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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 91 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLEAR

35 27

CROSS CAMPUS

BIRDS, DEER DOCUMENTING ELM CITY FAUNA

ARCHITECTURE

VEGANS

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Symposium talks politics of Berlin buildings, Hitler as architect

5-YEAR-OLD IN COW SUIT A CONFERENCE ATTENDEE AT YALE

Bulldogs split weekend and see their hopes for an Ivy title plummet

PAGE 8 THROUGH THE LENS

PAGE 3 CULTURE

PAGE 5 SCI-TECH

PAGE 14 SPORTS

Hendrie to see 2014 renovation

Telling it like it is. In a Friday

New York Times profile of BuzzFeed editor-in-chief and Yale alum Ben Smith ’99, Smith defended the depth and importance of the content provided by the popular website. As an example, Smith called Buzzfeed’s April 2012 post “33 Animals Who Are Disappointed in You” a “work of literature,” arguing that it took the author “like 15 hours finding images of animals that would express the particular palette of human emotion he was going for … and that in some ways is harder and more competitive than, say, political reporting.”

BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER

major construction projects put on hold in 2008 when administrators grew concerned about the University’s finances following the onset of the economic downturn. After

After extreme weather conditions caused administrators to cancel class for the second time this year, Yale College Dean Mary Miller is working to devise plans for future emergency course rescheduling. In a Friday email to faculty and students, Miller outlined recommendations for professors rescheduling classes and announced the creation of a committee to look into ways to deal with class cancellations. Miller said the registrar’s office has made classrooms available on Saturday, Feb. 23 and Sunday, March 3 for professors who want to reschedule the classes they missed on Feb. 11 and Feb. 12, and encouraged faculty not to schedule courses during reading period at the end of the semester. Though Miller said no solution for course rescheduling will be “perfect,” she added that the new committee, which will comprise faculty members and students nominated by the Yale College Council, will work with the Emergency Operations Center to create recommendations for future situations.

SEE HENDRIE PAGE 6

SEE ACADEMICS PAGE 4

Uh oh. It looks like Blizzard

Nemo is not quite finished with the Elm City just yet. According to a Saturday email from Branford Master Elizabeth Bradley GRD ’96, there was a major gas leak by Branford under High Street on Friday night. Though the issue will be resolved soon, Bradley said in her email that it will require major road upheaval and repair in the spring.

To infinity and beyond. In

celebration of “National Engineers Week” — a national event series that aims to celebrate the contributions engineers make to society — Yale will host activities throughout the week to honor the University’s engineering culture. These events will range from entrepreneurship panels and ice cream socials to networking sessions and engineering trivia night.

Activism on Cross Campus.

Students involved with the Yale Global Health and AIDS Coalition were spotted on Cross Campus on Friday protesting President Barack Obama’s proposed budget cuts to the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). In addition to asking students and passersby to sign a White House petition urging the president not to “break [their] hearts,” the organizers launched a photo campaign to spread the word on Facebook. Speak no evil. In a Sunday Washington Post editorial, Robert Barnes questioned why Supreme Court Justice and Yale Law alum Clarence Thomas LAW ’74 never asks questions during oral arguments. Thomas, who is famous for his silence on the bench, reportedly jots down inquiries once in a while and asks fellow Justice Stephen Breyer to pose them on his behalf, according to Barnes. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1971 The waterbed arrives in New Haven and immediately causes a stir. Recommended for those afflicted by insomnia, arthritis and impotency, the waterbed drives Yalies to question whether the new product will replace the standard mattress, and even encourages one entrepreneurial student to start selling waterbeds out of his dorm. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Courses scheduled for the weekend

EARL LEE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Construction on Hendrie Hall will begin in May 2014. Renovations will include new practice rooms and a student lounge. BY SOPHIE GOULD AND SARAH SWONG STAFF REPORTERS Four years after the onset of the recession prompted Yale to halt plans for the renovation of Hendrie Hall, administrators said they hope

construction will begin in May 2014. The $45-million renovation of the building — which houses practice spaces and offices for undergraduate musical organizations, along with some School of Music departments — was one of the seven

Students back early mayoral candidates BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Less than nine months before November’s mayoral election, Yale students are beginning to coalesce around two candidates vying for the mayor’s office. Ward 10 Alderman Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 and Connecticut State Rep. Gary

Holder-Winfield have thus far won the support of a handful students, who say they will come together in the next couple of weeks to engage other members of the Yale community about the election and try to increase student awareness of New Haven politics. With a number of potential candidates still unclear about their intentions, politically active Yale

Sergeants graduate leadership school BY LORENZO LIGATO STAFF REPORTER Nineteen newly promoted New Haven Police sergeants were sitting in a seminar room of the University of New Haven’s Saw Mill Road facility on Friday afternoon when NHPD Chief Dean Esserman walked in, followed by his four assistant chiefs, bearing freshly minted diplomas. The group of sergeants had just finished taking their final examination for Sergeant Supervisory School, a new leadership and crime-fighting training program for police supervisors developed by the NHPD in partnership with the University of New Haven and Yale University. As Esserman called their names one by one, the sergeants rose from their seats and received from him a framed certificate testifying the completion of the 80-hour intensive program. For two weeks, the 19 policemen — who were promoted to the rank of sergeant at a Feb. 1 ceremony — took classes in a variety of fields, including leadership devel-

opment, corruption control, police legitimacy and media relations. “This program is the first of its kind in the nation,” said program head John DeCarlo, who served as the chief of the Branford Police Department before becoming an associate professor of criminal justice at the University of New Haven in 2011. “These sergeants have been taught what can be considered the most cutting-edge policing philosophy in the United States,” he added. During the two-week training, about a dozen academic professors and former police chiefs came to share their research and experiences with the sergeants. Teachers included Yale Law School professor Tom Tyler, Yale psychiatrist Steven Marans, former New Haven Police Chief Nicholas Pastore and former Boston Police Department Senior Administrator Jim Jordan. The syllabus — covering fields such as psychology, special incident and SEE SERGEANTS PAGE 4

students said they are waiting for the field to develop before they pick a candidate. In particular, the potential candidacy of Ward 5 Alderman and Board of Aldermen President Jorge Perez may still shake up the race, as local city leadership is likely to support the laborbacked alderman. On Feb. 3, Jon Silverstone ’15 sent an email to a number of

students announcing his plans to form a group of students to work on behalf of Elicker. Citing the alderman’s youth and leadership as chair of the New Haven Board of Aldermen’s City Services Committee, Silverstone wrote in his email about Elicker’s ability to “lead the city in a fresh direction” in a period that he characterized as “open season at City Hall”

following Mayor John DeStefano Jr.’s announcement that he will not seek reelection after 19 years in office. Silverstone told the News that he has not yet had a chance to meet with interested students and declined further comment. Two days later, a group of SEE CANDIDATES PAGE 4

Holder-Winfield hosts kickoff

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale students greeted mayoral candidate Gary Holder-Winfield in the back of The Greek Olive Saturday. BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER STAFF REPORTER Fifteen days after filing papers to run for mayor, Connecticut State Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield kicked off his campaign Saturday with a public event in Long Wharf. Nearly 70 people — including a handful of HolderWinfield’s colleagues in the Connecticut House and seven

Yale students — flocked to the back room of The Greek Olive to greet the candidate and hear about his vision for New Haven. A state representative for parts of New Haven and Hamden, Holder-Winfield leaned heavily on his experience with state politics in pitching his candidacy to attendees, stressing ties to legislators across Connecticut as his principal

qualification for mayor. “The mayor of the city can’t just sit in the city,” Holder-Winfield said. “You need to go out and sell the city. I have relationships with people all over the state.” Those relationships were made evident by Connecticut House Rep. Patricia Billie SEE HOLDER-WINFIELD PAGE 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “I have no intention of going away. It is Yalies who are transient yaledailynews.com/opinion

I

VIEW WARNER TO WOODBRIDGE

Preempting the Singapore dilemma

Y

ale must define its values before they become contested abroad. with Singaporean law. When these confrontations arise, we expect President Salovey, as well as Yale-NUS president Pericles Lewis, to defend Yale’s values immediately and uncompromisingly — especially those that extend beyond academic freedom. These will be moments for principled leadership. Yale needs a president willing to criticize a partner, willing to respect cultural differences while remaining faithful to the University’s ideals. To complete this intellectual defense of Yale values, the Salovey administration must develop and explain how Yale will respond when our values and Singaporean law contradict. By crafting contingency plans now — establishing lines of communication and clarifying how Yale-NUS and the Singaporean government are each responsible for enforcing Singaporean law — Yale can avoid fumbling on an international stage. Reaffirming our commitment to Yale values abroad — and addressing its impact on our University's reputation — will go a long way in assuaging dissent and frustration with this unfortunate venture. It will allow the Yale community to accept the value of YaleNUS as an experiment — one whose positive consequences can be celebrated, but whose negative ramifications will be met with adequate preparation. Only by upholding the Yale in its name can YaleNUS create a community that offers its students the opportunities for intellectual discourse and responsible citizenship they deserve.

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 91

'THEANTIYALE' ON 'UPHOLDING OUR ANTHEM'

The culture of Yale College

NEWS’

Yale has committed itself to Yale-NUS — it is too late to turn back now. The college will open in six months, during the first semester of Peter Salovey’s presidency. The campus provides an opportunity for Yale to introduce the liberal arts in a country that greatly promotes pre-professionalism. The breadth and discourse of our liberal arts education are intellectual values we believe in and uphold each day in our pursuits in New Haven. But in Yale’s first campus abroad, our University will need to define which other Yale values are universal — within New Haven or without. Defining clear principles for the future of Yale-NUS is the only way for our University to avoid the embarrassment we foresee. In one of his first acts in Woodbridge Hall, President Salovey must clearly announce the values he believes cannot be compromised at this new campus. Singapore presents specific challenges to an institution that supposedly prides itself on free expression, civil liberties and non-discrimination. When Yale-NUS opens its doors, real conflicts will no longer be dismissible as mere hypotheticals. Defending an unjustifiable anti-homosexuality law under the grounds that it is rarely enforced will not be enough when a YaleNUS student is persecuted under 377A. When students push the boundaries of political expression, YaleNUS will have to decide how it will respond to action that is incompatible

invaders.”

n a “the emperor has no clothes” moment, a faculty committee recently concluded that grade inflation plagues Yale. The solution? Replace letter grades with numbers on a zero-to-one-hundred scale. While certainly deserving of consideration, this proposed policy misses a broader issue: Grade inflation is the symptom of our undergraduate culture. We cannot discuss why students gravitate toward easier courses with guaranteed A-minuses, without discussing the social and academic pressures that drive Yale College. In many ways, our culture is defined by whom we let into Yale — and what happens when newly minted freshmen come onto campus. Elite institutions of higher education select for a particular type of applicant: someone who avoids risks, works both hard and consistently, and dominates a small range of extracurricular activities — think model UN, a varsity team or student councils. When they graduate high school, goal-oriented freshmen find themselves without a clear

definition of success. Once at Yale, you no longer need to get into college. For students, the result is ambiguity and a bit NATHANIEL of anxiety. We ZELINSKY wonder, “How do I succeed here?” On Point As we seek b e n c h m a rks for what it means to “win Yale,” we look to what older students have done. We too often pick some socially approved extracurriculars, and make advancement in them our goal. (Right now, founding a start-up is a particularly hip way to succeed.) As we become sophomores and juniors, the goals shift: getting into the right sorority or secret society, to give two typical examples. How does this environment affect our academics? We hear that being a “section asshole” is bad, and so we strive for a kind of bland academic conformity. Our goal becomes getting A’s, in a way that makes it look like

we don’t do all our reading and we party every weekend night. And so, we frequently gravitate toward classes that protect our GPA, without much work — after all, we also need to devote so much of our time to extracurricular advancement. In the free market of shopping period and course evaluations, professors respond in kind, watering down syllabi and standards to meet our new goals.

IT IS TIME FOR US TO CONSIDER OUR CULTURE'S FOCUS What is particularly pernicious about Yale’s culture of conformity, both academic and social, is that we don’t notice it. We often cloak our conventionality in shrouds of uniqueness — we find sexy buzzwords to describe what we study or find some niche, within a larger extracurricular category, in which to specialize. But, at our core, Yalies remain risk averse,

afraid of working too hard while simultaneously loathing Bs — a measure of failure, of falling short of our goal. So how does this all relate to grade inflation? The bottom line is that a new grading system will not change Yale’s underlying culture. We will still seek out easier courses, and we will still poorly rate a professor who values intellectualism over academic conformity. Sure, professors can make finer gradations giving out 93s and 94s instead of an A — but grades will still remain high. And to pursue social validation, too many students will continue to prioritize the public success of extracurriculars over the private pleasure of true scholarship. I wish I could offer a pithy solution to our cultural problems, but I cannot — nor, am I sure that all our culture is a problem. But the bottom line is simple: We need to admit that this culture exists before we can tackle its flaws — flaws including and far exceeding grade inflation. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu.

