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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 86 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

RAINY RAINY

37 44

CROSS CAMPUS

BLIZZARD 2013 DOCUMENTING THRILLS, CHILLS

CREATIVE WRITING

BRENZEL JR.

MEN’S BASKETBALL

English Department considers offering intro writing course

ADMINS HOPE TO FIND ADMISSIONS DEAN BY APRIL

Bulldogs complete first Penn-Princeton road trip sweep since 1986-’87

PAGE 6-7 THROUGH THE LENS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 12 SPORTS

35 YEARS LATER, SNOW DAY BY MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER

School’s out! In case you

haven’t heard, there will be no classes today as officials work to clear the streets of snow. It’s a Monday miracle.

Yale students are enjoying a historic snow day — the first since 1978 — in the wake of New Haven’s most powerful snowstorm in a hundred years. The weekend’s blizzard dropped 34 inches of snow on the Elm City in just 24 hours, breaking the snowfall record set by the blizzard of 1978 — the last time Yale cancelled classes for snow. University Vice President Linda Lorimer sent an email to the Yale community at 5:08 p.m. Sunday night confirming that classes are cancelled and urging staff performing non-essential services to stay home. Commons dining hall will open for hot breakfast and brunch, and residential college dining halls will serve brunch from 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and dinner from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The University decided to cancel classes primarily due to the condition of New Haven roads, Associate Vice President for Administration Janet Linder said in an email to the News. As of Sunday night, the main arterial streets in New Haven had been cleared but the city travel and parking bans remained intact as city workers continued to clear secondary streets. “Stay home, stay off the roads

Making the most of Nemo. As the blizzard dumped nearly 3 feet of snow on the Elm City, Yalies took the opportunity to ski around town and build igloo fortresses. A group of singing Saybrugians filmed their own version of “Harlem Shakes,” while other students were spotted snowboarding down Science Hill and making snowmen and igloos. On Friday, a jubilant delegation of Timothy Dwight students stormed Silliman courtyard amid dramatic music, pelting snowballs at confused Sillimanders. And Branford seniors and juniors created something new: The Bigloo, an 8-foot-tall igloo with a built-in bench. Let it snow! Identity theft. An alleged President-elect Peter Salovey sent an email to the Yale community over the weekend supposedly correcting a typo in Salovey’s new “presidentelect” website, which is intended to faciliate his communication with the Yale community. Rather than president-elect, the email said Salovey’s website should say “president-select,” adding that the appointment “did not involve an election or a democratic process of any sort.” Yale’s own snow angel. When Ericka Saracho ’14 came across a car stuck in the snow on Friday night, she and a Yale security officer dug the car out and freed the vehicle. The two then proceeded to spend the next three hours digging out other cars, including emergency vehicles, from the snow. A good samaritan indeed.

BRIANNA LOO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

This weekend’s record-breaking blizzard has affected an estimated 40 million people and left 650,000 people without power.

SEE WINTER STORM PAGE 4

Macklemore to perform at Spring Fling BY KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG STAFF REPORTER Thrift shops in New Haven will be sold out before this year’s Spring Fling. News that Macklemore would perform at Spring Fling broke after an agent from the artist’s booking company, the Agency Group, told the News Satur-

day night that the Seattle-based rapper would perform at Yale this spring. The Yale College Council, which organizes the annual concert, confirmed on its Facebook page and in an email from the Spring Fling Committee Sunday that Macklemore and his producer Ryan Lewis will appear in the April 29 Spring Fling lineup.

All students interviewed said they are excited to hear Macklemore’s recent hits — including his current No. 1 iTunes song “Thrift Shop” — and several students said they are impressed the Spring Fling Committee was able to secure the group. “I think it’s awesome — what’s particularly cool is that while the acts for Spring Fling are always

artist to Yale. The committee’s email also included a survey in which students could help select the other acts to “complete the lineup.” YCC Events Director Bryan Epps ’14 and Spring Fling Committee Chair Ethan Karetsky ’14 could not be reached for

awesome, the fact that we have someone very recent, who had this amazing song that everyone loves,” Danielle Ellison ’15 said. “I think people get really excited about someone who has a Top Ten right now.” In its Sunday email to all Yale College students, the Spring Fling Committee said that it is “psyched” to bring the popular

SEE SPRING FLING PAGE 4

Weird news of the day. A

study by the Harvard School of Public Health found that men who watched more than 20 hours of television per week had a 44 percent lower sperm count than those who watched almost no television. In addition, the study observed that young men who did not exercise had significantly lower sperm counts than their exercising counterparts.

The Newtown Children’s Choir’s performance that was

scheduled to take place during the red carpet show of Monday night’s 55th Grammy Awards was canceled due to the blizzard, the Hartford Courant reported. The group was slated to sing in Newtown as part of a “live to tape” performance.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1974 U.S. Senator and North Carolina native Sam Ervin is appointed a Chubb Fellow and prepares to deliver a lecture in the Law School auditorium on “A Nation of Laws.” Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Faculty consider grading overhaul

Despite storm, IvyQ persists

COMMITTEE PROPOSES TRANSITIONING FROM A LETTER GRADE SYSTEM TO A 100-POINT SCALE BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER Forty years ago, only 10 percent of grades awarded by Yale College were A’s. Last spring, that percentage was 62. Yale College Dean Mary Miller created the Yale College ad hoc committee on grading policy, which released a preliminary report on grading trends last week, as a response to rising grade-point average cutoffs for high honors and soaring grade averages nationwide. Chaired by economics professor Ray Fair, the committee presented its findings at last Thursday’s Yale College faculty meeting and recommended that Yale College transition from a letter grade system to a 100-point scale, along with other proposals, which would be implemented in the 2014-’15 school year. The committee will consider student and faculty feedback and submit concrete proposals for a vote at April’s faculty meeting. Though the report stated that

compression at the top of the grade distribution can be detrimental to students, students and faculty interviewed expressed mixed reactions to the committee’s proposals.

The total number of A’s and A-minuses has risen steadily as a percentage of overall grades. KAMARIA GREENFIELD/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

MARY MILLER Dean, Yale College “[The report] looks at the long term trajectory in which the total number of A’s and A-minuses have risen steadily as a percentage of overall grades across all divisions and departments, and it recommends that the faculty take a number of actions,” Miller said. “I think this is going to be a SEE GRADES PAGE 5

In spite of the heavy snowfall, IvyQ ran around 30 workshops for 500 LGBTQ Ivy League students. BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER This weekend, 500 students converged on campus for the fourth annual IvyQ — a conference for undergraduate LGBTQ and allied students that Yale hosted for the first time — despite logistical challenges due to the blizzard. The sold-out conference,

organized by 40 students from all Ivy League schools, ran roughly 30 workshops as well as opening and closing events, although eight workshops and social activities Friday evening were canceled due to the weather. The Gay and Lesbian Alumni Association’s (GALA) second annual LGBTQ Reunion, which was also scheduled to take place this

weekend, was canceled due to closed venues and delayed flights, said Anna Wipfler ’09, the reunion’s co-chair. Organizers of IvyQ said strong support from sponsors, speakers and University administrators allowed them to hold the conference despite the snowstorm. “What really made the SEE IVYQ PAGE 5


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Bring back Sean Kingston.” yaledailynews.com/opinion

'BY10' ON 'BREAKING: MACKLEMORE FOR SPRING

FLING"

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T S K A T I E C H O C K L E Y A N D A M A L I A S K I LT O N

Respect for survivors of eating disorders

NEWS’

VIEW

Y

WARNER TO WOODBRIDGE

New Haven and the Yale degree University President Richard Levin will leave behind a legacy of outward expansion. Not only did he begin an expansion of online education, but he also launched the University’s partnership with the National University of Singapore to create one of Asia’s first liberal arts colleges. Because of these efforts, President-elect Peter Salovey will inherit a Yale with boundaries more fluid than ever. But as our University’s scope broadens, we cannot lose sight of what the Yale diploma means — an experience that can only be realized on this campus. The piece of paper we receive at commencement, inscribed with Latin and emblazoned with our names, means far more than our 36 credits. The Yale diploma represents our involvement in our colleges and New Haven communities — where we often learn more from our out-ofclassroom experiences than from our courses. These things, in their entirety, are the Yale experience. Their exported versions, whether online or abroad, will combine to form a new educational environment. These students must receive a new, and therefore different, diploma. Our Singaporean venture will only offer a degree granted by NUS to its first class this fall. But in three to six years, Yale-NUS will be officially evaluated by the Yale Corporation, and the pressure may grow for Yale to offer a joint degree, or even its own degree abroad. In fact, other universities have found themselves awarding degrees abroad despite only initially offering a diploma from NUS. At Duke University, administrators initially committed to a partnership with NUS in which a Duke degree would not be given

to the program’s graduates. The Duke Board of Trustees eventually voted to approve a joint degree program bearing both universities’ names. And in 2004, MIT students were surprised to learn that after a “test of concept,” the MIT-Singapore Alliance, which once enabled students to gain a “certificate of completion” from MIT alongside their NUS degree, would grant MIT graduate diplomas. Administrators, such as NUS President Tan Chorh Chuan, have said that the Yale-NUS degree “may evolve over time,” and none have been willing to guarantee that a Yale degree will not be available one day in Singapore. In the distant future, the Corporation could allow the Yale-NUS degree to “evolve” in a method similar to the path taken by Duke and MIT. But to earn a Yale degree away from New Haven fails to capture what our diploma truly means. We do not endorse isolationism; we commend resources like Open Yale Courses. Yet our desire to share Yale’s privileges should not allow us to succumb to the rat race of academic globalization: a slippery slope that may only lead us to establishing satellite campuses. Yale seems to understand this reality — that unchecked growth could compromise the Yale experience — when a recent University report urged Yale not to offer online degrees at this time. This philosophy must be sustained throughout the Salovey administration, and it should guide our thinking on the future of Yale-NUS. We believe that the values of a Yale education must transcend borders. But we hope that when someone says they graduated from Yale, we will always be able to ask them what college they were in.

