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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 14 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

RAINY CLOUDY

62 69

CROSS CAMPUS Hangin’ with the Crew.

Roughly 100 Yalies showed up to the Whaling Crew’s first event of the year on Friday: a parking lot party for the first men’s soccer home game. Members of the Whaling Crew, a student-led organization that aims to foster participation in Yale athletic events and promote school spirit, kept themselves busy grilling up food and playing cornhole in the parking lot by Reese Stadium. Rest in peace. The founder of

the University’s graphic design program, Alvin Eisenman, died at 92 in his home on Martha’s Vineyard. Eisenman spearheaded the establishment of Yale’s program in 1951 and served as its director for the next 40 years, recruiting design experts and counting “Doonesbury” cartoonist Garry Trudeau as one of his students. He is survived by his wife, three children, seven grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren.

Let the money flow. The Yale

Peabody Museum of Natural History will receive two grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, one of which will fund an educational program while the other will help support the Peabody’s mineralogy collection. Totaling $30,000,000, the two awards are among a total of 244 that will be bequeathed to museums across the country through the Institute’s “Museums for America” program.

Can emotional intelligence be taught? That was the

central question in a recent New York Times article about current efforts to teach children “social-emotional learning,” a strategy based on the idea that good emotional skills are linked to strong academic performance. The article cited research from a number of Yale professors and faculty, including University President Peter Salovey and Marc Brackett, director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence.

Upward trend. MIT saw an

11.1 percent return on its investments for the fiscal year that ended June 30, bringing the total value of the school’s endowment up to $11 billion, including pledges. Though Yale and its peer schools in the Ivy League have yet to release their most recent endowment figures, Provost Benjamin Polak said the school’s target endowment return is above 7 percent.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1964 Students and faculty returning to campus after summer vacation are horrified to find that University dormitories had become the target of widespread vandalism and theft, one of the worst in recent history. Apparently, intruders had entered dormitory rooms and ripped open storage boxes and footlockers, strewing the contents across the floor. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

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NATURE GETTING AWAY FROM CAMPUS

REACH OUT

BRUCE REED

BULLDOG GOLF

Dwight Hall groups will face tighter service trip regulations this year

BIDEN’S CHIEF OF STAFF TALKS STATE OF AFFAIRS IN D.C.

Both the men and women won their meets this weekend

PAGE 10 THROUGH THE LENS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE B1 SPORTS

Sequester stings scientists Billions of dollars

$35

GRAPH NIH FUNDING, WITH AND WITHOUT INFLATION

$30

Current $ (Billions)

$27.1B

$30.7B

$25 $20

Despite construction, 1 Broadway still empty

1995 Constant $ (Billions)

$21.0B

BY MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER

$17.0B

$15 $11.3B

funding in annual increments, will skim a percentage off the top of each of its payments. The decrease in funding has left many Yale faculty — especially those in the medical school who

Though construction crews have been diligently working on the corner of 1 Broadway throughout the summer, a tenant has yet to pick up the prime retail location. There are currently three construction companies working on the project, refacing the facade, improving the windows and walls and repairing the roof, according to Tony Santangelo, general manager of one of the companies, Universal Preservation Group. Though the construction companies are hard at work, they are completing only general repairs and not working for a specific tenant, according to Santangelo and representatives from University Properties, which manages Yale’s commercial properties. “There is nothing in ink,” said Carin Keane, the director of Retail Leasing & Marketing at University Properties, when asked about securing a new business to occupy the space. “But we’re actively showing it and the space has a lot of interest.” The question of what would become of 1 Broadway began back in late when May when Au Bon Pain closed. At the time,

SEE SEQUESTER PAGE 5

SEE CONSTRUCTION PAGE 4

$10 $5 $0

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ix months after the federal sequester slashed national budgets, Yale’s scientists say they are struggling to secure research funding. The cuts come in a context of long-term decreasing government support for scientific discoveries, leading researchers to sound the alarm bells about the future of American innovation. MICHELLE HACKMAN AND DAN WEINER report. Six months after the sequester slashed the budgets of national science organizations, Yale’s scientists say they are feeling a tangible impact. Two of the nation’s largest scientific funding organizations, the National Institutes of Health and

the National Science Foundation, cut their budgets by 5 percent and 2.1 percent, respectively, in response to the federal sequester in March. Both organizations have announced that they will award fewer new grants in the coming year, and the NIH, which provides

City nightclubs witness weekend shootings BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS STAFF REPORTER Gunshots rang out downtown both Friday and Saturday night, continuing the trend of violence outside of crowded nightclubs in the Elm City. The first incident occurred

just outside of Pulse Nightclub on Chapel Street Saturday morning. At 2:13 a.m., after police responded to a large fight that broke out as the club closed for the evening, shots were fired. Two men were hit and taken to Yale-New Haven Hospital with non-life threatening injuries. As

of now, police are still investigating the shooting and have made no arrests. “This string of violent incidents, one that left two men wounded by gunfire, is an inexcusable occurrence,” New Haven Police spokesman David Hartman said. “Violence to this

degree is not typical, but when it occurs in New Haven, it almost always stems from a venue that had promoted a hip-hop event.” When police arrived at Pulse following the fight, the crowd dispersed, with some running toward the Omni Hotel and beginning to fight outside of the

hotel’s doors. Police made two arrests before the shots were fired at the corner of Church and Crown Streets. The two victims, 24-year-old Timothy Charles of nearby Hamden and 21-year old Kirt Swan of SEE NIGHTCLUBS PAGE 5

Ward 1 candidates step up campus campaign efforts BY DIANA LI STAFF REPORTER With election season in full swing, New Haven’s two candidates for Ward 1 are operating at full speed to win students’ votes this November. Republican Paul Chandler ’14 will challenge incumbent and Democrat Sarah Eidelson ’12 for the aldermanic seat in Ward 1, which includes oncampus Yale undergraduates — except those living in Morse, Ezra Stiles, Silliman and Timothy Dwight Colleges and Swing Space — and which has not seen a Republican candidate run in 20 years. With under two months until the election, both candidates are stepping up campaign efforts. Both Eidelson and Chandler have been carrying out voter registration drives. Eidelson said that in her position as Ward 1 alderman, she has been working to register freshmen and introduce them to city politics. “When meeting with freshmen, we’ve been trying to have conversations just to help them orient themselves to the SEE WARD 1 PAGE 4

FROM LEFT: SARAH ECKINGER, JACOB GEIGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITORS

Sarah Eidelson ’12 and Paul Chandler ’14 will face off this November for the position of Ward 1 alderman.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “So far we know almost nothing about what any of this means.” yaledailynews.com/opinion

YALE TALKS YALE-NUS

The hairless caveman “W

hat brand of shaving cream did prehistoric cavemen use?” This was the question on my mind after seeing “The Croods,” the recent animated film from Dreamworks. The movie tells the story of a caveman family (“The Croods”) who, with the help of Guy, a clever and technologically advanced boy from another tribe, race against time to escape volcanic eruptions and earthquakes caused by continental drift. The plot revolves around the clash between Guy’s forward-looking, inventive ways and the Croods’ oldfashioned, brainless brawn. The result? The Croods comes to embrace Guy’s new methods, and Eep, the rebellious teenage daughter in the family, falls for him in the process. The female characters’ ridiculously clean-shaven armpits aside, the movie made me uncomfortable for a host of other reasons. First of all, the Croods and Guy share the same, vague reddishtanned skin tone purposefully designed to appear race neutral. Could you imagine if Guy had paler skin compared to the Croods? As the harbinger of fire and complex tools, Guy’s character could have easily evoked the image of the white outsider who descends upon a less-technologically advanced aboriginal people. On the other hand, if Guy’s skin had been made darker, then that could be a sign that the makers of the movie were trying too hard to reverse the white colonist stereotype. For the sake of political correctness, it was essential that the skin tones of the characters were made exactly the same — any slight deviation could cause controversy and discomfort in the audience. Furthermore, the character of Eep, the curious, rebellious and open-minded girl who falls in love with the outsider against the will of her father, easily calls to mind the Pocahontas foreign princess cliché. Could the genders of Guy and Eep be switched? Would the producers again be seen as deliberately attempting to reverse yet another deep-rooted stereotype? Walking out of the movie theatre, I impatiently vented all of my concerns of political incorrectness to the friend who accompanied me. She, a senior at Mount Holyoke College, immediately understood. As my friend and I discussed the race and gender implications of the movie, it was immediately clear that our heightened sensitivity to political correctness is a result of our experiences as college students in America. Nowhere else in the world do topics of race, gender, religion and sexual orientation make up such a important part

of daily conve rsa t i o n , and nowhere else are people judged harsher for where they stand on each of these XIUYI issues. ZHENG As a nonAmerican in Properthis country, when gandist and how did I come to internalize what can roughly be categorized as the average American liberal’s interpretation of what is politically correct? I do not know, but the voices I have heard from those around me on such issues have been remarkably uniform and consistent, and I was easily convinced by their logic. Ethnic, racial and gender equality; equal marriage and rights for people of all sexual orientations; freedom to practice all forms of religion as well as atheism — surely these are universal, self-evident truths that no one could deny? How could anyone ever think differently? Yet behind any interpretation of political correctness is an implied set of values, and the long-standing cultural heritages that formed them. While some ideals might be seen as universal, a truly universal value system only exists on paper. Does it matter that I was not born into the values that I now pledge allegiance to? Does it matter that the vast majority of my people, including my parents, believe in values that are different, even if just slightly so? The danger of going too far with political correctness is that to those who have fully internalized the “correct” values, different values become not only politically unacceptable, but “incorrect” in the fullest sense of the word. They become not only disagreeable in discourse, but incomprehensible, even unthinkable. Thus when my dad tells me that despite his best intentions, he still feels homosexuality is “unnatural,” I have trouble understanding that thought. I cannot sympathize with it. Yet I should be able to – traditionally, China is a more conservative, household-based culture, and it is unsurprising that gender norms would be more entrenched. And this feeling of alienation is precisely my worry. To adopt the values I believe in is one thing. To fail to understand that of another is something else. And if I cannot understand the values of my own people, I would feel like a caveman without armpit hair. XIUYI ZHENG is a senior in Davenport College. Contact him at xiuyi.zheng@yale.edu .

