6

Tipton Hill, Buladean to close; Yancey weighs idea of accepting transfer elementary students

T

60 rising kindergarteners and their families recently enjoyed a fun-filled afternoon in preparation for starting school. See a story about the event inside!

he Mitchell County Board of Education voted to close Tipton Hill Elementary school and Buladean Elementary effective at the end of the school year in response to shrinking enrollment and a tight budget. The move is forcing Yancey County school leaders to consider whether they will accept elementary school transfer students next year. See story on page 3

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2 April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Opinion/Outlooks

Secretary of State notice about constitutional amendment

When is a primary election, not just a primary election? The answer is when there is also a state constitutional amendment on the ballot. May elections in North Carolina, including the upcoming one on May 8, are often called “primary elections” since they are typically filled with candidates running in political party primaries. “However, this time, the May 8 election also includes the proposed state constitutional amendment on marriage,” Secretary of State Elaine F. Marshall said. “In terms of this proposed constitutional amendment,” Marshall said, “this is the one and only time North Carolina voters will be able to vote in favor of or in opposition to it. So, if there are any voters out there who have been thinking they might not vote in the primary, they should realize this is the ‘general election’ for this proposed amendment.” The 2011 General Assembly approved a measure (Session Law 2011-409) that would put language into the North Carolina Constitution related to legally recognized marriages in the state. The proposed amendment to Article 14 of the North Carolina Constitution would add a new section, to be called Section 6. It would read as follows: “Sec. 6. Marriage. Marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this State. This section does not prohibit a private party from entering into contracts with another private party; nor does this

section prohibit courts from adjudicating the rights of private parties pursuant to such contracts.” The General Assembly also approved the language that voters will see on the ballot as they consider this constitutional amendment:

[ ] FOR [ ] AGAINST Constitutional amendment to provide that marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this State. The Constitutional Amendments Publication Commission has approved language for an official explanation of the proposed amendment that can be provided to voters to assist them in understanding the amendment. The Commission has three members including Secretary of State Marshall, North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper and the General Assembly’s Legislative Services Officer George Hall. Secretary Marshall urges voters to take time to consider the amendment. “The Constitution of North Carolina belongs to the people of North Carolina. As with every proposed constitutional amendment, the voters have an important responsibility here to consider this proposed change and cast their ballots according to the facts and to their personal beliefs.” Here is the official explanation adopted by the Commission: A current North Carolina law enacted in 1996 says that marriage between individuals

of the same sex are not valid in North Carolina. This amendment would make that concept part of the North Carolina Constitution. If this amendment is passed by the voters, then under state law it can only be changed by another vote of the people. The term “domestic legal union” used in the amendment is not defined in North Carolina law. There is debate among legal experts about how this proposed constitutional amendment may impact North Carolina law as it relates to unmarried couples of same or opposite sex and same sex couples legally married in another state, particularly in regard to employment-related benefits for domestic partners; domestic violence laws; child custody and visitation rights; and end-of-life arrangements. The courts will ultimately make those decisions. The amendment also says that private parties may still enter into contracts creating rights enforceable against each other. This means that unmarried persons, businesses and other private parties may be able to enter into agreements establishing personal rights, responsibilities, or benefits as to each other. The courts will decide the extent to which such contracts can be enforced. This explanation is being provided to each North Carolina county board of elections. For copies, people may contact their county board of elections, the North Carolina Secretary of State’s Office, or visit the Secretary of State’s Office online at www.sosnc.com.

A request for information from candidates for the Board of Education On Tuesday 8 May 2012, the citizens of Yancey County have the opportunity – nay, the obligation – to make some important choices at the voting booth. One of the most important, and least discussed, is the selection of three members to sit on the county’s Board of Education. Five candidates are running. I, and many other voters, know little about the campaign positions of these five persons. There are many questions to ask and I am

WHO WE ARE

The Yancey County News is the only independent newspaper in Yancey County. It is owned, operated and published by

Susan Austin ........ Advertising/Publisher Jonathan Austin ........... Editor/Publisher who are the sole participants and members of

Yancey County News LLC 132 W. Main Street Burnsville, NC 28714 828-678-3900 jonathan@yanceycountynews.com susan@yanceycountynews.com The Yancey County News (USPS publication No. 3528) is published weekly - every Thursday - for $25 per year in Yancey County, $35 per year out of county. Published by Yancey County News LLC, Periodicals postage paid at Burnsville, NC. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Yancey County News, 132 W. Main St., Burnsville, NC 28714 Printed in Boone by the Watauga Democrat on recycled paper.

To be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard. v

hopeful this paper will provide a forum to do so. I trust each candidate will answer, for I sorely need “some learning”: 1. What do you know about the budget cuts made at both the State and County levels in the 2011-12 school year? From where are you getting your information? 2. What do you know about the funding of education at the State and County levels for the upcoming school year? Again, from where are you getting your information? 3. If cuts are made to the county’s 2012-12 education budget, what would you cut, and why? 4. If funds are restored to the county’s 201213 education budget, what would you restore, and why? 5. If the NC State Planning Board

recommended consolidation and/or closure of some or all of Yancey County’s community schools, would you support this recommendation? Why? Which school(s) would you close? 6. If there are only enough pennies to maintain one field of non-academic education -- sports or art or music -- which would you fund? Why? 7. What do you think about the Early College Program partnership with Mayland Community College? 8. What is your description of public education in Yancey County? 9. What is your definition of an “ideal public education” in Yancey County? Respectfully submitted, Amy Trobaugh

25 best restaurants include 16 in Western region Twenty-five restaurants have been selected to compete this summer in the Best Dish in North Carolina competition. The finalists will represent one of two regions within the state in either the fine or casual dining category. Each region will have a single judge who will be responsible for choosing that region’s winners in both categories. Judges will remain anonymous until they have completed their scoring process, at which time they will reveal their identity to the chefs. The finalists for this year’s

competition in the Western Piedmont/Mountain region are: Pleasant City Wood Fired Grille of Shelby; Bistro 42 of Asheboro; HomeGrown of Asheville; Curate of Asheville; Sunny Point Cafe of Asheville; Off the Square of Albemarle; Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen of Greensboro; Spring House Restaurant, Kitchen & Bar of Winston-Salem; Vidalia Restaurant and Wine Bar of Boone; Red Stag Grill of Asheville; Season’s at Highland Lake Inn of Flat Rock; Marisol of Greensboro; Westglow

Resort and Spa of Blowing Rock; Gallery Restaurant of Charlotte; Crippen’s Country Inn & Restaurant of Blowing Rock; and Mast Farm Inn of Valle Crucis. “This marks the seventh year of the contest and the interest among restaurants continues to grow,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. “I encourage everyone to support state food producers, growers and restaurants by visiting these restaurants and experiencing the best local recipes in North Carolina for themselves.”

Yancey County News - Recipient of the 2012 Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism v


April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 3

Area farm plans open house on Saturday

Tipton HIll School will be closed, as well as Buladean Elementary.

Mitchell will close Buladean and Tipton Hill schools By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News Yancey County Schools leaders are busy working on a policy to either accept or deny Mitchell County elementary transfer students on word that Tipton Hill and Buladean elementary schools will be closed. “I gave the board an overview so they can be thinking on it,” said Superintendent Dr. Tony Tipton. “We will be addressing it more. We’ve had two calls, but we expect more.” The Mitchell County Board of Education voted to close Tipton Hill Elementary school and Buladean Elementary effective at the end of the school year in response to shrinking enrollment and a tight budget. The school board held a public hearing earlier in the year to discuss the idea of closing the schools, and at that time parents in the two districts warned Mitchell leaders that they might pull their children in favor of going to school in Yancey. Dr. Richard Spurling, an associate superintendent with Mitchell County Schools, said the student population in the county had decreased dramatically in the past few decades to the point where closing the two elementary schools was feasible. “We’re stretching ourselves so thin, we just don’t feel like we are giving our students a quality education,” he told the Yancey County News in February. T i p t o n – t h e Ya n c e y superintendent – said his system has “put a hold on accepting anybody from Tipton Hill or Buladean until we can formalize a policy.” He said he has asked elementary principals to bring ideas to their next principals’ meeting on May 5. Mitchell school leaders have said they would release students at Tipton Hill or Buladean to attend in Yancey, and “on first gander, we’d might say, ‘Great,’” said

Yancey considers accepting transfer elementary students Tipton, because it would mean Yancey would get the state funds intended to educate the children. “But on the other hand, what does it do for our small schools? Does it create an overcrowding situation? Does it create problems for our schools?” Those, Tipton said, are issues that must be addressed before Yancey agrees to take any of the students. “What we’re hearing is, most would go to Clearmont Elementary; some mentioned Bee Log.” Clearmont is not bursting in student population, he said, but the school system must study the idea to make sure unintended problems don’t arise. “We’re not saying we’re not going to take people, but we want to have a plan. Bee Log Elementary is a small school with a small student body, Tipton said, but it may not be set up for many more students. “The big thing when you start adding classes is, it puts a crimp on everything you do.” Some classes at Buladean have only five students, while other elementary schools in Mitchell County are packed, Spurling said. If no students can go to Yancey, the students in question will be transferred to Gouge Elementary, which is planned as a K-4 school next year, or Bowman Middle, which will be for fifth to eighth grades. Tipton Hill Elementary is located less than a mile from the Mitchell-Yancey border at Green Mountain. While the Buladean school is not as close, geographically, officials say they expect some parents of students there may ask to send their children to Yancey.

Mark your calendars for the 5th Annual Wellspring Farm Open Farm Day in Burnsville, on Saturday, April 28, from 11 till 5, Rain or Shine! A t We l l s p r i n g Farm you will have the opportunity to learn about various fiber animals such as Llamas, Alpacas, Moorit Corriedale, Tu n i s a n d J a c o b Sheep as well as Angora Rabbits. This is an opportunity to learn step by step the harvesting of wool to using it for spinning and a wide variety of fiber arts. Come learn about the various livestock, pasture management, herd management, and fencing for the novice to the experienced. Our sheep shearer will be busy shearing the sheep and some of our fiber friends will be explaining the process of turning wool into finished garments. There will be hand spun yarns, prepared fibers and fleeces for

Rabies Clinic set for May 5

T h e Ya n c e y Humane Society will conduct a Rabies Clinic on Saturday, May 5 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Animal Shelter off Cane River School Road. State law requires all pets four months and older to have the rabies vaccination. All cats must be in carriers and all dogs must be on leash. If you need a carrier or a leash, just let one of the volunteers know and they will assist you. Checks and cash are acceptable. No credit or debit cards. Do not bring large denomination bills. Volunteers will be on hand so that you can sign up your pets for spay/neuter. It’s free.

sale alongwith other farm products. If you are interested in getting started with livestock, or just want to get “acquainted” with them, then this is a must attend. Other activities will feature spinning demonstrations, baby animals, meet the llamas and needlefelting. Our friends from Southeast Llama Rescue and 4-H will be joining us for this fun day. The farm has a wonderful covered porch and large barn so the event is held rain

or shine. Learn more at wellspringfarm. com Please carpool if possible, as parking may be limited. Directions: From Burnsville follow 19W alongside Cane River approximately 8 miles. Just past the store on the left (do not take the sharp right over the large bridge and continue on to TN) make a left onto Bald Mountain Road,drive 3 miles, make a right onto Riddle Branch Road, and a right onto Wellspring Lane.