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COPYRIGHT 2013 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 86

ou’ve probably seen them: the woman with the pencil-thin wrists; the man on the treadmill for hours; the friend who goes to the bathroom once too often. They are the most visible faces of eating disorders at Yale, but they are not the only ones. As survivors, we know the myths about eating disorders by heart. We’ve heard that we, and others who have lived through the same experience as we have, are too nervous or too dramatic about our bodies. Friends have seen our behavior as just an unhealthy variant on dieting, a good lifestyle taken too far. And most often, we’ve been told that we’re perfectionists, who get A’s because we obsess over our homework and get sick because we obsess over our weight. These narratives are true in part, but they only scratch the surface of reality. It’s hard to overstate how central the body becomes in the minds of people with eating disorders. Every emotion is translated into the language of food and weight: You feel thin when you’re happy, fat when you’re not. You want to be thin more than you want anything else, but you don’t know what thin means — you still want to be thinner when you can count your ribs, when you stop

menstruating, when you know you can’t eat any less. Why is this dangerous pattern of thoughts and behaviors so common? Many factors, biological and otherwise, conspire to cause eating disorders. American and other Western cultures encourage some behaviors that inch people along the road to illness. We are surrounded by images of thinness, exhortations to lose weight and negative judgments about food. The media invests weight with moral importance: We constantly hear the theme that good, educated people eat a certain kind of food and are thin, while only lazy or irrational people eat without worrying about the shape of their bodies.

STATISTICS SAY YOU KNOW SOMEONE WITH AN EATING DISORBER These messages emerge in conversations and relationships between individuals — especially between young women — in many ways. Complaints about our own

bodies hum around us on Yale’s campus. We hear women and men talk about their bodies as if they are useful only to attract others, or as if they are burdensome objects that we are obliged to make as fit and perfect as we can. We are also all too accustomed to hearing friends and acquaintances judge others’ bodies and food behavior. Every remark on how much weight a friend has gained or lost, or how much or little another person is eating, makes us wonder if we were right to judge ourselves and our worth based on what the scale read that day. Comments like these can come from a few places. Perhaps others know in the abstract that eating disorders exist, and even that they are exceptionally common in college, but don’t appreciate that the people around them may be survivors. Perhaps they understand that negative judgments about body shape and weight are dangerous for us, but make their comments without considering how much damage they can cause. All of us can do better than that. The statistics are clear that eating disorders, like other forms of mental and physical illness, do not discriminate. They affect men and women, white people and people of color, people with and without other disabilities.

And we know from experience that their symptoms can be hard to detect. People who seem to be at a healthy weight, or “overweight,” can suffer from disordered eating as profoundly as people who look dangerously thin. People who seem to have healthy food behaviors can restrict, binge or purge in secret. And people who have survived eating disorders do not wear their histories on their sleeves. Often, we hesitate to speak because of stigma, shame or reluctance to seem that we are asking for special treatment. You may think that you don’t know anyone with an eating disorder, but the statistics say that you almost certainly do. Show respect to that person, whether or not you know who they are. Don’t use the word “fat” as an insult. Don’t idolize thinness or venerate weight loss. Don’t tell us that our friends look bad because they’ve gained weight. In sum, don’t believe that the way you eat, or the way your body looks, reflects on yourself or your value as a person. It doesn’t. KATIE CHOCKLEY is a junior in Silliman College. AMALIA SKILTON is a senior in Calhoun College. Contact them at katherine.chockley@yale.edu and amalia.skilton@yale.edu .

For a capable armed forces “W

hy aren’t we intervening in Syria? It’s a humanitarian cri-

sis!” At a January Master’s Tea, a student asked that question of Sterling Professor Harold Koh, the recently retired legal adviser at the State Department. The questioner was emphatic, forceful — emotional even — in tone. For her, Syria is a moral issue with a solution: Innocents are being murdered daily, and “we” should stop it. That student exemplifies a good swath of Yalies, liberal internationalists all. They think that we — “we” being the United Nations, which really means the United States — should prevent slaughter around the world. Why? Because it’s the right thing to do. They passionately clamored for action in Darfur in the mid-2000s, or applauded the intervention in Libya two years ago. But ask the same students about the federal budget — a hot topic that makes you a hit at cocktail parties — and they just as fervently support defense cuts. As they see it, the Pentagon is a bloated money-suck. “Do we really need 10 aircraft carriers at $4.5 billion

NATHANIEL ZELINSKY On Point

a pop? Think of how many schools that money would build.” The same gung ho interventionist wants to shake the militaryindustrial behemoth for loose change with which to fund domestic

agenda items. These two political beliefs glaringly contradict: You cannot secure peace in areas of brutal conflict and simultaneously rob our armed forces of the tools they need to do the job. If Yalies really want to prevent the next Rwanda (and I think we do), then we should support a military that has the resources necessary to project power when crises arise. Sadly, after 10 years of wartime mobilization, the military faces a time of immense austerity. Some in Congress seriously favor sequestration — a plan that slashes $500 billion from the defense budget over the next 10 years. In a speech at Georgetown, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta

warned that sequestration would hinder our operational capacity. Fewer planes would fly; fewer ships would sail. And should another earthquake hit Japan or Haiti, or another Syria materialize, we would be left without adequate resources to bring aid relief or establish a U.N.-sanctioned humanitarian corridor for refugees.

ONLY AMERICA HAS THE WEALTH TO SECURE PEACE Even if Congress does pass legislation to overturn sequestration, the Obama administration will prioritize entitlements over defense — despite the fact that the most severe reductions in the Pentagon cannot fund the fiscal nightmares that are Social Security and health care. Is there room to trim the Defense Department? Of course. Any organization, especially a part of the government, wastes money. But if we gut our mili-

tary hardware and capabilities, no Western country is going to pick up the mantle of humanitarianism. In 2011, the NATO alliance couldn’t establish a no-fly zone in Libya without U.S. command and control networks. In Mali today, American cargo planes support the French army’s fight against the Islamist rebels because France cannot reliably transport its own troops and gear to Africa. Yes, other nations should share the burden, but only America has the wealth to truly secure peace when the need arises. And a peaceful world, a humane world is a world with fewer hot spots for terrorism, piracy and all of those nasty actors who threaten our safety and way of life. So, Yalies who support humanitarian intervention in Syria — or anywhere else for that matter — should be up in arms. We should protest defense cuts with vigor. We should make it clear where our generation’s priorities lie: on the side of a strong, capable America dedicated to a safer world. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .

Snow and tea on two continents W

hen I called my grandmother’s house on Friday night, the falling snow connected us from thousands of miles apart. As the howling winds slammed against my windows, my father pointed the webcam towards a snow-draped osmanthus bush beyond the balcony. Everything was covered in white. In my hometown in southern China, such heavy snowfall around Chinese New Year’s time is rare, and a cause for celebration. As in past years, my grandmother was busy making lastminute preparations for the festivities that were to come. Seeing her scurry about in her apron brought back memories of years past — I could almost smell the saliva-inducing aroma of steaming dishes on the table, the subtle fragrance of incense yet to be lit, the pungent smoke of firecrackers that filled the night air. The memories are clearer than ever, but it’s been a long time since I last celebrated Chinese New Year with my family. For the past three years, this holiday has meant little more than a phone call back home, and perhaps a meal with friends at Great Wall. Strangely, nothing seems amiss. Life goes on

as normal, this year’s blizzard notwithstanding. My family would spend New Year’s Eve at my great uncle’s, XIUYI my father told ZHENG me. He did not fail to menPropertion that my great uncle gandist was a master chef, hinting at what was sure to be an extraordinary feast. He took the webcam to the kitchen, and gave me a preview of what was to come — steamed fish, braised pork shoulder, soy sauce duck and my personal favorite, chicken preserved in prawn sauce. I nodded at each dish that came upon on my screen, recognizing them not as food, but as pixelated pictures that might have come up with any Google search. “Do you miss home?” my grandmother asked. For a second, I hesitated. I was sitting on my bed in my pajama pants, fresh out of the shower. My jacket, jeans and shoes lay scattered on the ground, still wet from the snow. Next door,

