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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 21 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

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CROSS CAMPUS Match made in heaven.

Two separate paths crossed at Fenway Park on Sunday when a 16-year-old high school student who had suffered from severe aplastic anemia met his bone marrow donor, Yale senior Philip Gosnell ’14. Gosnell, who signed up through the Mandi Schwartz Bone Marrow Donor Registration Drive as a freshman, met his “blood brother” for the first time on Sunday, next to baseball legend Carl Yastrzemski at an event co-ponsored by the Bone Marrow Donor Registry and Massachusetts General Hospital.

He lives. A friendly squirrel

was spotted sneaking away as it carried a brown, whitestriped tie, tucking away its conquest at the top of a pine tree in the Law School courtyard. Looks like this creature managed to survive the alleged squirrel apocalypse after all. A digital world. In a Tuesday email to the Yale community, Chief Information Officer Len Peters informed students of updates to the University’s technology infrastructure and the results of the 2013 Yale Technology Survey. In addition to launching quarterly newsletters centered on ITS services for students, the office has also expanded Yale’s software library, provided 50 GB of file storage workspace through Box @ Yale and opened the Technology Enabled Active Learning classroom. The greatest race. Yale’s all-

female a cappella group Whim ‘n Rhythm is in the running to win Zipcar’s “Students with Drive” contest, which comes with thousands of dollars in driving credit. As of press time, the all-senior group was in first place for the Arts section, beating out the University of Michigan’s ballroom dance team by a dozen votes.

The Great Debaters. The Yale Political Union announced the winners of the annual Freshman Prize Debate late Tuesday night. Though an email from YPU President Stewart McDonald stated that the four hours of debate were “grueling,” Kar Jin Ong ’17 emerged victorious, snagging first place. Layla TreuhaftAli ’17 and Andrew Weiss ’17 followed in second and third, respectively, and Matthew Massie ’17 and Daniel Judt ’17 were named honorable mentions. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1961 The Yale Police Department acquires portable transistor radios that can be attached to a belt or carried in a pocket, replacing the preexisting multistep pager system, in which an officer would first have to receive a page by coded signal before running to a telephone to receive instructions from the police office. Submit tips to Cross Campus

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‘STREETCAR’ MANGANIELLO AT THE YALE REP

LANGUAGES

CYCLING

GOOGLE GLASS

Student interest in Korean, Japanese and Chinese on the rise

CITY INSTALLS A BIKE RACK AT COLLEGE, CHAPEL

Quarterback Henry Furman ’14 takes snaps with new technology

PAGES 6-7 CULTURE

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 12 SPORTS

Yale posts 12.5% return GRAPH ENDOWMENT RETURNS ON INVESTMENTS 25% 20%

Family settles lawsuit over DKE crash BY LORENZO LIGATO AND MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTERS

15%

ground ever since, with the exception of the 2012 fiscal year, when the size of the endowment dipped slightly because the University’s spending outpaced growth. This year’s performance is in

The family of one of four Yale students killed in a 2003 crash on the return trip from a fraternity event has settled a lawsuit against the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. Court records show that the lawsuit against both the national organization and the Yale chapter, filed in 2005 by the parents of Nicholas Grass ’05, was settled under undisclosed terms on Sept. 5, bringing an end to years of legal battle between the victim’s family and DKE. Grass was one of nine students returning to campus from a DKE event in New York City when their SUV collided with a tractor-trailer on Interstate 95 at around 5 a.m. on Jan. 17, 2003. The collision killed Grass, Sean Fenton ’04, Andrew Dwyer ’05 and Kyle Burnat ’05 and injured the other five passengers, all of whom were members of DKE. “If you open your door up and say to a friend, hop in and let’s go to New York or wherever, you have to drive carefully, and if you don’t, you’re responsible for your friend’s safety: The same is true for a third person or organization,” Steven Ecker ’84, a lawyer representing the Grass family, told the News in September 2009, after the Connecticut Supreme Court sent the case to a trial by jury.

SEE ENDOWMENT PAGE 4

SEE DKE PAGE 4

10% 5%

0% FY 2008

FY 2009

FY 2010

FY 2011

FY 2012

FY 2013

-5% -10% -15% -20%

Harvard

Yale

Princeton

MIT

-25% -30%

BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER Yale earned a 12.5 percent return on its investments during the fiscal year that ended June 30, the University announced Tuesday. The endowment grew over the

latest fiscal period from $19.3 billion to $20.8 billion, its highest mark since it peaked at roughly $22.9 billion in fiscal year 2008. After losing nearly a quarter its value due to the onset of the nationwide economic recession, the endowment has been regaining

Elicker campaign launches Yale fellowship BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER A large map of New Haven, its wards outlined in different colors based on the priorities of mayoral challenger Justin Elicker’s SOM ’10 FES ’10 campaign, adorns

the wall of Drew Morrison’s ’14 Branford suite. Morrison leads Yale for Elicker, the most visible attempt of a mayoral candidate to curry favor of Yale students registered to vote in the Elm City. In the wake of Elicker’s loss to State

Students turn to interdisciplinary majors BY JANE DARBY MENTON AND LARRY MILSTEIN STAFF REPORTER AND CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As some of Yale’s most popular majors including history and English experience declining enrollments, majors that transcend disciplinary boundaries are on the rise. Yale College Dean Mary Miller said interdisciplinary majors — who draw from departments across the University to focus on a particular topic, like American studies or environmental studies — have become increasingly popular over the past decade. Students and faculty involved in the majors said they think interdisciplinary programs allow students to explore the Yale curriculum with more flexibility, but other professors said they believe students benefit from a more traditional disciplinary approach to education. “Majors that tend to be more problem-based than disciplinary-based have long been attractive, and I think, now, we are finding more ways to do this with subjects that are both topical and of keen interest to the millennial generation,” Miller said. “Such majors tend to focus on topic, not discipline, and look from many different lenses in order to gain expertise and

Sen. Toni Harp ARC ’78 in the Sept. 10 Democratic primary and his subsequent decision to run as an independent in the November general election, the group introduced a new initiative Tuesday, dubbed the Elicker Organizing Fellowship, that is aimed at both

denting Harp’s formidable organizational advantage and taking advantage of the large number of independent voters in the city. “The main difference [between the primary and general elections] is numerical — scale,” Morrison said. “There are going

to be a lot more voters.” The majority of Yale students are unaffiliated with a political party, making them ineligible to participate in the Democratic primary. According to Morrison, SEE ELICKER PAGE 5

SOM to offer scholarship to Yale graduates

multidisciplinary training for interdisciplinary exploration.” Though some interdisciplinary programs have their own faculty positions, most draw from other related departments and course listings. The American studies faculty includes professors from departments such as History, African American Studies and Anthropology.

[Interdisciplinary] majors tend to focus on topic, not discipline, and look from many different lenses in order to gain expertise. MARY MILLER Yale College Dean Senior lecturer Amity Doolittle said environmental studies has grown dramatically over the past decade, a trend she attributed both to the relevance of the subject matter and the intellectual freedom of the program. Last year, 28 students earned undergraduate degrees in environmental studies, compared to nine in 2003-’04. “Who doesn’t like to break SEE MAJORS PAGE 4

YUME HOSHIJIMA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The School of Management’s new campus on Whitney Avenue is slated to open in January 2014. BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER Yale graduates now have the option to attend the School of Management for a year at no cost. Each year, SOM admits a group of college seniors to the Silver Scholars Program, a three-year MBA program that allows recent graduates to pursue a business degree immediately after completing their undergraduate education. In its next admissions cycle, the school will waive the approximately $59,000 annual tuition fee for admitted candidates

who graduated from Yale for the first of the program’s three years. SOM senior associate dean for the fulltime MBA program Anjani Jain and SOM director of admissions Bruce DelMonico said the decision is part of the school’s broader effort over the past several years to increase the amount of merit-based aid it awards — scholarship support at SOM has grown from constituting roughly 3 percent of the school’s gross tuition last year to about 9 percent this year. SEE SOM PAGE 5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “This is huge” yaledailynews.com/opinion

The end of big things W

hen we were young, we were often asked whether we’d rather be a big fish in a small pond or small fish in a big pond. But it was a false dilemma. We never really got to choose between big ponds and small ponds, nor will we in the future. Big ponds are drying up all around us. Small ponds are burgeoning. We instead choose what particular small pond we want to plunge into. This transition, from the big and few to the small and many, is redrawing the confines in which we live. A few decades ago, the Yale Daily News and the Yale Political Union were the only two big extracurricular organizations on campus. Nothing rivaled them in size or finances. At one point in the 1980s, over a quarter of students were active YPU members, attending meetings and participating in debate. Today, such involvement is unthinkable. Even major Yale events like football games and athletic championships struggle to reach such levels of participation. Now Yalies can choose between hundreds of clubs for specific interests: prison tutoring, singing, bookmaking. Societies have also burst in numbers. Just a few decades ago, only landed societies existed. Now there are over thirty senior societies, some of them simply formal extensions of existing friend groups. Gone, too, are the days of students gathering around bulletin boards on Cross Campus. Now most Yalies get their event information via email panlists that serve particular interests, from the Yale Cabaret to Yale Athletics. Yale isn’t the only place disrupted by this transition. The national journalism industry is in shambles, as the Times and the Post are squeezed by smaller, niche publications that target vastly different viewerships. Twitter has replaced town hall meetings, allowing each individual to speak at will. Even college graduates now contemplate starting their own company or freelancing instead of climbing the ladder of Big Three corporations. I don’t know why big things are being chopped up into smaller bits. Nor am I nostalgic for the good old days where people did things together, simply because I never lived in those days. My generation does not know assemblies and flourishing orations; instead we know hard drives and screens. Nor have we lived in a place where people rely on church bells to signal the passing of an hour. Here, everyone has their own watch, and everyone tells their own time. Still, I wonder where this transition will lead. As personalized feeds develop, will there

be a point where we’ll be reading none of the same news? As displays like Google Glass gain p o p u l a rGENG ity, will each NGARMYalie end up BOONANANT literally seeing different things in Geng’s class? All Here And if we do, can we still live together as a community? Can we find commonality as our common ground slowly vanishes? Big things guarantee a collective experience. Small things don’t. Aristotle once wrote that “the acceptance of a fact as a fact is the starting point … there will be no further need to ask why it is so.” By “facts” he meant fundamental communal values that needed to be taken for granted. Questioning them, he thought, had the potential to tear apart a fragile social fabric. We know that Aristotle’s belief can lead to oppressive groupthink. Indeed, questioning these very facts have engendered the self-sufficiency of tech start-ups and the individualism of revolutions. The danger of small things is not in challenging facts, but rather the potential for two different sets of facts entirely. Each of us increasingly lives in our own small bubble — speaking with the same people, pursuing our own narrow passions and yes, picking our own facts to ingest. Communities like Yale are not fictional and cannot be taken for granted. We came to Yale because it felt most human to us, because we felt an overwhelming sense of belonging. But belonging requires something to belong to, and that something could slip away. We have already seen our unity decay: packs of students no longer flock to athletic games, student protests and Masters’ Teas. Even Peter Salovey’s inauguration next week — the biggest Yale celebration in 20 years — has not invited the excitement that it deserves. The most tragic danger for Yale, in the long-term, is to lose what higher education has been when all else was lost: a bastion for community. When our kids come to Yale, our ponds will have likely shrunk even more. It is up to our community builders — Masters and Deans, chaplains and administrators — along with our common student effort, to make sure these small ponds don’t dry up. GENG NGARMBOONANANT is a junior in Silliman College. Contact him at wishcha.ngarmboonanant@yale.edu .

