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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 52 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

70 80

BIRD WALK EIGHT SPECIES OBSERVED

FACULTY FORUM

POLITICAL GROUPS

SQUASH

Professors use new meetings in an attempt to find their voice

STUDENT PARTIES LACK DIRECTION POST-ELECTION

Team defeats Dartmouth and Princeton, falls to No. 3 Harvard

PAGE 6-7 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 12 SPORTS

CROSS CAMPUS

Academic Review underway

VETERANS REMEMBERED

It’s finally over. Yale returned

the third and final batch of Peruvian artifacts yesterday, bringing the years-long conflict between Peru and the University over the ancient relics to an end. The artifacts arrived in 127 boxes and included 35,000 pottery fragments, and many pieces from the first two batches are currently on display at the Casa Concha Museum in Cusco, Peru.

BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER

Honoring our veterans.

Conn. Gov. Dannel Malloy ceremoniously signed four bills pertaining to veteran issues into law yesterday afternoon in the Yale Law School’s Alumni Reading Room. SB 114 — one of the bills signed by Malloy that works to expand access to the state’s pretrial diversionary program — was created with the help of students in Yale’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic.

New Peter Salovey? Nicholas

Dirks was recently selected as the next chancellor of UC Berkeley. An anthropologist and historian, Dirks is expected to move West after serving as a dean at Columbia University. He may give President-elect Peter Salovey a run for his money: Dirks’ moustache is one that rivals Salovey’s much-beloved, long-lost facial hair. We hope Salovey can soon reestablish Yale’s dominance in the moustache subculture.

Get your Game face on.

Tickets to the Yale-Harvard game are still being sold at the Yale Athletics Ticket Office by Payne Whitney Gymnasium. Student tickets cost $20 per person and $35 for one additional guest. Start it up! Roughly 60 people met in the Elm City over the weekend as part of New Haven’s second Startup Weekend competition. The teams of software developers, designers and marketers discussed different entrepreneurial ideas and considered various business ventures. Tackling alcohol. In a faculty meeting last week, Harvard decided to adopt officially a new set of alcohol policies that aim to curb underage drinking on campus. Though the regulations establish guidelines for private parties and ban high-risk competitive drinking games, they also loosen restrictions for certain types of formal events.

KERRI LU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

‘THAT FREEDOM MIGHT NOT PERISH FROM THE EARTH’ Yale honored its veterans on Beinecke Plaza Monday afternoon. The ceremony featured remarks by students and faculty, the presentation of the colors by an honor guard and the traditional laying of the wreath in front of the alumni war memorial.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1993 The Yale Station post office reopens after more than two months of renovations. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

SEE ACADEMIC REVIEW PAGE 8

YCC aims to expand contact with admins BY KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG STAFF REPORTER The Yale College Council’s executive board has made an effort this year to improve its relationship with the President’s Office with the help of University Secretary and Vice President for Student Affairs Kimberly Goff-Crews.

Goff-Crews, who was appointed to the newly-created position in the President’s Office, met with members of the YCC’s executive board last week as part of a larger initiative to familiarize herself with Yale College student groups and organizations. The meetings, which will occur on a regular basis, mark an increase in the

YCC’s level of contact with the President’s Office compared to years past. The YCC also hopes that discussions in the meetings will lead to a closer relationship with Provost Peter Salovey — who was appointed University president last week — when he assumes his post next year, YCC President John Gonzalez ’14 said.

“This new relationship with Secretary Goff-Crews is an important setting to talk about more macro issues on campus, including alcohol policy,” Gonzalez said. “We’d like to work on formalizing the communication process between YCC and the President’s Office, so that when confidential issues come up, student opinions are brought

in.” Currently, the YCC’s only interaction with University President Richard Levin comes through weekly meetings with the president’s assistant, Pilar Montalvo, and meetings with Levin himself once a semester. But Gonzalez said he does not SEE YCC PAGE 4

Challengers enter Salovey to continue arts push mayoral race BY ANYA GRENIER AND YANAN WANG STAFF REPORTERS

When Provost Peter Salovey assumes the presidency on June 30 next year, Yale’s galleries and arts professional schools will be stronger than they ever have been before, following 20 years under University President Richard Levin’s leadership. In 2000, Levin announced the $250 million donor-funded Area Arts Plan, which would go on to fund additions to the physical resources of all four of Yale’s arts professional schools

Eat your fill. This week is

Restaurant Week in the Elm City, which means 32 participating restaurants in New Haven will offer discounted meals througout the week. Take this opportunity to exercise your eating skills just in time for Thanksgiving Day.

With an academic review process underway, Yale is beginning to evaluate the makeup of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Following a recommendation included in a report on faculty resources released last spring, the University is evaluating a number of administrative issues pertaining to the faculty, including the ratio of tenured to non-tenured professors and the size of individual departments. A 14-person Academic Review Committee, chaired by economics professor Steven Berry, has met almost weekly since September and hopes to propose potential changes to the allocation of faculty positions across departments by the end of the 2012-’13 academic year, Berry said. He added that the committee is currently collecting data on faculty size and composition prior to making recommendations on the allocation of faculty resources. “We’re still at the stage of learning and considering rather than making decisions,” Berry said. Berry said the committee is working with the advisory committees in each of the four academic divisions — physical sciences and engineering, biological sciences, social sciences and humanities — to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their academic departments. The directors of the divisions are members of the Academic

— the Schools of Architecture, Art, Drama and Music — as well other arts-related facilities. The plan also began the Yale University Art Gallery’s 14-year renovation process that culminated in March and increased the Gallery’s total exhibition space to 69,975 square feet. These changes in physical resources were accompanied by an increased administrative focus on increasing the affordability of professional arts education, and all four professional arts schools altered their financial aid policies during Levin’s tenure.

Though not all aspects of Levin’s vision for the Area Arts Plan and arts funding were completed before his resignation, high-level administrators at all four schools and the galleries said that Salovey’s important role in planning these initiatives will ensure their smooth continuation under the new administration. “As provost, [Salovey] has been an extraordinary supporter of the arts and of collections across the board,” British Art SEE SALOVEY PAGE 8

SARAH ECKINGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Mayor John Destefano Jr. may face challengers in his 12th election. BY DIANA LI STAFF REPORTER Less than a year before the next election, two politicians have already announced the formation of exploratory committees for next year’s mayoral race against 10-term Mayor John DeStefano Jr. Ward 10 Alderman Justin Elicker FES ’10 SOM ’10 and Connecticut Rep. Gary HolderWinfield said that they may contest what will be DeStefano’s 12th mayoral election. Elicker,

an environmental consultant and two-term East Rock alderman, and Holder-Winfield, a former Newhallville ward cochair and part of New Haven’s state delgation, are both familiar names to New Haven residents who threaten to end the nearly 20 years DeStefano has spent in office. “I think that having competitive elections are a good thing,” said DeStefano, who has previously indicated he will run for SEE MAYORAL RACE PAGE 4

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Provost Peter Salovey, right, performed with his bluegrass band in Davenport College last April.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “What is left of Jonathan Edwards or Benjamin Silliman or other Yale yaledailynews.com/opinion

Unequal before the law I

n honor of Veterans Day, Governor Malloy made a special visit to the Yale Law School. He came to applaud a recent piece of legislation that expands veterans’ access to pretrial diversionary programs. But despite the fact that the bill is clearly designed to provide preferential treatment for veterans, the bill’s supporters seem embarrassed to admit it. Their unwillingness to do so both reflects and reinforces problems in the way we think about criminal justice. The law, “An Act Concerning Services for Veterans in Pretrial Diversionary Programs,” provides for two small changes in the way the courts handle prosecutions of veterans charged with non-serious crimes. The Act allows veterans to enter the state’s accelerated rehabilitation program twice (instead of once, the limit for regular citizens), and it allows veterans to access the state’s existing supervised diversionary program (formerly available only to those with demonstrated psychiatric disabilities). According to the News, the Yale Law School’s Veterans Legal Services Clinic played a significant role in developing and advocating on behalf of the legislation. At first glance, it seems obvious that the law privileges veterans. Intuitively, this special treatment seems defensible. Military service is quite literally a service, and like all services, those who serve ought be rewarded by those whom they serve. It is precisely this logic that has led to the creation of an entire federal Department of Veterans Affairs devoted to providing veterans benefits that none of us would ever dream of receiving. Yet, the law’s advocates seem adamant that this narrative of service and reward does not relate to their bill. Instead, they seek to justify the bill’s special treatment of veterans within a framework of need and mental illness. This past month, Margaret Middleton, the executive director of the Connecticut Veterans Legal Center and a visiting lecturer at the Yale Law School, described the bill in precisely these terms. She explained to the News: “The concern was that manifestations of [major depressive orders] would result in criminal behavior or criminal arrest of veterans.” Similarly, Clinic member Sofia Nelson LAW ’13 explained that a veteran’s contact with the criminal justice system may be “a direct result of their service.” According to Nelson, “that’s a unique circumstance that should be addressed.” Underlying both Middleton’s and Nelson’s comments is an apparent discomfort with the thought that we might reward veterans through privileged treatment within the criminal justice system. They insist on seeing the veteran’s privileged treatment as deriving

