Page 1

T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 127 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY CLOUDY

52 44

CROSS CAMPUS Double dipping. It looks like

Cory Booker LAW ’97 will have numerous speaking engagements this semester. In addition to delivering Yale’s Class Day speech on May 19, the Newark mayor is slated to give the commencement addresses at Cornell and Washington University in St. Louis. When it comes to commencements, Booker has plenty of practice: He has delivered eight graduation speeches since 2009.

VIDEO GAMES THEY MAY BE GOOD FOR YOU

FUNDRAISING

NUTTER

SAILING

As Levin prepares to leave office, admins look to secure large gifts

PHILLY MAYOR TALKS DOMESTIC TERRORISM

Though the women did not race, the coed team placed fourth in N.Y.

PAGES 6–7 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 12 SPORTS

Legislating post-Newtown Prominent state senator joins race for mayor BY DIANA LI AND ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTERS

Less than 20 minutes later, officers arrived at the school, ready to apprehend a gunman. But the scene was eerily quiet. Inside, 20-year-old Newtown resident Adam Lanza had shot himself as he heard law enforcement approaching. He had just killed 20 first-grade children and six educators with a Bushmaster assault-style semiautomatic rifle in the second deadliest school shooting in American history. Soon after, a stunned public began a national conversation about the

And then there were six. Connecticut State Senator Toni Harp ARC ’78 announced Monday that she will run for mayor of New Haven, making her the sixth candidate vying to succeed Mayor John DeStefano Jr. Harp, who previously said she was not going to run, is now planning to file official campaign paperwork at the end of the week. If she wins, she will be the first female mayor in New Haven history. “I’ve had a lot of experience and I’m used to working with other people … I respect the legislative branch and I understand its importance in helping frame policy that affects every level of government, and that’s what I would do as mayor,” Harp said. “I’ve been in the Senate for the past 20 years and have worked really hard to ensure that we have the resources that we need in our city to make it as successful as possible.” Harp added that she has a “strong sense of policy” and that she was part of the group that instituted community policing in New Haven, which has seen a resurgence in recent years, when she served on the Board of Aldermen before going to work in Hartford in 1993. At 65 years old, Harp is an 11-term incumbent state senator representing

SEE GUN CONTROL PAGE 4

SEE MAYORAL RACE PAGE 5

On stage. Almost a year since

Marina Keegan ’12 died just days after graduating from Yale, the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater will be putting up the first professional production of her play “Utility Monster,” slated to run from May 25 to June 22. “Utility Monster” was first staged as a Dramat spring experimental production in 2011. EMMA GOLDBERG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

In the hot seat. University

President Richard Levin’s two-part conversation with prominent journalist Charlie Rose aired last night on Bloomberg TV. In the interview, Levin reflected on his presidency and discussed his new book, “The Worth of the University.” Feelin’ philanthropic.

Blackstone founder Steve Schwarzman has decided to donate $100 million to endow a scholarship program — intended to mirror the Rhodes Scholarship program — at Tsinghua University in Beijing. Known as “Schwarzman Scholars,” the 200 recipients of the award will receive funding to study in a one-year master’s program at Tsinghua University. In addition, Architecture School Dean Robert Stern will design the teaching building that will be constructed for the program. Money money money. The winners of the Yale College Council’s 10K Initiative have been announced: This year, funding will be split between a “bike share” program and rock-climbing wall. Launched in 2010, the initiative seeks to fund student-proposed plans that will improve campus life. Medical marijuana revisited.

Patients, advocates and prospective marijuana growers attended a public hearing held yesterday to discuss proposed medical marijuana legislation that will be presented to lawmakers in July. According to The Hartford Courant, Consumer Protection Commissioner William Rubenstein will ultimately propose between three and 10 growers and a separate group of licensed dispensers.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1980 About 150 students and professors convene on Cross Campus to protest draft registration. Participants of the rally, organized by Campaign Against the Draft, speak out against the draft and sing slogans, including “They told us another war would never come again.” Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

The March for Change rally in February drew a crowd that police estimated at 5,500 in front of the State Capitol in Hartford.

F

our months after the Newtown shooting, the state has responded with legislation on mental health, school safety and gun violence. But will these efforts help prevent future tragedy? MICHELLE HACKMAN reports.

At approximately 9:30 a.m. on Dec. 14, 2012, dispatchers at the Newtown police station started to receive a frantic flurry of phone calls about a disturbance at a local elementary school. “Sandy Hook School. Caller is indi-

cating she thinks someone is shooting in the building,” one dispatcher told officers, according to 911 tapes.

UPCLOSE

Canceled ‘Visitas’ unlikely to affect yield BY AMY WANG STAFF REPORTER Hundreds of newly accepted Harvard students flocked to Cambridge, Mass., over the weekend to participate in the university’s signature prefrosh welcome event — only to find out that they had nowhere to go. Due to public safety concerns surrounding the bombings at the Boston Marathon last Monday and the citywide manhunt for suspects that effectively shut down the greater Boston area on Friday, Harvard canceled its annual three-day Visitas prefrosh weekend on Friday afternoon. The sudden cancellation of the program — which would have run from April 20 to April 22 and is similar in format to Yale’s Bulldog Days program — precluded several hundred prospective students from arriving on campus, and left the other several hundred who had already arrived in Cambridge with no structured events to attend. Still, experts and college counselors interviewed said they do not think the cancellation will have a large impact on the percentage of students who matriculate at Harvard this year. “Personally, I do not think this will affect anything — Harvard and [its peers] are in the rarified arena of super-high yield, no matter what,” said Terry Kung, college counselor at Immaculate Heart High School. “Those determined to go to Harvard will go.” Officials at Harvard sent an email Friday at around 2 p.m. to students announcing the cancellation of the program. Though there was no known threat to Harvard’s campus, they said, the turmoil in Boston — as well as SEE VISITAS PAGE 5

Fernandez launches campaign BY NICOLE NAREA STAFF REPORTER After Sen. Toni Hart shook up the field as New Haven’s sixth mayoral contender to announce her candidacy, Henry Fernandez LAW ’94, former city economic development administrator, emphasized affordable housing and education reform in his campaign launch event Monday evening. Fernandez addressed a crowd of about 100 New Haven residents, including members of immigrants rights advocacy groups, Board of Aldermen members and business leaders, gathered in Orange Street’s Art Space gallery. The diverse audience was reflective of Fernandez’s “One City” campaign goal to bridge socioeconomic and racial divides in New Haven. The former director of New Haven-based LEAP — an academic and social enrichment program for children and youth — advocated embracing community

policing to make Elm City streets safer and implementing transparent school report cards that would make public school evaluations easily accessible to parents. “We can be one city that says that a high-quality education is the right of every child,” said Fernandez, who has an eight-year-old son in the New Haven public school system. “We can together … tackle the root causes of crime, ensuring that that our children have safe, high-quality community centers in every neighborhood.” Besides outlining policy objectives to undecided voters, Fernandez and his staff used the event to address criticism that his campaign lacks financial transparency. Fernandez opted not to participate in New Haven’s Democracy Fund, the city’s voluntary public-financing system for mayoral campaigns — funding that candidates Ward 10 Alderman SEE FERNANDEZ PAGE 5

NICOLE NAREA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Mayoral candidate Henry Fernandez LAW ’94 spoke at his campaign launch in Orange Street’s Art Space gallery.

Faculty debate costs of Yale-NUS BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER The most recent meeting of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences forum saw a modest turnout on Monday of roughly 30 professors, a considerable improvement from February’s meeting. The forum, which meets twice per semester and was launched by President-elect and then-Provost Peter Salovey in fall 2012, is intended to provide a venue for professors to discuss University issues and policies with each other and administrators. But after fewer than 10 faculty members not giving presentations attended the February meeting, some professors questioned whether the forum

would eventually be discontinued due to lack of participation. Professors who attended Monday’s meeting said the forum featured discussions on the University Library’s efforts to combat rising database subscription prices and on the costs of Yale-NUS, the college Yale is establishing with the National University of Singapore. “[The faculty] asked me to talk about the costs of Yale-NUS to plain, vanilla Yale,” Provost Benjamin Polak said. “Which wasn’t such a useful discussion [compared to the library discussion] because it’s hard to know what to say about them. The costs easily quantified are mostly paid by NUS, but a lot of the costs one might think of … you can’t quantify and hence you couldn’t bill for.”

Attendees said there were tense moments during the discussion about Yale-NUS because some professors had hoped that Polak would be able to provide concrete numbers about the costs the venture has created for Yale. Professors were particularly interested in the implicit costs of the redirection of administrators’ time and energy away from Yale issues and toward Yale-NUS. Polak said the financial costs of these efforts are difficult to quantify because administrators do not keep track of how many hours are spent on which issues. Most of the direct costs of YaleNUS are covered by NUS itself, attendees said. Though a few faculty SEE FACULTY FORUM PAGE 5


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Wow, someone's drunk on haterade tonight. Ad hominem attacks are yaledailynews.com/opinion

Becoming an “I” O

scar Wilde wrote, “The highest as the lowest form of criticism is a mode of autobiography.” Over the last four years at Yale — and the last year and a half of writing for the News — I have found his statement to be truer than I previously imagined. Autobiography — learning how to write about yourself — is woven into many parts of the Yale experience, and has become an integral part of mine. Every semester, I speak to at least one student in the Writing Center (where I have loved working during my time at Yale) who asks me what superficially appears to be a simple question: Am I allowed to use the word “I” in my paper? Most ask this question with a vaguely tortured expression on their face — the legacy of being browbeaten by high school teachers who told them that “I” was to be avoided at all costs. When I smile and tell them that they’re allowed to use the word, depending on their professor’s expectations and the discipline that the paper is intended for, they beam. Getting to write “I” becomes a form of empowerment: It’s a rite of passage, a sign that your opinions matter enough to be read on their own terms. For me, writing for the News has been a similarly empowering experience — one that has been fundamentally related to this question of what it means to use (and be) “I.” Yale professors in the humanities are fond of reminding students that writing is an extension of thinking: The clearer the writing, the more crystalline the thoughts behind the prose. Learning how to write “I” in academic writing becomes an act of self-acknowledgment: You are no longer able to hide behind vague generalities and the arguments formulated by others. You are irrevocably and intimately responsible for everything that you write, and therefore believe. At the same time, penning “I” is a tool of exploration, a trial on the page to test whether you genuinely believe something you say (or write) is true. We engage in imaginary dialogues — an “I,” a “you,” an “us” — that enact arguments and counterarguments, building larger communities of readers and writers who are implicated in what we say and how we say it. From the safe haven of the page, it is possible to refine and articulate beliefs, hopes, prejudices, expectations, to admit to what has been hidden and to acknowledge what came before. The “I” becomes a vehicle for confession, for communion, connection, as well as for alienation, isolation, dissent. Yale is both about the cre-

ation of this “I,” an articulate self on the page, as well as the effacement of it, the loss ZOE self in MERCER- of the larger commuGOLDEN nity of Meditations peers and s c h o l ars, past and present. We are given the opportunity to set ourselves apart by writing and also to lose ourselves within the context of an argument or a paper. Always, writing is a tool — perhaps the ultimate tool — for distinguishing the self from the herd and for joining it. Over the last year and a half, I have thought continually about what it means to be an “I” for a campus newspaper with a digital reach that extends far beyond its printed pages. I’ve received hilarious emails from people who believe that Shakespeare didn’t write his own plays; been excerpted on other people’s blogs (often without my name attached to my writing) and had people come up to me on the street to ask more about my experience and to share their own. More so than the continual conversation than my colleague and friend Nathaniel Zelinsky ’13 describes, what I have seen and experienced has been a series of people using the texts they read and write as catalysts for self-exploration. Indeed, each of my columns (and the columns of other opinion writers) has been a means of selfexpression and exploration. Our “I’s” are at once individual and collective: We teach and speak to each other. Of course, Oscar Wilde is right: Bad autobiographical writing is worse than most other forms of writing. Who doesn’t love to hate trashy memoirs, terrible blogs and those self-help books that make everyone feel a welcome dose of schadenfreude? But good autobiography — like Wilde’s many essays of selfreflection — lives forever. Getting to be an “I” on this page has been one of the greatest gifts my time at Yale has afforded — and getting to learn about the “I’s” of readers has been another great blessing. We are all given a rare opportunity for self-invention during our four years at Yale, but I am looking forward to discovering a new “I” next year and in all the years after. ZOE MERCER-GOLDEN is a senior in Davenport College. This is her last column for the News. Contact her at zoe.mercer-golden@yale.edu .

YALE DAILY NEWS PUBLISHING CO., INC. 202 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 432-2400 Editorial: (203) 432-2418 editor@yaledailynews.com Business: (203) 432-2424 business@yaledailynews.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Tapley Stephenson

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY Liliana Varman

MANAGING EDITORS Gavan Gideon Mason Kroll

SPORTS Eugena Jung John Sullivan

ONLINE EDITOR Caroline Tan OPINION Marissa Medansky Dan Stein NEWS Madeline McMahon Daniel Sisgoreo CITY Nick Defiesta Ben Prawdzik CULTURE Natasha Thondavadi

ARTS & LIVING Akbar Ahmed Jordi Gassó Jack Linshi Caroline McCullough MULTIMEDIA Raleigh Cavero Lillian Fast Danielle Trubow MAGAZINE Daniel Bethencourt

PRODUCTION & DESIGN Celine Cuevas Ryan Healey Allie Krause Michelle Korte Rebecca Levinsky Rebecca Sylvers Clinton Wang PHOTOGRAPHY Jennifer Cheung Sarah Eckinger Jacob Geiger Maria Zepeda Vivienne Jiao Zhang

PUBLISHER Gabriel Botelho DIR. FINANCE Julie Kim DIR. ADV. Sophia Jia PRINT ADV. MANAGER Julie Leong

ONL. BUSINESS. MANAGER Yume Hoshijima ONL. DEV. MANAGER Vincent Hu MARKETING & COMM. MANAGER Brandon Boyer

BUSINESS DEV. Joyce Xi

ILLUSTRATIONS Karen Tian LEAD WEB DEV. Earl Lee Akshay Nathan

COPY Stephanie Heung Emily Klopfer Isaac Park Flannery Sockwell

THIS ISSUE PRODUCTION STAFF: Leon Jiang, Isabel McCullough

EDITORIALS & ADS

The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2014. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission. Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Marissa Medansky and Dan Stein Opinion Editors Yale Daily News opinion@yaledailynews.com

COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 127

not the way to go”

'OKAYCALMDOWNPLS1111' ON 'A CONSTANT CONVERSATION'

The lessons we'll learn T

hree years and seven months ago, the class of 2013 arrived at Yale University. In four short weeks, it will be time for us to depart, time to set out to wander the country and the world in search of new adventures, new friends, new challenges, new homes. Even as we move boldly forward, it’s difficult not to look back and wonder whether we did everything the way we were supposed to, or try to figure out what we should take away from our experiences. We’ve gone through a whirlwind of rigorous seminars and raucous debauchery, classy dinners and midthesis junk food, rainy days of reading (sometimes literature, sometimes Facebook) and sunny courtyard picnics. Emotional breakdowns, fights among friends and rejections by employers were balanced by competitive triumphs, academic accomplishments and the warmth of young (if sometimes fleeting) love. All the while, broader sagas of pain and deprivation played out across the world, and the storms of life — figurative and literal alike — battered at our collective subconscious. What did it all mean, 2013? We get a “Life after Yale” guidebook that teaches us how to save for retirement and pay our taxes and utilities and even cook some things that aren’t ramen noodles. But no such guidebook exists to tell us what the takeaway of our college experience is. This isn’t because there isn’t one common Yale experience that unites all of us — there decidedly is. Rather, it is because the Yale experience will only make sense with the passage of time and exposure to life outside of Yale. For most of us, this is the only place we’ve known as adults. We need points of comparison,

a frame of reference. Perhaps over the coming years we will meet people or become part of communities in the broader world where tolerance is not as prevalent as it is at MICHAEL our alma mater. Then will really hit us how MAGDZIK itspecial it was to have lived in a place where Making characterizations or assumptions based on Magic gender, sexuality and race took a backseat to individuality. Or, in the future, we may suffer under the rigid orthodoxy of lumbering, bureaucratic organizations and wonder why no one is ready or willing to entertain the radical and innovative devil’s advocacy, the seditious questioning that permeates the 12 colleges and percolates every new freshman class upon their arrival.