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 21

'BOB LOBLAW' ON 'YALE REPORTS 12.5 RETURN ON INVESTMENTS'

Fix the Corporation W

e are a university in transition. We have a new president and provost, a new focus on science and math, a new “Yale” across the sea. There are far more new professors than ever before. These massive changes have gotten me thinking — who is making the decisions that shape a changing Yale? The answer, interestingly, troublingly, is the Yale Corporation. The Corporation, Yale’s governing body, embodies every conspiracy theory we have about those in power — a distant, shadowy group of people, wielding immense authority, making decisions behind closed doors. But it is sadly uncommon for Yalies to look behind the curtain and see the Yale Corporation for what it truly is. To understand the Yale Corporation is to be deeply unsettled and more than a little incredulous. The Yale Corporation is, in the words of its own website, “small” and “unusually active.” It is, indeed, unusual for a university the size and prominence of Yale not to have a faculty senate or other body representing the interests of professors. Instead, we have the Corporation, made up of just 19 individuals, including the University President, ten Successor Trustees, six Alumni Fellows and, bizarrely, the governor and lieutenant governor of Connecticut. Because of the way it is structured, the Yale Corporation is

not in the least way a cco u n ta b l e to the students, the staff or the faculty — those most affected by SCOTT its decisions. STERN The ten Successor TrustA Stern ees choose own Perspective their successors. The Corporation chooses the University President, so that’s another spot about which we have no say. I suppose Connecticut residents elect the governor and lieutenant governor, but that’s hardly a real check on Corporation membership, and the state executives are only ex officio members anyway. Finally, the six Alumni Fellows are elected, not by students or faculty, but by alumni — and, as if to make sure they’re as out of touch as possible, eligible voters must be at least five years out. The men and women who compose the Corporation are remarkably unrepresentative of modern Yale. The Corporation has almost twice as many men as women. Even more appalling is the fact that more than three quarters of Corporation members are white. White men alone are a majority. In a Yale that claims to celebrate diversity, to be striving to recruit the underprivileged and

the marginalized, this is troubling. In a Yale that is behind on its stated goals for minority hiring, that just appointed a new crop of white administrators to its highest positions, this is hardly surprising. And this brings us to larger concerns about the Corporation. It is too autocratic, too out of touch and too secretive. When Yale decided to partner with the National University of Singapore, building a new university bearing the “Yale” imprimatur in a country that smirks at free speech, criminalizes homosexuality and makes drug use a capital offense, it did so without any vote or approval from the faculty. The decision was made instead by the Corporation. When Yale decided to appoint a new President, students and faculty had pathetically little say in the appointment. In both these cases, there had been a couple poorly publicized meetings to discuss the decisions, but we have no idea how much, if at all, these meetings mattered, because all the decisions were made in private. The Yale Corporation plays the dominant role in choosing Yale’s administrators, its policies and goals, who gets honorary degrees, whether or not there will be new residential colleges and on and on. These meetings are not open to the public or to members of the Yale community. Meeting times are not set in stone, nor are there adequate mechanisms for the

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST CAT H Y Z H U

Peace at the post office T

here’s something about Monday mornings: so peaceful, so crisp. There’s the lazy allowance of a few extra, savory moments lying in bed, surrounded by the silence of Old Campus. It’s peaceful — except where the post office is concerned. Students line up before Yale Station even opens, hoping to beat the rush to pick up packages that will ensue later that day. My roommate checked both of our P.O. boxes practically every day for the first two weeks of school, a ritual perfected for receiving an important package. At first she’d get most of my mail, mostly textbooks from Amazon, finding the enigmatic yellow slips calling for parcel window pickup. Thinking it could be her package (we shared a box while she was getting her’s set up), she waited in line for it. But it was my book. Again. And again. (They really should label on the slip what package it is.) You would think picking up mail would be easy, maybe a matter of minutes. But lines at this parcel window were a matter of forty minutes. My roommate eventually became so frustrated waiting in line for me that she would just text me about my mail. Frankly, I was surprised she had been willing to stand in line all three times before that. So on an innocuous Monday morning, I ventured to the post office for the first time myself. I was already wary of its reputation of inefficiency and slowness; I waited over an hour to set up my P.O. box itself earlier in the month. I chose a time I thought the post office would be emptier, braced myself and opened the door near L-Dub. Even then, the line stretched down the hall and up the stairs leading to the entrance. I reluctantly joined the back of the line, clutching my yellow slip, but as a freshman, still eager to receive my first package at Yale. I waited thirty minutes that Monday. That day, there were two people working the counter, which as I came to realize, was truly a privilege. The next Monday, I returned to find the line the same length. Not in the mood to wait, I returned a few hours later to find the line the same as before, and this time begrudgingly

joined the back. I made a mental note to check mail on a different weekday. I tried Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Fridays to no avail. The line remained as constant as the rhythmic snoring of the guy sitting behind me in lecture last Wednesday. Once, I brought an orange with me to eat, thinking I could occupy myself through the wait. The line moved up maybe three or four people by the time I’d finished peeling and eating (while balancing the leftover peel and orange seeds in one hand, a somewhat odd endeavor). I started making friends, albeit temporarily, with the people behind me, groaning about the lassitude of standing so long, spewing expletives whenever a new surge of impatience hit.

MAYBE THE WAIT'S NOT SO BAD AFTER ALL The post office is so notorious for its inefficiency that Yale students have begun actively wondering how to improve it, taking to Facebook to suggest complete student takeover. The administration has kept the post office open longer the past week to allow more time to pick up mail, but that really just means more time available to stand in line. But on the other hand, the inefficiency has a positive side. It gives a chance to stop our days, to relax in the monotony of knowing there is nothing else we can accomplish in that very moment other than to just be. For my first couple weeks, it gave me something to talk about with the notso-strange-anymore-strangers at the dinner table. It gives us a small chance to bond, and is probably an irretrievable aspect of the Yale college experience. On Monday, when I’m unhurriedly readjusting to the routine for the week, I add the post office to my to-do list wearily, but also, optimistically. CATHY ZHU is a freshman in Branford College. Contact her at cathy.zhu@yale.edu .

Yale community to communicate concerns to the Corporation. Whereas in decades past President Kingman Brewster ’41 actually sat down with students and mandated that every Corporation member eat frequent lunches with undergraduates, we have never seen most members of the Corporation, much less met them or given them our suggestions. We are a university governed by an unelected, unrepresentative, unconnected and unknown body, meeting in private. This has to change. We can debate all the problems we want, but progress will be difficult until the institution at the root of so many problems is changed. If students or faculty members have an opinion on new appointments, new colleges, the grading policy, recruitment initiatives or anything else, that opinion should be heard. Short of disbanding the Corporation entirely and creating a more representative more in-touch body, several reforms can be enacted. Current members of the Yale community, not far-removed alumni or the Corporation itself, should vote on all members of the Corporation. Corporation meetings should be open to all members of the Yale community. We are a changing university. It is time for a change. SCOTT STERN is a junior in Branford College. Contact him at scott.stern@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST SARAH BRULEY

Solving Yale Station W

hat has many legs but cannot move? The line at the post office. On my first trip to Yale Station, I was unaware that you need to block out at least an hour from your schedule just to receive your package. After taking my yellow slip from my postbox, I, a naive freshman, merrily skipped my way to the parcel window. I stopped dead in my tracks upon seeing a line that extended past the doors and out onto the paved steps. Figuring that it was temporarily backed up and that I would have enough time to grab lunch afterwards, I decided to queue up. After 30 minutes elapsed, I had only just made it inside the building. But I had invested so much time in that line that I decided to wait it out. About an hour later, I remained package-less. My stomach started growling, my feet hurt and I couldn’t leave the line to use the bathroom. On top of that, the dining hall had closed, and it was chicken tenders day. I’m not the only one with a horror story. When my suitemate finally reached the front of the line, the fire alarm went off. Even though the alarm was wailing, no one dared to leave the post office and sacrifice a place in line. It’s not just the line that’s delayed. I’ve had to wait almost a week for the slip for a package that, according to the online tracking, had already arrived at Yale Station. Others have waited for up to two weeks for their late packages and letters. Despite efforts to speed up the line, such as increasing the number of staff, extending the opening hours and adding an operational window, my friends and I still find ourselves stuck in the same mindnumbing line. So I thought of a couple alternative solutions. First of all, deciding when to go to Yale Station is a huge guessing game. The wait times are unpredictable, and the length of the line fluctuates throughout the day. If there were a smartphone application that indicated how long the lines were and gave an estimated wait time, students could better plan when to pick

up their packages. Or perhaps Yale Station can take inspiration from the line management in theme parks. Many parks have two lines for an attraction — one long line and one shorter, faster line. To join the short line, tourists agree to come back to the ride within a specified time frame. The system works because the number of riders allowed to sign up for the faster line any given time is limited.

WE NEED PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS TO IMPROVE THE EFFICIENCY OF THE YALE STATION POST OFFICE If this system were implemented in Yale Station, two parcel windows would be open, and a certain number of students could take a ticket to show up for the shorter line at an assigned time. After all the tickets for the first time frame are gone, tickets can become available for the next time frame. To ensure that people don’t arbitrarily join the shorter line, both the ticket and the package slip would need to be turned in before receiving the parcel. The system would work on a firstcome, first-served basis and, unlike at the theme parks, it would run free of charge. Unfortunately, I don’t think any proposal will work until we learn why Yale Station continues to move so slowly. But if a line is so long that students would rather throw their selfpreservation to the wind and stay in the building when a fire alarm sounds than risk losing their hard-earned places in line, then Yale Station needs to come up with a solution quickly. SARAH BRULEY is a freshman in Morse College. Contact her at sarah.bruley@yale.edu.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“A woman without a man is like a fish without a bicycle.” GLORIA STEINEM AMERICAN FEMINIST AND POLITICAL ACTIVIST

CORRECTION TUESDAY, SEPT. 24

The article “Urban advocates call for transportation reform” misspelled the name of Josh Isackson ’15

Bard prof talks prisoner ed

SARAH ECKINGER/PHOTO EDITOR

With new lane, city promotes biking BY NICOLE NG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Following the addition of a dedicated bike lane on Elm Street, New Haven’s transportation department installed a 16-cycle bike rack at the intersection of College and Chapel streets last week. The city converted a parking space on College Street into a corral for bicycles and marked a bike lane from York Street to Orange Street after Elm Street was repaved in August. Both initiatives are part of a citywide effort to promote biking and alternative transportation across New Haven. “We want to improve cycling in the city,” said City Traffic Chief Jim Travers. “We have aggressively looked at how we could increase and expand our cycling network in the city, and having a bike corral front and center in a busy intersection sends the right message — that we want cycling to occur in the city center.” New Haven residents initially attempted to crowdsource donations for the rack on SeeClickFix, a neighborhood problem-solving website, but the city stepped in after they were unable to achieve their funding goal. The Transportation Department purchased the $4,000 bike rack with funding for transportation enhancement. The bike corral, which was fully occupied shortly after its unveiling, addresses the city’s high demand for bike storage and helps prevent bikes from clogging the street. “It’s very helpful — it’s often hard to find places to lock your bicycle,” said molecular biophysics and biochemistry professor Chuck Sindelar, a frequent cycler. The bike corral will be removed during the winter, as it interferes with snow plowing, but it will be returned in the spring. Though the parking space where the corral now stands was a busy and highly sought spot, Travers hopes that a more visible, secure location for bike storage will encourage cycling in the city. In an additional effort to make biking infrastructure more visible, the city’s transportation department is also working to locate a vendor to paint the Elm Street

WA LIU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A bike lane was added from York Street to Orange Street after Elm Street was repaved in August. bike lane green, as it is currently only demarcated by a single white line. There has been no negative effect to vehicle traffic as a result of the lane, according to Travers. “It really speaks to our city’s smart co-existing campaign, in which we create streets where we all co-exist in the same space without any negative effects,” said Travers. “In fact, I think we’ve improved travel because we’ve improved cycling travel on Elm Street.” New Haven saw an 11 percent increase in cyclists last year, Travers added, and is continuing its efforts to increase alternative means of travel throughout the city. In late August, Claire’s Corner Copia and the transportation department installed a vegetable-themed artistic bike rack, designed by Ben Green ’14, out-

Shore. As 3.8 percent of New Haven workers commute via bicycle, Hausladen said that the city will also focus its efforts on building more indoor storage facilities for commuters. “Bang for buck, bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure is some of the best government money spent, because it creates an opportunity for a resilient economy through local spending and money that circulates within our community,” Hausladen said. New Haven’s only dedicated bike infrastructure is currently the Farmington Canal, a multiuse trail that runs from downtown New Haven to Northampton, Mass.

side the Chapel street eatery. “In order for New Haven to be the alternative transportation capital of the world or the north east, we’re going to need more dedicated bike infrastructure,” said Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen ’04. “We need to get to the point where a seven-year-old, a 70-yearold and a 25-year-old all feel comfortable riding their bicycles on our streets.” Future developments for the city’s biking program will include additional bike lanes and storage racks, as well as an enhancement of cycling education programs, said Travers. New Haven will also look to work with the state to install its first cycle track — a bike lane with a buffer between pedestrians and traffic — on Water Street, which will connect downtown New Haven to the East

Contact NICOLE NG at nicole.ng@yale.edu .