from “need” rather than “reward” or “desert.” These advocates on behalf of veterans surely believe we YISHAI to proSCHWARTZ ought vide our former soldiers Dissentary with benefits simply because of their service, but balk at bundling those rewards into judicial treatment. This hesitation is misleading and derives from an overly simplistic understanding of justice. It’s clear from the legislation itself that the law’s content cannot be justified with simple claims about the military’s effect on psychological health. Indeed, the legislation includes all veterans, not just those who are suffering psychological trauma. An army veteran who spends her whole life behind a desk will have claim to the same rights as a soldier who came under fire in Iraq. This hardly seems justified by appeals to the effects of war on a person’s mental health. Framing the law in terms of need also reveals a deep discomfort with the thought that our justice system might serve as an avenue for rewards. This discomfort, too, makes a great deal of sense. As we walk into courthouses all over the country, we are confronted by the iconic image of a blindfolded lady of Justice. We all know what this image means: Justice is impartial; she takes no notice of an individual’s status or position in society. Given this bedrock assumption of total equality before the law, it becomes uncomfortable to suggest that the law ought to look more favorably on some by virtue of their service. But this discomfort is misplaced. In concentrating on the image of Lady Justice, we blind ourselves to the reality that just criminal sentencing must be an individualized affair and represents the most fundamental of collective state actions. When judges calculate a convicted criminal’s sentence, they must look at the whole person: his strengths and faults, his gifts and foibles. And when the judge passes judgment, she speaks for all of us. It is the moment when the power of the state comes into contact with the individual in the most forceful, personalized manner. In that moment, we must have the courage to say thank you. What’s more, on Veterans Day, we ought to have the courage to admit when our laws do precisely that. YISHAI SCHWARTZ is a senior in Branford College. His column runs on Tuesdays. Contact him at yishai.schwartz@yale.edu .

names except buildings?”

'THEANTIYALE' ON 'REMEMBER THE INSTITUTIONALIST'

GUEST COLUMNIST VICTORIA SANCHEZ

Tension in our community W

hen I was a pre-frosh, no one told me about Yale’s problems. In fact, everyone seemed to actually love Yale: they were friendly and happy and adamant that I should choose Yale. And so I did, not for the name, or the history department (my intended major), but for the gregarious community of students I met. These students had diverse interests, but they told me there was something for everyone. I could do whatever I wanted to do! Remember that? I daresay nearly everyone had that impression. Nevertheless, Yale routinely scapegoats different groups: athletes lower the academic quality of the student body; a cappella parties promote binge drinking; frats enable an unhealthy sexual culture; the cultural centers cause internal division; and so on. So yes, you can do whatever you want, but someone — another undergrad, or a professor or an administrator — is probably going to take issue with it. They will ask, in some form or another, “Why aren’t you building community?” While this question is legitimate, the ways we address it — such as scapegoating — are often problematic. One problem lies in how we

define building community. This process does not necessitate ridding ourselves of “problematic” elements as some have called our cultural centers, nor does it necessitate “unification.” Communities can be whole, and yet retain their division. In fact, divisions are crucial to communities, which exist because of and in spite of tension.

OUR DIVISIONS MAKE US STRONGER I heard that phrase on a tour of Fair Haven led by community organizer Lee Cruz. Fair Haven, known as “the Island,” is one of New Haven’s poorest neighborhoods. Prostitution, drugs and violent crime plague the Island, which is also where 2007’s immigration raids occurred. Though Lee acknowledges these problems, he loves the Island. He told The New Journal, “It’s not that bad things don’t happen. It’s that the bad things that happen are not the center of the conversation or the center of the way the neighborhood

thinks about itself.” Despite the crime, Lee walks his dog every day and talks to everyone he sees. He knows entire blocks of people. The idea of community tension resonated with me. Think about the popular vote in the presidential election. It was remarkably close, but we are still the United States of America. We are one country, in spite of political tension. Further, the process of handling tension makes communities stronger. We’ve seen this development at Yale. The Title IX complaint prompted panels, op-eds and countless dining hall conversations, and the campus is in a better place for it. Thus, building community and handling tension means talking to people, just like Lee Cruz. Most of the time, those conversations will go smoothly: we’ll complain about the weather, about our work, about how tired we are, about how we can’t wait for Thanksgiving Break. However, some conversations will produce conflict — and that’s okay. I once had an argument in JE’s dining hall over abortion. Yes, I was the angry feminist side, and no, neither one of us convinced the other. Nevertheless, I walked away with a greater understanding of my peer’s perspective, and of why his thinking

differed from mine. Tension produced empathy. I will be clear: when I say we can build community by talking to each other, I do not mean we should have free-for-all shouting matches about Yale-NUS. Thoughtless op-eds about sexual culture can be emotionally destructive. Scapegoating segments of the student population (or the administration) will alienate them counter-productively. I think it’s rude to interrupt someone, that we should be sensitive to each other’s individual vulnerabilities, and that we must think rigorously. I don’t think that raising our level of discourse is easy (and I have certainly broken my own rules before), but it is crucial that we do so. Yale has experienced considerable tension recently: the DKE chants; the Title IX complaint; Sex Week; alcohol policy; Yale-NUS; student input in the Presidential selection; the list goes on. These conflicts are not comfortable, and more are inevitable. But we are smart, and we have opinions, and we care, so we will deal with them and we will be stronger for it. VICTORIA SANCHEZ is a senior in Jonathan Edwards College. Contact her at victoria.sanchez@yale.edu .

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST E T H A N R O D R I G U E Z -T O R R E N T

Only stillness in the Chaplain’s Office I

n the aftermath of the banishment of the Buddhist group Indigo Blue from campus, University Chaplain Sharon Kugler’s commitment to the Yale community has been tested — and found wanting. First, a chaplain should communicate. Even if the reasoning behind this debacle had to be kept secret, the fact that it was happening at all should have been announced promptly, to the entire Yale community. No one at Yale should arrive at his or her regular place of worship one morning only to find it bolted shut; no one, seeking calm contemplation late at night, should arrive at a previously safe space only to find it inexplicably shuttered. No delegation of concerned students should be turned away from a discussion about the future of an organization they have come to love just because the Chaplain’s Office decided arbitrarily to cap the meeting attendance at 20. Second, a chaplain should respect those she serves. “This change … was carefully thought out,” wrote Kugler in her first e-mail to the Yale community regarding her office’s decision to sever relations with Indigo Blue — a week after the group’s

activities were first halted. Yet no transition plan was in place to fill the sudden voids left in the wake of Indigo Blue’s departure. Most important for the non-Buddhists at Yale, myself among them, is the lack of a nighttime space for quiet contemplation — a space formerly provided by Bruce Blair at Battell Chapel from 11 p.m. to 2 a.m. without fail throughout the academic year, known officially as Stillness and Light. Kugler is “considering” reinstating Battell as a meditation space “similar” to Stillness and Light. But there are two problems with that. First, every day that she spends pondering is a day without Stillness and Light, an institution that has been relied upon by many, myself included, as a welcoming refuge during times of uncertainty and sadness. Second, Kugler envisions this new, “similar” meditation ending at midnight, a full two hours before its predecessor. This will be small comfort to those who, like myself and many others, are most in need late at night — when friends have gone to bed, weariness sets in and emotions run high. When asked her reason for the limited hours of the yet-to-materialize meditation in a to-bedetermined location, Kugler told

the News that there were “security reasons” for the decision. This seems absurd: What are her security concerns and why were they not an issue before? It is also contradictory: When I pressed her on the same question during our meeting last week, she told me frankly that she felt that Yale students who attended until 2 a.m. just weren’t getting enough sleep. The latter is a judgment that Kugler has no right to make, and one that shows a misunderstanding of the relationship that Stillness and Light has always had with the student body.

BRING BACK YALE'S MEDITATION SPACE NOW Four years ago, I attended Stillness and Light because I felt alone. I couldn’t sleep and the door was open; Stillness and Light never imposed itself on me, or any other student. It simply provided a place in which students could “come and go without hindrance,” a driving ethos behind Indigo Blue.