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXVI, NO. 14

'WONDERING' ON 'YALE PUSHES ONLINE EXPANSION'

KAREN TIAN/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

POINT

COUNTER-POINT GUEST COLUMNIST PHIL WILKINSON

Engaging the trailblazers A

lthough Yale-NUS College is very much still in its developing stages, it has the potential for success. I believe this because I have seen it with my own eyes. I’m currently on a leave of absence from Yale studying in Beijing under the auspices of the Light Fellowship. During the break between my summer and fall Chinese language programs, I flew to Singapore to visit my freshman counselor who is now working at Yale-NUS and to see the place for myself. Despite its location 12 time zones away from New Haven, it is critical to the success of YaleNUS and the relationship between our two institutions that we, as Yale students, engage and collaborate with our counterparts at Yale-NUS. As soon as I arrived, I was struck by the students at YaleNUS. They share the same affability, spirit of inquiry, international mindset and passion for life both inside and outside of the classroom that I feel amongst all of you at Yale. I watched them as they started a cappella groups, a finance club, Japanese culture appreciation club, a venue for discussing issues of sexuality, a debate team, sports teams and more. I even received a note slipped under my door from their first secret society. Their school, however, isn’t like Yale with over 300 years of history to build on and be proud of. Yet, combined, there are students in this class that turned down offers from every Ivy League school. They came here to be trailblazers. They have the opportunity to start everything from scratch, which is both a daunting and exciting responsibility. So Yale-NUS has begun to build a sense of community in the image of what we have at Yale: movie nights, beach days, international group field trips, common room activities, free food and clubs. After spending part of the summer living in Berkeley, bonding, taking classes with Yale faculty, getting a taste for what life at Yale is like, the students learned to look up to us as role models. When I stumbled upon the a cappella group rehearsal (I happened to be wearing my Spizzwink(?) shirt), I was treated like a star. They know about us. Now it’s time for us to engage with them. Yale students have the opportunity to influence Yale-NUS in an important way. We can offer insight into starting clubs, how our organizations work and what

pitfalls to avoid. By going over to Yale-NUS, in trips or exchange programs, we can add new perspectives to the classes and take back new ideas to the United States. Yale faculty should follow suit. I encourage the administrations at both Yale and Yale-NUS to help create venues where members of Yale student organizations can share insight with students at Yale-NUS who are in the early stages of forming similar organizations. Our organizations should create bonds with their sister organizations at Yale-NUS and host joint conferences in both Singapore and the U.S. It would be possible for Yalies to think of Yale-NUS as a lesser sibling simply mooching off the Yale name, or for Yale-NUS to see Yale as an arrogant, aloof older sibling an ocean away. But we have much to learn from each other — it’s in our best interests to avoid this outcome. Let’s make the most of this opportunity for cross-cultural understanding and engage with each other. Only then will YaleNUS reach its full potential. The founding of Yale-NUS doesn’t represent a relinquishing of Yale’s values, but an opportunity to reaffirm them. In the spirit of the liberal arts and the search for knowledge and truth, we needn’t boycott any nation whose values don’t line up perfectly with our own. Even if their values aren’t the same as ours, experiencing and understanding that difference can help us better understand the society we live in and the values for which we stand. Students at Yale and on YaleNUS’s campus should continue to consider Singaporean values with a critical eye, in the same way students on both campuses should be able to challenge the aspects of American society that are morally dubious. Yale-NUS is fostering an environment where that kind of questioning is able to take place and offering a new angle from which to consider these issues. In the spirit and history of Yale, Yale-NUS can groom the leaders who will someday lead and change the status quo in Singapore. As Mark Twain once said, “Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one’s little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.” PHIL WILKINSON is a sophomore in Ezra Stiles College currently studying in Beijing. Contact him at phillip.wilkinson@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST SARAH ONG

Failings and flaws A

s a Singaporean graduate of Yale College based in Singapore, I want to touch on several issues regarding Yale-NUS. These include the following: Poor communication by Yale about what Yale-NUS is; the attractiveness of Yale among students in Singapore being reduced by Yale-NUS; and most importantly, the ill-conceived idea to let Yale-NUS graduates be non-voting members of AYA. Yale has failed to fully inform both the media and the public of its relationship with Yale-NUS. Because of this lack of information, misreporting has occurred and misinformation has spread. For example, on August 2, Bloomberg published an article titled “Yale Commences With Singapore Wielding Subsidy as Rivals Depart.” For one thing, this title incorrectly suggests that Yale is footing the bill for Yale-NUS. The article also quotes Yale alumnus Ben Wildavsky saying “Yale” in a quote about funding, when presumably what he really means is Yale-NUS. In another quote, an associate professor of education at the State University of New York in Albany, Jason Lane, seems to imply that Yale-NUS is a "branch campus" of Yale. The article makes no attempt to mention or correct these errors in perception, thus allowing the reader to accept them as facts — not identify them as the misperceptions they are. Yale should be more proactive about correcting these errors in the public eye. Another issue is that the presence of Yale-NUS seems to be reducing the value of a Yale education in Singaporean public opinion. Both alumni and current Yalies from Singapore who I have spoken to tell me this is true. More than one person has expressed that if they knew that Yale was going to work on Yale-NUS, they would not have chosen Yale when they were entering college. In January, I and a few other alumni in Singapore had a chance to spend some time with senior Yale faculty who were serving as an Advisory Council to then-President Levin on YaleNUS. Even within that group there was a struggle to come up with an analogy to describe the relationship between Yale and Yale-NUS. It was obviously not assuring given that Yale-

NUS was about to start its first year. Additionally, it is an ill-conceived idea to let Yale-NUS graduates become non-voting members of the Association of Yale Alumni. Did whoever considered this idea give serious thought to how this will affect the Yale Club of Singapore? The inaugural size of the Yale-NUS student body numbers approximately 150 people. Four years from now, any graduate who remains in Singapore after graduation may join the Yale Club of Singapore. Assume all 150 do so. Currently, there are currently about 300 people on the email list for the Yale Club of Singapore. The massive influx of Yale-NUS students would be equivalent to the Yale Club of New York being inundated with graduates of Columbia and NYU. The good thing is that Yale Club of Singapore has its own constitution, and thus does not have to accept Yale-NUS graduates as members on the basis of their NUS degrees. The typical Yale Club of Singapore event has a turnout of 20 to 30 Yalies, and it will quite simply be impossible for us to maintain our identity with a large group of Yale-NUS graduates joining us for core events. Someone from AYA once made a ridiculous suggestion to the Yale Club of Singapore: invite NUS alumni to participate in Yale Day of Service. That person either lacked a basic understanding of NUS, or lacked common sense all together. NUS had over 37,000 students this past academic year; just think how large its alumni body is. YaleNUS graduates will have a large network they can plug into already through NUS. So why should Yale-NUS graduates even be allowed membership in the AYA, which would falsely imply to every casual observer that they are Yale alumni? Current students of Yale College, take heed. You will be impacted more than anyone else. The ramifications of YaleNUS will most certainly not be limited to Singapore or Asia. SARAH ONG is a 2011 graduate of Berkeley College. Editor's note: The preceding column is an expansion of a letter written to the Yale Alumni Magazine that was subsequently published in their September/October issue.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“I’m afraid of losing my obscurity. Genuineness only thrives in the dark. Like celery.” ALDOUS HUXLEY ENGLISH WRITER

CORRECTION FRIDAY, SEPT. 13

The article “Staying In” misstated Professor Leslie Brisman’s critique of how some faculty members begin seminars. He specifically targeted the method of asking students to provide reactions to the reading, not casual introductions in general.

Service trips face tightened rules

SAMANTHA GARDNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

This year, Dwight Hall has implemented tighter regulations governing the organization of service trips by its member organizations. BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER Student organizations looking to do community service abroad during spring break may face tighter regulations on their volunteer-work this year. In recent years, students have criticized campus groups like Reach Out for running service trips to foreign countries that focus more on tourism and leisure than on direct advocacy. As a response to these critiques, Dwight Hall has released a set of regulations governing the organization of service trips led by seven of its member organizations. The new regulations, which Dwight Hall has called a “Code of Conduct,” require trip leaders to schedule volunteerwork for approximately half of all daylight hours and ban students from carrying out clinical medical service abroad. “Ethical considerations tend to fall to the wayside during some service projects,” Yvette Odu ’14, a Dwight Hall member who helped draft the new rules, said in an email. “The issue of students performing medical tasks that they are not trained to perform or engaging with [the] population in a way that is detrimental is part of what I believe is largely a failure in communicating what is appropriate behavior in an international context and as a representative of Yale University and what is not.” Each year, Yale students travel on roughly 16 service trips affiliated with Dwight Hall, 10 of which are organized through Reach Out, said Teresa Logue ’15, the international network membership coordinator for Dwight Hall. Around half of the trips held in the past would probably fail to meet these new standards, Logue said. Logue and Odu did not identify any Yale service trips in which students performed clinical care or other direct medical tasks, but Logue said service trips hosted by groups not affiliated with Yale have allowed undergraduates to assist with performing pap smears in Central America in the past. Members of Reach Out, which organizes annual summer and spring break service trips, expressed skepticism at regulations such as the minimum time requirement but said their past trips would have complied with most of the new requirements such as those related to medical care. Under the new regulations, trip leaders will be required to attend mandatory trainings on safety, health and risk management hosted by Dwight Hall in collaboration with the Center for International and Professional Experience. “These are student-orga-

nized trips as you know and they are not run under the auspices of CIPE,” said Jane Edwards, dean of international and professional experience. “With any student-organized trip, what we would want to do is everything we can to make sure students manage these trips with as much regards to health and safety and ethical issues of traveling to someone else’s community.” Service trip groups that follow the new regulations will be eligible for subsidies of up to $1,000, Logue said. While the funding is significant for smaller groups, Logue said it makes little impact on a large organization like Reach Out, which serves around 100 participants annually, she said. She added that Dwight Hall will not be liable for groups that drop their Dwight Hall membership following the implementation of the new regulations. Aobo Guo ’15, co-president of Reach Out, said service trips often appeal to students because they contain an opportunity for tourism. “One of the biggest appeals of doing service abroad is allowing people to experience what the foreign country is like,” Guo said. “I think if you’re doing 6 hours of service a day on average, it’s hard to get a grasp on the what the country is like outside your service project.” Some service efforts such as teaching may not benefit from complying with a minimum time-requirement, said Mehdi Lazrak ’14, a Reach Out board member. Service trip members could not teach children for six straight hours, because he said children cannot learn effectively for such a lengthy time period. Dwight Hall is prepared to make exceptions on certain regulations such as the time requirement, Logue said. Still, Logue said she felt a teaching trip she attended — a 2012 trip to Peru with Yale’s chapter of Nourish, a nonprofit which aids community development projects — did not make any significant impact abroad because the teaching was not substantial or sustained. Josh Barrett ’15, who led a medical service trip to Panama last year through Reach Out, said he believes his trip would have met the minimum timerequirement and restrictions against performing clinical care. “It’s definitely not going to hurt that Dwight Hall is getting more involved,” Barrett said. “[Reach Out has] a pretty minimal board, like 10 people managing like 10 trips, so it wouldn’t hurt to have more help.” Reach Out currently has seven board members. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

Biden chief of staff speaks at St. A’s BY RACHEL SIEGEL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER President Bill Clinton’s White House came straight out of the ’90s hit series “West Wing,” according to his domestic policy advisor Bruce Reed. Twenty years later, as Vice President Joe Biden’s chief of staff, Reed said the job still resembles the television show but “nobody is as funny and nobody is as good looking.” At a lecture hosted by St. Anthony’s Hall on Friday afternoon, Reed offered his own insights regarding the current state of affairs in Washington before roughly 90 students. Taking attendees through his career from his start as a speechwriter to his current position as chief of staff, Reed gave an insider’s view of gridlock politics on Capitol Hill. “It can’t go on this way forever,” he said. “We’re ready for the fever to break. The good thing about politics is that sooner or later, Americans get the change they want.” Describing himself as the “rarest of political fossils: a Democrat from Idaho,” Reed started his career as a speechwriter for then-Sen. Al Gore in the late ’80s. He became addicted to the adrenaline of the campaign cycle, he said, despite an unbreakable losing streak — he worked on 14 consecutive losing campaigns. But Reed said those losses taught him more than any single victory could. “You learn so much from losing,” Reed said. “The lessons stick with you longer. I encourage you to go out and fail at something. It’s a much more valuable learning experience.” Reed described how Clinton was a night owl prone to push deadlines and have fun around the office, while Obama takes a much more disciplined, businesslike approach. Reed and Biden, his current boss, make an “odd couple” because Biden is a constitutional scholar while Reed is an “LSAT dropout,” he said. Today’s political climate in Washington makes working across party lines increasingly more difficult, Reed said, adding that nationwide trust in the government is at an all-time

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Bruce Reed, Vice President Joe Biden’s chief of staff, delivered a lecutre at St. Anthony’s Hall on Friday. low. But change is on the horizon, he noted. Reed emphasized the responsibility his generation faces to ensure a safer future for the younger population. From environmental reform to economic growth, the older generation has a moral obligation not to leave behind “a social fabric coming apart at the seams,” he said. The younger generation has three advantages — young people comprise the most tolerant generation to date, they think differently than those in other age brackets and they are com-

ing of age at a time when the nation faces real problems that will force leaders to find the best solutions possible, Reed said. Reed told audience members not to confuse ambition with purpose because ambition can lead to great progress but “you can’t lead and you can’t be happy without being grounded in a purpose.” Audience members said they appreciated the chance to hear from a White House insider rather than a face on a television newscast. Eric Stern ’15 said he found

Reed’s optimistic outlook admirable. “This is what a career in politics is like,” he said. “Politics shouldn’t be a dirty, but a virtuous career.” Anna Lu ’17 said though many say the younger generation has little trust in the government, she appreciated the opportunity to hear from someone working within the system. Reed became Biden’s chief of staff in 2011. Contact RACHEL SIEGEL at rachel.siegel@yale.edu .

