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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 16 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

57 68

CROSS CAMPUS

YALE CABARET THREE DIRECTORS TO LEAD SEASON

SURVEILLANCE

NEW HAVEN SCHOOLS

MEN’S TENNIS

Board of Aldermen approves funding for cameras, canine unit

TEACHER ARRESTED UNDER SEXUAL ASSAULT CHARGES

Freshman standout excels at the PrincetonFarnsworth Invitational

PAGES 6–7 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 12 SPORTS

YCC creates specialized committees

YUAG SETS MUSIC TO RED GROOMS’ ARTWORK

The 101 on G&G 100. Students in “Natural Disasters” — affectionately known as “Natty D” or “Frat-ural Disasters” for its relatively light workload — can now receive help from free one-on-one tutors in the class, which is a popular science credit for non-science majors. The course boasts “good” to “excellent” assessments on Yale Blue Book and covers earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis and landslides, as well as the consequences of global warming.

BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER Newsletters and webpages from the Yale College Council may soon get an upgrade, after the council brought on a team of specialized members this semester. The YCC created four new committees this fall, each consisting of students with specific skill-sets in programming, production and design, business or event-planning. Previously, the YCC relied on the serendipitous skill-sets its elected representatives happened to have, said YCC Communications Director Andrew Grass ’16, but the new team, consisting of students who applied to their positions, will fill pre-existing gaps and ensure that the organization has access to specialized skills regardless of who is elected. “We have a sufficient amount of manpower to pursue the things we need [with the new committees] and I think we’ll be able to tap into a whole new level of things we’ll be able to promote by now having an organic inhouse team,” said Yale College Council President Danny Avraham ’15. Instead of relying on “random Photoshop skills any representative happened to have,” the YCC will now have access to reliable graphic designers, videographers and photographers on its eight-person produc-

Upward trend. Connecticut

Sen. Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73 has been ranked the fourth wealthiest member of Congress, moving up two spots since last year on CQ Roll Call’s list of the richest on Capitol Hill. According to CQ Roll Call, Blumenthal’s net worth went from $79.21 million last year to $85.32 million this year.

Continuing the conversation.

Following the Washington Navy Yard shootings on Monday, members of the Newtown Action Alliance (NAA) are now incorporating the recent shootings in Washington, D.C. in their calls for gun control legislation. Members of the NAA are expected to meet with legislators in the next few days, and Connecticut Sens. Chris Murphy and Richard Blumenthal have both called for gun reform. Advice for the media. New

Haven Police Department spokesman David Hartman had a few words for media representatives on Tuesday when he sent reporters an email with “Press Notice” as the subject line after journalists flooded his inbox with questions about a recent shooting. In an allcaps message, Hartmon wrote, “The more you call, the longer it will take to finish this press release. If you want the information delayed even longer, keep calling. Got it?!”

Home sweet home. Helen

Hadley Hall, a residential space for graduate students, recently welcomed back 200 residents after undergoing a year of renovations. The additions to the dorm included new carpeting, fresh paint, modern lounge furniture, an upgraded air conditioning system, multi-speed ceiling fans and — most importantly — a marker board spanning the width of the elevator lobby.

YDN

‘PLAYING IMAGES’ SERIES MIXES MEDIA IN BIANNUAL CONCERTS Today at 12:30 p.m., the Haven String Quartet — the resident quartet of the local, non-profit Music Haven — will pair the first movement of Beethoven’s string quartet Opus 59, No. 1 with the 1986 Red Grooms painting “Cedar Bar.” Turn to the culture section on pages 6-7 to learn more.

Hartford school desegregation under-enforced BY SAMUEL ABER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In a report released earlier this month, the Connecticut State Department of Education found that Hartford students enrolled in desegregated magnet and suburban schools performed substan-

tially better than their peers in neighborhood Hartford schools. The data are the first published by the state after years of working to give Hartford Public Schools students access to more diverse school environments as part of the settlement of the Sheff v. O’Neill case, which was decided

in 1996. In the case, the Connecticut State Supreme Court ruled that it was the responsibility of the state to combat racially segregated educational environments regardless of how the condition of segregation came to exist. Currently, 37 percent of Hartford students attend deseg-

$2.5 million fund to spur innovation at YEI

1970 Yale begins requiring students to check in with a guard when visiting students of the opposite sex in Vanderbilt Hall. With the new system, the guard on duty must notify the Vanderbilt resident in question before escorting his or her visitor into the building. According to an official, the plan aims to reduce thefts and other security problems on campus. TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

Promising programs of the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute could receive additional support through a new Connecticut Innovations fund. BY J.R. REED STAFF REPORTER

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

regated schools, despite the fact that the most recent settlement of the case mandated that the state have 41 percent of students in such schools by this year. “The data indicate that Hartford-resident students enrolled in choice programming opportunities perform at higher lev-

Last week, the University received a $2.5-million fund from capital support group Connecticut Innovations, spelling good news for students hoping to jumpstart their own business ventures on campus. Partnering with the Yale Entrepreneurial

Institute and early-stage venture fund support group Elm Street Ventures, CI established the fund to assist the most promising ventures emerging from YEI’s programs, including the highly selective 10-week Summer Fellowship Program and the Venture Creation Program. Using this new SEE YEI PAGE 4

els than those who are enrolled in the city public schools,” Kelly Donnelly, a spokeswoman for the State Department of Education, told The CT Mirror. “In terms of change in performance at the goal level from 2012 to 2013, the results were mixed. … We’re in SEE DESEGREGATION PAGE 4

Symplicity draws mixed response BY AMY WANG STAFF REPORTER

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

Submit tips to Cross Campus

SEE YCC PAGE 5

With fall semester comes the start of a new job search for many students, especially those who belong to the class of 2014. But as these students log online to peruse career opportunities for the summer or year, they may face a stark white page that is utterly unfamiliar. Earlier this year, Undergraduate Career Services launched a new online resource system for students and alumni that aims to streamline communication between students and employers. The new system — Yale UCS Symplicity — replaced the previous eRecruiting platform and runs in a similar format. Though the site was originally released with limited functionality, UCS continued to add new features and currently plans to develop the system even further. “We started the process in May, and we rolled out additional features over the summer so it would be the least disruptive time,” said UCS Director Jeanine Dames. “The use of the system has been very high.” The new system, Dames said, is superior to eRecruiting because of its increased func-

tionality and customizability. Through Symplicity, students can access contact information for various alumni classes, network directly with a database of over 9,500 employers and also view students’ reviews of their past employers. Dames added that UCS is currently building the peerto-peer password-protected database of employer reviews based on student feedback on their summer activities. So far, roughly 2,200 students, or 55 percent, have responded to the survey.

We rolled out additional features over the summer so it would be the least disruptive time. JEANINE DAMES Director, Yale UCS Ken Koopmans, director of employment programs and deputy director of UCS, said the new system will also be easier for employers to access and SEE SYMPLICITY PAGE 5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “You've been here a month, you're not even on the edge of the yaledailynews.com/opinion

Stay in, Ella I

f Ella Wood ’15 decides to run in the general election, one thing is clear: she will most likely lose. Her challenge to Doug Hausladen ’04 in the recent primary may have scared the incumbent’s supporters at first, but they needn’t have been worried. Even equipped with tremendous establishment support — the backing of New Haven’s unions and endorsements from highprofile incumbents, including Alderwoman Sarah Eidelson ’12 who donated her apartment to serve as Wood’s temporary headquarters — Wood could not scrap together a win. Wood’s candidacy was flawed from the outset. Despite her best intentions, none of her efforts successfully fought the prevailing narrative — fair or not — that she was a stereotypical Yale dogooder, descending from the ivory tower to dangle her feet in politics. As we saw, this image cost her the primary by almost 18 percentage points. If she stays, it will cost her the general election, too, maybe by an even larger margin. It certainly does not make much strategic sense for her to continue campaigning. But despite this reality, it would be a principled and ethical choice for her to stay in the race. We often forget that elections are more than the counting of votes. Elections are not only about the polling booth or the Day itself. Instead, they are a process of engagement that starts the moment a candidate decides to run. Conversations and discussions are equally integral parts of our democracy — and Wood’s candidacy in the general election would extend this process. While Hausladen won a hard fought victory in the primary, he should not be allowed to end his efforts there. Wood can, and should, force him to continue our public discourse. If Hausladen continues his campaign unopposed, he would no longer need to remain in conversation with constituents. In such a small community like Ward 7, interactions between residents and representatives can have a tangible impact on the aldermen’s thinking and eventual policy pursuits. New Haven’s election season — the period between the summer and November — is a tool that institutionalizes these conversations, giving voters direct access to Hausladen himself. Wood, a remarkable debater, can put additional pressure on Hausladen to justify his platform, including his controversial proposal to install red light cameras. While over half of New Haven’s aldermen are running unopposed, Wood currently possesses the ability to make Ward 7 an exception. On Election Day, Wood’s candidacy will also allow independents, a small segment of Ward

abyss”

'BASHO' ON 'PARTYING — SUCH SWEET SORROW'

GUEST COLUMNIST ABIGAIL BESSLER

The lone bugler

7, to voice their views. Even though Wood is not a Republican, the ability to choose an alternative can GENG become a NGARMreferendum BOONANANT on Hausladen. If a substantial Geng’s number of All Here general election voters vote for Wood, constituents will have sent Hausladen a message and perhaps even inspire a new crop of candidates the next time around. If, on the other hand, voters overwhelmingly approve of Hausladen, then he will be given further legitimacy to govern. It is true that Wood’s candidacy has been divisive, and according to many, harmful to relations between New Haven and Yale. Her choice to break her Ward 2 lease and move to Ward 7 is certainly not a model that we, nor many Ward 7 residents, want more Yalies to follow. But the choice that now confronts Wood is not whether she should have run. Here, six weeks after she announced her run, town-gown relations have already been damaged. The biggest harm, whatever it was, has been done. If Wood were to drop out, constituents would not feel any better about the intrusion of a Yalie into their political sphere. If Wood were to continue, some constituents may be puzzled by her refusal to drop out, but should be even more offended if she chooses to abandon the ward she claimed she would remain committed to for years. The effect of Wood’s continued campaign will ripple outward. Both Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 and Toni Harp’s ARC ’78 mayoral campaigns will have to address the Ward 7 race. The unions will have to question whether they truly wish to stand behind Wood again. Wood will have the chance to repair the burnt bridges with residents of Timothy Dwight’s Rosenfeld Hall annex. Every election, we are given an opportunity to reflect on our society: where we’ve been, where we’re going, and who can take us there. If Wood stays, the residents of Ward 7 will be given that chance to reflect. If she drops out of the race, these residents will be deprived of any direct instrument to express themselves. The vast majority of us believe this is a worthy cause. Does Wood? GENG NGARMBOONANANT is a junior in Silliman College. His column runs on Wednesdays. Contact him at wishcha.ngarmboonanant@ yale.edu .

T

wo weeks ago, I scrambled up the steps of Harkness Hall, triumphantly found WLH 117 and sat myself down amid the MacBook-toting, highlighter-wielding masses for my first section of introductory microeconomics. On an undisclosed date, somewhere between watching me take my first steps and dropping me off at Yale, my parents had decided this was the subject for me. But it wasn’t until the drive to New Haven, sitting in a compact car with a lampshade protruding into my left shoulder, that I grasped the full extent of my economicsentwined fate. “Abigail,” my dad said as we drove past Philadelphia, “We really think you should take microeconomics your freshman year.” It went downhill from there. Truthfully, I would have taken economics without my parents’ prodding. I’m interested in politics, and a better understanding of finance would be helpful. Plus, it couldn’t hurt to get a basic understanding of how consumers and firms interact in a market. Okay, I’ll admit, I got that last one from the textbook. Once I decided to take the class fall semester, though, I encountered my first of many existential BlueBooking crises. I had a

choice: Christopher Udry’s large lecture, ECON 115, or Katerina Simons’ smaller one, ECON 110. According to the shameful number of online evaluations I pored over, the small lecture gives you a deep understanding of economics but has a tough curve. The large lecture, which one student described as “like being in a herd of cattle,” depends more on self-motivation. The first Wednesday of shopping period, I attended both classes, back to back. I didn’t have any idea which one to take by the end of the day, but I did have a very solid understanding of opportunity costs. If you haven’t taken economics, an opportunity cost is the value of doing the next best thing you’re giving up by choosing to do something. I couldn’t believe how applicable it was to my dilemma. With each pro-con list I wrote, I felt increasingly doomed to an existence of never-ending opportunity costs. The incessant tolling of church bells outside my dorm window didn’t help. A week later, I still hadn’t made my decision. Luckily, it was made for me. On the walk between Udry’s and Simons’ lectures, I reached into my bag to check for new emails (thank you, Independent Party) and realized I had absentmindedly left my phone in

the lecture hall. After a frantic “Find My iPhone” search on my laptop, an awkward conversation with a Yale Security Officer in which I asked him what I should do and he replied, “Seems like a real heist,” and my first trek to science hill, I retrieved my phone from a kind student. By the end of the whole ordeal, five Chinese tourists had taken my picture. I’d also missed the seminar entirely. But thankfully, I still had time to get to my section for the large lecture. I raced back from science hill, one hand gripping “Microeconomics and Behavior” and the other cradling my rescued phone. I was a mess when I finally got to WLH 117. Students around me looked weary, but I was elated to have made it there. The teaching fellow calmly drew supply and demand curves on the chalkboard, then the graphs with a tax. Suddenly, I was lost. The supply curve confounded me, the equilibrium points muddled together, and I didn’t understand why firms were selling 5/2 units of corn. Then, I heard it. A bellowing noise from the window, growing higher pitched by the second. I looked around but no one else seemed to hear it. I turned my head, and there he

was. A lone bugle player. His horn held up in the pose of a champion, a large group gravitating towards him as he huffed and puffed his way to harmonious glory. Dressed from top to toe in black, the sun glinting off his instrument, he showered his audience with note after radiant note of his own tune. To this day, I have no idea what possessed him. But there he was, mere yards away, while I struggled with taxation. I couldn’t help it. I laughed. It’s easy to feel Yale’s weighty past in its Gothic architecture, large libraries and accomplished alumni. It’s harder, especially as freshmen, to keep a laugh-atourselves distance from our various “hardships” — the motorcycles that roll noisily down College Street every night, the line out the door at the post office, the incomprehensibility of tax graphs. Maybe I’ll love economics. Maybe I won’t. But regardless, a bugle player will remain, somewhere out there, trumpeting a merry tune. And I will always be grateful for the brief reprieve from the laws of supply and demand. ABIGAIL BESSLER is a freshman in Jonathan Edwards College. Contact her at abigail.bessler@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST MADELINE KAPLAN