Big BASS event set for May 3-6 BASS will host the Douglas Lake Challenge in Dandridge, Tenn., May 3 – 6, the fourth of eight Bassmaster Elite Series professional bass fishing tournaments scheduled in 2012. The contest pits 99 of the top bass anglers in the world against one another, including fishing legend Kevin VanDam and 2012 Bassmaster Classic champion Chris Lane, as they compete for the $100,000 first prize and a coveted spot in the 2013 Bassmaster Classic set for Feb. 22-24, 2013, in Tulsa, Okla. There is no cost to come watch, organizers said. Local anglers competing for the $100,000 prize include Bassmaster Elite anglers Brandon Card, Caryville, Tenn.; Ott DeFoe, Jefferson, Tenn.; and David Walker, Sevierville, Tenn. Following the weigh-in on Sat., May 5, the Evan Williams Bourbon Concert Series performance by RCA Recording artists Bush Hawg will take place at The Point Resort in Dandridge. Listen to a clip of Bush Hawg’s music here: www.bushhawg.net/ music. Full field of anglers launch is from The Point Marina. Public launch-viewing available 122 Boatdock Dr. Dandridge, Tenn.

ELECT Norb McKinney Yancey County School Board Highest Quality Teachers

HELP CONTINUE LONG TERM SUCCESS FOR OUR SCHOOLS Thank you for your support. Paid for by the candidate

Recruit the best teachers as jobs become available.

Identify future leaders Develop the best leaders from within our school system for the future.

Economics

Find creative ways to prevent state budget cuts from affecting our childrens’ classrooms.

Infrastructure

Maintenance and upgrade of existing infrastructure. Our facilities should be first class.


4 April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Dennis Grindstaff Jr. Dennis Keith Grinestaff Jr., 59, of the Big Brush Creek Community, passed away on Saturday, April 21, 2012, at his home. He was the son of the late Dennis and Margery Woody Grinestaff and was a construction contractor. Dennis is survived by his son, Patrick Grinestaff and wife, Sarah, of Spruce Pine; sisters Sandy Tipton of Mine Fork and Priscilla Hicks of Brush Creek; brothers Pat Grinestaff of Spruce Pine, Larry Grinestaff of Poplar and Timmy Grinestaff of Green Mountain; and grandsons Skyler Keith and Hayden Patrick Grinestaff. No services are planned at this time.

Obituaries of Weaverville, and several nieces and nephews. Funeral service was Wednesday in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home. The Rev. Perry Norton officiated. Burial was in the Academy Cemetery.

Fred Swayngim Jr. Fred Swayngim Jr., of Burnsville, died Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at Blue Ridge Regional Hospital. He was a son of the late Fred and Anna Fay Turner Swayngim. A Vietnam Army veteran, he was a lifetime member and past commander of The Sgt. E. L. Randolph Chapter 57 DAV. Fred was a member of Liberty Covenant Church. He was preceded in death by his sister, Nancy Currie and a stepson, Donn Lorenz. Surviving are his wife of 29 years, Carol Goldman Swayngim; a nephew, Scott Currie of Louisville, Ky., and extended family and friends. A memorial service was Saturday in the Liberty Covenant Church under the direction of The Sgt. E. L. Randolph Chapter 57 DAV. Pastor Frank Wyatt officiated.

Anna Mae Norman

Juanita Lusk

Debbie Smith Morris Debbie Smith Morris, 58, of Jack Sullins Road in Spruce Pine, died Monday, April 23, 2012, at her home. Born on January 18, 1954, in McDowell County, she was the daughter of the late Buford Smith and Dorothy Sparks Smith. In addition to her father, she was preceded in death by two brothers; Larry Smith and Chris Smith. Funeral was Wednesday at the Pine Branch Baptist Church with the Revs. Steve Williams and Bobby Joe Greene officiating. She is survived by her mother, Dorothy S. Smith of Spruce Pine; her daughter, Renee Strickland Currin of Henderson; her son, Tre Strickland of Spruce Pine; and granddaughters Emily Renee Strickland of Spruce Pine and Avery Laurel Currin of Henderson.

Juanita B. Lusk, a native of Big Creek, W. Va, has died. She was one of seven children born to Ora and Charlotte (Lottie) Lucas Burwell. In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, Harold S. Lusk, in 2003, as well as two sisters and three brothers. Surviving are a daughter, Vhonda L. Blankenship and husband, Malcolm, of Burnsville; a son, Harold Alan Lusk and wife, Nora, of Burnsville; five grandchildren: LeAnn Shutes and husband, Steve; Jennifer Ollis and husband, Geoff, Harold A. Lusk Jr., Selena C. Lusk, and Laura A. Lusk, engaged to Kevin McDaniel; one great-grandson: Ty K. Ollis; a sister, Bernice Hauth, and several nieces and nephews. A private family graveside service was held Monday, as well as a public memorial service at West Burnsville Baptist Church. Cary L. Bartz, 68, of Cooper Lane, Memorials may be made to the Billy Burnsville, died Tuesday, April 17, 2012, Graham Evangelical Association, Gideons at the Blue Ridge Regional Hospital in International, or Hospice of Yancey County. Spruce Pine. Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home is No services are planned at this time. assisting the Lusk family.

Anna Mae Norman, 97, of Nebo, died Thursday, April 19, 2012, at Sunrise Rehabilitation & Care. A native of Yancey County, she was the daughter of the late Gilbert and Cora Branch Carroway, and the wife of John Henry Norman, who passed away in 1977. She was also preceded in death by a daughter, Nina Norman, and a son, Allen Norman. Surviving are a son, Charles Norman and wife, Pauline, of Nebo; three grandchildren: Randy Norman, Louann Thomas and Rene Norman; and five great-grandchildren. Funeral was Monday in Nebo. Burial Susan Silver, 50, of Micaville, died was in the Elk Valley Baptist Church Thursday, April 19, 2012, at Mission Cemetery. Hospital in Asheville. Born on Dec. 2, 1961 in Mecklenburg County, she was the daughter of the late William Hickey and Eliza Hunt McKinney. Homer Fox, 79, of Burnsville, passed In addition to her parents, she was preceded away Monday, April 23, 2012, at Mission in death by her brother, Roger Dell Hospital. A native of Yancey County, he McKinney and her stepfather; Zeyland G. was a son of the late Arthur and Hattie McKinney. Laws Fox. He was preceded in death by Mrs. Silver attended the Young’s Chapel five sisters and two brothers. Homer was Baptist Church and was employed at Walan Army veteran of the Korean War. Mart in Spruce Pine. She was a graduate He attended Fox Creek Baptist Church. of Mayland Community College with Surviving are his wife of 45 years, Neta an A.A.S. Degree in Office Systems Wilson Fox; a daughter, Patricia Garland Technology. She enjoyed making baby and husband, Ricky, of Burnsville; a wreaths. grandson, Brandon Garland; two brothers: Funeral was Saturday in the Chapel Clay Fox of Burnsville and Albert Fox of Webb Funeral Home with the Revs.

Susan Silver

Homer Fox

Lawrence Glenn, Clayton McKinney and Jeff Reecer officiating. Graveside service was Sunday in the Burnett Cemetery. Survivors include her husband; James Silver of the home; her son, Jimmy Silver and wife, Renee, of Burnsville; her granddaughters Sierra and Madison Silver of Burnsville; her stepmother Betty McKinney of Spruce Pine; her stepsisters Wanda Ray and husband, Allen, of Weaverville; Kim Greene and husband, Byron, of Spruce Pine; Janice Cornell and husband, David, of Imperial, Pa., and Carol Pfontz and husband, Dan, of Hampstead, Md.; her brothers, William H. McKinney and wife, Anita, of Chester, S.C., and Wally Hunt of Stevensville, Md.; her sisters, Brenda McCrae of Stevensville, Md.; Lana Likas of Chester, S.C., Joi McKinney and husband, Thomas, of Winston-Salem, and Mary Rigdon and husband, Jeff, of Roanoke, Va.; and special friends Ann and Amanda Thomas.

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April 26, 2012 Sample Republican Primary Ballot Yancey County, North Carolina May 8, 2012 A

Ballot Style R0003

| | |

| | |

B

BALLOT MARKING INSTRUCTIONS:

D

Susan Harris Jeff Hunt

Joseph Hank DeBragga Greg Dority

Mark Meadows

Debra Goldman

Vance Patterson Chris Petrella

Fern Shubert Rudy Wright

Tamara Jean Ledford King

Richard Alexander Mark Crawford

Norb McKinney Judy F. Presnell Angie Weatherman Bill Whiteside

NC Treasurer

NC Commissioner of Agriculture

_______________________________ Write-in

Frank Roche Steve Royal

(You may vote for ONE)

_______________________________ Write-in

Bill McManus

_______________________________ Write-in

Steve Troxler

(You may vote for ONE)

NC House of Representatives District 118 (You may vote for ONE)

Jim Harney

NC Commissioner of Insurance

Scott A. Jones Jim Mahan

Newt Gingrich

(You may vote for THREE)

(You may vote for ONE)

NC Governor

(You may vote for ONE)

County Board of Education

Ray Ernest Martin David Scholl John Tedesco

(You may vote for ONE)

Spence Campbell

Presidential Preference

NONPARTISAN ELECTIONS

(You may vote for ONE)

Kenny West Ethan Wingfield

PARTISAN OFFICES

Ben Keilman

(You may vote for ONE)

Pat McCrory

James McCall

Charles Kenneth Moss Paul Wright

Richard Morgan Mike Causey

REFERENDUM

Michele D. Presnell Jesse Sigmon Constitutional Amendment

Ron Paul Mitt Romney Rick Santorum

NC Lieutenant Governor

Constitutional amendment to provide that marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this State.

NC Secretary of State

(You may vote for ONE)

No Preference

F

NC Superintendent of Public Instruction

NC Auditor

(You may vote for ONE)

b. Where authorized, you may write in a candidate by filling in the oval and writing the name on the Write-in line. c. If you tear, deface or wrongly mark this ballot, return it to request a replacement.