Climate panel focuses on local responses BY WESLEY YIIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy took the stage in Kroon Hall’s packed Burke Auditorium on Friday, he said he was thinking not only about himself and his constituents, but also his family. Murphy was one of six climate change experts who sat on a panel hosted by the Yale Climate and Energy Institute on the future of Connecticut and New England in the era of global warming. While the tone of the event was grim, the panelists suggested many possible solutions to mitigating the local effects of climate change, and those in attendance reacted positively. As the first speaker, Murphy set the bleak tone for the event. He wondered aloud about whether or not the world will have changed

unthinkably and irreversibly by the time his young daughters reach adulthood. “In only a half a decade, all of a sudden, we have come to a consensus that some of our worst fears may be coming true,” he said. The rest of the panel members — who were drawn from a variety of fields related to climate change — echoed his worries. Ronald Smith, Yale professor of geology and geophysics, and Kerry Emanuel, MIT professor of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences, discussed the negative effects of the rising sea levels on local infrastructure and the likelihood of the recent catastrophic weather events indicating a change in climate, respectively. But all six experts were still optimistic, offering local projects

and even individual actions that could be completed in the fight against climate change. One such solution involved changing education policy. Murphy concluded that the states of New England needed to invest more in environmental education, and Marion McFadden of the Hurricane Sandy Task Force cited her greatest challenge as the misinformation that people have about storm recovery. “While certainly rebuilding is a locally driven process to protect our communities and our investments, we knew that it was really going to be critical to engage and incentivize communities to rebuild differently — in a more resilient manner,” McFadden said. Yale and New Haven have seen a historically high proportion of hurricanes in recent years, which many climate scientists have said

JOYCE XI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy, pictured above, spoke Friday in Kroon Hall’s Burke Auditorium on climate change.

is the result of climate change. In 2011, Hurricane Irene caused at least 10 deaths in Connecticut and resulted in power outages throughout the state, while 2012’s Hurricane Sandy saw four deaths and widespread property damage.

In only a half a decade, all of a sudden, we have come to a consensus that some of our worst fears may be coming true. CHRIS MURPHY Senator, Connecticut Members of the Yale community who attended the event reacted positively to the panelists. Jonathan Mellor, a YCEI postdoctoral student, was impressed by how the event brought together policy makers and scientists to create a discussion with multiple facets. “I hope that the University and the policy makers and scientists keep this dialogue going as we continue to face the devastating effects of climate change,” he said. The event also attracted attendees from outside of Yale. Mark Pagani, the director of the Yale Climate and Energy Institute, moderated the event, and Katie Dykes ’99, deputy commissioner for energy at the Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection, and Alexander Felson, director of the Urban Ecology and Design Laboratory at Yale, also participated in the panel. Contact WESLEY YIIN at wesley.yiin@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Debate is so much better than denial.” JULIE WALTERS ENGLISH ACTRESS AND NOVELIST

Ward 1 enters election season

Fiscal accountability is … one of the most important ways to make sure our city lasts. PAUL CHANDLER ’14 Aldermanic candidate, Ward 1 Chandler added that one difference between him and Eidelson is the fact that he is still an undergraduate on Yale’s campus. While Eidelson graduated in May last year, Chandler is a senior and will spend a little under half of his term as an undergraduate at Yale if he were elected. He said that the Ward 1 position is a “student voice in city government,” and that it is “really

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important to keep it that way.” In a survey conducted by the News of 418 students this past December, 72 percent of people reported not having interacted with Eidelson since the beginning of the school year. Just 20 percent of the class of 2016 identified Eidelson as their alderman, though 66, 67 and 69 percent of the classes of 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, correctly identified her. Eidelson and Chandler have not yet met or spoken to each other, according to both. Ben Mallet ’16, Chandler’s campaign manager, said that both he and Chandler went to a mayoral debate on Aug. 28 at the Long Wharf Theatre and had hoped to see and meet Eidelson there, but they did not see her. Eidelson said that the Chandler campaign has not reached out to her. Nia Holston ’14, Ward 1 co-chair and an official supporter of Eidelson, said that having a Republican in the race changes the election dynamic, because groups like the Yale College Democrats and

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make sure our city lasts,” Chandler said. “I know a lot about finance and about budgets, and as an economics major, I have a very quantitative mind, which is just one of the assets I have.”

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city, the fact that they live in Ward 1 and what that means,” Eidelson said. “We’ve been talking about the issues that I’ve been fighting for on the Board in the past two years and the comprehensive youth agenda that I’ve been pushing for.” Eidelson, who was elected in 2011 after defeating Vinay Nayak ’14, serves as the chair of the Board of Aldermen’s Youth Committee. Eidelson said that during this election season, she has engaged students in conversations on community policing, charter revision and other issues facing the city. Chandler said the city’s budget is one of his top priorities. He said that the mayoral race has encouraged people to discuss and think about how the city can be more fiscally responsible. “Fiscal accountability is one of the biggest topics that’s coming out in mayoral debates, and we’ve been thinking about it for weeks: It’s one of the most important ways to

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Broadway corner remains vacant workers of the now-closed cafe complained that they were only given four days notice that they would no longer be employed. According to University Properties Director Abigail Rider, UP gave Au Bon Pain management a six-month prior notification in December 2012 that their lease would not be renewed, calling the company’s failure to communicate that decision to employees “regrettable.” “Yale chose to not renew the lease so that necessary upgrades could be made to the space in which Au Bon Pain is currently located,” said a May 2013 UP press release. Those upgrades are now underway — thus far, they have been entirely exterior repairs, Santangelo said. His Universal Preservation Group was hired by UP earlier this summer after ABP vacated the building and has been involved in refacing the brick facade of the building, which will most likely be finished in the next week.

Yale chose to not renew the lease so that necessary upgrades could be made to the space in which Au Bon Pain is currently located MAY 2013 UP PRESS RELEASE

Br i S dge

Students Unite Now, a progressive group on campus, have united behind Eidelson. Two years ago, when Nayak — a Democrat — ran against Eidelson, groups like the Democrats did not endorse one candidate, she said. Nicole Hobbs ’14, president of the Yale College Democrats, said the organization is looking for ways to support Eidelson’s campaign. “I think that over the past two years, Sarah has shown that she really cares about New Haven and Yale,” Hobbs said. “The Dems have worked with her on various projects, and she’s done a really great job with the Youth Services committee, and we’re proud to endorse her and support her candidacy.” Eidelson is holding a campaign event this Saturday at her house on High Street. Chandler also announced that he will hold open weekly lunches in Commons on Tuesdays.

The other two construction companies on the job are Consigli Construction and Ernest Peterson Inc., which are responsible for carpentry and roofing work. After University Properties has selected a tenant, another construction company will work to remodel the inside, Santangelo said. He added that, though he would not be privy to information about which tenant is moving into the space, certain decisions, like which glass will go into the property’s windows, have not yet been decided because it is unclear which tenant will eventually occupy the space. There has been much speculation around campus about which tenant will be selected for the coveted location at the corner of Broadway Street, but so far no rumors have been confirmed. Keane declined to comment on which businesses UP has courted as potential tenants. One of the rumored tenants, women’s clothing store Anthropologie, is not likely to come to Broadway. In an email to the News on Saturday, Rebecca Oliver, a representative for the store, said that Anthropologie does not currently have plans to open a store in New Haven. University Properties has over 85 retail tenants.

Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu .

Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .

You Watch Them. You Cheer For Them. Why Not Write About Them?

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Join Sports, and write about your favorite Yale teams. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT

“Your own safety is at stake when your neighbor’s wall is ablaze.” HORACE ROMAN LYRIC POET

Weekend violence at nightclub injures two Lyn P

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I can’t control what goes on outside the club and what goes on on the streets of New Haven.

The city has urged club owners to take greater responsibility for preventing such fights by hiring more security personnel and taking steps to ensure weapons stay out of the club. At Pulse, all patrons receive a pat-down from security officers before walking into the club. In the eyes of city officials the clubs’ responsibilities do not end at their doors, but instead extend to preventing violence on the streets directly outside. Owners, though, have pushed back, saying that the job of keeping the peace on the streets lies in the city’s hands. “I can’t control what goes on outside the club and what goes on on the streets of New Haven. That’s the city’s job,” Pulse owner Jason Cutler told NBC News, adding that the fight was some distance from the club. “That’s three blocks away from here yet they’re pointing the finger at the club. Also, the shooting happened at 2:13 in the morning, almost 45 minutes after the club let out.” The next night, shots were once again heard, this time just outside of the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School, located only two blocks from Yale’s campus. Although no one was injured, police arrested two New Haven men, Tyrese Dingle and Roger White Drive. Police also cited eight underage drinkers at the Exhibit X club downtown on Saturday night. This was the second citation this month for the club, where police found six Sacred Heart University students, all under 21, drinking on Sept. 6.

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New Haven, were taken to Yale-New Haven. Charles was shot in his right hand while Swan was shot in the upper back. Both of the men had attended the hip-hop event at Pulse Nightclub. Although police briefly detained several individuals seen fleeing from the intersection where the shooting took place, all of them were eventually released. Police have responded to at least two fights near the club in the past 18 months. They have also arrived at the club to snub out underage drinking violations, which Pulse has been cited for at least twice as well. Pulse is not the only club with a bad reputation with New Haven Police, though. Fights frequently break out among downtown clubgoers, often in the Temple Street Courtyard, as they stream out of bars and dance-floors after one in the morning. In response, police have added more officers to the downtown area on late weekend nights, but say that more police alone will not solve the problem.