Beyond preparation B

efore coming to Yale, I prepared as much as I possibly could for the college experience. I pondered prospective majors and read innumerable course descriptions. I watched “Animal House,” “Accepted” and “An Extremely Goofy Movie.” I made the requisite 18 trips to Target and purchased an almost incomprehensible number of packages of portable tissues. But despite my extensive training, I felt increasingly insecure as move-in day approached. What if I couldn’t make friends? What if I couldn’t write a passing college paper? What if my go-to party trick — reciting scenes from the movie Grease, naturally — was not as successful as the efforts of Danny Zuko and Cha-Cha DiGregorio in the Rydell High School dance competition? Nothing breeds irrational anxiety quite like the unknown. And is there anything quite so terrifying as moving to a strange school in a strange state filled with thousands of strangers? Almost certainly. But as I sat in the backseat of my dad’s car that day,

palms sweaty and left knee jumping nervously, it was difficult to think of anything worse. Miraculously, upon stepping out of the vehicle, I didn’t immediately cry, trip or vomit. I consider this the first great triumph of my college career. Move-in day was a blur of quick introductions, heavy lifting and indecipherable IKEA instructions. My suitemates and I got along immediately, and by the end of the day we were all excited and exhausted. But in the interest of disclosing the true freshman experience — my first night here was awful. Around midnight I was hit with the very depressing (and somewhat true) revelation that everyone I had ever known was now out of reach. My parents were going back to Ohio, my sisters to the daily grind of high school and my friends to their respective universities. Needless to say, I did not sleep much that night. The next day, the fidgety, overheated and awestruck freshmen gathered for convocation. The event felt like an out-of-body

experience, and the whole thing might have been a lengthy and opulent mirage. We heard about all sorts of interesting and inspiring things — about socioeconomic status and the status of college education in 2013, about how the Aztecs managed time and how therefore we should manage time our during finals. Our time as college students had officially begun. But after the pomp and circumstance subsided, Camp Yale brought its share of difficulties that seemed more like that first night than that hour in Woolsey Hall. I learned that Shopping Period is not, as I previously thought, synonymous with “Take Every Class You Want With No Exceptions or Consequences.” Getting into some seminars has proved as elusive as a steady Yale Wi-Fi connection. My desk is rapidly becoming a dumping ground for the dozens of pieces of paper that end up in my hands (crumpled at the bottom of my bag) throughout the course of a day, and I have not yet been challenged to the classic collegiate

breakdance-off that appears so often in movies. And yet, maybe a month into my new life, that ever-increasing pile of papers on my desk is now reassuring. It’s a daily, if disorganized, reminder that my experience here is becoming fuller and more complex. The friendliness of everyone around me is as infectious as a communicable disease in a dormitory (there’s something comforting about saying “hi” to at least one person every time I cross Old Campus). This beautiful place is beginning to feel like a home. So now, a few weeks older and hopefully at least a little wiser, it feels like I’m finding a real and comfortable place in this great and often-mythic institution. My dorm is furnished. My textbooks are purchased. My fellow freshmen are absolutely fantastic. I feel ready for everything Yale will throw at me over the next four years. Danny Zuko would be so proud. MADELINE KAPLAN is a freshman in Saybrook College. Contact her at madeline.kaplan@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST ESHE SHERLEY

Canvassing across the divide

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I

spent most of my summer on the East side of New Haven. For a canvasser it’s a difficult part of town. The East side is hilly, this summer was hot and humid, and all the people were opinionated. They get up in your face. They make you site your evidence. They demand to see their elected officials, and if you’re canvassing for one who hasn’t been around in a while — who hasn’t come to their church, their street festival, their home — they will send you away to bring them back to their door. And I loved every minute of it, because I have respect for people who love their neighborhood that fiercely. When the summer ended, I began coordinating a canvassing effort in the student half of Ward 22 (Timothy Dwight, Silliman, Ezra Stiles, Morse colleges and Swing Space), I was pretty sure I was ready. I mean, I had spent two months walking this city so hard that the backs of my Birkenstocks were coming off. But what I found was a level of apathy so strong that it knocked the wind out of everyone working on our campaign.

That wasn’t so surprising — college students are like that. What did surprise me, what really sent me reeling, was the anger. This is Yale, so we’re all pretty subtle about it. But people were truly angry that Yalies (and permanent residents who don’t go to Yale) were knocking on their doors for local elections. That’s fine, but I wanted to understand why. I know I woke up some people from naps (I’m sorry, I feel your pain, I know sleep here is precious), or interrupted some studying (though what’s the harm in a five minute study break?) or maybe just annoyed some by being in their space (sorry!), but as a friend of mine put it very astutely: “No one would be complaining if this was a national election.” I think a big source of that anger is the unique way that we think about Yale as our home, and how we have constructed that home (both physical and mental) in opposition to the city of New Haven. Consider our college architecture. It was not until I attempted to get six Dixwell residents from Ward 22 into Silliman

to canvass that I realized that we live in miniature fortresses. Our buildings are structured and organized to funnel people without the correct credentials back outside. Colleges are unique because they often construct a home that is separate from the city or town that surrounds it. We are Yalies, and rarely do we declare that we live in New Haven — unless it’s in order to forgo saying that we go to Yale. But in our non-Yale lives we have hometowns. We identify and link our home with our roles as public citizens. This physical and mental concept of Yale as separate from New Haven often relates to the idea of college being outside the “real world.” For some, college is this magical time where we live in this detached, special community, entering as only partially formed people, getting to work on ourselves for four years, and then rejoining the world as fully fledged leaders ready to change it. This is the real world. And I think that the most detrimental effect of the way that these two ideas interact is that we lose sight

of how integral our presence is to this city, leading us to shirk our responsibility to be engaged residents. The way Yalies interact (or don’t) with New Haven, even the fact that we take up space, has huge implications for this city, and vice versa. And because of that interdependence, I would argue that Yale and New Haven must be understood as the collective home of Yalies and permanent residents alike. Home is not just a place that we enjoy because it makes us happy; it is also a place where we are all partially responsible for maintaining its health. I want to be a part of a student body that values taking care of the totality of our home — not just the Yale portion of it — that recognizes Yale’s interdependent relationship with New Haven and understands itself as equal to all sectors of this community. With a general election coming up in November, now might be a good time to start. ESHE SHERLEY is a sophomore in Timothy Dwight College. Contact her at eshe.sherley@yale.edu.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Every man is a creative cause of what happens, a primum mobile with an original movement.” FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE GERMAN PHILOSOPHER

CORRECTION

GOODNIGHT MOON

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17

The article “Law School clinic helps battle state over education funding” mistakenly stated that Yale Law students have argued CCJEF v Rell before the U.S. Supreme Court, when in fact they have argued it before the Connecticut Supreme Court.

Surveillance, K9 funds approved

JACOB GEIGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

YALE TO GREET HARVEST MOON Depending on where you live on Earth, this year’s Harvest Moon — the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox, which will occur on Sept. 22 in 2013 —will be visible today or tomorrow. Whether there will be a cow jumping over it remains to be seen.

Teacher faces sexual assault charges PETER ISOTALO/CREATIVE COMMONS

City police dogs, like those above, gained from Tuesday’s Board meeting: The New Haven K-9 Unit’s $12,275 grant application was authorized. BY NICOLE NG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Board of Aldermen’s Public Safety Committee endorsed two grant applications looking to strengthen New Haven police efforts on Tuesday night. The committee unanimously approved a two-year, $50,000-per-year grant for New Haven’s camera surveillance system funded by the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s 2013 Port Security grant program. The Board also authorized the application and acceptance of a $12,275 grant from the Ben Roethlisberger Foundation for the Police Department’s K-9 Unit, the police’s canine group. “[The cameras] are definitely a deterrent for crime,” said Margaret Targrove, deputy director of emergency management for New Haven. “It’s just the way of the future. It’s another tool in the police’s arsenal to fight crime. We’ve actually got to catch up compared to what other cities have.” The two-year grant would pay for the maintenance, support and repairs of over 100 surveillance cameras in New Haven, which, without the contract, would be budgeted out of the city’s general fund. The cameras were originally installed in the 2009-’10 fiscal year using grant money from a variety of sources, Targrove said, although funding will be more difficult to procure this year as a result of the expiration of the cameras’ warranties. The cameras are currently located in neighborhoods with high crime rates and are intended to reduce crime by allowing police officers to catch offenders and readily obtain evidence. Due to server memory capabilities, the cameras are able to store surveillance for only up to 15 days, after which the system automatically deletes data. “The cameras are not meant to be watching anybody unless you’re doing something wrong,” Targrove said. When the cameras were first installed, there were few con-

cerns about privacy, as residents were more interested in the system as a crime deterrent, she added. Ward 15 Alderman Ernie Santiago asked whether 15 days was enough for police to find the data helpful. Targrove answered that 15 days was long enough for police investigations to gather and use video footage if necessary, and that the program is limited by costs and server space. The committee also approved the application for and acceptance of a $12,275 grant for food and supplies such as leashes, equipment, training and veterinary care for the canines in the police unit. “[The dogs] do find things that we will never find, and that’s what makes it … very important to our police force or anywhere,” said Sandra Koorejian, who organizes grant applications for the police department. Koorejian said that while these grants are typically for around $8,000, she requested more funding for the unit’s much-needed resources. The police department will hear whether they will be awarded the grant in late October.

[The cameras are] just the way of the future. It’s another tool in the police’s arsenal. MARGARET TARGROVE Deputy director, New Haven emergency management “[Both grants] seem definitely necessary,” said Ward 29 Alderman Brian Wingate. He added that Targrove said the surveillance cameras are decreasing crime. The Board unanimously approved both grant applications. Contact NICOLE NG at nicole.ng@yale.edu .

NEW HAVEN MAGNET SCHOOLS

Three students have come forward to report sexual assault by a special education teacher, who was subsequently arrested. BY ANNA WANE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Facing three separate allegations of sexual assault, a teacher in the New Haven Public Schools system was arrested last week. Robert Schmitt, a special education teacher at the MicroSociety Magnet School in New Haven, was arrested on Wednesday, Sept. 11. The 48-year-old man from Hamden, Conn., was accused by three students of having touched them inappropriately, according to the New Haven Police Department. Schmitt was charged with three counts of fourth-degree sexual assault, three counts of risk of injury to a child and one count of third-degree assault. “The safety and wellbeing of our students must be the absolute top priority for the school district

and our staff. Children should feel safe in school and parents should feel safe sending their children to school,” said Superintendent of Schools Garth Harries. “We work hard every day to maintain safety and wellbeing and we act immediately to investigate any concerns brought to our attention.” The accusations originated on April 29, 2013 when a social worker was informed of an incident of inappropriate touching by one of the victims — a 12-yearold-girl — and reported it to the school principal as well as the state Department of Children and Families. On that same day, Schmitt was suspended from the school before even the police were involved and has not had access to the facilities since then. Soon after, a second victim came forward. On May 7, 2013, a

14-year-old girl told her father she had had a similar experience with the teacher. The man immediately called the school to inform them of this and the police received this information automatically.

The principal acted immediately to remove the teacher once allegations were made. GARTH HARRIES Superintendent, New Haven public schools Two days later, a third victim, this time a 12-year-old boy, met with the detectives in charge of

the case. “In this case, the principal acted immediately to remove the teacher once allegations were made,” Harries said. “We reported the incident, cooperated fully with DCF and police and are moving forward with termination proceedings.” The MicroSociety Magnet School’s decision to pursue the teacher’s termination has been vehemently criticized by the accused’s lawyer, Diane Polan. She said she her client “should not be stripped of his reputation and livelihood based solely on unproven allegations.” Sexual assault in the fourth degree is a class D felony. Contact ANNA WANE at anna.wane@yale.edu .


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FROM THE FRONT

“The legal battle against segregation is won, but the community battle goes on.” DOROTHY DAY AMERICAN JOURNALIST AND SOCIAL ACTIVIST

Fund to assist promising YEI ventures SUB FROM PAGE 1 “YEI Innovation Fund,” student teams will apply to receive up to $100,000 to further develop their businesses. The YEI will accept applications through Friday, teams will be notified the following week if they have been selected to present to a board panel and the final investment decision will be made in October, with preference given to teams that have completed the Summer Fellowship. Although any team that has participated in a YEI program is eligible to apply for funding, YEI Deputy Director Erika Smith said summer fellowship participants would be most qualified to receive funding.