The events of the past three weeks have brought out in the Chaplain’s Office a fundamental disrespect for the traditions, needs and sound judgment of campus Buddhists and the Yale community as a whole. The proverbial rug has been swept out from under us. I call on Chaplain Kugler to begin — today, immediately — to take steps to help us up, on our own terms. She should return to us as many pieces as possible of what we once had; this includes immediately reopening the doors of Battell Chapel for late-night meditation. I call on the wider Yale administration, up to and including Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry and University President Richard Levin, to ensure that the chaplain’s actions are both swift and effective in addressing student concerns. As meditation is not an inherently religious activity, if the chaplain continues to delay, the University should provide a space on central campus for the continuation of this meaningful Yale tradition. ETHAN RODRIGUEZ-TORRENT is a senior in Davenport College. Contact him at ethan.rodriguez-torrent@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST KIKI OCHIENG

Beyond filling the seats

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B

etween Mitt Romney’s “binders full of women” gaffe, “legitimate rape” comments and recent legislative fights regarding women’s health, finding a panacea for our oftmisogynistic political system has been a topic of national conversation in recent months. While the gender imbalance in top political and business positions is not a problem endemic to the United States, it is especially egregious when considering our purported role as a global leader and major economy. Critics often attribute the troubling climate around gender in many nations as simply a product of a lack of female representation in the highest rungs of legislative bodies. However, can an increase in female representation solve the many problems related to gender and sexuality? On Election Night, the United States took a great leap forward as women made historic leaps in Congressional representation. The 113th Congress will have at least 19 female senators and 77 Congresswomen when it

meets for the first time this January. New Hampshire, in particular, made headlines with its allfemale congressional delegation. Given the verbal sparring over the “war on women” that dominated election coverage and President Obama’s ultimate 18-point percentage lead among women, this White House and Congress will play crucial role’s in advancing our national attitude towards women or continuing to let the troubling dynamic continue. But we cannot simply be content with the increase in female representation; it does not automatically correlate with action. Although Sweden, a nation that receives a great deal praise for its progressive stances, has 45 percent female representation in the Riksdag, it also has the second-highest number of rape and sexual assault allegations in the world at 63 out of 100,000 people. While some critics attribute the high number of reports to a culture that encourages women to feel comfortable reporting misconduct, the fact still remains

that the nation still is negligent when it comes to prosecuting such crimes. With the new surge in female representation, we cannot fall into the similar trap of relying upon image to carry us towards progress. Instead, we must implement policies with real teeth in them. During this year’s election, Obama worked hard to portray himself as a defender of women’s rights. While he has made strides in addressing issues like equal pay on a national level, his administration has not rigorously enforced other aspects of his women’s rights agenda such as domestic violence. Despite the fact that Vice President Biden worked with Secretary of Education Arne Duncan last year to craft a comprehensive guide to helping schools address sexual violence on their campus, we have yet to see enforcement of it. Enough talk, time for action. The women of Congress bear a unique burden because we exist in a bizarre transition time of figuring out just how fourth-

wave feminism will express itself. Although the women’s rights movement was once thought to be behind us, recent events and comments by major figures in the political and media landscapes tell us that it is not. These women have an obligation to their American sisters to ensure that their rights are protected and to encourage their male colleagues to care as wel by applying pressure in the legislative branch and challenging the President and his administration to set a national agenda that prioritizes women’s issues. We need women and men fighting on behalf of reproductive rights, equal pay and working towards a work-life balance that enables women to reach heights as leaders in the public and private sector. The women of the House and Senate are not simply benchmarks of progress, but figures with the capacity to effect substantive policy shifts. KIKI OCHIENG is a sophomore in Silliman College. Contact her at kiki.ochieng@yale.edu.


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

Yale College Republicans The Yale College Republicans have been steadily increasing their activity on campus. A mission of the organization is to create awareness of Republicans on campus and provide a community for them. The organization has also helped campaign for candidates such as Linda McMahon and Scott Brown, along with presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

CORRECTION MONDAY, NOV. 12

The article “Global health competition held” misidentified Martha Dale as the director of Global Health Initiatives at the Yale School of Public Health. In fact, Dale is the director of China programs at the Yale Global Health Leadership Intitute.

Political groups look beyond Nov. BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When members of the Yale College Democrats gathered Monday night for their weekly meeting in the Branford common room, they did not make phone calls, discuss canvassing strategies or plan voter registration drives. Instead, they kicked back and watched the West Wing. According to Dems president Zak Newman ’13, student volunteers who spent the fall working on political campaigns have earned a break. But only a short one, he added, looking ahead to the work that awaits the Dems for the rest of the semester. “Whenever we’re not in election mode, we’re in advocacy mode. We’ve learned that the Dems cannot only do work on the local and state level, but actually effect national change, for example with our Obama 2012 ‘Change Is’ campaign,” Newman said. “Immigration is something that will take center stage in the next session of Congress. That’s something I hope the Dems will have a hand in.”

We’re trying to figure out what we should be doing when it’s not election season. ELIZABETH HENRY ’14 Chairwoman, Yale College Republicans On the state level, the Dems will meet with members of the state assembly and the state senate in the coming weeks to discuss potential work on Connecticut issues. According to Newman, state advocacy work affords Yale students the opportunity to take an active role in pushing for policy changes, such as state-wide electoral reform. Going forward, he said, the Dems will seek to move beyond their supplemetary role in advocacy work, characterized in the past by writing letters and volunteering for elected officials. While the Dems take a break from electoral work and gear up to advocate for legislative initiatives, the Yale College Republicans will enter a “development phase” after a disappointing election season. YCR is primarily trying to increase membership, said the group’s chairwoman, Elizabeth Henry ’14. “We’re trying to figure out what we should be doing when

it’s not election season,” Henry said. “This is the first year since I’ve been here that the Yale College Republicans have really existed in any fashion, so we’re trying to build on that. We don’t have a trillion members like the Dems, but we’re working to build on momentum from the election.” Henry said YCR will be hosting speakers throughout the semester. Connecticut House Rep Gail Lavielle GRD ’81 led a discussion Monday night with YCR focusing on the election and the future of the GOP. Sitting at a roundtable with a group of six students, Lavielle spoke about the youth’s role in revamping the Republican message to voters. “I’m a Republican who won very big in Democratic towns,” she said. “There’s a misunderstanding about what is incontrovertibly Democratic and what is incontrovertibly Republican. The way that we as a party are going to overcome this is to articulate a stronger message about what the Republican Party stands for and what we need to do now. That will depend on young people.” Former U.S. Representative Bob Inglis from South Carolina is also slated to speak to the group on December 5 about “conservative environmentalism,” Henry said. The activist group Students United Now (SUN), which mobilized voter registration drives and canvassing efforts on campus leading up to Election Day, will continue its work advocating for greater student input in University decision-making, according to SUN member Sarah Cox ’15. Ward 1 co-chair Nia Holston ’14, who partnered with SUN and the Dems in canvassing prior to the election, said her work on the ward committee will revert back to promoting dialogue between campus groups and New Haven community members. “Personally, I’d like to work on issues of reentry and voter enfranchisement,” Holston said. “As far as the broader work of the committee goes, though, we’ll be working to make sure people know what’s going on at city hall and with the Board of Aldermen. That has been our original goal, so that’s what we’ll go back to.” Both the Dems and the Yale College Republicans said their next electoral work will focus on the 2014 midterm elections. Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

City plans sea wall BY MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, one of the Northeast’s most devastating storms in recent memory, New Haven is planning new infrastructure to combat the forces of nature. State representative Dennis Schain said storms like Hurricane Irene and Hurricane Sandy are evidence of how climate change may affect construction on the coastline. The Elm City is currently considering major structural investments after storms rocked New Haven in two successive years. Residents are pushing for sea wall funding that will help protect homes in Morris Cove against storms surges. The city applied for funding for a 500-foot sea wall to protect 10 houses in the area after Hurricane Irene, but the state denied the request. New Haven residents and city representatives are now pushing the state and federal government to reconsider supporting this project. “There are going to be more of these storms,” Schain, the communications director for Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, said. “We need to consider what the impacts will be whenever there’s planning for construction or development of any kind along the shoreline.” Schain said that sea walls can protect properties from storm surges and waves. He also said that since a sea wall was approved in the same location in the 1980’s, he does not see “insurmountable issues” in building a new one now. Schain cautioned, however, that sea walls are not appropriate in every situation because tidal conditions can cause sand erosion and weaken the wall. Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection has not yet reviewed the proposal for the New Haven sea wall because the funding has not been secured, Schian said. He added that if climate change leads to more prevalent storms, the state will have to take “greater care” to think about the impact of storms as it relates to shoreline development. In their first funding application, city representatives requested federal Hazard Mitigation Funds, which are grants that help implement long-term disas-