my suitemates were waiting for me to join them in a game of beer pong. It was Friday night. I wanted to say that I missed home, that I wanted to fly back and devour everything in my grandmother’s kitchen, but right now, my life is here in Davenport, here at Yale. Of course I wanted to spend time with my family, but the commotion, the feasts and the firecrackers seemed to exist in another place, at another time. From an early age I had gotten used to moving, first to one place and then to another. I’ve lived in three different Chinese cities, and I took my first intercontinental flight at the age of seven. I’ve spent the majority of my life holding a U.S. visa, coming to America first for high school and then college. I had always prided myself on my ability to adapt, to quickly blend into my surroundings — like a chameleon ready to change color. Yet as I came to know more and more places as “home,” home itself became an increasingly blurry concept, as if caught in a thickening fog. According to my passport, home is Pudong, Shanghai. According to tradition, home is in my grandmother’s kitchen; it is by the graves of

my ancestors. According to my heart, however, home is often nowhere to be found. On Chinese New Year’s Eve, the day of homecoming, I was most struck by how distant I felt from my roots, not in terms of miles, but in terms of how little I seemed to need it. When I told my grandmother that I didn’t miss home, she, for the most part, seemed unbothered. She chuckled at my response, apparently happy that I was enjoying my life here at Yale. What would she say if I told her that I was totally fine with not celebrating Chinese New Year, that I liked being at school more than being at home? I have no idea. But as I reached towards the glass of fresh tea sitting on my bedpost, something suddenly dawned on me. It was Longjing tea, a hometown specialty and my father’s favorite brew. As I took the warm glass into my hands, the emerald green leaves rose and sank. The rising steam carried a familiar aroma to my nostrils. A piece of home was here with me all along. XIUYI ZHENG is a junior in Davenport College. Contact him at xiuyi.zheng@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“One must be an inventor to read well. There is then creative reading as well as creative writing.” RALPH WALDO EMERSON AMERICAN ESSAYIST AND LEADER OF THE MID-19TH CENTURY TRANSCENDENTALIST MOVEMENT

E D WA R D S T A N K I E W I C Z 1 9 2 0 – 2 0 1 3 CORRECTIONS TUESDAY, JAN. 29

The article “Physicists observe quantum computing” mistakenly stated that quantum computers that can factor large numbers have already been developed. In fact, 21 is the largest number to have been factored by a quantum computer.

Professor of 4 decades dies at 92

Admissions dean search progresses

STEVE STANKIEWICZ

Edward Stankiewicz, a professor in Yale’s Slavic Languages and Literatures Department for 42 years, was a pre-eminent linguistics scholar.

ALLIE KRAUSE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The search committee for a new dean of undergraduate admissions has already identified potential candidates to interview. BY AMY WANG STAFF REPORTER Following the announcement last fall that Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel will step down at the end of the 2012-’13 year, the search for a new dean is already underway. Brenzel said in October that he planned to end his tenure at the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to focus on his role as master of Timothy Dwight College and to resume teaching philosophy in Directed Studies — ending a seven-year term leading the office. University Secretary and Vice President for Student Life Kimberly Goff-Crews, who is chairing the search committee for a new admissions dean, said she hopes to have a new dean named sometime this spring. “We are proceeding nicely, judiciously,” she said. “There are some great candidates out there that will do really well at Yale and will continue to build great classes we’ve seen in the past couple of years.” The search committee has already identified potential candidates to interview, GoffCrews said, although no one has come to campus yet. GoffCrews declined to comment on the number of candidates the committee is currently considering, though she said its national search has considered both internal and external candidates. University President Richard Levin said he feels very optimistic about the succession, adding that he thinks Brenzel is leaving behind a “strong infrastructure” of well-developed admissions procedures and dedicated staff members. Levin said he does not think that the changing leadership of the University and city at large — the triple turnover of the president, provost and New Haven mayor — will pose many challenges for the new admissions dean. According to Levin, sometime after spring break, the search committee plans to narrow down the candidates to a short list of finalists which he, President-elect Peter Salovey and Yale College Dean Mary Miller will review. Levin said he anticipates the search to conclude sometime in April. “I think the key is to get a right leader who will serve us well by selecting an extraor-

dinary class and really having great connection to the world of high schools,” Levin said. The “nature of the transition” to the new dean will depend on his or her prior experience, Brenzel said, but the fact that Brenzel will remain on campus as TD Master and as a professor in Yale College will make it possible to assist the new dean in whichever ways he or she will find helpful.

There are some great candidates out there that will do really well at Yale and will continue to build great classes. KIMBERLY GOFF-CREWS Vice president for student life, Yale Brenzel — who called the admissions dean position a “challenging” job — added that he hopes a new dean will take the first year in the role to become well-acquainted with the office and process, as he initially did when he took the position in 2005. Though he declined to comment on what qualities he would personally like to see in the new dean, Brenzel said he does not anticipate the new dean will make any radical changes to the Yale Admissions Office in the short term, but that the admissions landscape is always changing over the long term. Salovey said he hopes the new dean will have similar qualities to Brenzel, who he said “shaped terrific cohorts of Yale College students and has also been a thoughtful spokesperson for higher education.” Levin said he would like to see a person who “has the potential of being a real leader,” understands college admissions and also “knows the Yale scene.” The admissions dean reports to the University President and Yale College Dean. Brenzel will officially step down from the Admissions Office on June 30, 2013, after the close of the admissions cycle for the Class of 2017. Contact AMY WANG at amy.wang@yale.edu .

BY JACOB WOLF-SOROKIN AND JULIA ZORTHIAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER AND STAFF REPORTER Edward Stankiewicz, a Holocaust survivor who joined the Yale faculty in 1971 and pioneered the field of Slavic linguistics, died on Jan. 31 of cardiac arrest. He was 92 years old. Stankiewicz emigrated to the United States in 1949, after internment in a Jewish ghetto and Buchenwald concentration camp, and served as a linguistics professor in the Slavic Languages and Literatures Department during his 42-year tenure at Yale. A speaker of almost 20 languages, Stankiewicz saw language as a bridge between individuals of different backgrounds, those who knew him said. Friends and family remember Stankiewicz in part for his artistic ability and profound love of beauty, be it for art, music or the doodles he always drew on napkins and paper scraps. “His erudition expanded far, far beyond his scholarship and linguistics,” Slavic languages and literatures professor Rita Lipson said. “His sense of beauty was great — he knew art exceptionally well. In his lectures, he was able to bring everything together.”

Stankiewicz worked six days a week, arriving at his office “impeccably dressed” in a tweed jacket or suit and tie by 10 a.m. every morning, Lipson said. Alex Werrel ’13, who came to know the professor over lunches in the Timothy Dwight dining hall, said his framed artwork and napkin sketches adorned the walls of his office, which was crammed full of a vast library of Slavic linguistics textbooks, many of which he had written. Julia Titus, a Slavic languages and literatures professor, said Stankiewicz developed the study of Slavic grammar. Titus added that she helped Stankiewicz find undergraduates to serve as his research assistants because he treasured the chance to interact with Yale College students even after he stopped teaching courses. Lipson said these research opportunities for students were consistently more enriching than merely searching through a library for information. “You couldn’t have a conversation with him without him teaching you something,” said Stankiewicz’s son, Steve Stankiewicz. Steve, now an artist, said his father taught him the principles of painting when he was a child, and his wide range of passions came through

in every interaction he had with others. Stankiewicz painted passionately, traveling up and down the Adriatic coast to create watercolor landscapes, Titus said. His work has been exhibited in the Whitney Humanities Center and in Ezra Stiles College, said Lipson, who used to serve as the Stiles dean.

You couldn’t have a conversation without him teaching you something. STEVE STANKIEWICZ Son of Edward Stankiewicz His love of art manifested itself in not only his painting, but also his love of museums, his knack for doodling portraits and talent in singing and playing the mandolin, his friends and family said. Two colleagues described Stankiewicz as a Renaissance man. “His sense of beauty permeated his life and everything, everything,” Lipson added. Stankiewicz used his artistic talent to pay his way through school in the United Soviet Socialist Republic by work-

ing as a propaganda artist. Though he escaped from a Jewish Ghetto during World War II, he was eventually recaptured by the Nazi Secret State Police and deported to Buchenwald concentration camp in Germany. He was the only member of his immediate family to survive the Holocaust. Stankiewicz published “My War: Memoir of a Young Jewish Poet,” an account of his experiences during World War II, in 2003. Barbara Handler, his daughter, said she pressed her father to record his experiences with the Holocaust. “It was something that was important to me and I think became important to him as it went,” Handler said. Though the memoir was his only personal work, Stankiewicz also published numerous scholarly books and monographs, including “The Accentual Patterns of the Slavic Languages” in 1993 and “Studies in Slavic Morphophonemics and Accentology” in 1979. He is survived by his two children, Steve and Handler. Contact JACOB WOLF-SOROKIN at jacob.wolf-sorokin@yale.edu . Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .

English Dept looks to boost writing courses BY COLLEEN FLYNN STAFF REPORTER In an effort to open creative writing courses to more undergraduates, the English Department hopes to expand course offerings as early as fall 2013. Following a formal review of the creative writing program that occurred last academic year, the department is evaluating numerous options for addressing the lack of space in creative writing courses to accommodate student interest, including offering an introductory creative writing lecture for underclassmen next fall. The course would introduce students to major genres — poetry, fiction, drama and creative nonfiction — and provide them with an opportunity to get feedback in discussion sections, English Department Chair Michael Warner said. Students interviewed said the new course could break the cycle in which students who are rejected from writing courses one semester struggle to acquire the writing samples necessary to get into similar courses in future

semesters. “Yale has a very distinctive way of teaching creative writing,” Warner said. “We feel very strongly that creative writing is not merely a mode of selfexpression, but that good writers need to be well read and need to understand the tradition they are joining.”