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST JAC KS O N M C H E N RY

Anatomy of a marathon T

hose days when we didn’t have classes, I barely noticed the snow. Thanks to Linda Lorimer, I was spending my time in the heat of DC. I haven’t been able to turn away from House of Cards, the new, Netflix-designed thriller that features standard-issue political thriller components: evil Kevin Spacey, affairs between congressmen and the press and a devious Southern pronunciation of the h in “majority whip.” This sort of escapism has a weird way of bleeding into the rest of my life. About three seasons through Friday Night Lights, which I mowed through during Winter Finals, I was pretty sure that I was starting to care about football and, if not that, then definitely Connie Britton’s hair. Game of Thrones made me terrified of magical skinny blonde women (so basically yoga teachers). And I have to relearn to pause after sentences if I watch too many consecutive episodes of Gilmore Girls or The West Wing. Of course, that’s part of the fun. When you marathon a television show, you own it. Peo-

ple I know have bragged about spending a single weekend on The Wire. One of my friends once made a double-digit checklist of all the shows online which she had started, was planning to watch or was currently in the middle of watching.

WHEN YOU WATCH A TELEVISION SHOW, YOU OWN IT In this way, Internet television watching becomes a race, Indiana Jones-style, before someone accidentally-on-purpose lets slip who dies in the third season finale. And, in this sense, at least in college, television shows become intensely personal. But there’s a difference between catching up on a show that’s still on the air and the truly solitary experience of watching one that’s already ended. With the first kind, friends share the week-to-week banter of “Dowager said what?” or “OK, Car-

rie’s just insane” enjoyed by fans of Downton Abbey or Homeland. For older shows, you have to stake out dried-up message boards to get your explanations for the smoke monster on Lost or the first season of Heroes. My personal favorite find, buried deep within my Netflix account’s recommended cue, was Felicity. I can’t really recommend the show, unless you, like me, enjoy “90s dramadies featuring a Strong Female lead,” but I do recommend the experience. You see, when I was watching Felicity, I would disappear into a world where I had nobody to communicate with. I couldn’t tell my friends when Felicity cut her hair (bad idea), or when she got with Noel (better one). And I didn’t really want to. I would merely sit in my bed, or go to Bass if I wanted to be obnoxious to the people sitting around me and exchange Yale University for late-90s NYU. In college, this escapism is hard to find. We are trained to think very hard about our own lives, our goals, what we want from other people. Even when

we relax, we don’t stop trying to keep up. Maybe I’m just terrible at beer pong, but I’ve never felt totally at peace at a college party. And so I spend blocks of my weekend in alternate worlds. And, in these worlds, there’s always a Christmas Episode or Valentine’s Day Special. Relationships start and end at set points in time and people get to confront each other in eloquent tirades, rather than drunk texts. I know that other people do too. They may not want to talk about their trips to Sterling Cooper, Rockefeller Center or Pawnee, Indiana and I’m not about to ask — those are their lives, their 2 a.m. study breaks and their cliffhangers to ponder. I only ask the roommates not to interrupt, the people at the table behind me in Commons not to judge and my studymates in Bass to ignore when I’m laughing or crying in my cubicle. I know it’s fake; just don’t break the spell right now. JACKSON MCHENRY is a sophomore in Silliman College. Contact him at jackson.mchenry@yale.edu .

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T J UA N CA R L O S C E R D A

A lesson on SB 475 C

onnecticut State Democratic Representative Roberta B. Willis is an amiable woman. Intelligent and accomplished. A former teacher and activist. People know Ms. Willis for her charitable contributions to children’s education, health programs and youth service groups. She is not unlike many of our elementary school teachers. So you wouldn’t expect her to crush the dreams of hundreds of high school collegehopefuls. On February 22, Representative Willis will do just that. She will kill Senate Bill 475, a potential piece of legislation that would allow undocumented Connecticut students to receive institutional and state financial aid. Currently, SB 475 is stalled in the Connecticut Higher Education Committee, and Representative Willis is the last member of the committee who refuses to let the bill move forward for a public hearing. Her intransigence will be disastrous for the cause of higher education. College education remains beyond the means of most undocumented students. A 2011 Connecticut state law, which Willis supported, guarantees that undocumented Connecticut residents do not have to pay out-of-state tuition fees. This

measure has eased the financial burden of these students, but they still face more than $8,000 in education-related costs per year. This high cost of tuition serves as a deterrent to college attendance. Scholarships and grants also remain beyond the reach of immigrant students. Without a social security number, they are ineligible to apply for state financial aid, which is reserved for permanent legal residents. Although technically eligible for institutional aid, undocumented students are barred from obtaining public university scholarships because the applications also require a social security number. SB 475 would address these challenges. Under this piece of legislation, Connecticut would prohibit state universities from denying aid to students on the basis of their immigration status. The Connecticut Board of Regents would be required to create a FAFSA-like financial aid application that would not require a social security number. SB 475 would also aid students who attend community college. Connecticut would require twoyear institutions to set aside a portion of their tuition funds for undocumented students in need. Thus, immigrant students

who cannot afford to attend state universities would still have options to finance their education at community colleges. Unfortunately, people like Rep. Willis oppose these proposed measures. They think that SB 475 is “too controversial” and that Connecticut taxpayers would not support subsidizing immigrant education.

UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS DESERVE FINANCIAL SUPPORT FOR COLLEGE But Willis ignores the benefits that SB 475 would have for the entire state. Granting state and institutional financial aid to qualified students will stimulate better academic performance in schools and increase high school graduation rates — especially among immigrant populations. Undocumented students will be motivated to improve their grades if they know that a college education is financially feasible. More undocumented college students will be able to earn a degree and obtain high-pay-

ing jobs, which will increase tax revenues for the state government. State legislators thus have a powerful incentive to subsidize immigrant education. Taxpayers will benefit as well. Higher college graduation rates among immigrant populations could lead to lower expenditures on state health and welfare programs, which are typically spent on undocumented minorities. Do these economic benefits sound “too controversial”? Considering her background in education and social activism, Rep. Willis should support SB 475. Education is the most precious gift that we can give to our youth. Rejecting SB 475 would be a heartless decision that would leave undocumented students with little hope for improving their lives. If Roberta Willis succeeds in stopping the bill in the Higher Education Committee this week, then Connecticut will lose a generation full of educated workers and citizens. Whether Willis admits it or not, her decision would be the harshest lesson that she could ever teach us. JUAN CARLOS CERDA is a sophomore in Berkeley College. Contact him at juan.cerda@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Police arrested two kids yesterday, one was drinking battery acid, the other was eating fireworks. They charged one and let the other one off.” TOMMY COOPER

Yale-NUS hires rector

Symposium reflects on Berlin’s architecture BY YANAN WANG AND ERIC XIAO STAFF REPORTERS Architects, historians and critics convened in Rudolph Hall this weekend to discuss the political and historical significance of Berlin architecture, past and present. The School of Architecture’s “Achtung: Berlin” symposium took place from Thursday night to Saturday afternoon and drew roughly 100 participants. Organized by professor Stanislaus von Moos, the event featured talks and panel discussions led by professional architects and German historians alike to examine the architectural development of Berlin from the postWorld War II era to the present. School of Architecture Dean Robert A.M. Stern said the city is unique in that nearly every building of consequence is a subject of political debate. “Berlin used to be a laboratory of architecture livelier than any other in Europe,” von Moos said. “If you see the divide between east and west as one of the great themes of the period from 1945 to 1989, Berlin is the place where all this came together.” Highlighting the architecture of Berlin’s Nazi-era, several speakers addressed the controversial public perception of these structures today. Many of Berlin’s older structures were designed by Hitler and his chief architect Albert Speer, and these buildings have lost respect because of their affiliation with Nazism, explained Léon Krier, a visiting professor at the School of Architecture. “[Hitler] was a monster, but he was also somebody who understood architecture and scale,” Krier said. “The question becomes why we cannot admire a great architect who was also a criminal.” Krier added that Nazi architecture is criticized more than other industries affiliated with Nazism, such as Volkswagen or factories that supplied bombs for the war. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, many new architectural projects were initiated, but Von Moos said this phase of development is yet to be fully completed. Lacking the economic power to become “a true capital of Germany,” Berlin continues to be a subject of debate for urban planners, he added,

particularly in light of its varied building successes and failures in the last 30 years. Other speakers expressed hope that Berlin could become a thriving metropolis. Volker Hassemer, a former member of the Berlin House of Representatives, discussed possible future conditions for Berlin’s development. “Berlin must be aware of its importance and why it is seeking to obtain global importance,” Hassemer said. Hassemer explained that Berlin’s importance stems in part from the city’s open-minded atmosphere. He added that the spirit of Berlin discourages an “us vs. them” attitude, making it open to new people and fresh beginnings.

If you see the divide between east and west as one of the great themes of the period from 1945 to 1989, Berlin is the place where all this came together. STANISLAUS VON MOOS Event organizer “[Berlin in the 1990s] was a place for people who did not know what they wanted or where they wanted to be,” New York Times architecture critic Michael Kimmelman ’80 said. “It was a very accepting place.” Four students interviewed at the symposium said they enjoyed hearing about the German public’s reception of their buildings. Edward Hsu ARC ’13 said the symposium would have been too abstract without these accounts. “I feel there was a good balance between theoretical approaches and real-life projects,” said Jessica Angel, an intern at the New York-based firm Eisenman Architects. The Berlin Wall was demolished on Nov. 9, 1989.

BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER Yale-NUS science professor Brian McAdoo will serve as the new college’s inaugural rector — a position equivalent to that of a resident college master at Yale. McAdoo, who joined the Singaporean college’s faculty in September 2012 after teaching at Vassar College for 14 years, will assume the position this July with an initial term of two years. During its inaugural 2013-’14 academic year, YaleNUS will have one residential college before expanding to three colleges by 2015. McAdoo’s duties as rector will include overseeing residential college life and creating activities for students in collaboration with YaleNUS Dean of Students Kyle Farley. Yale-NUS administrators cited McAdoo’s experience working at a liberal arts college and his approachable personality as the key assets that qualified him for the position. McAdoo said he will draw on Singapore’s geographic location to organize student activities unique to the new liberal arts college. “I see this as an opportunity to consider the whole student — not just the one who engages intellectual material in the classroom, but the one that has passions that exist in the outside world, including travel, sports, food, music, spirituality, you name it,” McAdoo said. Yale-NUS administrators offered McAdoo the position of rector after he participated in last month’s Experience Yale-NUS Weekend — an opportunity for admitted students

Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu . Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

to hear sample lectures from professors and meet members of the college’s community. Students “loved” McAdoo’s lecture, Farley said, adding that he is “a very cool guy and students will find it easy to engage with him.” McAdoo said he and his family plan to eat most meals with students in the dining hall and that he plans to invite students for homecooked meals in his home on a regular basis.

I see this as an opportunity to consider the whole student … the one that has passions that exist in the outside world. BRIAN MCADOO Inaugural Yale-NUS college rector Yale-NUS President Pericles Lewis said administrators considered a number of candidates both from within and outside the YaleNUS community, but ultimately decided that a person who has been involved in planning the school’s co-curricular activities would be most appropriate for the rectorship. McAdoo helped craft the Learning Across Boundaries initiative, a week-long program during which all Yale-NUS students will undertake a research project outside of the traditional classroom setting as part of the school’s attempt to bolster experiential learning. McAdoo said he wants to take

advantage of the geography and history of the region in developing activities for future students. In addition to organizing events such as Rector’s Teas and campus-wide lectures — to which the college will invite prominent individuals from Singapore and abroad to address students — McAdoo said he plans to take weekend trips with students. “Perhaps once a semester, we can take a weekend trip to Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand or another nearby location,” McAdoo said. “The students will need breaks from the rigorous academics, and getting offcampus — possibly off-island — is a stimulating way to just regroup.” Farley and Bailyn cited McAdoo’s fieldwork in the region as an additional asset to his involvement with student life at the Singaporean college. McAdoo, a tsunami scientist, joined United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization post-tsunami survey teams in Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia in 2004 and has been doing research in Southeast Asia ever since. “His academic interests are directly tied to the region and he will be keen to bring students into the field,” Farley said. “His intellectual passions are inherently interdisciplinary and work very well within the curriculum.” Each rector will have a co-rector equivalent to the position of a residential college dean. McAdoo’s corector has not been appointed yet. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .

BRIAN MCADOO Brian McAdoo earned his B.S. in geology from Duke University in 1991 and his Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 1999. As part of his research at Santa Cruz, he traveled to the bottom of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans in the research submarine Alvin seven times. Before joining Yale-NUS, McAdoo was an associate professor of earth science at Vassar College, where he also served on several committees — including committees on environmental studies, faculty tenure, diversity and residential life. After the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, McAdoo traveled to Sri Lanka, the Maldives and Indonesia as part of UNESCO reconnaissance teams, researching how geophysical hazards can create disasters. He has also taken part in and led post-disaster surveys in the Gulf of Mexico (2005), Java (2006), the Solomon Islands (2007), Samoa (2009) and Haiti (2010).