BENJAMIN ACKERMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

ter prevention, for the sea wall’s construction, said City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ‘04 in an email to the News. Although the initial application was denied, the conversation is “ongoing,” she added. Scott Devico, a spokesman for the Connecticut Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection, said the state is working to find additional fund-

YALE

The force of Hurricane Sandy caused destruction throughout New Haven.

ing for the wall. “We continue to work with FEMA to determine possible eligibility and are working with the City to identify other federal funding sources for the project,” he said in an email to the News. The need for structural changes was evident in New Haven in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. Last week, City Hall estimated that city and Board of Education property sustained approximately $1.58 million worth of damage in the hurricane. This includes damage to six public schools, Long Wharf Park, street lights and traffic signals. City officials remain hopeful that the federal government will be able help with disaster relief and prevention. “I am optimistic that the vast majority of storm-related expenses and damages will be eligible for FEMA reimbursement,” said Mayor John DeStefano Jr. “These expenses were necessary and appropriate to keep New Haven families safe throughout the storm, and to make sure New Haven schools and workplaces could reopen.” According to City Hall, 1,708 hours of Department of Public Works overtime, 1,330 hours of fire department overtime and 3,179 hours of police department preparing for the storm were recorded during Hurricane Sandy. Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .

Faculty Forum builds discussion BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER

Students convene around Chris Murphy to show their support for his 2012 U.S. Senate campaign.

PHILIP ARNDT/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Many trees throughout the Elm City could not withstand the winds of Hurricane Sandy.

In one of its first meetings, Yale’s faculty forum drew about 40 professors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to discuss a range of issues affecting the University Monday afternoon. Established this fall by Provost Peter Salovey, the forums are meant to solicit faculty input in University policy in a less structured format than the Yale College and Graduate School faculty meetings. After several planning meetings, the forum held its first meeting yesterday in which faculty determined the makeup of the agenda. Professors convened in Connecticut Hall to exchange ideas about the presidential search process, the University’s science and technology resources and the possibility of founding a faculty senate. But economics professor Steven Berry, who chaired the meeting, said no consensuses emerged on any of these topics. “It’s a new kind of meeting we’re trying out this year,” Berry said. “The FAS forum is a chance for people to express concerns and hear information.” Berry said there was a good deal of enthusiasm among the professors present for “at least thinking about” the creation of a faculty senate, a form of a representative body for Yale’s faculty. History professor Frank Snowden, who served as one of the three members of the committee responsible for establishing rules for the forum’s first meeting in early October, said the faculty discussed questions such as whether this senate would

play an advisory role or a deliberative role and whether it would represent the full Yale faculty or just ladder-rank professors in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, though he said no conclusions were made.

The FAS forum is a chance for people to express concerns and hear information. STEVEN BERRY Economics professor The faculty forum, which is to convene twice a semester, was created in late August largely to address concerns expressed by some professors last spring over the faculty’s alleged lack of involvement in University governance. The FAS meetings are intended to allow more open discussions of issues facing the University — such as the presidential search and Yale’s partnership with the National University of Singapore in the creation of a liberal arts college — than allowed by the monthly meetings of faculty in Yale College and the Graduate School. Though faculty will have no official decision-making power in the forum, professors can pass formal resolutions “as the views of the FAS faculty.” Anna Pyle, professor of biology and chemistry and member of the Presidential Search Committee, led the segment on the presidential search in which the fac-

ulty discussed what lessons Yale might take away from the search process, after it ended last Thursday with the appointment of Salovey as the University’s next president, Snowden said. Berry said search committee members told the faculty they felt that they had learned a lot about the University during the search process and announced that they would be turning the input they had collected from the community over to Salovey, who will assume the presidency on June 30, 2013. During the discussion about whether Yale should put more emphasis on the sciences, no consensus was reached on whether the University emphasizes the area of study too little, enough or too much in the allocation of resources and in undergraduate admissions, Berry said. Over the past few weeks, professors have had the opportunity to submit agenda items on a website in anticipation of Monday’s meeting and vote to determine the three topics that would be discussed at the forum. Snowden called this procedure “the most democratic way” of establishing an agenda. The Faculty Forum meetings are chaired by the faculty heads of Yale’s academic divisions — physical sciences and engineering, biological sciences, social sciences and humanities — on a rotating basis. The next Faculty Forum will take place on Feb. 4, 2013. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“When the burdens of the presidency seem unusually heavy, I always remind myself it could be worse. I could be a mayor.” LYNDON B. JOHNSON PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

Elicker, Holder-Winfield to enter race MAYORAL RACE FROM PAGE 1 re-election in 2013. “It helps people discuss issues and set priorities, so I’ve always welcomed them in my own races, and I think they’re important.” Both Elicker and HolderWinfield said that they are running in part because they think they can connect with constituents and ensure government transparency better than DeStefano. Elicker said there is currently a “lack of trust” in city government as well as concern about the city’s long term financial sustainability. Beyond budget troubles facing the city, HolderWinfield said the mayor is “out of touch” with residents, particularly on issues like education reform. DeStefano described accusations of the administration’s unresponsiveness as “political tactics” that detract from his accomplishments of nearly two decades in office. As mayor, he attends weekly neighborhood meetings, knocked on doors last weekend to see progress in hurricane recovery and helped students and parents sign up for New Haven Promise last week, DeStefano said. New Haven Promise executive director Patricia Melton said that education reform under DeStefano has been very “grassroots,” adding that they have a core group of volunteers

involved with the initiative. DeStefano also said he disagreed with Holder-Winfield’s criticism about being out of touch, describing it as “disingenuous” because other public officials, like New Haven’s two state senators, have served longer than he has. Holder-Winfield, though, said that he comes from a more grassroots background than DeStefano, and that the state legislator’s frequent interactions with his constituents have helped him be much more responsive to their concerns. Holder-Winfield’s work repealing the death penalty in Connecticut, reforming juvenile justice and passing education initiatives has demonstrated his capacity as a legislator, he said. His record on city reentry initiatives, Holder-Winfield said, is much stronger than that of DeStefano. While Holder-Winfield said he has worked on reentry problems at the state level, he criticized the mayor for moving slowly to initiate re-enty reform in New Haven in the face of what he called a “clear problem.” “The city’s reentry program is over five years old, which is longer than [Holder-Winfield] has been in the legislature,” DeStefano said in response to HolderWinfield’s criticism. He added that contrary to the impression Holder-Winfield gave, New Haven has made more progress

GRAPH MAYOR DESTEPHANO’S ELECTION VICTORIES SINCE 1993

Percentage of Vote

80

70

60

50

1993

1995

1997

1999

2001

2003

2005

2007

2009

2011

in areas like education, reentry initiatives and immigrant policy than most Connecticut cities. In addition to connecting to constituents, community activist Gary Doyens said that the budget will be a big issue in next year’s mayoral race, adding that the next mayor must think about how to prevent lawsuits from draining the city’s funds. The Ricci v. DeStefano case cost City Hall $6 million in 2009, and city officials are currently debating how to pay for two other lawsuits — Aponte v. Gonzalez and Martone v. City of New Haven — which together cost the city $900,000.