When you get into a writing class, it kind of feels like a magic formula you don’t understand. AMELIA URRY ’13 The creative writing program evaluation involved an “internal self-study” and an external review committee comprising faculty from creative writing programs at other universities. In addition to creating an introductory course, the review recommended that the English Depart-

ment offer a more coherent curriculum that would allow students to take courses that build on one another. Warner said the introductory course may follow a similar format to “Daily Themes,” a popular English lecture in which students write short creative pieces every day and receive feedback from their Teaching Fellows and peers. Richard Deming, a lecturer in English who teaches “Daily Themes” this semester, said he received nearly 200 applications for the 96-person class this term. John Crowley, a senior lecturer in English and Creative Writing, said the department also hopes to expand waitlist sizes for creative writing classes. Since students may only take one creative writing course per semester but apply to as many courses as they like, competitive courses sometimes go with partial enrollment becuase admitted students opt for other courses. Four students interviewed said they support the possible changes to the creative writing program.

“I definitely know a lot of people who are interested in writing but have a lot of trouble applying to the seminars because they don’t have samples,” Karolina Ksiazek ’15 said, adding that she applied to eight creative writing classes this semester and was only accepted to one. Sally Helm ’14 said she thinks an introductory creative writing course that could include freshmen would be a valuable addition to the program, because she said students who are unable to take creative writing courses early in their Yale careers often struggle to get into them later. Amelia Urry ’13 said admission to creative writing courses can be random. “When you get into a writing class, it kind of feels like a magic formula you don’t understand,” she said. The English Department offers 13 creative writing courses this semester. Contact COLLEEN FLYNN at colleen.flynn@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Supporting acts TBD

“What you know about rockin’ a wolf on your noggin?” MACKLEMORE FROM HIS HIT SONG “THRIFT SHOP”

City receives federal aid WINTER STORM FROM PAGE 1

ANDREW STEPHENSON/CREATIVE COMMONS

Macklemore’s No. 1 single “Thrift Shop” is his best-known song off “The Heist,” his first studio album. SPRING FLING FROM PAGE 1 comment. YCC President John Gonzalez declined to comment on Macklemore’s performance Saturday night . Macklemore released his first fulllength album in 2005 and his hit single “Thrift Shop,” with Ryan Lewis featuring Wanz, on Oct. 8, 2012. “Thrift Shop” climbed to No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and sold over 2 million copies in total. The song appeared on hisfirst studio album “The Heist,” which reached the No. 1 position on the U.S. iTunes Albums chart within hours of release. The rapper recently visited New Haven to perform at Toad’s Place on Nov. 18, 2012. Several students interviewed said they are excited that Macklemore will return to New Haven because the Toad’s performance occurred on the same weekend as this year’s Harvard-Yale football game, causing many students to miss the performance. All 21 students interviewed said they are happy with the committee’s choice for Spring Fling. “It’s so exciting to be closing off the year

with such a strong Spring Fling.” Andre Shomorony ’13 said. “It will be an awesome graduation gift for me and my fellow senior class.” Nine students said they are specifically looking forward to hearing “Thrift Shop” and “And We Danced,” another of Macklemore’s hit songs. Four students said they hope Macklemore also plays some of his less well-known songs.

It will be an awesome graduation gift for me and my fellow senior class. ANDRE SHOMORONY ’13 “My favorite songs by him are ‘Starting Over,’ ‘Wings,’ ‘Otherside,’ ‘Hold Your Head Up,’ ‘Remember High School,’ ‘Same Love’ and ‘Make that Money,’” Lincoln Mitchell ’15 said. “These songs are more sentimental, and I really hope Macklemore includes

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them in his lineup.” The announcement of Macklemore’s performance follows an October 2012 meeting between the Spring Fling Committee and the Women’s Center in which students discussed sex and gender sensitivity issues surrounding Spring Fling artists and brainstormed ways the committee could choose performers that would not make any students uncomfortable. The Women’s Center Public Relations Coordinator Suzanna Fritzberg ’14 said she is pleased that the Committee took questions about an artist’s ethics and respect for diversity seriously during the selection process. “I think they’ve made a great choice,” Fritzberg said. “Macklemore has demonstrated commitment to improving dialogue around diversity issues, has a progressive ethos, and, most importantly, puts on a great show.” Rapper T-Pain was the headliner at last year’s Spring Fling. Contact KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG at kirsten.schnackenberg@yale.edu .

and stay safe so we can clean up our City and ensure public safety while we do it,” Mayor John DeStefano Jr. said in a Sunday evening press release. The blizzard has wreaked havoc throughout the northeastern United States since it began Friday evening. An estimated 40 million people regionwide were affected by the storm, and over 650,000 people lost power. The force of the blizzard caused coastal flooding and forced evacuations in Long Island and Massachusetts. While officials worked to prepare for the storm — including a travel ban imposed 4 p.m. Friday by Gov. Dannel Malloy — at least 11 people in the United States lost their lives in the blizzard. On Sunday, President Barack Obama declared a state of emergency in Connecticut, and federal emergency relief funded emergency devices such as snow removal equipment. Malloy expressed thanks for the federal assistance but stressed that residents should stay off the roads. “This declaration will provide much needed assistance to the state and our towns and cities as we continue to recover from this historic winter storm,” Malloy said following Obama’s declaration. “While the ban on travel has been lifted, we are continuing to urge residents to stay off the roads, if at all possible.” The storm covered New Haven, in particular, with frightening speed — from 10:30 p.m. on Friday night to 1 a.m. on Saturday morning about 8 inches accumulated in the Elm City. But though the storm raged in New Haven, not many residents experienced power outages and all power in the city had been restored by Sunday evening, according to City

Hall spokeswoman Anna Mariotti. Forty trucks from the city’s department of public works are busy plowing the roads with support from the National Guard, although a Sunday City Hall press release said that so much snow remains on the streets that heavy machinery must be used to move the snow before normal plowing can occur. The heavy snowfall also hurt regional transportation, with airline companies dramatically reducing service following the storm and Metro-North canceling trains from New York to New Haven, leaving Yale students, such as Zak Newman ’13, stranded in the Big Apple over the weekend. Newman, who was visiting Washington, D.C., to interview for a job and work on his senior essay was stuck in New York City on his way back to campus. Tomorrow, Metro-North will resume a limited a.m. peak service from Stamford to New Haven, which is about 50 percent of the normal a.m. peak service, according to the MetroNorth website. Linder told the News that road conditions in New Haven remain problematic for travel. “The city is fighting more snow than it’s seen in years, so the snow removal operation will take several days,” Linder wrote. “The city has made progress plowing main roads, but many side streets remain unplowed.” She added that there have not been many injuries to those affiliated with Yale or Yale’s campus. City Hall, New Haven Public Schools, Gateway Community College, New Haven Free Public Library and the city’s senior centers are all closed Monday. Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT Yale GALA reunion canceled IVYQ FROM PAGE 1 [IvyQ] conference worth it for me was seeing how much everybody else, not just the planning team, wanted it,” said the conference’s Vice Chair Stefan Palios ’14. “Getting calls from sponsors and speakers saying the storm won’t stop us — that’s what made it worth it for me.” Last spring, Yale won the bid to host this year’s IvyQ due to its in-depth events proposal and the concurrent Yale GALA Reunion scheduled, said Hilary O’Connell ’14, who co-chaired the IvyQ conference with Carolyn Farnham ’13. The schedule was designed around six areas that ensure a diverse representation of LGBTQ-relevant topics, such as queer history and internationality, established at last year’s IvyQ, O’Connell said. Faculty speakers included George Chauncey ’77 GRD ’89, co-director of the Yale Research Initiative on the History of Sexualities and professor of “U.S. Lesbian and Gay History,” and Maria Trumpler, director of Yale’s Office of LGBTQ Resources. Most events were held in William L. Harkness Hall and Linsly-Chittenden Hall, Palios said, and Davenport College Master Richard Schottenfeld ’71 MED ’76 hosted the closing banquet in the Davenport dining hall after Commons was closed due to the storm. IvyQ organizers said the main challenges in adjusting to the storm were relocating after the closure of main event facilities — Woolsey Hall and Commons — and organizing events despite travel delays for speakers and attendees. Over 250 students attended Chauncey’s welcome address Thursday evening. In his speech, Chauncey discussed the importance of studying queer history in order to understand the sources

of anti-gay hostility and analyze how political goals such as marriage equality have been formed within the LGBTQ community. “Our society is in the midst of a great moral debate over homosexuality and the place of LGBT people,” Chauncey said, “and studying the evolution of that debate over the last century helps us understand what’s at stake for the many participants in it.” Despite travel delays, Chauncey said he felt great enthusiasm in the room, and considers the conference a “success.” Organizers of Yale GALA announced the reunion’s cancellation at noon on Thursday. The decision was made early enough that the large majority of registrants could cancel their travel arrangements, Wipfler said, and ad hoc arrangements were made for the 30 to 50 people who had already arrived on campus. Wipfler declined to comment on the projected financial cost of the cancellation. Eight IvyQ attendees interviewed said their conference experience was not significantly diminished due to the snowstorm and the changes in schedule. “We’ve been inspired by Yale’s resourcefulness and dedication,” said Nick Ellis, an IvyQ Leadership Board member from Princeton. “We have big shoes to fill when we host the conference sometime in the next several years. But students from several schools said they experienced travel delays, and two students interviewed reported having difficulty acquiring meals due to the closure of stores and a lack of access to dining halls. Next year’s IvyQ host has not yet been selected. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