IT WILL TAKE TIME FOR US TO LEARN HOW YALE HAS SHAPED OUR VALUES AND OUR BELIEFS We’ll intuit that these sorts of things are worth fighting for elsewhere. Sometimes we won’t feel strongly enough about certain principles to champion

them, but other times a veritable roar from the very spirit of this institution will come surging back, reminding us of the ideals we stood for and demanding we defend them to our dying days. I’m not sure which life events will spark these personal revolutions, these returns to Yale. I don’t think I can very well predict which once-meaningful values or memories you or I will abandon with the passage of time, recognizing their ultimate insignificance, or which ones will remain with us forever. But I am convinced they will come, in one form or another, and our time in this company of scholars, this society of friends, this tradition, will be among the most powerful, inspiring and important of our entire lives. We’re not meant to have answers yet; we came here to start asking questions. I’ve been privileged to be part of not one but two very special communities where free speech and the exchange of ideas and rational arguments held primacy. They helped me develop some of my own big questions. Thank you to the many wonderful members of the Yale Debate Association. And thank you to all my editors and readers at the News. It has been an honor. Those of you who are staying at Yale: cherish every moment. Be good to one another, and be good to the world. And don’t get too caught up in trying to make sense of it now. It’s enough to just live it, one day at a time. MICHAEL MAGDZIK is a senior in Berkeley College. This is his last column for the News. Contact him at michael.magdzik@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST STEPHEN MARSH

Oppose Commons changes T

he end of a school year brings many changes: classes ending, seniors graduating and summers starting. Unfortunately, it also seems to bring about unexpected and damaging changes to Yale’s dining system. Two years ago, Yale Dining announced that Commons would not be open for dinner during the next academic year, using the untrue argument that the dining hall had not been open for dinner prior to the renovations. Students and dining hall workers rightly protested the unwanted change. The new arrangement of Commons revealed this week continues this disturbing trend. The new arrangement places the desk to swipe into the dining hall at a checkpoint in a blue barrier around the food. Dining hall workers are posted at various points around the barricade for security. This arrangement is bad for a number of reasons. First, Commons — the largest dining space on campus — is heavily trafficked between class periods. The new layout makes the line to get food even worse, because the line to reach the main servery in the back is now a part of the swipe line itself. This problem is exacerbated for people in a rush. Before the change, students could opt for a quick lunch at the pizza and pasta bar on the side. Now, with the servery and swipe lines combined, there is no way to save time by opting for less popular foods. Second, it is not entirely clear how students are meant to return to the servery for seconds. The system seems to involve repeatedly swiping in for every soda refill or cookie, which just extends the line even further. Third, the new arrangement significantly reduces the available seating space in Commons. Fewer seats means it is harder for people who eat with clubs and groups to sit together without being

YOUR LETTERS opinion@yaledailynews.com

WRITE TO US All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission.

forced to ask other people to move. All of this is problem enough in itself. But beyond that, the purported justification for this change, based on my conversation with a dining hall manager yesterday morning, is trivial and insulting. Yale Dining presumes students were somehow exploiting the university by swiping into Commons for breakfast, then committing the sin of having lunch without swiping a second time. This rationale is not only trite, but it also creates unnecessary divisions between dining hall staff and students.

THE NEW LAYOUT OF COMMONS IS A SOLUTION IN SEARCH OF A PROBLEM Take the issue of meal plans themselves. There is effectively no price difference between the three on-campus meal plan options; each on-campus plan costs roughly $3,000, and even the off-campus meal plan costs over $2,000. Because few students swipe in for breakfast, and residential dining halls close between 11:00 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., the already-high price per meal increases even more when distributed between two meals a day on the Full Meal Plan. If it is actually the case that Yale Dining needs to force students to swipe into Commons for both breakfast and lunch because some minority of students use breakfast swipes in Commons and lunch swipes at Durfee’s, then it suggests that Yale Dining is charging students for swipes that they are not expected to use. Either Yale Dining is deliberately overcharging for its meal plans, or the problem

Beyond the voters themselves Friday’s opinion article regarding the gun-control debate in Washington vexed me deeply (“Closing the Trust Gap,” April 19). Though never directly referencing it, the author seemed to dance around the fact that the United States Senate recently failed to pass universal background check legislation. He faults “the voters themselves” for no longer fervently supporting gun-control measures. But in his analysis, the author misreads public sentiment and fails to account for the distortion power of well-funded lobbyists like the NRA that undermine our democracy by creating laws completely at odds with public opinion. Over 90 percent of Americans believe in universal background checks. In fact, before this debate, most believed it was already the law. The American people are not to blame for the Senate’s failed leadership on this issue. The blame falls squarely on Wayne LaPierre, the out-of-touch leadership of the NRA and a cowardly group of senators too afraid of the gun lobby’s big money to pass common-sense reform that “the voters themselves” supported in droves. TYLER BLACKMON April 21 The author is a freshman in Jonathan Edwards College.

they claim exists is minor at best. The new layout in Commons suggests Yale Dining managers and administration see students as exploitative malefactors simply because they want to get the full benefits of a meal plan they have no choice but to buy. This is insulting not only to students, but also to dining hall workers, who have already been victim to reduced dining hours in Commons and now bear the brunt of harder labor due to longer lines, harder-to-navigate workspaces and inevitable conflicts with students. Ultimately, this is a solution in search of a problem. It does not appear that there are as many people as Yale Dining thinks there are who swipe in for breakfast and stay in Commons all day. Though Yale Dining released no data about how many students do this, that number is certainly nowhere near high enough to justify inconveniencing every student and worker in Commons. For the last four years, I have eaten nearly every weekday lunch meal in Commons. It has been a convenient place to eat with my friends, and its regular options will always mean that there will be something I want to eat. Commons itself represents a large part of what it means to be a Yalie, apart from college affiliation. These new changes sacrifice efficiency, convenience, space and student comfort for no reason beyond a meaninglessly small increase in profits. We are a part of this university more than just consumers, and we should oppose these changes as forcefully as possible. For the sake of everyone who eats in Commons, from daily diners to less frequent eaters, I ask that Yale Dining restore Commons’ original arrangement. STEPHEN MARSH is a senior in Saybrook College. Contact him at stephen.marsh@yale.edu .

A cop in the best sense With the tragic murder of an MIT campus police officer on Thursday night, it is an appropriate time to again recognize the work of the men and women who serve and protect not only the Yale campus but the streets of New Haven. I suspect that there are few day-to-day jobs in the city as stressful and dangerous as the traffic stops that these people do among their many responsibilities. If their families and friends share one thing, it is relief when one of their own comes home at the end of the shift. It is heartbreaking that the same won’t exist for those close to the cop who was killed without warning — like his fellows at Yale, he wasn’t just a campus policeman, he was a cop in the best sense and he was on the job. JOHN BENNETT April 19 The author is an employee of Yale University Libraries.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“The basis of optimism is sheer terror.” OSCAR WILDE IRISH WRITER AND POET

PA mayor decries gun violence

CORRECTIONS MONDAY, APRIL 22

The article “All College Storage partners with Yale” stated that All College Storage is generally cheaper than the YCC’s partner organization, Boomerang Storage, and included a graphic outlining the differences in cost between All College Storage and Boomerang Storage. While Boomerang Storage’s general advertised costs were listed correctly in the graphic and are for the most part more expensive than All College Storage’s costs, the YCC offers special storage options to students through Boomerang that cost less than those offered by All College Storage. MONDAY, APRIL 22

The article “YaleWomen conference unites alumni” misidentified Katherine Edersheim ’87 as a member of the University Council, when in fact she serves on the YaleWomen Conference board. MONDAY, APRIL 22

The article “Singaporean college to test a new curriculum” inaccurately paraphrased Michael Montesano ’83, a former Southeast Asian studies professor at the National University of Singapore, as saying that a report released earlier this month on the Yale-NUS curriculum fails to set the new college in the context of the restrictive policies of the Singaporean government. In fact, Montesano did not say these policies are restrictive but that the Singaporean government has specific priorities not acknowledged in the report.

With Levin exit, a fundraising push BY JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTER The development office is working around the clock and around the world to secure a number of large gifts as University President Richard Levin’s tenure draws to a close. With days full of meetings with donors, Vice President for Development Joan O’Neill said she, development staff and administrators are putting forth a stronger fundraising effort this year than they have in previous years. While they are still concentrated on raising money for the capital budget, Levin said he is also pursuing gifts toward other projects, such as the two new residential colleges. Though Levin had hoped to secure funding for the colleges and a number of other construction projects that were stalled because of the onset of the recession in 2008, such as a new biology building, before the end of his tenure, O’Neill said it is unlikely that the University will raise the outstanding costs associated with the construction projects before Levin steps down. “We’re going to be raising money for the same things the day President Levin steps down and President-elect [Peter] Salovey becomes President Salovey,” O’Neill said. The University has raised more money in fiscal year 2013 than it had by the same time last year, but Levin declined to comment on the amount raised because the University does not discuss the totals before reporting the final. Levin added he’s been “trying to track a number of very large gifts,” coming in at eight- or nine-figures, but declined to comment on the specific number of donations about which he is in conversation. Levin declined to comment on whether any of those prospective gifts will be designated for the two residential colleges, but he said he is optimistic the gifts will come through in the end. To ensure the presidential transition does not detract from the volume of dona-

tions received, O’Neill said the Development Office has been introducing Salovey to several donors so he can continue the relationships they have with the current president. Levin has also personally introduced Salovey to donors, including a handful of previous benefactors during a visit to China last week. In addition to visiting YaleNUS in Singapore last week, Salovey met with donors and alumni as his “listening tour” continued in Hong Kong and Beijing. Association of Yale Alumni Board of Directors Chair Jimmy Lu ’77 said the AYA and members of the Yale Club of Beijing hosted an event on April 16 for Salovey in which he addressed and had the chance to meet over 120 alumni, including U.S. Ambassador to China Gary Locke ’72. Salovey added that he will announce a more definite order of initiatives for which the University will fundraise in the first few months of his presidency, but his goal will be to focus on major building projects. Among Salovey’s highest priorities will be building the two new residential colleges and biology building, as well as renovating Hendrie Hall and the Hall of Graduate Studies — four projects that were stalled after the 2008 financial downturn and that have yet to restart. While O’Neill said she is not aware of any radically new fundraising goals that Salovey’s term could bring, she said she doubts that any of Salovey’s ideas will be “out of left field” since the president-elect has served as the second-highest University official since 2008. Though some donors hit it off with certain administrators due to shared interests or mutual friends, O’Neill said she would be “very surprised” if donors seriously prefer one president to another, given their similarities in approachability. Yale raised $540 million in the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2012. Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .

GRAPH YALE FUNDS RAISED, FISCAL YEAR $600M

$400M

$200M

$0

2009

2010

2011

2012

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter spoke about gun violence, stressing its almost “genocidal” nature within urban communities of color. BY ADRIAN RODRIGUES STAFF REPORTER In cities across the country, domestic terrorism is a daily reality, said Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter at a talk on Monday afternoon. Before an audience of students and community members that included Mayor John DeStefano Jr., Nutter said urban areas in the United States are defined by a culture of violence. Nutter, who also serves as president of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, emphasized the government’s inability to enact gun safety legislation and presented the “Sandy Hook principles” — a code of conduct for gun-affiliated corporations to protect American citizens that was written by the U.S. Conference of Mayors. Nutter said roughly 30 firearms homicides occur per day in the United States but politicians have not given proper attention to the prevalence and destructive nature of gun violence. “In essence, we have a Sandy Hook every day,” he said. “Yet, you will not see these folks on CNN. Apparently, it’s background noise.” Nutter said his hometown of Philadelphia has one of the highest murder rates in the country — the city has seen 72 murders in 2013. In the time since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which killed nearly 3,000 citizens, over 100,000 Americans have been killed as a result of gun violence, he said. A host of reforms and legislative changes took place during the period following 9/11, but “there’s not been a commensu-

rate response to gun violence in cities,” he added. Last Wednesday, the U.S. Senate rejected a proposal by a vote of 54 to 46 that would have mandated universal background checks for gun buyers. Still, Nutter said he remains confident that change will come. The U.S. Conference of Mayors has called for the adoption of the “Sandy Hook principles” — which include the promotion of restrictions on firearms sales and mandatory background checks for those buying firearms and ammunition — by companies in the gun industry and all those indirectly related to it, he said. The document does not seek to limit Second Amendment rights, but rather establish a set of good business guidelines that better protect American citizens, Nutter added.

In essence, we have a Sandy Hook every day. Yet, you will not see these folks on CNN. MICHAEL NUTTER Mayor, Philadelphia Gun violence disproportionately affects people of color, Nutter said, adding that in Philadelphia, roughly 80 percent of homicide victims are African-American. “You cannot escape the issue of race in this discussion,” Nutter said. “[Gun vio-

lence is] almost genocidal in communities of color.” Nutter also outlined several ways in which he has worked toward reducing violent crime as mayor, including emphasizing stricter prosecution of illegal gun possession, enacting criminal employment programs and linking community organizers with law enforcement. “This is the most serious issue, other than education, which I’ll ever work on,” Nutter said. Acquiring a gun in Philadelphia is too easy, he said, adding that drug dealers often give their customers free firearms as “icing on the cake” after a transaction and citizens can rent guns from some providers. Audience members interviewed said they agreed with Nutter’s opinions and his comments were especially relevant given the recent Senate vote. New Haven resident William Gleason said he appreciated that Nutter was candid about the prevalence of black-on-black crime and the statistics of gun violence. “He’s on top of what’s going on,” Gleason said. Wendell Adjetey GRD ’18 said he was happy that Nutter addressed black violence in cities but he felt the mayor was should have addressed the issue of race further. Nutter testified before the U.S. House of Representatives on the issue of gun violence in January. Contact ADRIAN RODRIGUES at adrian.rodrigues@yale.edu .