The mayor is not a nice man. I think DeStefano will eat [Elicker] for lunch. GARY DOYENS Public activist Elicker recently called upon City Hall to find a sustainable way to pay for these cases, explaining that officials need a bigger focus on long-term fiscal decisions. He explained that the city will not be able to fund pensions and its self-insurance fund using the way the city currently handles its budget, particularly given expensive lawsuits. “In terms of managing the city, there’s no program against these huge lawsuits and losses. Some of these things are beyond stupid,” Doyens said. “For example, the Ricci case is beyond stupid: You can’t discriminate against anybody for reasons that are not legitimate or related to firing or hiring or promoting. I learned that as a child. It’s just wrong.” Another criticism Elicker leveled at the DeStefano administration was its lack of transparency, explaining that if he were elected mayor, he would aim to increase public discourse and input on city policy. Elicker cited CompStat — a weekly public meeting to discuss police strategy introduced by New Haven Police Department Chief Dean Esserman last year — as a model for enabling public input. In deciding to run for mayor, potential candidates must weigh whether to opt in to the pub-

SARAH ECKINGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Mayor John DeStefano Jr. will face a contested election when he runs in his 12th consecutive election next year. lic finance system that DeStefano helped create over a decade ago after allegations of corruption plagued his administration. The public finance option would give candidates like Elicker and Holder-Winfield around $50,000 for their campaigns. After opting out of the public finance option in 2011, DeStefano raised over $700,000, outspending 2011 challenger Jeffrey Kerekes, who chose to rely on public money, by a 14-to-1 margin. DeStefano’s decision to opt out of this system, Doyens said, was a “travesty” that demonstrated “a lack of integrity” on DeStefano’s part. Despite this, DeStefano still received the lowest percentage of the city vote in any election since he was first elected mayor. Doyens said that although he respects Elicker, he believes DeStefano’s negative campaign strategies will complicate Elicker’s ability to win if he were to run for mayor. “[Elicker is] an interesting candidate: He has a lot of personal integrity, and he is pretty much what he says he is,” Doyens said. “The mayor is not a

nice man. I think DeStefano will eat [Elicker] for lunch: He goes for the jugular and Elicker will want to run this positive, niceguy campaign.” Elicker said he plans on running a “clean” and “positive” campaign, explaining that even if people will think he is “naïve” for it, he wants to run a campaign he will be proud of once the election is over. “I wouldn’t be considering [running for mayor] if I weren’t serious about it and thought I had the potential to win,” Elicker said. “I think nationally, people are tired of politics that are negative and candidates that only talk about how bad the other candidate is. If I do run, I think an energetic and optimistic campaign around issues of public engagement will win the day.” If Elicker and Holder-Winfield both decide to run, they will first navigate the city’s Democratic Party primary election next September before a potential November general election. While winning the Democratic nomination has traditionally been tantamount to a general election victory in Democratheavy New Haven, Kerekes ran

as an Independent after taking second to DeStefano in 2011’s Democratic primary election. While Elicker said that Holder-Winfield has done good work as part of the city’s state delegation, he said that HolderWinfield has often said that he is running because people have talked to him and asked him to. Instead, Elicker said, voters should focus not on whether people want candidates to run but whether they would actually serve as an effective mayor. According to Doyens, HolderWinfield — who is black — may receive an advantage from his ethnicity, but Doyens added that the legislator will have to defend his state record that has included support for tax and spending increases during a budget crisis. “One thing Holder-Winfield has going for him is his ethnicity, and he’s going to play it to the max,” Doyens said. DeStefano has served as the mayor of New Haven since 1994. Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu .

Salovey to hold meetings regularly with YCC YCC FROM PAGE 1 think the YCC’s interactions with Levin should be restricted to these meetings with the president’s assistant. He said he hopes to “formalize and make more effective” the relationship between YCC and Salovey with the help of Goff-Crews. Salovey said in an email to the News that he “certainly” plans to hold regular meetings with the YCC, adding that he worked

closely with the group when he served as Yale College Dean from 2004 to 2008. This year, the YCC will continue to interact with the University president only through Montalvo, he said, and the YCC’s relationship with Goff-Crews will be their most direct line of communication to the President’s Office. “Secretary Goff-Crews knows all the moving parts of the University and can help tighten YCC’s

relationship with the president,” Gonzalez said. “I would love to see the YCC Executive board meet with the new president once a week or once every two weeks, so that there can be more of a consistent conversation.” Gonzalez added that he hopes the President’s Office will consult Goff-Crews for detailed student input when contentious issues arise. Goff-Crews said “constant relationships and [increased]

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CONTACT KAREN TIAN AT karen.tian@yale.edu

open communication” between the President’s Office and YCC would better help administrators understand student concerns, adding that she hopes to start a precedent of “more student contact on a more regular basis” between YCC and the President’s Office. YCC Events Director Bryan Epps a’14 said he is looking forward to collaborating with GoffCrews because he is excited to work directly with an administra-

tor who is willing to put time and effort into developing a relationship with YCC. Gonzalez said that in his weekly, hour-long meetings with Montalvo, the two discuss general campus issues, such as policies on sexual misconduct and alcohol. He added that he aims “to convey student opinion,” and Montalvo debriefs Levin after each meeting. Former YCC President Brandon Levin ’14 said he communicated with Richard Levin through

the same channels as Gonzalez. Levin also interacted with the President’s Office through weekly meetings with the president’s assistant, then Nina Glickson, and he added that Levin was “also available on email to me.” Levin created Goff-Crews’ position of vice president for student affairs last January. Contact KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG at kirsten.schnackenberg@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

1891

Year in which Hedda Gabler premiered.

Hedda Gabler, a play written and published by Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen, premiered in 1891 in Germany. It received negative reviews, but has since gained recognition. A 1902 production on Broadway was successful. Ibsen died in 1906 at the age of 78.

English department profs stage play

KATHRYN CRANDALL/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Merve Emre GRD ‘15 prepares for her role as Hedda, the female lead of show, “Hedda Gabler.” The show was peformed Monday evening, and professors and graduate students acted out the show. BY HELEN ROUNER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER “But no one does that!” English and Theater Studies professor Joseph Roach, playing the character of Judge Brack, exclaimed. The last line of “Hedda Gabler,” a response to its heroine’s abrupt suicide, rang so true that it elicited giggles from the crowd in Linsly Chittenden 101 on Monday evening. About 50 spectators had come to watch the 16th Annual Yale English Department Staged Reading, which this year featured Henrik Ibsen’s tragic “Hedda Gabler,” performed by four English professors and three graduate students, five of whom are teaching “English 129: Tragedy” this semester. Conceived and directed by

English and Theater Studies associate professor Murray Biggs, the annual staged reading project began as an opportunity to air a British or Irish play that even the English Department faculty had not seen, read or heard of, Biggs said. Last year the department decided to begin integrating the staged reading with its active curriculum by performing plays read in the Tragedy course. Biggs said English 129 was the logical curricular choice because it is the department’s largest drama course aside from its Shakespeare lectures. The staged reading productions are primarily for the benefit of English 129 students, according to Roach, one of the five Tragedy professors. “It always helps to hear a play on its feet, even if it’s a reading,”

Roach said. “I also have a sentimental attachment to its being heard live — everyone is in the same place at the same time.”

I think of teaching as a different kind of performance. MERVE EMRE GRD ’15 Hedda, “Hedda Gabler” Biggs explained that each actor’s unique interpretation of their lines, as well as their physical characteristics and idiosyncrasies, influences how an audience understands his character. “What Hedda looks like, for example, will influence the audi-

ence’s understanding of who she is and why she is the way she is,” Biggs said. English 129 student Julian Drucker ’16 said the show presented him with new insight into the meaning of certain lines, adding that he understood some differently when spoken aloud rather than read. After watching the staging, he said he realized that in its richness, Ibsen’s text lends itself to multiple interpretations. “I think seeing facial expressions and hearing inflections brought a lot more insight into the lines, which by themselves can come across as a little ridiculous sometimes,” said Christopher Chow ’13, another English 129 student. Biggs said the secondary purpose of the production is to

showcase the performing talents of some faculty members and to encourage others with “undeveloped performance abilities” to take the stage. Biggs said that being a professor necessarily involves performing. Merve Emre GRD ’15, who plays Hedda in the production, noted a similar overlap between teaching and acting. “I think of teaching as a different kind of performance, so it doesn’t seem that far out of field. I just happen to play a different character,” Emre said. “Everyone you’re working with is playing up a natural tendency that they already have.” Though some of his actors do not have stage experience, Biggs said he defers to the fact that they have studied and taught the text. “I don’t talk about interpretation; we discussed some aspects

of the play but as a round table discussion,” he said. “What I’m interested in is making sure there’s a certain tempo.” Emre, as well as another graduate student and two of the professors in “Hedda Gabler,” also participated in last year’s reading, Molière’s “The Misanthrope,” in which Emre played the female lead. Prior to “The Misanthrope,” Emre’s acting experience only included playing Snoopy in her fourth grade play. All five “Tragedy” teachers have participated in the annual staged reading since the productions and the course became linked last year. Contact HELEN ROUNER at helen.rouner@yale.edu .

Senator champions agriculture BY TIANYI PAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Ben Nelson, a Democratic Senator from Nebraska, came to the Yale Political Union Monday night to speak about the agricultural sector’s significance in American life. Nelson focused on the role of the American midwest as the country’s main food supplier, as an important producer of biofuel and as a preserver of traditional values. Because of its significance to Americans’ daily lives, he said, the midwestern agricultural region of the United States has become an indispensable part of the country that will fuel future prosperity.