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SHOOTING FROM PAGE 1

Post-sequester, researchers face funding cuts SEQUESTER FROM PAGE 1 earn the majority of their salary from outside grants — wondering how they will continue to run their labs. “We don’t fully know the effect yet, but it seems like it’s harder to get grant applications accepted, and grant approvals are being reduced in what they award,” Provost Benjamin Polak said. “The good news is that we have a very high quality medical school. We’re small but very high quality, so those cuts don’t seem to have hit us as badly as other places.” The sequester cuts also come amid a larger trend of decreasing government commitment to scientific research. Researchers say tight budgets are discouraging the next generation of scientists and endangering the future of American innovation.

A QUESTION OF FUNDING

The sequester put the lab of professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology Paul Forscher in an “extremely vulnerable situation,” when, for the first time in 23 years, a grant was not funded in the first round. The funding gap forced Forscher to seek University “bridge funding” to support his lab while the grant went in for a second round review. Yale has allocated a few hundred thousand dollars for bridge support each year, with average grants of about $50,000, said Deputy Provost for Science and Technology Steve Girvin, adding that the University has been able to meet about half of recent faculty requests in Yale College. Without the bridge support, Forscher said he would have had

to let members of his lab go. “I’m probably one of the lucky ones, but it was a very difficult period, and it caused a lot of pressure and stress on personnel in my lab,” Forscher said. “If I hadn’t got the money I would have had to let the core of my research lab go. This is happening all over the country to wellestablished labs.” The effects of the sequester are being felt by some of Yale’s most senior faculty, like professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry Donald Engelman GRD ’67, who has been on faculty since 1970. He received a 9 percent cut to grant support from the NIH this year, which means he will be unable to replace a postdoctoral fellow who left to take a faculty position. While the sequester has not yet had a direct impact on the work of School of Medicine professor of pathology and genetics Gerald Shadel, he said it has prevented him from pursuing a more aggressive research program. “Before, I would hire a postdoc even if they didn’t have a fellowship, and say I’ll get the grant eventually,” Shadel said. “But I’m much less inclined to take that risk because of the sequester because the future is so tenuous. I’ve become much more conservative as a result.” For professor of psychology Gregory McCarthy, the sequester meant a “relatively mild cut” to his NIH grant support, which he is trying to keep in context. “In this funding climate, I am fortunate to have grant funding at all, and so I am taking this cut in stride,” McCarthy said. Years of budget surplus tend

to balance out deficit years, said professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry Michael Koelle. While he said he is not terribly worried about the anticipated 5 percent cut this year to his lab this year, it is the long term trends and future outlook of science funding in the country that have Koelle and his colleagues preoccupied.

‘A SLAP IN THE FACE’

The sequester cuts come amidst a decade of decreasing government commitment to science funding. While grants from the NIH soared from $11 billion in 1995 to $27 billion in 2003, over the last decade they have only risen to a peak of $31 billion in 2010 and have flat-lined at $30 billion ever since. But when adjusted for inflation, NIH funding has steadily declined since 2003 at an average annual rate of roughly 1.9 percent. “To me, the sequester is almost like, ‘Oh, you were down already? Here is a slap in the face — we’re taking 5 percent more off the top that the NIH has to figure out how to squeeze out of people,’” Shadel said. The funding climate impacted Shadel’s lab, which investigates mitochondrial DNA, even before the sequester hit this year. Despite continuing productivity and paper publication from his lab, Shadel said he has had a hard time renewing grants that he has held for decades. As a result within the last three years, Shadel has been forced to cut the size of his lab back from 14 to four members. Over the last decade, Koelle said he has observed the labs of his peers at Yale getting smaller.

In better funding climates, roughly the top 20 percent of grants would be funded, Koelle said, but recently, the rate has plummeted to nearly 10 percent. “If it goes down to a level like that or below, it gets to a point where you just sort of feel hopeless,” Koelle said. But hope may indeed be on the horizon. In Koelle’s experience, science funding is cyclical in nature: Funding was similarly tight when he was a graduate student in the ’80s, but Koelle recalls his mentors then reminisced about strong funding before he entered science. Funding once more boomed under Clinton, reaching its peak in 2003.

The decrease in R&D investments now is likely to have a negative impact on the health of the economy a few decades from now. MEG URRY Chair, Physics Department Scientists hope that the sequester represents merely the lowest point of the cycle. Still, many said, scientific research represents an insignificant portion of the total federal budget. “If you really think about the amount of money the United States invests in discovery and translational science, it’s appalling really, the percentage of that compared to what it would take

to bomb Syria tomorrow or what it’s taken to occupy Iraq and Afghanistan for 10 years,” Shadel said.

AN UNCERTAIN FUTURE

This fall, Congress will once more face the prospect of balancing the annual budget and hitting the nation’s debt ceiling. In the climate of political rancor that is likely to result, the chances of reinstating science funding cut by the sequester are slim. U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy, who fought against the sweeping budget cuts before they went into effect last March, said in an interview with the News that scientific research is particularly unlikely to have a reprieve because many politicians view it as a “low-hanging fruit.” “The Republican house leadership is absolutely celebratory about sequestration,” Murphy said. “There is a chance that, in the budget debate that is likely to come at the end of this month, there could be the possibility of repealing part of sequestration. But I acknowledge that without Republican support, we cannot repeal sequestration.” Nearly every scientist interviewed emphasized that the state of scientific research in the United States will be unsustainable if the current paucity of funds continues, as it likely will. The relative lack of funds will force principal investigators to take on fewer post-doctoral researchers, the position traditionally considered a steppingstone to a successful scientific career. The fewer the post-docs now, the fewer the principal investigators will number in the future.

“You have great post-docs from all the labs at Yale who either will not be able to find jobs or even if they do, not be able to get funding to run their labs,” Shadel said. “We stand to lose our competitive advantage that we have held for hundreds of years in this country.” Many scientists fear that, with the decrease in funding for fundamental research, the nation’s economic productivity will slow years down the line. “It is not only scientists who should be concerned,” said Meg Urry, the chair of the physics department. “Given that fundamental research often fuels economic activity decades down the line, the decrease in R&D investments now is likely to have a negative impact on the health of the economy a few decades from now.” Many say they can only hope that, as the nation’s economy improves, politicians will find the will to restore funding to the levels it reached during the Clinton years. Still, they fear that, at least in the near future, the sequester will represent a semipermanent state of affairs rather than the low-point of a boomand-bust funding cycle. “One hopes that the economy will return and the political will to fund science will return and we’ll go back to a better period in the future,” Koelle said. “All the scientists I know feel like we are hunkering down and trying to survive this period to go back into a better part of the cycle.” Contact MICHELLE HACKMAN at michelle.hackman@yale.edu . Contact DAN WEINER at daniel.weiner@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION Lawmakers debate plan for Syria BY LIBBY QUAID ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — Lawmakers assessing the agreement on Syria’s chemical weapons argued Sunday about whether President Barack Obama was outfoxed by the Russians and had lost leverage in trying to end the civil war, or whether his threat of military action propelled the breakthrough. Obama said the turn to diplomacy had laid “a foundation” toward political settlement of the conflict. The deal announced Saturday in Geneva by U.S. and Russian diplomat sets an ambitious timetable for elimination of Syria’s chemical weapons by mid-2014, with rapid deadlines including complete inventory of its chemical arsenal within a week and immediate access by international inspectors to chemical weapons sites. PABLO MARTINEZ MONSIVAIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS The agreement came in response to an Aug. 21 chemical weapons President Barack Obama shakes hands with Russian President Vladimir Putin. attack near Damascus, the capital, that the U.S. believes was carried out by the government of Syrian PresiObama said Saturday that “if of force “is still very much in Russian diplomacy fails, the United States hands.” dent Bashar Assad. Republican lawmakers said that remains prepared to act,” and Secre“That’s the most important elecommitting to remove or destroy tary of State John Kerry warned dur- ment, is the veto piece, Corker said. Syria’s chemical weapons was laud- ing a visit to Israel on Sunday that “So in many ways, our credibility in able, the agreement fell short by not “the threat of force is real” if Assad the region, and certainly relative to mandating military action should fails to live up to the terms of the the chemical warfare, is very much Assad fail to comply. agreement. driven by Russia, which has its hands Rep. Mike Rogers, chairman of the firmly on the steering wheel. “ House Intelligence Committee, said Democrats insisted that while the In many ways, our credibility agreement itself doesn’t commit the U.S. is “being led by the nose by” the U.S. to using force, the option Russian President Vladimir Putin. in the region, and certainly of acting independently of the U.N. “So, if we wanted a transition with Assad, we just fired our last remains. relative to the chemical round, and we have taken our abilDemocratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan, chairman of the Senate ity to negotiate a settlement from the warfare, is very much driven Armed Services Committee, said White House, and we’ve sent it with Russia’s primary aim has been to Russia to the United Nations,” Rogby Russia. force the U.S. to give up that option. ers, R-Mich., said. “That’s a dangerous place for us to be if you want an “Russia has failed in that goal,” Levin said. overall settlement to the problems.” BOB CORKER To Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., Russia, which already has rejected Senator, Tennessee three resolutions on Syria, would be chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the threat of sure to veto a U.N. move toward military action, and U.S. officials said Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, the American military action is “the only they did not contemplate seeking top Republican on the Senate Foreign reason we’ve gotten to this point, such an authorization. Relations Committee, said the threat even to this possibility.”

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Dow Jones 15,376.06, +0.49%

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World’s oldest man dies in NY at age 112 ASSOCIATED PRESS GRAND ISLAND, N.Y. — The world’s oldest man, a 112-year-old self-taught musician, coal miner and gin rummy aficionado from western New York, has died. He was 112. Salustiano Sanchez-Blazquez died Friday at a nursing home in Grand Island, according to Robert Young, senior gerontology consultant with Guinness World Records. Sanchez-Blazquez became the world’s oldest man when Jiroemon Kimura died June 12 at age 116. Born June 8, 1901, in village of El Tejado de Bejar, Spain, he was known for his talent on the dulzaina, a doublereed wind instrument that he taught himself and played at weddings and village celebrations. At 17, he moved with his older brother Pedro and a group of friends to Cuba, where they worked in the cane fields. In 1920, he came to the United States through Ellis Island and worked in the coal mines of Lynch, Ky. Ultimately, he moved to the Niagara Falls area of New York, where he worked in construction and in the industrial furnaces. He married his wife, Pearl, in 1934.

GUINNESS WORLD RECORDS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Salustino Sanchez-Blazquez died Friday at the age of 112.

A spokeswoman for SanchezBlazquez’s family did not immediately return a phone message Saturday. In a statement provided by Guinness World Records earlier this summer, Sanchez-Blazquez — whose nickname was “Shorty” — said he was humbled by the attention, saying he didn’t feel he accomplished anything special just because he has lived longer than most. “He says, `I’m an old man and let’s leave it at that,’” his daughter, 69-yearold Irene Johnson, said at the time. Sanchez-Blazquez lived with Johnson in Grand Island after his wife died in 1988; he moved to a nursing home in 2007. “We did our best,” Johnson said. “We weren’t going to put him somewhere just because he was old.” Sanchez-Blazquez had said his longevity was attributed to eating one banana per day and his daily dose of six Anacin tablets. His daughter had another theory. “I think it’s just because he’s an independent, stubborn man,” she said. Besides his daughter, SanchezBlazquez had a 76-year-old son, John, seven grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren and five great-great-grandchildren. Guinness says the world’s oldest person is a woman, 115-year-old Misao Okawa of Japan. Young said 90 percent of all supercentenarians are female and SanchezBlazquez had been the only male born in 1901 with proof of birth. Arturo Licata, 111, of Italy, is now the leading candidate to be officially recognized by Guinness as the current world’s oldest man, according to Young. Guinness will make a pronouncement on Licata at a later date. The oldest authenticated person was Jeanne Louise Calment of France, who died at the age of 122 years and 164 days. Sanchez-Blazquez is to be buried at Gate of Heaven cemetery in Lewiston, N.Y. following a private funeral, according to John Colucci, of M.J. Colucci & Son Funeral Chapels.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Scattered showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 69. Low of 47.