NAACP leader discusses city inequality BY JIWON LEE STAFF REPORTER Apartheid exists in New Haven, according to James Rawlings, the president of the Greater New Haven branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. At a Monday afternoon talk, Rawlings — who is also a clinical instructor at the Yale School of Public Health — discussed a report by the NAACP Greater New Haven branch entitled “Urban Apartheid” that found that low-income minority residents in the New Haven area still face significant barriers to equal opportunities in all aspects of life, such as education, health, housing, jobs and civil rights. Rawlings called on various members of the community, including students and Yale community members, to take action to change the policies that promote an unequal system. “For the last 20 years, the gap [between low-income and high-income neighborhoods] has grown in America, in Connecticut and in New haven,” Rawlings said. Rawlings said a major barrier to employment results from a lack of physical access to transportation. The report showed that African-American workers in New Haven County are six times more likely to rely on public transportation than

non-minority workers. Public transportation should be improved to make the commuting time for individuals “30 minutes instead of 90 minutes,” Rawlings said. In New Haven County in 2010, 36 percent of AfricanAmericans owned homes while as many as 74 percent of Caucasians did, Rawlings said. He said a reform in housing policy is necessary for better integration of low- and high-income neighborhoods. The gap between the health conditions of minority and non-minority residents is also evidence of drastic inequality, Rawlings said. The NAACP’s report found that the current asthma prevalence among black children in Connecticut is 18.9 percent, compared to 9.9 percent among non-Hispanic white children. Rawlings said the Yale community plays a crucial role in solving these problems, but a major divide still exists between the University and the rest of the community. “We have never sat down with the president of Yale University — not because we did not want it,” Rawlings said. He added that his organization hopes to “go every place, any place” to raise awareness about the issues of inequality and to better motivate community involvement. Audience members interviewed said they thought the

JIWON LEE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

James Rawlings, president of the Greater New Haven branch of the NAACP, cited transportation and housing as central issues of “urban apartheid.” talk was meaningful because the issues discussed should be spread to a wider range of people. Jamil Jivam LAW ’13 said he thought Rawlings’ speech would help facilitate conversation about urban inequality within the Yale community. “The best part of today’s event was hearing from a mixed group of people — both Yale’s

and New Haven’s perspective,” he said. Ceria Fernandez, a New Haven resident, said she was “excited to find out what I can do about [the problem].” The NAACP Greater New Haven branch was granted its charter in 1917. Contact JIWON LEE at jiwon.lee@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“The guns and the bombs, the rockets and the warships, are all symbols of human failure.” LYNDON B. JOHNSON 36TH U.S. PRESIDENT

Post-Newtown, no easy solutions GUN CONTROL FROM PAGE 1 need to prevent gun violence and improve mental healthcare. There was a sense that Lanza had somehow slipped through the cracks of the system, and activists wondered aloud whether, had those cracks been filled, the events of Newtown would have ever transpired. That is certainly the mindset Connecticut lawmakers adopted when, in early January, they bypassed the normal committee process to move a bill in response to the shooting through the legislature as quickly as possible. State legislators established the Bipartisan Taskforce on Gun Violence Prevention and Children’s Safety, made up of three subcommittees on gun violence, mental health services and school security. For the next three months, each group worked separately on their respective sets of proposals, which were debated by top Democratic and Republican lawmakers and ultimately combined into an all-encompassing, omnibus bill. Legislative leaders, particularly Connecticut House Speaker Brendan Sharkey, insisted on a bipartisan effort from the beginning, appointing a Democrat and a Republican to co-chair each committee. “If not Connecticut, where else would a bipartisan agreement be reached?” Sharkey said. The law passed with unusual bipartisan support in early April, later than lawmakers had hoped but still two months ahead of the end of this year’s legislative session. The legislation, which contains an expanded ban on assault weapons and a limit on the size of ammunition magazines, among other provisions, makes the state a national leader in the fight for tighter gun control measures. While top lawmakers and activists from both sides of the aisle have lauded the legislation as a wide-ranging package of improvements, it remains to be seen whether the new law will be strong enough to prevent another tragedy like Newtown or achieve the broader reform that advocates sought. Underscoring this effort is another, more fundamental question: Is it possible to prevent a tragedy?

GRASSROOTS PRESSURE

As soon as Nancy Lefkowitz heard that there had been an elementary school shooting just 45 minutes away from her home, she knew she had to act. So she took to Facebook, inviting her friends and acquaintances to a meeting to discuss the possibility of real change in the state’s gun laws. Less than two months later on Feb. 14, Lefkowitz’ organization, which became the March for Change, drew a riled-up Gov. Dannel Malloy, top state lawmakers and a rambunctious crowd of 5,500 supporters wearing commemorative green ribbons to the steps of the State Capitol building. One by one, family members of those who had died at Newtown and in other acts of gun violence made tearful pleas to lawmakers to change the state’s gun laws, so that their loved ones would not have died in vain. “Because of that grassroots pressure, the laws changed in Connecticut,” Lefkowitz said. Following the last major mass shooting, at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo., the national conversation around strengthening gun restrictions was tepid at best. Ethan Rodriguez-Torrent ’13, a Yale student who was present in the Aurora theater, said that people used the tragedy as a springboard for discussion on potential gun-free zones and an expanded right to carry arms, instead of moving in the direction of stronger gun control, as some may have hoped. Newtown changed that. “Obviously, you can’t make that argument when someone is shooting at a bunch of children,”

he said. “As a country, we feel a more collective responsibility for children. We use the term ‘our children’ whenever something happens to a child, even when it’s not our child.” Whereas passing universal background checks would have been viewed as a huge success mere weeks earlier, gun control advocates suddenly felt they had the momentum to push for bigticket reforms, Rodriguez-Torrent said. One of the state’s most fervent advocates for increased gun control was its governor. Over protests that it was “too soon” to discuss politics following a tragedy, Malloy called for the state legislature to tighten an existing assault weapons ban and criticized Congress for allowing the 1994 federal ban to expire. In January, he set up his own Sandy Hook Advisory Commission to work concurrently with the legislature. When the Legislature’s gun violence committee appeared to stall in its deliberations, Malloy stepped forward with his own proposals, an openly aggressive move that caused many from both parties to criticize him of overreaching his office. Several weeks after the final legislation was passed — legislation that looked largely similar to the provisions he had outlined — Malloy told the News that his pressure on the legislature had succeeded. “The talks had stalled,” he said. “I think [my recommendations] focused people’s attention on what needed to happen and why.” Other than a retroactive ban on newly-restricted weapons and ammunition, every one of Malloy’s recommendations found their way into the final law passed in April.

PREDICTING MASS MURDER

While some gun control advocates may argue that mass public shootings are on the rise — the United States saw seven in 2012, the highest number since 1999 — experts stressed that the number of mass public shootings has stayed steady since the early 1900s. More important to policymakers in the wake of Newtown, though, are signals that may notify authorities of shootings before they happen. Experts admit that there are few reliable predictors of mass murder, as the number of school shootings is so small that they are nearly impossible to generalize. But in studying the small number of school shooting incidents, some patterns do emerge. In 2002, the U.S. Secret Service published a well-renowned analysis of 37 school shootings between 1974 and 2000. Overwhelmingly, perpetrators were white males between the ages of 13 to 18. In over two-thirds of these cases, researchers found that gunmen had extensive firearms experience, and nearly the same number acquired their weapons from their or relatives’ homes. Moreover, 71 percent of school shooters reported being bullied or threatened at school, and 78 percent thought about or attempted to commit suicide. Some 98 percent of school shooters experienced a major personal trauma, such as the loss of a loved one or the end of a romantic relationship. Still, only 34 percent of school shooters during this period ever received a mental health evaluation. Grant Duwe, author of “Mass Murder in the United States: a History,” said that had these young men been tested, a majority would have likely been found to be afflicted by some sort of mental illness — making the recent effort to expand the availability of mental health coverage “money wellspent.” “Of course, this doesn’t mean that someone who had a serious

Dec. 16 Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy calls for tighter gun control laws on CNN’s “State of the Union” talkshow.

Dec. 14 A gunman enters Sandy Hook Elementary School and shoots 26 children and six educators.

2013

mental illness is going to commit one of these types of crimes — but it’s a risk factor we need to take into account,” Duwe said. Critical to prevention efforts, more than two-thirds of shooters confided in others about their plans before carrying them out. According to Louis Schlesinger, a forensic psychiatrist at John Jay College for Criminal Justice, this last warning sign is one of the only signals that has been used to avert a shooting successfully. Still, a proposal that would have required schools to create a confidential reporting system for students did not receive enough support from lawmakers on the school safety committee to make it into the final law. “The only way to know [when a shooting might occur] is if [the gunman] told someone — if he was thinking, planning, fantasizing,” Schlesinger said. “How are you going to do it otherwise? He looks weird? He doesn’t have friends? No. None of that is predictive of mass murder.”

‘THE VALUE OF EARLY INTERVENTION’

When investigators searched Lanza’s home in the days after the shooting, they uncovered several books that offered a glimpse at the troubles that plagued the gunman. Two were entitled “Look me in the eye — My life with Asperger’s” and “Born on a blue day — Inside the mind of an Autistic Savant.” Though law enforcement officials have offered no official diagnosis for Lanza, these books, alongside numerous interviews with friends and family, have led many to speculate that the young man struggled with some form of mental illness. Numerous reports also suggest that Lanza was severely bullied in school, contributing to this notion. The mental health services committee knew little of Lanza’s mental health when it began its work in January, and so it set out to plug basic holes in the state’s current healthcare delivery system. The committee established a mental health first aid program, aimed at training teachers, nurses and other professionals, to recognize and deal with early signs of mental illness, funded two different service programs for psychiatric patients leaving the hospital and created a system to connect pediatricians with child psychiatrists. Christine Limone, the political director of Connecticut’s chapter of the National Association of Social Workers, said that she was pleased with the components of the mental health legislation. Even if the specific provisions of the law were not tailored to Lanza’s perceived mental health problems, she said, the bill certainly passed because of them. “It’s my opinion that the whole legislative session would have been about closing the deficit and looking to make some tough decisions to cut mental health services and do more with less,” she said. “It’s sad that it takes a tragedy to recognize the value of early intervention.” Indeed, Malloy proposed to cut $21 million from the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services’ budget in his biennial budget proposal released in early February. The Appropriations Committee, which released its legislative budget proposal on Friday, shrunk that number to $5 million. The cuts come amid larger questions of funding, with state closure of psychiatric hospitals reducing the number of psychiatric beds available from 2,000 to 400. The decreased availability has led to longer wait times, as the average length of time a person must wait before receiving state psychiatric care has risen to two years, said Howard Zonana, the director of the Psychiatry and Law Division at Yale Medical School. These facts frighten mental

health advocates, who say that many existing behavioral services cannot operate without state grants. If lawmakers cut mental health funding, it is unclear whether they will appropriate the additional funds necessary to sustain the programs created under the new law. “Some of the things that were in the bill will require additional funding,” said Kate Mattias, the executive director of the National Alliance on Mental Illness Connecticut. “We don’t want money to come from existing programs – it will need to be new dollars.” Some mental health advocates in Hartford have taken issue with one provision of the law, which states that any individual who voluntarily signs into a psychiatric hospital is prohibited from purchasing a gun for six months, and that those who are involuntarily committed cannot own a gun for five years. Mattias said that this provision may lead many patients not to seek care for fear that their rights would be restricted as a result. Still others took issue with the legislation because they said it does not go nearly far enough. Boucher, who chaired the school security committee, called the mental health services portion of the law “the weakest of all.” She said that the law’s provisions do not focus on individuals who do not or cannot comply with mental health regimens, the constituency that needs the most help. “My constituents say they are afraid to be in their own homes with family members who are seriously mentally ill,” she said. “They live with people who they love, but who, if they aren’t taking their medication, could turn around and kill them. That’s reality.” Committee co-chair Sen. Toni Harp, a Democrat, does not deny that the mental health provisions her committee crafted will make a small impact, at best. But she added that, in cases like Lanza’s, an early intervention — perhaps by a teacher or doctor — might have made the difference.

SAFER SCHOOLS

Though Sandy Hook Elementary school had installed a new security system that locked all entrances to the school at 9:30 a.m. each morning, investigators found that Lanza bypassed such security by using an assault rifle to shoot open one of the school’s entrances. As a result, of the three major portions of the final law, perhaps the most direct response to the Newtown tragedy was to attempt to fortify schools against future mass shooters. The school safety subcommittee was the first of the three to deliver its recommendations with bipartisan support, perhaps due to the relatively uncontroversial topic at hand. Its most significant provision requires school districts to conduct biennial security assessments and develop individualized emergency plans. The committee also recommended enhanced school security infrastructure standards, including installing solid-core doors, bullet-proof glass and electronic locks — though it fell short of requiring these standards of all schools, unless the school should choose to renovate on its own. Rather, it created a $15 million competitive grant program that would partially reimburse schools that choose to implement the new building regulations. The committee’s recommendations lacked some of the more controversial solutions that cropped up in the weeks following Newtown, including the National Rifle Association’s proposal to arm teachers against potential threats. The NRA did not respond to multiple requests for comment. “Some people would say we didn’t go far enough. Some people said, why didn’t you require more police officers on site?” said Republican Sen. Toni Boucher,

1200k

800k

400k

0

applications for regulated firearms in the U.S. 2006

2008

15M 10M

background checks for gun sales in the U.S.

5M 0

2006

2008

a co-chair of the school security committee. “Other people were very concerned about mandating costs that they could not afford. I think ours was a balanced approach.” Still, the committee’s swiftness belies the nuance with which it looked into each issue, according to several legislators involved in the effort. According to Speaker of the House Sharkey, one person on the committee requested that all doors have outer locks so that children could hide there during a shooting. But that same lock might have enabled a bully to hide his or her victim inside — a much more likely occurrence, Sharkey explained. One danger in beefing up a school’s security apparatus, Boucher added, is the potential of disrupting the school’s climate. “You have to balance the school climate not to create a threatening, prison-like environment,” Boucher said. “You want a nurturing and positive environment while still having protections that people can’t see.” Other mass shooting experts criticized the committee for focusing on school buildings so specifically. In a 1989 school shooting in Cleveland, a gunman opened fire on an outdoor playground, killing five elementary school children and wounding 29 others. “It’s a very simplistic idea, that if we lock the school door or if we put a resource officer at the entrance, we’ll prevent a mass killing,” said Jack Levin, a sociologist at Northeastern University and the author of several books on mass shootings. “If you can’t get into the school, you can get into the teen center down the street, the skating rink, the swimming pool, the local cinema.” Malloy acknowledged that the law does little to protect children outside the confines of the school building. But fortifying schools, he said, was an important first step.