E

*R0003*

C

US House of Representatives District 11

a. With the marking device provided or a black ball point pen, completely fill in the oval Q to the left of each candidate or selection of your choice, like this:

R 0003

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 5

(You may vote for ONE)

Dale Folwell Dan Forest

A. J. Daoud Kenn Gardner

Tony Gurley

Ed Goodwin

Grey Mills Arthur Jason Rich

Michael (Mike) Beitler

For Against ____________________ End of Ballot ____________________

Continue voting next side A

North Carolina

B

E

D

North Carolina

E

F

-- VOTE BOTH SIDES --

C

VOTE BOTH SIDES -These are samples of --the ballots for the May 8 primary. Above is the Republican ballot, which consists of two pages. Below at left is the Democrat ballot, and at right is the sample Libertarian primary ballot. Registered voters who chose no political party affiliation may vote in the primary using a nonpartisan ballot, the Republican ballot, the Democratic ballot, or the Libertarian ballot, but may choose only one. All ballots include the state constitutional amendment question and the nonpartisan school board races. The nonpartisan ballot includes only those items. Sample Democratic Primary Ballot Yancey County, North Carolina May 8, 2012 A

Ballot Style D0001

| | |

| | |

B

Sample Libertarian Primary Ballot Yancey County, North Carolina May 8, 2012

C A

BALLOT MARKING INSTRUCTIONS:

NONPARTISAN ELECTIONS

NC Governor

a. With the marking device provided or a black ball point pen, completely fill in the oval Q to the left of each candidate or selection of your choice, like this:

(You may vote for ONE)

County Board of Education

Walter H. Dalton Gary M. Dunn Bob Etheridge Bill Faison Gardenia M. Henley Bruce Blackmon

b. Where authorized, you may write in a candidate by filling in the oval and writing the name on the Write-in line. c. If you tear, deface or wrongly mark this ballot, return it to request a replacement.

(You may vote for THREE)

(You may vote for ONE)

_______________________________ Write-in

Eric L. Mansfield Linda D. Coleman

Marlowe Foster

Tom Hill Hayden Rogers Cecil Bothwell

Ty Richardson John C. Brooks

Angie Weatherman

b. Where authorized, you may write in a candidate by filling in the oval and writing the name on the Write-in line. c. If you tear, deface or wrongly mark this ballot, return it to request a replacement.

Bill Whiteside _______________________________ Write-in _______________________________ Write-in _______________________________ Write-in

PARTISAN OFFICES

REFERENDUM

Constitutional Amendment

Roger Gary R. J. Harris Gary Johnson Carl Person

Constitutional amendment to provide that marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this State.

Bill Still Lee Wrights No Preference

For Against

NC Treasurer

Ron Elmer Janet Cowell

North Carolina

Judy F. Presnell

Constitutional amendment to provide that marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that shall be valid or recognized in this State.

(You may vote for ONE)

B

Norb McKinney

Constitutional Amendment

(You may vote for ONE)

(You may vote for ONE)

Tamara Jean Ledford King

(You may vote for ONE)

NC Commissioner of Labor

US House of Representatives District 11

(You may vote for THREE)

Presidential Preference

Walter Smith Scott Bryant

Barack Obama No Preference

County Board of Education

REFERENDUM

(You may vote for ONE)

(You may vote for ONE)

a. With the marking device provided or a black ball point pen, completely fill in the oval Q to the left of each candidate or selection of your choice, like this:

_______________________________ Write-in

NC Commissioner of Agriculture

C

NONPARTISAN ELECTIONS

Angie Weatherman

NC Lieutenant Governor

| | |

BALLOT MARKING INSTRUCTIONS:

Judy F. Presnell

_______________________________ Write-in

| | |

B

Norb McKinney

Bill Whiteside

Presidential Preference

Ballot Style L0005

Tamara Jean Ledford King

PARTISAN OFFICES

A

D 0001

*D0001*

C

For Against

____________________

____________________

End of Ballot ____________________

End of Ballot ____________________

A

B

North Carolina

C

L 0005

*L0005*


6 April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Conservancy protects piece of viewscape A county landowner has helped the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy establish another conservation easement in Yancey County. The 192-acres off the Cane River were added to a conservation easement late last year, and public word of the effort came out this spring. The property holds spectacular northerly views over the Black Mountains and sits close to several other prominent conservation easements, including the Big Tom Wilson Preserve, public tracts of land such as Pisgah National Forest, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and Mount Mitchell State Park. SAHC Executive Director Carl Silverstein said the property is prominent on clear days in the view-scape from Mt. Mitchell State Park and the Blue Ridge Parkway. The property rises to an elevation of 5,163 feet at the summit of High Knob. “The Elk Fork property epitomizes what land conservation trusts try to do on a daily basis–protect pieces of land that hold aesthetic, practical, and intrinsic value,” Silverstein

said. “It is pivotal that we continue to protect properties that are highly visible to the public eye.” The size of the property, complemented by its close proximity to several other protected properties, makes Elk Fork biologically significant. Elk Fork is made up of primarily Oak and Cove hardwoods that range from 20-60 years old and potentially older trees at higher elevations. NC wildlife biologists have found Allegheny Woodrats (State Special Concern Species) and Least Weasels (State Significantly Rare Species) in the rock habitats on the property. “Our family has long shared a dream of protecting natural areas for the future. This easement ensures that our property will continue to support a small part of the incomparable biological diversity of the Appalachian Mountains,” said Russ Oates, landowner of the Elk Fork tract. Silverstein said Oates is a biologist specializing in birds. “A personal goal of his was to own a mountain property in Western

North Carolina that would make a difference for wildlife. About 10 years ago he bought this property, and he’s been trying to manage the property for the benefit of birds.” The conservancy can help, and Oates still has the right to build his non-intrusive retirement home on the land. The conservation easement costs were made possible by a complete donation by the landowners and from the generous assistance of Fred Stanback. “It is reassuring to know that remarkable pieces of land can still be protected today thanks to the ecological awareness and economic generosity of others,” said SAHC’s Land Protection Director Michelle Pugliese. Elk Fork is within the French Broad River Watershed and includes tributary streams of Elk Fork Creek which flow into the Cane River. “Conservation of the property helps protect tributary streams of the French Broad Watershed from sources of sedimentation and other types of pollution,” says SAHC Stewardship Director Hanni Muerdter.

Agencies working to help keep kids, families well fed this summer A group of concerned agencies (AMY Regional Library, Designing Women Group, Graham Children’s Health Services, MANNA Food Bank, Reconciliation House, Yancey County Cooperative

Extension Office & Yancey County Schools) have been meeting and would like to offer a free bag of food for families that may need some extra support during the months of June and July to be delivered by the

Bookmobile once a month. “We’re excited about this opportunity to bring both books and food to children during the summer” said Sylvia Archer, Bookmobile Librarian for AMY Regional Library. Families can

Commissioners float idea to save TRAC gallery in Burnsville From the front

The Yancey County News was the first to report on plans to close the West Main Street TRAC gallery due to budget issues. TRAC Executive Director Denise Cook said the option to possibly use the old library would take TRAC forward and back, as the gallery was once housed in the upstairs of the former bank building on the town square. “I am pleased by this

show of support from our commissioners, community and members that will help TRAC to grow in the right direction for the future,” Cook said. “This moment in time provides us with an opportunity to engage in plans that can have an even greater impact on our schools, our community and region.” Commissioners were meeting Monday to hear initial budget figures for the next fiscal year. In reports from the

budget office staff, they found that departments in county government are requesting about $1.35 million more than the finance office expects to see in revenue, which is not unusual at this point in the budget process. Commissioners must work with the department heads and the finance office to bring that number down in coming weeks. “It is, after all, only April,” Bennett said.

sign up for this service by calling 682-4476. “With school ending mid-May, we realize this will be a particularly long summer for families that qualify for free and reduced-price school meals,” said Lynne Deyton, the Yancey County Schools Child Nutrition Director. The group has been meeting since December to brainstorm solutions to get food into the hands of children over the summer. Many children rely on the schools to provide them with two solid meals each day and almost 400 children also take food home on the weekends through the Operation Feed a Child program that runs during the school year.

Educating our children is a team effort! TOGETHER we can focus on the success of every student in Yancey County Schools. VOTE FOR

ANGIE WEATHERMAN YANCEY COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION

I SINCERELY APPRECIATE YOUR VOTE! PAID FOR BY THE CANDIDATE

Mountain Village Apartments

200 W. Main St., Burnsville Immediate openings for 1 bedroom apartments!

New in 2012: PTAC heat/AC units, windows, toilets, water-saving faucets, vanities, and energy-efficient lights in our Green Certified Building! More scheduled for upgrade! Amenities include: Indoor laundry room, game room, weekly activities, on-site night manager, indoor mail boxes, convenient to groceries, banks, shopping, restaurants, theater, beauty shops, church, post office, pharmacies, Senior Center, shopping! Must be 62 or over, or have disabling condition to qualify. Section 8 Housing!

Members of the Bald Creek Brownie Troop #30605 toured the animal shelter today and made a generous donation of dog and cat treats and toys! Thanks girls! Pictured with the Brownies are YHS Executive Director Tim Tipton and Troop Leader Melanie Garrett.

Phone: 682-7411 Fax: 682-0931 Email: Mvillageburnsville@ yahoo.com Office hours: 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. M-F


April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 7

Regional Market Reports Which markets offer Yancey farmers the best return on their investment? Should they head west, east or south? Agriculture and food industries accounted for $29,057,488 in Yancey County income in 2000, or 7.77 percent of the total county income. Livestock, poultry, and their products accounted for 23 percent of the total agricultural market. So this list recounts the prices in the last week at regional farm markets.