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

High of 66, low of 41.

High of 70, low of 52.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 4:30 PM Prisms of War: Challenging the Logics of US Intervention in Syria Three speakers will discuss a US intervention in Syria. The speakers include Bassam S. Haddad, professor of political economy and director of Arab Studies at George Mason University, and co-founder of the influential online publication Jadaliyya; Inderpal Grewal, professor of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Yale University, and a key figure in the academic discipline of women’s studies; and Vijay Prashad, professor of International Studies and director of South Asian History at Trinity College and currently serving as the Edward Said Chair at the American University of Beirut. Linsley-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 102. 9:15 PM Yale Undergraduate Choral Society (YUCS) Rehearsal The Yale Undergraduate Choral Society (YUCS), Yale’s only non-audition singing group, invites you to sing. Please join them in rehearsal anytime, regardless of your past singing experience. They sing all genres of music and are open to all repertoire suggestions. Music directors are Stephanie Tubiolo (SM ‘14) and Timothy Lind (JE ‘15). Snacks immediately following every rehearsal. Please meet outside Hendrie Hall. For more information about YUCS, email binh.hoang@yale.edu or robert.pecoraro@yale. edu. Hendrie Hall (165 Elm St.), Rm. 201.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 2:00 PM Michael Sloan: Paintings of Hong Kong Street Markets The Yale-China Association presents a new exhibit featuring paintings of Hong Kong by acclaimed illustrator Michael Sloan featuring 18 works that depict portraits, street markets, and scenes of social crossroads within the Hong Kong metropolis. Yale-China Association (442 Temple St.), John C. Bierwirth Rm.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 7:00 PM Films at the Whitney Don Jon (USA, 2013) 90 min. 35mm. Directed by Joseph Gordon-Levitt. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE SEPTEMBER 16, 2013

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORDEdited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Manages (for oneself) 6 Snuck 11 __ Moines, Iowa 14 Native Alaskan 15 Cowboy singer Gene 16 “That’s nasty!” 17 Criticize gas and electric companies? 19 The Beatles’ “__ Loves You” 20 Sunrise direction 21 One of a D.C. 100 22 Russian capital 24 Roy G __: rainbow mnemonic 26 Piebald horse 27 Criticize a modeling shoot array? 30 It replaced the French franc 33 Pass out 35 Mudville number 36 Complete, as a scene 37 Tropicana and Minute Maid, briefly 38 Cheesy sandwiches 39 Grounded jet 40 Sworn statement 42 Isaac’s eldest 43 Wranglers with wheels 45 Folk music’s Kingston __ 46 Criticize stage shows? 48 Former Bears head coach Smith 50 Be in debt 51 Sea near Stockholm 53 Prefix with pass 55 Become enraged 59 World Cup cheer 60 Criticize awards? 63 Gen-__: boomer’s kid, probably 64 Invalidate 65 On one’s toes 66 Fist pumper’s word 67 Trotsky and Uris 68 Pack animals DOWN 1 Lose color in the wash

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2 “On the Waterfront” director Kazan 3 Loch with a monster 4 Brit’s trash can 5 Sault __ Marie 6 Batman’s hideout 7 Wreck completely 8 And so on: Abbr. 9 Vacate the __: eviction notice phrase 10 Big name in chicken 11 Criticize college subjects? 12 Bounce in a 6Down 13 Depict unfairly 18 Invitation letters 23 Bouillabaisse, e.g. 25 Practitioner: Suff. 26 Kept in, as hostility 27 Criticize farmers? 28 Bodysuit for a tiny tot 29 “__ Marner”: Eliot work 31 Speak with a grating voice 32 Chooses

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33 12 inches 34 Open a bit 38 Doctor’s profession 41 Owl’s cry 43 A boxer may have a glass one 44 They’re attractive to look at 47 “Footloose” costar Singer 49 “Myra Breckinridge” author Gore

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51 Like the Honda Element 52 Away from the wind 53 Really surprise 54 Web addresses, briefly 56 Beehive State natives 57 Little more than 58 Repair co. proposals 61 __-cone 62 Sheep’s call

3 4 4 8 7 5 9 2 6 2 6 1 7 3 4 5 1 4 6 9 8 5 8 7 3 4 6 3 7 2 9 5 3 6 2 3 5 9 8 4 6 9 2 3 1


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

“Countries are different. They make different choices. We cannot harmonise everything.” DAVID CAMERON PRIME MINISTER, UNITED KINGDOM

Syrian official: Chemical weapons deal a ‘victory’ BY RYAN LUCAS AND MATTHEW LEE ASSOCIATED PRESS BEIRUT — A high-ranking Syrian official called the U.S.Russian agreement on securing Syria’s chemical weapons a “victory” for President Bashar Assad’s regime, but the U.S. warned Sunday “the threat of force is real” if Damascus fails to carry out the plan. The comments by Syrian Minister of National Reconciliation Ali Haidar to a Russian state news agency were the first by a senior Syrian government official on the deal struck a day earlier in Geneva. Under the agreement, Syria will provide an inventory of its chemical arsenal within one week and hand over all of the components of its program by mid-2014. “We welcome these agreements,” Haidar was quoted as saying by the RIA Novosti agency. “On the one hand, they will help Syrians get out of the crisis, and on the other hand, they averted a war against Syria by removing the pretext for those who wanted to unleash one.” He added: “These agreements are a credit to Russian diplomacy and the Russian leadership. This is a victory for Syria, achieved thanks to our Russian friends.” There has been no official statement from the Syrian gov-

ernment, and it was not clear whether Haidar’s comments reflected Assad’s thinking. The deal, hashed out in marathon negotiations between U.S. and Russian diplomats, averts American missile strikes against the Assad regime, although the Obama administration has warned that the military option remains on the table if Damascus does not comply. President Barack Obama said last week the U.S. Navy will maintain its increased presence in the eastern Mediterranean Sea to keep pressure on Syria and to be in position to respond if diplomacy fails.

These agreements are a credit to Russian diplomacy and the Russian leadership. ALI HAIDAR Syrian Minister of National Reconciliation “The threat of force is real, and the Assad regime and all those taking part need to understand that President Obama and the United States are committed to achieve this goal,” U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Sunday in Jerusalem, where he briefed Israeli leaders on the

agreement. He also said the agreement, if successful, “will have set a marker for the standard of behavior with respect to Iran and with respect North Korea and any rogue state, (or) group that tries to reach for these kind of weapons.” French President Francois Hollande said in a televised address to his country that he has not ruled out the “military option,” either. Otherwise, he said, “there will be no pressure.” The U.S. accuses the Assad government of using poison gas against rebel-held suburbs of Damascus on Aug. 21, killing more than 1,400 people. Other death toll estimates are far lower. Syria denies the allegations and blames the rebels. The suspected chemical attack raised the prospect of U.S.-led military action against Syria that the rebels hoped would tip the civil war in their favor. But as the strikes appeared imminent, the Parliament of key U.S. ally Britain voted against military action and Obama decided to ask Congress for authorization first, delaying an armed response. Russia then floated the idea of Syria relinquishing its chemical arsenal to avert Western strikes, and the Assad regime quickly agreed. On Saturday, Moscow and Washington struck a framework agreement to secure and

Egypt finds traps on Gaza border BY SARAH EL DEEB ASSOCIATED PRESS CAIRO — The Egyptian army has discovered a network of booby traps along its border with the Gaza Strip, a military spokesman said Sunday, as he criticized the Palestinian territory’s Hamas rulers for poorly controlling their side of the border and urged them to reign in militant groups operating there. The accusations, made in a news conference explaining the military’s ongoing offensive in the volatile northern Sinai area, were a rare public criticism of the Palestinian militant group by the military since the July ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in a coup. Egyptian media has been pointing the finger at Hamas for meddling in Egypt’s affairs, some suggesting that the ouster of Morsi, an ally and fellow Islamist, has prompted the group to cause trouble in Sinai by supporting militant groups there. Hamas officials have denied interfering and complain that Egyptian authorities have imposed the strictest restrictions on the border and its vital Rafah crossing in years. “Securing borders is a joint mission for those sharing the borders. It is also up to Hamas to exert more effort to control the borders,” Col. Ahmed Mohammed Ali said. “Egypt deserves more than the effort we are seeing from the other side to secure the border.”

Ali said troops have arrested 309 militants and criminals, including Palestinians, in operations that began in the region in July and were stepped up with an offensive last weekend. They also uncovered weapons caches that included anti-aircraft missiles, long-range mortars, rocket-propelled grenades and tons of explosives, he added. In the last 48 hours, he said, troops had discovered explosives laid in tunnels along the border and under Egyptian watchtowers, with detonating wires running back into Gaza.

Securing borders is a joint mission for those sharing the borders. AHMED MOHAMMED ALI Colonel, Egyptian Army “This will call for new measures … to deal with these threats that endanger the forces and the borders,” Ali told reporters, adding that Egyptian intelligence had also discovered that a number of insurgent attacks in Sinai had been coordinated with Gazabased extremist groups. Since Morsi’s overthrow, militant attacks against security forces in northern Sinai have escalated, a trend Egyptian authorities blame on Morsi and

his allies. Morsi’s supporters insist they are peaceful, but some have openly said the situation in Sinai will not stabilize unless he is restored to power. In Gaza, Hamas government spokesman Ihab al-Ghussein denied militants were using the Palestinian territory as a staging ground for operations against Egypt. “We deny any connection between Gaza, its resistance and government, and the tunnels and the explosives which were mentioned by the Egyptian army spokesman today,” al-Ghussein told reporters. Egypt’s military launched the recent Sinai offensive last Saturday in response to militant attacks they say have killed more than 100 policemen and soldiers in recent months. In the worst single attack, gunmen pulled police recruits from buses and shot 25 of them dead on Aug. 19. And last week, in a new escalation, two suicide bombers hit a military intelligence building nearly simultaneously, killing at least six troops. During the ensuing offensive, Egyptian troops began demolishing homes along the Gaza border to block the flow of militants and weapons. Ali said houses had been knocked down on the Egyptian side up to 1 kilometer (0.06 miles) away, but that the owners would be compensated.

PAULO FILGUEIRAS/UNITED NATIONS

Professor Ake Sellstrom hands over the report on the Al-Ghouta massacre to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. destroy Syria’s chemical stockpile. For Syria’s opposition, the deal is disappointing in many

ways. It defers any U.S. action for the foreseeable future and does nothing to address the broader civil war or the use of

conventional weapons, which have been responsible for the vast majority of the more than 100,000 deaths in the conflict.