Bard College progessor Ellen Lagemann visited Yale for a Trumbull Master’s Tea Tuesday to discuss her efforts to help inmates obtain degrees. BY ZARA CONTRACTOR CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Bard College professor Ellen Lagemann discussed her efforts to help hundreds of men and women obtain college degrees from prison at a Trumbull Master’s Tea Tuesday afternoon. Lagemann explained her work on the Bard Prison Initiative — a project that allows inmates to pursue an undergraduate degree from Bard while serving time in prison — and addressed the causes and consequences of mass incarceration before an audience of roughly 30 students. She said prison education programs can lower the number of convicts who become repeat offenders. “Rather than change laws, change attitudes,” Lagemann said. The reasons why people commit crimes are still unknown, Lagemann said, but she believes that incarceration and crime are not directly linked, since crime rates and incarceration rates differ significantly. Since 2008, the number of individuals imprisoned in the United States has fallen because of budget constraints rather than because of a decrease in the crime rate, she added. While most prisoner rehabilitation programs have a failure rate of over 65 percent, she said, roughly 4 percent of the Bard Prison Initiative participants have returned to prison. Prisoners are admitted to the Bard Prison Initiative through a competitive application process, she said. She said she believes that education is effective as a long-term solution to mass incarceration. Lagemann said she thinks that race and politics play a significant role in mass incarceration. A large number of the inmates she has met have been African-American, a phenomenon that she thinks resulted from resentment toward the black community after the

Civil Rights movement. “Mass incarceration is undermining democracy in the U.S.A.,” she said. Lagemann also discussed her upcoming book about the Bard Prison Initiative, entitled “America Imprisoned: the Causes and Consequences of Mass Incarceration.” She chose to title the book “America Imprisoned” because citizens of the United States pay for the 2.2 million imprisoned Americans with their taxes, so the incarcerated are a burden on each taxpayer, she said. The massive amount of funding is comparable to the amount the government spent on the war in Afghanistan, Lagemann said, adding that as the government pays to support the incarcerated it cuts funding for other programs, such as education.

East Asian languages see enrollment spike

Rather than change laws, change attitudes. ELLEN LAGEMANN Professor, Bard College George Chochos DIV ’16, a former participant of the Bard Prison Initiative, said in an interview with the News that the program was often a more rigorous academic program than the Bard College curriculum. Through the initiative, he said he learned important skills such as an ability to think critically. Will Portman ’14 said he appreciated the initiative because it has a “tremendous” impact on many people’s lives. Jessica Liang ’17 said she found the talk insightful because Lagemann seemed passionate about the subject. The Bard Prison Initiative currently enrolls 215 students and offers them 50 courses. Contact ZARA CONTRACTOR at zara.contractor@yale.edu .

BRIANNA LOO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The number of students taking Korean and Japanese courses, as well as L1 Chinese, increased significantly this year. BY WESLEY YIIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER This semester, Yale’s Korean, Japanese and Chinese language programs saw unprecedented increases in student enrollment. The number of students taking Korean and Japanese courses increased by 25 percent since fall 2012, and 108 students enrolled in L1 Chinese, a 20 percent increase over last year’s 90 students. Seungja Choi, director of language instruction in the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department, said student interest in East Asian languages has been growing nationally, adding that her department last saw a large spike in enrollment in 2005. Choi, who has taught Korean at Yale since 1990, said the East Asian language program’s strong curricula, positive reputation and structural improvements have played a role in attracting students.

Though the total enrollment in the Chinese program has not grown much — from 380 last fall to 385 this semester — its increase in Level 1 enrollment could indicate that the student enrollment will spike in the future, Choi said. She added that since the classes are mostly composed of freshmen, parents might have pushed these new students to learn a practical language like Chinese for their future careers. Choi and Yu-Lin Wang-Saussy, who teaches the L1 “Elementary Modern Chinese” course, were enthusiastic about increased student interest in East Asian languages, though WangSaussy said she hopes her classes can be moved to larger rooms in the future. During shopping period, she said, many students who came to her Chinese class had to sit on the floor because all of the class’s seats were taken. Wang-Saussy said Chinese

might be seeing heightened enrollment because of the growing importance of China in the global economy. “China is strong, its economy is strong,” she said. “If you want to start working in business, the opportunities are there.” Wang-Saussy also highlighted some of the unique strengths of Yale’s Chinese program as possible contributors to the program’s rising popularity, such as the rotation of teachers in “Elementary Modern Chinese” and the prestigious Richard U. Light Fellowship, which fully funds study abroad of East Asian languages. The 10 students in L1 Chinese interviewed said they are taking Chinese out of a mix of personal interest and pragmatic goals. Mack Ramsden ’17 said he had been interested in East Asian affairs, namely the politics of the region and its relationship to western nations, since high school. Before coming to Yale,

he spent part of a gap year in China, where he discovered that he “really enjoyed speaking the language,” which pushed him to enroll in “Elementary Modern Chinese.” Some students said the practicality of learning Chinese was their primary motivator in pursuing the language. Dara Huggins-James ’17 said she feels Chinese is a “practical language to learn,” adding that she wanted to learn a language other than Spanish, which she had studied in high school. “It’s a really useful language,” Sandeep Peddada ’16 said. As a future engineer, he felt that “the industry seems to be heading in that direction.” The East Asian Languages and Literatures Department offers an undergraduate major with tracks in Chinese and Japanese. Contact WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Endowment at $20.8B ENDOWMENT FROM PAGE 1 line with those at three other top universities that have released their fiscal year 2013 returns so far. Provost Benjamin Polak told the News he is “delighted” with the endowment’s performance. Yale’s 12.5 percent return for the latest fiscal period is higher than Harvard’s 11.1 percent and MIT’s 11.3 percent but lower than the University of Pennsylvania’s 14.4 percent return. Most universities have yet to release their fiscal year 2013 results. Though the return is significantly greater than the 4.7 percent performance the University posted in fiscal year 2012, Yale’s investments did not fare as well as the S&P 500 stock market index, which saw a total return of 20.6 percent during fiscal 2013. Experts interviewed before Yale announced this year’s endowment performance forecasted returns as high as 16 percent in light of the success of the stock market this year. But Polak told the News in a Tuesday email that Yale’s endowment is made up of a variety of different investments and asset classes, many of which are not influenced by the highs and lows of the stock market. “Our investment portfolio is very diversified,” he said. “This means it sometimes does less well but often does much, much better than domestic stocks.” Under the guidance of Chief Investment Officer David Swensen — who pioneered the shift toward more diversified investment port-

folios in the ’80s, a strategy commonly known as the “Yale model” — the University holds only about 6 percent of its endowment assets in domestic equities and allocates the majority of its assets toward private equity, real estate and absolute return. Swensen told the News last spring that he believes his investing principles provide the most effective way to structure a portfolio. He declined to comment for this story.

I think that the world in many ways is fundamentally riskier than it was 10 or 20 years ago. There are lots of stresses and imbalances in the global economy that create an unusual level of uncertainty. DAVID SWENSEN Chief Investment Officer, Yale University Polak added that Yale deliberately keeps its endowment from depending too highly on the U.S. stock market because other sources of funding for the University such as federal grants and private gifts already correlate with the stock market. Roger Ibbotson, a finance professor at the Yale School of Management, said he expects Yale will end up being “somewhere in the mid-

dle” compared to other Ivy League schools’ fiscal 2013 returns. He added that he does not expect the Yale endowment to return to the “exceptional” track record it enjoyed in the boom years leading up to the recession, when the endowment saw returns in the mid20 percent range for several years in a row. “I think that the world in many ways is fundamentally riskier than it was 10 to 20 years ago,” Swensen told the News last spring. “There are lots of stresses and imbalances in the global economy that create an unusual level of uncertainty. So I have fairly normal return expectations but abnormally high concern about fundamental risks.” Since the University uses a “spending rule” to smooth out the effects of good and bad years for the endowment on the University’s operating budget, Polak said the effect of an endowment return on the next year’s budget is relatively small. Yale’s annual target endowment return is approximately 7.5 percent, which allows the University to spend about 5 percent of the endowment each year and account for inflation while maintaining the purchasing power of the endowment, Polak said. Each additional 1 percent beyond the target return adds about $2 million to help the overall University budget the next year, he said. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .

“Chaos is a name for any order that produces confusion in our minds.” GEORGE SANTAYANA PHILOSOPHER

Students look to cross disciplines MAJORS FROM PAGE 1 boundaries?” Doolittle said. “Studying within traditional disciplines means adopting labels such as, ‘I am a historian,’ or ‘I am botanist,’ or ‘I am an artist.’ But with an interdisciplinary EVST focus you can draw together your multiple interests.” Like many interdisciplinary majors, environmental studies requires that students complete courses in different disciplines, including the humanities, social sciences and sciences. Ned Blackhawk, director of undergraduate studies for American studies, called his field “inherently interdisciplinary,” adding that he thinks the growth of interdisciplinary majors reflects creative collaboration among professors across disciplines on campus. Norma Thompson, director of undergraduate studies for the humanities major, said she thinks the major allows students to bring together courses that interest them without feeling constrained by requirements. Humanities incorporates courses from programs such as literature, film studies and political science. “I don’t think you should be wasting time at Yale taking courses you don’t want to take,” Thompson said. Still, Thompson said it can be difficult to balance academic freedom with cohesiveness in the major. Without dedicated faculty, she said inter-

disciplinary majors cannot guarantee that course offerings will remain consistent each year, as the major depends on cross-listed courses in other departments. Professor Beverly Gage, director of undergraduate studies for the history major, said single-discipline majors help students build “methodological tools of knowledge, such as writing and analyzing well,” skills that may be lost in a purely topic-based approach. Several students interviewed said they enrolled in an interdisciplinary major because it allowed them to draw upon their interests in different departments to form their own academic track. “When I was looking through the blue book, I noticed that many of my interests aligned with [women, gender and sexuality studies],” Lily Vanderbloemen ’16 said. “A lot of the courses that I most enjoyed happened to be cross listed.” Ethan Karetsky ’14 said he has taken courses in art, teater and history that fulfill requirements within his personally-designed track in the American studies major. Yale undergradautes can choose from 75 different majors. Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu . Contact LARRY MILSTEIN at larry.milstein@yale.edu .

2005 lawsuit claimed negligence on the part of DKE DKE FROM PAGE 1 Neither Ecker nor a representative of the DKE national chapter could not be reached for comment late Tuesday evening. The lawsuit, filed in 2005, claimed negligence on the part of the fraternity. Grass’ family asserted in the suit that DKE held responsibility for safely transporting students from the New York event to New Haven and ought to have chosen a more cautious driver. It further suggested that the driver of the car, Fenton,

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was sleep deprived the night of the accident because of the fraternity’s “Hell Week,” which was ongoing at the time and included frequent mandatory initiation activities. A September 2012 Connecticut Supreme Court ruling decided that, despite protests from DKE, the fraternity could be sued on the grounds alleged by Grass’ family. The accident occurred in icy conditions along a stretch of Interstate 95 when a 42,000 pound truck broke through the barriers dividing the freeway.

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Fenton was unable to stop the car before it collided with the jackknifed truck’s trailer.

An investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board, concluded in 2005, found

that the government bore at least partial responsibility for the accident. According to the report, the median dividing the freeway, standing 32 inches tall, was too short to stop the truck from overriding it. “They were never intended or even capable of withstanding medium-sized vehicles, let alone heavy vehicles,” senior research director at Advocates for Highway and Auto Safety Gerald Donaldson said at the time. “There’s a very narrow range that you can use them in. [The Federal Highway

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He was humble and modest and the joy of my life. CATINA GRASS Mother of Nicholas Grass ’05

Administration] knew that barrier provided no protection whatsoever. This highway authority knew this would occur eventually, but they did nothing to prevent it.” Grass pitched for the Yale baseball team and was the first native of Holyoke, Mass., to attend Yale since 1942, then-Pierson College Dean Christa Dove said in 2003. In his obituary in the News, friends and family described him as a talented baseball player and dedicated role model to younger students. “He was humble and mod-

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est and the joy of my life,” Catina Grass, Grass’ mother, said in 2003. “Until he died, I knew he had many, many friends, but I never knew how many people he had touched in his life.” The summer before his death, Grass was named an All-star in the Atlantic Collegiate Baseball League. Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu . Contact MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu.

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT Elicker pushes Yale vote ELICKER FROM PAGE 1

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com

OPINION.