STRICTER GUN LAWS

Perhaps the most widely reported facts about Lanza pertained to the stockpile of weapons found in his home. Beside the three weapons he brought with him to Sandy Hook Elementary, investigators found a wide array of firearms, as well as more than 1,600 rounds of ammunition, 11 knives, a bayonet and three samurai swords. They also found an NRA certificate awarded to Lanza, an NRA manual on the basics of pistol shooting and a Christmas card from his mother with a check

Feb. 22

Legislative leaders announce the creation of a bipartisan taskforce with three committees on school safety, mental health and gun violence to craft a swift legislative response to Newtown.

The bipartisan legislative committee examining school security announces its recommendations.

Gov. Malloy announces the creation of a Sandy Hook Commission to review current policy and make specific recommendations pertaining to school safety, mental health and gun violence prevention.

2012

20M

Jan. 15

Jan. 3

2010

2010

2012

intended to buy a new gun. Though members of the gun violence committee did not know these details when they began their work, it was clear from initial reports that Lanza enjoyed ready access to guns he should not have, and the committee saw to it that no one else would. Unlike the school safety and mental health services committees, though, the gun violence committee could not agree on which provisions were appropriate, ultimately releasing separate Democratic and Republican proposals. Both parties in the committee agreed on a majority of proposed items, including raising the minimum age to own a gun from 18 to 21, mandating universal background checks, requiring gun permits to purchase ammunition, limiting the number of guns a permit holder can buy per 30-day period, creating a gun offender registry and strengthening the regulation of straw purchases — the process by which a permitholder purchases a gun for a person not authorized to own one. The Democrats’ most prominent proposals — to tighten the ban on assault-style semiautomatic weapons and limit the size of ammunition magazines — were absent from the Republicans’ proposal. But in a testament to the Democrats’ power in the state legislature, both proposals were included in the final law. Despite his and other legislators’ intentions, experts say that an assault weapons ban and other gun control measures will likely have little impact on future mass shooters. The majority of mass shooters do not even use assault rifles as defined by Connecticut ban, according to Levin. Assault weapons are categorized in law enforcement by cosmetic features on the weapon, such as a thumbhole or a pistol grip, that assist the shooter in aiming or minimizing kickback. But a basic semiautomatic weapon, without additional cosmetic features, is still legal in the state of Connecticut — and tends to be the weapon of choice for mass shooters. Moreover, Duwe’s research indicates that previously enforced assault weapons bans, background checks and limits on the size of magazines have had little impact on the frequency of mass public shootings. When he examined the effect of loosening gun laws, he found that looser restrictions had little impact, either. SEE GUN CONTROL PAGE 5

Feb. 20

Mar. 5

In an open attempt to push the legislature to act, Gov. Mallloy releases his own set of “common-sense” gun control proposals.

The bipartisan legislative committee examining gun violence does not reach consensus. Democratic and Republican caucuses release separate recommendations. The bipartisan legislative committee examining mental health announces its recommendations.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT

“Never go on trips with anyone you do not love.” ERNEST HEMINGWAY AMERICAN AUTHOR

Forum considers Yale-NUS FACULTY FORUM FROM PAGE 1 members have taken time off from teaching to help hire professors to teach at Yale-NUS, NUS has compensated Yale departments for the faculty members’ time, said philosophy professor Shelly Kagan, who attended the meeting. “Yale-NUS is a much more controversial topic than the library, and feelings run higher on all sides,” Kagan said. “To the extent that you didn’t think [Yale-NUS] was a good idea in the first place, you’re going to mind whatever money is coming from Yale.” Michael Fischer, a computer science professor and outspoken critic of Yale-NUS, said he raised questions at the forum about whether it was a good idea to have a checkbox on the Yale College application next year to allow simultaneous application to Yale College and Yale-NUS. Since the faculty will discuss Yale-NUS next week at a Yale College faculty meeting, Polak said he would have liked to see professors discussing other important issues at Monday’s forum.

“I would rather be discussing teaching initiatives at Yale, or diversity, or the relationship between the sciences and the arts or countless topics that I think are enormously important,” he said. “That doesn’t mean this isn’t important, but it is one of many, and I would like for us to get a balance of topics that different faculty care a lot about.” Attendees said they found the discussion about the library informative. University Librarian Susan Gibbons spoke about the rising costs of subscriptions to digital databases and academic journals, Kagan said. “Journals are consuming more and more of the library’s budget. They have a monopoly,” Kagan said. “Each field [at Yale] wants the library to have access to the leading journals. Particularly for the sciences, a delay of a couple of months is a significant delay.” Gibbons said a large group of research institutions is discussing how best to negotiate better prices with publishers, Kagan said, adding that possible strategies discussed included advocating for altered

copyright restrictions or even bypassing the traditional publishers by expanding universities’ involvement in academic publishing. Gibbons declined to comment Monday night. Charles Bailyn, astronomy professor and Yale-NUS dean of faculty, said scholarly journal subscription prices are going up at a rate of seven percent to 10 percent each year, while the library’s budget is not growing at that rate. “Part of the problem is the journals are getting fewer and fewer personal subscriptions, so they keep increasing costs to libraries,” he said. “It’s very challenging environment.” Psychology professor Marvin Chun said in an email that attendance at the forums “can always be stronger” but enough faculty turned out on Monday to foster productive discussion. The first meeting of the faculty forum took place on Oct. 1. Cynthia Hua contributed reporting. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .

Fernandez calls for ‘One City’ FERNANDEZ FROM PAGE 1 Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 and State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield have embraced. Fernandez’s campaign manager Jim Doumas defended Fernadez’s decision to finance his campaign privately by claiming that the candidate would have fallen behind in fundraising had he used the Democracy Fund because his March entry into the race was comparatively late. East Haven resident Andrew DePino, who previously lived and worked in the Elm City, said Fernandez’s lack of political connections within the city is refreshing and noted that he identifies well with minority voters. “You have to have that support to get elected in this city,” DePino said, estimating that about a third of the

crowd consisted of minorities. William Placke, president of New Haven-based Start Bank, cited Fernandez’s teamwork with his wife Kica Matos, executive director of immigrant rights advocacy group Junta for Progressive Action, as a potentially positive influence on the mayorship, particularly in facilitating Fernandez’s “One City.” Both Fernandez and Matos have helped shape the city’s immigration policies. Fernandez, who said he hopes to make the city welcoming to immigrants, pushed for the passage of Connecticut’s DREAM Act, which allocated funds for in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants. Matos led advocacy efforts for the Elm City Resident Card — which provides all residents with a tool to access basic public amenities regardless of immi-

gration status — as Junta’s director and as the New Haven community services administrator. “I know we can count on [Fernandez] to protect immigrants rights,” said Megan Fountain, an organizer for New Haven-based immigrant rights advocacy group Unidad Latina en Accion. Fernandez is a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress, focusing on civil rights, as well as the director of New Haven’s Livable City Initiative, which seeks to enhance the experience of the individuals who live and work in the city through housing programs and economic development. Contact NICOLE NAREA at nicole.narea@yale.edu .

Gun control debate persists GUN CONTROL FROM PAGE 4 “These new laws are certainly not going to hurt anything,” he said. “But we need to be realistic about what impact they will have or not have on the incidence of mass public shootings.” A sizable minority of Connecticut’s residents oppose the new measures because they believe the restrictions create unnecessary impediments for law-abiding citizens, such as being subjected to an arduous background check or limiting the types of weapons they can use for sport. Rich Burgess, the president of Connecticut Carry, noted that shooters will likely be able to circumvent such restrictions. “There is no stopping someone who is hell-bent on killing his mother and children. There’s nothing stopping him from making a bomb or starting a fire,” Burgess said. “These things happened long before a particular style of rifles were ever invented.” Rep. Craig Miner, the Republican co-chair of the gun violence committee, largely agreed with this assessment. He said that, though it was likely impossible to create a legislative barrier against any future tragedies from occurring, his committee had taken on a broader intention. Though 26 people had perished in Newtown, hundreds of others lost their lives across the state that year in smaller one-on-one killings. “I have a bit of a hard time as a legislator thinking about all of this separately from what goes on, on a more regular basis in some of our larger, more urban areas,” Miner said. “We can’t forget that for many, many years, some of this violence has been going on, not in mass shootings, but in regular shootings.” The gun control package’s most effective provision, then, will likely not be its expanded assault weapons ban but rather the system of background checks it puts in place or the increased penalty it demands for straw purchasers. These are the types of legislation, experts and lawmakers say, which do make a sizable impact on urban street violence. “People say that politicians are using Sandy Hook to push forward their own agenda. I say, absolutely, yes!” said State Rep. Gary HolderWinfield, who represents New Haven. “I’m more than happy to be accused of taking advantage of this opportunity — because if I didn’t, it would be a waste.”

‘TAKING ADVANTAGE’

Four months after the events of Newtown, the conversation surrounding gun violence, mental health and school safety is as alive as ever. After the passage of the Sandy Hook Legislation — officially titled “An Act Concerning Gun Violence Prevention and Children’s Safety” — Connecticut is just beginning to parse out the logistics of enforcing its new law. Even as the legislature moves onto other matters, Malloy’s Sandy Hook Commission continues to meet, preparing more robust mental health and school security initiatives to hand to next year’s legislature. The law falls short of restricting the weapons used in the most common types of violence or providing the broad overhaul of the state’s mental health system that some would like. Thus, while they may celebrate its passage, virtually all of those involved in the bill acknowledged it will likely not be enough to stop the next Adam Lanza. Yet despite continuing concerns about the effectiveness of the legislation, Connecticut has set a clear national example, showing that Democrats and Republicans can negotiate contentious issues with little political fanfare. Sharkey, the architect of the bipartisan taskforce, said that bringing both parties to the table made for an ultimately stronger bill. “If we tried to do what some were proposing — a strictly Democratic partisan bill — we may not have even had the numbers to get that passed,” Sharkey said. “We might have had to water it down just to get all Democrats to pass it. So by trying to maintain the bipartisan approach, we got a better bill and got more votes.” To be sure, the effects of Newtown fell short of Washington last week, when the U.S. Senate voted down a measure that would have established a nation-wide universal background check system, the provision thought by many to be the one that could overcome the gun lobby so present in the chamber. Still, a delegation of Newtown families that was present in Washington for the vote vowed to keep working on behalf of the family members they lost on Dec. 14. “Our hearts are broken,” said Mark Barden, the father of one of the first graders who lost his life in Newtown, repeating the movement’s refrain. “But our spirit is not.” Contact MICHELLE HACKMAN at michelle.hackman@yale.edu .

Harvard makes up for canceled Visitas VISITAS FROM PAGE 1 transportation issues between Boston and Cambridge — was enough to cause the administrators to call off the program. Harvard Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William Fitzsimmons, who ran in the Boston Marathon on Monday, and other admissions officers have contacted prefrosh by phone and email. Harvard paid the hotel and meal fees for families who needed to stay the night in Boston, and the university planned to reimburse the cost of changing flights. On Friday afternoon, Fitzsimmons headed to Boston Logan International Airport with other university officials to meet students and families who had just landed at the time of Harvard’s cancellation announcement. Jayshlyn Acevedo, a Harvard junior and co-coordinator of Visitas, said students at the airport quickly found one another and were able to get assistance from admissions officers. “The prospective students that were either in Boston or on campus during the events on Friday were quite distraught, and those outside of Boston as well,” Acevedo said. “I’d say their safety was of great concern, as [it] was with everyone in Boston.” Acevedo added that the Undergraduate Admissions Council, a student group that works with the admissions office, coordinated with admissions officers to react quickly to the program’s cancellation and share information with prospective students. Despite the official cancellation of Visitas, Acevedo said Harvard students continued to host events and lead tours of campus, creating impromptu gatherings for the prefrosh who were already on campus at the time of the announcement. Harvard students have also taken to online platforms such as Twitter and YouTube to create “virtual Visitas” videos to help bring the undergraduate experience to prefrosh who were unable to visit campus. Although the cancellation leaves hundreds of prefrosh without the opportunity to see Harvard in person, experts and college counselors were confident that the cancellation will have little effect on Harvard’s yield rate — the

V I S I TA S In lieu of its signature Visitas weekend this year, Harvard students and administrators have improvised events for the hundreds of prefrosh that arrived on campus, including: ›Çm`iklXcM`j`kXjÈPflKlY\ videos for prefrosh who will not be able to visit campus ›hl\jk`fe$Xe[$Xejn\ij\jj`fej on Twitter ›`dgifdgklZXdgljkflij offered by Harvard students

percentage of students who accept their offers of admission — this year. David Petersam, president of Virginia-based higher education consulting group AdmissionsConsultants, said he does not think the lack of a prefrosh program will significantly lower Harvard’s yield rate due to Harvard’s prestige. Though schools typically use admit weekends such as Visitas or Bulldog Days to “bring students in” and “roll out the red carpet,” he said, most prefrosh who are accepted to highly selective schools already have an idea of which school they will choose before attending the events. “It would probably have more of an effect at schools that are still prestigious but don’t have the panache of a Harvard,” Petersam said. “I think a lot of the students have already made up their minds.” In light of the cancellation, Fitzsimmons said Harvard could possibly grant an extension for accepted students to reply to their offers of admission, which are typically due by May 1. Ivy League admissions officers had been in email communication with him about the possibility of extending the reply date, he said. Harvard’s yield rate last year was 81 percent, a leap from its 77-percent yield rate in 2011. Contact AMY WANG at amy.wang@yale.edu .

Harp entry to shake up race MAYORAL RACE FROM PAGE 1 portions of New Haven and West Haven. She co-chairs the Appropriations Committee, in which she has played a major role in shaping state budget agreements, as well as the Mental Health Working Group under the state’s Bipartisan Task Force on Gun Violence Prevention and Children’s Safety. With Harp at the helm, the Appropriations Committee voted Friday to approve final recommendations for balancing the $43.3 billion state budget. Harp said that after finishing her committee work, she has had time to reconsider her decision about entering the mayoral race, a move that many in the city expected her to make immediately following DeStefano’s January announcement that he would not seek re-election after 20 years in office. Fellow Connecticut State Senator and Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney said he confidently endorses Harp and plans on “actively supporting her.” He particularly praised Harp’s leadership in devising state budgets as Appropriations Committee co-chair and lauded her work on municipal aid programs and “raise the age” legislation, which seeks to foster juvenile justice. “She will be a superb mayor and a unifying force in the city,” he said. Looney previously said he would support the potential candidacy of probate judge Jack Keyes, who owns a law practice with Looney. But with Keyes out and Harp in, Looney has thrown his full weight behind his colleague in the senate. When she files to run, Harp will enter a dense field of candidates. The five candidates who have already filed are former New Haven Economic Development Administrator Henry Fernandez LAW ’94, Connecticut Technology Council CEO and former president of the

Greater New Haven Chamber of Commerce Matthew Nemerson, Connecticut State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield, Ward 10 Alderman Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 and plumber Sundiata Keitazulu. A likely seventh candidate is Hillhouse High School Principal Kermit Carolina, who remains in the “exploratory phase” of his campaign. Nemerson, who said he has known Harp through her work as an alderman and then as a state senator, said he believes Harp can best serve New Haven in her current position.