“But there are advantages to being elected president. The day after I was elected, I had my high school grades classified top secret.” RONALD REAGAN 40TH PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Faculty debate grading GRADES FROM PAGE 1 major point of discussion this year.” The committee’s report begins with an examination of the purpose and intent of grades, and then compares grading data from Yale to similar data from peer institutions. The report notes continuous grade compression at the top of the GPA rubric, with A’s, A-minuses and B-pluses dominating students’ transcripts. The report also indicates large discrepancies between the grades awarded in different departments. Based on this data, the committee drafted a number of preliminary proposals, including transitioning Yale’s grading system to a 100-point system. Fair said percentage grades would eliminate the “cliffs” that exaggerate the differences between B-plus and A-minus grades while providing professors with a means of curbing potential grade inflation. “If you’re going to change the system at Yale from what we now have with respect to the clustering of A’s and A-minuses, you’re probably going to have to change the units of currency,” Fair said. Though the committee did not advocate mandatory grade distributions, the report suggested a set of guidelines that would award 35 percent of grades in the 90 to 100 range, 40 percent in the 80 to 89 percent range, 20 percent in the 70 to 79, 4 to 5 percent in the 60 to 69 range and less than 1 percent at 59. Under these distributions, the mean grade in Yale College would be an 85.5 percent, according to the report. But faculty and students interviewed expressed mixed opinions about the committee’s current proposals. Philosophy professor Shelly Kagan said he thinks the upward compression of grades makes grades lose their effectiveness as evaluative tools, which is harmful for students. “If B-plus is being kept for bad work, and virtually everyone is getting A or A-minus, this eliminates any genuine feedback,” Kagan said. “I’ve always thought this is a disservice to undergraduates.” Kagan said he thinks taking a more active stance against grade inflation could prompt other universities to follow suit, adding that Princeton drew the attention of other universities in 2004 when it instituted grade deflation policies, which standardized the percentage of A’s and A minuses

GRAPH PROPOSED GRADE DISTRIBUTION, IN PERCENT 40

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PRELIMINARY REPORT OF THE AD HOC COMMITTEE ON GRADING, FEBRUARY 2012

awarded at 35 percent for undergraduate courses and at 55 percent for junior and senior independent work. But political science professor David Cameron said he is skeptical about the benefits of the committee’s proposals. While Cameron said he is intrigued by the data the committee has collected so far, he added that many complex factors determine grade distribution, and he thinks professors should consider the reasons behind fluctuations in grading over time and across departments before making significant changes to University policy. The 13 students interviewed opposed switching to a 100-point system, though not all agreed on whether grade inflation affects their performance in the classes they take. Christopher Mulvey ’15 said he believes

grade inflation affects certain departments at Yale, but he thinks the net impact of switching Yale’s current system would be detrimental overall. “I think the 100-point system would be way too much stress,” Mulvey said. “[Yale] was billed to me as one of the least competitive Ivies, in a good way, where you don’t want to kill the people around you for doing better than you. That’s not what Yale’s about.” Matthew Thomas Ambler ’13 added that students would stress more about every point in a 100-point system, which would also put additional pressure on professors. Miller convened the ad hoc committee on grading policy in September. Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

BLIZZARD 2013

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ver the weekend, the Elm City was blanketed by nearly three feet of snow in advance of Yale’s first snow day in 35 years. Photographers BRIANNE BOWEN, SARAH ECKINGER, KAMARIA GREENFIELD, KERRI LU, STEPHANIE RIVKIN, BLAIR SEIDEMAN AND VIVIENNE ZHANG document the thrills and chills.

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

“Resting on your laurels is as dangerous as resting when you are walking in the snow. You doze off and die in your sleep.” LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN PHILOSOPHER


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

BLIZZARD 2013

O

ver the weekend, the Elm City was blanketed by nearly three feet of snow in advance of Yale’s first snow day in 35 years. Photographers BRIANNE BOWEN, SARAH ECKINGER, KAMARIA GREENFIELD, KERRI LU, STEPHANIE RIVKIN, BLAIR SEIDEMAN AND VIVIENNE ZHANG document the thrills and chills.

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

“Resting on your laurels is as dangerous as resting when you are walking in the snow. You doze off and die in your sleep.” LUDWIG WITTGENSTEIN PHILOSOPHER


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

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S NASDAQ 3,193.87, +0.91% S Oil $95.78, +0.08%

Senator vows to delay nominees ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — A leading Republican senator said Sunday he would hold up Senate confirmation of President Barack Obama’s nominees to head the Pentagon and the CIA until the White House provided more answers about the Sept. 11 attack against a U.S. installation in Benghazi, Libya. The White House took aim at South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, a persistent critic of Obama’s response to the terrorist assault, by urging quick approval of the president’s second-term national security team and scolding any lawmakers trying to “play politics” with critical nominations. Graham accused the White House of “stonewalling” requests to release more information about the attack that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya. “We’re going to get to the bottom of Benghazi,” he told CBS’ “Face the Nation.” A Democratic colleague branded Graham’s threat to stall the nominations of former Sen. Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., to be defense secretary and John Brennan, Obama’s top counterterrorism adviser, to be CIA director as “unprecedented and unwarranted.” Senators should have the chance to vote on the fate of those nominees, said Sen. Jack Reed of Rhode Island. The White House did not address Graham’s demand for more information, but did note that Defense Secretary Leon Panetta and Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, testified Thursday before Congress about the chaotic day of the Sept. 11 attack. In January Graham had signaled he would delay Brennan’s pick and told Fox News he would “absolutely” block Hagel unless Panetta and Dempsey testified about the Benghazi attack. The senator said he was “happy as a clam” when he learned the hearing with Panetta and Dempsey had been scheduled.

Dow Jones 13,992.97, +0.35%

Republicans have accused the Obama administration of an election-year cover-up of the attack and at the hearing several suggested the commander in chief was disengaged as Americans died. “We know nothing about what the president did on the night of Sept. 11 during a time of national crisis, and the American people need to know what their commander in chief did, if anything, during this eight-hour attack,” Graham said on CBS.

The American people need to know what their commander in chief did, if anything, during this eight-hour attack. LINDSEY GRAHAM U.S. senator, South Carolina Graham contended that a six-person rescue team was delayed from leaving the Benghazi airport because of problems “with the militias releasing them and a lot of bureaucratic snafus,” and he said he wants to know whether Obama called any Libyan officials to expedite their mission. “I don’t think we should allow Brennan to go forward for the CIA directorship, Hagel to be confirmed to secretary of defense until the White House gives us an accounting,” Graham said, adding, “What did he do that night? That’s not unfair. The families need to know, the American people need to know.” Tommy Vietor, a spokesman for the White House’s National Security Council, said, “We believe the Senate should act swiftly to confirm John Brennan and Sen. Hagel. These are critical national security positions and individual members shouldn’t play politics with their nominations.”

Natasha Trethewey Poetry Reading Poet Laureate of the United States and former Beinecke Fellow Thursday, February 14, 2013, 4:30 pm Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library 121 Wall Street, New Haven, Connecticut Free and open to the public In conjunction with the Beinecke Library’s 50th anniversary celebration and the exhibition By Hand: Celebrating the Manuscript Collections

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10-yr. Bond 1.95%, +0.00 Euro $1.34, 0.05

Grammys spread love around BY CHRIS TALBOTT ASSOCIATED PRESS LOS ANGELES — Mumford & Sons wrapped up a completely unpredictable Grammy Awards with perhaps the most surprising win of the night, taking home album of the year for “Babel.” It was an event that even shocked the London folk-rockers. “We figured we weren’t going to win anything because The Black Keys have been sweeping up all day, rightfully so,” Marcus Mumford said. Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys ended up the night’s top winner with four trophies, including producer of the year and three rock category victories with bandmate Patrick Carney. But it was hardly a clean sweep as The Recording Academy’s thousands of voters spread the love for the year’s top singles. Fun. took home major awards best new artist, in something of an upset over Frank Ocean, and song of the year for the transcendent anthem “We Are Young,” featuring Janelle Monae. “I didn’t think we were going to win this one,” lead singer Nate Ruess said after the best new artist win. “Frank Ocean. The Lumineers. Everybody, amazing.” Like Mumford & Sons, Gotye busted up the predictions, taking record of the year for 2012’s top-selling single, the haunting “Somebody That I Used To Know,” featuring Kimbra, and finished with three awards. Prince, in hood and sunglasses and carrying a sparkly silver cane, presented him with the record of the year trophy and the Australian paid tribute to The Purple One’s influence. “A little bit lost for words, to receive an award from the man standing behind us with the cane,” Gotye said. “Many years listening to this man’s music growing up and a big reason I was inspired to make music. Thank you.” Jay-Z and Kanye West had three wins - sharing one award with Ocean - along with Skrillex, and a slew