SUB FROM PAGE 1

These funds would give us the strength to … close the early-stage funding gap. SEAN MACKAY SOM ’14 Member, business venture team ‘IsoPlexis’

TASNIM ELBOUTE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Any team that has participated in a Yale Entrepreneurial Institute program is eligible to apply for additional funding.

“Once the early foundations have been established, we want to put money into these teams to get them over early stage hurdles and make them more attractive to significant funds from outside venture partners,” Smith said. “Connecticut Innovations is one of the leading funders in the state, helping build the state’s most creative companies. They were a natural partner for us to extend the work we are doing.” Smith said she expects another partner to contribute roughly $500,000 to the innovation fund. In a recent Yale News press release, Yale President Peter Salovey said the fund underscored the University’s commitment to foster entrepreneurship in New Haven using innovative Yale ideas. “This fund will give our innovative students and faculty the resources they need to grow their ventures into self-sustaining businesses that positively impact the city and the state,” Salovey said. During the application process, an Investment Advisory Board, comprised of people from

YEI’s partnering groups, will evaluate the teams’ funding proposals. The Innovation Fund will provide a revenue stream to fill an early-stage funding gap that drives many entrepreneurs out of the state and into cities like Boston and San Francisco, said Hasan Ansari SOM ’14, who worked within YEI to create TummyZen, a brand of antacid. Sean Mackay SOM ’14 said he and his business venture team “IsoPlexis” — which is selling a new technology to analyze cancer immune subsets — intend to apply for the Innovation Fund and see it as a critical steppingstone for their business. “These funds would give us the strength to approach a large number of investors and close the early-stage funding gap,” Mackay said. “We need that $50,000 or $100,000 to ultimately raise $1 million, and hopefully we can use these resources to execute on the vision we have to change life science research.” Using SOM grants and YEI’s Summer Fellowship grant, Ansari and his team have developed a website and created the first batch of their product, and TummyZen believes this YEI innovation Fund would allow them to produce enough pills to sell them on their website and other digital platforms, as well as market the product online platforms and in local pharmacies throughout New Haven. “Even if you have a great product idea, it’s very hard for a New Haven-based company to raise money and take the product mainstream without giving away a significant portion of the company,” Ansari said. “[The new fund] allows startups to not be beholden to investors outside of New Haven. This could transform us from a company with a valiant idea to having a product being sold at multiple retailers, both online and in brick-andmortar stores — which is a fantastic transformation.” Currently, there are 75 active YEI companies around the country that have raised over $66 million in funding and created over 300 jobs nationally. Contact J.R. REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

Report finds students in desegregated schools perform better DESEGREGATION FROM PAGE 1 the process of looking at these and other data in a variety of additional ways that have the potential to shed further light on results in the Sheff region and beyond.” Still, Connecticut legislators like State Sen. Toni Boucher and State Rep. Douglas McCrory are heartened by the data, and both hope it will create an impetus in the state legislature and in cities around Connecticut to take further action towards integrating schools and closing the state’s achievement gap. “There are a number of school districts that are majority-minority in the state of Connecticut … they don’t benefit from this stuff because they are not in Hartford,”

McCrory said. Elizabeth Carroll, director of Education Studies at Yale, said that the phenomenon illustrated by the data out of Hartford is not new. The state Department of Education report indicating higher test scores and graduations rates for students at integrated schools fits a pattern seen in other urban metro areas around the country, she added. Carroll added that in some cases there can be unintended consequences for neighborhood schools in situations like Hartford’s. “For students to attend these kind of programs or to get into those external other district schools, it requires on the part of those students and parents the initiative to put your name on a

list, sign up for a lottery or express preferences,” said. “By definition, the students who end up in those schools have either in themselves or in their families advocates for their education. I’m not saying that kids who end up in community schools are kids with no one who cares about them, but there is a degree of social capital that moves with those students from wherever they live in Hartford into those other schools.” Boucher also indicated that exploring other models for improving the quality of schools in Hartford may be necessary. “Let’s face it — it’s not feasible to turn every Hartford school into a magnet school,” Boucher said. “So then what happens to those 50 percent of students that are not in

one because they didn’t happen to get the lottery?”

What happens to those 50 percent of students … that didn’t happen to get the lottery?. TONI BOUCHER State senator, Connecticut Connecticut’s achievement gap, or the disparity in measures of academic success between white students and black and Latino students, and between students in different income groups, is “infa-

mous in certain circles,” according to Carroll. Such gaps are widely recognized to be the product of de facto segregation in urban areas, a phenomenon which is particularly prevalent in Connecticut cities like Hartford and New Haven, where blacks and Latinos are represented proportionally much higher than they are in the state as a whole. It was this type of segregationrelated education deficit that Sheff v. O’Neill sought to address. Elijah Anderson, professor of sociology at Yale, explained that this kind of segregation has come to exist over a long period of time, but was particularly accelerated during the civil rights movement. “In the onslaught of the militancy of these black citizens who wanted their rights, who wanted

to be first class citizens, the white people began to flee from the city, and this created a greater concentration of black people in these places,” Anderson said. Anderson said while desegregation efforts like those in Hartford are not adequate to address the problem, he recognized that there is no easy solution. “One of the remedies is to encourage the process of education — to educate people about the historical dynamics,” Anderson said. To date, Hartford Public Schools has opened 12 magnet schools in the city with financial help from the state. Contact SAMUEL ABER at samuel.aber@yale.edu .

recyclerecyclerecyclerecycle YO U R

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FROM THE FRONT

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“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” LEONARDO DA VINCI ITALIAN RENAISSANCE POLYMATH

Designers, programmers join YCC YCC FROM PAGE 1 tion and design team, Avraham said. The team has already begun to work on a video and posters promoting YCC’s new centralized calendar for student events, Grass said. The group will help with creating infographics for reports and designing advertising in the future, he added. Five programmers will now be responsible for keeping YCC-affiliated applications up to date and creating new apps for the Yale community, Avraham said. SubletMeYale, which is currently down due to technical issues, is one of the first projects the new programmers will tackle, Grass said. Emily Murphy ’17, a videographer on the production and design team, said the new team positions gave her a way to be involved in the council even though she is not interested in the elected positions. “The interesting thing about YCC is their projects, which are meant to help the student community,” Murphy said. “However, the changes made won’t mean anything if the students aren’t informed.” The four-person business team will begin working to seek discounts for students from New Haven businesses, Avraham said. Students in these committees will not be involved in the decisions related to YCC initiatives, Grass said, a job that remains for elected representatives only. The YCC received around eight times more applications as there were positions available, Grass said. Walden Davis ’16, a member of the production and design team, said he joined the team because he wanted to take responsibility for how student government operates at Yale. “Behind the scenes of every elected official, you have numerous people who support that official, who advise, who guide, who make that governance possible,” Davis said. “Positions like mine — specific positions that support specific functions — will make the YCC function better and more efficiently.” Thirty-one people will serve on the four newly created teams. MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Danny Avraham ’15, above, is the president of the Yale College Council, which expanded this year to hone efforts on programming, production and design, business and event planning.

Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

Symplicity replaces eRecruiting UCS system SYMPLICITY FROM PAGE 1

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com

OPINION.

use than the previous platform. “Employers post and edit their own job descriptions. … They can also extend deadlines and access applications on their own,” Koopmans said. “It’s a much more effective and efficient system for them.” Despite the positive feedback from employers, students themselves have not responded so enthusiastically to the changes. Out of nine students interviewed, seven said they either disliked the new system or were confused by it. Emily Harris ’15 and Ezriel Gelbfish ’16 both mentioned that they had problems accessing the system at first. Harris said she had to email UCS about five times to fix a log-in issue with her account, and Gelbfish said he could not use the site for Yale-in-New York events when he tried to during the summer. “I haven’t used the site since [I first logged in], but it seems to have pretty much the same functionality as eRecruiting,” Harris said. Dames said the feedback UCS

has received about the new site has largely been in the form of questions about how to access certain features or make use of them. But she added that the traffic to the site has been high, with over 1,600 views on a page featuring the contact information for members of the class of 2013, whom students may reach to for career advice. “I want to remind students that if they do have any questions, they should take a look at the instructions or come to us with them,” she said. “[Symplicity] really does offer a really strong, searchable database, and it is a very powerful tool that can be incredibly helpful for students.” A large part of the system is currently live, Dames said, though certain features — such as special resources for a health professions advisory program — have yet to be completed. Yale UCS Symplicity was first announced on May 8 after the end of the spring semester exam period. Contact AMY WANG at amy.wang@yale.edu .

YALE SYMPLICITY

Over the summer, Undergraduate Career Services unveiled a new platform called Symplicity, which aims to streamline communication.


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ARTS & CULTURE

“Life imitates art far more than art imitates Life.” OSCAR WILDE IRISH WRITER

Study gallery hosts ‘Ghost Town’

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BY YANAN WANG STAFF REPORTER

Cabaret to unveil new season

YALE CABARET

This season, the Yale Cabaret announced that it will present “We Know Edie la Minx Had a Gun,” “Dutchman” and “The Most Beautiful Thing in the World.” BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER This season, the Yale Cabaret, the primary home for extracurricular productions mounted by students at the School of Drama, will follow a less hierarchical managing structure than in past years. The theater will be run by three co-artistic directors, Whitney Dibo DRA ’14, Kelly Kerwin DRA ’15 and Lauren Dubowski DRA ’14, while the Cabaret had one head artistic director and two associate artistic directors last year. All three women said their experiences working in collaboration-

based theater prior to attending the drama school informed their desire to bring this leadership model to the Yale Cabaret. The three shows that have been announced so far, “We Know Edie la Minx Had a Gun,” “Dutchman” and “The Most Beautiful Thing in the World,” each represent a different method of generating theater, from collaboratively written work to a traditional script to purely devised performance. The Cabaret’s new season will kick off this Thursday with “Edie,” which was written by Kerwin, Helen Jaksch DRA ’15 and Emily Zemba DRA ’15. Kerwin, who is also direct-

ing the show, added that “Edie” — as a play that “can’t be done anywhere else and [needs] to be done now” — exemplifies the artistic directors’ hopes for the season. The three women wrote “Edie” as a group with the physical space of the Cabaret and specific actors in their year in mind. The play explores queer identity in the ’80s, a time period that laid the foundation for the language we use to describe queer rights today, Dibo said, adding that some of the terms used in the show might appear “harsh” to modern audiences inhabiting the highly progressive Yale bubble.

“We were really interested in exploring the idea of what it means to be a legend and how to tell the stories of the bit players of history and stories that haven’t been told — and also glitter and drag,” Kerwin said. Though past Cabaret seasons have featured several shows directed by the theater’s leaders, the co-artistic directors will not direct any more shows this year after “Edie,” Kerwin said. Dibo said the new team instead hopes to serve in the new role of “creative producers”: one coartistic director will be involved on each production in a curatorial capacity. She added that these creative producers will

act as liaisons between each production team and the larger Cabaret staff and participate in the overall discussion of each show’s developing vision. “We don’t want anything to be last minute, [but] last-minute changes happen all the time at the Cabaret,” Dibo said. “The original impulse [for a project] can get clouded as a result of things that come up. We are here to be a stable footing for each show.” Each co-artistic director comes from a dramaturgy background and understands the importance of serving as an “outside eye” in the artistic process, Dubowski said. She

Art transforms athletic space

added that dramaturgs receive the training to see theater holistically and from the perspective of an audience member walking in with no prior knowledge about the decisions that went into its creation. “As dramaturgs we know that is an important role — to have someone who is invested in the artistic process but [is] also outside of it,” Dubowski said. The second show, “Dutchman,” was written by Amiri Baraka in 1964, but the murky racial questions Brarka raises make it far from “a period piece” almost 50 years later, Dibo explained. The entire show takes place in a subway

car, and begins when a white woman approaches a black man on the way to the same party as her. The small space of the Cabaret is “uniquely suited to feel claustrophobic like the New York subway,” Dibo explained. The third show that has been announced, “The Most Beautiful Thing in the World,” is an entirely devised work, meaning that the creative team built the show experimentally with no baseline script. The show engages with “popular psychology” and “media and advertising and Internet,” Dubowski said, adding that the show’s creation process was inspired by clown work.

“‘The Most Beautiful Thing in the World’ is one of those Cabaret processes that is really bold and brave in that they are creating something out of nothing,” Dubowski said. “The cabaret is just a room in a building — without the people who fill it, it would just be a room. I think we have a very community-minded mission in terms of wanting to harness the power of the community to create the best.” The rest of the Cabaret’s season will be announced on Sept. 19. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu.