Merkel allies appear to triumph in Bavaria BY GEIR MOULSON ASSOCIATED PRESS BERLIN — Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative allies triumphed in Bavaria’s state election Sunday, according to projections, though her partners in government suffered a painful setback just a week before Germany’s national vote. The Merkel-allied Christian Social Union, traditionally the dominant force in the prosperous southern region, won support of roughly 49 percent, according to ARD and ZDF television projections based on exit polls and early vote counting. That meant it gained more than 5 percentage points and won back a majority in the state legislature it humiliatingly lost in 2008. “This election gives us tailwind for the national election,” said Hermann Groehe, the general secretary of Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union. But, he warned, “it is of course clear that the national election hasn’t yet been decided.” The projections showed only 3 percent support in Sunday’s vote for Merkel’s national governing partners, the pro-market Free Democrats, meaning they would lose their seats in the legislature in Munich. That’s a concern for Merkel ahead of next Sunday’s national election, in which she’s favored to win a third term. Germany’s main opposition party, the Social Democrats of Merkel challenger Peer Steinbrueck, finished a distant second in Bavaria with a little under 21 percent. That was a couple of percentage points better than the post-World War II low they hit five years

ago, but too little to give them any hope of unseating the conservatives or much national momentum. And their allies, the Greens, lost ground to score a disappointing 8.5 percent. “This is a great election success,” Bavarian governor Horst Seehofer, the CSU leader, told supporters in Munich. The CSU has led Bavaria since 1957, most of that time with an absolute majority. “With this, the year 2008 is history,” Seehofer said. “We’re back.” In Berlin, a somber Vice Chancellor Philipp Roesler, the Free Democrats’ leader, sought to rally his party - which governed Bavaria with Seehofer for the past five years. It’s also weak in national polls, hovering around the 5 percent needed to keep its seats in the national Parliament. “We all know that things are different in Bavaria — and from now on, it’s all about Germany,” Roesler said. “And this result is a wake-up call.” Challenger Steinbrueck’s Social Democrats pointed to the positive, pointing to their modest gains in a state where they usually struggle and vowing to step up their own national campaign. Steinbrueck said Sunday’s election added to a string of votes in which voters have failed to endorse a conservative-Free Democrat coalition — “and prospects are good for that being the case at federal level in a week’s time.” Merkel, who has campaigned hard against her center-left opponents’ plans for tax increases, has benefited in the national campaign from Germany’s strong economy and low unemployment.

CAPTURE THE MOMENT JOIN YDN PHOTO photography@yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

6

Number of bikes made available to students last semester.

A bike-share program has started among students at Columbia College in New York City. Last semester, six bikes were made available to 100 students. Columbia looks to continue the program this year.

H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

Summers ends Fed speculation

Penn to aid victims of sexual violence

BY NIKITA KANSRA AND SAMUEL Y. WEINSTOCK STAFF WRITERS Former university President Larry Summers has withdrawn his name from consideration for the Chairmanship of the Federal Reserve, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday afternoon. “This is a complex moment in our national life,” Summers wrote in a letter to President Obama dated Sunday. “I have reluctantly concluded that any possible confirmation process for me would be acrimonious and would not serve the interests of the Federal Reserve, the Administration, or ultimately, the interests of the nation’s ongoing economic recovery.” The economics professor, who was widely rumored to be Obama’s favored candidate to replace current Chair Ben S. Bernanke ‘75, issued the letter after sharing his decision with Obama in a phone call earlier on Sunday, according to the Journal. In a statement, Obama said that he accepted the withdrawal of Summers, who served as director of the National Economic Council during Obama’s first presidential term. “I will always be grateful to Larry for his tireless work and service on behalf of his country, and I look forward to continuing to seek his guidance and counsel in the future,” Obama said, calling Summers “a critical member of my team” during the financial crisis that began in the late 2000s. Summers’s exit from the conversation surrounding the position makes Janet L. Yellen, the current vice chair of the Federal Reserve System’s Board of Governors, the clear frontrunner for the job. If nominated and confirmed, Yellen would be the first woman to serve as Fed Chair — one of the most powerful positions in the country. Before the Journal’s article, Summers’s standing as the most likely nominee had in recent weeks solidified. Nikkei, a Japanese newspaper, reported last week that Obama would nominate Summers and that Obama was “in the final stages” for preparing such an announcement. The White House fired

BY WILL MARBLE STAFF WRITER

MEGHAN PURDY/HARVARD CRIMSON

Former University President Larry Summers has withdrawn his name from consideration for Federal Reserve chair. back, telling Reuters that Obama had not come to a final decision for the nomination. But as speculation surrounding Summers’s potenHARVARD tial nomination mounted, so did opposition to his appointment. On Friday, Congressman Jon Tester, a Democrat from Montana, became the third member of the Senate Banking Committee to publicly express his objection to the prospect of Summers’s leadership. “Senator Tester believes we need a consensus builder to lead the Federal Reserve. He’s concerned about Mr. Summers’ history of helping to deregulate financial markets,” Andrea Helling, a spokesperson for Tester, told Reuters. In addition, more than 300 notable economists and policymakers, including Christina D. Romer, Jeffrey D. Sachs ’76, and Joseph E. Stiglitz, have voiced

their support for Yellen in a public letter to Obama. Some of the letter’s signers, such as Romer, who chaired the Council of Economic Advisers during Obama’s first presidential term, have worked closely with Obama in the past. Summers’s opponents, who spanned both sides of the aisle but mostly included Democrats, criticized his ties to Wall Street and claimed that he had contributed to the financial crisis by easing banking regulation as Secretary of the Treasury—a post he occupied before taking office in Massachusetts Hall from 2001 to 2006. Still, Summers had garnered some prominent supporters in the academic and business fields, including financier Steven L. Rattner. In a Politico op-ed earlier this month, Sue J. Goldie, a professor at Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School, contested claims that Summers treated women with whom he worked poorly, describing him instead as “encouraging, promoting, and investing in women like me.”

C O L U M B I A D A I LY S P E C TAT O R

Bike-share program expands BY EITAN NEUGUT STAFF WRITER Thanks to the EcoReps’ extended bike-share pilot program, students may see more of their peers biking around campus this fall. The program, first piloted last spring, was re-launched for another test run on Sept. 9. This semester, the program is set to expand and include 150 to 200 students who will use the same bikes from last semester. In order to join the program, students must first sign up for a 45-minute information session. The session, run by an EcoRep, is designed to teach users about New York City bike laws, bike safety, and the proper way to lock up a bike. Training sessions are set to begin for new bike-share users in late September or early October. For now, students who par-

ticipated in the pilot last spring are still using the bikes. O n c e trained, COLUMBIA users may sign out available bikes from the 24-hour Hospitality Desk in Hartley Hall. Students can then take bikes from a special bike rack located between Carman Hall and Lerner Hall. Due to safety concerns about late-night biking, the bikes are available only from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. The bike share has been in the works for around three years and was finally made a reality last semester when 6 bikes were made available to 100 randomly chosen students from Columbia College and the School of Engineering and Applied Science for four weeks. This summer, the city launched

a new bike-share program, Citi Bike, but it doesn’t go north of 60th Street. “It’s a wonderful program because it gives the opportunity to students who don’t have the space or money to ride a bike safely in New York City, and it’s both a healthy and great alternative mode of transportation,” Raphaëlle Debenedetti, president of EcoReps, said. Eliana Bessler said that she thought the bike-share program expansion would help students venture off campus more frequently. “When I first came to Columbia, I was advised to leave campus at least once a week to explore New York City and just have a change of scenery,” she said. “Having a bike constantly available would make it extremely easy to make that happen without spending over $5 to take the subway back and forth.”

Penn is working to expand its resources to support victims of sexual violence. Counseling and Psychological Services is implementing a new program — called Sexual Trauma Treatment, Outreach and Prevention, or STTOP — that is designed to address the unique needs of victims of sexual violence. The program involves a team of four CAPS counselors who have undergone additional training to treat victims. Beginning last semester, the group counselors began research into treatment of sexual violence victims and attended a conference on treatment methods over the summer — efforts that “keep the clinician up to date on best practices, and you see what other colleges are doing,” CAPS Director Bill Alexander said. “It keeps us sharp.”

The priority of the clinician is to deal with the student’s emotional and psychological trauma. BEN ALEXANDER Director, Counseling and Psychological Services Though all CAPS counselors are qualified to treat sexual assault victims, “we think it will be better for the students … to get someone who has more

expertise,” Alexander said. H e noted that increased sensitivity is required PENN compared to other reasons that students come to CAPS — particularly, care must be taken not to revictimize people seeking help. To that end, Alexander said, CAPS is planning a method to bypass the typical triage system and connect students directly with a STTOP team member. “You don’t want to have to re-tell that story over and over again because it’s so re-victimizing,” he said. The treatment goal of the program is to create a comfortable place for victims. “The priority of the clinician is to deal with the student’s emotional and psychological trauma — to make them safe,” Alexander added. “The first priority is to create a safe space. It’s the old adage, ‘Do no harm.’” The program, which was piloted last semester and is undergoing its full launch this semester, grew out of the sexual assault support group run in conjunction by CAPS and the Penn Women’s Center — which is poised to be a steady source of referrals to the STTOP team. “I think they complement each other well,” Jessica Mertz, associate director of the Women’s Center, said. “A lot of the referrals we get to the [support] group are people who are already going to CAPS — it goes both ways.”


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

C

lasses have started, and spending time outdoors often seems like an impossible feat. Contributing photographer ALEXANDRA SCHMELING shares photos from some of her favorite spots away from the center of Yale’s campus to enjoy nature: Yale Marsh Botanical Gardens, Edgerton Park, East Rock Park and the Conn. Trust for Historic Preservation.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL Atlanta 31 St.Louis 24

NFL Baltimore 14 Cleveland 6

SPORTS QUICK HITS

NFL San Diego 33 Philadelphia 30

NFL Buffalo 24 Carolina 23

MONDAY

TOM DETHLEFS ’13 ELI TAKES MEDAL AT WORLDS The former heavyweight crew captain earned a bronze medal with the U.S. men’s eight that finished behind Great Britain and Germany in the World Rowing Championships final on Chungju Tangeum Lake in Chungju, South Korea on Sept. 1.

ROWING NEW HAVEN BOATHOUSE PLANNED Construction of a boathouse at Canal Dock will begin Monday after over 10 years of planning. The building will serve as a hub for rowing, kayaking and canoeing in New Haven Harbor and will replace the Adee Boathouse, which was demolished in 2007.

NFL Houston 30 Tennessee 24

“We competed every single set and everyone stepped up [against No. 8 Stanford].” KENDALL POLAN ’14 CAPTAIN, VOLLEYBALL YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Two teams, two titles BY ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER By the end of day one, both the men’s and women’s golf teams came out on top. By the end of day two, both sets of Eli golfers had clinched a tournament victory.

GOLF The Bulldogs made the trek north this weekend for the men’s team to compete in The Doc Gimmler at Bethpage Red in New York, while the women headed to Hanover to participate in the Dartmouth Invitational tournament to defend their title. “Everyone on the team kept their composure on the course and everyone stayed calm and positive throughout the tournament,” women’s team captain Sunny Park ’14 said. “We encouraged and supported each other whenever we saw each other and that boosted the overall morale on the team, to do better individually to contribute to the overall team score.” Ivy competitors Harvard, Princeton and Columbia joined the Bulldogs in Farmingdale while Brown, Dartmouth and neighbor Quinnipiac accompanied the women’s program in Hanover. The men’s team finished day one with an eight stroke lead in which Joe Willis ’16 shot a 63 for a -9 finish in his first round. For the

GOLF

women’s squad, Elisabeth Bernabe ’17 posted a 68 to lead the Elis to their second-straight Dartmouth Invitational Title. “Joe led the team this week. He played some unbelievable golf and made a ton of birdies. He had a few bad holes but was very poised and handled adversity very well,” men’s team captain Sam Bernstein ’14 said.