Harward Brothers Livestock Market, Turnersburg Weighted Average Report for Monday Apr 23, 2012 Cattle Receipts: 1051 Last Week: 1173 Last Year: 635. Slaughter cows trended mostly 2.00 to 6.00 lower, bulls trended mostly steady to 4.00 higher. Feeder cattle trended mostly 1.00 to 7.00 higher. Slaughter cows made up 18 percent of the offering, slaughter bulls 3 percent, replacement cows 1 percent, other cows 1 percent, and feeders 78 percent. The feeder supply included 37 percent steers, 36 percent heifers, and 27 percent bulls. Near 16 percent of the run weighed over 600 lbs. WNC Regional Livestock Center, Canton. Weighted Average Report for Monday Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2 Apr 23. Slaughter cows made up 31 percent of the offering, slaughter bulls 6 percent, Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price replacement cows 12 percent, and feeders 52 percent. The feeder supply included 26 percent steers, 41 percent heifers, and 33 percent bulls. Near 23 percent of the run 3 185-190 187 225.00-262.50 242.48 weighed over 600 lbs. 2 225-245 235 230.00-247.50 238.38 Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2 6 250-295 273 200.00-217.50 209.48 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 13 305-345 330 179.00-222.00 196.91 1 210-210 210 210.00 210.00 9 350-395 380 175.00-199.00 184.20 Saluda County Stockyards, 1 265-265 265 185.00 185.00 Inc., Saluda, SC 9 400-445 423 167.00-184.00 175.61 1 305-305 305 183.00 183.00 Report for Monday Apr 23, 13 450-495 474 160.00-189.00 172.39 5 356-390 363 180.00-198.00 194.13 2012 Goats: Receipts 55 last 12 500-545 522 155.00-173.00 164.62 2 430-440 435 170.00-182.50 176.32 week 59.Kids Sel 1 40-60lbs 6 555-590 568 158.00-168.50 165.01 2 460-470 465 177.50-179.00 178.24 70.00-76.00; Sel 2 20-40lbs 1 535-535 535 170.00 170.00 17 600-645 622 147.00-161.00 152.59 50.00-58.00, 40-60lbs 62.002 580-580 580 155.00 155.00 3 650-660 657 145.00-152.00 148.34 65.00; Yearlings Sel 1 60-80lbs 1 630-630 630 140.00 140.00 3 700-740 715 130.00-135.00 133.37 90.00-100.00, one at 115.00: 1 745-745 745 125.00 125.00 2 785-795 790 127.00-129.00 128.01 Sel 2 60-80lbs 80.00-85.00 Small 1 - 2 2 815-845 830 120.00-123.00 121.53 ; Nannies Sel 1100-140lbs 1 295-295 295 125.00 125.00 115.00-120.00; Wethers Sel 2 870-885 878 118.00-121.00 119.49 Medium and Large 3 1&2 100-150lbs, one at 142.50, Small 1 - 2 1 445-445 445 160.00 160.00 150-250lbs 182.50-192.50; 5 260-290 275 119.00-162.50 144.64 1 450-450 450 145.00 145.00 Billies Sel 1 100-150lbs 6 305-340 325 110.00-173.00 155.12 Holstein Large 3 115.00-120.00,few 127.502 310-330 320 115.00-140.00 127.11 9 355-395 374 160.00-174.00 167.11 137.50, 150-250lbs 140.001 530-530 530 108.00 108.00 5 400-440 422 150.00-168.00 158.46 152.00, one at 167.50. Hogs: Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1 - 2 4 475-495 485 148.00-155.00 151.03 Receipts 16 last week 22. US Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 4 510-535 521 150.00-153.00 151.25 1-3 Barrows and Gilts 2001 185-185 185 180.00 180.00 3 565-590 577 145.00-156.00 152.25 250lbs 50.00-57.50, 250-300lbs 1 295-295 295 175.00 175.00 54.00; Boars 200-300lbs 16.002 605-635 620 130.00-140.00 134.88 2 325-325 325 170.00-182.50 176.25 17.00, 300lbs up 9.00-10.00; Medium and Large 3 8 375-385 378 176.00-182.00 177.63 Sows 300-400lbs 56.00. 4 350-380 368 154.00-175.00 167.35 2 415-420 418 150.00-163.00 156.54 Chesnee Livestock Market, 2 405-430 418 161.00-167.00 164.09 4 450-465 459 152.50-167.50 159.02 Chesnee, SC Report for 2 510-535 523 137.50-141.00 139.21 Holstein Large 3 Tuesday Apr 17, 2012 (13) 6 555-595 577 130.00-145.00 137.33 2 180-190 185 119.00-136.00 127.73 HOGS: Barrows-Gilts U S 2-4 3 615-645 635 123.00-137.50 132.82 8 205-245 229 106.00-139.00 115.19 205-355 lbs 63.00-68.00, Sows 1 670-670 670 127.00 127.00 15 250-295 273 90.00-130.00 115.00 U S 3-4 415-490 lbs 64.001 850-850 850 100.00 100.00 5 300-315 307 106.00-132.00 121.52 71.00, B B Q Pigs 145-180 lbs Small 1 - 2 62.00-66.00. 4 360-395 376 111.00-117.00 113.54 1 335-335 335 160.00 160.00 (27)GOATS: KIDS 1 20-40 15 405-443 434 100.00-128.00 120.00 Medium and Large 3 lbs 50.00-65.00, NANNIES 22 450-495 473 98.00-128.00 123.61 1 380-380 380 150.00 150.00 1 70-100 lbs 80.00-90.00, 9 515-547 535 106.00-123.00 111.49 1 410-410 410 130.00 130.00 NANNIES 1 100-140 lbs 3 450-465 457 130.00-148.00 140.26 2 920-930 925 90.00-92.00 91.01 110.00-120.00, NANNIES 1 Feeder Bulls Medium and Large 1 - 2 Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1-2 140-180 lbs 140.00-155.00, Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price BILLIES 1 100-150 lbs 110.002 415-420 418 180.00-190.00 185.03 2 205-245 225 170.00-190.00 179.11 120.00, BILLIES 1 150-250 lbs 5 450-485 466 160.00-171.00 166.53 7 250-295 274 175.00-194.00 183.51 155.00-175.00. 1 525-525 525 155.00 155.00 11 300-340 329 164.00-193.00 183.07 4 550-585 571 120.00-133.00 127.83 Darlington, S.C., Friday, April 15 350-395 370 163.00-188.00 173.03 2 605-605 605 137.50 137.50 20. Goats: Receipts 170, week 24 400-445 420 150.00-186.00 159.51 6 655-683 669 127.00-137.00 130.43 ago 232. Goats sold per head, 43 450-495 473 147.00-164.00 153.60 2 720-740 730 114.00-118.00 116.03 weights estimated. Slaughter 2 765-775 770 110.00-116.00 113.02 27 500-545 524 144.00-160.00 150.39 and Replacement classes.Kids: Small 1 - 2 14 550-585 564 140.00-159.00 148.43 Selection 1 under 20 lbs 40.001 440-440 440 138.00 138.00 8 600-645 620 140.00-150.00 145.55 45.00, 20-40 lbs 50.00-60.00, 1 545-545 545 132.00 132.00 2 665-675 670 143.00-146.00 144.51 40-60 lbs 70.00-80.00, 60-80 Medium and Large 3 lbs 87.50-97.50, 80-100 lbs 1 475-475 475 120.00 120.00 Upstate Livestock Exchange, Williamston, SC 102.50-110.00; Selection 2 1 545-545 545 120.00 120.00 Report for Monday Apr 23, 2012 - Cattle under 20 lbs 30.00-35.00, 201 600-600 600 118.00 118.00 Receipts: 432 Last week: 538 Last year: 351 40 lbs 40.00-45.00, 40-60 lbs 1 680-680 680 113.00 113.00 Slaughter cows and bulls steady-3.00 higher, 45.00-62.50, 60-80 lbs 65.00Feeder steers and heifers mostly steady. 77.50, 80-100 lbs 85.00-90.00; Bred Cows Medium and Large 1 - 2 Young Slaughter cows made up 19 percent of the Selection 3 20-40 lbs 35.00Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price offering, slaughter bulls 2 percent, replacement 37.50, 40-60 lbs 40.00-42.50, 1 945-945 945 810.00 810.00 Per Head cows 6 percent, other cows 0 percent, and feeders 60-80 lbs 52.50-57.50. Does/ 1-3 Months Bred 73 percent. The feeder supply included 39 Nannies: Selection 1 50-70 lbs 1 950-950 950 975.00 975.00 Per Head percent steers, 37 percent heifers, and 24 percent 85.00-90.00, 100-140 lbs one 4-6 Months Bred bulls. Near 20 percent of the run weighed over @ 140.00; Selection 2 50-70 3 1060-1165 1098 999.00-1125.00 1044.20 Per 600 lbs. (Figures in parentheses are weighted lbs 57.50-75.00, 70-100 lbs Head 7-9 Months Bred average weights and prices for each category) 92.50-105.00. Bucks/Billies: Medium and Large 1 - 2 Middle Aged Feeder Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 200-225 Selection 1 70-100 lbs 115.001 730-730 730 550.00 550.00 Per Head lbs (212) 205.00-210.00 (206.77); 260-265 lbs 120.00, 100-150 1-3 Months Bred (263) 200.00-210.00 (205.05); 300-345 lbs lbs one @ 145.00, 150-250 lbs 2 1030-1195 1113 875.00-1150.00 1022.70 Per (326) 192.50-209.00 (199.27); 350-385 lbs 195.00-227.50; Selection 2 70Head 7-9 Months Bred (367) 195.00-203.00 (197.21); 405-445 lbs 100 lbs 90.00-100.00, 100-150 (422) 186.00-192.00 (189.10); 455-490 lbs lbs 127.50-130.00, 150-250 Slaughter Cows Breaker 70-80% Lean (472) 175.00-180.00 (177.86); 500-545 lbs lbs 150.00-175.00. Pairs: (1) Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price (524) 155.00-160.00 (156.74); 515-515 lbs Nanny 115 lbs with under 20 1 1500-1500 1500 82.00 82.00 fancy (515) 167.00-175.00 (171.00); 504-504 lbs kid 125.00 per pair. 3 1400-1490 1430 84.00-90.00 86.31 High lbs value added (504) 178.50 (178.50); 550-585 Dressing lbs (559) 149.00-166.00 (155.31); 600-640 Boner 80-85% Lean lbs (616) 129.00-160.00 (145.89); 665-675 1 715-715 715 79.00 79.00 lbs (670) 135.00-142.00 (138.53); 700-745 1 610-610 610 52.00 52.00 Low Dressing lbs (723) 125.00-135.00 (129.79); 780-785 lbs (783) 21 915-1340 1067 70.00-83.00 77.76 125.00-130.00 (127.51); 810-825 lbs (818) 120.0017 905-1370 1208 84.00-97.00 87.22 High Dressing 123.00 (121.51); 860-890 lbs (875) 110.00-122.00 1 1105-1105 1105 69.00 69.00 Low Dressing (116.10). Small 1-2 215-230 lbs (225) 190.00-200.00 3 1425-1505 1477 79.00-82.50 80.67 (195.11); 290-290 lbs (290) 197.50 (197.50); 325-340 1 1425-1425 1425 89.50 89.50 High Dressing lbs (331) 160.00-180.00 (173.64); 375-390 lbs (382) Lean 85-90% Lean 180.00-184.00 (181.65); 405-425 lbs (415) 170.003 880-1075 962 60.00-64.00 61.59 175.00 (172.44). Medium and Large 3 315-345 lbs 1 1340-1340 1340 21.00 21.00 Low Dressing (332) 155.00-177.50 (165.59); 315-315 lbs brahman x (315) 120.00 (120.00); 365-395 lbs (381) 110.00-160.00 Cows/Calf Pairs: (12) Small 1 and 2 745-890 lbs middle age cows with 125-275 lbs (142.41); 455-490 lbs (476) 140.00-150.00 (142.57); calves 925.00-1200.00 per pair. Medium 1 and 2 920-1115 lbs middle age cows with 505-535 lbs (523) 122.00-130.00 (127.20); 540-540 150lbs jersey (540) 80.00 (80.00); 550-550 lbs (550) 120.00 250 lbs calves 1125.00-1725.00 per pair. Large 1 and 2 1155-1360 lbs middle age cows (120.00); 690-690 lbs (690) 125.00 (125.00); 730-730 with 200-260 lbs calves 1425.00-1625.00 per pair. lbs (730) 105.00 (105.00). Holstein Large 3 360-360 lbs (360) 123.00 (123.00); 480-480 lbs (480) 119.00 Goats, per head: (9) Slaughter and Replacement Classes: Kids: Selection 1 20-40 lbs (119.00). Holstein Large 4 450-450 lbs (450) 93.00 47.50, 40-60 lbs 52.00; Selection 2 20-40 lbs 40.00, 40-60 lbs 50.00. Does/Nannies: (93.00). Feeder Heifers: Medium and Large 1-2 210-220 Selection 2 50-70 lbs 60.00. Wethers: Selection 1 70-100 lbs 67.50, 100-150 lbs 125.00. lbs (215) 195.00-200.00 (197.56); 250-260 lbs (255) Bucks/Billies: Selection 1 70-100 lbs 60.00-80.00. 195.00-198.00 (196.98); 300-345 lbs (321) 185.00200.00 (191.86); 355-390 lbs (374) 170.00-180.00 Source: NC Dept of Ag-USDA Market News Service, Raleigh, NC (174.09); 400-445 lbs (423) 160.00-170.00 (164.69); 919-707-3156 www.ams.usda.gov/lsmnpubsRA_LS754.txt 455-490 lbs (470) 153.00-175.00 (164.83); 500-545 lbs (521) 144.00-148.00 (145.49); 560-597 lbs (584)