On the fourth floor mezzanine of the Yale University Art Gallery, “study” has taken on a new meaning. The Jane and Richard Levin Study Gallery, which was unveiled in December 2012 with the gallery’s re-opening, offers a space for professors to curate exhibitions of artwork related to their course material. Using works from the YUAG’s collection that were not previously on display, professors select a group of images to be hung in the gallery for the semester, during which students can freely come in to examine the pieces. Professors then design assignments based on the works on display, said Kate Ezra, the gallery’s curator of education and academic affairs. Elihu Rubin, an assistant professor of urbanism at the School of Architecture, is using the study gallery this semester for his seminar “Ghost Town: City Building, Abandonment, and Memory.” He pointed out that the study gallery provides a learning experience for students and professors alike. “This program not only offered a great opportunity to take advantage

of the art gallery’s resources, but also inspired me to expand the parameters of the course,” Rubin said. “I found that as I looked at different photographs or engravings, they sparked ideas in my own mind about the kinds of ghost towns that I was interested in exploring. While this semester is the second that the Levin Study Gallery has been in use, the YUAG has had exhibition space devoted primarily to study since fall 2009, Ezra noted, when the first study gallery was created on the fourth floor of the Kahn building. Since then, the gallery has hosted 50 course exhibits and has been receiving requests from an increasingly diverse range of courses, she added. Of the nine classes using the study gallery this semester, only one is exclusively a History of Art class — others are either cross-listed between History of Art and another discipline or relate to another field entirely. Among the classes using the space are Ned Blackhawk’s “Writing Tribal Histories” and a finance course taught jointly by the School of Management and the history department. No STEM courses have used the study gallery so far.

“There isn’t a blanket invitation for every faculty member,” Ezra said, explaining that the YUAG staff instead sends out a call for proposals to faculty members who have expressed an interest in the gallery in the past, or who have curricula that would suit the gallery’s material. When Rubin was working with Ezra and other YUAG staff to select material for display, he collaborated with a team that made its selections from an initial batch of over 100 relevant photographs. In the end, the group arrived at a collection of images ranging from engravings by Canaletto and Piranesi to contemporary black-and-white photographs depicting ramshackle homes across America. One work by Jerome Liebling depicts a group of five boys standing by a boarded-up building, laughing. This re-appropriation of abandonment tells an interesting story about the versatility of play, Rubin said. “The use of photos is a good fit [for the class] because the interest in ghost towns lies not just in the places themselves, but also in the ideas of abandonment and emptiness, and how they are represented,” he explained.

As a part of their interaction with the gallery, Rubin’s students have each been assigned a piece of art within the exhibit on which to write a short analytical essay. Bruce Hancock ARC ’15 will examine a grouping of black-and-white photographs in Mark Ruwedel’s “Dusk” series. Hancock said the “very stark, almost completely similar” photographs offer a unique perspective into the notion of abandonment — a perspective that is best observed at the gallery, in front of the works themselves. Another student in the seminar, Meghan McAllister ARC ’15 said she is excited to discover architecture through the alternative lens of art. “Art, especially the pieces that [Rubin] curated, definitely shows architecture through a very specific and personal lens,” McAllister said. “There is an added level of framing issues or human interpretation of architecture that can be provoked through art.” The renovations on the Yale University Art Gallery were completed in 14 years. Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu.

Alexander talks race, poetry

At YUAG, viewing art through music

BY ASHLEY MCCORMICK CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Elizabeth Alexander ’84 wears many hats. The 2009 inaugural poet and chair of Yale’s African American Studies Department is also an essayist and a playwright. Alexander plays a pivotal role in African American poetry. Alexander has published six books of poems and two collections of essays, produced a play — “Diva Studies” — and composed words for musical projects. This month, Alexander will be honored as a “Champion of Change” by the Center for Community Change in Washington, D.C. The News interviewed Alexander to ask her a few questions about her experience and mission as a poet. JOYCE XI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BY YANAN WANG STAFF REPORTER Behind the Chapel street bus station, installation art is scoring a hole-in-one. Early this month, the New Haven gallery Artspace presented an artist-designed, mini golf installation at “The Lot,” its outdoor venue between Church and Orange streets. Part play space and part exhibition, the installation includes two ninehole mini golf courses which were constructed by artists in the New Haven community, featuring works from local figures such as Matt Feiner of the Devil’s Gear Bike Shop and Nhv.org’s Ian Applegate. With entry fees of $5 per visit, the venue welcomes adults and children alike to experience the intersection of art and sport. “The element of play makes the work more approachable,” said Artspace Gallery Manager Michael Galvin. “It encourages people to participate with the artwork.” Galvin added that while art can often be isolating and inaccessible for the general public, Artspace uses The Lot as a space for community members to interact with work by local artists. In the past, the location has hosted other installations related to play, such as a basketball court and a swing set.

The mini golf exhibit is situated behind a popular bus station on Chapel street, a choice of location which one community member commended for its potential to enliven a historically dangerous area. “This is a nice way to utilize the space,” said Tarshima Downing, a social worker who attended the opening reception with her two school-age daughters. “Especially with the economy the way it is, it will uplift people, [and] encourage them to be more open and creative.” When she leaves the office in the evenings, Downing said she sometimes feels unsafe walking by the bus station area. The art exhibit enhances community presence in the area, she said.

The element of play makes the work more approachable. MICHAEL GALVIN Artspace Gallery Manager The mini golf holes vary in their design and use of materials, with some veering toward the realm of abstract structure and others, such as MakeHaven’s string theory-inspired hole, in the vein of scientific mod-

you were selected to QInserveDec.as2008, President Obama’s Inau-

YUAG

The Haven Quartet will serenade visitors with “Playing Images,” a concert meant to create a multisensory experience and broaden viewers’ experience with visual art. BY LILLIAN CHILDRESS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

GRAHAM HEBEL/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The mini golf art exhibit allows for a creative fusion of play and art appreciation. els. Team members from MakeHaven, a cooperative workplace on State street which lends residents woodworking and mechanical tools, included members of the math departments at Yale and Quinnipiac University. Feiner took a more playful approach with his installation, which uses old spokes and other leftover parts from his bike shop to poke fun at traditional mini golf courses. “The spinning pedals are a joke, a kind of ‘ode to windmills,’” Feiner explained. Heather Bizon, whose hole was heralded the most difficult

at the exhibit, said she attempted to challenge traditional notions of mini golf by using a self-supporting structure that can be changed and manipulated by each incoming player. “Apparently it’s a torture device,” she quipped. Bizon is an architect at Apicella + Bunton, the New Haven-based firm undertaking the renovations on Lanman-Wright Hall. “Mini Golf” will be open at The Lot from Wednesdays to Saturdays through Nov. 8. Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu.

Today, audience members will experience a concert in an unconventional venue — the Yale University Art Gallery. The concert, “Playing Images: An Exploration of Music and Art,” will be performed in the YUAG at 12:30 p.m., and will feature a talk by Public Education Curator Jessica Sack and a performance by Haven String Quartet, the resident quartet of local nonprofit Music Haven. The audience will be asked to listen to a piece of live music and then connect it with a particular piece of art on display. The idea behind the event is for the audience to have the chance to explore similar themes presented in the music and art, and to gain insight into how each informs the other, said Tina Hadari, executive director of Music Haven. “A lot of people say they hear or notice things in the painting that they never would have noticed had there not been music attached to it,” Hadari said. “Making these connections really opens up the possibility to look and listen in totally different ways.” Today’s concert is part of a bian-

nual series on the intersection of visual art and music that the YUAG has presented since 2010. Sack, an amateur violinist herself, grew connected through the New Haven music network to members of Music Haven, a nonprofit organization that provides tuition-free music programming for kids in under-resourced New Haven neighborhoods. Hadari said that while Music Haven has brought kids to galleries to look at art in conjunction with music as part of an afterschool program, concerts like “Playing Images” are intended primarily for patrons of the art gallery. The idea behind the series is simple: The audience listens to a talk — usually given by Sack — on how themes from the two works intersect, and then listen to the concert while viewing the relevant piece of art. Today’s concert features the first movement of Beethoven’s string quartet Opus 59 no.1, juxtaposed with the 1986 painting “Cedar Bar” by Red Grooms. Sack said the talk will focus on the themes of scale, size and time portrayed in the two works. “They’re mainly talking about scale in terms of expansiveness of

both of the works, but also the idea that there are these motivic elements that are repeating and then are developed into something of wealth, something of a massive scale,” Hadari said of the two pieces. The first movement of the quartet is one of Beethoven’s longest, which explains why the quartet is not playing the rest of the piece, Hadari said. “He takes these very small motives and just develops them in a variety of different ways, and the scale in which he does it is very broad,” Hadari explained, adding that this idea of scale drew both the quartet and Sack to the Red Grooms piece. While “Playing Images” carefully curates the combination of music and art, interdisciplinary appreciation of different media on campus extends far beyond the YUAG’s series. “Of course juxtaposing two works of art — in any medium — helps the viewer-listener experience elements they might not have noticed singly,” said music professor Judith Malafronte in an email, who uses a variety of media other than print in her “Shakespeare and Music” freshman seminar. “People often respond more quickly to either sound or visual

cues, and can then be coaxed into relating that response to the other medium.” Still, interdisciplinary art appreciation is increasingly uncommon. Suzana Bartal, a School of Music student who teaches the undergrad course “Intro to Elements of Music” explained that as those in art professions specialize more and more, they are less likely to appreciate the inspiration that comes from “crossing boundaries outside of their own specialty.” The YUAG’s goal of combining art and music appreciation will not end with today’s concert. “[The series] is about really looking closely, taking to time to look,” Sack said. “In a world right now where things are happening very fast and things are always changing, it can be nice to have an extended period of time to just linger with a piece.” The same concert was also performed on Sunday at the YUAG, as the concerts usually take place bi-annually in groups of two. Contact LILLIAN CHILDRESS at lillian.g.childress@yale.edu.

gural Poet, becoming only the fourth poet to read at a swearing-in ceremony after Robert Frost. Describe that experience for us.

A

It was a huge experience for me — there were a lot of pieces to it. I was honored to be chosen and wanted to write a poem that would hopefully live up to the occasion without exceeding its boundaries. That was a bit nerve wracking but the beauty of a lifetime of work and preparation is that when you find yourself in a crunch situation, you do what you’ve always done, and you do what you’re prepared to do, and you do the work you’ve been called to do. That was how I approached the task at hand. I thought it was extraordinary that then President-Elect Obama wanted to have a poem at the ceremony, and that he felt like poetry and art had a place in such an extraordinary civic occasion. I felt that I was representing American poetry, and that it was very important to do a good job on behalf of that wonderful rich and diverse collection of artists.

it hard writing for such an QWas occasion on a deadline?

A

Yes, it was very hard. And that’s okay because — hey — it was hard to become President! The difficulty felt actually the way it was supposed to be, because it was noth-

ing but work and the forward march of history and sacrifice that got the country to that stage. For it to have been easy would not have been appropriate. Sept. 26, you will be honored as QOn Champion of Change by the Center for Community Change in Washington, D.C., where you grew up as a child. What is the significance to you of receiving this award in your hometown? What does this award represent?

A

I was very lucky to grow up in Washington, D.C., because it’s a city where civic pageantry is everywhere. I grew up in the neighborhood of Capitol Hill, so you see the government at its home and its workings all the time — there is a mode of accessibility. … The fact also that on the Mall and the grounds in the late ’60s and early ’70s, especially, there were always marches and protests. Sometimes we had to change our route to go to school or go about our business because there was some controversy that was going on. It was wonderful to see that what governs the country and also the very important voices that are counter voices when the government is going in a direction that some of the people did not like. It also gave me the understanding that dissent is not anything to be afraid of. There are structures within which dissent can express itself, and that is

absolutely crucial. That’s what it was like for me to live in Washington in addition to the wonderfulness of living in a dominantly African American city and a city where, though not outside of the constraints of racism, nonetheless had black people governing it at all different levels. It’s also a town, in terms of Center for Community Change, where I spoke at their reform rally and read a poem in Spanish there on those same Capitol grounds. I think it is the perfect place to receive an award, plus my parents get to come. do you incorporate issues QHow surrounding racial justice and immigration through your writing?

A

I do not come at it issue-first. Honestly, I was very pleasantly surprised and honored when the Center for Community Change wanted to honor me in this way because that is not what I set out to do in my work. Through my work, I set out to be true to the word, to the voices, to the craft. So really, they are the ones who saw something in the work. My commitments to justice in explicit ways are more evident in my own ways as a citizen. So, I think it really says a lot about them that they see something in my poems that feels useful to their movement. Contact ASHLEY MCCORMICK at ashley.mccormick@yale.edu.


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PAGE 7

ARTS & CULTURE

“Life imitates art far more than art imitates Life.” OSCAR WILDE IRISH WRITER

Study gallery hosts ‘Ghost Town’

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BY YANAN WANG STAFF REPORTER

Cabaret to unveil new season

YALE CABARET

This season, the Yale Cabaret announced that it will present “We Know Edie la Minx Had a Gun,” “Dutchman” and “The Most Beautiful Thing in the World.” BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER This season, the Yale Cabaret, the primary home for extracurricular productions mounted by students at the School of Drama, will follow a less hierarchical managing structure than in past years. The theater will be run by three co-artistic directors, Whitney Dibo DRA ’14, Kelly Kerwin DRA ’15 and Lauren Dubowski DRA ’14, while the Cabaret had one head artistic director and two associate artistic directors last year. All three women said their experiences working in collaboration-

based theater prior to attending the drama school informed their desire to bring this leadership model to the Yale Cabaret. The three shows that have been announced so far, “We Know Edie la Minx Had a Gun,” “Dutchman” and “The Most Beautiful Thing in the World,” each represent a different method of generating theater, from collaboratively written work to a traditional script to purely devised performance. The Cabaret’s new season will kick off this Thursday with “Edie,” which was written by Kerwin, Helen Jaksch DRA ’15 and Emily Zemba DRA ’15. Kerwin, who is also direct-

ing the show, added that “Edie” — as a play that “can’t be done anywhere else and [needs] to be done now” — exemplifies the artistic directors’ hopes for the season. The three women wrote “Edie” as a group with the physical space of the Cabaret and specific actors in their year in mind. The play explores queer identity in the ’80s, a time period that laid the foundation for the language we use to describe queer rights today, Dibo said, adding that some of the terms used in the show might appear “harsh” to modern audiences inhabiting the highly progressive Yale bubble.