Maintaining rural values helps preserve … the democratic freedom on which the country is founded. BEN NELSON Senator, Nebraska “I don’t think there has to be the kind of contest or choice of urban versus the rural,” Nelson said. “What I hope is that we will always be in the position where people can choose one, or the other — we need our cities, and we need our rural areas.” Nebraska, which is the second biggest producer of both corn and ethanol in the United States, takes pride in helping feed and fuel America, Nelson said. He added that Nebraska’s corn production ensures that most American families will not go hungry, and its ethanol supply could allow the United States

BENJAMIN ACKERMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Senator Ben Nelson spoke at a debate for the Yale Political Union Monday. Nelson advocated for the rural life of the Midwest in the United States. to attain energy independence, which should be a “national priority.” The heartland — or the midwest region — also succeeds in addressing unemployment, a main concern facing the country, by creating countless jobs directly and indirectly related to the energy industry, he said. He added that the country’s traditional values, such as pragmatism and hard work, are most

clearly expressed in the heartland. “Maintaining rural values helps preserve the American life and the democratic freedom on which the country is founded,” he said. Nelson also said he believes that rural areas generally favor small governments because rural areas have smaller populations, so residents are often more involved in their govern-

ment and thus feel its presence to a greater extent. He added that residents in urban areas do not typically understand the nature of a rural life. “Many people in Washington think of ‘rural’ as the five miles between Washington and Maryland where there aren’t any buildings,” he said. Audience members interviewed said they enjoyed the

debate because it explored a relevant problem associated with today’s urbanization and globalization. Danny Roza ’15 said he enjoyed Nelson’s speech because his views came off as “reasonable.” Ben Wilson ’14, president of the YPU, said he thought Nelson’s background in the midwest added a personal perspective to the debate.

“As such a strong advocate of farm subsidies and environmental sustainability, Senator Nelson is the ideal candidate for this debate,” he said. “It was something he was very passionate about.” Nelson has served in the U.S. Senate since 2001 and plans to retire in January. Contact TIANYI PAN at tianyi.pan@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“I, I wanna save you/ Wanna save your heart tonight” ONE DIRECTION SAVE YOU TONIGHT

Early autism treatment changes

BY J.R. REED CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY GIDEON BROSHY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Researchers at the School of Medicine’s Child Study Center have demonstrated the effectiveness of early intervention treatments for children with autism spectrum disorders. In a study published in the online issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders on Oct. 27, Child Study Center researchers Fred Volkmar, Kevin A. Pelphrey and their colleagues showed that an early intervention treatment called pivotal response training caused improvements in social behavior in young children. In pivotal response training, therapists interact with children in a play environment and try to encourage social behavior in this “naturalistic” setting, researchers said. The therapy does not seek to teach specific responses in children through rote instruction, but rather is structured around their natural interactions with people. This study is the first to prove that pivotal response training directly induces beneficial changes in areas of the brain associated with social interaction, researchers said. “We’ve known for about 10 or 15 years that early intervention in autism can and often does make a tremendous difference in terms of outcome,” Volkmar said. “If you lack the social frame to motivate yourself, you have a lot of trouble making sense of the world. This is where early intervention helps.” Over the course of summer 2011, the researchers conducted pivotal response training with two young children diagnosed with autism. The training, developed in 1979 by Robert and Lynn Koegel at the University of California, Santa Barbara, can be used for children across a variety of ages and functioning levels and can be conducted by parents at home, said coauthor Pamela Ventola, associate research scientist at the Child Study Center. Before and after the training, the team evaluated the children’s various communication skills, such as speaking and eye contact. After four months of pivotal response training, they observed improvements in all of these areas. Researchers

SAHELI SADANAND

Bonde talks new surgery support systems

MONICA DISARE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have begun to research methods for early intervention treatments for autistic children. also tested the subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging and found increased activity in areas of the brain associated with face recognition, social decision-making, social responsiveness and biological motion, Ventola said. The Child Study Research team demonstrated the effectiveness of pivotal response training in teaching autistic children communicative skills and in changing their neurology. “We may be able to change how their brains are functioning,” Ventola said. The study was significant because most of the research on pivotal response training has been conducted by its developers at UC Santa Barbara and because its effects have never been studied through neuroimaging, she said. Volkmar said the use of fMRI to evaluate the treatment was a natural extension of the neuroimaging research that

the Child Study Center has conducted for years. The Center has been at the forefront of research regarding the neurology of face recognition and social behavior, and has pioneered the use of eye tracking to measure social competence, he said. “We’ve been involved in this for a very long time,” Volkmar said. The study is the first step in a more thorough investigation of the effects of pivotal response training. Volkmar’s team is currently conducting a full-scale study with 60 children. The study was also unique in that it paired autism research with autism treatment. “There’s often a disconnect between what’s going on in the research environment and what therapists are doing at home,” said research assistant Jonathan Tirrell, one of the therapists who worked on the study. The study was an attempt

to bridge this gap between therapy and research, he added. Volkmar said that understanding the markers for successful treatment response may help tailor more specialized treatments for autistic children. Integrating fMRI data into this approach will help researchers understand which treatments are working, and why and how they are working, he said. Volkmar added that this study is important because within the field of autism research, studies focusing on treatment programs are rare. Volkmar and Pelphrey’s team also included the paper’s first author Avery C. Voos, Danielle Bolling, Brent Vander Wyk, Martha D. Kaiser and James C. McPartland of the Child Study Center. Contact GIDEON BROSHY at gideon.broshy@yale.edu .

In late October, Pramod Bonde, surgical director of the School of Medicine’s Mechanical Circulatory Support, and Joseph Akar, an electrophysiologist at the Yale School of Medicine, successfully performed a surgery on a patient with ventricular tachycardia, a life-threatening fast heart rhythm originating in one of the heart’s ventricles. This surgery, which burned the tissue causing the dangerously rapid heart rhythm, was Connecticut’s first hybrid extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-assisted (ECMO) procedure on a patient with VT. The ECMO system used by Bonde is characterized by the application of an artificial heart and lung support system, which facilitates such complex procedures. ECMO provides oxygen-rich blood and circulation support and can be utilized in patients with acute heart failure and acute respiratory failure both during surgery and during recovery. Over a year ago, Bonde started an adult ECMO service, also the first of its kind in Connecticut. Bonde’s ECMO program has seen impressive outcomes — in over a dozen patients needing support for acute respiratory failure, Bonde and his team have lost only one patient. The News spoke with Bonde in his office Monday morning. did you first become QWhen interested and how did you first begin diving into this ECMO research?

A

I have a long-standing interest in the development and application of mechanical circulatory support. Most adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery are supported by an artificial heart and lung machine for

Fighting Future Frankenstorms

ECMO procedure is an QThe established technique that

surgeons use in hospitals throughout the country. How is your ECMO procedure distinct?

A

What I have done is streamlined the patient selection, procedural details, equipment set-up and post operation management to a simple “ten point” set of management goals. This allows everyone who is involved in caring for the patient — nurse, perfusionist, anesthesiologists, critical care attending, physician assistants, etc. — to have a very simplified target list within which the patient’s physiological parameters are maintained. Any deviation from these initiates an automatic action to correct this imbalance. This can only be achieved by all team members being on the same page and workPRAMOD BONDE ing towards a set of goals created for that particular patient. I In late October, Connecticut saw its first hybrid extracoporeal membrane oxygenation-assisted surgery. This surgery burns away tissue that causes a dangerously rapid heart beat rhythm. think this is where the real innovation lies that directly results in opment of the artificial heart and, heart and lung system that I am place of the diseased heart and Yes, our goal is to minimize it’s essential that this device will improved survival and outcomes recently, a bio-mimetic artificial developing is important not just lung. The clinically successful the amount of things needed mimic the human lung that can lung that can work with normal because of the development of ECMO program helps to modify into a single portable unit. The be inserted into the chest and that we witnessed here at Yale. room air. This type of work is cru- the device, but how to implement and understand what is clinically device that I’m developing in the can last for months or years. We cial in allowing me to know which it. The current ECMO device relevant and what is physically laboratory will be ideal for people can’t keep someone in an ICU or Could you describe some of aspects to focus on in patient care that is available is not portable. feasible to build in a lab. who have end stage lung disease a hospital for that long. We need your past experiences that and which are important. This What I am trying to do is create an due to COPD [Chronic Obstruc- to make sure they can go home have helped you develop proce- tells me what is critical, what is implantable, permanent device, tive Pulmonary Disease], who to return to their families and dures to accomplish these suc- the basic minimum thing you which means an artificial lung Is that the direction you’re have pulmonary fibrosis, or who friends and lead a productive life. need to do, rather than looking and heart that can be put inside headed in terms of extending have cystic fibrosis. For those cesses in surgery? who are not candidates for lung at a hundred thousand things. the patient’s body. Such a device this program? Contact J.R. REED at transplantation, it will be a perMy artificial heart labora- You want to narrow it down to a will be accommodated within jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu . manent artificial lung device. So tory is focused on the devel- critical component. The artificial the patient’s own chest cavity in