Yale for Elicker’s main objective is to bring those students to the polls on Nov. 5. Harp exhibited a superior get-outthe-vote effort when she won a convincing victory in the primary. With the organizational support of New Haven’s major unions, the state senator drew the support of nearly half the New Haven Democrats who voted. It was Elicker’s disadvantage in the turnout realm, Morrison said, that provided the impetus for the Elicker Organizing Fellowship. The unpaid fellowship, according to Morrison, currently includes around 10 students, most of them freshmen and sophomores. Each of the fellows will be assigned a piece of turf for which they will be responsible in the seven weeks until the election. They will also be charged with implementing much of the campaign’s social media strategy, in particular managing the Facebook pages of the Elicker Yale contingent and the campaign at large. Brynne Follman ’17, one of the program’s first recruits, said she joined the program after learning about Elicker’s education policies. On Tuesday night, Follman sat in Morrison’s suite as Morrison elucidated the dynamics of the city’s politics and provided a how-to on local political organizing. Meanwhile, the Harp campaign plans to continue its work on campus. According to Harp Field Director Michael Harris ’15, several dozens students volunteered for the state senator over the summer and are continuing their efforts on campus. Although there is no Harp equivalent of the Yale for Elicker group, the campaign is working in conjunction with Students Unite Now, an affiliate of Yale’s Unite Here unions, to persuade Yale students to support Harp. The campaign is also working with Ward 1 Alderman Sarah Eidelson’s ’12 campaign to canvass throughout the ward and plans to bring Harp to canvass several more times before the election. “We’re interested in making sure we involve Yale students as much as possible,” Harris said. Both candidates face an uphill battle to turn out Yale voters. In the Sept. 10 primary, only 223 residents voted in Ward 1, which is composed mostly of Yale’s Old Campus and eight of its residential col-

“We are all sentenced to solitary confinement inside our own skins, for life.” TENNESSEE WILLIAMS AMERICAN WRITER

SOM increases merit-based aid SOM FROM PAGE 1 SOM Professor Barry Nalebuff, who helped found the Silver Scholars program in 2001, said that the program targets seniors with a wide range of intellectual backgrounds, including students majoring in the liberal arts. The program usually attracts between 250 and 300 applicants from colleges across the nation, Jain said, and roughly 10 are admitted each year.

There are no obligations — you get the first year for free … and you just see what you think about it. TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Justin Elicker’s FES ’10 SOM ’10 campaign has been the most active on Yale’s campus. leges. Elicker received 108 of those votes, with only 47 going to Harp. Former candidate Henry Fernandez took 61, while Hillhouse High School principal Kermit Carolina picked up the last seven. Harris said that the low turnout was no surprise, as municipal primaries have a historically low turnout in Ward 1, largely due to students’ arrival on campus less than three weeks before voters go to the polls. However, a contested aldermanic race and the efforts of the mayoral candidates on campus, Harris said, will increase voter participation in the general election. Although Elicker has maintained the most visible presence on campus, the candidate sought to distance himself from the notion that he is focusing on Yale more than other neighborhoods. Instead, he said, the on-campus balance between his presence and Harp’s is representative of their efforts throughout the city. “Toni investing less time in Yale doesn’t mean that I’m focusing more on Yale,”

Elicker said. “I just invest more time everywhere.” Yale Democrats Communications Director Tyler Blackmon ’16 said that despite traditionally low turnout in Ward 1, mayoral candidates have a responsibility to seek the votes of Yale students. “There are as many votes here as there are in any ward,” Blackmon said. “All the mayoral candidates should be reaching out to all parts of the community, and Yale is part of the community.” Blackmon said that the Dems will spend the fall registering freshmen and encouraging Yale students to vote. Although the group will not endorse a candidate in the mayoral contest, it has thrown its weight behind Eidelson. In 2011, 963 Ward 1 residents voted in the election between Eidelson and challenger Vinay Nayak ’14. Contact MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

BARRY NALEBUFF Professor, Yale SOM “The options nowadays for someone who is a liberal arts major and doesn’t want to go a Ph.D. can be limited, and those initial jobs are often not particularly rewarding intellectually or financially,” Nalebuff said. “With this program, there are no obligations — you get the first year for free, then you get to earn some money, and you just see what you think about it.” In the past, Nalebuff said, the program has admitted Yale seniors who majored in art history, film studies and physics, adding that the financially enhanced initiative aims to attract students well-versed in finance and accounting as well as “students who want to take risks and who may not have otherwise considered business school.” While the typical MBA program at SOM lasts two years, the

Silver Scholars program has an interim year between the first and last year of studies, during which candidates pursue an internship or a full-time job. This allows students to earn their third year’s tuition, administrators said, and Jain added that the interim period can be extended to several years if students want to work longer. Administrators said by making the first year of the program free for Yale graduates, they hope to affirm SOM’s relationship with Yale College and relieve recent graduates from the burden of immediately having to pay for their business degree. SOM administrators have recognized that the school is behind peer institutions in the amount of financial aid it awards. SOM director of financial aid Rebekah Melville said that since SOM Dean Edward Snyder’s arrival in 2011, the school has been steadily increasing the amount of scholarships it offers. “Even now we are at the low end, but at least now we are in the range of what other schools are doing,” DelMonico said. SOM administrators and Nalebuff agreed that the increase in merit-based aid is partly enabled by the school’s imminent move to its new campus on Whitney Avenue, slated to open in January 2014. The move will enable the school to grow its class size, and given that a large portion of scholarship funds comes from tuition, the school will be able to further increase the amount of aid it awards. SOM does not offer needbased grants. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

ARTS & CULTURE

“STELLA!” MARLON BRANDO AS STANLEY KOWALSKI A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE

‘Streetcar’ comes home

Yale-China captures Hong Kong’s local flavor BY HELEN ROUNER STAFF REPORTER

CAROL ROSEGG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire” opens at the University Theatre Thursday, starring René Augesen DRA ’96 as Blanche DuBois and Joe Manganiello as Stanley Kowalski. The show first premiered at the Shubert Theatre in 1947. BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER In 1947, “A Streetcar Named Desire” premiered for the first time at the Shubert Theater, just blocks away from the University Theatre where the show is opening this Thursday after five days of preview performances. This will be the Yale Repertory Theatre’s first ever production of Tennessee Williams’ most famous play. “Streetcar” portrays the growing tension between fading beauty Blanche DuBois, played by René Augesen DRA ’96, and her sister Stella’s working class husband, Stanley Kowalski, played by Joe Manganiello. Manganiello, best known for his role on HBO’s “True Blood,” said he loves the show’s direct approach to con-

fronting the “enmeshed” brutality and sexuality of his character. “It creates a complex feeling in the audience,” Manganiello said. “You understand why Stella would be attracted to this guy … even if you’re ashamed to find him attractive. It’s not a black and white play.” Mark Rucker DRA ’92, who has previously directed eight shows for the Rep, said “Streetcar” has been on the “top of the list” of plays he has dreamed of directing for many years. Though he first discovered the play as a “movie buff” enamored of the 1951 film, he said that for this production he avoided not only re-watching the movie but also looking at any other productions. “It’s well known cause it’s so good,” Rucker said. “I wanted to

really, really sink my teeth into the play.” Rucker said he has found it exciting to make new discoveries about a play he believed he knew so well, especially about the nuances of Blanche and Stanley’s relationship which includes attraction as well as enmity. He added that he had never realized the importance of Stella’s role as a character stuck in the middle of the developing conflict. Rucker flew out to Los Angeles to meet with Manganiello and talk about the role of Stanley, and said he was impressed by the actor’s passion for the play and the character. Manganiello said “Streetcar” is his favorite play, and that he has had a relationship with the show ever since he first played the role of Stanley 16 years ago. He

said that every time he has performed the show it has struck him a different way: In rehearsing this production he said he has felt much more empathy toward Blanche than he did as a 21-year old.

I don’t agree with Stanley, but I get it. I get why he is the way he is. JOE MANGANIELLO Actor, Streetcar Named Desire “The play becomes a mirror to show how you develop as a person,” Manganiello said, adding that he hopes the perspective he

Eclectic ensemble enters second season

has gained will give the character additional layers. Manganiello first encountered the role as a Carnegie Mellon student. He said almost every student director asked him to be Stanley in “Streetcar” scenes they were directing for an assignment. “When there’s an entire school to pick Stanleys from, and they’re all coming to me, I had to ask myself ‘What is it about this character?’” Manganiello said. “I think there’s a lot there instinctively. I don’t agree with Stanley, but I get it. I get why he is the way he is.” “A Streetcar Named Desire” has several other historical ties to Yale, Steven Padla, the Rep’s director of communications, said in an email. Elia Kazan DRA ’33 directed both the original play and the film version with Mar-

lon Brando and Vivian Leigh. The play’s third scene was inspired by Vincent Van Gogh’s celebrated painting “The Night Café,” which has been housed at the Yale University Gallery since 1961, Padla added. Rucker said both he and the designers viewed the work several times while imagining the set design, and hopes its “color and sensuality” infuses the production. Rucker said the production’s challenge is to capture both the claustrophobia of the cramped apartment in which almost the entire action of the play takes place and the vibrancy of the city of New Orleans just outside. “It’s looking at New Orleans in post-WWII America, in this neighborhood [where] all different kinds of people are forced to

live together,” Rucker said. “It’s this new world where borders are loose.” The set is built on a movable platform which shifts throughout the show to highlight the action on the street or in different parts of the house, depending on the scene. Rucker said he is particularly excited about how many fellow School of Drama graduates are working on the show, including Augesen as Blanche, Sarah Sokolovic DRA ’11 as Stella and Adam O’Byrne ’01 DRA ’04 as Mitch, as well as others. “A Streetcar Named Desire” will play at the University Theatre through Oct. 12. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

KATHRYN CRANDALL/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

At the Yale-China Association, illustrator Michael Sloan is bringing Hong Kong’s authentic street markets to life. city’s commercial sphere, dominated by large glass and metal malls, to be soulless and hygienic. The street markets felt much more authentic to him, and he was usually the only white foreigner in these markets, which had few signs in English — and, he added, he does not speak Chinese. In addition to illustrating the tension between the sterilized and authentic aspects of the city, Sloan said his work depicts the love-hate relationship between Chinese mainlanders and the residents of Hong Kong Island.

It’s a part of the city that’s often in black and white, but Michael brings it into color — what’s often in the background, he brings to the foreground. ANNIE LIN ’09 Curator, “Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” “Mainlanders are subject to humiliation and discrimination because they look and behave differently,” Sloan said.

He explained that social norms like spitting and pushing, which are acceptable in Mainland China, are considered vulgar in Hong Kong and give rise to cultural prejudices. He cited a painting of a “parallel trader,” someone who transports goods between Hong Kong and Mainland China — for instance, infant formula, the quality of which is not trusted on the Mainland. Sloan said he depicted this man as dignified despite his allegedly disreputable profession, adding that this is the first time he has combined his sketch work and his editorial work. “Here, my opinions about what I’ve drawn are pretty clear,” he said. Sloan is married to Leslie Stone, the Yale-China Association’s director for Hong Kong and director of education. The couple moved to Hong Kong for the year with their three children so that Stone could run Yale-China’s Hong Kong Office. The family lived on the New Asia College campus in an apartment that has belonged to Yale-China since the 1970s, Stone said. She explained that the Yale-China Association and New Asia College established a partnership in the 1950s that has facilitated cultural and educational exchanges among their students ever since.

Every two years, four Yale-China Teaching Fellows are appointed to teach foundation courses for underclassmen majoring in English at New Asia College, Stone explained. Sloan said living on the university campus allowed his family and the Teaching Fellows to share parts of their lives with one another, and that the fellows introduced Sloan to the neighborhoods he painted, he said. Sloan is the fifth artist to be featured in Yale-China’s art exhibit series, which began four years ago. Lin, who previously worked on the Association’s “Foothills” exhibit, featuring photography from China’s Xiuning County, said she hopes visitors to the exhibit will appreciate the dignity that Sloan brings to the everyday people he paints. “These pigs are something that might be considered grotesque,” Lin said of a painting of a butcher’s stall, “but the role Michael shows them to play in society could be considered beautiful.” “Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” is on display weekdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 442 Temple St. through June 7. Contact HELEN ROUNER at helen.rouner@yale.edu .