“We were really interested in exploring the idea of what it means to be a legend and how to tell the stories of the bit players of history and stories that haven’t been told — and also glitter and drag,” Kerwin said. Though past Cabaret seasons have featured several shows directed by the theater’s leaders, the co-artistic directors will not direct any more shows this year after “Edie,” Kerwin said. Dibo said the new team instead hopes to serve in the new role of “creative producers”: one coartistic director will be involved on each production in a curatorial capacity. She added that these creative producers will

act as liaisons between each production team and the larger Cabaret staff and participate in the overall discussion of each show’s developing vision. “We don’t want anything to be last minute, [but] last-minute changes happen all the time at the Cabaret,” Dibo said. “The original impulse [for a project] can get clouded as a result of things that come up. We are here to be a stable footing for each show.” Each co-artistic director comes from a dramaturgy background and understands the importance of serving as an “outside eye” in the artistic process, Dubowski said. She

Art transforms athletic space

added that dramaturgs receive the training to see theater holistically and from the perspective of an audience member walking in with no prior knowledge about the decisions that went into its creation. “As dramaturgs we know that is an important role — to have someone who is invested in the artistic process but [is] also outside of it,” Dubowski said. The second show, “Dutchman,” was written by Amiri Baraka in 1964, but the murky racial questions Brarka raises make it far from “a period piece” almost 50 years later, Dibo explained. The entire show takes place in a subway

car, and begins when a white woman approaches a black man on the way to the same party as her. The small space of the Cabaret is “uniquely suited to feel claustrophobic like the New York subway,” Dibo explained. The third show that has been announced, “The Most Beautiful Thing in the World,” is an entirely devised work, meaning that the creative team built the show experimentally with no baseline script. The show engages with “popular psychology” and “media and advertising and Internet,” Dubowski said, adding that the show’s creation process was inspired by clown work.

“‘The Most Beautiful Thing in the World’ is one of those Cabaret processes that is really bold and brave in that they are creating something out of nothing,” Dubowski said. “The cabaret is just a room in a building — without the people who fill it, it would just be a room. I think we have a very community-minded mission in terms of wanting to harness the power of the community to create the best.” The rest of the Cabaret’s season will be announced on Sept. 19. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu.

On the fourth floor mezzanine of the Yale University Art Gallery, “study” has taken on a new meaning. The Jane and Richard Levin Study Gallery, which was unveiled in December 2012 with the gallery’s re-opening, offers a space for professors to curate exhibitions of artwork related to their course material. Using works from the YUAG’s collection that were not previously on display, professors select a group of images to be hung in the gallery for the semester, during which students can freely come in to examine the pieces. Professors then design assignments based on the works on display, said Kate Ezra, the gallery’s curator of education and academic affairs. Elihu Rubin, an assistant professor of urbanism at the School of Architecture, is using the study gallery this semester for his seminar “Ghost Town: City Building, Abandonment, and Memory.” He pointed out that the study gallery provides a learning experience for students and professors alike. “This program not only offered a great opportunity to take advantage

of the art gallery’s resources, but also inspired me to expand the parameters of the course,” Rubin said. “I found that as I looked at different photographs or engravings, they sparked ideas in my own mind about the kinds of ghost towns that I was interested in exploring. While this semester is the second that the Levin Study Gallery has been in use, the YUAG has had exhibition space devoted primarily to study since fall 2009, Ezra noted, when the first study gallery was created on the fourth floor of the Kahn building. Since then, the gallery has hosted 50 course exhibits and has been receiving requests from an increasingly diverse range of courses, she added. Of the nine classes using the study gallery this semester, only one is exclusively a History of Art class — others are either cross-listed between History of Art and another discipline or relate to another field entirely. Among the classes using the space are Ned Blackhawk’s “Writing Tribal Histories” and a finance course taught jointly by the School of Management and the history department. No STEM courses have used the study gallery so far.

“There isn’t a blanket invitation for every faculty member,” Ezra said, explaining that the YUAG staff instead sends out a call for proposals to faculty members who have expressed an interest in the gallery in the past, or who have curricula that would suit the gallery’s material. When Rubin was working with Ezra and other YUAG staff to select material for display, he collaborated with a team that made its selections from an initial batch of over 100 relevant photographs. In the end, the group arrived at a collection of images ranging from engravings by Canaletto and Piranesi to contemporary black-and-white photographs depicting ramshackle homes across America. One work by Jerome Liebling depicts a group of five boys standing by a boarded-up building, laughing. This re-appropriation of abandonment tells an interesting story about the versatility of play, Rubin said. “The use of photos is a good fit [for the class] because the interest in ghost towns lies not just in the places themselves, but also in the ideas of abandonment and emptiness, and how they are represented,” he explained.

As a part of their interaction with the gallery, Rubin’s students have each been assigned a piece of art within the exhibit on which to write a short analytical essay. Bruce Hancock ARC ’15 will examine a grouping of black-and-white photographs in Mark Ruwedel’s “Dusk” series. Hancock said the “very stark, almost completely similar” photographs offer a unique perspective into the notion of abandonment — a perspective that is best observed at the gallery, in front of the works themselves. Another student in the seminar, Meghan McAllister ARC ’15 said she is excited to discover architecture through the alternative lens of art. “Art, especially the pieces that [Rubin] curated, definitely shows architecture through a very specific and personal lens,” McAllister said. “There is an added level of framing issues or human interpretation of architecture that can be provoked through art.” The renovations on the Yale University Art Gallery were completed in 14 years. Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu.

Alexander talks race, poetry

At YUAG, viewing art through music

BY ASHLEY MCCORMICK CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Elizabeth Alexander ’84 wears many hats. The 2009 inaugural poet and chair of Yale’s African American Studies Department is also an essayist and a playwright. Alexander plays a pivotal role in African American poetry. Alexander has published six books of poems and two collections of essays, produced a play — “Diva Studies” — and composed words for musical projects. This month, Alexander will be honored as a “Champion of Change” by the Center for Community Change in Washington, D.C. The News interviewed Alexander to ask her a few questions about her experience and mission as a poet. JOYCE XI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BY YANAN WANG STAFF REPORTER Behind the Chapel street bus station, installation art is scoring a hole-in-one. Early this month, the New Haven gallery Artspace presented an artist-designed, mini golf installation at “The Lot,” its outdoor venue between Church and Orange streets. Part play space and part exhibition, the installation includes two ninehole mini golf courses which were constructed by artists in the New Haven community, featuring works from local figures such as Matt Feiner of the Devil’s Gear Bike Shop and Nhv.org’s Ian Applegate. With entry fees of $5 per visit, the venue welcomes adults and children alike to experience the intersection of art and sport. “The element of play makes the work more approachable,” said Artspace Gallery Manager Michael Galvin. “It encourages people to participate with the artwork.” Galvin added that while art can often be isolating and inaccessible for the general public, Artspace uses The Lot as a space for community members to interact with work by local artists. In the past, the location has hosted other installations related to play, such as a basketball court and a swing set.

The mini golf exhibit is situated behind a popular bus station on Chapel street, a choice of location which one community member commended for its potential to enliven a historically dangerous area. “This is a nice way to utilize the space,” said Tarshima Downing, a social worker who attended the opening reception with her two school-age daughters. “Especially with the economy the way it is, it will uplift people, [and] encourage them to be more open and creative.” When she leaves the office in the evenings, Downing said she sometimes feels unsafe walking by the bus station area. The art exhibit enhances community presence in the area, she said.

The element of play makes the work more approachable. MICHAEL GALVIN Artspace Gallery Manager The mini golf holes vary in their design and use of materials, with some veering toward the realm of abstract structure and others, such as MakeHaven’s string theory-inspired hole, in the vein of scientific mod-

you were selected to QInserveDec.as2008, President Obama’s Inau-

YUAG

The Haven Quartet will serenade visitors with “Playing Images,” a concert meant to create a multisensory experience and broaden viewers’ experience with visual art. BY LILLIAN CHILDRESS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

GRAHAM HEBEL/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The mini golf art exhibit allows for a creative fusion of play and art appreciation. els. Team members from MakeHaven, a cooperative workplace on State street which lends residents woodworking and mechanical tools, included members of the math departments at Yale and Quinnipiac University. Feiner took a more playful approach with his installation, which uses old spokes and other leftover parts from his bike shop to poke fun at traditional mini golf courses. “The spinning pedals are a joke, a kind of ‘ode to windmills,’” Feiner explained. Heather Bizon, whose hole was heralded the most difficult

at the exhibit, said she attempted to challenge traditional notions of mini golf by using a self-supporting structure that can be changed and manipulated by each incoming player. “Apparently it’s a torture device,” she quipped. Bizon is an architect at Apicella + Bunton, the New Haven-based firm undertaking the renovations on Lanman-Wright Hall. “Mini Golf” will be open at The Lot from Wednesdays to Saturdays through Nov. 8. Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu.

Today, audience members will experience a concert in an unconventional venue — the Yale University Art Gallery. The concert, “Playing Images: An Exploration of Music and Art,” will be performed in the YUAG at 12:30 p.m., and will feature a talk by Public Education Curator Jessica Sack and a performance by Haven String Quartet, the resident quartet of local nonprofit Music Haven. The audience will be asked to listen to a piece of live music and then connect it with a particular piece of art on display. The idea behind the event is for the audience to have the chance to explore similar themes presented in the music and art, and to gain insight into how each informs the other, said Tina Hadari, executive director of Music Haven. “A lot of people say they hear or notice things in the painting that they never would have noticed had there not been music attached to it,” Hadari said. “Making these connections really opens up the possibility to look and listen in totally different ways.” Today’s concert is part of a bian-

nual series on the intersection of visual art and music that the YUAG has presented since 2010. Sack, an amateur violinist herself, grew connected through the New Haven music network to members of Music Haven, a nonprofit organization that provides tuition-free music programming for kids in under-resourced New Haven neighborhoods. Hadari said that while Music Haven has brought kids to galleries to look at art in conjunction with music as part of an afterschool program, concerts like “Playing Images” are intended primarily for patrons of the art gallery. The idea behind the series is simple: The audience listens to a talk — usually given by Sack — on how themes from the two works intersect, and then listen to the concert while viewing the relevant piece of art. Today’s concert features the first movement of Beethoven’s string quartet Opus 59 no.1, juxtaposed with the 1986 painting “Cedar Bar” by Red Grooms. Sack said the talk will focus on the themes of scale, size and time portrayed in the two works. “They’re mainly talking about scale in terms of expansiveness of

both of the works, but also the idea that there are these motivic elements that are repeating and then are developed into something of wealth, something of a massive scale,” Hadari said of the two pieces. The first movement of the quartet is one of Beethoven’s longest, which explains why the quartet is not playing the rest of the piece, Hadari said. “He takes these very small motives and just develops them in a variety of different ways, and the scale in which he does it is very broad,” Hadari explained, adding that this idea of scale drew both the quartet and Sack to the Red Grooms piece. While “Playing Images” carefully curates the combination of music and art, interdisciplinary appreciation of different media on campus extends far beyond the YUAG’s series. “Of course juxtaposing two works of art — in any medium — helps the viewer-listener experience elements they might not have noticed singly,” said music professor Judith Malafronte in an email, who uses a variety of media other than print in her “Shakespeare and Music” freshman seminar. “People often respond more quickly to either sound or visual

cues, and can then be coaxed into relating that response to the other medium.” Still, interdisciplinary art appreciation is increasingly uncommon. Suzana Bartal, a School of Music student who teaches the undergrad course “Intro to Elements of Music” explained that as those in art professions specialize more and more, they are less likely to appreciate the inspiration that comes from “crossing boundaries outside of their own specialty.” The YUAG’s goal of combining art and music appreciation will not end with today’s concert. “[The series] is about really looking closely, taking to time to look,” Sack said. “In a world right now where things are happening very fast and things are always changing, it can be nice to have an extended period of time to just linger with a piece.” The same concert was also performed on Sunday at the YUAG, as the concerts usually take place bi-annually in groups of two. Contact LILLIAN CHILDRESS at lillian.g.childress@yale.edu.

gural Poet, becoming only the fourth poet to read at a swearing-in ceremony after Robert Frost. Describe that experience for us.

A

It was a huge experience for me — there were a lot of pieces to it. I was honored to be chosen and wanted to write a poem that would hopefully live up to the occasion without exceeding its boundaries. That was a bit nerve wracking but the beauty of a lifetime of work and preparation is that when you find yourself in a crunch situation, you do what you’ve always done, and you do what you’re prepared to do, and you do the work you’ve been called to do. That was how I approached the task at hand. I thought it was extraordinary that then President-Elect Obama wanted to have a poem at the ceremony, and that he felt like poetry and art had a place in such an extraordinary civic occasion. I felt that I was representing American poetry, and that it was very important to do a good job on behalf of that wonderful rich and diverse collection of artists.

it hard writing for such an QWas occasion on a deadline?