I’m going to have to campaign a little harder because I know she’s really recognizable. SUNDIATA KEITAZULU Mayoral candidate “My position is that [Harp] is a very, very valuable asset to the next mayor if she stays in her seat. Her seniority is impossible to replace, and she has connections to the Appropriations Committee and she will be somebody who can use her influence to push what has become a very difficult state budget,” Nemerson said. “My position is she should stay where she is.” Along with Nemerson, other candidates have said that Harp’s entry into the race will not change their approaches to the campaign. Elicker said he has learned that “politics is unpredictable” and that when he declared his candidacy this past December, he “would never have predicted that the field looks like it does now.” Prior to Monday’s announcement that she will run, Harp had said that she would be supporting Holder-Winfield in his bid for the mayor’s office. Holder-

Winfield said Harp’s entry is bound to change the race. “Senator Harp is a wellknown commodity. She has years of experience,” he said. “It’s going to have a change, but I’m not quite sure exactly what that change is.” Keitazulu called Harp’s entry a “big change.” “I’m going to have to campaign a little harder because I know she’s really recognizable,” Keitazulu said. “My ideas are about jobs and creating jobs. I think my question with Harp entering the race is, why hasn’t she done more to create jobs in the area?” At a Fernandez campaign kickoff event Monday, Fernandez’s campaign manager Jim Doumas said the campaign remains “very confident” despite Harp’s entry. Remarking on an issue that has already divided the current candidates, Harp said she will not use the Democracy Fund, New Haven’s public campaign finance system that limits individual contributions in return for matching funds and a block grant. Along with Fernandez and Nemerson, Harp will rely exclusively on private fundraising, and said that coming into the race so late prevents her from using the Democracy Fund effectively. Fernandez has explained his decision to opt out similarly. Looney dismissed the question of campaign finance as a “relatively minor one,” explaining that Harp’s leadership capacities and campaign platform should matter more. Harp has said that she is still working out her campaign team and platform and that she will announce details of both in the coming week and a half. Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu . Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“If we can put a man on the moon and sequence the human genome, we should be able to devise something close to a universal digital public library.” PETER SINGER MORAL PHILOSOPHER

Efficient HIV/AIDS treatment combos

New scan for cancer diagnosis

people with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

may... prevent 2/3 of new cases in South Africa

reduce the virus’ prevalence from 14% to 10% in 10 years

QWhat prompted you to run this study?

A

Tomosynthesis is a relatively new development in mammography — Smilow received a 3D imaging unit in August 2011, and we were the first in Connecticut to have it. During our first few months of experience with it, we realized we were finding cancers that we couldn’t see with 2D images, and I wanted to do this study to add validity that we were finding more cancers with the new unit. I know there is new stuff coming out all the time, and not everything new is better, but in this case I think tomosynthesis is better. I just sort of wanted to create more awareness that this new, better technology is out there and can be used to leave fewer cases of breast cancer undiagnosed.

Kids around the world playing video games might have new comebacks at their disposal the next time their parents demand they put down their controllers. In a study published April 8 in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics, a Yale School of Medicine group synthesized prior research on electronic media’s role in improving kids’ behaviors. The research examined how educational computer games, video games and other media forms can be used to promote healthier lifestyles. The findings reveal that, using these media platforms, teenagers can see positive changes in managing asthma, increasing physical activity, improving their diet and learning general safety skills. Associate Professor of Medicine and study co-author Lynn Fiellin MED ’96 explained that researchers spearheaded the study to supplement progress made through Yale’s Play2Prevent Initiative, which develops innovative video games to educate youth and young adults on ways to prevent risky lifestyle behavior. Their most recent development, an iPad application called PlayForward: Elm City Stories, aims to help teens learn about HIV prevention strategies. “This prompted us to want to systematically review the literature and the science to see what had been published in the area of electronic media — including videogames — for the purpose of behavior change in youth,” said Fiellin, who also serves as the director of Play2Prevent. After using the MEDLINE and PsychINFO scientific databases to investigate every study in the past 50 years that aimed to direct electronic media to changing young adults’ behavior, the researchers pinpointed 19 studies to include in their final analysis. These studies analyzed a variety of effects in teen-

voluntary circumcision oral pre-exposure prophylaxis vaginal microbicide gel

5.6 million

Researchers at the Smilow Cancer Center of Yale-New Haven Hospital may have identified a more accurate way to diagnose breast cancer. A study conducted by Yale School of Medicine Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Radiology Jaime Geisel shows that 3D imaging, also called tomosynthesis, can reveal breast abnormalities that 2D mammograms alone overlook. Geisel said she found an 11 percent greater cancer detection rate in patients who were screened through both 2D and 3D methods than in those who only received a 2D mammogram. Geisel presented her study to the ARRS Medical Imaging Society on April 19 in Washington, D.C. She met with the News Monday to talk about her experimental methods, the implications of her findings and her plans to pursue this research further.

BY JR REED STAFF REPORTER

Combining

Currently

BY PAYAL MARATHE STAFF REPORTER

Video games can promote health

add 31 million life years to the population

did you go about analyzing QHow whether tomosynthesis is more accu-

ANNELISA LEINBACH

agers including changes in physical activity, nutrition, asthma management, general safety and risky sexual behaviors. In analyzing the results of these studies, the research group discovered that common behavior changes accompanying increased participation in instructive computer games included greater consumption of healthier foods such as fruit or vegetables, increase in physical activity, improved asthma management, greater abstinence from sex and improvements in street and fire safety skills. Fiellin admitted that limitations in the research group’s findings stem from the quality of the studies they identified. To assess the qual-

ity of the trials used in the studies, the research team evaluated each study’s methods by allocating points in categories such as randomization and blinding. Only five of the studies were rated as “excellent” in terms of the methods used, she added. Some of these forms of electronic media also offer limitations because of their potential lack of availability to kids and teens, according to the study’s lead authors. In an April 8 news report found on the health news website dailyRX, the study’s authors explained factors — such as minimal access to the internet and other computer-based technologies — that may impede promoting health and safety behaviors in the youth.

Yale School of Medicine associate research scientist Kimberly Hieftje, a lead author of the study’s final report, and other members of the team hopes to expand its research. Fiellin said they plan to use these results to modify their Play2Prevent videogame and use new strategies in creating similar future technologies. The research was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Yale Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Contact JR REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

rate than a typical 2D mammogram?

A

We essentially looked at data from the first year of having tomosynthesis, and divided every patient who had a screening mammogram into two groups — one for people who just had 2D imaging and another for people who had 2D plus 3D imaging. We found more cancers in the group which had 3D imaging. Actually, we saw 11 percent increased detection, which isn’t too large but it’s still significant. We also noticed that the cancers found through 3D screening tended to more often be in patients with dense breasts. All of this shows that there are cancers we can’t see on a 2D mammogram that we can only see on a 3D mammogram. With 2D imaging, it’s as if we’re looking at the front page of a book, whereas the 3D method takes multiple images and gives us more information. It’s still not perfect, but it still picks up on more cancers, and it’s better especially for patients with dense breasts.

BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER More efficient allocation of HIV treatment may lead to disease containment and case reduction in South Africa, according to a study done by a pair of Yale researchers. Elisa Long, an assistant professor at both the Yale School of Management and the Yale School of Public Health, and resident Robert Stavert MED ’09 SOM ’09 from the Yale School of Medicine have developed mathematical models that demonstrate the medical effectiveness and economic benefits of combining types of HIV treatments. Long and Stavert’s paper was

A

Q

Is tomosynthesis new to the field of breast cancer research, and how do you hope it will change breast cancer diagnosis?

A

Tomosynthesis is a very new concept, and is probably the most exciting thing that’s happened in breast imaging in the past couple years. The FDA only approved it in February 2011, but I know other institutions are also showing similar findings to what we are seeing. We’ve been so impressed with 3D mammography that soon we’ll have five units at Smilow, and we’re hoping to eventually replace all our units with 3D units. A lot of other places haven’t bought 3D units yet because there is no reimbursement, meaning there is no extra charge to the insurance company when a patient is screened through tomosynthesis. But I’m hoping that in the future, there will be more widespread availability for all women having mammograms so that more patients have access to accurate diagnosis. Contact PAYAL MARATHE at payal.marathe@yale.edu .

preventing HIV, which include male circumcision, HIV screening and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), an ingestive medication. When applied in isolation, the more common preventative measures like circumcision yield success rates of 30 to 60 percent, Long said. Certain other methods, such as the PrEP treatment, generally have higher success rates in isolation, but are also significantly more expensive and harder to distribute. As a result, Long and Stavert have proposed a “portfolio approach,” which uses a combination of cheaper, cost-effective treatment options instead of a single more expensive one.

“We have a number of programs that are currently within reach. On their own, they may not have a substantial impact on the epidemic. But in an aggregate manner, this portfolio of interventions could avert up to twothirds of HIV cases over the next 10 years. We view this multi-faceted approach as our best chance of having a big impact on the epidemic while we wait for more advanced methods,” Long said. One of the biggest obstacles in treating HIV has been dealing with the effects of secondary transmission — the spread of the disease from person to person, Long said. She contends, however, that this phenomenon can actually facilitate the contain-

ment of the disease. “If we avert 30 percent of cases in men due to circumcision, we also prevent, let’s say, six percent of cases in women just through this modality of secondary transmission,” she added. Currently, few clinical trials are being conducted to analyze the effectiveness of combining these intervention programs, forcing Long to generate her analysis through the use of mathematical models. What has been particularly innovative about her approach is her application of operations research techniques to addressing a public health issue, said Gregg Gonsalves, an HIV activist and visiting lecturer at the Yale Law School.

Gonsalves said he has been impressed with Long’s ability to analyze the HIV epidemic through this partly-mathematical, partly-economic lens. “Coming from someone who has worked in HIV for a long time, [Long] is pioneering a whole area of thinking about operations research in the context of HIV. It’s really important to figure out how to do things most efficiently, cost-effectively and with the biggest bang for the buck,” he added. Long estimates that over 5 million South Africans are currently infected with HIV.

Quinnipiac River recreated on Beinecke

Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

Graf talks increased ADHD diagnoses

you plan to continue investigating QDo tomosynthesis? Definitely — my study is ongoing. As of now we’ve only analyzed one year’s worth of data, so we need to follow up and see what happens next year to determine if there were any cancers we missed. We want higher numbers, so we’ll be looking at data from other years of tomosynthesis as well. Really, my goal is to look at 3D mammography from every angle, so I also hope to analyze recall rates to see how often we are asking women to come back after a mammogram and to see how often we require six month follow-ups for abnormalities that are probably benign. Both of these rates seem to be reduced by tomosynthesis.

published in the April issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “In the last five years, the landscape of HIV prevention has really changed dramatically, and in a setting like South Africa that has limited HIV resources, one question is how can we best allocate limited resources most effectively and cost-effectively in order to mitigate this huge epidemic,” Long said. This scarcity of medical resources has forced researchers to find creative ways to redistribute funds and supplies efficiently to those that need them. To find the most cost-effective combination of treatments, Long investigated existing methods of

BY DAN WEINER STAFF REPORTER Children in the United States are being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at higher rates than ever before, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control. While historical rates of ADHD have hovered around 5 percent, the study, which was conducted from February 2011 to June 2012, revealed that 11 percent of American children have received the diagnosis. The results have sparked discussion in the medical community about diagnosis in a time with increasing pressure for children to succeed. Yale School of Medicine pediatrics and neurology professor William Graf sat down with the News Monday to discuss the causes and implications of the rising rates of ADHD diagnosis in America. do you think we are seeing increasQWhy ing rates of ADHD diagnosis?

A

We are talking about this now because of the recent [CDC] paper, but the rates have been drifting upwards by most of our measures. There are a lot of reasons why clinicians would be fast to diagnose, some of which have to do with our society, our health care system and the difficulty in making this diagnosis. The quick doctor visit is a setup for a quick diagnosis with a quick fix. There is this common misperception that if a child responds to Ritalin, he must have ADHD. I drink coffee every day as a stimulant and I have a response to it, but I don’t believe I have ADHD.

you think there are social roots of the QDo increasing diagnosis of ADHD?

A

One of the big debates that has been going on has been with children, high school students and college students that are multitasking all day long with multiple distracters through electronic devices. There is a big overlap here because part of the definition of ADHD is inattention and inability to focus and concentrate. One of the big debates is that there is a rising rate of ADHD because people are more distracted.

you think that the increase in diagnoQDo sis rates has anything to do with increasing pressure for children to perform at consistently high levels in schools?

A

I think that’s playing a major role. “Race To The Top,” “No Child Left Behind,” these pressures on schools to have higher test scores and have all kids succeed, even those that have learning problems, put the schools under a lot of pressure for those kids who are not performing. There are not numbers to answer that question — these are societal changes that are observable. How much that is playing a role in the rising diagnostic rates of ADHD isn’t completely clear.

one in five high school-aged QInboysthehasstudy, a diagnosis of ADHD, twice the rate of girls. Why do you think prevalence is so much higher in boys?

A

There seems to be a greater tendency to make the diagnosis in boys for multiple reasons. Some studies show that the hyperactivity components of ADHD is higher in boys than in girls, but in addition, hyperactivity is more common in preschoolers and early grade school children than it is in high school students and adults with ADHD. In the study that just came out, the teenage

boys make the single biggest jump — they were 20 percent — and why that was I’m not sure because teenage boys tend to be less hyperactive. do you think are the long-term bioQWhat logical effects of the use of the stimulants, especially in those that don’t have ADHD?

A

Generally, stimulants are safe, but there is concern about the potential for side effects, and those depend on the individual, the dose and the length of time they are taken. But in principle, the standards for safety have to be much higher for healthy individuals as opposed to those with impairments. The willingness to accept the side effect of a medication is higher if you can’t function in day-to-day life, but if you are otherwise healthy, the concerns of having a significant side effect when you don’t actually need the treatment is greater.

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Artist Fritz Horstman works on his collaborative Earth Day project, a model of the Quinnipiac River constructed with recyclable water bottles on Beinecke Plaza. BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER

medication like AdderQIfall,prescription even for those who don’t have ADHD, can produce increases in attention and performance, why should we be worried about increasing diagnosis?

A

There are both ethical and biological arguments here — why not just put it in the water? It’s not natural, and it has potential side effects. There are ethical concerns about giving strong medications to people who don’t need them. There are health concerns. There are concerns about changing the developing brain in ways that we can’t understand. There are just lots and lots of medical concerns. Contact DAN WEINER at daniel.weiner@yale.edu .