JOHN SHEARE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Justin Timberlake, left, and Jay-Z perform onstage at the 55th Annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. of nominees had two wins apiece, including former best new artist winner Esperanza Spalding. Ocean was shut out in the major categories, but took home two trophies, including best urban contemporary album. Only Chris Brown, with whom Ocean scuffled last month, remained seated as the 25-year-old R&B winner walked to the stage during a standing ovation. Ocean beat Brown, who attended with girlfriend Rihanna, in the category. Ocean won also won best rap/ sung collaboration for “No Church in the Wild” with fellow top nominees Jay-Z and West, and The-Dream. The win came after victories for Jay-Z and West for best rap song and best rap performance for “... in Paris,” another “Watch the Throne” track. Ocean also performed his song “Forrest Gump,” the love song written about a man that first started the buzz that led to his announcement that his first love was a man. “We Are Young” helped fun. earn a starring role at these Grammys with nominations in all four major cate-

gories after the release of their first album, matched only by Christopher Cross in 1981, and six overall. The band turned in a powerful early performance of “Carry On” as a downpour on stage began mid-song and guitarist Jack Antonoff got a kiss from girlfriend “Girls” creator Lena Dunham after winning. The Black Keys took best rock performance for “Lonely Boy” during the main telecast and earlier in the day won best rock song for “Lonely Boy” and best rock album for “El Camino.” He also got an assist - but no trophy - on Dr. John’s best blues album “Locked Down,” which he produced. Other winners included Rihanna, Beyonce, Mumford & Sons and Taylor Swift, who opened the show as the Mad Hatter. Swift dressed in white top hat, tails, shorts and tall boots during the surreal version of her hummable hit “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together” that included a troop of mime clowns and a guy on a tricycle with a flame-thrower attached.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Snow and freezing rain, then rain. Patchy fog. High near 43. Low of 33.

High of 43, low of 27.

WEDNESDAY High of 40, low of 28.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 4:00 PM Femininitea with Kristyn Zalota. Come enjoy refreshments and conversation with Kristyn Zalota, founder of Cleanbirth.org, a New Haven-based nonprofit that works to reduce maternal and infant mortality in Laos. Zalota has focused on projects that empower women in the developing world since finishing her master’s at Yale. After learning that Laos has among the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in the world, she partnered in 2012 with Our Village Associate (OVA), a Lao nonprofit which has worked with ethnic minority groups for more than a decade. CleanBirth.org and OVA work together to train nurses and give them the supplies they need to promote safe birth in their communities. Yale Women’s Center (198 Elm St.).

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 3:00 PM “Alexander Purves: Roman Sketches.” Professor Purves has led an intensive four-week drawing seminar in Rome for graduate students of the Yale School of Architecture for the past 12 years. Now here is an opportunity to see some of his own work — a series of sketches done in ballpoint pen of various architecturally interesting features of buildings in Rome. The sketchbooks are filled with personal notations, thoughts and observations that imbue the rough sketches with an air of disclosure. In our technologically advanced age, drawing by hand remains a critically important mode of investigation and expression. Don’t miss this rare insight into the phenomenology of the architectural sketch! 6:10 PM “Eating Invaders: A Panel Discussion on Invasive Species.” The panel will consider the ecological impacts of invasive species and the question of whether eating these often tasty creatures is the best strategy for protecting the natural environment. Panelists include Daniel Simberloff of the University of Tennessee; Jackson Landers, freelance writer and hunting instructor; and Bun Lai, owner and chef of Miya’s Sushi in New Haven. Moderated by James Gorman of The New York Times. Free and open to the general public. Yale Law School (127 Wall St.), Room 120.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

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Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Tip, as one’s hat 5 Empty spaces 9 Subsides 14 Suffix with switch 15 Wilson of “Wedding Crashers” 16 Texas shrine 17 Tall tale teller 18 “Deck the Halls” syllables 19 Tear to shreds 20 Residential loan 23 About to happen 24 Bronze from a day at the beach 28 René’s friend 29 Appear to be 31 __ Lingus: Irish carrier 32 Russian fighter jets 35 “I’d like to hear the rest” 38 Italian violin maker 40 Squeak stopper 41 Rigs on the road 42 1974 Jimmy Buffett song 45 Reasons for extra innings 46 “Tastes great!” 47 Poet’s inspiration 48 Sow or cow 50 What social climbers seek 52 Curtail 56 Office communication, and what can literally be found in 20-, 35- and 42-Across 59 Gangster John known as “The Teflon Don” 62 Twice-monthly tide 63 Paths of pop-ups 64 Place on a pedestal 65 Show some spunk 66 “That makes sense” 67 Saunter 68 Vehicle on runners 69 Proof of ownership

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2/11/13

By Gail Grabowski and Bruce Venzke

DOWN 1 New __: India’s capital 2 Hunter constellation 3 Heads on beers 4 Hint of the future 5 “Take a shot!” 6 Informed (of) 7 Attack, as with snowballs 8 Stocking tear 9 Military practice 10 Visitor from afar 11 Treat jet lag, perhaps 12 Earthbound Aussie bird 13 Dip, as bread in gravy 21 Dad’s partner 22 “Lemme __!” 25 Vocalist Judd 26 Really strange 27 Bride’s purchase 29 Base runner’s option 30 Scat legend Fitzgerald 32 Flagship store at New York City’s Herald Square 33 Words from one with a bad hand

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU BASIC

2 5

4 9

(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

34 Letter after beta 36 Long, long time 37 Parking ticket issuer 39 Resistance to disease 43 Expel 44 Like a slingshot handle 49 Christmas, e.g.: Abbr. 51 Proof of ownership

2/11/13

52 Simple trap 53 Far from talkative 54 Intro giver 55 Snooped (around) 57 Pulls the plug on 58 More than lifelike 59 Precious stone 60 Big name in kitchen gadgets 61 Profs’ helpers

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Notre Dame beats Louisville in five overtimes In a game that lasted past midnight despite starting at 9 p.m., the Fighting Irish and the Cardinals played 25 bonus minutes of basketball on Saturday night, leading to a 104–101 victory for Notre Dame. The game was the second-longest in Division I college basketball history since the introduction of the shot clock, only trailing Syracuse and UConn’s six-overtime classic in the 2009 Big East Tournament.

Historic sweep for basketball MEN’S BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 12 contributed to Yale’s hot shooting. “We shot the ball really well,” Martin said. “But we [also] got good shots.” The Elis hit 13 of their 20 firsthalf shots and five of nine from beyond the arc to take a 34–26 advantage into the break. The Tigers came back to tie it at

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Six of the Bulldogs’ final eight games will take place at the John J. Lee Amphitheater.

53-all with 6:55 remaining, but two free throws by forward Nick Victor ’16 put Yale ahead for good. The Tigers made a final push with less than a minute remaining as a 3 by junior Will Barrett pulled Princeton within two with 40 seconds to go, but Morgan sank both of his free throws with three seconds left to put the game away. He currently ranks third in Division I with a .918 free throw-shooting percentage. In addition to the team’s offensive efficiency, Jones and Cotton credited Yale’s twothree zone with helping to topple a Princeton team that had been undefeated in the Ancient Eight. “Within our zone we always made sure that we kept the ball out of the paint,” Cotton said. After Harvard’s 78–63 loss to Columbia Sunday afternoon, Yale sits just two games out of the top spot in the Ivy League. With six of their final eight games at home, Jones said that the schedule begins to work in the Bulldogs’ favor after a fourgame road trip. Yale returns home this Friday to host Cornell (11–12, 3–3) at 7:00 p.m. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

YALE 69, PRINCETON 65

YALE 68, PENN 59

YALE

34

35

69

YALE

29

39

68

PRIN.

26

39

65

PENN

32

27

59

J. Duren (Yale): 13 pts, 2 asts S. Martin (Yale) 11 pts, 3-3 3PM-A D. Koon (Prin.): 16 pts, 2 rebs, 2 asts, 2 stls I. Hummer (Prin.): 14 pts, 6 asts, 5 rebs

A. Cotton (Yale): 15 pts, 6 rebs J. Duren (Yale): 11 pts, 8 rebs H. Brooks (Penn): 12 pts, 2 rebs P. Lucas-Perry (Penn): 9 pts, 6 rebs

Yale overpowers Dartmouth W. SQUASH FROM PAGE 12 eton (11-0, 7-0 Ivy) has clinched first place with an undefeated league record, and Harvard (11–1, 5–1 Ivy) still hangs onto second. The Crimson have won the last two meetings against Yale, including last year’s National Championship. Should Yale beat Harvard and Penn lose to Cornell (12-4, 3-3 Ivy), the Elis will clinch second place. “We are very excited by the chance to prove ourselves at the Howe Cup. We are going in with no pressure, so we can just relax [and] play our best. Hopefully, this will result in another National Championship win [for the program],” Tomlinson said. Tilghman said the team definitely has a chance to compete for the Cup, especially because the team boasts home-court advantage. Yale is hosting the National Championship at the Brady Squash Center this weekend, Feb. 15, 16 and 17.