4

700-735

719 115.00-125.00 120.23 Small 1 - 2 2 250-260 255 140.00-150.00 144.90 2 370-395 383 150.00-160.00 155.16 16 400-445 425 135.00-155.00 149.37 11 455-490 473 120.00-150.00 143.09 7 510-545 528 139.00-145.00 141.86 Medium and Large 3 3 215-245 233 117.50-145.00 130.43 2 315-330 323 148.00-164.00 156.19 7 365-395 386 130.00-168.00 151.99 4 420-445 435 130.00-151.00 142.22 6 450-495 473 145.00-150.00 147.45 4 505-535 519 130.00-143.00 137.54 2 555-570 563 146.00-149.00 147.48 4 685-690 688 110.00-133.00 118.98 3 700-745 730 105.00-111.00 107.04 2 775-785 780 107.00-108.00 107.50 Feeder Bulls Medium and Large 1 - 2 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 37 400-445 425 150.00-179.00 165.71 31 450-495 466 155.00-173.00 161.17 20 500-545 526 145.00-160.00 154.27 13 550-590 568 152.00-160.00 156.28 7 610-635 621 146.00-157.00 148.68 4 705-740 718 126.00-135.00 129.93 4 810-835 828 99.00-119.00 111.03 Small 1 - 2 2 405-430 418 136.00-149.00 142.31 10 475-495 484 139.00-153.00 144.97 9 500-545 526 122.00-150.00 137.49 12 550-595 576 120.00-149.00 143.14 2 635-640 638 136.00-140.00 138.01 5 660-670 665 120.00-143.00 132.37 2 775-780 778 94.00-100.00 97.01 Medium and Large 3 2 400-420 410 161.00-163.00 162.02 3 450-465 455 137.00-150.00 144.07 3 575-590 582 140.00-149.00 144.36 2 610-640 625 113.00-135.00 123.74 3 650-675 667 120.00-140.00 127.85 2 725-730 728 98.00-115.00 106.53 Slaughter Cows Breaker 70-80% Lean Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price Lean 85-90% Lean 3 640-790 740 55.00-75.00 65.68 Low Dressing 18 860-1330 1075 78.00-84.00 80.09 17 805-1300 972 55.00-76.00 69.95 Low Dressing 6 1440-1555 1496 69.00-74.00 72.04 Low Dressing Other Cows Small 1 - 2 Young Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 2 725-755 740 100.00-101.00 100.49 Per Head Slaughter Bulls Yield Grade 1-2 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 10 1000-1480 1261 98.50-109.00 103.59 8 1630-1950 1781 104.00-109.50 106.98 4 1605-1945 1781 110.00-118.50 113.47 High Dressing Cows/Calf Pairs: (3) Medium 1 and 2 880-1075 lbs middle age cows with 85-275 lbs 130.00-138.00 (132.92); 623-640 lbs (629) 130.00132.50 (131.49); 650-665 lbs (656) 130.00-134.00 (132.02); 705-720 lbs (713) 118.00 (118.00); 765-785 lbs (775) 110.00-115.00 (112.47); 915-915 lbs (915) 96.00 (96.00). Small 1-2 350-390 lbs (368) 155.00157.00 (155.71); 405-430 lbs (418) 144.00-147.00 (145.54); 455-495 lbs (475) 121.00-148.00 (133.93). Medium and Large 3 290-290 lbs (290) 130.00 (130.00); 350-395 lbs (368) 130.00-147.00 (135.62); 375-375 lbs brahman x (375) 97.00 (97.00); 405-440 lbs (425) 120.00-125.00 (122.40); 425-425 lbs brahman x (425) 87.00 (87.00); 460-485 lbs (476) 119.00-125.00 (122.84); 500-530 lbs (515) 117.00-120.00 (118.74); 590-590 lbs (590) 119.00 (119.00); 600-640 lbs (625) 113.00-123.00 (118.63); 695-695 lbs (695) 108.00 (108.00). Feeder Bulls: Medium and Large 1-2 400-445 lbs (420) 182.00-190.00 (185.25); 450-490 lbs (464) 179.00-184.00 (180.73); 500-545 lbs (525) 160.00170.00 (163.52); 555-595 lbs (575) 148.00-157.50 (150.67); 605-645 lbs (630) 139.00-145.00 (142.17); 650-680 lbs (664) 132.00-141.00 (136.78); 655-655 lbs fleshy (655) 126.00 (126.00); 710-745 lbs (728) 124.00130.00 (126.93); 805-805 lbs (805) 121.00 (121.00). Small 1-2 405-420 lbs (413) 152.00-160.00 (156.07). Medium and Large 3 420-435 lbs (428) 95.00-157.00 (132.67); 470-490 lbs (480) 130.00-156.00 (142.73); 515-530 lbs (525) 135.00-140.00 (137.01); 555-590 lbs (573) 125.00-135.00 (131.77); 780-780 lbs (780) 119.00 (119.00). Bred Cows: Medium and Large 1-2 Young 600-600 lbs (600) 640.00 per head 1-3 months bred (640.00). Medium and Large 1-2 Young 1020-1080 lbs (1052) 975.00-1100.00 per head 4-6 months bred (1028.78). 950-1115 lbs (1041) 980.00-1225.00 per head 7-9 months bred (1073.09). Medium and Large 1-2 Middle Aged 790-875 lbs (833) 690.00-810.00 per head 4-6 months bred (753.06); 960-1080 lbs (1020) 860.00900.00 per head 4-6 months bred (881.18). 1020-1195 lbs (1118) 810.00-970.00 per head 7-9 months bred (897.57). Slaughter Cows: Breaker 70-80 percent lean 1275-1345 lbs (1317) 88.00-92.00 (89.69); 1425-1580 lbs (1496) 88.00-95.00 (90.94). Boner 80-85 percent lean 995-1340 lbs (1181) 86.50-95.00 (90.66); 10751125 lbs high dressing (1098) 97.00-99.00 (98.01); 14251560 lbs (1501) 87.00-94.50 (90.59); 1455-1490 lbs high dressing (1473) 96.00-96.50 (96.25). Lean 85-90 percent lean 770-775 lbs low dressing (773) 68.00-70.50 (69.25); 895-1385 lbs (1059) 78.50-87.00 (83.51); 1120-1145 lbs high dressing (1133) 87.50-88.00 (87.75); 1120-1120 lbs low.


8 April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Crowds turn out for gun and knife show Hundreds turned out last weekend for the two day High Country Gun & Knife Show at the Mountain Heritage Expo Center in Micaville. Organized by High Country Shows, the event featured firearms and knives, of course, but also live music, a bake sale, barbecue and door prizes. O rg a n i z e r R o n Thompson said he felt good about turnout, and may plan another show if the vendors are interested. Photos by Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News

MLS #24891 $179,000 Lovely country farm home on 8 acres located in Prices Creek section of the county. Garage/ apartment, paved drive.

MLS #24144 $179,000 New log cabin sided home in the mountains with great views. 3BR/2BA, hardwood and ceramic floors.  Attached garage.

MLS #24140 $259,000 3BR/3BA log cabin style home with decks, balconies and porches from 3 levels. Closed drive-in garage and workshop. Great views

MLS #24355 $279,000 3BR/3BA with poss of 5BR in this immaculate and elegant 3 story log sided home. A must see for the professional family. Great views.

MLS #24172 $69,000 Remote getaway on 12.5 acres w/ small unique cabin, abundant wildlife, rumbling creek and a great hunting area.

MLS #24191 $269,000 Unique self-sustaining cabin located on 38.47 acres. Wildlife galore, lots of fruit trees, grape vines, meadows and wildlife habitat. Exceptional long views.

Robert P. Laborde, MD Board Certified Retina Specialist is pleased to announce the addition of his new Burnsville office.

Aldridge Eye Institute 419 E. Main Street Burnsville • 828.682.2104 Hendersonville Office 709 5th Avenue West 828.693.0747

Asheville Office 1200 Ridgefield Blvd, Ste. 160 828.667.9696

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Dale’s cell - 208-1881. Jonathan’s cell - 779-1980 728 W. Main St. 682-9994


April 26, 2012

Local artist to exhibit at Southern Watercolor Society

Local artist Jo Wainright has been accepted into the 35th Annual Juried Exhibition of the Southern Watercolor Society. Her work was viewed and selected by Juror Fredrick C. Graff, AWS NWS, TWSA, to be part of the 2012 exhibit at the Sautee Nacoochee Center, Ga. Jo successfully competed with 230 artists living in 19 states, with a total of 425 paintings. Ninety paintings were selected for the show. Her work is displayed locally at Design Gallery in Burnsville and Art and Frame in Spruce Pine. For information, visit www.jowainright.com.

Sit a Spell by Jo Wainwright

Elementary EOG testing rescheduled Due to a scheduling conflict, Yancey County Schools elementary end of grade testing has been rescheduled to begin Tuesday, May 1. The Middle School and High School testing are not affected and will continue as previously

scheduled – Middle school will begin on April 30, and high school EOCs will begin on May 9. School officials said they regret the inconvenience; however, this will provide elementary students an additional week to prepare.

Contest seeks best photos, video of the Brown Mountain Lights

The Burke County Tourism Development Authority has launched the “Brown Mountain Lights P h o t o a n d Vi d e o Contest” to let the general public to play a role in documenting this natural phenomenon. The contest offers $1,000 in prizes – $500 for best photo and $500 for best video. It is broken down into monthly competitions for best photo and best video through September. In October, all monthly winners advance to a final round of competition, with the top overall photo and top overall video each receiving a $500 first prize. Entries must be actual photos or videos of the lights shot in Burke County. Entrants must be at least 18 and legal residents, or the parent/legal guardian

submitting an entry for a minor who is a legal resident. Photos and videos must be authentic, un-doctored shots of

Bridal Registry

Choose from our beautiful selection of home furnishings, kitchen and dining accessories, art and fine decor for your home and new life together.

Now Registered at A Touch of ‘Cass’ Your one-stop Bridal Linsay Austin Registry and Jim Marrelli destination Brandi Hughes and Jamus Jones in Burnsville!

Complimentary Gift Wrap for all Bridal and Shower Gifts

101 Town Square, Burnsville, NC

(828) 682-2522

How Fast Can Kids Get Drugs?