Joe [Wills] led the team this week. He played some unbelievable golf and made a ton of birdies. SAM BERNSTEIN ’14 Captain, men’s golf Harvard was the closest to the men’s team after day one with a -6 finish overall and a team score of 554. After last weekend’s loss to No. 22 Texas A&M, Yale got the quick rebound the team was seeking. Jonathan Lai ’17 ended day one with a tally of 135 and the team second-best -5 finish. Bernstein finished with 140 strokes, as did teammate William Davenport ’15. “Last weekend we lost to a team that won the national title a few years back. So we were SEE GOLF PAGE B2

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The men’s golf team traveled to New York to compete in The Doc Gimmler at Bethpage Red over the weekend and clinched the title.

Army, Air Force no match for Elis

Bulldogs break even BY JAMES BADAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The women’s soccer team received a rude awakening Friday afternoon when No. 12 Georgetown handed the Bulldogs their first loss of the season by a score of 8–0. Yale managed to salvage the weekend with a tense overtime thriller, defeating Towson 4–3 on the road.

WOMEN’S SOCCER The Bulldogs (3–1–0, 0-0 Ivy) were the first to attest that the Hoyas (7–0–0, 0-0 Big East) are a legitimate national champion contender. Yale hung in for the first 30 minutes of the match, trailing only by a goal, but Georgetown dominated from that point forward. Yale surrendered three goals in a nine-minute stretch right before halftime, which opened the floodgates. Georgetown tacked on four more goals in the second half to continue its excellence thus far this season, outscoring opponents 27–3.

We took a lot out of Georgetown and seeing where we made our mistakes. MARISA LOWE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Outside hitter Brittani Steinberg ’17 finished with seven kills and five digs as the Bulldogs swept Air Force in their second match of the Service Academy Challenge. BY DIONIS JAHJAGA STAFF REPORTER The women’s volleyball team spent the weekend in the nation’s capital competing in the Pentagon against strong teams from across the country.

VOLLEYBALL Playing in the Service Academy Challenge, the Elis (4–2, 0–0 Ivy) faced off against two of the national ser-

MEREDITH SPECK ’16

vice academies, Air Force and Army, as well as No. 8 Stanford. The Bulldogs prevailed over Air Force and Army by scores of 3-0 and 3-1, respectively, but fell to the Cardinal in three sets. This weekend was about more than just about volleyball. It marks the first time any Yale team has played inside the Department of Defense headquarters, and it certainly made an impression on the players.

“They were just better athletically and in the air,” head coach Rudy Meredith said. “We gave up three goals on corner kicks, which just doesn’t happen often.” Yale did manage to escape the road trip with one victory to show for its travels, overcoming Towson (3–4–1, 0-0 CAA) in a hard-fought overtime battle. This was the first game of the season to go to overtime for the Bulldogs. It was a game of momentum shifts

SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B2

SEE WOMEN’S SOCCER PAGE B2

TOP ’DOG COED SAILING

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The women’s soccer team managed to rebound with a tense overtime thriller, defeating the Towson Tigers 4–3 on Sunday.

THE NO. 2 BULLDOGS CLINCHED TWO TITLES OVER THE WEEKEND, WINNING BOTH THE HARRY ANDERSON TROPHY AND THE PINE TROPHY.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS MARIANO RIVERA The greatest closer in baseball history was honored by his archnemess last night as the Boston Red Sox held a pre-game ceremony to honor the Yankee closer’s last appearance at Fenway Park.

Victorious weekend for Yale golf GOLF FROM PAGE B1 not too disappointed considering what we were up against and continued working hard in practice this past week,“ Bernstein said. While the men’s team was looking to bounce back from a tough loss the prior weekend, the women’s program looked to defend last years’ title. Starting the season with a school record 286 after 18 holes was a commanding outset to accompany the explosive entry into the 2013-’14 season. In addition to Bernabe’s 68, Marika Liu ’15 made par with a 72 while Seo Hee Moon ’14 and Sandy Wongwaiwate ’17 ended the first day of competition with a pair of 73s. The Bulldogs remained consistent to finish the weekend, scoring just three strokes more and finishing day two with a 289. The next closest team, The BU Terriers, finished a total of 23 strokes behind the Bulldogs. “As defending champions, we wanted to take the title again,” Park said. “Everyone on the team strived toward our goals for the weekend and showed much of Yale pride and spirit to best represent Yale.” In individual contest, Bernabe earned an individual medal by scoring a 73 in day two for a com-

bined score of 141. In day two of The Doc Gimmler, the Bulldogs teed-off at 9 a.m. and Willis scored an individual tournament win, helping lead the Elis to the team title. Willis scored a 199 to finish -11 overall, while Lai tied for third in the tournament with a scorecard reading of 205. Sean Gaudette tallied a total of 212 to help push Yale to its first tournament win of the 2013-’14 season while Bernstein clinched a seventh place finish and Davenport earned an 11th place finish.

As defending champions, we wanted to take the title again. SUNNY PARK ’14 Team captain, women’s golf The women’s team will host the annual Yale Intercollegiate in New Haven Sept. 20-22 while the men’s program will next compete on the course in the Notre Dame Invitational in South Bend on Sept. 23-24. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

YALE ATHLETICS

The women’s golf team headed to Hanover to compete in the Dartmouth Invitational tournament over the weekend and captured its title.

Elis blitz Army, Air Force

Chaotic weekend for the Elis WOMEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE B1 as forward Melissa Gavin ’16 once again ignited Yale’s offense. Gavin found the back of the net in just the second minute of the match for her third goal of the campaign. Gavin capitalized off the first assist of the season from defender Meredith Speck ’16. The Towson Tigers responded in resounding fashion. In a 13-minute span to start the second half, the Tigers turned a 1–0 deficit into a 3-1 advantage, much to the chagrin of Meredith. “The communication with our whole defensive unit needs to improve,” Meredith said. “It’s coming along but we’ve made a couple mental errors.” Yale fought back resiliently as midfielder Geny Decker ’17 continued her productive freshman season with her third goal in four games, scoring in the 63rd minute off another assist from Speck. Fittingly enough, it was Gavin who scored the equalizer, tying things up at three in the 86th minute. After a scoreless first period of overtime, it did not take long for Yale to walk away with the victory.

Just a minute and 14 seconds into the second overtime period, forward Paula Hagopian ’16 picked the perfect time for her first goal of the season, connecting with a strike from eight yards out. Speck once again orchestrated the goal, streaking down the left flank of the field after handling a long ball from midfielder Frannie Coxe ’15, before crossing it to Hagopian for the game-winner. It was a gutsy effort for the Bulldogs, especially on the heels of Friday’s blowout. “We took a lot out of Georgetown and seeing where we made our mistakes,” Speck said. “It was great to see us come back and not doubt ourselves.” Coming back from a second half, two-goal deficit was something that Meredith could not recall happening during his 19-year tenure at Yale. “That certainly showed a lot of heart and character,” Meredith said. “That is rare in soccer, and certainly rare for our program.” There will not be much time to reflect on the weekend as Yale has a three-game week of in-state foes, beginning on Wednesday when it hosts Hartford (3–1–3). Sacred Heart (2–5–0) and Fairfield (3–3–0) are also on the slate for the Bulldogs next

weekend. Meredith is aware that the short week will impact how the Elis prepare, and he is looking for more productivity off of the bench and for more players to step up, just as Hagopian did on Sunday. “This game was absolutely a confidence boost for us coming back from the two goal deficit,” Hagopian said. “It is definitely going to be a great thing for us going forward.” The Ivy League portion of Yale’s schedule will get under way on Sept. 28 at Princeton. Contact JAMES BADAS at james.badas@yale.edu .

YALE 4, TOWSON 3 YALE

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TOWSON

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3

GEORGETOWN 8, YALE 0 GEORGETOWN

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4

8

YALE

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0

MARISA LOWE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Bulldogs took down two service academies on the Department of Defense’s home turf inside the Pentagon this weekend. VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1 “It was an honor to play in the Pentagon,” middle blocker McHaney Carter ’14 said. The team went on a tour, as well as more than a few security checks, before setting up on a multi-purpose floor for the tournament. Yale matched up first against the Cardinal. Stanford, aided by its height advantage over the Elis, won the first set by a score of 25-17 behind an efficient .348 hitting percentage. The Elis emphasized their opponents’ size in practice, according to outside hitter Brittani Steinberg ’17. “We had to work on a lot of different shots to neutralize their height,” she said. Yale came alive in the second set, bursting ahead to a 16-11 lead over the Cardinal. Captain Kendall Polan ’14 assisted on eight kills and produced two of her own as Yale forced a Stanford timeout. But Stanford, showing the poise of a national contender, regrouped and made a run to take the second set 25–20. In the final set, Yale fell by a score of 25-18 as Stanford scored 17 kills on an impressive .436 percentage. The match against Stanford is the second time this season the Elis have come up against a much taller team. At the Yale Invitational last weekend, the Bulldogs lost to Missouri by a score of 3–1 in a competitive match. The experience gained in both losses may prove useful against tall Ivy League teams like Princeton and Cornell. “[Stanford is] obviously a very talented team,” Polan said. “I think we held our own really well. We competed

every single set and everyone stepped up.” Against Air Force, Carter said the Elis focused on keeping to the high level of play they demonstrated against Stanford. With a balanced attack — five Bulldogs had six or more kills — Yale prevailed over the Falcons 3–0. Particularly effective were Carter and middle blocker Jesse Ebner ’16, who hit .500 and .583 in the match, respectively.

When you can trust someone beside you the competition is less intimidating. BRITTANI STEINBERG ’17 Outside hitter, volleyball The Elis finished the weekend on a strong note with a 3–1 comeback victory over Army on Saturday. After narrowly dropping the first set 25–23, the Elis flipped the switch and dominated the final three sets with scores of 25–14, 25–12, and 25–19. The level of chemistry this team has already displayed should not be understated, according to Steinberg. “I just think we trust each other really well,” Steinberg said. “When you can trust someone beside you the competition is less intimidating.” The Elis will head to Pennsylvania for the Penn State Tournament on Friday to face Eastern Kentucky and Albany. Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs were overpowered by the No. 12 Georgetown Hoyas 8-0 on Friday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

Lebron James marries high school sweetheart The Miami Heat star was wed to longtime girlfriend Savannah Brinston at a private hotel wedding in San Diego. According to Radar Online, Beyonce and Jay Z were in attendance and performed “Crazy in Love” for the couple and approximately 200 guests in attendance.