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Contact FRANCESCA COXE at francesca.coxe@yale.edu .

Of the nine matches played, the Elis won seven in decisive three-game sweeps.

Elis extend winning streak MEN’S SQUASH FROM PAGE 12 a former Yale women’s squash captain, Logan Greer ’11. Yale’s second loss of the morning came at the No. 1 spot, when Kenneth Chan ’13 fell to Dartmouth’s nationally ranked No. 10 Christopher Hanson. “Hopefully winning the last two

matches of the season [before Friday’s victory] will allow us some momentum going into nationals and a chance for us to make a run,” Robinson said. “The guys are pumped and ready to commit 100 percent to the next two and a half weeks that will ultimately decide the outcome of our season.”

The Elis will travel to Cambridge for their last match of the regular season against Ivy rival No. 3 Harvard. The match has been postponed until further notice due to the storm. Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

SPORTS

“In my opinion, the Freeh report was seriously flawed. ... There was a rush to injustice.” RICHARD THORNBURGH, FORMER U.S. ATTORNEY GENERAL AND CO-AUTHOR OF NEW REPORT ON JOE PATERNO COMMISSIONED BY PATERNO FAMILY

Bulldogs earn second Ivy win W. BASKETBALL FROM PAGE 12 Despite the unexpected changes, the Elis responded to the adversity with a solid 40 minutes of play. The Bulldogs gained the lead early when forward Janna Graf ’14 hit a jumper at the 17:23 mark in the first to put Yale up 7–6. The Elis never looked back, holding onto the lead for the rest of the game. The Quakers (10–9, 3–2 Ivy) applied a full court press early and often, but they were unable to slow the Bulldogs down. The Elis managed a 17–2 run to put them 11 points ahead of Penn with 8:42 remaining in the first half. The Quakers briefly regained their footing at the end of the period, pulling within seven behind an eight-point scoring effort from forward Kara Boneneberger. But forward Meredith Boardman ’16 and guard Megan Vasquez ’13 hit jumpers in the final minute to push the Bulldogs’ halftime lead back to 11. “We have a lot of great ball handlers on this team,” Messimer said. “Megan and Sarah did a great job of getting the ball inbounds and pushing right through the middle of their press.” The Quakers continued to press and apply on-ball pressure in the second half, testing the Bulldog guards. While Penn managed to pull within three at 47–44 with 7:24 left to play, the Yale guards responded with an explosive offensive performance. Vasquez and Sarah Halejian ’15 combined to score Yale’s final 18 points of the game, finishing the game with 15 and 11, respectively.

Vasquez’s performance at the free throw line proved to be the difference for the Elis. She was a perfect 10-for-10 from the line, with four of her trips coming in the final minute of the game.

The whole weekend was a little crazy and weird but the Penn game won’t be forgotten soon. CHRIS GOBRECHT Head coach, women’s basketball

found their scoring touch, the Tigers continued to overpower the Bulldogs and they charged into halftime with a commanding 56–26 lead. The Bulldogs struggled to contain Princeton all night and allowed their opponents to shoot 58.6 percent from the field and 50 percent from beyond the arc. The Tigers, who led by over 30 for the entire second half, overwhelmed the Elis, and walked away with a 99–53 win. Graf led the scoring for the Bulldogs with 14 points and five rebounds, while Halejian and

Vasquez chipped in 11 each. With the split this weekend the Elis fall to 2–4 in the league. They will travel to Cornell and Columbia next weekend to take on both teams for the first time this season. “This team wants to play hard, play together and always get better,” Gobrecht said. “We’ll see where that takes us.” Friday’s game at Cornell is scheduled to begin at 7:00 p.m.

MEN’S HOCKEY ECAC SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Yale

9

5

1

0.633

13

6

3

0.659

2

Dartmouth

7

6

3

0.531

11

8

4

0.565

3

Princeton

7

6

3

0.531

9

10

4

0.478

4

Brown

4

6

5

0.433

8

9

5

0.477

5

Harvard

4

10

2

0.312

8

13

2

0.391

6

Cornell

3

12

1

0.219

5

15

2

0.273

WOMEN’S HOCKEY ECAC

Contact SARAH ONORATO at sarah.onorato@yale.edu .

Graf added 11 points to the Yale offensive effort, while Messimer and center Zenab Keita ’14 each chipped in eight. Keita was a force on the boards for the Elis, grabbing 11 rebounds, and the Bulldogs out-rebounded the Quakers in the game, 44–27. “The whole weekend was a little crazy and weird but the Penn game won’t be forgotten soon,” head coach Chris Gobrecht said. “We rebounded very well and that was key.” On Sunday, Yale hosted Princeton, the reigning Ivy League Champions. The Tigers returned 2011-’12 Ivy Player of the Year Niveen Rasheed ’13, who had a career night with 29 points against the Elis. Princeton (14-5, 5-0 Ivy) came out of the gate strong and never slowed down. The Tigers started the game on a 20–0 run and held the Bulldogs scoreless for six minutes into the first half. While the Elis eventually

YALE

33

32

65

PRINC

56

43

99

PENN

22

34

56

YALE

26

27

53

M. VASQUEZ (Yale): 15 pts, 10–10 FT, 6 reb S. HALEJIAN (Yale): 12 pts, 3 ast

N. RASHEED (Yale): 29 pts, 12 reb K. HELMSTETTER (Yale): 18 pts, 10 reb, 4 ast

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

T

%

W L

T

%

1

Harvard

14

1

1

0.906

17

3

12

0.818

2

Cornell

15

3

0

0.833

20

5

0

0.800

3

Dartmouth

8

6

3

0.559

13

7

4

0.625

4

Princeton

4

12

2

0.278

9

14

2

0.400

5

Yale

3

11

2

0.250

4

17

2

0.217

6

Brown

3

14

0

0.176

4

17

1

0.205

MEN’S BASKETBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Harvard

5

1

0.833

13

7

0.650

2

Princeton

4

1

0.800

11

8

0.579

3

Cornell

3

3

0.500

11

12

0.478

3

Yale

3

3

0.500

9

14

0.391

5

Penn

2

3

0.400

5

17

0.227

6

Columbia

2

4

0.333

10

10

0.500

6

Brown

2

4

0.333

8

12

0.400

6

Dartmouth

2

4

0.333

6

14

0.300

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

PRINCETON 99, YALE 53

YALE 65, PENN 56

OVERALL

IVY

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Megan Vasquez ’13 led the Elis with 15 points and made all 10 of her free throws, including eight in the final minute to seal Yale’s win over Penn.

Track struggles at Princeton

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

5

0

1.000

14

5

0.737

2

Harvard

4

1

0.800

13

6

0.684

2

Dartmouth

4

1

0.800

6

13

0.316

4

Penn

3

2

0.600

10

9

0.526

5

Cornell

2

3

0.400

10

9

0.526

6

Yale

2

4

0.333

7

13

0.350

7

Brown

1

5

0.167

7

13

0.350

8

Columbia

0

5

0.000

2

17

0.105

MEN’S SQUASH IVY

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

6

1

0.857

10

1

0.909

2

Harvard

5

1

0.833

14

1

0.933

2

Yale

5

1

0.833

11

2

0.846

4

Cornell

5

2

0.714

16

3

0.842

5

Columbia

2

5

0.286

7

8

0.467

5

Dartmouth

2

5

0.286

7

8

0.467

7

Brown

1

6

0.143

8

9

0.471

7

Penn

1

6

0.143

4

10

0.286

WOMEN’S SQUASH IVY

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs scored 23 points on the men’s side and 25 on the women’s on Saturday. BY ALEX EPPLER STAFF REPORTER As 34 inches of snow blanketed New Haven Friday and Saturday,dining hall hours were altered, libraries closed, and students kept warm inside dorms. The men’s and women’s track and field teams, however, stayed their course, traveling to Princeton to take on the Tigers and the Harvard Crimson.

TRACK AND FIELD The Bulldogs limped to thirdplace finishes against their rivals on Saturday. The Tiger men scored 88 points en route to winning the meet, while their counterparts on the women’s team amassed 79 points to carry the women’s meet. Harvard captured second with 59 points for the men’s team and 55 for the women, while Yale scored 23 points on the men’s side and 25 on the women’s to bring up the rear.

“I think it didn’t really reflect what we are capable of right now,” men’s team captain Tim Hillas ’13 said. “[But] it’s another step on the way to Ivy Championships.”

I think it didn’t really reflect what we are capable of right now. TIM HILLAS ’13 Team captain, track and field This weekend marked the Elis’ fifth straight week of competition, so the Tigers and Crimson faced a squad affected by fatigue. Hillas said the team was hit hard by the norovirus sweeping Yale’s campus, knocking five Bulldog runners in both the men’s and women’s teams out of the meet and leaving another group of athletes recovering from the virus. Both factors left Yale at less than full strength.