Activism encouraged at Black Solidarity Conference

KATHRYN CRANDALL/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale’s 18th Annual Black Solidarity Conference drew roughly 200 students past weekend. The conference centered around activism in the modern era and included panels, a career fair and a concert. BY LAVINIA BORZI STAFF REPORTER Roughly 200 students flocked to campus this weekend to participate in Yale’s 18th Annual Black Solidarity Conference, which centered around activism in the modern era. The conference, which concluded with a celebration at the Omni Hotel Saturday night, included several events throughout Friday and Saturday such as panels on education and virtual activism, a professional networking career fair and a concert at Toad’s. Marc Morial, the keynote speaker and current president of the civil rights advocacy group the National Urban League, discussed the economic and political issues facing young African Americans today. “The objective is not a postracial America”, Morial said. “It is a post-racist America, a mul-

ticultural America.” Morial traced the ways in which several major events in U.S. history from 1863 to the present related to AfricanAmerican identity, such as the imprisonment of Martin Luther King Jr., the Great Depression, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the re-election of President Barack Obama. He said the questions raised by these historical events are relevant to today’s younger African-American generation because they show a “tragedy and triumph of black and brown youth.” Morial outlined several challenges that present-day AfricanAmerican youth must address, including poverty, income, globalization and the new concept of diversity. He said the strength of the United States comes from its multiculturalism, and that everyone must be proud of their

origins outside of the United States. Society still needs to adapt fully to its “new diversity,” he said, adding that the change is positive because it allows ethnic nuances to emerge and the corresponding differences between races to be respected.

It sounds cliché but it’s a great reminder that ‘yes we can’ do this, ‘yes we can’ actually change things. MAYA DOIG Middlebury College Freshman At a Saturday morning panel called “From the Classroom to the Community: The Importance of an Education,” six panelists spoke about the impor-

tance of teaching students about African-American history and government. The panel — which included Calhoun College Master Jonathan Holloway, Teach for America participant Evan Hendon, Reverend Forrest Pritchett, motivational speakers Tina and Trina Fletcher and Emmanuel Paul Sterling, a representative from the non-profit organization City Year — encouraged the students in the audience to take an active role in helping younger African-American kids at public schools through mentoring programs. “Be that person who gets up and goes over to the school — talk to the principal, talk to the baseball coach and see if you can tutor [the] students,” Tina Fletcher said. Fletcher said she thinks classroom education is essential to helping African-American students develop character,

which will in turn reduce crime rates. All panelists agreed that the public education system in the United States needs to be reformed to foster a more constructive learning process that will motivate kids to concentrate on their studies and develop career ambitions. Holloway said he believes the humanities and, specifically, the history of slavery are the most important subjects to teach African-American youth, because these parts of history are constantly neglected by both white and African American educators. “So much of American History is about liberation and how awesome we are,” Holloway said, “but we can’t understand freedom if we don’t understand slavery.” Throughout the weekend’s events, the audience — almost entirely composed of African

American undergraduates — responded with claps, snaps of the fingers and words of agreement. Students interviewed at the conference said they were grateful to have the opportunity to meet with a large group of African-Americans from their own generation. Six students said that being exposed to African-American leaders from academic and political fields was empowering because it helped them realize their own potential. “It sounds cliché but it’s a great reminder that ‘yes we can’ do this, ‘yes we can’ actually change things,” said Maya Doig, a freshman at Middlebury College. The BSC closed with a Black Church at Yale Morning Service on Sunday morning. Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

40

City leaders look to Perez CANDIDATES FROM PAGE 1 students — including Michael Harris ’14, Rachel Miller ’15 and Tom Stanley-Becker ’13 — launched Yale for Gary Holder-Winfield, which now has a Facebook page that boasts 17 likes and includes a link to the candidate’s remarks in the State House on gun violence. The group organized seven Yale students to attend Holder-Winfield’s Saturday campaign kickoff event in Long Wharf, six of whom say they are officially supporting Holder-Winfield for mayor. Miller, who said her support for Holder-Winfield is the result of his policy accomplishments in the State House, said students involved in Yale for Gary Holder-Winfield will be meeting with the candidate Monday evening for dinner in the Calhoun Fellows’ Lounge. “It will be an opportunity to discuss ways we can be helpful moving forward,” Miller said. “We’re generally going to be canvassing and doing voter registration. A big push will be getting freshmen involved and aware of what’s going on next fall.” Harris said he supports Holder-Winfield because the candidate has a “history of activism in New Haven” and a strong record in the State House, especially as chairman of the Black and Puerto Rican Caucus.

“He has the ability to rally people together instead of just being a managerial mayor,” Harris said. “Elicker is a two-term alderman. I don’t really know of anything he’s gotten passed.” Yale students have yet to come out in support of Sundiata Keitazulu, a plumber and New Haven resident and the third Elm City resident rounding out the current candidates in the mayoral election.

[Holder-Winfield] has the ability to rally people together instead of just being a managerial mayor. MICHAEL HARRIS ’14 Yale College Democrats Communications Director Tyler Blackmon ’16 said the Dems are “officially neutral” as of now — and will work on behalf of whichever candidate wins the Democratic primary this September — although he personally supports Holder-Winfield. In their role as Ward 1 co-chairs, Ben Crosby ’14 and Nia Holston ’14 will cast votes to decide which mayoral candidate the New Haven Democratic Town Committee endorses. The DTC, which is made up of 60 ward co-chairs — two

D E F I N I T E CA N D I DAT E S JUSTIN ELICKER

Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 is currently in his second term as Ward 10 Alderman, representing East Rock, Cedar Hill and part of Fair Haven. He chairs the City Services and Environmental Policy Committee and has worked as an environmental consultant. GARY HOLDER-WINFIELD

Gary Holder-Winfield is a Connecticut state representative serving portions of New Haven and Hamden. He led the 2012 repeal of the death penalty in the State House and has also worked on early childhood education, gay and transgender rights and juvenile justice. Before being elected in 2008, he was involved in community activism in New Haven. SUNDIATA KEITAZULU

Sundiata Keitazulu is a plumber and New Haven resident. He filed candidacy papers on Nov. 14, 2012.

from each of the city’s 30 wards — elects delegates for state primary elections and endorses local candidates, and its endorsement typically carries significant weight in local elections. Crosby said he does not yet know which candidate he would support, adding that he is “excited to see the field of candidates develop.” With a high concentration of labor-backed members, the DTC is expected to throw its weight behind Perez if he enters the race. Perez told the News Sunday that he will be “deciding in the next couple of weeks” whether he will run. “Perez could be an exciting candidate,” Crosby said. He declined to share his opinion of either Elicker or HolderWinfield. Sarah Cox ’14, a member of the activist group Students Unite Now, also signaled interest in Perez’s potential candidacy, adding that she was impressed by his Board leadership on is jobs pipeline, which helps connect city residents to employment opportunities. Hillhouse High School Principal Kermit Carolina, another possible mayoral candidate, told the News Sunday that he would have a decision regarding his plans by mid-March.

event planning and cognitive bias — was designed to educate the new sergeants in “problem-oriented policing,” said Christopher M. Sedelmaier, an associate professor and coordinator of the Crime Analysis Program at the University of New Haven. “This approach takes police and city resources and brings them to bear on a problem within the community,” Sedelmaier said. NHPD sergeant Marco Francia was one of the 19 officers who graduated from the Sergeant Supervisory School. A 24-year veteran of the NHPD, Francia said the training program helps sergeants “create an inclusive environment” and develop “a sense of ownership” in the community. “It’s really the beginning of a change of trends in the department,” Francia said. DeCarlo said he has received positive feedback from the sergeants who entered the training program. Some

recommendations, he added, included devoting more time to subjects like general supervision and corruption control.

What we are trying to effect is systemic change in policing in the U.S. JOHN DECARLO Associate professor of criminal justice, University of New Haven The Sergeant Supervisory School is only the first stage of the Center for Advanced Policing, a new NHPD initiative designed to train future police chiefs by integrating the latest developments in policing research and practical applications of community policing. The Center for Advanced Policing, announced last December, will fully roll out this summer with the executivelevel training school, but the NHPD is

During the snowstorm that occurred last week, New Haven received roughly 34 inches of snow. Hamden, Conn. — roughly six miles from New Haven — received the most snowfall in the state.

Faculty work to make up lost time

Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu . JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

POSSIBLE CA N D I DAT E S KERMIT CAROLINA

Kermit Carolina is the principal of Hillhouse High School. He told the News he would make a decision about a possible candidacy by midMarch. JORGE PEREZ

Jorge Perez is the Ward 5 Alderman and currently serves as president of the Board of Alderman. He told the News he would make a decision about a possible candidacy in the next couple of weeks.

DeCarlo hopes to launch national model SERGEANTS FROM PAGE 1

Inches of snowfall in Hamden, Conn.

currently creating lesson plans for programs targeted at future lieutenants and captains, DeCarlo said. “What we are trying to effect is systemic change in policing in the U.S.,” DeCarlo said, adding that he hopes to launch a model that will be emulated nationwide. DeCarlo added that in the coming weeks the police department will bring together all of New Haven’s top officers — 47 sergeants, nine lieutenants, one captain, the four assistant chiefs and Esserman — to discuss “the philosophy of the department” in a “one- or twoday long management retreat.” The Command College program is funded by a two-year, $350,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice. The sergeant program was partially paid for by the grant, but several instructors volunteered their time for the program, DeCarlo said. Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

Administrators are discussing ways in which to reschedule missed classes effectively during an emergency, such as last weekend’s snowstorm. ACADEMICS FROM PAGE 1 “Not counting discussion sections, there are about 1,000 Yale classes on Monday and Tuesday,” Miller said. “We’ve got hundreds of instructors, thousands of students and dozens of rooms to negotiate, and that’s the challenge.” Miller said she does not expect the new committee to find a “onesize-fits-all solution” for rescheduling classes, but added that she hopes to establish a set of best practices for faculty to follow in making up lost class time. She added that she considered numerous options to compensate for the missed classes this semester, including rescheduling classes on a Friday or during reading period, but she said the number of courses that needed to be accommodated made these options unfeasible. Miller added that she thinks class should not be scheduled during reading period, especially in light of the new calendar put into effect this year, which shortened reading period by two days. Faculty members interviewed said they are compensating for the lost class time on a course-bycourse basis. Several professors said they have opted to condense their lectures rather than reschedule because the complexity of students’ schedules makes it difficult to find a time that would be convenient for all students, while other professors said they will use the recommended Saturday and Sunday makeup times. But all six professors interviewed said they are not concerned that the lost class

time will negatively affect their students. English professor Leslie Brisman said he could not find one time that worked for all students in his “Victorian Poetry” and “Major English Poets: Milton to Eliot” seminars, so he offered two makeup sessions, one last Thursday and one last Friday. “This curse has turned to a blessing,” Brisman said. “The opportunity to meet them in smaller groups gave the reticent a chance to shine, and gave me a chance to get to know all of them better.” All seven students interviewed said they do not expect their classes to be rescheduled because most professors only altered their course syllabi in response to class cancellations during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Jenna Hessert ’14 said many students would be unable to attend class on weekends because of athletic and extracurricular commitments. Students said they do not think missing class negatively affected their academic experience last semester. Abhimanyu Chandra ’14 said his classes last semester made up for the hurricane days without a problem. “I don’t mind having a few faster classes if we have a few days off,” Chandra said. Prior to the 2012-’13 academic year, the last time Yale canceled class was during the 1978 blizzard. Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“With all this crap they put in meat, … only the vegetarians will survive — so let me give you a good piece of advice: if you want to eat some healthy meat, eat a vegetarian!” JEANLUC LEMOINE FRENCH HUMORIST

Students descend on campus for YES-W BY AMY WANG STAFF REPORTER

BRIANNA LOO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The third annual Yale Engineering and Science Weekend drew over 100 science and engineering high school seniors to Yale’s campus.

When most of Yale’s campus was asleep at 9 a.m. on Sunday morning, more than 100 high school students flooded Kroon Hall to learn about brain tumors, mathematical symmetry and robotics. The third annual Yale Engineering and Science Weekend (YES-W) — a three-day program run by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions — drew over 100 highly qualified science and engineering high school seniors from the class of 2017 applicant pool to visit campus and participate in science-related events from Feb. 16 to 18. Though the Admissions Office reached its goal of building an incoming class with 40 percent of students planning to major in the STEM fields for the first time last year, it continues to seek the same percentage of science-oriented students for its next class. The program, which is part of the Admissions Office’s larger plan to recruit the country’s best science and engineering students to Yale, followed a similar format to last year’s weekend and introduced the prospective students to faculty, current students and research opportunities. Jeremiah Quinlan, deputy dean of admissions, said organizers relied on “the success of previous weekends” to design this year’s YESW. “We still take immense pride in the quality of our on-campus programming, and it takes a lot of time and effort to bring all of Yale’s resources together in such a showcase,” Quinlan said, adding that dozens of admissions officers worked with a team of students to

Vegan conference draws diverse crowd

organize the weekend. The schedule for YES-W this year included several master classes with faculty, an undergraduate research symposium and a panel of young alumni, in addition to campus tours and meals in the residential colleges. On Saturday evening, students competed to build a Rube Goldberg machine in the Center for Engineering, Innovation and Design.