A

Yes, it was very hard. And that’s okay because — hey — it was hard to become President! The difficulty felt actually the way it was supposed to be, because it was noth-

ing but work and the forward march of history and sacrifice that got the country to that stage. For it to have been easy would not have been appropriate. Sept. 26, you will be honored as QOn Champion of Change by the Center for Community Change in Washington, D.C., where you grew up as a child. What is the significance to you of receiving this award in your hometown? What does this award represent?

A

I was very lucky to grow up in Washington, D.C., because it’s a city where civic pageantry is everywhere. I grew up in the neighborhood of Capitol Hill, so you see the government at its home and its workings all the time — there is a mode of accessibility. … The fact also that on the Mall and the grounds in the late ’60s and early ’70s, especially, there were always marches and protests. Sometimes we had to change our route to go to school or go about our business because there was some controversy that was going on. It was wonderful to see that what governs the country and also the very important voices that are counter voices when the government is going in a direction that some of the people did not like. It also gave me the understanding that dissent is not anything to be afraid of. There are structures within which dissent can express itself, and that is

absolutely crucial. That’s what it was like for me to live in Washington in addition to the wonderfulness of living in a dominantly African American city and a city where, though not outside of the constraints of racism, nonetheless had black people governing it at all different levels. It’s also a town, in terms of Center for Community Change, where I spoke at their reform rally and read a poem in Spanish there on those same Capitol grounds. I think it is the perfect place to receive an award, plus my parents get to come. do you incorporate issues QHow surrounding racial justice and immigration through your writing?

A

I do not come at it issue-first. Honestly, I was very pleasantly surprised and honored when the Center for Community Change wanted to honor me in this way because that is not what I set out to do in my work. Through my work, I set out to be true to the word, to the voices, to the craft. So really, they are the ones who saw something in the work. My commitments to justice in explicit ways are more evident in my own ways as a citizen. So, I think it really says a lot about them that they see something in my poems that feels useful to their movement. Contact ASHLEY MCCORMICK at ashley.mccormick@yale.edu.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

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Federal gun laws did not block Navy Yard shooter BY ALICIA A. CALDWELL ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The gunman in the mass shootings at the Washington Navy Yard, Aaron Alexis, had a history of violent outbursts, was at least twice accused of firing guns in anger and was in the early stages of treatment for serious mental problems, according to court records and U.S. law enforcement officials. But Alexis apparently managed to exploit seams in the nation’s patchwork of complicated gun laws designed to keep weapons out of the hands of dangerous people. He was able to buy a shotgun in Virginia with out-of-state identification, even though that would have prevented him from buying a handgun. It is illegal for gun dealers to sell handguns to such out-of-state buyers, but the Firearms Owners’ Protection Act, passed by Congress in 1986, opened up interstate sales for shotguns and rifles. Virginia gun laws require only that an out-of-state buyer show valid identification, pass a background check and otherwise abide by state laws in order to buy a shotgun in the state. Alexis was never prosecuted for the two misdemeanors involving guns. Alexis bought the shotgun at Sharpshooters Small Arms Range in Lorton, Va. on Saturday, according to a statement from the attorney for the gun range. Michael Slocum said in an email that Alexis rented a rifle, bought bullets and used the range before buying the shotgun and 24 shells. Slocum said Alexis passed a federal background check. Law enforcement officials visited the range Monday, reviewing the store’s video and other records. “What the 1986 Firearms Own-

ers’ Protection Act did was it made it more convenient for gun buyers,” said Kristen Rand, the legislative director at the Violence Policy Center. “That’s the road we’ve been on for a while: The convenience of gun owner always seems to trump the right of victims not to be shot.” Federal gun laws bar the mentally ill from legally buying guns from licensed dealers. But the law requires that someone be involuntarily committed to a mental health facility or declared mentally ill by a judge, and that information must be reported to the FBI in order to appear on a background checks. In the wake of the 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech, state authorities changed state laws to make it tougher for the mentally ill to buy guns there. But like other recently accused mass shooters, Alexis was never declared mentally ill by a judge or committed to a hospital. He was being treated by the Veterans Administration as recently as August, according to two law enforcement officials, but the Navy had not declared him mentally unfit.

Congress must stop shirking its responsibility and resume a thoughtful debate on gun violence. DIANNE FEINSTEIN Senator, D-Calif. The Virginia Tech shooter, Seung Hi Cho, was declared mentally ill by a judge, but nobody ever reported it to federal authorities to get him included in the database of banned purchasers.

U.S. NAVY MEDIA CONTENT SERVICE, ARIF PATANI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, right, and other officials attend a wreath laying ceremony at the U.S. Navy Memorial on Tuesday. After the December massacre at a Connecticut elementary school, U.S. lawmakers pushed to overhaul gun laws. Among the proposals was a ban on militarystyle rifles, including the popular AR-15, and high-capacity ammunition magazines. There was also a plan to expand background checks to make sure anyone who wanted a gun got the approval of the federal government. No legislation has moved forward in Congress, despite urgent pleas from the president, some lawmakers and victims’ families. President Barack Obama has made a few narrow administrative changes, but those are not likely

to impact the kinds of guns most often found at crime scenes. Obama said Tuesday he was concerned that an American ritual could emerge where every few months, the nation suffers a horrific mass shooting, then fails to take action to stop the next one from occurring. He said he would continue speaking out about the need for new gun laws, but that ultimately, it’s up to lawmakers. “I’ve taken steps that are within my control,” Obama said in an interview with Telemundo. “The next phase now is for Congress to go ahead and move.” Monday’s shooting prompted a new round of calls for action from

Obamacare still a source of conflict BY DAVID ESPO ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Implacable Republican opposition to Obamacare has Congress once more veering closer to gridlock. In the House, more than 60 conservatives support tacking a one-year delay in implementing the health care law onto a bill needed to prevent a partial government shutdown on Oct. 1. Senior leaders warn the GOP could suffer significant political reverses if the party goes along with the plan and President Barack Obama and Democrats resist, as they have made clear they will, but it is strongly backed by senators with tea party ties and their influential allies outside Congress. Its leading advocate, Rep. Tom Graves of Georgia, said the proposal unifies the rank and file “around two objectives we have, keeping the government open and protecting our constituents from the harmful effects of Obamacare.” Across the Capitol, where energy legislation is under debate, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is proposing to add a one-year delay in the requirements for individuals to purchase coverage and for businesses to provide it to their employees. Obama has already ordered the postponement for businesses. Additionally, Sen. David Vitter, R-La., is threatening to hold up passage until the Senate agrees to vote on a proposal that would require lawmakers, their aides and presidential political appointees to obtain their coverage through exchanges that would be set up under the law beginning Oct. 1. They would also be required to pay the full cost of their insurance out of pocket, denying them the contribution that the government currently makes as their employer. Other Republicans have raised the possibility of tying an increase in the Treasury’s ability to borrow more money to a measure delaying or defunding the health care law, a possibility that Treasury Secretary Jack Lew flatly ruled out on Tuesday. Such efforts “are unacceptable. That is not a path toward something that can ultimately be signed into law,” he said. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid was more cutting. “The anarchists have taken over,” the Nevada Democrat said recently, referring in less-than-friendly terms to Republicans with tea party ties. “They’ve taken over the House. Now they’re here in the Senate.” Republicans in Congress see it differently. “Now, I know that some of you who supported this law might be thinking, “Well, they’ll learn to like it,’“ Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky said recently. “But it’s precisely that kind of `We know what’s good for you’ attitude that’s so upsetting to my constituents. It’s what got us into this mess in the first place.” Yet no matter how often GOP leaders

lawmakers. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Sen. Joe Manchin, D.-W.Va., the author of a bill on background checks, both said they would like to see a vote on the background checks bill, but the votes aren’t there for passage at this time. Still, Reid said he hopes to get another gun control vote this year. “I don’t want any more bad things to happen, you know. Something’s going to have to get the attention of these characters who don’t want any controls.” Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., a leading advocate for tougher gun control in the Senate, said in

Some refuse to leave as rescues wind down BY JERI CLAUSING ASSOCIATED PRESS

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., speaks to reporters following a Democratic caucus at the Capitol in Washington on Tuesday. pledge allegiance to the cause, tea party activists are loudly dismissive, and rarely pass up a chance to challenge McConnell or House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. A recent call from the House Republican leadership merely requiring the Senate to take a vote on delaying Obamacare was quickly shot down by the restive rank and file as too weak. That quickly gave birth to the plan backed by Graves and dozens of other conservatives to impose a one-year delay in implementation, even though leaders fear it risks a re-run of the twin government shutdowns nearly two decades ago that did significant damage to Republicans.

It’s precisely that kind of ‘We know what’s good for you’ attitude that’s so upsetting to my constituents. MITCH MCCONNELL Senator, R-Ky. At the same time, Republican Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Ted Cruz of Texas have featured roles in television ads designed to build public pressure on Congress to block implementation of the law. “Republicans in Congress can stop Obamacare if they simply refuse to fund it,” Lee says in one. While members of Congress play out the drama, they are supported by a cast of outside groups with money to spend in the current struggle and the 2014 elections a little over a year away. The Senate Conservatives Fund, founded by former Sen. Jim

DeMint of South Carolina, is financing the television ads that show Lee and Cruz. DeMint, who has strong ties with tea party groups, no longer has any connection with the organization. He now runs Heritage Foundation, and has reinvigorated its political arm, Heritage Action. The group declared its support for Graves’ legislation last week even before the congressman had publicly unveiled it. The Club for Growth, which has backed tea party challengers over establishment Republican candidates in recent elections, also supports the measure. So, too, the Tea Party Express, which issued an “urgent call to action” to its online supporters late last week to back Graves’ measure. Another group, ForAmerica, claimed credit for generating over 40,000 phone calls in three weeks to McConnell, Boehner and other leading Republican lawmakers whom it said “have refused to get behind the effort to defund ObamaCare.” Republican lawmakers opposed the health care law without exception when it cleared Congress in 2009. After failing to prevent its enactment, they and their allies in several states turned to the courts, backing lawsuits that challenged the new law’s constitutionality. When the Supreme Court ruled against them, House Republicans embarked on a series of votes — more than 40 so far — to defund, delay or otherwise derail the law. Most such measures have died in the Democratic-controlled Senate, and Obama has made it clear he won’t allow his cherished health care law to be erased. Yet periodically, he signs relatively minor adjustments into law that Republicans seize on as evidence that the law is unsustainable.

a statement that the shooting “is one more event to add to the litany of massacres.” “Congress must stop shirking its responsibility and resume a thoughtful debate on gun violence in this country. We must do more to stop this endless loss of life,” she said. Some congressional Democrats and family members of shooting victims planned to gather at the Capitol on Wednesday to renew their push for background check legislation. The trip, organized by the Newtown Action Alliance, was previously planned to mark the nine-month anniversary of the Connecticut school shooting.

BOULDER, Colo. — In the days right after floodwaters rushed through the Rocky Mountain foothills, the helicopter crews that lifted stranded people to safety were greeted like heroes. Nearly a week later, they are often being waved away by stubborn mountain residents who refuse to abandon their homes. Caleb Liesveld hiked several miles into tiny Pinewood Springs, midway between Longmont and Estes Park, to try to convince his parents to leave. His mother relented, but his father refused. The elder Liesveld was determined to use heavy equipment from the family’s granite quarry to resurrect an old stagecoach road that would let residents get vehicles in and out. “He wants to be productive, and I don’t think he’d really know what to do with himself off the mountain,” Caleb Liesveld said Tuesday. In nearby Lyons, a number of residents were working together to clean rotting food out of abandoned restaurant refrigerators. “We are a community. We all want to stay here and help,” Molly Morton, who also declined rescuers’ advice to leave or face months of isolation, said Tuesday in a phone interview. Morton, 44, lives with her boyfriend on a hill overlooking Lyons. They have well water and a septic field, and Monday night she got her power back, allowing her to restart her cleaning business. Several residents of Lyons moved up the hill to camp on her property in tents, bringing suitcases and coolers filled with as much food as they could salvage from refrigerators and freezers. One of the men had been given house keys by many people who did evacuate, and he had been going around to empty refrigerators and freezers to throw away food before it spoils. He’s also been on the lookout for anyone who might try to take advantage of all those empty houses. By Tuesday, military helicopters had flown nearly 2,400 people and more than 850 pets to safety in what officials said was likely the largest such airlift since

Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast in 2005. The pace of rescues was beginning to taper off. Crews were shifting from emergency airlifts to more systematic searches of flooded areas. Green tags and flags, bold enough to be seen from the air, were being used to mark properties that had already been checked. The reluctance to leave was evident during an aerial tour for media Tuesday arranged by the National Guard. As a Blackhawk chopper churned over Jamestown, where slabs of highway were stacked in murky water, two Guardsmen leaned out the open sides and waved to people below. Most waved back and went on shoveling rocks from their driveways or gazing at the debris piled in their yards.

He wants to be productive, and I don’t think he’d really know what to do with himself off the mountain. CALEB LIESVELD

Russell Wade, a Federal Emergency Management Administration safety officer, said when the helicopter he was on landed Monday in Left Hand Canyon “we had two groups of people with pets in tow, in kennels, who were actually running for the helicopter itself.” But after those 18 people were flown to safety, Wade said, the mission changed. That’s when the crew went back in with maps, going houseto-house to warn residents it was their last chance to leave or face an extended period with no certainty of further assistance from FEMA, the Guard or the scores of other agencies that have been dropping supplies and ferrying people to safety. Only one person asked to leave, Wade said, and that man did so because he was out of medication. He said the crews took the names of the people who stayed, then left them to their own devices.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

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BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Sunny, with a high near 70. Calm wind becoming south 5 to 9 mph in the morning.