LeWitt’s works transform School of Management walls

BY DANA SCHNEIDER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Theorbos, baroque bows, a babbling tenor and a barefoot soprano: Each played a role in the captivating artistry of Cantata Profana’s “Of Time and Space and Nonsense” on Monday night. The Cantata Profana is dedicated to the performance of eclectic and under-performed works for larger chamber groups, said Jacob Ashworth MUS ’14, who formed the Cantata Profana last year. Nearly all the musicians in the Cantata are students or faculty from the School of Music and the Institute of Sacred Music, and all have played with one another in the past. “The group was inspired by the spirit of collaboration, which is essential for chamber music and unique to the Yale environment,” Ashworth said. Naomi Woo ’12 MUS ’13 said the Cantata presents a repertoire that is not performed enough, whether due to an unusual combination of instruments or the logistical issues associated with larger chamber groups. Presenting unusual chamber works presents various financial challenges — funding for musicians and staff, instrument rental, costumes and recordings. To propel the success of this year’s season, the Cantata set a goal to raise $14,000 through a Kickstarter campaign in August. The group achieved the goal on Sept. 10 after only 21 days online. Despite the planning issues that accompany organizing an ensemble of this size and scope, all three musicians interviewed said they were excited about the opportunity to perform these works, which included “Mystery Sonata No. 1” by Heinrich Biber — unusual in its usage of

The Yale-China Association’s newest art exhibit brings Hong Kong’s street markets to life on Temple Street. The exhibit, which opened earlier this month, features 18 portraits and street scenes that local illustrator Michael Sloan created during a yearlong residency in Hong Kong. Sketched and then painted in watercolor and acrylic, the works primarily portray locals in the Tai Po and Mong Kok East street markets. Sloan said that the paintings, some of which have an explicitly political message, illustrate the dichotomy of Hong Kong’s social spheres. Curator Annie Lin ’09, senior program officer for the arts at the YaleChina association, said Sloan’s work depicts a side of Hong Kong that is often forgotten, but is as integral to the city as its glossy, tourist-friendly enclaves. “It’s a part of the city that’s often in black and white, but Michael brings it into color — what’s often in the background, he brings to the foreground,” Lin said. Sloan has worked as an illustrator for the last two decades, drawing for newspapers and magazines such as “The New York Times,” “The Wall Street Journal” and “The New Yorker.” He is also the creator of “Zen of Nimbus, ” a comic series about a scientist who struggles with fame and fortune after discovering an outer space phenomenon. “Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” is Sloan’s first experiment in portraiture. Lin said she has been a fan of Sloan’s work since the two met a number of years ago. She reached out to him this summer about the possibility of showcasing his work at the Yale-China Association. She added that Sloan’s work, which grew out of extended, first-hand experience with a community, speaks to Yale-China’s mission to promote “a true bicultural understanding.” “There’s great value to developing an intimacy with a place,” Sloan said. “My work is about getting to know the rhythms of a particular street or neighborhood, recognizing the same people.” Sloan said he had visited Hong Kong a number of times prior to living there, but never for more than a few days at a time. During those trips he sketched mostly scenes of the harbor and other better-known aspects of the city, he said. Sloan added that living in Hong Kong and exploring the city beneath its commercial surface inspired him to start sketching street markets. He found the

BY SARAH HOLDER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

This year, Cantata Profana will focus on vocal chamber music and theme-based performances. two theorbos, a baroque instrument similar to a large guitar — and “Nouvelles aventures” by Gyorgy Ligeti, which featured a relatively large group of 11 performers in atypical combinations. On the other hand, the final piece, “Seven Romances on Poems by Alexander Blok” by Shostakovich for soprano, violin, cello and piano, was representative of more traditional chamber music. Ashworth said that while all the musicians are masters in their own right, none is the lead performer. While Cantata Profana’s inaugural concert last semester centered on the monodrama “Eight Songs for a Mad King,” Ashworth explained that the group has since developed a

focus on vocal chamber music and theme-based performance that will be prevalent in the group’s entire season of shows, which will take place in New Haven and New York. Woo described the Cantata as more of an experience than a concert. “Of Time and Space and Nonsense,” the theme of Monday’s concert and another in Brooklyn Tuesday night, featured changes of lighting, costumes, choreography and acting to challenge the audience to think beyond music as merely sound, and rather to think of its function both in time and space. By presenting information about each work and reflecting on the theme throughout the course of the concert, the Cantata members aimed to make the

music accessible to the audience. The concert’s sense of theatricality helped audience members feel more engaged with the foreign works. “Getting to perform great, tricky music with your friends is always a privilege,” Alto Annie Rosen MUS ’08 ’12 said. “It was amazing to see the reaction to the Ligeti last night — we’d all worked so hard on putting the parts together that I at least forgot it was actually funny … it was a treat to see the audience experience it for the first time.” The concert was sold out in both New Haven and New York City. Contact DANA SCHNEIDER at dana.schneider@yale.edu.

BENJAMIN HECHT

Behind the glass windows and stark walls of the new School of Management building lie the beginnings of a colorful new installation featuring the work of acclaimed artist Sol LeWitt. LeWitt donated a large number of his wall drawings to the Yale University Art Gallery before his death in 2007, hoping that the University would archive and properly maintain the integrity of his work. Several pieces from this large collection have been displayed at the YUAG, and museum director Jock Reynolds has been making an active effort to place more of LeWitt’s drawings throughout campus, said John Hogan, the YUAG’s installation director and archivist since 2013. Thanks to Evans Hall architects Foster + Partners and a team of faculty and staff from the School of Management, three of these pieces have found a home in the new School of Management building, which has gone through almost 6 years of construction and is scheduled to open in 2014. “[Evans Hall] is a very modern, stark building in some senses,” said SOM professor Stanley Garstka, the faculty member in charge of ensuring that the design and construction are true to the programmatic needs of the space. “Art is a way of livening [it] up a bit.” The building is very transparent, featuring wide windows and an open layout. When the installation is finished, Garstka explained, the transformed walls will be “visible from almost no matter where you are in the building.” The rest of the design feels more traditionally “Yale,” featuring leather furniture, a wood-finished cafeteria and a courtyard, he added. Hogan has played a central role in the ongoing installation at Evans Hall, which he says will be completed by early November. “The scope of Sol’s work is quite large,” Hogan said, adding that it

BENJAMIN HECHT

Faculty and staff at the School of Management are installing three of Sol LeWitt’s works into Foster + Partners’ Evans Hall. ranges from subtle pencil drawings to more active, colorful pieces. The Yale architects and general planners asked for works that have a strong visual presence and are more durable, rather than LeWitt’s more delicate pieces meant primarily for museums. What makes LeWitt’s paintings so unique is their intrinsic ability to be recreated and shared. LeWitt created original drawings that artists could then reproduce on walls anywhere by using his template. “The nature of Sol’s work is about the idea of the piece,” Hogan said. As LeWitt’s principle drafter in the early 1980s, Hogan knows the artist’s process and installation procedure well and is now leading a team

of Yale undergraduates and graduates in installing them in Evans Hall. The process begins with scaling LeWitt’s drawing in relation to the wall space. Many of his sketches are expandable and retractable and can be blown up without sacrificing the integrity of the initial design. Hogan has selected works that are both “strong choices for the building” and “work with the dimensions of the walls.” In the weeks since the project’s start in early September, the group has already made significant progress on installing two pieces. Working from LeWitt’s scaled blueprints, the designs are sketched onto the wall and covered with a layer of paint.

One wall is splashed with bold horizontal stripes and rainbow diagonals. Another is carefully painted with half circles and broken brown brush strokes. The third vibrant work will be 20 feet high and 60 feet long, a colossal tribute to LeWitt that will likely take most of October to be completed. Last semester, undergraduate art group The Elihu Athenæum and the YUAG installed LeWitt’s “Wall Drawing No. 587” in the basement that Ezra Stiles College and Morse College share. Contact SARAH HOLDER at sarah.holder@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

ARTS & CULTURE

“STELLA!” MARLON BRANDO AS STANLEY KOWALSKI A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE

‘Streetcar’ comes home

Yale-China captures Hong Kong’s local flavor BY HELEN ROUNER STAFF REPORTER

CAROL ROSEGG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire” opens at the University Theatre Thursday, starring René Augesen DRA ’96 as Blanche DuBois and Joe Manganiello as Stanley Kowalski. The show first premiered at the Shubert Theatre in 1947. BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER In 1947, “A Streetcar Named Desire” premiered for the first time at the Shubert Theater, just blocks away from the University Theatre where the show is opening this Thursday after five days of preview performances. This will be the Yale Repertory Theatre’s first ever production of Tennessee Williams’ most famous play. “Streetcar” portrays the growing tension between fading beauty Blanche DuBois, played by René Augesen DRA ’96, and her sister Stella’s working class husband, Stanley Kowalski, played by Joe Manganiello. Manganiello, best known for his role on HBO’s “True Blood,” said he loves the show’s direct approach to con-

fronting the “enmeshed” brutality and sexuality of his character. “It creates a complex feeling in the audience,” Manganiello said. “You understand why Stella would be attracted to this guy … even if you’re ashamed to find him attractive. It’s not a black and white play.” Mark Rucker DRA ’92, who has previously directed eight shows for the Rep, said “Streetcar” has been on the “top of the list” of plays he has dreamed of directing for many years. Though he first discovered the play as a “movie buff” enamored of the 1951 film, he said that for this production he avoided not only re-watching the movie but also looking at any other productions. “It’s well known cause it’s so good,” Rucker said. “I wanted to

really, really sink my teeth into the play.” Rucker said he has found it exciting to make new discoveries about a play he believed he knew so well, especially about the nuances of Blanche and Stanley’s relationship which includes attraction as well as enmity. He added that he had never realized the importance of Stella’s role as a character stuck in the middle of the developing conflict. Rucker flew out to Los Angeles to meet with Manganiello and talk about the role of Stanley, and said he was impressed by the actor’s passion for the play and the character. Manganiello said “Streetcar” is his favorite play, and that he has had a relationship with the show ever since he first played the role of Stanley 16 years ago. He

said that every time he has performed the show it has struck him a different way: In rehearsing this production he said he has felt much more empathy toward Blanche than he did as a 21-year old.

I don’t agree with Stanley, but I get it. I get why he is the way he is. JOE MANGANIELLO Actor, Streetcar Named Desire “The play becomes a mirror to show how you develop as a person,” Manganiello said, adding that he hopes the perspective he

Eclectic ensemble enters second season

has gained will give the character additional layers. Manganiello first encountered the role as a Carnegie Mellon student. He said almost every student director asked him to be Stanley in “Streetcar” scenes they were directing for an assignment. “When there’s an entire school to pick Stanleys from, and they’re all coming to me, I had to ask myself ‘What is it about this character?’” Manganiello said. “I think there’s a lot there instinctively. I don’t agree with Stanley, but I get it. I get why he is the way he is.” “A Streetcar Named Desire” has several other historical ties to Yale, Steven Padla, the Rep’s director of communications, said in an email. Elia Kazan DRA ’33 directed both the original play and the film version with Mar-

lon Brando and Vivian Leigh. The play’s third scene was inspired by Vincent Van Gogh’s celebrated painting “The Night Café,” which has been housed at the Yale University Gallery since 1961, Padla added. Rucker said both he and the designers viewed the work several times while imagining the set design, and hopes its “color and sensuality” infuses the production. Rucker said the production’s challenge is to capture both the claustrophobia of the cramped apartment in which almost the entire action of the play takes place and the vibrancy of the city of New Orleans just outside. “It’s looking at New Orleans in post-WWII America, in this neighborhood [where] all different kinds of people are forced to

live together,” Rucker said. “It’s this new world where borders are loose.” The set is built on a movable platform which shifts throughout the show to highlight the action on the street or in different parts of the house, depending on the scene. Rucker said he is particularly excited about how many fellow School of Drama graduates are working on the show, including Augesen as Blanche, Sarah Sokolovic DRA ’11 as Stella and Adam O’Byrne ’01 DRA ’04 as Mitch, as well as others. “A Streetcar Named Desire” will play at the University Theatre through Oct. 12. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

KATHRYN CRANDALL/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

At the Yale-China Association, illustrator Michael Sloan is bringing Hong Kong’s authentic street markets to life. city’s commercial sphere, dominated by large glass and metal malls, to be soulless and hygienic. The street markets felt much more authentic to him, and he was usually the only white foreigner in these markets, which had few signs in English — and, he added, he does not speak Chinese. In addition to illustrating the tension between the sterilized and authentic aspects of the city, Sloan said his work depicts the love-hate relationship between Chinese mainlanders and the residents of Hong Kong Island.

It’s a part of the city that’s often in black and white, but Michael brings it into color — what’s often in the background, he brings to the foreground. ANNIE LIN ’09 Curator, “Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” “Mainlanders are subject to humiliation and discrimination because they look and behave differently,” Sloan said.

He explained that social norms like spitting and pushing, which are acceptable in Mainland China, are considered vulgar in Hong Kong and give rise to cultural prejudices. He cited a painting of a “parallel trader,” someone who transports goods between Hong Kong and Mainland China — for instance, infant formula, the quality of which is not trusted on the Mainland. Sloan said he depicted this man as dignified despite his allegedly disreputable profession, adding that this is the first time he has combined his sketch work and his editorial work. “Here, my opinions about what I’ve drawn are pretty clear,” he said. Sloan is married to Leslie Stone, the Yale-China Association’s director for Hong Kong and director of education. The couple moved to Hong Kong for the year with their three children so that Stone could run Yale-China’s Hong Kong Office. The family lived on the New Asia College campus in an apartment that has belonged to Yale-China since the 1970s, Stone said. She explained that the Yale-China Association and New Asia College established a partnership in the 1950s that has facilitated cultural and educational exchanges among their students ever since.

Every two years, four Yale-China Teaching Fellows are appointed to teach foundation courses for underclassmen majoring in English at New Asia College, Stone explained. Sloan said living on the university campus allowed his family and the Teaching Fellows to share parts of their lives with one another, and that the fellows introduced Sloan to the neighborhoods he painted, he said. Sloan is the fifth artist to be featured in Yale-China’s art exhibit series, which began four years ago. Lin, who previously worked on the Association’s “Foothills” exhibit, featuring photography from China’s Xiuning County, said she hopes visitors to the exhibit will appreciate the dignity that Sloan brings to the everyday people he paints. “These pigs are something that might be considered grotesque,” Lin said of a painting of a butcher’s stall, “but the role Michael shows them to play in society could be considered beautiful.” “Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” is on display weekdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at 442 Temple St. through June 7. Contact HELEN ROUNER at helen.rouner@yale.edu .