There are things so new that they’re not yet in the Admissions Office’s promotional materials. VINCE WILCZYNSKI Deputy dean, School of Engineering and Applied Science High school students at YES-W — all of whom received “likely letters” indicating their probable admission to Yale — said they enjoyed the weekend’s events, though most said they are still undecided about where to attend college. All 11 students interviewed said attending YES-W sharpened their knowledge of Yale’s resources and offerings. “They are definitely spending a lot of energy trying to get us to come to Yale, and I think it’s working,” said Daniel Chen, a YES-W attendee. “Talking to current Yale students, their interesting points of view made my opinion [of Yale] better than it was before.” Another student, Claire Mellon, said she “never really thought

ILAN FISCHER

BY EMMA GOLDBERG STAFF REPORTER This weekend, 120 Ivy League students converged on campus for the second annual iV: Ivy League Vegan Conference, which featured 14 speakers, a career fair and even a 5-year-old attendee dressed in a full-body cow suit. Organized by a leadership team composed of representatives from all eight Ivy League universities, the conference drew a diverse group of participants ranging from academics to non-profit professionals seeking to engage with youth. The event featured speakers including president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States Wayne Pacelle, Yale philosophy professor Shelly Kagan and William Crouch, founder of the nonprofit 80,000 hours. The 2013 conference, directed by Ilan Fischer ’13 and University of Pennsylvania senior Victor Galli, was four times larger than the inaugural one held at Penn last year, Fischer said. “Vegans get questioned all the time by people who don’t agree with us, and it’s amazing to be able to explore the arguments for veganism,” said Dartmouth sophomore Emily Reeves, who attended the conference. “I’m usually being told ‘humans are supposed to eat meat,’ so it’s nice to be around people who agree with me.” The conference organizers said they hoped the event would raise the level of academic discourse about veganism, so they invited professors to share their research on the ethics, health and environmental impact of veganism. The conference’s opening discussion, held in William L. Harkness Hall, featured Milton Mills, director of preventive medicine at the Physicians Committee for Responsi-

ble Medicine, who presented his research demonstrating that humans are not biologically designed to eat meat. He said that societal pressures, such as marketing done by advertising agencies, are partially responsible for humans’ desire to eat meat. “No one asks for pork chops and chicken tenders in the delivery room,” he said to the crowd. “People develop preferences as they get older and it’s in our power to develop healthier eating habits.”

I’m usually being told ‘humans are supposed to eat meat,’ so it’s nice to be around people who agree with me. EMILY REEVES Sophomore attendee, Dartmouth Offering attendees a range of perspectives on veganism, the conference also featured speakers who do not advocate the practice. Yale School of Medicine neuroscientist Gordon Shepherd said that though he is not a vegan, he was persuaded to speak at the conference to share his research in a panel on plant-based diets and nutrition. “The conference organizers wanted to present a lot of different views and not just preach to the converted,” Shepherd said. The conference was not just a hub for academic discussion — it also offered students the opportunity to explore careers in vegan and animal-rights advocacy, and attracted a number of representatives from non-profits including the Humane

League and Farm Sanctuary. Anne Dinshah of the American Vegan Society said the weekend offered her a valuable opportunity to look for interns among a passionate group of students. Fischer said iV’s leaders spent the past nine months coordinating the conference and are currently planning the 2014 conference. While preparing for the event, he learned about attitudes toward veganism at various campuses. Though he said Yale Dining is “accommodating” to vegan students, he learned that Brown’s cafeteria offers vegan chicken tenders. Jennifer Davidson, a Dartmouth sophomore who helped plan this year’s conference, said she hopes to incorporate more interactivity in the 2014 event. “It was so satisfying to see everything come to fruition this weekend, but we’re also figuring out how next year we can involve more movement and have multiple sessions going on at once,” Davidson said. Because the conference organizers wanted to show how veganism can be used to promote the public good, according to their press release, the weekend featured a discussion on college activism. Humane League representative Heather Arsenald said she learned a lot from students about initiatives she can implement in her own community. The iV League consists of the Brown Animal Rights Club, the Columbia Students for Animal Protection, the Cornell Vegan Society, the Dartmouth Animal Welfare Group, Harvard Vegitas, the Penn Vegan Society, the Princeton Animal Welfare Society and the Yale Animal Welfare Alliance. Contact EMMA GOLDBERG at emma.goldberg@yale.edu .

Contact AMY WANG at amy.wang@yale.edu .

City officials blast Malloy budget BY NICOLE NAREA STAFF REPORTER

The second annual Ivy League Vegan Conference took place at Yale this weekend. The conference brought 14 speakers and 120 attendees.

of Yale as an engineering powerhouse” before coming to campus. She added that receiving a likely letter and being invited to the program made her consider Yale more seriously. Vince Wilczynski, deputy dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science and the leader of a Saturday master class on engineering and design, said he enjoyed speaking with excited high school students and witnessing the impact of that excitement on current Yale students involved in YES-W. He added that he feels the weekend gave students a view of Yale’s science offerings beyond the current admissions materials. “There are things so new that they’re not yet in the Admissions Office’s promotional materials, like the CEID and the engineering café,” Wilczynski said. “And you can’t document the connection between faculty and students … except in person.” Yale students who previously participated in YES-W during their senior year of high school also said the weekend significantly changed their level of commitment to Yale. Bechir-Auguste Pierre ’15, who attended the pilot year of the program in 2011, said YES-W provided a strong introduction to Yale’s science culture. “I was really shown that professors care,” he said. “[I also saw] the kinds of research undergraduates were doing — not just cleaning laboratory tools, but actual research.” This year’s YES-W will officially conclude with a reception in Luce Hall on Monday at 5 p.m.

A panel of eight state senators and representatives unanimously criticized Gov. Dannel Malloy’s proposed budget for the coming fiscal year at a Saturday Board of Alderman meeting for cuts that could cripple city services and leave local government with few options to make up lost revenue. Malloy’s budget — which was announced earlier this month and must address a projected $1.2 billion deficit for the fiscal year — stipulates $43.8 billion in spending over the next two years, marks a five percent increase over the state’s current level of spending and does not include any major tax increases. It also proposes to redirect state dollars into local capital improvement funds, which would require cities to use the money for projects such as building new roads or purchasing new equipment, not to pay the salaries of public works employees or subsidize pensions and healthcare. While Malloy claims the distribution of funds will remain the same for New Haven, State Rep. Roland Lemar said the reallocations will have a “devastating impact” on government layoffs and social services. “It is somewhat disingenuous that the city has to reorder its priorities in order to accommodate the state’s budget,” said Lemar, who represents New Haven and served four years on the Board of Alderman. “It is incumbent on us to fight back and fight together on this.” In the wake of the proposed funding modifications, the state delegation was especially critical of Malloy’s decision to denounce increasing taxes for millionaires to augment revenue during his public appearances as a means of pandering to his wealthiest constituents in Fairfield County. They said Malloy’s budget is $400 million over the state’s spending cap, which state Democrats cannot pass without a three-fifths majority in the House — an advantage they currently lack. “This budget and tax package is not a real package,” State Rep. Toni Walker said. “It is [Malloy’s] manifesto for re-election.

We have a budget that is placed before us that we can’t pass.” The state delegation viewed the meeting as an opportunity to bridge state and local government, forming a coalition to amend the budget so that it may respect the challenges of urbanbased communities. Lemar said he anticipated an “extraordinary push back” against Malloy’s proposal from Connecticut mayors and local delegations.

This budget and tax package is not a real package. It is [Malloy’s] manifesto for re-election. TONI WALKER State representative, New Haven The redirected funds also include $6.9 million from the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan Fund, a state fund distributed across 169 municipalities. Walker, who represents New Haven, said the Elm City was one of the fund’s “biggest winners,” and such a change would represent a significant blow to the city’s ability to balance its budget. Malloy also proposed to cut several revenue drivers for New Haven, including the state’s car tax, which yields approximately $3.5 million annually for the city and represents a total of $560 million in revenue for municipalities statewide, said Democratic State Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney, who represents New Haven. Lemar said the elimination of the car tax would result in higher property taxes and layoffs of public officials like police officers and firefighters. In addition, legislators criticized Malloy’s proposal to reduce resources for mental health services and eliminate $1 million in New Haven public school transportation funds. New Haven’s new budget is due to the Board of Aldermen on March 1. Contact NICOLE NAREA at nicole.narea@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Rep stresses state ties

“I guess a small-town mayor is sort of like a community organizer, except that you have actual responsibilities.” SARAH PALIN FORMER GOVERNOR OF ALASKA

Admins close in on Hendrie fundraising goal HENDRIE FROM PAGE 1

ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Rep. Gary Holder-Winfield focused on reforming education and addressing violence during his candidacy speech. HOLDER-WINFIELD FROM PAGE 1 Miller’s introduction of HolderWinfield, which concluded when Miller noted that state representatives from three other Connecticut cities had come out to support their colleague. In a 13-minute speech, the candidate explained why he wanted to be mayor and laid out his tentative ideas for a campaign platform, which included education reform, community policing overhaul, economic development and government transparency. Addressing the issue of failing schools, Holder-Winfield said he would focus on early childhood education because “the problems begin early.” Curricular development, smaller classrooms and greater parental involvement, he added, are necessary components of school reform. Holder-Winfield cast the importance of opportunity for the city’s youth in a personal light, saying he escaped his impoverished upbringing because of the educational opportunities for which he and his single mother had to fight. “I grew up in the housing projects in the Bronx,” he said. “I grew up in a place where if you were going to get an education, you had to literally fight to get that education. I want people to have more opportunity than I ever had.” Turning to the issue of violence in New Haven, Holder-Winfield said the city needs a mayor who recognizes the reality of crime. He said he would put the “community” back into “community policing,” ensuring that police engage all New Haven residents. After his speech, he elaborated, saying “every single one of those cops needs to be talking.” He also spoke about economic development and government transparency, saying he hoped to

“make this city the jewel of Connecticut.” He cited New Haven’s easy access to a highway and a port and its proximity to an airport and a number of universities — including Yale, Southern Connecticut State University and Quinnipiac University — as opportunities for economic advancement. Transparency, he said, is critical to government effectiveness, adding that decisions that affect residents’ lives must be made by people who “stand among them.” As attendees milled about before the candidate’s remarks, Leslie Blatteau ’97 GRD ’07, a New Haven Public Schools teacher and 2005 mayoral candidate, said she was inspired by Holder-Winfield’s work on death penalty repeal and gay rights in the State House. She added that she hopes he will continue work on school reform, which she said should mean “avoiding scapegoating the teachers and focusing on the psychological and mental health of students.” After his speech, Holder-Winfield said what distinguishes him from his main competitor — Ward 10 Alderman Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 — is experience, noting specifically his work on education reform. “I’ve actually been working on it,” he said. “I was the leader of a K-3 reading bill in the State House. I’m the one person who has been working on these issues for years.” In the past, Elicker has emphasized his attendence at community meetings and events, pointing to his extensive involvement in the city as his main source of experience. In building his campaign, Elicker has also reached out beyond New Haven, he said. Elicker told the News Sunday that he has been forging relationships on the state level as he con-

tinues to meet with people in the governor’s office and the state House, but stressed that knowledge of the city is critical. “Having a good relationship with the state is important. What’s more important is having a strong understanding of the city’s budget and operations,” Elicker said. “The main job of the mayor is the operation of the city. Making smart decisions starts at home.” Megan Ifill, who lives in Elicker’s ward, said she has not decided which candidate to support but came to Holder-Winfield’s kickoff to learn more about the political process. Still, she described Elicker as a “phenomenal” alderman, adding that the candidate is involved extensively in the neighborhood, “in the trenches with his sleeves rolled up.” Elicker said he recently hired Kyle Buda, an expert in field organizing who has been working on Democratic campaigns in Wisconsin, as his campaign manager. Meanwhile, Holder-Winfield said he is fundraising and starting to build his staff. Before the speech, Christine Bartlett-Josie, his campaign treasurer, handed out contribution forms. BartlettJosie said the campaign is slated to raise enough money to qualify for public financing by the end of the month. That will require having received 200 contributions — a threshold Elicker reached late last month — and will make Holder-Winfield eligible for a $19,000 grant and matching funds of up to $125,000 through New Haven’s Democracy Fund. The event was initially scheduled for Feb. 9 but postponed due to last weekend’s blizzard. Contact ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

the project received a $5-million donation in December 2011, University President Richard Levin and School of Music Dean Robert Blocker ramped up discussions with potential donors to raise the remaining funds needed for the project. Blocker said in an email that he and Levin have received a “commitment” from Stephen Adams ’59 and Denise Adams, who gave a $100 million donation to the School of Music in 2005 that enabled the school to be tuitionfree for all students. Their potential gift to Hendrie Hall “will take us to our goal,” Levin told the News last week, allowing the project to move forward next spring and reach completion by 2016. “Within the last year, both Dean Blocker and I have solicited major gifts toward the project, and we are very close to finalizing an agreement with a donor that will take us to our goal,” Levin said. Before the recession, the University had planned to cover a portion of the renovation costs for Hendrie Hall, Blocker said, but this financial scheme became inadvisable when the endowment lost nearly a quarter of its value in fiscal year 2009. The Hendrie Hall project will be funded entirely by gifts and “capital replacement funds” set aside by the School of Music from its operating budget, Deputy Provost Lloyd Suttle said in a Feb. 5 email. Most of the donors for the project are Yale College alumni who “love music,” Levin said, adding that at least one of the major donors is an alumnus of the School of Music. The Glee Club, which has rehearsed in Hendrie Hall since 1937, reached out to its alumni in December to solicit additional donations for the renovation project. The Glee Club room and Band room will be updated but will retain their historic features, Blocker said. In an letter to the Glee Club community posted online in December 2012, Glee Club Director Jeffrey Douma announced that the Glee Club would match, dollar for dollar, all donations from Glee Club members up to a total of $250,000. “We all share an extraordinary tradition, and Hendrie Hall has been a large part of that tradition for many years,” Douma said in the letter.