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519 Hwy 19E Bypass Beside JBs Bargains • 284-4207 Mon-Fri 10-6 • Saturday 10-4

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At the following locations…

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Help us keep pharmaceutical and control-substance drugs off the streets and out of the rivers! No questions will be asked, and any prescription and over-the-counter medications and medical supplies can be turned in anonymously. For More information contact Jessica Farley at 688-2183 ext. 34 (Mitchell County) Liz Elkins at 678-3914 (Yancey County)

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• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

What’stoeatattheelementaryschools? Friday, April 20

Monday, April 23

Tues, April 24

Wed, April 25

Breakfast Scrambled Eggs/ Toast/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Biscuit w/Jelly Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Waffles Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Chix Taco Salad/ Corn Dog/ Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/Tossed Salad/ Peas/Peaches/Pears/ Milk

Lunch

SW Chix Nachos/Mini Corn Dog/ SunBut’r w/Jelly S’wich/Carrot Stix/ Baked Beans/Blueberry Apple Crisp/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch

Turkey Pie/Chix Biscuits/ SunBut’r w/ Jelly S’wich/Potato Rounds/Green Beans/ Baked Apples/Peaches/ Milk

Lunch

Hamburger Steak/ Chix Nuggets/ Roll/Sunbutter w/ Jelly S’wich/Mashed Potatoes/Peas/ Applesauce/Pears

Milk

Thurs, April 26

Friday, April 27

Breakfast

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Chix Biscuit

Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk Lunch

Spaghetti/Roll/ Pepperoni Pizza/ Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/Salad/Corn/ Fruit/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Beef Tacos/Fish Nuggets/Cornbread/ Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/Salad/Pinto Beans/Pineapple Tidbits/Mandarin Oranges/Milk

Food for thought for middle school Friday, April 20

Monday, April 23

Tuesday, April 24

Wed, April 25

Thurs, April 26

Friday, April 27

Breakfast Biscuit w/jelly/Chix Biscuit/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Biscuit w/jelly/Chix Biscuit/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Waffles Sausage Biscuit/ Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast

Breakfast Pancake&Sausage Stick/Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Chix Taco Salad/ Corn Dog/ Tossed Salad/Peas/ Peaches/Pears/ Milk

Lunch

SW Chix Nachos/Mini Corn Dog Carrot Stix/Baked Beans/Blueberry Apple Crisp/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch

Turkey Pie/Chix Biscuits/ Potato Rounds/Green Beans/Baked Apples/ Peaches/ Milk

Lunch

Hamburger Steak/ Chix Nuggets/Roll/ Mashed Potatoes/Peas/ Applesauce/Pears

Milk

Pancakes Chix Biscuit

Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk Lunch

Spaghetti Roll/Pepperoni Pizza/Salad/Corn/ Fruit/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Beef Tacos/Fish Nuggets/Cornbread Salad/Pinto Beans/ Pineapple Tidbits/ Mandarin Oranges/ Milk

Chowing down at Mountain Heritage Friday, April 20

Monday, April 23

Tuesday, April 24

Wed, April 25

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit/ Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Pancakes/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pancakes Sausage Biscuit/ Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Chix Taco Salad/ Corn Dog/Chix Quesadillas Tossed Salad/Peas/ Peaches/Pears/ Milk

Lunch

SW Chix Nachos/Mini Corn Dog/Stuffed Crust Pizza Carrot Stix/Baked Beans/Blueberry Apple Crisp/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch

Turkey Pie/Chix Biscuits/ Stuffed Crust Pizza Potato Rounds/Green Beans/Baked Apples/ Peaches/ Milk

Lunch

Hamburger Steak/ Chix Nuggets/Chix Quesadilla/Roll/ Mashed Potatoes/Peas/ Applesauce/Pears

Milk

Thurs, April 26

Friday, April 27

Breakfast

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit/ Breakfast Pizza/ Cereal/Animal Crackers/ Juice/ Fruit/Milk Lunch Beef Tacos/ Fish Nuggets/ Chix Quesadilla/ Cornbread/Salad/ Pinto Beans/ Pineapple Tidbits/ Mandarin Oranges/ Milk

Pancake&Sausage Stick/Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk Lunch

Spaghetti Roll/Pepperoni Pizza/Chix Fingers/ Salad/Corn/Fruit/ Fruit Cocktail Milk

Teachers, do you want another way to show how great your students shine? Then send the news of their success to this newspaper, your local newspaper! Send news and photographs to Jonathan@yanceycountynews.com

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tbaarch.com

312.401.1236


April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 11

Staying patient and hoping for the best

The turkey-less hunter had his share of troubles early in the morning of opening weekend. Last week started the story of how I had birds show up to stop just short of range. Then, after calling, the birds made one more approach, turning from 100 yards out to get within range. At the moment of truth, the birds took to the air and the bewildered hunter sat there with bow drawn for only a couple of seconds before the reason was revealed. A black bear just a couple of dozen yards away stepped out of the woods where the gobblers had been. Most days this would have been enough excitement. But remembering past hunts for this elusive bearded bird, I was determined to stay patient and hope for the best. The clock continued to tick as the mosquitoes tested my will power. As the sun rose in the sky, the temperature also increased. Little breeze was available and the blind coupled with the long sleeved shirt and long pants caused the sweat to start pouring. Luckily turkeys cannot smell. If they could, they would be impossible to kill. Their eyesight is keen and their hearing is more than adequate. But I would not have to worry able scent control on this day. The rest of the morning allowed me the opportunity to spot a couple more black bears. These were much further away than the first. I have hunted this area before for bear, and I marked the spot on the gps application on my cell phone. About mid-morning, the next big surprise occurred. I was somewhat relaxing as nothing was going on nearby. Virtual silence made for a peaceful time period, and if this would have continued much longer, I am sure a nap would have ensued. I sensed something to my right, but never saw anything. I would take an occasional glance down the lane but nothing appeared. After several minutes I nearly jumped out of my seat. In my peripheral vision a small black object had made its way into the blind. Though it startled me, I did not make much movement or noise. It flared a couple of times and pulled back out of the window. Then, stepping forward, a small buck whitetail stepped in front of the window and stretched his neck downward and to the side to see what he smelled. Yes, I had a deer within 3 feet of me sniffing in the window of my blind. Once he saw me in the blind, he jumped away into the woods. This was enough to wake me up for the rest of the day. Shortly after noon, a couple of toms worked their way into the lane in front of me. They were several hundred yards away, but there was promise. After coming down the lane about 50 yards or so, they walked off to the right into the high grass and woods. I clucked a few times with the call and waited. They exited the grass and looked my way. They continued toward me in a steady and brisk walk. My heartbeat sped up once again. Even though a bear ruined the first real chance of the day, this would be a great opportunity. There

a detriment. One outlook is there were five opportunities. The other outlook is there were now five sets of eyes and ears.

Bill Howard’s

Outdoors

was nothing slowing the gobblers down. Then, when 25 yards away, the birds stopped. They were nervous about something. I glanced toward my left and saw nothing. I checked behind me to see if something appeared in the lane there. Again, nothing. I looked to my right. There it was. As soon as I saw it, the birds ran in full stride back down the path from where they had come. I took turns looking at them and back to my right. It took cover in the high grass beside the path. I could see its shoulders and muscular build as it slowly crept through the grass my way. Every once and a while, I would lose sight, but the grass folding out of the way indicated its position. About 15 yards out it stepped back out of the grass. It was confused. A bobcat had caught sight of my decoys and had started it sneak and pounce tactic. But once it was close enough, it realized that even though they looked like turkeys, they did not quite behave like turkeys. Something was definitely amiss. The bobcat turned and walked down the middle of the path away from the blind. It continued to turn and look at the decoys over his shoulder. I could only imagine what he was thinking. He had no idea what I was thinking. On one hand there was excitement as I was witnessing nature in its truest form. Predator coming upon prey. The other part of me was again disappointed, as nature had pulled together two predators, human and bobcat, thus allowing the real prey to dart away. I sat there, reviewing video of the bear, turkeys, bobcat, and deer. At least I had a story to tell. Then I noticed two small black objects nearly 500 yards away. I pulled out my monocular scope. Both were toms. Nice ones, as I could see their beards dragging the ground. I clucked. I clucked again. They started my way. Three more turkeys flew down from the left of the path just behind the two toms. Now there were five. This could be beneficial or

I worked the birds for two hours, alternating between a gobbler call and a hen cluck. At one point a gust of wind blew down a hen decoy and I snuck out the bottom of the blind. The birds were still far away, so I felt like I could put it back up. Crawling on my belly, I was successful. The birds stopped about 30 yards away as one of the big toms walked into the high grass to the right. There was a dip in the earth there, and I prepared myself to ‘see the head of the gobbler come over the ridge’ just in front of me. One of the smaller birds, walked off to the left into the woods. All were picking and pecking. The big tom came back up to the path, but about 15 yards further away than where he went in. He had turned. This was not good. I was not in a position to call any longer as the birds were too close. But, they were still too far for a bow shot, and the one big tom had all of them nervous. I had positioned myself when the birds began getting close in the most comfortable shooting position I could attain. But this position had lasted for over 30 minutes, and I was beginning to feel the fatigue on my back and legs. The stance was similar to the catching position of baseball great Benito Santiago. My left leg was outstretched to my left, my right leg bent. I did not know how much longer I could go like this. At one point, I drew back an arrow. The thought was there, but the shot was not. I could not take the shot at the small kill zone from so far away and feel good about it. It just was not meant to be. Patience, maybe they will again come closer. It did not happen. The birds actually split up with the two big toms exiting into the woods to the right about 50 yards away. The three smaller ones entered the tree line just 30 yards away to my left. I waited for a bit to see if they may come out on the path to the left, but they never did. In the end, the rule of three came into play. Bear, bobcat, and time were my undoing. Then again, they also made the hunt that much more memorable. An appreciation washed over me on the drive home that evening. I had witnessed some great things on this day, and had successfully put myself in position several times to take my first turkey. And though I did not have the feathers in hand, I did have video and this story to share. After all, it is called hunting and not killing. Bill Howard is an avid bowhunter and outdoorsman. He teaches hunter education (IHEA) and bowhunter education (IBEP) in North Carolina. He is a member of North Carolina Bowhunters Association and Pope & Young, and is an official measurer for both. He can be reached at billhoward outdoors@ gmail.com.

Knoxville man takes bass event at South Holston

Joe Lee of Knoxville, Tenn., weighed a five-bass limit totaling 18 pounds, 2 ounces Saturday to win the Walmart Bass Fishing League Volunteer Division event on the South Holston Reservoir. For his victory, Lee earned $4,505. “Coming in I had decided that I was going to fish the lower end of the lake,” said Lee. “I was trying to target the spawning smallmouths that were up on the sides of coves

and up the big creek arms. It turned out to be a good decision for me, as I caught 15 bass today. I did catch a few largemouth as well, but they were a little deeper and were still in the pre-spawn phase I believe.” The South Holston Reservoir is located on the Tennessee-Virginia border, just 65 miles from Burnsville. “I was using a 4-inch green pumpkin-colored Berkley Finesse Worm,” Lee continued. “I was fishing

with 8-pound test fluorocarbon line and fishing it extremely slow. They were up real shallow; I couldn’t see them, but I think they were on the beds. I also caught a few largemouth on a green pumpkin-colored Berkley Havoc Pit Boss. I’m really looking forward to the next tournament on Douglas Lake and continuing my goal of a fourth-straight points championship in the Volunteer division.”