TOMORROW

FRIDAY

High of 74, low of 52.

High of 74, low of 60.

OVER AND OVER BY A. CAMP

ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 2:00 PM Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets The Yale-China Association presents a new exhibit featuring paintings of Hong Kong by acclaimed illustrator Michael Sloan. “Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets” features 18 works that depict portraits, street markets, and scenes of social crossroads within the Hong Kong metropolis. Michael returns to New Haven after a year-long residence in Hong Kong. A seasoned outdoor sketch artist, Michael discovers commonplace nooks and overlooked settings as noteworthy subjects and portrays them in his signature style of selective coloring, detailed surroundings, and artistic perspective. Through this exhibit, Michael explores the livelihoods and social conditions in the local street markets of one of the world’s great social and economic intersections. Yale-China Association (442 Temple St.), John C. Bierwirth Rm.

ANTIMALS BY ALEX SODI

7:00 PM Films at the Whitney Don Juan (USA, 2013) 90 min. 35mm. Directed by Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 4:30 PM The Philipines on the World Stage: A Talk with His Excellency Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. The Filipino Club of Yale and the Yale International Relations Association (YIRA) are proud to welcome Philippine Ambassador to the United States His Excellency Jose L. Cuisia, Jr. for a speaker’s event on Thursday, Sept. 19th at 4:30pm in LC 101. His Excellency the Ambassador will discuss the relevance of the Philippines on the global stage and the future of the Philippines as Asia’s up-and-coming tiger economy. Contact Hannah Gonzales or Chris Dee for any questions about this event. Linsley-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 101.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 7:30 PM Yale Anime Society Presents: Cowboy Bebop Join the Yale Anime Society for its Fall 2013 season premiere. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Rm. 119.

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Nation between Togo and Nigeria 6 “Look over here!” 10 CSNY member 14 Private line? 15 Elevator man 16 “It’s clear now” 17 *Edward Cullen’s rival for Bella’s hand, in the “Twilight” series 19 Genghis __ 20 “The Plains of Passage” author 21 Former SSR 22 Pharmaceutical rep’s samples 23 *She played Michelle on “Full House” 26 Dogpatch creator 31 Alley cats, e.g. 33 Some crowns 34 Desert tableland 35 Blue bird 37 Looking for a fight 38 Suffix with infer 39 Cook, in a way 41 Bar bowl item 42 “Don’t tell me!” 44 2007 “American Idol” winner Sparks 45 *Brother of Helen of Troy, some say 47 Fails to pronounce 48 Image to identify on a driver’s license exam 51 Drifters 53 Diarist Anaïs 54 Neighbor of a Cambodian 58 Short race, briefly 59 *Beach Boys title girl 62 Ruse 63 Duel tool 64 Target Field team, and each pair of intersecting names in the answers to starred clues 65 Funny Dame 66 Bombs 67 Narrow piece, as of cloth DOWN 1 __ California 2 *Biblical birthright seller

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3 “Great shot!” 4 Teen Vogue subject 5 Lincoln’s st. 6 Beer garden music 7 Super Bowl I and II MVP 8 [Not my error] 9 “That wasn’t nice” 10 Former Soviet leader Khrushchev 11 *“High Crimes” actress 12 Corporate emblem 13 Egg sources 18 Bruises partner 22 Shade provider 24 North Sea feeder 25 Naut. speed units 26 Env. router 27 Stay awake in bed 28 *Source of an age-old medicinal oil 29 Part of MOMA 30 Promotional bribes 32 Composer Erik 34 Cattle call 36 Hankerings 38 “Need You Tonight” band

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2013 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

40 First name in shipping 43 1963 Newman/Neal film 44 *“Today” correspondent __ Bush Hager 46 Start of a showoff kid’s cry 49 How traditional Chinese brides dress 50 Taunts

SUDOKU MEDIUM

9/18/13

51 Garden waterer 52 Burned, in a high-tech way 54 “I __ I taw ...” 55 It may have highlights 56 Years, to Caesar 57 Clouseau’s rank: Abbr. 59 Place to sleep 60 Bart’s Squishee provider 61 ACLU concerns

7 2 8 4 6 8 4 5 7 4 2 4

1 8

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

Number of Brazilian presidents

36

Brazil postpones US trip

Deodoro da Fonseca became the first president of Brazil on Feb. 26, 1891. With his presidency, Brazil entered into the Old Republic. This changed to the Vargas Era in 1930, the Second Republic in 1946, the Military Regime in 1964 and the New Republic in 1985. Rousseff became president in

Iran’s Internet opens, but briefly BY NASSER KARIMI AND BRIAN MURPHY ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama, right, meets with Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff in the Oval Office of the White House. BY BRADLEY BROOKS ASSOCIATED PRESS RIO DE JANEIRO — Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff on Tuesday postponed a state visit to the U.S. to protest an American spy program that has aggressively targeted the Latin American nation’s government and private citizens alike. Rousseff was to be honored with a state dinner next month, an event meant to highlight strengthening ties between the Western Hemisphere’s two biggest nations. Instead, revelations of the National Security Agency’s spy program and Rousseff’s dissatisfaction with the U.S. response to questions about the espionage made it impossible to continue with that trip for now, her office said in a statement. “Given the proximity of the scheduled state visit to Washington and in the absence of a timely investigation … there aren’t conditions for this trip to be made,” the statement read. “The Brazilian government is confident that when the question is settled in an adequate manner, the state visit can

quickly occur.” The decision comes after a series of reports on Brazil’s Globo TV gave details about the NSA program’s efforts in Brazil. American journalist Glenn Greenwald, who is based in Rio de Janeiro and broke the story of the NSA espionage program after obtaining leaked documents from Edward Snowden, has worked with Globo on its reports.

The Brazilian government is confident that when the question is settled in an adequate manner, the state visit can quickly occur. Statement, Brazilian President Dilma Rouseff’s Office They have included revelations that Rousseff’s communications with aides were intercepted, that the NSA hacked the computer network

of state-run oil company Petrobras, and that the NSA scooped up data on billions of emails and telephone calls flowing through Brazil, an important hub for trans-Atlantic fiber optic cables. Rousseff has crafted a pragmatic foreign policy more in line with U.S. views than that of her predecessor and political mentor Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, She has distanced Brazil from sticky issues such as the Middle East peace process and the Iranian nuclear program, and has shown renewed interest in making a lucrative fighter jet purchase from Boeing rather than the company’s French or Swedish rivals. However, Rousseff is facing a reelection fight next year that became more competitive after nationwide anti-government protests in June, with Rousseff drawing much of the demonstrators’ ire. She has since bounced back in the polls, but cannot afford to look weak in the face of a U.S. spy program that has angered Brazilians and added to longstanding suspicions about the American government here.

TEHRAN, Iran — Word of the opening of Iran’s blocked social media sites was spread, of course, by social media itself: in celebratory tweets and breathless Facebook posts. Hours later, the same sites Tuesday chewed over the sobering reality that the four-year-old firewalls were back in place. Iran’s Internet overseers blamed a “technical” glitch on the brief window to the Web. But others interpreted the seesaw events as signs of growing internal struggles between the moderate-leaning President Hasan Rouhani — who has promised to ease Iran’s cyber-censorship — and hard-liners in the Islamic establishment who see no benefit in lifting restrictions intended to foil potential political opponents and reformists. The chances are highly unlikely that Iran’s secretive Web watchers will provide a full accounting of the brief freedoms, which allowed users to access banned sites such as Twitter and Facebook directly rather than having to use proxy servers that bypass Iranian controls. The semiofficial Mehr news agency quoted Abdolsamad Khoramabadi, a member of the board overseeing the Internet, as saying the filters were temporarily removed late Monday by a “technical failure regarding some Internet service providers.” He warned, too, that an investigation will also study the possibility of an inside job. “We are probing it,” he said. Later, a telecommunications official, Hasan Karimi, said the Web openings were caused by Internet address changes by Facebook that required taking down the filters to install new firewalls. Facebook did not immediately respond to an Associated Press request for comment. Some Rouhani backers, however, believe the Iranian government had a hand in freeing up the Internet, even if briefly. Scores of Facebook users quickly posted “Rouhani, Mochakerim,” or Farsi for “Thank you, Rouhani.” “God liberated Facebook,” wrote Mohammad Reza on his Facebook

account. “This isn’t really about a glitch even if one really happened,” said Scott Lucas, an Iranian affairs expert at Britain’s Birmingham University and editor of EAWorldView, a foreign policy website. “The bigger picture is that the Internet is central to the political battles inside the country in both the direction of domestic and foreign affairs.” The clampdown on Iran’s social media was in response to the street riots and unrest after the disputed 2009 reelection of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, whose opponents were among the first in the Middle East to harness the Web to organize protests. Ironically, Iranian officials also have recognized the usefulness of the social media they consider too dangerous to be allowed in the public domain.

The bigger picture is that the Internet is central to the political battles inside the country. SCOTT LUCAS Iranian affairs expert, Birmingham University Accounts carrying the name of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei typically churn out dozens of comments a day. Authorities insist Khamenei does not maintain his own accounts, but he has not disavowed them - raising speculation that they are fed by close aides and have his tacit approval. On Tuesday, the Khamenei-branded Twitter account equated diplomacy to a wrestling match. It’s good to grapple, it said, but important to member you are still foes - an apparent reference to possible increased outreach to the U.S. during Rouhani’s trip to New York later this month for the U.N. General Assembly. The comment was similar to an earlier state TV report quoting Khamenei. Khamenei’s top aides, including former nuclear negotiator Saeed Jalili, were ahead of even Rouhani in embracing social media during this year’s presidential race.

Acapulco tourists stranded; Mexico death toll at 47 BY JOSE ANTONIO RIVERA ASSOCIATED PRESS ACAPULCO, Mexico — The death toll rose to 47 Tuesday from the unusual one-two punch of a tropical storm and a hurricane hitting Mexico at nearly the same time. Authorities scrambled to get help into, and stranded tourists out of, the cutoff resort city of Acapulco. With roads blocked by landslides, rockslides, floods and collapsed bridges, Acapulco was cut off from road transport after Tropical Storm Manuel made landfall on Sunday. The terminal at the city’s international was flooded, but not the landing strips. Commercial carriers and the

Mexican military responded by setting up flights ferrying tourists to a nearby concert hall instead of the terminal. Emergency flights began arriving in Acapulco to evacuate at least 40,000 mainly Mexican tourists stranded in the resort city where some streets were transformed into raging brown rivers. Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong told the Radio Formula that 27 people had died because of the storm in the Pacific coast state of Guerrero, where Acapulco is located. Osorio Chong said 20 more people died nationwide, many as a result of former hurricane Ingrid, which struck the Gulf coast on Monday. Mexican meteorologists said it was

the first time since 1958 that two tropical storms or hurricanes had hit both the country’s coasts within 24 hours. While most Acapulco hotels seemed to be operating normally on Tuesday, many outlying neighborhoods were without water or electricity, and floodwaters were knee-deep at the city airport’s check-in counters. Federal officials said it could take at least another day to open the main highway to Acapulco, which was hit by more than 13 landslides from surrounding hills, and to bring food and relief supplies into the city of more than 800,000 people. Two of Mexico’s largest airlines, Aeromexico and Interjet, began running flights to and

from the still-swamped international airport. Those with tickets got first priority, then families with small children or elderly members, officials said. Interjet’s director Luis Jose Garza told Milenio TV that his airline’s first flight was taking 150 passengers back to Mexico City and it hoped to run four to six such flights Tuesday. The Guerrero state government said 40,000 tourists were stuck in the city, while the head of the local chamber of business owners said reports from hotels indicated the number could be as high as 60,000. Many tourists finally emerged from their hotels Tuesday morning after days of pelting rain.

CAPTURE THE MOMENT JOIN THE YALE DAILY NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF AND HAVE YOUR MOMENTS SHINE. photography@yaledailynews.com

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YOUR Y D N DA ILY

EDUARDO VERDUGO/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hundreds of stranded tourists arrive at a military airbase in hopes of getting a seat on a Mexican Air Force jet flight on Tuesday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

AROUND THE IVIES

“A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.” MARCUS GARVEY JAMAICAN POLITICAL LEADER

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

C O L U M B I A D A I LY S P E C TAT O R

Summers’s colleagues pan Fed politicization

‘La Maison’ turns 100

BY FRANCESCA ANNICCHIARICO AND JOHN P. FINNEGAN STAFF WRITERS In the aftermath of Lawrence H. Summers’s withdrawal from consideration for the position of Federal Reserve chairman, several Harvard faculty members condemned the politicization of the confirmation process and expressed dismay over the decision. “It is a sad outcome and a very bad precedent for future Fed chair appointments to have this one become a subject of public and political debate,” economics professor Martin S. Feldstein said in an emailed statement to The Crimson. Harvard Kennedy School professor Jeffrey A. Frankel said that Summers’s announcement had demonstrated how “the Senate confirmation process is broken.” “President Obama should be able to have the chairman he wants, just like he should be able to have the Cabinet members he wants,” Frankel said. “And yet they and lots of federal judges and lots of other positions are very commonly blocked.” In 2009, Obama appointed Summers to lead the National Economic Council, where he helped steer the administration through the nation’s worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Until Sunday’s announcement, Summers had been considered a frontrunner for the position of Fed chairman. According to Richard J. Zeckhauser, a professor of political economy at the Kennedy School, the controversy surrounding Summers’s candidacy will make potential candidates for similar appointments “less willing to serve.” “It’s hard enough for the President to get the appointments through when they’re opposed by the other party. Usually almost every senator supports the president when [the nominee] is in his own party,” Zeckhauser said. “Now we’re going to start to have … ideological concerns within the party. It’s going to make it just an awful lot harder.”