THAO DO

As part of Monday’s Earth Day celebrations, New Haven artist Fritz Horstman recruited Yale students to recreate the Quinnipiac River in Beinecke Plaza out of water bottles. Horstman created a 100-footlong outline of the river on the plaza with logistical support from the Yale Peabody Museum and the Yale Office of Sustainability. Passersby were invited to fill water bottles — either their own or ones provided at the exhibit — from a cistern filled with water from the river, and to place them along the outline. The exhibit, named “The Quinnipiac River Bottled,” was intended to raise awareness about water sustainability and discourage bottled water consumption. “People are drinking bottled water imported from Fiji when

most bottled water is actually just tap water,” Horstman said. “This exhibit is a call to attention. We’re focusing on raising awareness and changing habits.” Several months ago, the Yale Peabody Museum Sustainability Committee invited Horstman, an art instructor at Albertus Magnus College, to create an interactive piece on Yale’s campus to celebrate Earth Day. Volunteers from the Yale Sustainability Service Corps and high school students in the Peabody’s EVOLUTIONS after-school program helped to inform participants about issues relating to bottled water consumption, such as the fact that 1500 water bottles are purchased every second in the United States, Horstman said. Committee member James Sichs said the responses from participants were overwhelmingly positive, adding that many participants

seemed surprised to learn about the extent of the bottled water consumption problem. “It was news to some people that a lot of bottled water comes from tap water,” Sichs said. “We helped them rethink the idea of buying bottled water.” Committee member Susan Butts said she was pleased to note that relatively few participants were carrying their own plastic water bottles, which she said indicates that many students at Yale already have had effective education about the waste associated with disposable water bottle use. Horstman, who explores the intersection of nature and culture in many of his works, said he also wanted his piece to present a “poetry of natural light and water.” He described the work’s “visual hook” as the sunlight reflecting off the bottles and the water as it rip-

pled in the wind. His work also juxtaposes water in its natural form — the river — with water in its manufactured bottled form. Horstman said the activity serves as a reminder of their proximity to the often forgotten 45-mile-long Quinnipiac River, which runs from west central Connecticut to New Haven Harbor, east of downtown New Haven. After the last water bottles were placed at the mouth of the river at roughly 5 p.m., they all were emptied into the surrounding vegetation and recycled. The exhibit received financial support from the Regional Water Authority, The Garden Club of New Haven, an anonymous donor and the Yale Peabody Museum. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“If we can put a man on the moon and sequence the human genome, we should be able to devise something close to a universal digital public library.” PETER SINGER MORAL PHILOSOPHER

Efficient HIV/AIDS treatment combos

New scan for cancer diagnosis

people with HIV/AIDS in South Africa

may... prevent 2/3 of new cases in South Africa

reduce the virus’ prevalence from 14% to 10% in 10 years

QWhat prompted you to run this study?

A

Tomosynthesis is a relatively new development in mammography — Smilow received a 3D imaging unit in August 2011, and we were the first in Connecticut to have it. During our first few months of experience with it, we realized we were finding cancers that we couldn’t see with 2D images, and I wanted to do this study to add validity that we were finding more cancers with the new unit. I know there is new stuff coming out all the time, and not everything new is better, but in this case I think tomosynthesis is better. I just sort of wanted to create more awareness that this new, better technology is out there and can be used to leave fewer cases of breast cancer undiagnosed.

Kids around the world playing video games might have new comebacks at their disposal the next time their parents demand they put down their controllers. In a study published April 8 in the medical journal JAMA Pediatrics, a Yale School of Medicine group synthesized prior research on electronic media’s role in improving kids’ behaviors. The research examined how educational computer games, video games and other media forms can be used to promote healthier lifestyles. The findings reveal that, using these media platforms, teenagers can see positive changes in managing asthma, increasing physical activity, improving their diet and learning general safety skills. Associate Professor of Medicine and study co-author Lynn Fiellin MED ’96 explained that researchers spearheaded the study to supplement progress made through Yale’s Play2Prevent Initiative, which develops innovative video games to educate youth and young adults on ways to prevent risky lifestyle behavior. Their most recent development, an iPad application called PlayForward: Elm City Stories, aims to help teens learn about HIV prevention strategies. “This prompted us to want to systematically review the literature and the science to see what had been published in the area of electronic media — including videogames — for the purpose of behavior change in youth,” said Fiellin, who also serves as the director of Play2Prevent. After using the MEDLINE and PsychINFO scientific databases to investigate every study in the past 50 years that aimed to direct electronic media to changing young adults’ behavior, the researchers pinpointed 19 studies to include in their final analysis. These studies analyzed a variety of effects in teen-

voluntary circumcision oral pre-exposure prophylaxis vaginal microbicide gel

5.6 million

Researchers at the Smilow Cancer Center of Yale-New Haven Hospital may have identified a more accurate way to diagnose breast cancer. A study conducted by Yale School of Medicine Assistant Professor of Diagnostic Radiology Jaime Geisel shows that 3D imaging, also called tomosynthesis, can reveal breast abnormalities that 2D mammograms alone overlook. Geisel said she found an 11 percent greater cancer detection rate in patients who were screened through both 2D and 3D methods than in those who only received a 2D mammogram. Geisel presented her study to the ARRS Medical Imaging Society on April 19 in Washington, D.C. She met with the News Monday to talk about her experimental methods, the implications of her findings and her plans to pursue this research further.

BY JR REED STAFF REPORTER

Combining

Currently

BY PAYAL MARATHE STAFF REPORTER

Video games can promote health

add 31 million life years to the population

did you go about analyzing QHow whether tomosynthesis is more accu-

ANNELISA LEINBACH

agers including changes in physical activity, nutrition, asthma management, general safety and risky sexual behaviors. In analyzing the results of these studies, the research group discovered that common behavior changes accompanying increased participation in instructive computer games included greater consumption of healthier foods such as fruit or vegetables, increase in physical activity, improved asthma management, greater abstinence from sex and improvements in street and fire safety skills. Fiellin admitted that limitations in the research group’s findings stem from the quality of the studies they identified. To assess the qual-

ity of the trials used in the studies, the research team evaluated each study’s methods by allocating points in categories such as randomization and blinding. Only five of the studies were rated as “excellent” in terms of the methods used, she added. Some of these forms of electronic media also offer limitations because of their potential lack of availability to kids and teens, according to the study’s lead authors. In an April 8 news report found on the health news website dailyRX, the study’s authors explained factors — such as minimal access to the internet and other computer-based technologies — that may impede promoting health and safety behaviors in the youth.

Yale School of Medicine associate research scientist Kimberly Hieftje, a lead author of the study’s final report, and other members of the team hopes to expand its research. Fiellin said they plan to use these results to modify their Play2Prevent videogame and use new strategies in creating similar future technologies. The research was funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the Yale Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Contact JR REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

rate than a typical 2D mammogram?

A

We essentially looked at data from the first year of having tomosynthesis, and divided every patient who had a screening mammogram into two groups — one for people who just had 2D imaging and another for people who had 2D plus 3D imaging. We found more cancers in the group which had 3D imaging. Actually, we saw 11 percent increased detection, which isn’t too large but it’s still significant. We also noticed that the cancers found through 3D screening tended to more often be in patients with dense breasts. All of this shows that there are cancers we can’t see on a 2D mammogram that we can only see on a 3D mammogram. With 2D imaging, it’s as if we’re looking at the front page of a book, whereas the 3D method takes multiple images and gives us more information. It’s still not perfect, but it still picks up on more cancers, and it’s better especially for patients with dense breasts.

BY MAREK RAMILO STAFF REPORTER More efficient allocation of HIV treatment may lead to disease containment and case reduction in South Africa, according to a study done by a pair of Yale researchers. Elisa Long, an assistant professor at both the Yale School of Management and the Yale School of Public Health, and resident Robert Stavert MED ’09 SOM ’09 from the Yale School of Medicine have developed mathematical models that demonstrate the medical effectiveness and economic benefits of combining types of HIV treatments. Long and Stavert’s paper was

A

Q

Is tomosynthesis new to the field of breast cancer research, and how do you hope it will change breast cancer diagnosis?

A

Tomosynthesis is a very new concept, and is probably the most exciting thing that’s happened in breast imaging in the past couple years. The FDA only approved it in February 2011, but I know other institutions are also showing similar findings to what we are seeing. We’ve been so impressed with 3D mammography that soon we’ll have five units at Smilow, and we’re hoping to eventually replace all our units with 3D units. A lot of other places haven’t bought 3D units yet because there is no reimbursement, meaning there is no extra charge to the insurance company when a patient is screened through tomosynthesis. But I’m hoping that in the future, there will be more widespread availability for all women having mammograms so that more patients have access to accurate diagnosis. Contact PAYAL MARATHE at payal.marathe@yale.edu .

preventing HIV, which include male circumcision, HIV screening and oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), an ingestive medication. When applied in isolation, the more common preventative measures like circumcision yield success rates of 30 to 60 percent, Long said. Certain other methods, such as the PrEP treatment, generally have higher success rates in isolation, but are also significantly more expensive and harder to distribute. As a result, Long and Stavert have proposed a “portfolio approach,” which uses a combination of cheaper, cost-effective treatment options instead of a single more expensive one.

“We have a number of programs that are currently within reach. On their own, they may not have a substantial impact on the epidemic. But in an aggregate manner, this portfolio of interventions could avert up to twothirds of HIV cases over the next 10 years. We view this multi-faceted approach as our best chance of having a big impact on the epidemic while we wait for more advanced methods,” Long said. One of the biggest obstacles in treating HIV has been dealing with the effects of secondary transmission — the spread of the disease from person to person, Long said. She contends, however, that this phenomenon can actually facilitate the contain-

ment of the disease. “If we avert 30 percent of cases in men due to circumcision, we also prevent, let’s say, six percent of cases in women just through this modality of secondary transmission,” she added. Currently, few clinical trials are being conducted to analyze the effectiveness of combining these intervention programs, forcing Long to generate her analysis through the use of mathematical models. What has been particularly innovative about her approach is her application of operations research techniques to addressing a public health issue, said Gregg Gonsalves, an HIV activist and visiting lecturer at the Yale Law School.

Gonsalves said he has been impressed with Long’s ability to analyze the HIV epidemic through this partly-mathematical, partly-economic lens. “Coming from someone who has worked in HIV for a long time, [Long] is pioneering a whole area of thinking about operations research in the context of HIV. It’s really important to figure out how to do things most efficiently, cost-effectively and with the biggest bang for the buck,” he added. Long estimates that over 5 million South Africans are currently infected with HIV.

Quinnipiac River recreated on Beinecke

Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

Graf talks increased ADHD diagnoses

you plan to continue investigating QDo tomosynthesis? Definitely — my study is ongoing. As of now we’ve only analyzed one year’s worth of data, so we need to follow up and see what happens next year to determine if there were any cancers we missed. We want higher numbers, so we’ll be looking at data from other years of tomosynthesis as well. Really, my goal is to look at 3D mammography from every angle, so I also hope to analyze recall rates to see how often we are asking women to come back after a mammogram and to see how often we require six month follow-ups for abnormalities that are probably benign. Both of these rates seem to be reduced by tomosynthesis.

published in the April issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine. “In the last five years, the landscape of HIV prevention has really changed dramatically, and in a setting like South Africa that has limited HIV resources, one question is how can we best allocate limited resources most effectively and cost-effectively in order to mitigate this huge epidemic,” Long said. This scarcity of medical resources has forced researchers to find creative ways to redistribute funds and supplies efficiently to those that need them. To find the most cost-effective combination of treatments, Long investigated existing methods of

BY DAN WEINER STAFF REPORTER Children in the United States are being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder at higher rates than ever before, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control. While historical rates of ADHD have hovered around 5 percent, the study, which was conducted from February 2011 to June 2012, revealed that 11 percent of American children have received the diagnosis. The results have sparked discussion in the medical community about diagnosis in a time with increasing pressure for children to succeed. Yale School of Medicine pediatrics and neurology professor William Graf sat down with the News Monday to discuss the causes and implications of the rising rates of ADHD diagnosis in America. do you think we are seeing increasQWhy ing rates of ADHD diagnosis?

A

We are talking about this now because of the recent [CDC] paper, but the rates have been drifting upwards by most of our measures. There are a lot of reasons why clinicians would be fast to diagnose, some of which have to do with our society, our health care system and the difficulty in making this diagnosis. The quick doctor visit is a setup for a quick diagnosis with a quick fix. There is this common misperception that if a child responds to Ritalin, he must have ADHD. I drink coffee every day as a stimulant and I have a response to it, but I don’t believe I have ADHD.

you think there are social roots of the QDo increasing diagnosis of ADHD?

A

One of the big debates that has been going on has been with children, high school students and college students that are multitasking all day long with multiple distracters through electronic devices. There is a big overlap here because part of the definition of ADHD is inattention and inability to focus and concentrate. One of the big debates is that there is a rising rate of ADHD because people are more distracted.

you think that the increase in diagnoQDo sis rates has anything to do with increasing pressure for children to perform at consistently high levels in schools?

A

I think that’s playing a major role. “Race To The Top,” “No Child Left Behind,” these pressures on schools to have higher test scores and have all kids succeed, even those that have learning problems, put the schools under a lot of pressure for those kids who are not performing. There are not numbers to answer that question — these are societal changes that are observable. How much that is playing a role in the rising diagnostic rates of ADHD isn’t completely clear.

one in five high school-aged QInboysthehasstudy, a diagnosis of ADHD, twice the rate of girls. Why do you think prevalence is so much higher in boys?

A

There seems to be a greater tendency to make the diagnosis in boys for multiple reasons. Some studies show that the hyperactivity components of ADHD is higher in boys than in girls, but in addition, hyperactivity is more common in preschoolers and early grade school children than it is in high school students and adults with ADHD. In the study that just came out, the teenage

boys make the single biggest jump — they were 20 percent — and why that was I’m not sure because teenage boys tend to be less hyperactive. do you think are the long-term bioQWhat logical effects of the use of the stimulants, especially in those that don’t have ADHD?

A

Generally, stimulants are safe, but there is concern about the potential for side effects, and those depend on the individual, the dose and the length of time they are taken. But in principle, the standards for safety have to be much higher for healthy individuals as opposed to those with impairments. The willingness to accept the side effect of a medication is higher if you can’t function in day-to-day life, but if you are otherwise healthy, the concerns of having a significant side effect when you don’t actually need the treatment is greater.

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Artist Fritz Horstman works on his collaborative Earth Day project, a model of the Quinnipiac River constructed with recyclable water bottles on Beinecke Plaza. BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER

medication like AdderQIfall,prescription even for those who don’t have ADHD, can produce increases in attention and performance, why should we be worried about increasing diagnosis?