LeWitt’s works transform School of Management walls

BY DANA SCHNEIDER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Theorbos, baroque bows, a babbling tenor and a barefoot soprano: Each played a role in the captivating artistry of Cantata Profana’s “Of Time and Space and Nonsense” on Monday night. The Cantata Profana is dedicated to the performance of eclectic and under-performed works for larger chamber groups, said Jacob Ashworth MUS ’14, who formed the Cantata Profana last year. Nearly all the musicians in the Cantata are students or faculty from the School of Music and the Institute of Sacred Music, and all have played with one another in the past. “The group was inspired by the spirit of collaboration, which is essential for chamber music and unique to the Yale environment,” Ashworth said. Naomi Woo ’12 MUS ’13 said the Cantata presents a repertoire that is not performed enough, whether due to an unusual combination of instruments or the logistical issues associated with larger chamber groups. Presenting unusual chamber works presents various financial challenges — funding for musicians and staff, instrument rental, costumes and recordings. To propel the success of this year’s season, the Cantata set a goal to raise $14,000 through a Kickstarter campaign in August. The group achieved the goal on Sept. 10 after only 21 days online. Despite the planning issues that accompany organizing an ensemble of this size and scope, all three musicians interviewed said they were excited about the opportunity to perform these works, which included “Mystery Sonata No. 1” by Heinrich Biber — unusual in its usage of

The Yale-China Association’s newest art exhibit brings Hong Kong’s street markets to life on Temple Street. The exhibit, which opened earlier this month, features 18 portraits and street scenes that local illustrator Michael Sloan created during a yearlong residency in Hong Kong. Sketched and then painted in watercolor and acrylic, the works primarily portray locals in the Tai Po and Mong Kok East street markets. Sloan said that the paintings, some of which have an explicitly political message, illustrate the dichotomy of Hong Kong’s social spheres. Curator Annie Lin ’09, senior program officer for the arts at the YaleChina association, said Sloan’s work depicts a side of Hong Kong that is often forgotten, but is as integral to the city as its glossy, tourist-friendly enclaves. “It’s a part of the city that’s often in black and white, but Michael brings it into color — what’s often in the background, he brings to the foreground,” Lin said. Sloan has worked as an illustrator for the last two decades, drawing for newspapers and magazines such as “The New York Times,” “The Wall Street Journal” and “The New Yorker.” He is also the creator of “Zen of Nimbus, ” a comic series about a scientist who struggles with fame and fortune after discovering an outer space phenomenon. “Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” is Sloan’s first experiment in portraiture. Lin said she has been a fan of Sloan’s work since the two met a number of years ago. She reached out to him this summer about the possibility of showcasing his work at the Yale-China Association. She added that Sloan’s work, which grew out of extended, first-hand experience with a community, speaks to Yale-China’s mission to promote “a true bicultural understanding.” “There’s great value to developing an intimacy with a place,” Sloan said. “My work is about getting to know the rhythms of a particular street or neighborhood, recognizing the same people.” Sloan said he had visited Hong Kong a number of times prior to living there, but never for more than a few days at a time. During those trips he sketched mostly scenes of the harbor and other better-known aspects of the city, he said. Sloan added that living in Hong Kong and exploring the city beneath its commercial surface inspired him to start sketching street markets. He found the

BY SARAH HOLDER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

This year, Cantata Profana will focus on vocal chamber music and theme-based performances. two theorbos, a baroque instrument similar to a large guitar — and “Nouvelles aventures” by Gyorgy Ligeti, which featured a relatively large group of 11 performers in atypical combinations. On the other hand, the final piece, “Seven Romances on Poems by Alexander Blok” by Shostakovich for soprano, violin, cello and piano, was representative of more traditional chamber music. Ashworth said that while all the musicians are masters in their own right, none is the lead performer. While Cantata Profana’s inaugural concert last semester centered on the monodrama “Eight Songs for a Mad King,” Ashworth explained that the group has since developed a

focus on vocal chamber music and theme-based performance that will be prevalent in the group’s entire season of shows, which will take place in New Haven and New York. Woo described the Cantata as more of an experience than a concert. “Of Time and Space and Nonsense,” the theme of Monday’s concert and another in Brooklyn Tuesday night, featured changes of lighting, costumes, choreography and acting to challenge the audience to think beyond music as merely sound, and rather to think of its function both in time and space. By presenting information about each work and reflecting on the theme throughout the course of the concert, the Cantata members aimed to make the

music accessible to the audience. The concert’s sense of theatricality helped audience members feel more engaged with the foreign works. “Getting to perform great, tricky music with your friends is always a privilege,” Alto Annie Rosen MUS ’08 ’12 said. “It was amazing to see the reaction to the Ligeti last night — we’d all worked so hard on putting the parts together that I at least forgot it was actually funny … it was a treat to see the audience experience it for the first time.” The concert was sold out in both New Haven and New York City. Contact DANA SCHNEIDER at dana.schneider@yale.edu.

BENJAMIN HECHT

Behind the glass windows and stark walls of the new School of Management building lie the beginnings of a colorful new installation featuring the work of acclaimed artist Sol LeWitt. LeWitt donated a large number of his wall drawings to the Yale University Art Gallery before his death in 2007, hoping that the University would archive and properly maintain the integrity of his work. Several pieces from this large collection have been displayed at the YUAG, and museum director Jock Reynolds has been making an active effort to place more of LeWitt’s drawings throughout campus, said John Hogan, the YUAG’s installation director and archivist since 2013. Thanks to Evans Hall architects Foster + Partners and a team of faculty and staff from the School of Management, three of these pieces have found a home in the new School of Management building, which has gone through almost 6 years of construction and is scheduled to open in 2014. “[Evans Hall] is a very modern, stark building in some senses,” said SOM professor Stanley Garstka, the faculty member in charge of ensuring that the design and construction are true to the programmatic needs of the space. “Art is a way of livening [it] up a bit.” The building is very transparent, featuring wide windows and an open layout. When the installation is finished, Garstka explained, the transformed walls will be “visible from almost no matter where you are in the building.” The rest of the design feels more traditionally “Yale,” featuring leather furniture, a wood-finished cafeteria and a courtyard, he added. Hogan has played a central role in the ongoing installation at Evans Hall, which he says will be completed by early November. “The scope of Sol’s work is quite large,” Hogan said, adding that it

BENJAMIN HECHT

Faculty and staff at the School of Management are installing three of Sol LeWitt’s works into Foster + Partners’ Evans Hall. ranges from subtle pencil drawings to more active, colorful pieces. The Yale architects and general planners asked for works that have a strong visual presence and are more durable, rather than LeWitt’s more delicate pieces meant primarily for museums. What makes LeWitt’s paintings so unique is their intrinsic ability to be recreated and shared. LeWitt created original drawings that artists could then reproduce on walls anywhere by using his template. “The nature of Sol’s work is about the idea of the piece,” Hogan said. As LeWitt’s principle drafter in the early 1980s, Hogan knows the artist’s process and installation procedure well and is now leading a team

of Yale undergraduates and graduates in installing them in Evans Hall. The process begins with scaling LeWitt’s drawing in relation to the wall space. Many of his sketches are expandable and retractable and can be blown up without sacrificing the integrity of the initial design. Hogan has selected works that are both “strong choices for the building” and “work with the dimensions of the walls.” In the weeks since the project’s start in early September, the group has already made significant progress on installing two pieces. Working from LeWitt’s scaled blueprints, the designs are sketched onto the wall and covered with a layer of paint.

One wall is splashed with bold horizontal stripes and rainbow diagonals. Another is carefully painted with half circles and broken brown brush strokes. The third vibrant work will be 20 feet high and 60 feet long, a colossal tribute to LeWitt that will likely take most of October to be completed. Last semester, undergraduate art group The Elihu Athenæum and the YUAG installed LeWitt’s “Wall Drawing No. 587” in the basement that Ezra Stiles College and Morse College share. Contact SARAH HOLDER at sarah.holder@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

NEWS

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 路 yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Sunny, with a high near 72. North wind 5 to 7 mph. Low of 51.

TOMORROW

FRIDAY

High of 72, low of 53.

High of 72, low of 51.

OVER AND OVER BY A. CAMP

ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 5:00 PM Yale-China Information Table Come learn about the Symposium on Global Leadership and the YUNA Exchange. Additional details at http://www.yalechina.org. Ezra Stiles College (302 York St.), Dining Hall Foyer. 8:00 PM A Streetcar Named Desire In steamy New Orleans, an electrifying battle of wills ignites between Southern belle Blanche DuBois and her working class brother-in-law Stanley Kowalski. A Streetcar Named Desire is staged by Mark Rucker. University Theatre (222 York St.).

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 5:00 PM Innovation and Industrial Ecology: Interface’s Competitive Strategy Mikhail Davis, director of restorative enterprise at Interface, Inc., will speak at the Yale University School of Forestry & Environmental Studies on “Innovation and Industrial Ecology: Interface’s Competitive Strategy.” Interface is the world’s largest manufacturer of modular carpets and developed the Mission Zero program which aims to eliminate any negative impact Interface may have on the environment by 2020. Interface strives to work only with partners who have the same level of commitment to creating close-loop systems and to using only recycled or bio-based materials in their products. The talk is organized by the Industrial Environmental Management (IEM) Program. Kroon Hall (195 Prospect St.), Burke Auditorium. 8:00 PM Dutchman New York City, summer of 1964: A black man meets a white woman on the subway as it careens through the bowels of the city. They decide to go to a party together, but never make it there. Born out of the Black Arts Movement, Amiri Baraka’s Dutchman is a brutal discussion of race, sex and personal accountability. Yale Cabaret (217 Park St.).

ANTIMALS BY ALEX SODI

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 8:00 PM Lux Improvitas Come watch All In The Family: An Improv Show from Yale’s own Lux Improvitas. Jonathan Edwards College (68 High St.), Theatre.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Pizza Quick sauce brand 5 Boxer’s weapon 9 Frankly declare 13 Parade instrument 14 “The Andy Griffith Show” tyke 15 Olin of “The Reader” 16 Cheers for a torero 17 Like a blue moon 18 Overcast, in London 19 Animation pioneer 22 Too scrupulous for 24 Peasant dress 27 Warren Harding’s successor 32 Jacuzzi effect 33 50+ group 34 Score after deuce 35 Line on a map 37 1999, 2000 and 2001 Best Actor nominee (he won once) 43 Japanese fish dish 44 Battery post 46 “Dear” one? 47 __ qua non 51 Duds 52 Cry of pain 53 Eat too much of, briefly 54 Poems of praise 55 Company’s main activity, and a hint to a different three-letter abbreviation hidden in 19-, 27- and 37Across 58 Coyote’s coat 59 Bridge player’s blunder 60 Work on a garden row 62 Garden pest 63 Low points on graphs 64 Benelux locale: Abbr. 65 Billboard fillers 66 Lacking a musical key 67 Souse’s woe

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DOWN 1 Frat letter 2 Longtime ISP 3 Got tiresome 4 Not in the know 5 Old West defense 6 High-tech release of 2010 7 Voice-activated app for 6-Down 8 Football supporters 9 African country that was a French colony 10 “Well, that’s weird” 11 With 12-Down, sign with an arrow 12 See 11-Down 20 Island ring 21 Patriots’ org. 22 Serving success 23 Horrible 25 Modern film effects, briefly 26 Understanding 28 __ the Great: boy detective 29 Rob Reiner’s dad 30 Hershiser of ESPN

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T Dow Jones 15,334.59, -0.43% S NASDAQ 3,768.25, +0.08% S Oil 103.37, +0.23%

Cruz vows to filibuster Obamacare BY DONNA CASSATA ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Tea party conservative Sen. Ted Cruz on Tuesday vowed to speak in opposition to President Barack Obama’s health care law until he’s “no longer able to stand,” even though fellow Republicans urged him to back down from his filibuster for fear of a possible government shutdown in a week. “This grand experiment is simply not working,” the Texas freshman told a largely empty chamber of the president’s signature domestic issue. “It is time to make D.C. listen.” Egged on by conservative groups, the potential 2016 presidential candidate excoriated Republicans and Democrats in his criticism of the 3-year-old health care law and Congress’ unwillingness to gut the law. Cruz supports the House-passed bill that would avert a government shutdown and defund Obamacare, as do many Republicans. However, they lack the votes to stop Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., from moving ahead on the measure, stripping the health care provision and sending the spending bill back to the House. That didn’t stop Cruz’ quixotic filibuster. Standing on the Senate floor, with conservative Sen. Mike Lee of Utah nearby, Cruz talked about the American revolution, the Washington establishment, his Cuban-born father and the impact of the health care law. As his talkathon entered its fourth hour, a few senators joined Cruz on the Senate floor, including Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, both of whom have been mentioned as possible presidential candidates. Cruz yielded to them for questions but did not give up his time controlling the debate. “It is my hope, my fervent hope, that the voices of dissension within the Republican conference will stop firing at each other and start firing” at the target of the health care law, Cruz said, a clear acknowledgment of the opposition he faced.