Douma did not respond to requests for comment. Blocker said administrators have begun meeting about the project and will engage with the architects soon to review the construction plans, adding that the plans will likely be updated since they were last reviewed three years ago. He said the original designs feature a digital media room, but he added that the plans for the equipment in this room will need to be reconfigured. “The technology features [might be] obsolete,” Blocker said. “This will transform constantly.” Students interviewed said they think the renovations will benefit students in future years.

We all share an extraordinary tradition, and Hendrie Hall has been a large part of that. JEFFREY DOUMA Director, Glee Club Lauren Hunt MUS ’13, who plays the French horn, said Hendrie Hall is “old and falling apart,” and added that it would be helpful for students to have more practice rooms, because most of the practice rooms on campus are only accessible to students with connections to the School of Music. The newly renovated Hendrie Hall will house 35 practice rooms, compared to the seven practice spaces currently on the building’s third floor, Blocker said. He added that the renovation will also create an atrium for a student lounge, an orchestral rehearsal space and several new administrative offices, faculty studios and student lockers. The project will also involve the construction of a four-story building connected to Hendrie and Leigh Halls. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu . Contact SARAH SWONG at sarah.swong@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TUESDAY

Sunny, with a high near 32. Wind chill values as low as -2. Windy with gusts as high as 33 mph.

WEDNESDAY

High of 46, low of 29.

High of 35, low of 18.

ON VIEW BY ALEXANDRA MORRISON

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18 3:00 PM Alexander Purves: Roman Sketches The Whitney Humanities Center is privileged to offer glimpses into Professor Purves’s own drawing practice: “The sketches in this show have been taken from my own Roman sketchbooks, as from time to time I have grabbed a few minutes for myself. Consequently the drawings are very rapid. In my sketchbooks over many years, I have consistently used a ballpoint pen. It is very practical.” Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall Street) 9:15 PM Yale Undergraduate Choral Society (YUCS) Rehearsal The Yale Undergraduate Choral Society (YUCS) is a choir whose mission is to diversify the singing scene at Yale University. By being the only choir at Yale that is non-audition and has a repertoire partially decided by its own members, YUCS seeks to make singing a more readily available pleasure to Yale students of all previous singing experiences and skill levels. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall Street), Room 207

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19 5:00 PM “The Taste of Ashes: The Afterlife of Totalitarianism in Eastern Europe” Marci Shore, a professor at Yale University, will give a Benjamin and Barbara Zucker lecture on her new book. It is not a conventional history, with a straight narrative, though it tells an important story about the legacy of the three utopian ideas of the 20th century — fascism, communism and zionism — that transformed Europe. It is part memoir, part reportage, a treatise on the philosophy of history, and part romance written with lyrical beauty in places. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Room 208

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20 5:30 PM Buddhist Nuns in Late Choson Korea Dr. Yi’s talk will present three sets of counter evidence to the popular image of the “invisible” nun. Dr. Hyangsoon Yi is an associate professor of comparative literature at the University of Georgia. Hall of Graduate Studies (320 York Street), Room 217A

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Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Old flatboats 5 Stag party attendees 10 Fixes with thread 14 Skid row sort 15 River joining the Missouri near Jefferson City 16 “Is there __ against that?” 17 Skating maneuver 18 Gnatlike insect 19 Strauss of blue jeans 20 Jefferson 23 Hibachi residue 25 18-wheeler 26 Black cats, to some 27 Washington 32 Baton-passing event 33 Singer Brickell who’s married to Paul Simon 34 “You got that right, brother!” 35 In first place 37 Crab’s grabber 41 Impressionist 42 Chicago airport 43 Jackson 48 Coffee lightener 49 Word with popper or dropper 50 Fishing stick 51 Truman 56 Bump up against 57 Jeweled headpiece 58 Reverse, as a computer operation 61 It ebbs and flows 62 Kauai and Tahiti, for two 63 Read bar codes on 64 Large amount 65 Gets things growing 66 Number picker’s casino game DOWN 1 Leatherwork tool 2 Brazilian port, for short 3 Lumber blemish 4 Frosh, next year 5 Christina Crawford’s “__ Dearest”

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6 Italian cheese region 7 Youngsters 8 “Simply delicious” waffle maker 9 Tea leaves reader, e.g. 10 Deli meat in round slices 11 Dreaded business chapter? 12 Greeting from a distance 13 Deli cheese 21 Wild revelry 22 Went off the high board 23 Taj Mahal city 24 Come across as 28 Competed in a 10K 29 Back in style 30 Altar vow 31 Pants seam problem 35 Not shut, in verse 36 Just out of the box 37 Comedian Margaret 38 “Sons and Lovers” novelist

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2/18/13

47 Cardiac surgery technique 48 Chews the fat 52 Spunkmeyer of cookie fame 53 Get out of bed 54 Auto racer Yarborough 55 Elephant’s incisor 59 “The Da Vinci Code” author Brown 60 John’s Yoko

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

A

s we scurry from class to class, it’s often all too easy to tune out the wildlife that shares New Haven with us. DAVID TAN, a visiting student from the National University of Singapore, sheds some light on the feathered and furry creatures that can be found across the Elm City.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

WASHINGTON — Republicans and Democrats alike on Sunday predicted President Barack Obama would fail if he pushed forward with his own effort to overhaul the nation’s immigration system and urged the administration to hold off while lawmakers work on a bipartisan measure. Republican Sen. John McCain predicted the administration’s efforts would come up short if the White House went forward with a proposal to put the estimated 11 million illegal immigrants in the U.S. on a long pathway to citizenship. Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer, who met with Obama on Wednesday at the White House to discuss progress, urged his allies in the administration to give a bipartisan group of eight lawmakers the time to hammer out a deal on their own. Obama’s newly appointed top aide, chief of staff Denis McDonough, said the White House would only send its plan to Congress if the lawmakers stumble in their efforts and cast its efforts as a backup plan. “Well, let’s make sure that it doesn’t have to be proposed,” McDonough said of the president’s pitch, first reported on USA Today’s website late Saturday. “We will be prepared with our own plan if these ongoing talks between Republicans and Democrats up on Capitol Hill break down,” McDonough said in a second interview, adding he’s optimistic they would not crumble. The administration’s proposal would create a visa for those in the country illegally and allow them to become legal permanent residents within eight years. The proposal also requires businesses to know the immigration status of their workers and adds more funding for border security. It drew immediate criticism from

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla. “If actually proposed, the president’s bill would be dead on arrival in Congress, leaving us with unsecured borders and a broken legal immigration system for years to come,” said Rubio, who is among the eight lawmakers searching for a comprehensive plan. Many of the details in the administration’s draft proposal follow the broad principles that Obama previously outlined. But the fact the administration is writing its own alternative signaled Obama wants to address immigration sooner rather than later and perhaps was looking to nudge lawmakers to move more quickly.

If actually proposed, the president’s bill would be dead on arrival in Congress. MARCO RUBIO U.S. senator, Florida The tactic potentially complicates the administration’s work with Congress. Republican Rep. Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin lawmaker who was his party’s vice presidential nominee last year, said the timing of the leak suggested the White House was looking for “a partisan advantage and not a bipartisan solution.” “Leaking this out does set things in the wrong direction,” said Ryan, who could be a serious contender for his party’s presidential nomination in 2016. “There are groups in the House and the Senate working together to get this done and when he does things like this, it makes that much more difficult to do that.” Freshman Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, called the leaked plan “incomplete” and said both parties in Congress and the White House need to work together on a solution. “It hasn’t happened yet. It will

happen before something is acted upon and certainly before something is passed,” he said. McCain, the Arizona senator whose previous efforts at an immigration overhaul ended in failure in 2007, predicted the White House proposal’s demise if it were sent to Congress. He strongly urged the president to pocket the drafted measures and give senators a chance to finish their work. “I believe we are making progress in a bipartisan basis,” McCain, who is among the Senate group working on legislation, said. Schumer, a New York Democrat and a close ally to the White House, said he has not seen the draft proposals but, along with the Democrats working on a compromise, met with Obama this week to talk about progress being made on Capitol Hill. Schumer acknowledged that a single-party proposal would have a much more difficult time becoming law and urged the bipartisan group of senators to keep meeting to find common ground. “I am very hopeful that in March we will have a bipartisan bill,” Schumer said. “And, you know, it’s obvious if a Democrat — the president or anyone else — puts out what they want on their own, (it) is going to be different than when you have a bipartisan agreement. But the only way we’re going to get something done is with a bipartisan agreement.” Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., suggested Obama’s proposed plan was going nowhere but added that his party was evaluating its relationship with Hispanic voters, who supported Obama in November with 71 percent of their votes. “I think people want a little different face on immigration, frankly,” said Paul, who is also considered among the 2016 presidential hopefuls. “They don’t want somebody who wants to round people up, put them in camps and send them back to Mexico.”

GOP calls for Hagel vote BY DARLENE SUPERVILLE ASSOCIATED PRESS PORT ST. LUCIE, Fla. — Republican opponents of former Sen. Chuck Hagel’s stalled bid to become defense secretary said Sunday that they’ll probably allow his Senate confirmation vote to proceed unless material more damaging to the nominee - and, by extension, the Obama administration — surfaces in the coming week. Critics said the decorated Vietnam combat veteran is a “radical” unqualified to lead the U.S. military. A top White House official expressed “grave concern” over the delayed confirmation vote, adding that there was nothing to worry about in any disclosures that may yet come. “No, I don’t believe he’s qualified,” Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said of his fellow Republican and former Senate colleague. “But I don’t believe that we should hold up his nomination any further, because I think it’s (been) a reasonable amount of time to have questions answered.” McCain and other Republicans have angered President Barack Obama by delaying him from rounding out his second-term national security team, which

includes Hagel and John Brennan, the White House counterterrorism adviser who is awaiting confirmation to become CIA director. Former Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry assumed his post as secretary of state at the beginning of February.

I don’t believe he’s qualified. But I don’t believe that we should hope up his nomination any further. JOHN MCCAIN U.S. senator, Arizona Critics contend that Hagel, who snubbed McCain by staying neutral in the 2008 presidential race between McCain and Obama, isn’t supportive enough of U.S. ally Israel and is unreasonably sympathetic to Iran, which has defied international pressure to halt its pursuit of material that could be used to make nuclear weapons. Hagel’s nomination also became ensnared in Republican lawmakers’ questioning of

J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. confer.

how the White House handled the Sept. 11 attack against a U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, in which the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans were killed. Hagel was not involved in the administration’s response. GOP senators also have challenged Hagel’s past statements and votes on nuclear weapons, and his criticism of President George W. Bush’s administration. Republicans last week delayed a confirmation vote, but have indicated that one will be allowed when senators return from a break on Feb. 25. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., another leader of the opposition to Hagel, referred to a letter he received from Hagel in response to questions about past statements on Israel. Graham said that, as a result, he’ll take Hagel “at his word, unless something new comes along.” Still, the weeklong delay buys Hagel’s opponents even more time to rally additional opposition. White House chief of staff Denis McDonough, making his first appearances on the Sunday talk shows in his new role, was asked if the delays in filling out Obama’s Cabinet presented a threat to national security. “It’s a grave concern,” he said. Hagel “has one thing in mind: how do we protect the country,” McDonough said, adding that there was nothing to worry about in any disclosures about Hagel that may still come. Graham said senators were taking seriously their responsibility to scrutinize “one of the most unqualified, radical choices for secretary of defense in a very long time.” Last week, Obama criticized Republican senators for delaying the nomination, accusing them of playing politics with national security. “It’s just unfortunate that this kind of politics intrudes at a time when I’m still presiding over a war in Afghanistan and I need a secretary of defense who is coordinating with our allies to make sure that our troops are getting the kind of strategy and mission that they deserve,” he said during a Google-sponsored online forum.