Frankel said that several factors, including Summers’s economic philosophy, played a role in the politicization of the process. “Some people appear to think that he would HARVARD tighten monetary policy, raise interest rates, or stop quantitative easing,” Frankel said, adding that the role Summers played in deregulating financial markets during the Clinton administration may have led to opposition. Zeckhauser, however, pointed to Summers’s focus on evidence rather than ideology in policy-making and said he believes that even Summers was unsure of his potential platform.

JEFFREY A. FRANKEL Professor, Harvard Kennedy School “I don’t think that the people who opposed him know what he would have done, because I don’t think that he knows what he would have done.” Zeckhauser said. “One thing that’s clear is that his policies would have been really empirically grounded.” Frankel referenced Summers’s history at the university — in particular, controversial comments he made regarding womens’ aptitude in the math and sciences — as a potential reason for his withdrawal. Summers resigned as university president in 2006, almost one year after the Faculty of Arts and Sciences passed a vote of no-confidence in his leadership.

Geisel med school profs awarded $1.4 million grant

KASSAUNDRA AMANN/THE DARTMOUTH

The Geisel School of Medicine will collaborate with the Muhimbili University to create an HIV and tuberculosis institute in Tanzania.

Researchers at the Geisel School of Medicine were awarded a five-year, $1.4 million grant by the Fogarty International Center to create an HIV and tuberculosis research institute in Tanzania. Geisel will partner with the Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences in Dar es Salaam to build the institute, which will train local doctors to treat HIV and tuberculosis patients. Unlike past grants the team has received, the money will not be used for medical research, said Ford von Reyn, the Geisel team leader. The grant will instead be used to improve current care for Tanzanians infected with the two diseases. “We want to make sure that the providers in Tanzania will understand the best practices,” said Richard Waddell, Geisel professor and associate director of Dartmouth’s Global Health Tanzania DarDar programs. “They will have a better understanding of HIV and TB co-infections and the best practices in place for dealing with these health issues and we will provide them the most updated training that is available.” This grant is the third that von Reyn’s team has received from the Fogarty International Center. Von Reyn used money from a previous grant to create DAR-901, the first effective vaccine against tuberculosis in over 80

This semester, the campus is saying “joyeux anniversaire” to La Maison Française. This year is the 100th anniversary of the founding of Columbia’s cultural institution devoted to the study of French culture — the first of its kind on an American campus — and it’s being celebrated with “Century 1913-2013,” an ongoing exhibit of international, institutional and military significance held in the lobby of Buell Hall. La Maison Française’s story began in 1913 on the eve of World War I, under university President Nicholas Murray Butler, who

“felt it was important to offer an i n te r n a tional perspective to students COLUMBIA at Columb i a , ” Shanny Peer, the director of La Maison, said. “Global education is an important emphasis of the university today, and what is interesting is that there was a similar kind of move around the time of when the Maison Française was created,” she said. In particular, Butler had close ties to France, both academic and personal, as the president

President Obama should be able to have the [Federal Reserve] chairman he wants.

THE DARTMOUTH

BY AMELIA ROSCH STAFF WRITER

BY SARAH ROTH STAFF WRITER

years and the only vaccine that can treat HIVtuberculosis co-infection. Paul Palumbo, director of Geisel’s international pediatric program, said von DARTMOUTH HIV Reyn’s vaccine research helped the team obtain the new grant and led to the development of DarDar’s collaboration with Muhimbili University. “We got started around tuberculosis,” he said. “The vaccine established the foundation to conduct our current and future research.” The grant will “empower” Tanzanian doctors to eradicate tuberculosis and HIV in their own country, Geisel professor Timothy Lahey said. “We hope they will be joined by more promising young investigators who turn HIV and TB into bad memories,” he said. While working in Tanzania means dealing with a lack of safe drinking water and reliable electricity, Lahey said he valued the opportunity to meet and research people with tuberculosis and HIV. Tanzania is an epicenter of the HIV and tuberculosis epidemics, which will make it easier for researchers to learn about these diseases than in developed countries with intact infrastructures.

LUKE HENDERSON/COLUMBIA SPECTATOR

Visitors to “Century 1913-2013” examine artifacts from La Maison Française’s history.

of the France-America Society, which was originally headquartered at La Maison Française. The exhibit features calling cards from some of Butler’s French correspondences — including viticulturist Maréchal Joffre and historian Gustave Lanson — as well as a number of medals given to Butler in recognition of his attendance at the 1900 Exposition Universelle in Paris. These pieces highlight the intimacy of Butler’s relationship with France. Research for the exhibition, which opened Sept. 5, began more than a year ago. “It’s really a process of looking at a lot of material and distilling it and figuring out where the stories are and how to shape it,” Peer said. “We wanted to tell the story of the Maison Française, but we also wanted to inscribe that story within a few larger narratives.” The exhibit also touches upon the important role that La Maison Française played in the two world wars. On display are photographs from October 1918 showing the Columbia Student Army Training Corps doing drills behind Low Library, as well as images of a professor in his military uniform writing the lyrics to the French national anthem — a stark reminder that not even Columbia students were safe from the tides of war. Alongside these photos sits a 1942 letter from the Committee for French Scholars asking for donations to help French professors and students who were sent into exile after the Nazi invasion. One line from the letter stands out: “Are you interested and will you help?” The answer to both was “Yes.”


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

CHAMPIONS Man United 4 Bay Leverkusen 2

CHAMPIONS Real Madrid 6 Galatasaray 1

SPORTS QUICK HITS

FOOTBALL THROUGH THE EYES OF A QB At Tuesday practice, quarterback Henry Furman ’14 ran plays wearing Google Glass through a partnership between Yale and the digital advertising firm Digital Surgeons, which hopes to find further ways to use Google Glass through Yale athletics.

CHAMPIONS PSG 4 Olympiakos 1

CHAMPIONS Bayern Munich 3 CSKA Moscow 0

y

BRITTANI STEINBERG ’17 ROOKIE OF THE WEEK HONORS FOR YALE VOLLEYBALL PLAYER The freshman outside hitter collected 27 kills in three matches over the weekend, including 10 against No. 8 Stanford. Setinberg had 15 kills and a .500 hitting percentage in her Yale debut against Missouri on Sept. 6.

CHAMPIONS Man City 3 Plzen 0

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“It’s nice having someone to compete against who makes you better” RACHEL AMES ’16 GOALKEEPER, W. SOCCER

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Freshmen make immediate impact for Elis MEN’S TENNIS

BY NIKOLAS LASKARIS STAFF REPORTER A week ago, Alex Hagermoser ’17 tried out for the men’s tennis team as a walk-on. On Sunday, he left the Princeton-Farnsworth Invitational with the most wins out of the entire Yale squad. The men’s tennis team rebounded from a poor showing on Friday to turn in a solid team performance over the weekend. Hagermoser, who advanced to the semifinals of the main singles draw, notched three victories in the tournament, though captain Kyle Dawson ’14 lost in the consolation singles final. “Despite a tough first round for all players, it was important that we bounced back in the second rounds,” Dawson said. “As it was the first tournament of the year and our first matches, I am not too concerned with the early results.” The opening day of the invitational featured five singles players and two doubles teams from Yale, all of whom lost by the end of the day’s competition. The duo of James Ratchford ’17 and Tommy Ratchford ’14 notched the Elis’ only main-draw victory of the day, defeating NYIT’s Thomas Lieb and Julio Marcon, 8-2. The Ratchford brothers then lost a tightly contested secondround match to Andrew Berman and Zach Lessen of Penn, 8-7(3).

Generally, I am optimistic about the season. ZACH KRUMHOLZ ’15 After dropping his openinground match, Dawson regrouped to cruise through the singles consolation bracket, notching a 6-2, 6-2 victory over Octavio Canibe of Bucknell in the semifinals. In the final Dawson stormed out to take the first set 6-1 but ulti-

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

After a solid team performance at its first tournament of the year over the weekend, the men’s tennis team will return to New Haven this weekend to host the Ivy Plus Invitational. mately fell short of the consolation crown, losing 1-6, 6-3, 1-0(8) to Ismael Dinia of Binghamton. The story of the weekend, though, was Hagermoser’s performance. In his collegiate debut, the walk-on posted an impressive victory over a fellow Ivy League player as he bested Princeton’s El Mo Tonbario 6-5(4), 6-4. Building on the momentum

of his first-round victory, Hagermoser cruised past his quarterfinal opponent Akil Mehta of Buffalo, 6-4, 6-1. In the semifinals, Hagermoser posted his fifth consecutive set victory, taking the first from Columbia’s Richard Pham 6-3. He conceded the match, however, losing in three sets 3-6, 6-2, 6-4. On Sunday, Hagermoser took the court again for an extra

match against Florin Radu, also of Princeton. He completed the weekend in excellent form, winning 6-3, 6-3 to finish with a 3-1 record. “Alex is a great competitor and a very hard worker,” head coach Alex Dorato said. “He knows what works best for himself, and he is disciplined about sticking to it. I was definitely pleased with his outstanding performance.”

While Hagermoser’s impressive run overshadowed a disappointing team performance, the group’s morale was not dampened by the unfavorable results. Zach Krumholz ’15 said the team does not read too much into the first tournament of the season. “Generally, I am optimistic about the season,” Krumholz said. “We may not have had the

best results this weekend, but it has motivated us and we will continue to work hard and improve.” The Bulldogs return to New Haven this weekend to host the Ivy Plus Invitational, a new tournament on the fall calendar, with matches starting on Friday, Sept. 20. Contact NIKOLAS LASKARIS at nikolas.laskaris@yale.edu

Goalkeeper battle keeps Bulldogs sharp BY MARC CUGNON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER With their first Ivy League bout against Princeton still more than a week away, excitement is already gripping the Yale women’s soccer squad as an intense position battle unfolds.

WOMEN’S SOCCER

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Rachel Ames ’16 boasts a .667 save percentage this season.

The Bulldogs’ coach, Rudolph Meredith, has split time thus far this season between two standout goaltenders, Elise Wilcox ’15 and Rachel Ames ’16, who are locked in a heated contest to win the starting goalie position. Players said that practices this season have been pushed to game-like intensities as the two keepers engage in a friendly, but ardent competition for the top role. “Being in competition makes us both better,” Wilcox said. “You always want to be ready no matter who’s starting, and we motivate each other to do better.” Ames painted a similar picture of the contest, saying that the two are naturally competitive and consistently give their all. While the goaltenders are obviously competing for a key spot, Wilcox noted that their rivalry on the field does not diminish their respect for one another and the camaraderie born of a shared love of the game.

TOP ’DOG ALEX HAGERMOSER ’17

“Elise and I are always joking around together after plays, and we’ll always compliment the other on a nice save,” Ames said. “I think we’re pretty evenly matched players honestly, and it’s nice having someone to compete against who makes you better.” So far this year, they have put up similar numbers in between the pipes, with Wilcox recording a .688 save percentage and Ames a .667 mark. Ames played the Elis’ first game of the season against Stony Brook in net, while Wilcox commanded the second against UMass-Lowell. In the two games since then, Wilcox has started the game, and Ames has taken over in the second half. Midfielder Lillian Bitner ’17 praised the two keepers’ collective talents. “They’re both amazing players who are really evenly matched,” Bitner said. “Elise is a little taller, so she has a bit better reach, but Rachel is excellent at leaping out for balls, so things really balance out.” Bitner added that the position battle ultimately makes both players better and creates a “quicker” pace that the team benefits from in practice and in games. The freshman noted that she thinks the competition would only make the team better going forward. The Bulldogs play three games in the next five days against Hartford, Sacred Heart and Fairfield, before

their Ivy League debut at Princeton on Sept. 28. Last season, the Elis hosted the Tigers in their first conference matchup, but fell 2–1 in overtime. Meredith, who is in the enviable position of having two great choices in Ames and Wilcox, weighed in on the ongoing contest. “The playing arrangement for this season going forward will be determined by how the two keepers play. If they stay even, I’m going to play them evenly,” Meredith said. “If one keeper goes on a hot streak, I’m going to keep her in, even if I had planned on splitting playtime earlier. Stylistically, they’re very similar. They’re both solid players and I don’t have enough information right now to really see a clear difference.” Like his players, Meredith is convinced of the benefit that the competition brings to Yale’s overall quality on the field. “If you’re shooting on goal in practice, as an attacking player, and both keepers are giving it they’re all, you have to play even better to beat them. I can see that the [the competition] creates a more energetic environment for our practices.” Wilcox and Ames will renew their competition tonight against Hartford at Reese Stadium at 7:00 p.m. Contact MARC CUGNON at marc.cugnon@yale.edu .

THE FRESHMAN MEN’S TENNIS WALK-ON ADVANCED TO THE SEMINFINALS AT THE PRINCETON-FARNSWORTH INVITATIONAL OVER THE WEEKEND.

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September 18, 2013

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