Still, several Eli athletes managed to post impressive results. Bulldog men swept the first two spots of the pole vault, amassing eight points in the process. Paul Chandler ’14 placed first, besting his personal record with a vault of 4.80m. Teammate Brendan Sullivan ’16 finished close behind with a vault of 4.65m, 0.15m more than the two Princeton vaulters and one Cantab who tied for third. The Bulldog men also scored well on the track. In the mile, James Shirvell ’14 ran 4:09.06 to place second behind Harvard’s Maksim Korolev. Dylan Hurley ’15 also finished second in his event, running 50.24 in the 400m to finish just behind the 48.95 of Princeton’s Tom Hopkins. The women’s team found little more success than the men’s. “There were a few people we were planning on having better days than they did,” women’s team captain Allison Rue ’13 said. “That being said, there were a

few exciting performances.” The most notable of those performances came in the 60m hurdles, the only event the women’s team won at the meet. Mackenzie Matthews ’16 nipped Harvard’s Hannah Nunez at the finish in the event’s finals, winning with a time of 8.94. Despite the tough overall results, however, Hillas said, “I don’t think [we need to do] anything really too different [at Heps].” Rue agreed, saying that the meet was a rough performance the team aims to surpass in coming weeks. The Elis will begin championship season in two weeks when the men’s and women’s teams compete at Ivy League Championships Feb. 23 and 24 and participate in ECAC championships the week after. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

LEAGUE

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

1

Princeton

7

0

1.000

11

0

1.000

2

Harvard

5

1

0.833

11

1

0.917

3

Penn

5

2

0.714

12

2

0.857

4

Yale

4

2

0.667

11

3

0.786

5

Cornell

3

4

0.429

12

5

0.706

6

Brown

2

5

0.286

12

6

0.667

7

Dartmouth

1

6

0.143

6

8

0.429

8

Columbia

0

7

0.000

3

10

0.231

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IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA L.A. Clippers 102 N.Y. Knicks 88

NBA Miami 107 L.A. Lakers 97

SPORTS QUICK HITS

MEN’S HOCKEY RESCHEDULED AGAIN WILL PLAY AT BROWN ON TUESDAY After a scheduled Saturday matchup against Brown was moved to Sunday at 5 p.m. in advance of this weekend’s snowstorm, the continued poor conditions have led Yale and Brown officials to move the game to Tuesday. The puck will drop at 7 p.m.

NCAAB No. 4 Duke 62 Boston Coll. 61

NCAAB No. 1 Indiana 81 No. 10 Ohio St. 68

IVY BBALL Columbia 78 Harvard 63

MONDAY

MARK OPPENHEIMER ’96 WRITES FOR SPORTS ILLUSTRATED The former student and current professor wrote the cover for the Feb. 4 issue, titled “Does God Care Who Wins the Super Bowl?” The article has earned praise for exploring the issue of religion in football, but it has also drawn criticism from religious groups.

“[The history] didn’t really sink in until we accomplished the sweep of the Killer P’s.” ARMANI COTTON ’15 GUARD, MEN’S BASKETBALL YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2013 · yaledailynews.com

Bulldogs split in Lanman

Yale dominates Penn-Princeton MEN’S BASKETBALL

BY SARAH ONORATO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER After several postponements and a change of venue, Yale women’s basketball wrapped up another weekend of Ivy play in a split with Penn and Princeton.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL The Bulldogs (7–13, 2–4 Ivy) earned their second conference win of the season in a matchup against Penn Saturday night. The game was rescheduled from Friday night due to the storm, and a leaky roof above the John J. Lee Amphitheater forced a last-minute move to the Lanman Center, the four-court gymnasium in Payne Whitney. “Playing in Lanman is very different. It can be difficult to focus, but I think we did a good job of overcoming the change,” captain Allie Messimer ’13 said. SEE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE 11

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Guard Sarah Halejian ’15 scored 12 points in the Elis 65–56 win over Penn at the Lanman Center.

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain Sam Martin shot 80 percent from the field and made all three of his 3-point attempts in an 11-point effort that helped the Elis to a 69–65 upset at Princeton.

Men’s squash defeats the Big Green BY ADLON ADAMS STAFF REPORTER The No. 4 Yale men’s squash team (11-2, 5-1 Ivy) extended its winning streak to three this past Friday against No. 8 Dartmouth (7-8, 2-5 Ivy).

MEN’S SQUASH With the weekend’s winter storm on the horizon, the Bulldogs were forced to move their match up to 10:00 a.m. on Friday morning instead of playing later in the evening. The Elis earned a 7–2 victory in their last match before facing Harvard, the final contest of the season before the CSA Team Championships. “We want to train smart as well as hard and make sure that we are in top form for the upcoming matchup with Harvard,” Eric Caine ’14 said. “Then it’s the national championships after that.” The Bulldogs swept the first round of matches. Richard Dodd ’13 won in three close games at the No. 3 spot. Rookie Zachary Leman ’16

also won in three at the No. 6 spot. Joseph Roberts ’15 rounded out the first set of matches with a win at No. 9 in three games as well. The second round of matches saw the first loss for the Bulldogs at No. 8, when Pehlaaj Bajwa ’16 lost in three games to Dartmouth’s Mark Funk. The other two matches of the round proved tougher for the Bulldogs to conquer. Sam Fenwick ’16 battled for the win at No. 5 over Kyle Martino. Team captain Hywel Robinson ’13 also fought for his win at the No. 2 spot in four games. “The team played well against Dartmouth,” Neil Martin ’14 said. “They are a great team who we have been tight with the last few matches. They are also having a strong season so it was great that we could put together a number of good performances.” In the final round, Caine staged a comeback in four games at No. 7 after dropping the first game to the Big Green’s Alex Kurth. At No. 4 Martin won in three games against Alexander Greer, the brother of SEE MEN’S SQUASH PAGE 10

The No. 5 Elis find themselves one step closer to second place in the Ancient Eight after this weekend’s victory over Dartmouth.

WOMEN’S SQUASH

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

STAT OF THE DAY 26

While the rest of campus was snowed in this weekend, the men’s basketball team got hot on its southward road trip to propel itself up the Ivy League standings. For the first time since the 1986-’87 season, Yale (9–14, 3–3 Ivy) swept the Penn-Princeton road trip. The Bulldogs started by downing Penn (5–17, 2–3 Ivy) 68–59, before finishing up the weekend with a 69–65 upset at Princeton (11–8, 4–1 Ivy).Forward Armani Cotton ’15 said that losing at both Harvard and Dartmouth for the first time under head coach James Jones last weekend made this weekend’s victories even more signficiant. “[The history] didn’t really sink in until we accomplished the sweep of the Killer P’s,” Cotton said. “We made history at both ends.” Cotton led the Elis to Friday’s win in the historic Palestra at Penn with a game-high 15 points. Yale overcame a three-point halftime deficit to put the Quakers away. Both Cotton and Jones credited Yale’s “tenacious” efforts on the offensive glass with helping the Bulldogs pull out the victory. Yale held a 21–13 edge in offensive rebounds over Penn and scored 19 second-chance points. Although the Bulldogs shot just 33.9-percent (19–56) from the floor, Jones said that he was encouraged by his team’s effort on Friday. “Austin [Morgan ’13] had a tough night shooting on Friday,which was great for us,” Jones said. “It showed that we could win as a team. … We got a good team effort.” Morgan, who leads the team with 11.6 points per game, scored nine points on just 1–10 shooting. Shooting was not the problem on Saturday night, as the Elis made a blistering 54.8-percent (23–42) of their field goals against the Tigers. Captain Sam Martin ’13 said that good shot selection SEE MEN’S BASKETBALL PAGE 10

Elis in the hunt for second place BY FRANCESCA COXE CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

The 7–2 victory for the Elis against Dartmouth was their last match of the season before the CSA Team Championships.

BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER

On Friday morning — pushed up from the evening start time due to Friday’s snowstorm — the Bulldogs (11-3, 4-2 Ivy) decisvely blanketed Dartmouth 9-0. The weekend’s second matchup against the Harvard Crimson, originally scheduled for Sunday, was postponed due to the snow. The faithful hometown crowd at Brady Squash Center was not deterred by the impending snowstorm and saw the Bulldogs explode out of the blocks from the start. Of the nine matches played, seven were won in deci-

sive three-game sweeps. Leading the way, No. 2 nationally ranked Millie Tomlinson ’14 in the first spot and team captain Katie Ballaine ’13 in the second did not allow more than five points in any game and put an exclamation point on the team’s aim to finish out the season in second place. Katie Harrison ’13 in the eighth spot provided some suspense when she dropped her first game, before defiantly rallying back in a nail-biting four games. Gwen Tilghman ’14 in the fourth spot battled in a cat-andmouse match as well. Tilghman convincingly won the first game 11-5, only to fall 13-11 in the second and then to courageously rally back 11-5, 11-5 to put her opponent away. The Elis are currently in a tie for third place in the Ivy League with Penn (11-2, 4-2 Ivy). PrincSEE WOMEN’S SQUASH PAGE 10

NUMBER OF YEARS SINCE THE MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM SWEPT THE ROAD TRIP AGAINST PENN AND PRINCETON. The win over Princeton broke the Tigers’ 21-game home streak against Ivy League opponents and brought Yale within two games of league leader Harvard.


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