NASDAQ 3,192.03, -6.63

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Woman killed same day sister sat behind Obama

M. SPENCER GREEN/ASSOCIATED PRESS

On Friday in Chicago, President Barack Obama spoke about the nation’s struggle with gun violence at an appearance at Hyde Park Academy. ASSOCIATED PRESS CHICAGO — An 18-year-old Chicago woman was killed the same day her sister had sat on the stage behind President Barack Obama, listening to him push for gun control legislation. Janay Mcfarlane was shot once in the head around 11:30 p.m. Friday in North Chicago, Lake County Coroner Thomas Rudd told the Chicago Sun-Times . Mcfarlane, a mother of a 3-month-old boy, was in the Chicago suburb visiting friends and family. North Chicago police said two people are being questioned in connection with Mcfarlane’s death, but no charges have been filed. “I really feel like somebody cut a part of my heart out,” Angela Blakely, Mcfarlane’s mother, said. Blakely said the bullet that killed Mcfarlane was meant for a friend. Hours earlier, Mcfarlane’s 14-yearold sister was feet from Obama at Hyde Park Career Academy, where he spoke about gun violence and paid tribute to Hadiya Pendleton, the 15-year-old honor student fatally shot last month

in a South Side park. Police have said it was a case of mistaken identity, and two people have been charged. Pendleton’s death was one of more than 40 homicides in Chicago in January, a total that made it the deadliest January in the city in more than a decade. Pendleton, a drum majorette, had recently performed during Obama’s inauguration and the slaying happened about a mile from his Chicago home. Blakely told the newspaper that Janay Mcfarlane had been affected by Pendleton’s death. “She always said after Hadiya Pendleton got killed, `Momma that’s so sad,’” Blakely said. “She was always touched by any kid that got killed. She was always touched by mothers who couldn’t be there for their babies because they were gone.” Mcfarlane was supposed to graduate from an alternative school this spring, Blakely said, and wanted to go into the culinary arts. “I’m just really, truly just trying to process it - knowing that I’m not taking my baby home anymore,” Blakely said.


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

81

Shiites respond to bombing

Number of casualties from a massive bombing in Quetta, Pakistan

The blast occurred at a produce market in Quetta — a region that boasts a Sunni majority. Members of the Pakistani Shiite Hazara community threaten to hold widespread protests if the government does not pursue arrests.

UN envoy backs call for talks in Syria BY JAMAL HALABY AND HAMZA HENDAWI STAFF WRITER

ARSHAD BUTT/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Pakistani relatives of Saturday’s bombing victims mourn next to their bodies in a mosque in Quetta, Pakistan, on Sunday. BY ABDUL SATTAR ASSOCIATED PRESS QUETTA, Pakistan — Members of the Pakistani Shiite Hazara community Sunday threatened to hold widespread protests if the government did not arrest within 48 hours the people responsible for a massive bombing that killed 81 people in a southwestern city. Saturday’s blast at a produce market in Quetta underlined the precarious situation for Shiites living in a majority Sunni country where many extremist groups don’t consider them real Muslims. Some 160 people were also wounded in the blast. Most of the dead and wounded were Hazaras, an ethnic group that migrated from Afghanistan over a century ago. Shiite Muslims, including Hazaras, have often been targeted by Sunni extremists in Baluchistan province, of which Quetta is the capital, as well as in the southern city of Karachi and northwestern Pakistan. The vice chairman of the Hazara Democratic Party, a political group representing Hazaras, said Sunday that the party was giving the government 48 hours to find those responsible for the attack and arrest them. “Otherwise, the Hazara community will start a protest in Pakistan and the world over,” said Azizullah Hazara. Graves had been dug but at least 60 of the dead from the Saturday evening blast still hadn’t been bur-

ied Sunday evening. Religious and community leaders were set to meet Monday morning to decide whether to bury their dead or to protest the bombing by refusing to bury the bodies as they did after a similar attack in January.

We want the government to act now and take action against the terrorist group. HASAN RAZA Shiite activist After 86 people died in that bombing, which hit a billiards hall, prompting Shiites to camp out in the street for four days alongside the coffins of their loved ones. Eventually the country’s prime minister ordered a shake-up in the regional administration, putting the local governor in charge of the whole province. “So far, we are not going home. We are not burying the dead,” said Dawood Agha, a Shiite leader in Quetta. The violence touched a chord among Pakistanis elsewhere in the country, with small-scale protests being held in Islamabad, Karachi and at least 12 other cities. At the Islamabad rally, hundreds of Shiites and various civil rights groups demanded the government

crackdown on the al-Qaida-linked militant group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi, which has claimed responsibility for the attack. “We all know it is LeJ,” said Hasan Raza, a Shiite activist. “We want the government to act now and take action against the terrorist group.” The large-scale attack comes as the government, headed by the Pakistan People’s Party, is preparing for elections this spring, and it adds to the widespread perception that the government has done little to improve security or the economy during its five-year tenure. Whether that anger will translate into widespread opposition to the PPP come election time remains to be seen. Baluchistan, the largest but most sparsely populated province, is a long way from places like Punjab and Sindh provinces where most of voters live. The protests calling for government action have generally been small scale so far and limited to mostly liberal activists. At the blast site, members of the Hazara community helped authorities dig through rubble to find the dead or survivors. Most of their efforts were focused on a twostory building that was completely destroyed. More than 20 shops nearby were also demolished. Clothing and shoes were scattered through the concrete rubble, broken steel bars and shattered wooden window frames littering the streets.

AMMAN, Jordan — A Syrian opposition leader’s call for dialogue is a test for the intentions of President Bashar Assad, the international envoy to Syria said Sunday, as fighting raged between rebels and government forces in at least three Syrian provinces. Lakhdar Brahimi, the joint U.N.Arab League envoy to Syria, said the proposal by Mouaz al-Khatib, the president of the opposition coalition, “has opened the door and challenges the Syrian government to fulfill its often-repeated assertion that it is ready for dialogue and a peaceful settlement.” “This initiative is on the table and will be on the table,” Brahimi told reporters in Cairo following talks with Arab league chief Nabil Elaraby. “We believe that if a dialogue begins in one of the U.N. headquarters, at least initially, between the opposition and an acceptable delegation from the Syrian government, it will be a start for getting out of the dark tunnel in which Syria is placed,” Brahimi added. In a statement Friday, the opposition’s main umbrella group, the Syrian National Coalition, said it would not allow President Bashar Assad or members of his security services to participate in talks to end the crisis. It did not rule out, however, dialogue with some members of his ruling Baath party, saying it welcomed talks with “honorable people” from all parts of society who “have not been embroiled in the crimes against the Syrian people.” Still, neither side has proposed a concrete plan for the talks. Meanwhile, Syrian Parliament Speaker Jihad Laham told fellow lawmakers in a session Sunday that dialogue is the path that must be pursued under a political agenda Assad proposed in January to end the nation’s 23-month-old conflict. “All Syrians must work within the framework of this program to resolve the crisis in the country,” Laham said, pleading to “all Syrians, from all sects and orientations, to confront the terrorism facing us.” Addressing the same session, Syrian Prime Minister Wael al-Halqi said the difficult conditions caused by the war and international sanctions placed on Syria “are beyond the capacity and ability of any country to bear.” He said the economic blockade imposed by the European Union, the United States and some Arab states has had a “negative impact” on the health

sector, although he did not elaborate. Rebel attacks, he added, have damaged 2,500 high schools and caused serious power outages, reducing electricity distribution by up to 60 percent nationwide. He also blamed a shrinking oil supply - which he said now meets around 40 percent of the country’s needs - on rebel attacks on oil refineries. Also Sunday, anti-regime activists reported sectarian clashes in a rural area between the Syrian town of Qusair and the Lebanese border. Clashes have grown common in the area between its Shiite and Sunni Muslim villages, whose residents generally back different sides in Syria’s civil war.

All Syrians must work within the framework of this program to resolve the crisis in the country. JIHAD LAHAM Syrian Parliament Speaker Most of the rebels fighting to topple Assad are from Syria’s Sunni majority, while many of the country’s Shiites stand by the regime. The area’s residents also have clan and family ties to communities across the porous border with Lebanon. Activist Hadi Abdullah said via Skype that Shiite gunmen tried to enter three Sunni villages early Saturday, leading to clashes with rebels. Five rebels were killed in the clashes, he said, and seven Sunni civilians were killed in shelling, adding that rebels thought they had killed 12 Shiites. He and other activists said the Shiite gunmen were from Lebanon’s Hezbollah militant group. A local Lebanese official in Hermel, near the border, said a group of Hezbollah fighters had entered Syria to protect the Shiite villages. Two of them were killed and 10 were wounded, he said, speaking on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss Hezbollah matters. A Hezbollah spokesman declined to comment. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the clashes killed 10 rebels and three Shiite gunmen, noting that many Lebanese live in the Shiite villages. Most of the area’s Shiites support Hezbollah.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

AROUND THE IVIES

“As a human rights issue, the effort to end violence against women becomes a government’s obligation, not just a good idea.” CHARLOTTE BUNCH

B R O W N D A I LY H E R A L D

Global campaign fights violence against women BY CALEB MILLER STAFF WRITER Valentine’s Day doubled as a day of awareness as students around campus participated in the One Billion Rising campaign’s events intended to “Strike. Dance. Rise!” against violence directed at women around the world. The campus group represents one chapter of the global campaign, which includes activists from 203 countries around the world, according to a press release from V-Day, the movement that launched the campaign. The V-Day movement aims to combat harm toward women, and the One Billion Rising campaign was “the biggest global action in the history of humankind for women … to end the violence and bring about a time when women are cherished,” said V-Day founder Eve Ensler in a video on the movement’s Facebook page. The campus campaign kicked off with a dance party Wednesday night and continued with events Thursday on the Main Green. A “yarnbombing” of the

Green featured pink and red woven artwork hangi n g f ro m the trees. At noon, a flash mob BROWN broke out in front of Sayles Hall. While a crowd of students looked on, the act grew from a couple of dancers to almost 30 pink- and redclad performers. Fabio DiSanto, a visiting research fellow in international affairs and one of the performers in the flash mob, said the “energy” of the presentation was enjoyable and an important way to draw attention to a good cause. “The world has to know that people suffer — and women more than others,” he said. “That’s why we are here.” The dancing was far from over — the campaign moved into Sayles Hall Thursday afternoon for a dance class in West African Mande style. Eliza Reynolds, one of the head organizers of the campaign, said the emphasis on

dancing and physical expression was an important part of the movement’s message. “It’s about movement as an act of protest, celebration, healing,” she said. “When we reclaim our body through movement, through taking up space, that itself is a way of activism.” The activists also used discussion, baked goods and other displays to convey their message. Reynolds called the organization of these events a “real lesson in teamwork.” The planning process for the campaign began in early January when Reynolds reached out to a few friends about doing a dance class, Reynolds said. She added that as word began to spread, she met many people who wanted to contribute. Saudi Garcia, another head organizer, had started working on the project independently before teaming up with Reynolds. “I’ve been holding open meetings every Sunday … and every time, scores of new people show,” Reynolds said. “The huge amount of people that have put in mainly their energy, their

BROWN DAILY HERALD

A flash mob of students danced on Brown’s Main Green to raise awareness about violence against women. time, their enthusiasm, has been huge.” The campaign reached a new level when Garcia found students willing to film and document the events, Reynolds said. Students then pitched the idea

of covering the events to mtvU, a music channel affiliated with MTV that targets college students, who jumped on board and will run a feature on the campaign in the coming weeks, she added.

“It’s a hard topic to talk about, gender and gender-based violence,” Reynolds said. “I hope that this starts a conversation that is much more real for a wider demographic at Brown.”