Rounding out the top five pros were: Rod Grayson, Bristol, Va., five bass, 17-11, $1,753 Ken Vicchio, Bluff City, Tenn., five bass, 16-15, $1,169 + $1,000 Evinrude Bonus Willie Browning, Saltville, Va., five bass, 16-11, $818 Tim Hicks, Kingsport, Tenn., five bass, 15-11, $701


12 April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

CLASSIFIEDS FOR RENT

1,2, & 3 Bedroom apartments for rent in town of Burnsville. Please call 865-607-3208.

FOR SALE

Dune Buggy for sale $2,500 OBO. 828.208.0406. Boxwoods for Sale. $10 each. 828.208.0406.

MOVING SALE Huge Yard/Tent/Moving Sale. The Computer Help Shop. (1.5 miles east of Burnsville) Furniture, Household, Clothing, Antiques, Tools, Equipment, Computers, Parts, Accessories. Friday/ Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SERVICES

Neighbors helping Neighbors, a Bolens Creek

Kindergarten registration a big success!

The sixth Annual Kindergarten Registration Kick-Off Event at the Town Center was a success! This event was sponsored by Yancey County Safe and Drug Free Schools and the Burnsville Police Department. This event brought out 60 upcoming kindergarteners and their families. The Kindergarteners Blue Belle Farms, A U’Neat enjoyed a fun filled afternoon touring a Gift shop and makers of school bus, fire truck, and police car. The Goat Soaps and Lotions is up coming Kindergarteners also enjoyed, currently seeking Crafters to join the fun! You keep 100% face painting, learning centers, art activities, of YOUR proceeds for a very fingerprinting, meeting Betty Tumey the of stop 4/30/12 - 5/6/12 small rentalWeek fee. Please by 127 West Main Street to public Health Dental Hygienist, and enjoying see what everyone is talking fun activities with Yancey County Schools about in beautiful Downtown P.E. staff. The up-coming Kindergartens Burnsville! Give the gift of reading! loved Firefighter Fred’s fire truck and talking Subscribing to the Yancey to the letterland characters. Yancey County County News. Only $25 will get your home delivery! Schools would like to give a special thank you Call 678-3900 to sign up. to the Town of Burnsville, Burnsville Police or subscribe online at www. Department, Burnsville Fire Department, yanceycountynews.com McDonald’s, Burger King, Yancey Theater, Community Project. Call 208-3999. Sewing alterations. Call 208-3999. Low Interest Loans to Qualified Home Owners for Any home improvement projects. 828-273-0970

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Book before Romans 5 Propose 10 Storm predecessor? 14 Open to question 15 Lowest part of a ship 16 Opera solo 17 Stench 18 Discover 19 Pub fare 20 Deli meat 22 Rude 24 Old-timer 26 Adhesive strip 27 Mainmast leader 31 Find 35 Eggs 36 Lieu 38 Lowest point 39 Inclined way 41 Arm joint 43 Hitchcock's window 44 Extreme sadness 46 Jeans material 48 Con's counter 49 Shoelace hole 51 Guide in the sky 53 Dregs 55 Tenant's payment 56 Kansas property 60 Fit to eat 64 ___ vera 65 Sordid 67 Shipping label word 68 Genuine 69 Mysterious 70 "WKRP" star 71 1950, to Caesar 72 Great fear 73 Wide-mouthed jug

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2. Any voter of the county may attend this meeting and may observe the count. 3. The results of the absentee ballot count will not be announced before 7:30 PM when polls close on that day.

Copyright 2012 by The Puzzle Syndicate

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On Tuesday, March 27, 2012, the Yancey County Board of Elections met at the Board of Elections Office, Burnsville, North Carolina, and adopted the following resolution:

1. The Yancey County Board of Elections shall meet at 2:00 PM on Election Day, Tuesday, May 8, 2012, at the Board of Elections Office at 225 West Main Street, Burnsville, to count and total absentee ballots.

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R E S O L U T I O N O F T H E YA N C E Y COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS CONCERNING THE COUNTING OF ABSENTEE BALLOTS

BE IT RESOLVED by the Yancey County Board of Elections that: 48

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3 Workbench item 4 Rake with gunfire 5 Commit 6 Expression of disgust 7 Plane part 8 Long-plumed bird 9 Classified ad listing 10 San Francisco sight 11 Region 12 Hold on property 13 Selling place 21 Parasitic plant 23 Once ___ a time 25 Give up 27 Fake a signature 28 Reproductive organ 29 Flaxlike fiber 30 Identifying tag 32 Proficient DOWN 33 Pope's crown 1 Andy's cohort 34 Blunder 2 Closing measure 37 Blood bank in music visitor

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Flowers By Vance, Ingles, George Nero, Chad Fox, Patty McIntosh, Yancey County Schools PE Department, MHHS Cheerleaders, MHHS Child Care Class, and Yancey County Schools staff for all their help and continued support. A special thanks to all the parents for coming out and supporting their up-coming Kindergartener.

Baldwin of film Wander Challenge Crest of a hill Solitary Arabian prince Ms. Farrow

Signed, Charles McCurry, Chairman Grace Whitson, Secretary Gary Boone, Member Yancey County Board of Elections R E S O L U T I O N O F T H E YA N C E Y COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTIONS CONCERNING THE OPENING AND RUNNING THROUGH THE M100 OF ABSENTEE BALLOTS On Tuesday, March 27, 2012, , the Yancey County Board of Elections met at the Board of Elections Office, Burnsville, North Carolina, and adopted the following resolution:

Answer to Last Week's Crossword R E A P

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C E S H O M A N D A R E R G I M P A C Y E S E A M E L E G R T R E R E A O R N A D I S A R T M E

C A B A L F L A S H A R M

A R A B N A G E Y N E S E E T E C O A C L O P H I T E P H W S B A E R E S E A T N E K E I V E B E R

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BE IT RESOLVED by the Yancey County Board of Elections that: 1. The Yancey County Board of Elections shall at every Absentee Meeting open and run through the M100 set aside for Absentee Ballots all approved absentee ballots from that meeting. 2. The totals will not be run until 2:00 PM May 8, 2012, and the totals will not be released to the public until 7:30 PM when polls close. Signed, Charles McCurry, Chairman Grace Whitson, Secretary Gary Boone, Member Yancey County Board of Elections


April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 13

Women and men see things differently

By John Rosemond

than do today’s parents, and more complicated parenting translates to a A fellow in West Virginia asks, “My wife and I need to agree higher likelihood of disagreement, blah blah. Nope, that’s not it either. The biggest difference between then and now is that kids in the concerning our children. She sees things one way, and I see things a completely - and I mean completely - different way. How can we get 1950s and before were raised not by mothers and fathers but by husbands and wives. This problem of the male and female on the same page?” not being on the same page is prevented when those two This is certainly the most serious Living people act primarily from the roles of husband and wife. and common of child-rearing Conversely, it is all but inevitable if they act primarily from problems. I suspect - but know of the roles of father and mother. no research that backs the suspicion with Why? Because men and women see things - everything! - that it is better for a child to be - differently. A man and a woman who witness the same raised by a single parent than it is for children event from the same vantage point will describe it differently. a child to be raised by two people Likewise, a man and a woman who raise the same children in who are not of one parenting mind. the same home are seeing things from two different genderIn the past, when people have determined perpectives; therefore, they struggle to get on asked me this question, I have said, “I don’t know. I mean, there is no pat answer. The solution depends on the same page. The only way for a man and a woman to share a common perspective the two people in question, how willing they are to make compromise, on their children is to act primarily as husband and wife. That simply and so on.” In other words, I was thinking like a negotiator, a mediator. I was means they are in a far stronger, more active relationship with one thinking that solving this problem would require that each individual another than they are with their kids. Being on the same page concerning give up some “territory” and accept less than what they want. But I’ve their kids flows naturally from the fact that their first obligation, their lately been giving this a lot of thought along with talking and listening first commitment, is to one another. One flesh, one mind. Mind you, that’s how to get on the same page. Don’t ask me how to lots of people, and I think I now have the pat answer people are to get a man and woman in the same paragraph, much less the same looking for. It’s actually quite simple. The breakthrough occurred when I realized that this problem is new. sentence. I’ve been married long enough to know that same page is Just 50 years ago, it was rare to find parents who were not on the same about as good as it gets. page. Today, the opposite it true. Why? The answer is not that those Family psychologist John Rosemond answers questions at females submitted to male authority in the home. That’s neo-feminist poppycock. Nor is it that those parents had to deal with fewer issues rosemond.com.

Legal Notice THE GREAT STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA IN THE COUNTY OF YANCEY

Prices Creek Township, Ya n c e y C o u n t y, North Carolina, more particularly described by metes and bounds in that IN THE GENERAL Deed dated 22 August COURT OF JUSTICE 2006 from Mountain DISTRICT COURT Air Development DIVISION Corporation, a North Carolina Corporation, to 12 CvD _____ Orthopaedic Associates, PA, a Florida Corporation, YA N C E Y C O U N T Y, recorded of record at a B o d y P o l i t i c , a n d Yancey County Deed Corporate of the Great Book 531, Page 397, State of North Carolina, to which reference is Plaintiff hereby made for a more particular description of Vs. such property by metes and bounds as if set forth NOTICE OF SALE fully herein. O RT H O PA E D I C FOR TITLE ASSOICATES, PA, REFERENCE: See A Florida Corporation, Yancey County Deed Defendant Book 531, Page 397. T H E P R O P E RT Y UNDER AND BY DESCRIBED ABOVE VIRTUE of that Default shall be sold in fee Judgment and Order simple, free and clear of Sale signed by the of all interests, rights, H o n o r a b l e Ta m m y claims, and liens whatever R . M c E n t y r e , C l e r k except that the sale shall of Superior Court for be subject to taxes the Yancey County, North amount of which cannot C a r o l i n a , d a t e d 1 5 be definitely determined March 2012, and entered at the time of the judgment in the above captioned referenced herein above, proceeding, Donny J. and taxes and special Laws, Commissioner, will assessments of taxing expose for sale at public units which are not parties auction on the 8th day of to the action May 2012 at 2:00 o’clock ANY SUCCESSFUL p.m. at the front door BIDDER may be required of the Yancey County to deposit with the Clerk of Courthouse in Burnsville, Superior Court for Yancey N o r t h C a r o l i n a , t h e County immediately upon following described real the conclusion of the sale property: a cash deposit of twenty BEING L O T percent (20%) of the NUMBER 23 of Unit prevailing bid. Six in Mountain Air THE SALE WILL BE Country Club, located in MADE SUBJECT to all

applicable provisions of NC Gen. Stat. 105-374 and Article 29A of the North Carolina General Statutes. This the 17th day of April 2012. _________________ D O N N Y J . L AW S , Commissioner 131 East Main Court, Suite D PO Box 397, Burnsville, NC 28714 (828) 682-9645 POSTED at the door of the Yancey County Courthouse in Burnsville, North Carolina, on this the 17th day of January 2012. _________________ D O N N Y J . L AW S , Commissioner 131 East Main Court, Suite D PO Box 397, Burnsville, NC 28714 (828) 682-9645

Your Local News is Here!

