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It's Ubu Time It is not surprising that the public should have been aghast at the sight of its ignoble other self, which it has never before been shown completely. This other self…is composed “of eternal human imbecility, eternal lust, eternal gluttony, the vileness of instinct magnified into tyranny; of the sense of decency, the virtues, the patriotism and the ideals peculiar to those who have just eaten their fill.” —ALFRED JARRY QUOTING CATULLE MENDÈS In 1890s France, La Belle Époque, or Beautiful Era, was less than picturesque for the majority of the French people. The police had militarized, and the cities had revolted. The working class was evicted while the wealthy re-designed the city center. New media technology allowed advertising to expand its reach into everyday life, where it convinced people they wanted what they didn’t need. Women’s bodies were confined in the corset, and voting rights were restricted to men for another half century. It was an age of progress that left most people behind.

U B U

In 1890s France, the time was right for Ubu. When he arrived in Paris in 1891, Alfred Jarry brought with him Pa Ubu, a buffoon caricature he had based on his sycophantic physics teacher. Within the grotesque embodiment of this childhood authority figure was the germ of a broader critique. When Ubu Rex premiered in 1896, the play hit a nerve with its derision of literary, spiritual, and political powers. A burlesque of social structures, both authoritative and authoritarian, Ubu is a piece of Western art that addresses the cultural ills that we, as a republic, continue to suffer today. When it feels naïve to imagine a different future, or we find ourselves in delusional mourning for the easy clarity of a romanticized past, then it is time for Ubu. It is time to lampoon our unexamined desires, mock our impulse to remain docile. It is time to loosen the chains we place on our minds, topple the authority in our heads.

—PATRICK YOUNG, PRODUCTION DRAMATURG

The Studio Series productions are designed to be learning experiences that complement classroom work, providing a medium for students at Yale School of Drama to combine their individual talents and energies toward the staging of collaboratively created works. Your attendance meaningfully completes this process.

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Monday, April 10 at 8PM Tuesday, April 11th at 4PM and 8PM Wednesday, April 12th at 4PM Iseman Theater, 1156 Chapel Street 2016–17 SEASON


APRIL 10–12, 2017 YALE SCHOOL OF DRAMA James Bundy, Dean Victoria Nolan, Deputy Dean Joan Channick, Associate Dean Chantal Rodriguez, Assistant Dean

PRESENTS

UBU By ALFRED JARRY Adapted by CHRISTOPHER BAYES and STEVEN EPP Directed by CHRISTOPHER BAYES

CREATIVE TEAM

COMPANY

PRODUCTION STAFF

in alphabetical order

Music Director EUGENE MA Production Dramaturg PATRICK YOUNG

SEBASTIAN ARBOLEDA BAIZE BUZAN JULIANA CANFIELD

Rehearsal Stage Manager HELEN IRENE MULLER Tech/Calling Stage Manager BENJAMIN EDWARD CRAMER PFISTER

ANNA CRIVELLI RICARDO DÁVILA EDMUND DONOVAN

Associate Production Manager BECCA TERPENNING Crew HERIN KAPUTKIN WILLIAM NEUMAN CHRISTOPHER ROSS-EWART

ADMINISTRATION Associate Managing Director FLO LOW Assistant Managing Director SYLVIA XIAOMENG ZHANG Management Assistant LISA D. RICHARDSON House Manager RACHEL CARPMAN

BRONTË ENGLAND-NELSON LELAND FOWLER ESTON J. FUNG GEORGE HAMPE JONATHAN HIGGINBOTHAM

Yale School of Drama productions are supported by the work of more than 200 faculty and staff members throughout the year.

SPECIAL THANKS

Cosmo Bayes, Eli Bayes, Annie Piper

SYDNEY LEMMON UBU IS PERFORMED WITHOUT AN INTERMISSION. FRONT ILLUSTRATION FROM UBU ROI: DRAMA IN 5 ACTS, BY ALFRED JARRY. NEW DIRECTIONS PUBLISHING, 1961,

UBU (2017)  

UBU by Alfred Jarry, adapted by Christopher Bayes. Yale School of Drama, 2017.

UBU (2017)  

UBU by Alfred Jarry, adapted by Christopher Bayes. Yale School of Drama, 2017.