H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

HMC creates new VP position BY NIKITA KANSRA AND SAMUEL Y. WEINSTOCK STAFF WRITERS Harvard Management Company has created a new position devoted to researching and understanding sustainability issues related to the university’s $30.7 billion endowment. The new Vice President of Sustainable Investing will also serve as HMC’s primary liasion to other University offices on environmental, social, and governance investment issues. HMC, which oversees Harvard’s endowment, posted a job application for the new position on its website last week. The position is listed under HMC’s compliance team, which advises the Company’s investors on legal, tax, and regulatory issues. Jane L. Mendillo, President and CEO of HMC, said in a statement to The Crimson that the creation of the position aligns with HMC’s longterm outlook. “Given the growing conversation around sustainability and related issues on campus and across the financial sector, we wanted to develop a more integrated approach to these issues at HMC,” Mendillo said in the statement. “We are long-term investors and that means we are concerned with sustainability and stewardship. This new position will strengthen this longstanding focus at HMC.” Although a Harvard spokesperson has said the university “operates with a strong presumption against divestment,” the push for socially responsible investment has recently gained momentum on campus. A month after Harvard College students passed a referendum in support of a social choice fund, the university announced plans

in December to create such a fund separate from its existing endowment. HARVARD T w o weeks ago, five students met with members of the Harvard Corporation to discuss the details of the social choice fund, and earlier this week, a referendum to seed the social choice fund with money from Harvard’s endowment passed with 93 percent support of Harvard Kennedy School student voters. Student members of the Responsible Investment at Harvard Coalition, which was involved in coordinating the two student referendums, expressed cautious optimism about the creation of the new HMC position. “We were in general really pleased to see that the HMC is formally considering [environmental, social, and governance issues],” said Kevin S. Wang, the investments and faculty coordinator of the Coalition. S i m i l a rly, S. K r i s h n a Dasaratha, the Coalition’s treasurer, praised the move as an “indicator” that the University is listening to a rising chorus of student concerns about Harvard’s investment. H o w e v e r, Wa n g and Dasaratha both said that the creation of the position, which primarily entails research on sustainable investment, does not necessarily mean that Harvard will commit to adjusting its investment strategies. In the hopes of compelling HMC to change its investment practices, Wang said, “We’re pushing for action.”

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PAGE 12

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

President Obama and Tiger Woods hit the links The two met up to play a round during the long President’s Day weekend at the Floridian, an exclusive club on Florida’s Treasure Coast. Jim Crane, who owns the Floridian and the Houston Astros, told MLB.com that it was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. “It was a lot of fun. The President was very cordial, and Tiger had a lot of fun and hit some great shots,” Crane said after the round.

Tough weekend for the Elis

Yale hits stride with sweep

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Guard Sarah Halejian ’15 scored 12 points in Yale’s victory over Columbia on Saturday. W. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 14

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Andrew Miller ’13 evened the scoreboard early in the second off an assist from Antoine Laganiere ’13 and Tommy Fallen ’15 against RPI. MEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 14 On Friday night, defender Tommy Fallen ’15 gave the Bulldogs a one-goal lead on a power play at the end of the third period, but Union managed to score four goals in the second and third periods. Miller responded halfway through the third period with another powerplay goal, but it was not enough to bridge the team’s two-goal deficit.

Bottom line is that three goals over the course of a weekend is not enough to win. ANTOINE LAGANIERE ’13 Forward, men’s hockey Shots on goal were nearly on par between the two teams, with the Bulldogs down just 42–39. Jeff Malcolm ’13, who was the team’s starting goalie until he suffered a leg injury during the Princeton game on Feb. 1, is still out of commission. Nick Maricic ’13 started in net on Friday, but after about 31 minutes of play, Connor Wilson ’15 took his place in the crease. Forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 said the team

has not been fazed by the recent goaltending changes. “Bottom line is that three goals over the course of a weekend is not enough to win,” he added. Saturday night saw Wilson play in net for his first full game this season. The Engineers opened scoring with a power play goal halfway through the first period, but Miller evened the scoreboard early in the second period off an assist from Laganiere and Fallen, marking his 12th goal of the season. Despite parity in shots on goal in the third period, the Engineers managed to tip two in past Wilson, followed by an empty-netter with 11 seconds left in the game. However, the Bulldogs outshot RPI 27–22. “The team worked really hard this weekend, things just didn’t go our way,” Wilson said. “We’re going to prepare for the upcoming weekend the same way we would for any other weekend and approach this week’s practices the same way we have all season. The team is very optimistic and we’ll be ready to go on Friday.” Next weekend, the Bulldogs will travel to No. 1 Quinnipiac and Princeton on Friday and Saturday, respectively. It will be the secondto-last weekend of season games before ECAC playoffs begin.

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0

3

#

4

YALE

0

1

0

#

1

G: A. MILLER (YALE) – 1, M. NEAL (RPI) – 1, Three others with 1 (RPI) A: T. FALLEN (YALE) – 1, A. LAGANIERE (YALE) – 1, Seven others with 1 (RPI) Sh: A. MILLER (YALE) – 7 Sv: J. KASDORF (YALE) – 26

Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

Janna Graf ’14 caught fire just after the 10 minute mark. After sinking a jump shot, she never looked back, scoring 12 of her 13 points in the final 10 minutes to secure a 67-58 win for the Bulldogs. Graf finished the game with 13 points and 6 rebounds, while Vasquez and captain Allie Messimer ’13 added 15 and 10 points, respectively. Forward Meredith Boardman ’16 led the rebounding for the Bulldogs, pulling down 10. “Our success this weekend came from playing team basketball,” guard Sarah Halejian ’15 said. “We had a balanced scoring attack in both games and also helped each other out defensively when we needed to.” On Saturday, the Bulldogs made the trip to Columbia to take on the Lions. Four Bulldogs finished the game in double figures, and center Zenab Keita ’14 was one rebound shy of her second double-double of the season with 11 points and nine rebounds. The Bulldogs rushed out to a dominant 38-17 first half lead and never relented, besting the Lions in all offensive categories. The Elis shot 43.1 percent from the field and grabbed 40 rebounds on their

YALE 67, CORNELL 58

way to a convincing 62-43 win. The balanced scoring continued to be a theme for the Elis. Keita and Graf each scored 11, while Vasquez and Halejian chipped in 12 apiece. Keita and Halejian led the Elis on the boards with nine and seven rebounds, respectively. “This weekend was all about sharing the ball and playing as a team,” Messimer said. “Our coach really had us focus on each other and it took us a long way. We took care of the boards and helped each other a lot on defense.” The weekend sweep on the road gives the Elis much-needed momentum heading into another away weekend against Harvard and Dartmouth. Despite second half comebacks against both teams earlier in the season, the Elis came up short in both games. “We really want to get back at Harvard and Dartmouth,” Messimer said. “The second round in the Ivy League is always exciting. We just need to keep having fun and sharing the ball and the momentum will follow.” Friday’s game is set to tip-off at 7:00 p.m. at Dartmouth. Contact SARAH ONORATO at sarah.onorato@yale.edu .

YALE 62, COLUMBIA 43

YALE

27

40

67

YALE

38

24

62

CORNELL

23

35

58

COLUM.

17

26

43

Women’s hockey stumbles in quest for playoff spot WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 14 bear down, put those 60 minutes together, and come out with some wins next weekend.” The Elis (4–19–3, 3–13–3 ECAC) started off the weekend against RPI (10–18–4, 8–10–2

ECAC) on Friday night. In the first period, defenseman Kate Martini ’16 scored after 7:03 of game action, but RPI’s Mari Mankey tied the game with less than a minute remaining in the period. After a scoreless second period, forward Danielle Mon-

cion ’13 scored off an assist from defender Tara Tomimoto ’14 to retake the lead for the Elis early in the third period. However, the lead did not last long. Alexa Gruschow scored twice in a 4:14 span and Jenn Godin put the nail in Yale’s cof-

fin at the 14:52 mark to give the Engineers the 4–2 win. Saturday’s game against Union was even more heartbreaking for the Bulldogs. The Dutchwomen (7–21–4, 0–16–4 ECAC) entered the game winless in conference play. They had lost

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

With just three games remaining for the Bulldogs, they stand in 11th place in the ECAC, three points out of eighth place and the final playoff spot.

12 straight conference games. And after Martini scored to put the Elis on top 1–0 with 14:27 left in the third period, it seemed that Union’s streak would continue. After pulling its goaltender and adding an extra attacker in the final 1:27, though, Union hit the jackpot when forward Rhianna Kurio fired a long shot past Yale goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15, who was screened on the play, with 16 seconds left in the game. “It was definitely disappointing to let a goal in with such a short amount of time left in the game,” Kennedy said. “It’s important to take the positive that we were able to get energy going, but it was really tough to be so close and have the other team catch us in the third period.” The teams then played a scoreless extra frame, giving the Bulldogs a bittersweet point in the ECAC standings. In order to reach their season goal of making the ECAC playoffs, the Elis need to make up some major ground in the conference ladder. Princeton, Colgate and Brown all stand between Yale and the final playoff spot. “This isn’t a position that we wanted to be in,” forward Jamie Haddad ’16 said. “Everyone knows we have to win every game left to make playoffs … but it’s an exciting challenge and it’ll provide us the motivation we need for the games ahead.” Just two weeks ago, the Bulldogs found themselves in a similar predicament. The team lost two different third-period leads, falling 3–1 to Princeton on Feb.

1 and tying Quinnipiac 2–2 on Feb. 2. “We’ve been getting outworked in the third period and making mental errors due to fatigue,” Haddad said. “Our real struggle has been holding off goals and defending against other teams.” Yale takes on Quinnipiac and Princeton this weekend at Ingalls Rink, followed by No. 5 Harvard on Tuesday in a makeup for a game snowed out by last weekend’s blizzard. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

RPI 4, YALE 2 RPI

1

0

3

4

YALE

1

0

1

2

G: A. GRUSCHOS (RPI) – 2 A: M. MANKEY (RPI) – 2 Sh: A. GRUSCHOW (RPI) – 6 Sv: J. LEONOFF (YALE) – 29

YALE 1, UNION 1 YALE

0

0

1

1

UNION

0

0

1

1

G: K. MARTINI (YALE) – 1, R. KURLO (UNION) – 1 A: T. TOMIMOTO (YALE) – 1, D. MONCION (YALE) – 1 Sh: R. KURLO (UNION) – 1 Sv: J. LEONOFF (YALE) – 31


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

“I’ll answer anybody’s question but yours. Because you’re an idiot and really a disloyal person.” SYRACUSE M. BASKETBALL HEAD COACH JIM BOEHEIM, SPEAKING TO ESPN’S ANDY KATZ AT A PRESS CONFERENCE ON FEB. 14

Bulldogs split big weekend MEN’S BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 14 3-pointer just seconds into the second half. Six lead changes later the Elis tied it up again at 59 on a free throw by forward Justin Sears ’16 with 3:03 to go. Two quick 3-pointers by Cornell, however, gave the Big Red the lead and put Yale away for good. Yale’s Achilles’ heel against Cornell on Friday was free throw shooting. The Elis shot just 46.2 percent (12–26) from the line during the game, including a dismal 5–15 performance in the second half. “We came out pretty flat and we gave up a lot of open shots defensively,” forward Brandon Sherrod ’15 said in a message to the News. “Add that on to a number of missed free throws that we usually knock down, and it’s hard to win.” But the Bulldogs did not let Friday’s struggles flow over into the next game. The Elis scored the first nine points against the Lions and held Columbia scoreless for the first five minutes. Yale shot a scorching 66.7-percent (18–27) from the floor in the first half and opened up a 43–21 halftime lead. “I thought we came out on our heels for whatever reason versus Cornell,” Jones said. “Our starting group’s got a lot of pride and it was something they felt bad about [Friday] night, so I thought that we had much more of a charge and much more energy [against Columbia].”

Although less dominant in the second half, the Bulldogs coasted to a 19-point victory over the Lions. Thirteen different players scored for Yale and eight Elis contributed at least six points. Morgan said that the team’s balance makes the Bulldogs difficult to defend. “That’s the really fantastic quality about our team,” Morgan said. “When one person gets scoring you try to stop him and then another person gets scoring. Like there are 12 leaks in a sink: If you try to stop one, another one gets stronger.” Columbia’s star point guard Brian Barbour was held scoreless and limited to one assist in just 21 minutes a night after not playing at Brown due to illness. Jones added that Yale was able to take advantage of some of Columbia’s smaller lineups for easy looks inside. The Bulldogs shot 70-percent (28–40) from inside of the three-point range for the night. Yale remains at home next weekend to host Dartmouth (6–16, 2–6 Ivy) on Friday and Harvard (15–7, 7–1 Ivy) on Saturday. The Elis have home games remaining against both Harvard and Princeton, but Yale will need significant help from the other teams in the conference to make a run at the Ivy crown. Friday’s game is scheduled to tip-off at 7:00 p.m.

MEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

30

38

68

YALE

43

32

75

YALE

27

34

61

COLUMBIA

21

35

56

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

9

8

1

0.528

13

9

3

0.580

Dartmouth

8

7

3

0.528

12

9

4

0.560

Princeton

7

8

3

0.472

9

12

4

0.440

Brown

5

8

5

0.417

9

11

5

0.460

Harvard

4

12

2

0.278

7

15

3

0.340

Cornell

5

10

3

0.361

9

13

3

0.420

ECAC SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

Cornell

16

3

1

0.825

21

5

1

0.796

Harvard

15

2

1

0.861

19

4

2

0.800

Dartmouth

10

6

4

0.600

15

7

5

0.648

Princeton

5

13

2

0.300

10

15

2

0.407

Brown

5

14

0

0.263

6

17

1

0.271

Yale

3

13

3

0.237

4

19

3

0.212

IVY

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Against Columbia, the Bulldogs shot 66.7 percent from the field during the first half to earn a 43–21 halftime lead on the way to a 75–56 win.