A

Q

Q

A

Yale joins Science Without Borders

I

n the aftermath of Frankenstorm Sandy, climate change — an issue that was completely ignored in all three presidential debates — has justifiably become a national concern. In fact, like the election, you may be sick of reading about it (sorry). While the jury is still out on whether climate change contributed to Sandy’s strength, it is refreshing to see that many Americans have moved away from arguing whether climate change is occurring and are instead wondering what we can do about it. Broadly, there are two avenues we need to pursue. First, we need to reduce our damage rate by initiating more stringent regulations on greenhouse gases. This act would serve two purposes — as a country, we could reduce our contribution to climate change and we would also be setting an important example to the rest of the world, particularly China and India, two huge greenhouse gas producers who have been similarly irresponsible. Regulation is a vague and sometimes scary term, particularly when wielded by fossil fuel-funded politicians, but it doesn’t have to be painful for business. In August, the Obama administration implemented new regulations that would improve the fuel economy of cars by almost double by 2025 — a move that was endorsed by most major car manufacturers. Not only will these new car standards save consumers money and hopefully reduce our dependency on foreign oil, their approval by car industry officials shows that big business can be painted more green. Similar regulations can and should be put into place for other sectors. Unfortunately, we can’t do much about the greenhouse gases that have already been released in the atmosphere, and we must also develop and implement better ways of protecting ourselves in extreme weather. If climate scientists are right, we Northeasterners may be facing more frequent hurricane hits. As a born and bred Connecticut girl, this freaks me out. As Sandy showed, one of the most frightening consequences of being in the line of a hurricane is the storm surge. Sandy’s power was such that, when combined with

an hour or two. However, some afflictions of the heart and lungs can take days to weeks and even months to heal. Early in my career, I thought to myself that, although we have a reliable way of doing heart surgery, we have no reliable way of supporting circulation and oxygenation of a man that can buy him some time until we figure out how we can fix his heart and lungs.

BY PATRICK CASEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

KAREN TIAN/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

a full moon high tide, the storm surge topped 13 feet in some locations. Some coastal communities had a defense mechanism in place. Stamford is protected by a movable sea barrier and was completely insulated from the storm surge. Movable sea barriers are like gates — they can swing open or flip up from the ocean floor. While they have downsides — for example, they could be disruptive to aquatic ecosystems — they have been

implemented in a number of places and seem like a pragmatic solution to protect cities such as New York from billions of dollars in damage, even if they cost a lot to construct. Due to development, many coastal areas have lost wetland areas that can help protect against storm surges by acting as giant sponges. It is time to consider how to best restore wetland areas, which could complement movable sea barriers in protecting against flooding.

Aside from massive flooding, thousands of people lost power for extended periods of time — some people still don’t have power — thanks to wind and water damage from Sandy. Losing electricity is awful, particularly when air conditioning or heating are required. Overhead wires and power substations that lie close to the water will always be liabilities, so we need to consider more stable means of powering our buildings. Geothermal

wells, a fairly common heating/ cooling option in countries like Iceland and China, may be one option. Geothermal wells are essentially underground pipes circulating fluid deep enough to pick up heat (or get rid of heat as needed) that can then be extracted at the surface. They have less of a carbon footprint because there is no combustion of fossil fuels and while initially expensive to install, the energy savings can, in the long-term,

offset the cost. We’ve wasted enough time arguing over the reality of climate change — and time is precious. We need to take concrete action not only to curb our greenhouse emissions but also to protect ourselves against future Frankenstorms. SAHELI SADANAND is a graduate student in the Department of Immunobiology. Contact her at saheli.sadanand@yale.edu .

Yale has teamed up with the Brazilian government to provide educational and funding opportunities for Brazilian students in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. Members of Yale’s faculty and administration and Brazilian officials met on Oct. 25 to announce Yale’s new partnership with Science Without Borders, an initiative run and funded primarily by Brazil’s federal government. By 2014, the program intends to qualify 100,000 Brazilian undergraduate and graduate students for the opportunity and financial means to study sciences abroad. As a participating university, Yale will accept students and visiting faculty from Brazil to a variety of its programs in the sciences. Science Without Borders will provide advantages for Yale students and faculty as well, said School of Medicine pediatrics professor Michael Cappello. Yale faculty will be able to apply for funding from Science Without Borders to do collaborative projects with researchers in Brazil. “There are opportunities at many levels — student, postdoctoral fellow and faculty — for engagement between researchers at Yale and researchers in Brazil, so I think it’s an outstanding program,” Cappello said. Brazil’s government is looking for ways to train scientists and engineers beyond the capacity of its own universities to fill the demands of the country’s rapidly growing economy. In 2011, the government announced that Science Without Borders will spend $2 billion by the end of 2014 on 75,000 scholarships to send Brazilian science students abroad. The grants made available to Brazilian students by Science Without Borders will fund most Brazilian participants for up to 12 months of study or research work in a foreign institution. The program also provides grants to fully fund Ph.D. students earning a degree abroad. Universities in countries including France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom are also participants in the program. The bulk of Yale’s participants in Science Without Borders will be graduate students and faculty,

alongside research cooperation with Brazilian universities. Yale genetics and cell biology professor Lynn Cooley said in an email that the Yale’s biological and biomedical sciences department will accept applications from Brazilian students to participate in any of its 12 Ph.D. programs. “However, Science Without Borders is brand new, so we do not yet know how many students will end up in biology and biomedical sciences programs,” she said. Cappello, who was present at the ceremony announcing Yale’s participation in the program, said he looks forward tothe new partnership. “They demonstrate that Brazil recognizes its both obligation and opportunity to train first-rate scientists, and they recognize that doing so in partnership with an institution like Yale will allow them to accelerate that process,” he said. Yale has relationships with universities in Brazil that predate Science Without Borders. For the past four summers, Cappello himself has played a major role in running a School of Medicine program that has hosted three to five graduate students or post-doctoral fellows from the University of São Paulo to conduct research. Though Yale anticipates participating in this exchange, there is some uncertainty regarding how some of the program’s logistics will work. “We are eager to have more Brazilian students in our department. It will take some time however to work out how the mechanisms in the SWB program fit with our research and degree programs,” said professor Holly Rushmeier, chair of Yale’s Computer Science Department, in an email. Cappello expressed similar sentiments about how the new agreement with Brazil will work in practice. “It’s actually quite a broad-based program. Some of these initiatives may be more easily adapted to Yale’s existing structures, some of them may require some degree of adjustment or negotiation,” he said. Brazil produces 30,000 engineers a year, according to a March issue of The Economist. Contact PATRICK CASEY at patrick.casey@yale.edu .

Citizen Science project takes flight

KATHRYN CRANDALL/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Previous spring bird walks have resulted in the identification of 43 species of bird, along with providing avian education for students.. BY KATHRYN CRANDALL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale Citizen Science project kicked off its first fall semester with a bird walk held Friday afternoon. The Citizen Science project, created in the spring of 2012, is the result of a partnership between the Peabody Natural History Museum and the Yale Office of Sustainability. The project hosted four bird walks over the course of the spring semester and observed and documented 43 different bird species on Yale’s campus. In addition to the bird walks, the project arranged training sessions to educate students, faculty and staff about the different birds that can be found on Yale’s campus and how to properly document their findings. These findings will be used by the Yale Grounds Maintenance Department to decide locations of future building projects, said David Heiser, head of education and outreach at the Peabody. “We hope that more members of the Yale community will be able to better understand the urban ecology of the Yale campus so that we can all be better land stewards of our campus and our communities,” said Amber Garrard, education and outreach coordinator at the Office of Sustainability. This year the Yale Citizen Science project is focused on reaching out to greater numbers of people from the Yale community, Garrard said. She added that any interested participant can become a citizen scientist.

“Everyone from experienced birders to new students is more than welcome to join us,” Garrard said. In the brief time that this program has existed, it has already attracted about 170 “unique individuals” to the various training sessions and bird walks that have occurred since spring, Heiser said. There were, however, only 13 people in attendance at Friday’s bird walk, all from various backgrounds including graduate students, undergraduate students and Sterling Memorial Library staff.