A

There are both ethical and biological arguments here — why not just put it in the water? It’s not natural, and it has potential side effects. There are ethical concerns about giving strong medications to people who don’t need them. There are health concerns. There are concerns about changing the developing brain in ways that we can’t understand. There are just lots and lots of medical concerns. Contact DAN WEINER at daniel.weiner@yale.edu .

THAO DO

As part of Monday’s Earth Day celebrations, New Haven artist Fritz Horstman recruited Yale students to recreate the Quinnipiac River in Beinecke Plaza out of water bottles. Horstman created a 100-footlong outline of the river on the plaza with logistical support from the Yale Peabody Museum and the Yale Office of Sustainability. Passersby were invited to fill water bottles — either their own or ones provided at the exhibit — from a cistern filled with water from the river, and to place them along the outline. The exhibit, named “The Quinnipiac River Bottled,” was intended to raise awareness about water sustainability and discourage bottled water consumption. “People are drinking bottled water imported from Fiji when

most bottled water is actually just tap water,” Horstman said. “This exhibit is a call to attention. We’re focusing on raising awareness and changing habits.” Several months ago, the Yale Peabody Museum Sustainability Committee invited Horstman, an art instructor at Albertus Magnus College, to create an interactive piece on Yale’s campus to celebrate Earth Day. Volunteers from the Yale Sustainability Service Corps and high school students in the Peabody’s EVOLUTIONS after-school program helped to inform participants about issues relating to bottled water consumption, such as the fact that 1500 water bottles are purchased every second in the United States, Horstman said. Committee member James Sichs said the responses from participants were overwhelmingly positive, adding that many participants

seemed surprised to learn about the extent of the bottled water consumption problem. “It was news to some people that a lot of bottled water comes from tap water,” Sichs said. “We helped them rethink the idea of buying bottled water.” Committee member Susan Butts said she was pleased to note that relatively few participants were carrying their own plastic water bottles, which she said indicates that many students at Yale already have had effective education about the waste associated with disposable water bottle use. Horstman, who explores the intersection of nature and culture in many of his works, said he also wanted his piece to present a “poetry of natural light and water.” He described the work’s “visual hook” as the sunlight reflecting off the bottles and the water as it rip-

pled in the wind. His work also juxtaposes water in its natural form — the river — with water in its manufactured bottled form. Horstman said the activity serves as a reminder of their proximity to the often forgotten 45-mile-long Quinnipiac River, which runs from west central Connecticut to New Haven Harbor, east of downtown New Haven. After the last water bottles were placed at the mouth of the river at roughly 5 p.m., they all were emptied into the surrounding vegetation and recycled. The exhibit received financial support from the Regional Water Authority, The Garden Club of New Haven, an anonymous donor and the Yale Peabody Museum. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T

Dow Jones 14,567.17, +0.14%

S NASDAQ 3,233.55, +0.86% S Oil $88.76, 0.00%

S S&P 500 1,562.50, +0.47% T 10-yr. Bond 1.70%, -0.01 T Euro $1.31, +0.08%

Bomb suspects appear driven by faith BY DAVID CRARY AND DENISE LAVOIE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ticed Islam. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev communicated with his interrogators in writing, a less-than-ideal format that precluded the type of detailed back-and-forth crucial to establishing the facts, said one of two officials who recounted the questioning. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the investigation. The two officials said the pre-

liminary evidence from an interrogation suggests the Tsarnaev brothers were driven by religion but had no ties to Islamic terrorist organizations. At the same time, they cautioned that they were still trying to verify what they were told by Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and were looking at such things as his telephone and online communications and his associations with others.

The criminal complaint containing the charges against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev shed no light on the motive. But it gave a detailed sequence of events and cited surveillancecamera images of him dropping off a knapsack with one of the bombs and using a cellphone, perhaps to coordinate or detonate the blasts. The Massachusetts college student was listed in serious but stable condition at Beth Israel Dea-

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com

OPINION.

BOSTON — The two brothers suspected of bombing the Boston Marathon appear to have been motivated by their religious faith but do not seem connected to any Muslim terrorist groups, U.S. officials said Monday after interrogating the severely wounded younger man. He was charged with federal crimes that could bring the death

penalty. Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was charged in his hospital room with using a weapon of mass destruction to kill. He was accused of joining with his older brother, Tamerlan — now dead — in setting off the pressure-cooker bombs that killed three people and wounded more than 200 a week ago. The brothers, ethnic Chechens from Russia who had been living in the U.S. for about a decade, prac-

PRODUCTION & DESIGN We’re the best-looking desk at the YDN. Come make us look even better.

design@yaledailynews.com

coness Medical Center with a gunshot wound to the throat and other injuries. His 26-year-old brother died last week in a fierce gunbattle with police. “Although our investigation is ongoing, today’s charges bring a successful end to a tragic week for the city of Boston and for our country,” Attorney General Eric Holder said in a statement. The charges carry the death penalty or up to life in prison.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST A slight chance of showers. Cloudy, with a high near 53. Low of 40.

TOMORROW High of 65, low of 43.

THURSDAY High of 61, low of 41.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, APRIL 23 6:30 PM “Life After Yale”: An Alumni Panel Participants include Gustavo Gordillo ’10 ART ’13, Dushko Petrovich ’97, Matthew Pillsbury ’95 and Hannah Whitaker ’02. Moderated by Lisa Kereszi ART ’00. Pizza will be provided at 6:30 p.m., and the panel will begin at 7 p.m. Yale School of Art Green Hall (1156 Chapel St.), Room B03.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 4:00 PM “Linda Sue Park: The 39 Clues” Linda Sue Park is the winner of the Newbery Medal and the author of “Trust No One,” the most recent addition to “The 39 Clues” series of young adult fiction. “Trust No One” brings its protagonists to Yale University’s Beinecke Library to view the Voynich Manuscript and delve into its intriguing history. Drafts from Park’s manuscript will be on exhibition alongside the Voynich Manuscript in the current exhibition, “By Hand.” Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (121 Wall St.), Mezzanine.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 4:00 PM “The Danger of Good Intentions: Successes and Consequences of Advocate-Driven U.S. Policy in SubSaharan Africa” Laura E. Seay, assistant professor of political science at Morehouse College, will discuss American advocacy organizations and their relationship with conflict-affected communities in Africa. Open to the general public. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), Room 203. 4:30 PM Donald Kagan Farewell Lecture After over 40 years of teaching at Yale, Sterling Pofessor of classics and history Donald Kagan will be giving a farewell lecture, speaking on his experience at Yale and within the liberal arts. Sponsored by the William F. Buckley, Jr. Program. Free and open to the general public. Sheffield-Sterling-Strathcona Hall (1 Prospect St.).

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person

Interested in drawing cartoons for the Yale Daily News? CONTACT KAREN TIAN AT karen.tian@yale.edu

202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE)

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Pink drink, briefly 6 Arson aftermath 9 Hutt crime lord of sci-fi 14 According to 15 Grazing area 16 Light purple 17 O’Neill drama set in Harry Hope’s saloon 20 Tailor’s target 21 Many a Beethoven sonata ender 22 Popeye’s __’ Pea 23 Jabber on and on 24 __ in November 25 Likable prez 27 More than feasts (on) 28 With 30-Across, drama based on ’70s presidential interviews 30 See 28-Across 32 Aspiring doc’s course 33 Walked alongside one’s master 35 On the Pacific 36 Fertilizable cells 38 “Just __!”: “Be right there!” 40 Drama about Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine 45 “Friendly skies” co. 46 Greatly feared 47 Comstock Lode find 48 Fred of “My Cousin Vinny” 50 Oozed 52 With 54-Across, “Viva La Vida” rock group, and what 17-, 28-/30and 40-Across each is? 54 See 52-Across 55 Pottery “pet” 58 Smooth transition 60 Pastoral poem 64 Invisible vibes 65 More than most 66 Wine tasting criterion 67 Quilting parties 68 Corrida cheer 69 Neuter, horsewise

CLASSICAL MUSIC 24 Hours a Day. 98.3 FM, and on the web at WMNR.org Pledges accepted: 1-800345-1812

ADROIT ACADEMICS, an innovative start-up test prep company, is hiring tutors. Offering unique positions with a competitive salary. Apply at www. adroitacademics.com

Monday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU EASY

4 5

(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Give __: yank 37 By way of 39 Believability on the street, slangily 41 Driver’s license fig. 42 Threat words 43 Actor Snipes 44 Thought 49 “March Madness” games, informally 51 Sizing up

CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

4/23/13

By John Verel and Jeff Chen

DOWN 1 Slyly spiteful 2 Irish actor Milo 3 Say what you will 4 Golda of Israel 5 “The Lord of the Rings” baddie 6 Answering the penultimate exam question, say 7 Actor Connery 8 How lovers walk 9 “Jersey Girl” actress, to fans 10 Goals 11 Emulated Mt. St. Helens? 12 With __ breath: expectantly 13 Pains’ partner 18 Answering machine button 19 Journalist Roberts 24 Name, in Nîmes 26 Program file suffix 29 Not counterfeit 31 “The Good Earth” mother 32 “Nonsense!” 34 Tractor manufacturer

Want to place a classified ad?

4/23/13

53 “Whip It” band 54 Like the driven snow 55 Red wine choice, for short 56 Tint 57 Wrath 59 Salon goop 61 Mommy deer 62 Initials on L’Homme fragrance 63 Took the reins

1 5 9 6

1 8 9 8 2 6 4 3 9 1 2

8 3 7 2 4 2 7 8 9 4 9 2 7 8 9 1 5 8 6


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

“You never need an argument against the use of violence, you need an argument for it.” NOAM CHOMSKY AMERICAN LINGUIST AND COGNITIVE SCIENTIST

Syrian regime refocuses

Indian girl’s rape highlights police apathy BY NIRMALA GEORGE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALEPPO MEDIA CENTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Members of the Free Syrian Army hide behind scrap metal during an attack against government forces in Aleppo. BY RYAN LUCAS ASSOCIATED PRESS BEIRUT — After watching much of Syria’s territory slip into rebel hands, President Bashar Assad’s regime is focusing on the basics: shoring up its hold on Damascus and the strip of land connecting the capital with the Mediterranean coast. In the past week, government troops have overrun villages near the Lebanese border and suburbs of Damascus, including two districts west of the capital where activists say regime forces killed more than 100 people. The advances have improved the regime’s footing in strategic areas that are seen as crucial to its survival. In many ways, Assad’s government has little choice at this point in the civil war, analysts say. Rebels

have captured much of northern and eastern Syria, seizing control of military bases, hydroelectric dams, border crossings and even a provincial capital. Those areas are home to most of the country’s oil fields, and the losses have deprived the regime of badly needed cash and fuel for its war machine. But those provinces — Raqqa, Hassakeh and Deir el-Zoura — are located hundreds of miles (kilometers) from the capital. Rebel advances there pose no direct threat to the regime’s hold on Damascus - the ultimate prize in the civil war - and any effort to claw back the lost territory would demand manpower and military hardware, neither of which the regime is inclined to invest at the moment. Instead, it has used its remaining airbases and military outposts in those areas to shell and

bomb the territory it has lost in an attempt to forestall the opposition from establishing an interim administration in the rebel-held regions. “What’s important for the regime is not to leave any buffer zone, or any security zone for the rebels,” said Hisham Jaber, a retired Lebanese army general who heads the Middle East Center for Studies and Political Research in Beirut. While keeping the rebels offbalance in the lands it has lost, the regime at the same time has dedicated its resources to Damascus and securing what it widely believed to be Assad’s Plan B — a retreat to the Mediterranean coastal region that is the heartland of his Alawite minority, which views its own survival as being tightly intertwined with that of the regime.

NEW DELHI — A child disappears. Police are called. Nothing happens. Child rights activists say the rape last week of a 5-year-old girl is just the latest case in which Indian police failed to take urgent action on a report of a missing child. Three days after the attack, the girl was found alone in locked room in the same New Delhi building where her family lives. More than 90,000 children go missing in India each year; more than 34,000 are never found. Some parents say they lost crucial time because police wrongly dismissed their missing children as runaways, refused to file reports or treated the cases as nuisances. The parents of the 5-year-old said that after their daughter disappeared, they repeatedly begged police to register a complaint and begin a search, but they were rejected. Three days later, neighbors heard the sound of a child crying from a locked room in the tenement. They broke down the door and rushed the brutalized girl to the police station. The parents said the police response was to offer the couple 2,000 rupees ($37) to keep quiet about what had happened. “They just wanted us to go away. They didn’t want to register a case even after they saw how badly our daughter was injured,” said the girl’s father, who cannot be identified because Indian law requires a rape victim’s identity be kept secret. Delhi’s Police Commissioner Neeraj Kumar admitted Monday that local police had erred in handling the case. “There have been shortfalls, so the station house officer and his deputy have been suspended,” Kumar told reporters. Other poor parents of missing children say they also have found police reluctant to help them. In 2010, police took 15 days to register a missing-persons case for 14-year-old Pankaj Singh. His mother is still waiting for him to come home. “Every day my husband and my father would go wait at the police station, but they would shoo them away,” Pravesh Kumari

Singh said as she sat on her son’s bed, surrounded by his pictures and books. One morning in March 2010, she fed her son a breakfast of fried pancakes and spicy potatoes, then left for a community health training program. “He told me he would have a bath and settle down to study for his exams,” said Singh, clutching the boy’s photograph to her heart. When she returned, he was gone. “The neighbors said some boys had called him out. We searched everywhere, went to the police, but they refused to believe that something had happened to our son.” The police insisted he had run off with friends and would return, she said. “They said we must have scolded him or beaten him, which is why he had run away from home,” she said. Formal police complaints were registered in only one-sixth of missing child cases in 2011, said Bhuwan Ribhu, a lawyer with Bachpan Bachao Andolan, or the Save the Childhood Movement. He said police resist registering cases because they want to keep crime figures low, and that parents are often too poor to bribe them to reconsider. Ribhu said the first few hours after a child goes missing are the most crucial. “The police can cordon off nearby areas, issue alerts at railway and bus stations, and step up vigilance to catch the kidnappers,” he said. Activists say delays let traffickers move children to neighboring states, where the police don’t have jurisdiction. There is no national database of missing children that state police can reference. Police have insisted that most of missing children are runways fleeing grinding poverty. “It’s easy enough to blame the police for not finding the children. Some of the parents do not even possess a photograph of the child. Or they will come up with a years-old picture. It becomes difficult when there’s not even a photograph to work with,” Delhi police spokesman Rajan Bhagat said last month when asked about complaints on police inaction in investigating case of missing children. Many cases involved poor migrant construction workers who move from site to site around the city, Bhagat said.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

SPORTS

“I am looking forward to following in the footsteps of so many great strikers.” ROBIN VAN PERSIE, DUTCH SOCCER PLAYER

Women’s tennis splits weekend WOMEN’S TENNIS FROM PAGE 12 van brought her singles record this season to 17-0 with an emphatic 6-0, 6-1 win, while Li lost in straight sets at No. 5. Since it was Senior Day, Sarah Guzick ’13 made an appearance in the No. 6 spot, earning a 6-3, 6-4 win over Christina Danosi.