Deja vu for Bulldogs

VOLLEYBALL IVY

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Dartmouth

0

0

0.000

5

2

0.714

MEN’S SOCCER FROM PAGE B4

Yale

0

0

0.000

4

2

0.667

tain hunger for goals and to want it more than the other team. That’s getting numbers in the box, that’s fighting for loose balls and getting anything we can on the ball to get it in the back of the net.” At the end of the first half, the Yale defense had allowed just one shot and one corner kick. Defender Henry FlugstadClarke ’17 was key in the performance, as he slid to stop a threatening Fairfield through ball midway through the half and later managed to stop a dangerous Fairfield two-on-one situation. The Bulldogs continued to press the Stags in the second half with two shots and three corners in the first 15 minutes of the half, but again were unable to get the ball past Fairfield goalkeeper Joe Martin. The Stags got their second shot of the game midway through the half, when defender Matt Danaher fired a shot off the crossbar. In the 71st minute, Fairfield forward Reco McLaren dribbled the ball down the side of Yale’s penalty box and fell to the ground after contact with a Yale defender, and the referee awarded the Stags a penalty kick. Forward Jon Clements stepped up to the penalty spot and hit the shot passed Yale goalkeeper Blake Brown ’15 to take a 1–0 lead. At that point in the game, Yale held a 9–2 lead in shots. “I felt that the penalty on Friday was very, very harsh,” Tompkins said. “We were pressing them … and the penalty, which was controversial, I think …it took our momentum away.” The Bulldogs came close to retaliating shortly after the goal was scored with many offensive opportunities, but none of the chances turned into shots. In the final minute of the game, Albrecht rushed to take a free kick from just outside the box with the clock winding down and struck the ball right at the keeper. “I was really pleased on Friday that our guys persisted and kept looking for a goal, but we weren’t able to find one,” Tompkins said. By the end of the game, Yale had outshot Fairfield 13–4, with three of the shots taken by forward Cameron Kirdzik ’17. The game was similar to the Elis’ contest against Fairfield last season, in which they lost 1–0 after outshooting the Stags 9–8. Yale’s offense came out stronger against the Mountain Hawks (1–3–1, 0–0–0 Patriot) Sunday, as the team managed three shots within the first 10 minutes of the game. Peter Jacobson ’14, who scored a hat trick against Sacred Heart last Tuesday, rocketed a shot off the hands of diving Lehigh keeper Kevin Motylewski less than a minute into the game, and Kevin Michalak ’15 hit the post with a hard free kick after a foul. In the 35th minute, a Lehigh forward ran onto a long pass near the top of the

Harvard

0

0

0.000

3

2

0.600

Princeton

0

0

0.000

3

3

0.500

Penn

0

0

0.000

3

4

0.429

Cornell

0

0

0.000

2

4

0.333

Brown

0

0

0.000

2

5

0.286

Columbia

0

0

0.000

1

5

0.167

MEN’S SOCCER IVY

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Nick Alers ’14 said the Elis need to be more aggressive in pursuit of goals this season. Yale box as Brown went for the ball. The Lehigh player ran into Brown, stayed on his feet for five more yards and then fell down, resulting in a yellow card for Brown, a penalty shot and eventually, a 1–0 lead for the Mountain Hawks. “[We find] ourselves making one minor lapse in each game that the other team unfortunately has been able to take advantage of,” Alers said. Yale was unable to retaliate for the rest of the half and headed into the locker room down a goal despite outshooting Lehigh 7–6 in the half. The second half featured close scoring opportunities for both sides, including four corner kicks for the Bulldogs and a diving save by Brown on a hard Lehigh shot. Yale had the ball in Lehigh’s zone for the last minute of the game, in which the Elis set up several scoring chances, including a corner kick, but could not get a shot off. Time expired just after the corner kick for the Bulldogs’ second 1–0 loss in a row. Yale outshot Lehigh 13–10 in the game and took five corners while the Mountain Hawks had just one. The Bulldogs now prepare for their trip to California this weekend for games against UC Santa Barbara (3–2–0, 0–0–0 Big West) and Cal Poly (3–2–0, 0–0–0 Big West). The trip will be the team’s first to California in almost 20 years. “We’re playing two teams that are potential top-10, top-15 caliber teams, so

we know we’re going to have our hands full,” Tompkins said. “It’ll be a different style of soccer.” To prepare for the weekend, Tompkins said the team will focus on scoring goals with better ball movement and finishing. “It’s really exciting to get to travel to California and play at some other places in the nation,” said midfielder Jenner Fox ’14, who attended Palo Alto High School. “I’m especially excited because I’m from California. We have a lot of California guys who are going to be able to have family and friends see us play.” The Bulldogs will square off against UC Santa Barbara on Friday at 7 p.m. Pacific Time, 10 p.m. Eastern Time. Contact GREG CAMERON at greg.cameron@yale.edu .

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

0

0

0

0.000

3

0

1

0.875

Dartmouth

0

0

0

0.000

2

0

2

0.750

Penn

0

0

0

0.000

2

2

0

0.500

Brown

0

0

0

0.000

1

2

1

0.375

Columbia

0

0

0

0.000

1

2

0

0.333

Princeton

0

0

0

0.000

1

2

0

0.333

Yale

0

0

0

0.000

1

3

0

0.250

Harvard

0

0

0

0.000

0

3

1

0.125

WOMEN’S SOCCER IVY

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Penn

0

0

0

0.000

4

0

0

1.000

Yale

0

0

0

0.000

3

1

0

0.750

Cornell

0

0

0

0.000

2

1

2

0.600

Princeton

0

0

0

0.000

2

1

1

0.625

Columbia

0

0

0

0.000

2

2

1

0.500

Brown

0

0

0

0.000

2

2

0

0.500

Harvard

0

0

0

0.000

1

3

1

0.300

Dartmouth

0

0

0

0.000

1

3

0

0.250

FIELD HOCKEY IVY

FAIRFIELD 1, YALE 0

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

FAIRFIELD

0

1

1

Princeton

0

0

0.000

3

1

0.750

YALE

0

0

0

Penn

0

0

0.000

2

1

0.667

Brown

0

0

0.000

2

2

0.500

Columbia

0

0

0.000

2

2

0.500

Cornell

0

0

0.000

2

2

0.500

Dartmouth

0

0

0.000

1

2

0.333

Harvard

0

0

0.000

1

2

0.333

Yale

0

0

0.000

1

3

0.250

LEHIGH 1, YALE 0 LEHIGH

1

0

1

YALE

0

0

0

Narrow road losses for field hockey FIELD HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 utes later off a penalty corner shot. But the Bulldogs found the net again when forward Gabby Garcia ’14 scored off a penalty corner on the final play of the half, allowing the team to head into the locker room with a 2–1 lead at half time. The advantage did not last long. Albany tied the game six minutes into the second half and pushed ahead less than 10 minutes later, scoring two more goals in a span of four minutes.

Overall we played them tough — the best we’ve played against them in recent years. PAM STUPER Head coach, field hockey The Elis surrendered three second-half goals off penalty corners to an Albany team that had a 7-0 advantage in the second half and an overall advantage of 13-2 on penalty corners. On Sunday, the Bulldogs lost to Hofstra (3-4, 0-0 CAA) 4–3 in overtime, after coming back to tie the game at three near the end of regulation. Yale midfielder Georgia Holland ’14

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs took a 2–1 lead into halftime against No. 13 Albany, but the Great Danes struck back in the second half with three goals for a 4–2 win. scored the first goal of the game near the one-minute mark off

HOFSTRA 4, YALE 3 F/OT

ALBANY 4, YALE 2

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a penalty corner and kept the advantage for 30 minutes before Hofstra scored, tying the game at one going into the half. The Bulldogs were unable to keep Hofstra off the scoreboard in the beginning of the second half when the Pride scored two unanswered goals to take a 3–1 lead. The Elis launched a relentless comeback after the

60-minute mark, as Holland scored off of a corner in the 62nd minute and forward Erica Borgo ’14 tied the game just before the end of regulation at 68:37. Near the beginning of sudden-death overtime, Yale was awarded a penalty corner, but the team was unable to capitalize and score. Three minutes

later, junior forward Jonei Boileau of Hofstra scored her third goal of the game and the Pride came away with the 4–3 victory. “We didn’t put together a complete effort, from start to finish, today,” Stuper said in an interview with Yale Athletics. “There were individual moments of brilliance, but we didn’t play well enough as a

team to get the win.” Yale takes on Harvard at home for its first conference game next Saturday and follows with a game against Vermont on Sunday. Contact ASHLEY WU at ashley.wu@yale.edu.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Mayweather dominates Alvarez, remains unbeaten The fighter, nicknamed “Money,” cashed in on a $41.5 million payday after taking a decision over previously undefeated Mexican star Canelo Alvarez. Mayweather was favored 117–111 and 116–112 on two judges scorecards, while a third judge, to the shock of many commentators, scored the fight as a 114–114 draw.

Penalty calls doom Elis in 2012 repeat

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The only two goals the Bulldogs surrendered this weekend came after controversial penalty calls that provided the margin of victory in the team’s losses to Fairfield and Lehigh. BY GREG CAMERON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The men’s soccer team’s games against Fairfield and Lehigh this weekend were nearly indistinguishable: 1–0 losses in which the Bulldogs outshot their opponent but allowed a goal on a controversial penalty call. Both games showed signs of

last year’s Bulldogs, who boasted a strong defense but inefficient offense for the entire season. Yale (1–3–0, 0–0–0 Ivy) also lost 1–0 to both the Stags and the Mountain Hawks in 2012.

MEN’S SOCCER The stagnant offensive performance was especially disap-

pointing for the Elis after coming off a 4–1 win over Sacred Heart (2–4–0, 0–0–0 NEC) the previous Tuesday. “One of our goals is to be much more dangerous offensively, and I think we’ve accomplished that,” head coach Brian Tompkins said. “We’ve outshot every team that we’ve played so far but our actual execution when it comes to goal

scoring chances hasn’t quite been where we need it to be … We’ve got speed, we’ve got skill, size and strength, so it’s just a question of execution now.” In Friday’s home opener against Fairfield (1–1–1, 0–0–0 MAAC), both teams started the game off slowly with just one shot each after 20 minutes of play. Yale held possession for the

majority of the first half and created numerous offensive opportunities along the sideline, many of which were either flushed out by Fairfield defenders or turned into corners that the Bulldogs could not capitalize on. “I think that what we need to do as a team is twofold. First, we have to sharpen our execution in the final third of the field,”

defender Nick Alers ’14 said. “The final ball is not always executed to the extent that it should be. That’s an issue of technique that we’ll work on with lots of repetitions in practice over the next week. The second thing is more of an effort thing, and that’s just being ruthless, to have a cerSEE MEN’S SOCCER PAGE B3

Rough weekend on the road for the Bulldogs BY ASHLEY WU CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The field hockey team took to the road this weekend for its first games away from Yale this season against No. 13 Albany and Hofstra, and returned with two losses.

FIELD HOCKEY The Elis (1-3, 0-0 Ivy League) played a tough first game on the road Saturday against the nationally ranked Great Danes (4-0, 0-0 America East), coming out strong to take a halftime lead before Albany rallied, eventually defeating Yale 4-2.

There were individual moments of brilliance, but we didn’t play well enough as a team to get the win. PAM STUPER Head coach, field hockey “Overall we played them tough — the best we’ve played against them in recent years,” head coach Pam Stuper said in an interview with Yale Athletics. “We scored two goals against a team that hasn’t given up a lot of goals this year. But they have got a strong penalty corner unit, and we gave them too many chances in the second half.” Forward Brooke Gogel ’14 opened the scoring for Yale a little over a minute and a half into the game off an assist from midfielder Emily Schuckert ’14. Albany, trailing for the first time all year, quickly tied the game with a goal less than seven minSEE FIELD HOCKEY PAGE B3

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yale rebounded from a 3–1 deficit to tie the game against Hofstra on Sunday, but fell to the Pride 4–3 in overtime for their second straight road defeat.


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