May 11: Bee Log fundraiser

LOCAL EVENTS

Baptist Church. All area churches are invited to attend this A barbecue and community prayer auction to benefit meeting. Bee Log Elementary School PTO will be Youth rally held Friday, May 11. set April 27 The meal incudes T h e Ya n c e y barbecue, roll or bun, Baptist Association slaw, baked beans, will sponsor a free c h i p s , d r i n k a n d one-night youth rally dessert. The cost is on Friday, April 27. $6 for an adult, $4 for “The Wake up Call” is a child, and an extra for students in middle sandwich is $2. The school through high meal will be served school and will be from 4-7 p.m., and the held from 6 p.m. to auction is from 7-9 9 p.m. The event p.m., by Joe Silvers. will be held at West Entertainment is Burnsville Baptist from 6-7 p.m., featuring Church. There will Front and Back Porch be breakout sessions Pickers and classroom on different issues, performances. such as Evangelism. T h e p u b l i c i s A group from the invited to come out Baptist Student Union and enjoy a wonderful at Appalachian State evening of good food, University will help fun, entertainment and lead the sessions, and fellowship. there will be guest speakers and bands. Day of Prayer Area churches will be providing food and planned May 3 everything is free. Local participation The event for in the 61st annual April 28 has been National Day of cancelled, organizers Prayer will be announced. Thursday, May 3, from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. at a prayer tent on Free food with B u r n s v i l l e To w n Democrats Square. The public is A program will invited to a f r ee a l s o t a k e p l a c e barbecue and Adobefrom 7-9 p.m. at oven Pizza supper to We s t B u r n s v i l l e meet the Democratic

Party candidates on Saturday, May 12, 4-7 p.m, at Patience Park. This will be a good opportunity to share your questions, concerns, and ideas with State Rep. Ray Rapp, Commission candidates Jim Edwards, Randy Ollis, and Jerri Storie, and Clerk of Court Tammy McEntyre. Music by blues and folk guitarist and singer-song writer J.P. Delanoye. Door prizes.

Quilters meet on May 9 The next meeting of The Mountain Piecemakers Quilt Guild will be Tuesday May 9th at 6:30 P.M. at the Burnsville To w n C e n t e r. Anyone that shares the love of quilting or is interested in the guild is welcomed to attend. Anyone needing more information about The Mountain Piecemakers Quilt Guild can call Angie Lamoree at 828-6910449 or Kathryn Zimmerman at 828-231-4149 . .


14 April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

2012 lOOK GOOD FEEl BETTEr CAlENDAr FOr yANCEy AND MiTCHEll COUNTy:

May 14th – 10 a.m.- Noon - Blue Ridge Regional Hospital July 16th – 10 a.m. - Noon - Blue Ridge Regional Hospital September 10th – 10 a.m.-Noon - Blue Ridge Regional Hospital November 12th – 10 a.m. - Noon - Blue Ridge Regional Hospital

CAll: AlliSON GriNDSTAFF 828-467-6307 TO rEGiSTEr FOr ADDiTiONAl iNFOrMATiON CAll: liBBy BUrlESON, AMEriCAN CANCEr SOCiETy 828-467-5778

Week of 4/30/12 - 5/6/12

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828-284-7522

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Polling Place Buffer zones for Yancey County Polling Places

The following is a list of Yancey County polling places and a description of each buffer zone is which Election Day electioneering. Buffer zones are designated in accordance with G.S. § 163-166.4(a), by the county board of elections. Where practical set limit of the zone is 50 feet from the door of entrance to the voting place, measured when that door is closed, but in no event is the limit at more than 50 feet or at less than 25 feet. The poll workers will mark buffer zones on Election Day with No Campaigning or Electioneering signs. Burnsville: Located at Burnsville Elementary School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the front door of the building Cane River: Located at Bald Creek Elementary School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the back door of the building Egypt: Locate at Bee Log Elementary School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the Cafeteria door Ramsey Town: Located at Ramsey Town Fire Department Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the side entrance door Green Mountain: Located at Green Mountain Voting House Electioneering is allowed 25 ft from front entrance Jacks Creek: Located at Clearmont Elementary School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the back entrance Brush Creek: Located at the Brush Creek Community Building Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the front door Crabtree: Located at Micaville Elementary School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the front door South Toe: Located at South Toe Elementary School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the back entrance Pensacola: Located at Pensacola Fire Department Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the side entrance Prices Creek: Located at Cane River Middle School Electioneering is allowed 50 ft from the main front entrance Charles McCurry, Chairman Yancey County Board of Elections

Run Dates: April 5, April 12, April 19 and April 26


April 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 15

Delicious ways to serve super broccoli By Medea L Galligan MS Nutrition Broccoli is one of the easiest vegetables to find in supermarkets all across our country. While broccoli has gotten a bad reputation as being one of the most dreaded vegetables on the dinner plate for a child, there are actually many different delicious ways to prepare the vegetable with the alluring green stalk and bushy top. Broccoli is a member of the cabbage family; the name broccoli is derived from the Italian word broccolo, meaning “The flowering top of a cabbage.” Broccoli provides a high amount of vitamin C, which aids iron absorption in the body, prevents the development of cataracts, and also eases the symptoms of the common cold. One cup of cooked broccoli has as much vitamin C as an orange and one third of a pound has more vitamin C than two and one-half pounds of oranges. A serving of one-half cup cooked broccoli offers 58.2 mg while the raw stores 41 mg. A cup of broccoli actually fulfills your daily vitamin C requirement. Across the nutrition scale, broccoli contains vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc. Folic acid is abundant in broccoli with one-half cup cooked registering 39 mcg and raw 31.2 mcg. Folic Acid helps women sustain normal tissue growth and is often used as a supplement when taking birth control pills and during pregnancies. The potassium in broccoli aids those battling high blood pressure. The vegetable is also fiberrich, which helps to reduce cholesterol levels. Frozen broccoli contains about 35 percent more beta carotene than the fresh because the frozen packages consist mainly of the florets. Most of the beta carotene is stored in the florets. But don’t jump too quickly. There’s plenty of nutrition in those stems, such as extra calcium, iron, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and vitamin C. The darker colors of the florets, such as blue green, or purplish green contain more beta carotene and vitamin C than those with lighter greens. Don’t discard the stem of the broccoli! Have you have ever noticed the inside of the stem is white in color? The white part of the broccoli is very high in phytochemicals that are very beneficial to our bodies. In recent years, broccoli has made the headlines regarding three components found in the vegetable. For instance, indole-3-carbinol has captured the attention of those looking to prevent hormone-related cancers, such as breast- and prostate cancer. I3C promotes “good” hormones, while working against destructive ones. Broccoli has a particularly powerful type of sulforaphane, which helps to increase the level of enzymes that block cancer, while the beta-carotene in broccoli transforms into vitamin A within the body, providing an effective antioxidant that destroys free radicals. It appears that broccoli contains the necessary ingredients to help switch ON genes that prevent cancer development, and help switch OFF other ones that help it spread. Preparation For the best flavor and nutritional benefit, cook broccoli soon after purchase. Any vegetable that sits around for a week, even if refrigerated, will lose considerable vitamin value along with flavor. Wash broccoli thoroughly just before using, and buy organic broccoli if at all possible. Trim tough portions of the stem off about one inch from the bottom. How you cut the broccoli prior to cooking is a matter of preference and the nature of the dish you are planning. For salads and stir-fries, cut the broccoli into bite size pieces. Include the stems, too. Many classic cookbooks will direct the cook to discard the leaves and peel the stems, but

think of all the nutrients and fiber you would lose. Keep those stems intact, and simply chop them or cut them into julienne strips to take advantage of their valuable vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals. Cooking Broccoli Ta k e c a r e n o t t o overcook broccoli or your kitchen will be engulfed with the odor of rotten eggs from the sulphur compounds that include ammonia and hydrogen sulfide released with long cooking. Waterless cookware is a fabulous way to cook broccoli. If you do not own waterless cookware, lightly steam or cook this vegetable directly in a small amount of water. Cook no longer than 3 to 5 minutes. For a delicious stir-fry, chop broccoli into bite-size florets, pre-heat skillet or wok and stir-fry for a few minutes in coconut oil. Flavor with Bragg Liquid Aminos or tamari, lemon or lime juice, a touch of your favorite vinegar, or with seasonings and herbs of your choice. When eating raw broccoli Chop or dice broccoli florets and stems into your salad bowl along with crisp romaine lettuce and an array of fresh vegetables. Or

include broccoli florets as an appetizer, and serve along with your favorite dip, such as hummus or babaganush (roasted eggplant dip). You can also enjoy a broccoli slaw by shredding the stems and combining them with shredded carrots and other veggies of your choice; add a little extra virgin olive oil, some lemon or lime juice, and season to taste. Add broccoli to a blended raw soup preparation for a vitamin C boost. Toss chopped broccoli stems into a blended green drink with water, kale, celery, and cucumber, and sweeten with a chopped apple. What is the healthier than a beautify head of broccoli? Broccoli sprouts! Small quantities of fresh broccoli sprouts contain as much cancer protection as larger amounts of the mature vegetable sold in food markets. Just 5 grams (0.17 ounces) of sprouts contain concentrations of the compound glucoraphanin (a precursor to sulforaphane) equal to that found in 150 grams (5.2 ounces) of mature broccoli. You can grow broccoli sprouts at home quite easily and inexpensively, and add them to a salad for a super-easy, super-food! Broccoli is an amazing superfood, and is a great example of how whole foods prepared correctly can help you achieve optimal health. Medea L Galligan earned her Masters of Science in Nutrition from Oklahoma State University, and also attended the Institute for Integrative Nutrition’s Health Coach Training Program, located in New York City. Since 1998, she has helped thousands of people of all ages improve their health and well being t h ro u g h s u p p o r t and encouragement, exploring which foods are right for them, and assisting them in bringing back the joy of cooking and eating. Visit www. HealthyLifestyle Concepts.com for more information.

Creamy Broccoli Soup Ingredients for 6 servings

2 Tbs unrefined organic coconut oil 1½ pounds broccoli cut into small florets 1 large yellow onion, coarsely chopped 2 medium potatoes, cut into 2-inch pieces 3 cups vegetable or chicken stock ½ cup white wine ¼ teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice ¼ cup fresh basil leaves, chopped Sea salt and ground pepper to taste 1 cup organic cream, half-n-half, or if dairy-free use unsweetened coconut milk 1 fresh lemon for garnish Directions 1. In a large pot (8 or 12 Quart Stock Pot), melt the coconut oil on medium heat, then add the onion and sauté until translucent. Then add broccoli and potatoes, sautéing until softened. Add vegetable stock, wine, and lemon juice, cover and simmer until just under a boil. Decrease the heat to low, and simmer covered until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes. Add sea salt and ground pepper to taste. 2. Remove the soup from the heat and add the cream or half-n-half. Using a high speed blender or food processor, blend the ingredients in 2 or 3 rounds, as you do not want to fill the blender to the top. Add half the basil and blend until smooth. 3. Serve in bowls, garnish with lemon slices and basil leaves, and enjoy!


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