Euro $1.35, +0.02%

Nuclear talks may resume

It is my hope, my fervent hope, that the voices of dissension within the Republican conference will stop firing at each other and start firing. TED CRUZ U.S. senator, Texas McConnell told rank-and-file senators privately and reporters publicly that the GOP should not speak as long as the rules permit on the legislation, for fear it would give them little time to try to turn the political tables on Democrats or to avoid a possible shutdown. Delaying tactics could push a final vote into the weekend, just days before the new fiscal year begins on Oct. 1. That would give Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and House Republicans little time to come up with a new bill. McConnell told reporters that if the House doesn’t get a Senate-passed bill until Monday, lawmakers there would be in a tough spot. “Delaying the opportunity for the House to send something back, it seems, plays right into the hands of Senate Democrats,” Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., said. “If I’m Harry (Reid), what I’d hope would happen is you wait until the very last minute to send something over to the House.”

PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama, right, speaks with Bill Clinton at the Clinton Global Initiative.

NEW YORK — President Barack Obama and former President Bill Clinton took to the same stage Tuesday to promote the new health care law that Obama championed after Clinton’s own efforts to reform health care years earlier fell flat. Joining forces under dimmed lights in a hotel ballroom in New York, Obama and Clinton laid out the law’s benefits and its connection to the economy while dispelling what they called disinformation about its downsides. Clinton, acting as host, lobbed the questions; Obama answered with the eagerness of a guest on a daytime TV talk show. It was a pair of presidents in dark suits, reclining on comfy, white chairs as they reflected on the effort that went in to passing the sweeping law, and the intense challenges facing its implementation. New exchanges where Americans can buy health insurance — a centerpiece of the law — open for enrollment on Oct. 1. “I don’t have pride of authorship for this thing, I just want the thing to work,” Obama said. He added that he was confident Americans will be swayed by its advantages even though polls show they’re deeply wary of the law. “The devil you know is always better than the devil you don’t know.” Clinton felt free to point out some of the drawbacks in the law’s implementation, while making clear that Obama was not the one to blame. For example, he noted that

T

10-yr. Bond 2.653, -2.25%

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and the GOP’s No. 2, Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, opposed Cruz’ tactic, and numerous Republicans stood with their leadership rather than Cruz. Sen. John Thune, the third-ranking Republican, declined to state his position. “I think we’d all be hard-pressed to explain why we were opposed to a bill that we’re in favor of,” McConnell told reporters. “And invoking cloture on a bill that defunds Obamacare, it doesn’t raise taxes, and respects the Budget Control Act strikes me as a no brainer.”

Obama, Clinton tout health care law

BY DARLENE SUPERVILLE ASSOCIATED PRESS

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the Supreme Court said states could not be forced to take Medicaid money to finance the expansion of health coverage. “That’s going to lead to a cruel result, and there’s nothing the president can do, and it’s not his fault. That’s what the Supreme Court said,” Clinton said. The hourlong appearance, sponsored by the former president’s foundation known as the Clinton Global Initiative, marks the start of a concerted campaign by the Obama administration and its allies to inform consumers about their options under the law. It also took place around the 20th anniversary of Clinton’s address to a joint session of Congress calling for an overhaul of the health care system. That effort, by Clinton and former first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, was unsuccessful. Mrs. Clinton, who ran against Obama before becoming his first-term secretary of state, introduced the two presidents with a list of what they have in common. They’re both left-handed, love golf and have fabulous daughters, she said. And one more thing: “They each married far above themselves,” Clinton said with a laugh. Beyond the discussion, Obama also plans to promote the law during a speech Thursday at a community college in Maryland. Vice President Joe Biden will reach out to nurses across the country on a conference call and Obama will hold a separate call with mayors and other state and local officials, the White House said. First lady Michelle Obama plans outreach to key groups, such as mothers and military veterans, through editorials.

BRENDAN MCDERMID/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hasan Rouhani, president of the Islamic Republic of Iran, addresses the 68th United Nations General Assembly. BY JULIE PACE AND EDITH M. LEDERER ASSOCIATED PRESS UNITED NATIONS — Hopeful yet unyielding, President Barack Obama and new Iranian President Hasan Rouhani both spoke up fervently for improved relations and a resumption of stalled nuclear talks Tuesday at the U.N. — but gave no ground on the long-held positions that have scuttled previous attempts to break the impasse. The leaders’ separate appearances at the United Nations General Assembly came amid heightened speculation about a thaw in U.S.-Iranian relations following the election of Rouhani, a more-moderate sounding cleric. In fact, officials from both countries had quietly negotiated the possibility of a brief meeting between Obama and Rouhani. But U.S. officials said the Iranians told them Tuesday that an encounter would be “too complicated” given uncertainty about how it would be received in Tehran. Instead, Obama and Rouhani traded their public messages during addresses hours apart at the annual U.N. meetings. Obama declared that it was worth pursuing diplomacy with Iran even though skepticism persists about Tehran’s willingness to back up its recent overtures with concrete actions to answer strong concerns at the U.N. and in many nations that the Iranians are working to develop a nuclear bomb. “The roadblocks may prove to be too great, but I firmly believe

the diplomatic path must be tested,” Obama said. He added that he while he was “encouraged” by Rouhani’s election, the new president’s “conciliatory words will have to be matched by actions that are transparent and verifiable.” Rouhani, making his international debut, said Iran was ready to enter talks “without delay” and insisted his country was not interested in escalating tensions with the U.S. He said Iran must retain the right to enrich uranium, but he vigorously denied that his country was seeking to build a nuclear weapon.

The roadblocks may prove to be too great, but I firmly believe the diplomatic path must be tested. BARACK OBAMA President, United States “Nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction have no place in Iran’s security and defense doctrine, and contradict our fundamental religious and ethnical convictions,” Rouhani declared. “Our national interests make it imperative that we remove any and all reasonable concerns about Iran’s peaceful nuclear program.” He strongly criticized the economic sanctions that have

been imposed on Iran as part of the effort to persuade its leaders to open its nuclear programs to international inspection. The sanctions have badly hurt Iran’s economy, and Rouhani called them “violent” in their impact. He also said that U.S. drone strikes that kill civilians in the name of fighting terrorism should be condemned. U.S. officials said they were not surprised to see Rouhani publicly stake out those positions on the international stage. Still, they say they see him as a more moderate leader elected by an Iranian public frustrated by international isolation and the crippling sanctions. However, the Obama administration is unclear whether Rouhani is willing to take the steps the U.S. is seeking in order to ease the sanctions, including curbing uranium enrichment and closing the underground Fordo nuclear facility. The U.S. and its allies have long suspected that Iran is trying to produce a nuclear weapon, though Tehran insists its nuclear activities are only for producing energy and for medical research. Even without a meeting between Obama and Rouhani, it was clear that the U.S. and Iran were edging close to direct talks. Obama said he was tasking Secretary of State John Kerry with pursuing the prospect of a nuclear agreement with Iran. Kerry, along with representatives from five other world powers, is to meet Thursday with Iran’s new foreign minister, Mohammad Javad Zarif.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

WORLD

“It is my intention to commandeer one of these ships, pick up a crew in Tortuga, raid, pillage, plunder and otherwise pilfer my weasely black guts out.” JACK SPARROW CAPTAIN, BLACK PEARL

Kenyan president declares victory in mall siege BY JASON STRAZIUSO, DAVID RISING AND TOM ODULA ASSOCIATED PRESS NAIROBI, Kenya — “Just seeing dead bodies,” Kenya prepared for the gruesome task of recovering dozens more victims than initially feared after its president declared an end Tuesday to the four-day siege of a Nairobi mall by al-Qaida-linked terrorists. Officials said the death count could jump by another 60 or more. “We have ashamed and defeated our attackers,” President Uhuru Kenyatta said in a televised address to the nation that was delayed for hours as gunbattles persisted at the upscale Westgate mall. “Kenya has stared down evil and triumphed.” Despite Kenyatta’s declaration, troops remained deployed at the vast complex, and security officials told The Associated Press attackers with weapons or booby traps might still be inside. A plan to remove bodies was aborted because of continued skirmishes inside the mall, where three floors had collapsed. Describing the victims as “innocent, harmless civilians” of “various nationalities, races, ethnic, cultural, religious and other walks of life,” a solemn-looking Kenyatta reported the known death toll: at least 61 civilians, along with six security forces and five al-Shabab militants. About 175 people were injured, including 62 who remain hospitalized, he said, acknowledging that “several” bodies remained trapped in the rubble, including those of terrorists. However, another government official said a far higher toll was feared and morgue workers were preparing to receive up to 60 more bodies. A Western embassy official said the number of additional dead could go as high as 100. Both officials spoke on con-

dition of anonymity in order to discuss information not publicly disclosed. “They’re just seeing dead bodies. They’ve found no survivors, no live hostages,” said a Nairobi resident whose brother was taking part in the military sweep inside the mall. He spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because his brother was not authorized to publicly release the information. Kenyatta said 11 suspects had been arrested; authorities previously announced that seven had been taken into custody at the airport and three elsewhere. “These cowards will meet justice as will their accomplices and patrons, wherever they are,” an emotional Kenyatta declared. “We confronted this evil without flinching, contained our deep grief and pain, and conquered it,” he said. “As a nation, our head is bloodied, but unbowed.” Kenyatta declared three days of national mourning starting Wednesday. Kenyatta said forensic experts would examine the corpses of the assailants to determine their identities, softening earlier assertions by Kenya’s foreign minister that Americans and a Briton were involved in the siege.

We confronted this evil without flinching, contained our deep grief and pain, and conquered it. UHURU KENYATTA President, Kenya “Intelligence reports had suggested that a British woman and two or three American citizens may have been involved in the attack,” the president said. “We cannot confirm the details at present but forensic experts are

KENYA PRESIDENCY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, at podium, makes a television address to the nation from State House in Nairobi, Kenya on Tuesday. working to ascertain the nationalities of the terrorists.” Kenyan officials as early as Sunday evening began declaring near-victory over what they said were 10 to 15 attackers, some who wore black turbans and many with grenades strapped to their vests. But battles inside the shopping complex continued, straining the credibility of victory declarations. Booming explosions on Monday collapsed a second-story

parking garage down into a department store — blasts that lit cars on fire and sent dark plumes of smoke skyward for nearly two hours. Explosions continued throughout Tuesday, and the chatter of gunfire from inside the building could be heard. Fresh smoke rose from the building in the afternoon. Fears persisted that some of the attackers could still be alive and loose inside the rubble of the mall, a vast complex that had

Russia to file piracy charges

shops for retailers like Bose, Nike and Adidas, as well as banks, restaurants and a casino. Two Kenyan soldiers who had been inside the mall shortly before the president spoke said the operation was mostly over, but security forces were still combing the facility and had not definitively cleared all the rooms. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were under orders not to speak to the media. Another higher-ranking secu-

US, Russia still at odds over Syria BY MATTHEW LEE ASSOCIATED PRESS

EFREM LUKATSKY/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A crew member keeps watch aboard a Russian coast guard boat, left, as the Greenpeace ship ‘Arctic Sunrise’ is anchored. BY ALEXANDER ROSLYAKOV AND LYNN BERRY ASSOCIATED PRESS MURMANSK, Russia — Russia’s top investigative agency said Tuesday it will prosecute Greenpeace activists on piracy charges for trying to climb onto an Arctic offshore drilling platform owned by the state-controlled gas company Gazprom. The 30 activists from 18 countries were on a Greenpeace ship, the Arctic Sunrise, which was seized last week by the Russian Coast Guard. The ship was towed Tuesday into a small bay near Russia’s Arctic port of Murmansk and the activists were bused to the local headquarters of Russia’s Investigative Committee late at night for several hours of questioning and then into a detention facility. The Investigative Committee, Russia’s main federal investigative agency, said its agents will question all those who took part in the protest and detain the “most active” of them on piracy charges. Piracy carries a potential prison sentence of up to 15 years and a fine of 500,000 rubles (about $15,500).

Two activists tried to climb onto the Prirazlomnaya platform on Thursday and others assisted from small inflatable boats. The Greenpeace protest was aimed at calling attention to the environmental risks of drilling for oil in Arctic waters.