Despite losing, we are learning from this match and preparing ourselves to play Brown on Saturday. REE REE LI ’16 Sullivan said it was especially great to secure a win over Dartmouth on Senior Day and praised the contributions of Guzick and Epstein. “Senior Day is always a special day for us as we all try to play for our senior class and win the match for them,” Sullivan said. “Sarah and Elizabeth have been such amazing leaders this year. They lead by example and their hard work and commitment inspires the entire team.” After their success, the Bulldogs had a day of rest before facing Harvard in Cambridge on Sunday. Knowing that they needed to clinch this win to be guaranteed a third straight Ivy League title, the pressure was on for the Elis. The team was disappointed to start the

match after losing the doubles point. All three matches were close, with Amos and Sullivan prevailing 8-6 at No. 3 and Hamilton and Li dropping their match 8-6 at No. 2. No. 1 pairing Epstein and Yu, playing together for only the second time this season, endured a hard 8-9 loss, with the score in the final tiebreak standing at 7-9. Epstein bounced back from the doubles loss to beat her singles opponent 6-1, 6-4 at No. 1. Sullivan continued her dominance at No. 3, defeating Harvard’s Kristin Norton 7-6, 7-5 and extended her winning streak to 18. The remaining Bulldogs did not fare so well against the Crimson, with Hamilton and Yu at No. 2 and No. 4, respectively, both losing in three sets. Li suffered a 6-2, 7-5 defeat at No. 5, while Amos was dealt a 6-0, 6-1 blow in the No. 6 position. Ree Ree Li ‘16 said that despite the loss against Harvard, the team is already gearing up for its next match. “Harvard came out with great energy, and they were ready to compete,” Li said. “Despite losing, we are learning from this match and preparing ourselves to play Brown on Saturday.” Despite last Sunday’s disappointment, if the Bulldogs defeat Brown this coming Saturday, they still stand a shot at the Ivy League title. They currently stand second in the conference, behind Columbia. Contact JASMINE HORSEY at jasmine.horsey@yale.edu

SAMANTHA GARDNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The No. 35 Elis defeated Dartmouth 5–2 on Friday, but the team fell to archrival Harvard by the same score on Sunday.

Mangan talks Yale lax program MEN’S LACROSSE FROM PAGE 12 Yale Lacrosse be recognized as a perennially top program. a political science major and QYou’re last year were on Ivy Honor role twice. How have you managed D-I athletics and

the academic demands of an Ivy League school?

A

It’s very difficult. I put in three to four hours a day on lacrosse between watching film and getting treatment. It is really hard to balance your time well and it really presses you to make the right

choices. … You have to maintain your focus on the practice or game field and not worry about tests or papers and also figure out how to get your work done once lacrosse is over with.

Q

Does the No. 22 jersey mean anything special to you?

A

Yes, it is an extremely special number. In my old high school, Wantagh High, during the 1999 season Scott DeVerna, an amazing athlete, lacrosse player and human being, passed away in his sleep and his number was 22 on the team. So each year, a senior is elected to wear the number. … In our town it’s very important to wear No. 22. We have all tried to continue to wear that number as we continue our careers in college lacrosse. There have been over 40 players who have worn that number in college for the purpose of honoring him. My brother wore the number in college, another friend at Rutgers is wearing it right now, as well as Hofstra, and it’s really important to our town and to everyone that knew him that we continue to wear his number with pride.

Coed sailing finishes in 4th SAILING FROM PAGE 12 choppy conditions play to the Bulldogs’ advantage. “Our venue where we practice is known for heavier wind and big waves so we usually have a big boat speed advantage in those types of conditions,” she said. Custo Grieg added that the Elis performed well in windy conditions due to their ability to pick patterns out in the wind and adjust weight distribution in the boats depending on the size of the waves. “Unlike at shifty venues where patterns never really develop, with a 15 knot median breeze at King’s Point it was important for us to pick up on repeating (wind) patterns,” she said. Last weekend, the coed team fell to No. 6 nationally due to a disappointing performance at Brown. The Elis finished in sixth

place at the New England Dinghy Championship on April 13. Custo Grieg added that the team is hungry to prove itself again. “The New England Dinghy Championships was a hard regatta for us as we were losing to teams that we had been beating all year, but our perseverance through that tough weekend got us a spot at Semifinals where we will be able to prove ourselves again,” Custo Grieg said. This weekend the team travels to Norfolk, Va., to compete in the ICSA Semifinal Dinghy Championship hoping to qualify for Nationals. The women’s New England Championship has been rescheduled to this weekend as well and will be hosted by Tufts University on Mystic Lake. Contact NIKOLAS LASKARIS at nikolas.laskaris@yale.edu .

are you looking to do better QWhat approaching the final games of the season and knowing you will probably have to win the Ivy League Tournament to go to the NCAA’s?

A

It’s very important for us to play through the whole 60 minutes of the game and take every minute by itself. I don’t think we have played our best lacrosse yet. I don’t think our offense and defense have played together well enough. I think we really need to play our best against Harvard so that we can get some momentum for the Ivy Tournament.

SARA MILLER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Attackman Brandon Mangan ’14 leads the Elis’ offense with 30 goals.

Contact FREDERICK FRANK at frederick.frank@yale.edu .

Men’s golf claims Century Intercollegiate title MEN’S GOLF FROM PAGE 12 then ended his round on 18 to finish with a four-over 75 on Saturday. “We didn’t play that great the first day,” Willis said. “But we definitely played much better the second day.” The Bulldogs made their charge during the second round. The team shot a combined 297, the lowest team score on the day by five strokes. Team captain Bradley Kushner ’13 rebounded from a tough eight-over first round to lead the Elis on Sunday, shooting a one-over 72. Willis was hot on the cap-

tain’s heels, nearly matching him with a two-over 72, while Bernstein finished with a five-over 76. “The team is very resilient and we know that if we are in striking distance of the lead we have a shot to win,” Bernstein said. “We have come from behind to win both at [the Princeton Invitational] and Century, and that experience will serve us well if we are in a similar position next weekend.” Willis noted that the team’s performance was especially noteworthy given both the difficulty of the course and the tough playing conditions, which featured strong winds and harsh cold.

With the victories at the Century Intercollegiate and the previous weekend’s Princeton Invitational, the Bulldogs seem to be peaking at the perfect time as the season comes to a close. “I’d definitely say we have some good momentum coming off these past couple weeks,” Willis said. The team will conclude its season at the Ivy League Championships next weekend at the Caves Valley Golf Club in Owings Mill, Md. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alex.eppler@yale.edu .

SAMANTHA GARDNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Skipper Cameron Cullman ’13 placed second in the A division, and Eric Anderson ‘16 placed fifth in the single-handed division.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Chicago 90 Brooklyn 82

SOCCER Man Utd 3 Aston Villa 0

SPORTS QUICK HITS

NHL Detroit 4 Phoenix 0

y

ANDREW MILLER ’13 HCA PLAYER OF MONTH Men’s ice hockey team captain Andrew Miller ’13 was awarded the Hockey Commissioners’ Association National Division I Player of the Month for March/ April Monday. Miller signed a one-year entry-level contract with the Edmonton Oilers last week.

WOMEN’S LACROSSE TO TAKE ON BU TOMORROW LAST HOME GAME OF THE SEASON The women’s lacrosse team will have its last home game at Reese Stadium on Wednesday 4 p.m. against Boston University. If the Bulldogs manage to take down the Terriers, the Elis will end this season with a winning record.

NHL Pittsburgh 3 Ottawa 1

NHL Winnipeg 2 Buffalo 1

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“I think we really need to play our best against Harvard so that we can get some momentum for the Ivy Tournament.”

BRANDON MANGAN ’14 ATTACKMAN, M.LAX

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Bulldogs build momentum SAILING

Elis win second straight BY ALEX EPPLER STAFF REPORTER The men’s golf team continued its tear last weekend, capturing the Century Intercollegiate title and winning its second tournament in a row.

MEN’S GOLF

’16, sailing in his first intersectional regatta for the coed team, placed fifth in the single-handed division. Unlike previous weekends that saw capricious winds and regular postponements, a steady 15-18 knot breeze and strong current allowed the race committee to sail all 15 races in each division on Saturday. Kate Gaumond ’15, who is a member of the women’s team and did not participate in the Admiral’s Cup, said, however, that strong winds and

Sam Bernstein ’14 and Joe Willis ’13 led the Elis over the course of the two-day tournament, both posting scores of 149 to tie for third overall. Dartmouth’s Charlie Edler and Princeton’s Quinn Prchal tied for the individual title at the event, hosted by Yale at the Century Country Club, by shooting 145 each. The Elis started slow during the first round on Saturday. They shot a combined 303 during the round, paced by Bernstein, who shot a two-over 73, and Thomas Greenhalgh ’15, with 75. At the end of the day, the team was in fourth place out of the eight teams in the field, trailing first-place Dartmouth by seven strokes. “One thing that we can really improve on and that we’ve seen in the last two tournaments is getting off to a good start,” Kushner said. “We need to be sure we’re focused going into the first round.” Greenhalgh played a challenging but impressive round Saturday, leading to his eventual fourth-place finish for the Bulldogs. Kushner said Greenhalgh often found himself having to make tough shots to keep his score down. On the 17th hole, he launched a ball into a sand trap. Yet this misfortune set up one of the day’s nicest shots, as the sophomore sunk a bunker shot,

SEE SAILING PAGE 11

SEE MEN’S GOLF PAGE 11

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The coed sailing team competed in the Admiral’s Cup hosted by King’s Point Merchant Marine Academy and finished fourth overall. BY NIKOLAS LASKARIS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While the Boston Marathon bombings forced the Women’s New England Championships to be postponed, the coed sailors nevertheless headed to New York to compete in the Admiral’s Cup, finishing fourth overall in the competitive field.

SAILING Hosted by King’s Point Merchant Marine Academy, the Admiral’s

Cup marked the final intersectional regatta of the spring, with only two events — the ICSA Semifinal Dinghy Championships and Nationals — remaining on the Elis’ calendar. The event was raced in a three-division format, with two double-handed divisions and one single-handed division, which forced the Bulldogs to showcase their depth in a variety of sailing formats. They did just that, finishing in the top-five in each of the divisions to place fourth overall in the event. Crew Charlotte Belling ’16 said

that the cancellation of the women’s regatta turned out to be beneficial for the coeds. “Because the women’s regatta was canceled, we were lucky enough to have some really talented crews, Eugenia Custo Grieg ’15 and Amanda Salvesen ’14, with us,” she said. Skipper Cameron Cullman ’13, sailing variably with crews Salvesen, Custo Grieg and Belling, placed second in the A division. Salvesen and Custo Grieg also sailed in the B division with skipper Max Nickbarg ’15, finishing fifth. Eric Anderson

Star attackman reflects on season BY FREDERICK FRANK STAFF REPORTER Men’s lacrosse attackman Brandon Mangan ’14 has had a strong season for the Bulldogs thus far, ranking first on the team with 30 goals and 22 assists. The Wantagh, N.Y., native ranks second in the Ivy League and seventh in the nation in points per game and, as the Elis’ top threat on offense, has started every game over the past two seasons for the Bulldogs. The News sat down with Mangan to discuss his lacrosse experiences, the team’s success and the legacy he hopes to leave.

impressive to even be mentioned in the same sentence as Matt Gibson ’12 or John Reese ’90 who have provided so much to this program. It’s really amazing but those records are not on the top of my list. I just want to win an Ivy League Tournament this year, make it to the NCAA’s and make it to the final four. Individual accolades don’t really matter to me — everything on my mind is team oriented. Kessenich on Inside Lacrosse put QQuint you as one of his top-12 players under the

started your interest in lacrosse and QWhat why attack?

radar and you rank second only to highlytouted Cornell attackman Rob Panell in points per game in the Ivy League. Is it somewhat justifying for you that people are starting to recognize your exploits on the field?

A

A

When my brother started playing lacrosse, I was just playing t-ball and that wasn’t really for me. I was the mascot for his team — he is four years older than me — so I started playing lacrosse in second grade. Ever since then I fell in love. My brother was a defenseman so growing up we played a lot of one-on-ones, and I guess that naturally made me into an attackman.

Q

You have had quite the productive season so far. You are three points away from breaking into Yale’s all-time career record for points and your 52 points put you 14th for a single season on Yale’s records, and you still have games left? What is it like knowing that you are already part of Yale’s records and have an additional season of lacrosse to go in your career?

A

Honestly I didn’t know that, but it’s pretty cool. … Yale has a really rich 130-year history of college lacrosse, and it’s

Yale drops No. 1 spot in Ivies

It’s cool but I haven’t ever been that recognized. … I am trying to make a name for myself, but the only thing that matters to me are the four letters on the front of the jersey. This year’s senior class has really instilled that in us and it’s something I have definitely taken to heart.

Q

You talked about the team and the amazing team spirit. Is there anything that sets this team apart from other Yale teams you have played on?

A

SAMANTHA GARDNER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain Elizabeth Epstein ‘13, above, took down Harvard’s Hideko Tachibana in singles 6-1, 6-4 at No. 1. BY JASMINE HORSEY STAFF REPORTER

I think we feed off of those past teams. We are trying to prove to the alumni that we will continue their legacy and keep the program. This year’s senior class took an under .500 program and they have done a heck of a job of keeping this thing rolling, becoming the winningest class in Yale lacrosse history. Every team wants to help

The No. 35 women’s tennis team had mixed success in Ivy League play over the weekend, defeating Dartmouth 5 –2 but losing to archrival Harvard by the same score.

SEE MEN’S LACROSSE PAGE 11

In the last home match of the

WOMEN’S TENNIS

TOP ’DOG BRANDON MANGAN ’14

season, the Bulldogs first faced Dartmouth in the CullmanHeyman Tennis Center on Friday. The doubles play got off to a rocky start, with No. 1 pairing Madeleine Hamilton ’16 and Annie Sullivan ’14 dropping their match to the Big Green 5-8. But captain Elizabeth Epstein ’13 and Hanna Yu ’15 took down their opponents comfortably at No. 2, while No. 3 duo Courtney Amos ’16 and Amber Li ’15 also enjoyed

an 8-6 success. With the doubles point secured, the Elis were eager to make an impact in singles play. At No. 1, Epstein, ranked No. 67 in the nation, suffered a 6-4, 6-1 loss to Dartmouth’s Katherine Yau. Hamilton fought back after dropping the first set 2-6 at No. 2, taking the next two sets by the same score. At No. 3, SulliSEE WOMEN’S TENNIS PAGE 11

THE ATTACKMAN LEADS THE MEN’S LACROSSE TEAM WITH 30 GOALS AND 22 ASSISTS THIS SEASON. Mangan recorded two goals and one assist against Maryland last Saturday.

Today's Paper  

April 23, 2013

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you