Women’s squash finishes in top five BY FRANCESCA COXE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Bulldogs entered the National Championship in search of the 2013 College Squash Association’s Howe Cup as the number five seed.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Harvard

7

1

0.875

15

7

0.682

2

Princeton

5

2

0.714

12

9

0.571

3

Cornell

5

3

0.625

13

12

0.520

4

Yale

4

4

0.500

10

15

0.400

5

Penn

3

4

0.429

6

18

0.250

6

Brown

3

5

0.375

9

13

0.409

7

Columbia

2

6

0.250

10

12

0.455

Dartmouth

2

6

0.250

6

16

0.273

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

7

0

1.000

16

5

0.762

2

Penn

5

2

0.714

12

9

0.571

3

Harvard

4

3

0.571

13

8

0.619

Dartmouth

4

3

0.571

6

15

0.286

5

Yale

4

4

0.500

9

13

0.409

6

Cornell

3

4

0.429

11

10

0.524

7

Columbia

1

6

0.143

3

18

0.143

8

Brown

1

7

0.125

7

15

0.318

MEN’S SQUASH

WOMEN’S SQUASH In the quarterfinals on Friday, No. 5 Yale (11-5) faced No. 4 Trinity (15-2), a team they had lost to three weeks prior in a close 5-4 match. This time, the Elis were without No. 6 Kim Hay ’14, who suffered a season ending injury. Even though the team tried to make up for the loss of Hay with its depth, Yale could not win the close matches. The Bantams emerged victorious again, this time by a larger margin of 7-2, and captured seven wins in the first eight matches to secure their place in the semifinals, relegating the Elis to a consolation semifinal against Brown. “The team was disappointed to not get past Trinity to give themselves a shot at the National Title. The top five teams were so evenly matched, as evident by the results this weekend,“ head coach Dave Talbott said. “Princeton went into the Championships ranked No. 1 and finished fourth. Having lost 5-4 to both Princeton and Trinity in the regular season, the women felt they would be right in the mix to win this weekend.” The scoreboard does not tell the whole story of the Elis’ valiant battle against the Bantams, team members said. In front of a loyal hometown crowd in New Haven and at the No. 9 position, Katie Harrison ’13 fell 3-1 despite fierce play. Always returning to center court, Harrison’s agility kept her in the match even after dropping the first and second games. Capitalizing on her opponent’s errors, she battled back in a must-win third game, triumphing 12-10. But Trinity would not let up and won the fourth game 11-6, putting the Bantams up 1-0. It was up to the tenacious Issey Norman-Ross ’15 in the sixth spot to try to make it an even match, but she lost a close five-setter to Trinity’s No.6 Natalie Babjukova 3-2. Shihui Mao ’15 in the third spot gave Yale its first point of the day in a four-game match. After dropping the first game 11-6, Mao’s precise placement of shots in the second gave her an early lead and an 11-6 win. The third game was closer, but Mao remained on top with a score of 11-8. In the fourth and final game, mental power and technical ability propelled Mao to win 11-3, breathing life back into the Bulldogs. “Losing the first game really woke me up, and I knew that I had to change my game plan to win. I focused on being

OVERALL

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

CORNELL

SCHOOL Yale

WOMEN’S HOCKEY

YALE 75, COLUMBIA 56

CORNELL 68, YALE 61

OVERALL

IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

6

1

0.857

10

2

0.833

2

Harvard

5

1

0.833

14

2

0.875

Yale

5

1

0.833

11

2

0.846

4

Cornell

5

2

0.714

16

3

0.842

5

Columbia

2

5

0.286

7

8

0.467

Dartmouth

2

5

0.286

7

8

0.467

Brown

1

6

0.143

8

9

0.471

Penn

1

6

0.143

4

10

0.286

7

NIKOLAS LASKARIS/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis finished the season ranked No. 5 in the country. confident and getting my shots to the backcourt. I knew that I needed to win [to give us] a shot to beat Trinity, especially since I was first on court, and that a win would really help motivate the team overall,” Mao said. Though Trinity went on to record six unanswered points, the individual matches against Trinity were all fairly close. At No. 8, Annie Ballaine ’16 put up a fight with tough shots to the back corners of the court, but the Bantams won 3-0 to take the match. In the fifth spot, Lilly Fast ’14 came out strong with an early lead and win in the first game, but her opponent recovered from the loss to take the next three games and the match. The Bantams continued their pursuit in the No. 2 spot against team captain Katie Ballaine ’13. Neck and neck in the second game, Ballaine’s championship effort gave her the 11-8 win. Continuing to play with drive and emotion, Ballaine won the third game 11-6 to put her up 2-1. However, the Bantams outlasted Ballaine to take the last two games 11-6 and 11-8 to win the match. Despite strong play, Anna Harrison ’15 and Gwen Tilghman ’14 were taken down at the seventh and fourth spots, respectively, to put Trinity up 7-1. It was No. 2 Millie Tomlinson ’14 at the first spot who triumphed. After losing to Trinity’s Kanzy El Defrawy in the decisive match at their last meeting, Tomlinson raced out of the starting blocks with purpose, defeating El

Defrawy in a four-game match. After defeating Yale, the Bantams moved onto the semifinals on Saturday against No. 1 Princeton. With the National Championship out of reach, the Bulldogs played in a consolation semifinal against No. 8 Brown on Saturday. It was only last week that the Elis defeated the Bears 9-0, and they did so in a similar dominating fashion on Saturday with a clean sweep. Yale’s lineup was similar to Friday’s, with the addition of Georgia Blatchford ’16 at No. 9. In the match for fifth place on Sunday, the Bulldogs faced No. 6 Cornell. In regular season, Yale topped the Big Red 6-3, and in the consolation final, the Elis did it again, with the same score. Only at spots two, four and nine did Cornell gain points. Yale finishes the 2013 season ranked No. 5 in the country, making it 12 straight years that the Bulldogs have finished in the top-5. “It was hard without [Kim] Hay, but right now, [we] are really happy with what we have done and hope to come back and win it next year,” Mao said. The CSA Individual Championships will take place at Trinity College from March 1 to 3. Tomlinson will try to win her second Individual National Championship in three years. Contact FRANCESCA COXE at francesca.coxe@yale.edu .

OVERALL

WOMEN’S SQUASH IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

7

0

1.000

12

2

0.857

2

Harvard

6

1

0.857

15

1

0.938

3

Penn

5

2

0.714

14

3

0.824

4

Yale

4

3

0.571

13

5

0.722

5

Cornell

3

4

0.429

13

7

0.650

6

Brown

2

5

0.286

12

9

0.571

7

Dartmouth

1

6

0.143

9

8

0.529

8

Colubmia

0

7

0.000

5

11

0.312

Read and be read. Daily. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NCAAB No. 9 Arizona 68 Utah 64

NCAAB No. 4 Mich. 79 Penn State 71

SPORTS QUICK HITS

JEFF MALCOLM ’13 NO OFFICIAL WORD ON INJURY After suffering an injury early in the game against Princeton on Feb. 1, Yale’s leading goaltender has not yet returned to the ice. Head coach Keith Allain ’80 told WYBC on Saturday only that Malcolm “will play when he’s healthy.”

NHL N.Y. Rangers 2 Washington 1

NHL Chicago 3 Los Angeles 2

FA CUP Man City 4 Leeds 0

MONDAY

WHALING CREW BRINGS THE HARLEM SHAKE The fan group encouraged students to attend the men’s basketball game against Columbia on Saturday ready to do the Harlem Shake at halftime. The top “shaker” on the video will win a $100 Apple gift card. The stunt seemed to work — according to yalebulldogs.com, over 1,400 people attended the game.

“This weekend was all about sharing the ball and playing as a team.” ALLIE MESSIMER ’13 CAPTAIN, W. BASKETBALL

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Yale slips in Ivy standings BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER

MEN’S BASKETBALL

A disappointing home split may have taken Yale out of the Ivy League title race just a week after a surprising road sweep thrust the Elis back into the conversation. The Elis (10–15, 4–4 Ivy) let Cornell slip away with a 68–61 win, but rebounded to dispatch Columbia (10–12, 2–6 Ivy) in a 75–56 blowout. Yale fell to three games behind Ivy League-leading Harvard after the Crimson swept Penn and Princeton at home. Yale now sits in fourth place in the conference, behind Harvard, Princeton and Cornell, with just six games remaining to make up the difference. Guard Javier Duren ’15 said that the Bulldogs must work on being more consistent. “The story [against Cornell] was that we didn’t come out aggressive enough,” Duren said. “Once we finally got going we were battling the whole game.” The Big Red (13–12, 5–3 Ivy) jumped out to an 11–2 advantage in the first six-and-a-half minutes thanks in part to five Yale turnovers. Captain Sam Martin ’13 propelled the Elis back to within two points by scoring 10 straight points as part of a 10–2 Yale run. Martin hit three of his four attempts from beyond the arc for the game. Center Jeremiah Kreisberg ’14 tied the score at 22 on two free throws a minute later and Yale went into the half trailing by just three, 30–27. Guard Austin Morgan ’13 picked up where the Bulldogs left off, tying the game at 30 with a SEE MEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE 13

Elis see historic sweep BY SARAH ONORATO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When Yale women’s basketball hosted Cornell last season, it was a historic night for the Bulldogs. Coach Chris Gobrecht recorded her 500th career win, and guard Megan Vasquez ’13 tallied her 1,000th career point in an 86-73 win over the Big Red.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Almost exactly one year later, in a game Friday night in Ithaca, Vasquez reached another historic landmark, netting her 1,300th point and propelling the Elis (9-13, 4-4 Ivy) to a 67-58 win. Vasquez became the eighth player in the history of the program to reach this milestone, finishing the night with 15 points in Yale’s eighth consecutive win over Cornell (11-10, 3-4 Ivy). Following the win, the Elis travelled to Columbia (3-18, 1-6 Ivy) on Saturday and took down the Lions 62-43. “1300 points is significant but I think Megan is just very focused on her team’s success right now,” Gobrecht said. “She did a great job handling the defensive pressure of both Cornell and Columbia and is really feeling the rhythm of the game again.” Both teams came out strong and the game remained tight through the first half. The Bulldogs managed to secure a 27-19 lead with just under two minutes remaining in the first, but the Big Red made up some ground to pull within four at 27-23 heading into halftime. Cornell maintained their momentum to start the second half and pulled out to a five point lead midway through the half. Forward

Reigning Ivy League Player of the Week Javier Duren ’15 had seven points, seven assists and five rebounds against Cornell.

Bulldogs’ skid extends to four

SEE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE 12

Third period woes continue

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

With starting goalkeeper Jeff Malcolm ’13 sidelined by an injury, the Bulldogs have dropped their past four games and slipped to fifth place in the ECAC standings. BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER The No. 10 men’s hockey team faced a disappointing away weekend, suffering losses to Union and RPI and a threeplace drop in league rankings.

MEN’S HOCKEY The Bulldogs fell 4–2 to Union (15– 10–5, 8–6–4 ECAC) and 4–1 to RPI (14– 11–5, 9–6–3 ECAC) on Friday and Saturday nights, respectively. With this weekend’s losses, Yale will finish its sea-

son without wins over either ECAC competitor: In December, the Elis lost to the Engineers 6–1 and tied the Dutchmen 2–2. After their current four-game losing streak, the Elis (13–9–3, 9–8–1 ECAC) have fallen from second to fifth place in the ECAC. RPI now ranks second and Union lies in third place. “We have not produced nearly enough offense in the past four games,” team captain Andrew Miller ’13 said. “You can’t win scoring less than two goals a game.” SEE MEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 12

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs held leads in the final period against both RPI and Union but came away with only a single draw. offs.

BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Although the women’s hockey team held third-period leads in both of its games this weekend, it only came away with one point combined and further endangered the Elis’ chances of making the ECAC play-

TOP ’DOG MEGAN VASQUEZ ’13

WOMEN’S HOCKEY On Friday Yale fell 4–2 to RPI before drawing last-place Union 1–1 on Saturday at Ingalls Rink. With just three games remaining in the regular season, the Bulldogs stand

in 11th place, three points out of 8th place — the final playoff spot. “Our team has demonstrated that we have the individual and collective skills to be competitive with any team in this league,” forward Lynn Kennedy ’15 said. “It’s time we SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 12

THE SENIOR GUARD SCORED HER 1300TH CAREER POINT AGAINST CORNELL ON FRIDAY NIGHT. She is the eighth player to reach this milestone in Yale history.


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