Such activities not only infringe on the sovereignty of a state, but might pose a threat to the environmental security of the whole region. VLADIMIR MARKIN Spokesman, Russian Investigative Committee “When a foreign vessel full of electronic technical equipment of unknown purpose and a group of people calling themselves members of an environmental rights organization try nothing less than to take a drilling platform by storm, logical doubts arise about their intentions,” Investigative Committee spokesman

Vladimir Markin said in a statement. He said the activists posed a danger to operations on the oil platform. “Such activities not only infringe on the sovereignty of a state, but might pose a threat to the environmental security of the whole region,” Markin said. The oil platform, the first offshore rig in the Arctic, was deployed to the vast Prirazlomnoye oil field in the Pechora Sea in 2011, but its launch has been delayed by technological challenges. Gazprom has said it was to start pumping oil this year, but no precise date has been set. Greenpeace insisted that under international law Russia had no right to board its ship and has no grounds to charge its activists with piracy. “Peaceful activism is crucial when governments around the world have failed to respond to dire scientific warnings about the consequences of climate change in the Arctic and elsewhere,” Greenpeace International executive director Kumi Naidoo said in a statement. “We will not be intimidated or silenced by these absurd accusations and demand the immediate release of our activists,” he added.

rity official involved in the investigations said it would take time to search the whole mall before declaring that the terrorist threat had been crushed. That official also insisted on anonymity. Al-Shabab, whose name means “The Youth” in Arabic, first began threatening Kenya with a major terror attack in late 2011, after Kenya sent troops into Somalia following a spate of kidnappings of Westerners inside Kenya.

UNITED NATIONS — U.S. and Russian negotiators remain at odds on a U.N. Security Council resolution that would hold Syria accountable if it fails to live up to pledges to dismantle its chemical weapons stockpiles, American officials said Tuesday, as President Barack Obama warned the world body that it risks its credibility and reputation if it does not act. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov met for nearly 90 minutes at the United Nations and though progress was made in some areas, they were unable to reach agreement on the text of a resolution that would meet Obama’s standard, the officials said. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss publicly the closed-door meeting. Kerry told reporters after the meeting that the session had been “very constructive.” Three senior officials familiar with the effort say negotiations remain a work in progress as the U.S. pushes for a binding, enforceable, verifiable arms-control regime that strips Syria of its entire chemical weapons stocks and facilities. The U.S. also is demanding that the resolution not contain ambiguities or loopholes, they said. The officials said several “key conceptual hurdles” are points of contention with the Russians as both sides seek agreement on the language of the resolution. The U.S. and Russian ambassadors to the United Nations have been tasked with working out the language. U.N. diplomats say differences between the U.S. and Russia on how a resolution should be enforced have held up action in the Security Council. Russia is opposed to any mention of Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter, which includes military and nonmilitary actions to promote peace and security. Russia and China have vetoed three Western-backed resolutions that would have pressured Syrian President Bashar Assad to end the 2 1/2year war that, according to the U.N., has killed more than 100,000 people.

Work on the resolution is going on at the same time as the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the body that will be in charge of securing and destroying the arms, is working on its own document to lay out its exact duties. The two resolutions must be completed and agreed in tandem if the U.S.-Russian agreement is to succeed, the U.S. officials said. The U.S.-Russia agreement came as Obama was pushing Congress to approve a military strike against Syria for a chemical weapons attack last month on civilians outside Damascus, which the Obama administration contends was carried out by Assad’s regime. With Congress appearing all but certain to withhold its approval, Obama did an abrupt turnaround and asked Kerry to try a last-ditch diplomatic approach with Lavrov.

It’s an insult to human reason and to the legitimacy of this institution. BARACK OBAMA President, United States In his address to the Security Council on Tuesday, Obama said the council had to act. “If we cannot agree even on this,” Obama said, “then it will show that the United Nations is incapable of enforcing the most basic of international laws.” Despite the framework chemical weapons deal, the Russians have challenged the Assad’s culpability. Assad has blamed rebel forces for the attack. Obama aggressively pushed back against those claims in his U.N. speech. “It’s an insult to human reason and to the legitimacy of this institution to suggest that anyone other than the regime carried out this attack,” the president said. Obama also said that while the international community has recognized the stakes involved in the civil war, “our response has not matched the scale of the challenge.”


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MEN’S HOCKEY ELIS BRING IN STRONG RECRUITS SB Nation’s Western College Hockey Blog ranked the Elis’ incoming class the second-strongest in the ECAC, behind only Harvard’s. The freshman group highlighted by Chicago Blackhawks draft pick John Hayden ’17 and goaltender Alex Lyon ’17.

JESSE EBNER ’16 ELI NAMED PLAYER OF THE WEEK The Yale middle blocker shared Ivy League Player of the Week honors with Brown’s Thea Derrough after collecting 27 kills and a .321 hitting percentage as the Bulldogs went 2–1 at the Penn State Classic. Ebner also recorded a double-double against E. Kentucky.

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Google Glass caught almost everything, including the fact that I probably need a haircut. HENRY FURMAN ’14 QUARTERBACK, FOOTBALL

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Elis peek into the future BY GRANT BRONSDON STAFF REPORTER Some say innovation is the key to success. This year, the Yale football team is hoping it can turn technological innovation into wins with Google Glass.

FOOTBALL At practice on Sept. 17, the Bulldogs partnered with Digital Surgeons, a New Haven-based digital marketing group, to have starting quarterback Henry Furman ’14 take snaps wearing Google Glass near the end of practice. A video posted on Vimeo by Digital Surgeons shows the world through Furman’s eyes as he surveys the defense, runs the option and throws a touchdown. “It was a fun experience,” Furman said in a message to the News. “The device is very lightweight and the ‘glass’ part only covers about a quarter of a normal glass lens.” Google Glass is a wearable computer that looks like a pair of glasses. It can record video, take pictures and connect to the Internet, among other functions. In February, Google opened an application process for members of the public to purchase an early version of Glass. Since

then, only 10,000 pairs have been made available worldwide, and one of those pairs went to Digital Surgeons. “[Associate Athletic Director of Marketing] Patrick O’Neill came to us and was looking to figure out new, exciting ways to promote Yale football,” said David Salinas, CEO of Digital Surgeons. “We had a brainstorming meeting and the idea came out of that.” Salinas mentioned numerous ways to use Glass with the football team, both on and off the field. “I think it has a ton of potential,” Salinas said. “A quarterback might be able to see the plays dynamically in Glass. Think about how immersive the playbook could be when the quarterback doesn’t have to have everything committed to memory.” Yale football is not the first use of Google Glass on the gridiron. Free agent NFL punter Chris Kluwe was also selected through the Google Glass Explorer program, and he posted a video earlier in the year of him punting at Oakland Raiders training camp while wearing Glass. As far as the future of Glass within Yale athletics as a whole, Salinas remained coy. “We have some other concepts in football, and we’ve had a discussion around hockey as

well,” Salinas said. “We want to know if it’s possible to create a new type of fan experience in sports.” Although the technology is nascent, players, coaches and fans alike can all see the potential benefits. “It would definitely be great to see what players are looking at and be able to coach them from the film,” head coach Tony Reno said. Furman agreed, saying that the ability to see what a quarterback sees during a given play would be “incredibly useful” for coaches. However, Glass does raise some questions for the future of football. Salinas wondered about the potential legality of having offensive coordinators see what the quarterback sees, calling plays through Glass and even communicating with the quarterback during the play. The biggest drawback of Glass could be the unintentional consequences of such a powerful device. “Google Glass caught almost everything, including the fact that I probably need a haircut,” Furman said. The Elis open their home slate this Saturday against Cornell at noon. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

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Google Glass captured a first-person view of Henry Furman ’14 running an option play at practice last week.

Conner set for strong cross country season BY CAROLINE WRAY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Alex Conner ’16 of the men’s cross country team finished in the top seven four times last year, as well as second on the team at the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships. This year, he has been the first-place finisher for the cross country team in the last two meets so far. The News spoke with Conner about his individual performance and the upcoming season.

on a strong QCongratulations start to the season. What did you do over the summer to train and give you a leg up for the start of this year?

A

I lived in Boulder, Colo., with a teammate, Ryan Laemel ’13. We moved out there June 1 and were there for two months, and the idea was high-altitude training, and I think the biggest part of it was consistently running 85 miles a week. The time really paid off fitness-wise, and I think I’m really starting to reap the benefits of it now and hopefully will con-

tinue to in the long-term. last year you placed in the QSo, top seven four times, which is

something you’re definitely poised to beat right now. How do you think you’ve evolved as a runner since last year?

A

I think the biggest difference between my freshman year and now is that, number one, my freshman year was an adjustment to the 8K distance, and I’ve been able to go into my sophomore year with a good understanding of what that means in terms of pac-

ing. I think the second difference is I’m just a more mature runner. I know what’s the smarter decision to make, and I’m better at making it now, whether that’s trainingrelated or just lifestyle-related. It’s just an extra year of experience and I think that helps a lot, more than I anticipated it ever would. more toward the team QLooking as a whole, the season opened

with what must have been a disappointing loss to Harvard. Can you talk a little about how you felt as an individual and also how the team felt, and then how you stepped up and brought it the next weekend at the Iona Meet of Champions?

A

I think that Harvard definitely was a low point for the whole team, myself included. When you get beat that badly, everyone was involved. I felt just as bad as anyone else. There was a lot of stuff I could have done to get in that top five, and I maybe made the wrong decisions in the race or whatnot, but the bottom line is, it was a wake-up call for us. We had a really good week leading up to the next Saturday in terms of workouts, and everybody stayed pretty positive, too, which was a big help. Those things sort of contributed to a much, much better race this weekend. And I think another, much more practical reason for the loss was that Harvard was our first race of the season. People were more prepared for what was to come than at Harvard.

Saturday, you finished at QOn the exact same time as James Randon ’17. Had you two been running together a lot and strategizing that?

ANNA-SOPHIA HARLING/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Though the cross country team fell to Harvard early this season, the Bulldogs have high hopes for the rest of the year.

STAT OF THE DAY 3

A

We ran the first two miles together, and then we sep-

arated a little bit, and then right at the end he was catching up to me, and we crossed the line close enough to the point where they saw it as the same time. The plan was to run the first two or three miles together, but then we got some separation, and then pretty much closed it back together during the kick. So it wasn’t the plan, but it’s really great to see that. And on top of that, we had a 23-second spread from one to five which bodes really well for the team and is a really good sign. I think overall we did a very good job of running together, and I think, in terms of training, it’s had that dynamic in practice, too, where the top five have been pretty close and good at working together during the hard workouts. been talking about the QYou’ve strategies going into the race. Are you pretty consistent with that?

A

I definitely think it depends on the race and what [Coach Paul Harkins] is trying to get out of it. Saturday, the coach had the idea of wanting to work on pack running, so he focused a lot more on five of us staying together through the first three miles, ideally, and then really racing hard the last two. So, without a doubt, there’s a race plan tailored to what he’s trying to get done. In an early-season meet, he wanted to work on a little bit more of the fundamentals of racing or just working on running as a pack because that’s how you do well as a team. I’m not sure that will necessarily be the case all year, but it would be good if it were, because it’s a solid plan.

talked a little about RanQSodon,webut there seem to be some of the younger runners really stepping up.

A

Yeah, we’re definitely a young team right now, and it’s really promising. The oldest guy in the top seven was a junior, and it’s really cool to see how young we are and still holding our own. In the freshman class, Randon was obviously a huge recruit for us to get. He was a very, very impressive high school runner. It’s been really cool to see all the freshmen come into this completely new scenario. The adjustment to college, in terms of athletics, isn’t always easy, and they’ve done a great job with it. I’m happy with my class as well. It’s only a good sign for the program.

a closing note, looking to QOn the rest of the season, what are

your big individual and team goals, and what do you think the biggest obstacles are going to be in trying to get there?

A

In terms of team goals, we’ve talked about being in the top three, top four Heps [Ivy League Heptagonal Champpionships] as a team. Ivy League is such a competitive conference — if we’re third or fourth in the Northeast region, I think that would put us in a good position to qualify for nationals. I think those are our bigger aspirations. Personally, my goals are to do whatever I can to contribute to that. Time-wise, if we could get a solid group of guys in the low24:00’s for the 8k, that would be great. So I want to do that as an individual, and if there’s more guys doing it with me, then all the better. We’ve got a good set of goals, and if we stay healthy, which is an obstacle sometimes, injury, and I know coach has got a great plan for the workouts, so that should be doable, so it’s exciting. Contact CAROLINE WRAY at caroline.wray@yale.edu .

THE MEN’S GOLF TEAM’S RANKING AT THE FIGHTING IRISH GRIDIRON GOLF CLASSIC. On Tuesday, captain Sam Bernstein ’14 and William Davenport ’15 posted fifth place in the individuals and led the Bulldogs to an overall third-place finish in the tournament.


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