It’s about building a community of active and aware members. AMBER GARRARD Education and outreach coordinator, Office of Sustainability The group was equally diverse in its expertise. Some members had never attended a bird walk, while others like David Tan — a foreign exchange student from Singapore — have been “birding” for over 10 years. The tour was led by Kristof Zyskowski, Peabody collections manager, and Jim Sirch, coordinator of public education at the Peabody, and took off at noon from Beinecke Plaza and finished the exploration at 1 p.m. in the Grove Street Cemetery. By the end of the walk, the group had observed approximately eight different

bird species, from the common grackle to the slightly more elusive blue jay. Though no new bird species were observed on Friday’s walk, participants said they left the walk satisfied. “I look forward to future events through the Citizens Science project,” Abhinav Gupta ’13 said. In addition to expanding the number of citizen scientists, the Peabody Museum has designed a new database to capture bird and plant sightings from around campus. This database will serve as the primary portal to organize data collected by citizen scientists, including species they have seen, the time of day, the location and any photos they have taken. “Ideally, citizen scientists will record data from specific locations of their choice on a regular basis so that we can begin to develop trending data,” Heiser said. Heiser added that the Citizens Science project will move forward with its efforts to promote a healthy relationship between the campus and its natural ecosystem. Garrard said the program also hopes to develop a culture of citizen scientists. “It’s about building a community of active and aware members,” she said. The next scheduled bird walk will occur from noon to 1 p.m. on Nov. 28, leaving from the Peabody Museum lobby. Contact KATHRYN CRANDALL at kathryn.crandall@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

“I, I wanna save you/ Wanna save your heart tonight” ONE DIRECTION SAVE YOU TONIGHT

Early autism treatment changes

BY J.R. REED CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY GIDEON BROSHY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Researchers at the School of Medicine’s Child Study Center have demonstrated the effectiveness of early intervention treatments for children with autism spectrum disorders. In a study published in the online issue of the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders on Oct. 27, Child Study Center researchers Fred Volkmar, Kevin A. Pelphrey and their colleagues showed that an early intervention treatment called pivotal response training caused improvements in social behavior in young children. In pivotal response training, therapists interact with children in a play environment and try to encourage social behavior in this “naturalistic” setting, researchers said. The therapy does not seek to teach specific responses in children through rote instruction, but rather is structured around their natural interactions with people. This study is the first to prove that pivotal response training directly induces beneficial changes in areas of the brain associated with social interaction, researchers said. “We’ve known for about 10 or 15 years that early intervention in autism can and often does make a tremendous difference in terms of outcome,” Volkmar said. “If you lack the social frame to motivate yourself, you have a lot of trouble making sense of the world. This is where early intervention helps.” Over the course of summer 2011, the researchers conducted pivotal response training with two young children diagnosed with autism. The training, developed in 1979 by Robert and Lynn Koegel at the University of California, Santa Barbara, can be used for children across a variety of ages and functioning levels and can be conducted by parents at home, said coauthor Pamela Ventola, associate research scientist at the Child Study Center. Before and after the training, the team evaluated the children’s various communication skills, such as speaking and eye contact. After four months of pivotal response training, they observed improvements in all of these areas. Researchers

SAHELI SADANAND

Bonde talks new surgery support systems

MONICA DISARE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine have begun to research methods for early intervention treatments for autistic children. also tested the subjects using functional magnetic resonance imaging and found increased activity in areas of the brain associated with face recognition, social decision-making, social responsiveness and biological motion, Ventola said. The Child Study Research team demonstrated the effectiveness of pivotal response training in teaching autistic children communicative skills and in changing their neurology. “We may be able to change how their brains are functioning,” Ventola said. The study was significant because most of the research on pivotal response training has been conducted by its developers at UC Santa Barbara and because its effects have never been studied through neuroimaging, she said. Volkmar said the use of fMRI to evaluate the treatment was a natural extension of the neuroimaging research that

the Child Study Center has conducted for years. The Center has been at the forefront of research regarding the neurology of face recognition and social behavior, and has pioneered the use of eye tracking to measure social competence, he said. “We’ve been involved in this for a very long time,” Volkmar said. The study is the first step in a more thorough investigation of the effects of pivotal response training. Volkmar’s team is currently conducting a full-scale study with 60 children. The study was also unique in that it paired autism research with autism treatment. “There’s often a disconnect between what’s going on in the research environment and what therapists are doing at home,” said research assistant Jonathan Tirrell, one of the therapists who worked on the study. The study was an attempt

to bridge this gap between therapy and research, he added. Volkmar said that understanding the markers for successful treatment response may help tailor more specialized treatments for autistic children. Integrating fMRI data into this approach will help researchers understand which treatments are working, and why and how they are working, he said. Volkmar added that this study is important because within the field of autism research, studies focusing on treatment programs are rare. Volkmar and Pelphrey’s team also included the paper’s first author Avery C. Voos, Danielle Bolling, Brent Vander Wyk, Martha D. Kaiser and James C. McPartland of the Child Study Center. Contact GIDEON BROSHY at gideon.broshy@yale.edu .

In late October, Pramod Bonde, surgical director of the School of Medicine’s Mechanical Circulatory Support, and Joseph Akar, an electrophysiologist at the Yale School of Medicine, successfully performed a surgery on a patient with ventricular tachycardia, a life-threatening fast heart rhythm originating in one of the heart’s ventricles. This surgery, which burned the tissue causing the dangerously rapid heart rhythm, was Connecticut’s first hybrid extracorporeal membrane oxygenation-assisted (ECMO) procedure on a patient with VT. The ECMO system used by Bonde is characterized by the application of an artificial heart and lung support system, which facilitates such complex procedures. ECMO provides oxygen-rich blood and circulation support and can be utilized in patients with acute heart failure and acute respiratory failure both during surgery and during recovery. Over a year ago, Bonde started an adult ECMO service, also the first of its kind in Connecticut. Bonde’s ECMO program has seen impressive outcomes — in over a dozen patients needing support for acute respiratory failure, Bonde and his team have lost only one patient. The News spoke with Bonde in his office Monday morning. did you first become QWhen interested and how did you first begin diving into this ECMO research?

A

I have a long-standing interest in the development and application of mechanical circulatory support. Most adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery are supported by an artificial heart and lung machine for

Fighting Future Frankenstorms

ECMO procedure is an QThe established technique that

surgeons use in hospitals throughout the country. How is your ECMO procedure distinct?

A

What I have done is streamlined the patient selection, procedural details, equipment set-up and post operation management to a simple “ten point” set of management goals. This allows everyone who is involved in caring for the patient — nurse, perfusionist, anesthesiologists, critical care attending, physician assistants, etc. — to have a very simplified target list within which the patient’s physiological parameters are maintained. Any deviation from these initiates an automatic action to correct this imbalance. This can only be achieved by all team members being on the same page and workPRAMOD BONDE ing towards a set of goals created for that particular patient. I In late October, Connecticut saw its first hybrid extracoporeal membrane oxygenation-assisted surgery. This surgery burns away tissue that causes a dangerously rapid heart beat rhythm. think this is where the real innovation lies that directly results in opment of the artificial heart and, heart and lung system that I am place of the diseased heart and Yes, our goal is to minimize it’s essential that this device will improved survival and outcomes recently, a bio-mimetic artificial developing is important not just lung. The clinically successful the amount of things needed mimic the human lung that can lung that can work with normal because of the development of ECMO program helps to modify into a single portable unit. The be inserted into the chest and that we witnessed here at Yale. room air. This type of work is cru- the device, but how to implement and understand what is clinically device that I’m developing in the can last for months or years. We cial in allowing me to know which it. The current ECMO device relevant and what is physically laboratory will be ideal for people can’t keep someone in an ICU or Could you describe some of aspects to focus on in patient care that is available is not portable. feasible to build in a lab. who have end stage lung disease a hospital for that long. We need your past experiences that and which are important. This What I am trying to do is create an due to COPD [Chronic Obstruc- to make sure they can go home have helped you develop proce- tells me what is critical, what is implantable, permanent device, tive Pulmonary Disease], who to return to their families and dures to accomplish these suc- the basic minimum thing you which means an artificial lung Is that the direction you’re have pulmonary fibrosis, or who friends and lead a productive life. need to do, rather than looking and heart that can be put inside headed in terms of extending have cystic fibrosis. For those cesses in surgery? who are not candidates for lung at a hundred thousand things. the patient’s body. Such a device this program? Contact J.R. REED at transplantation, it will be a perMy artificial heart labora- You want to narrow it down to a will be accommodated within jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu . manent artificial lung device. So tory is focused on the devel- critical component. The artificial the patient’s own chest cavity in

A

Q

Q

A

Yale joins Science Without Borders

I

n the aftermath of Frankenstorm Sandy, climate change — an issue that was completely ignored in all three presidential debates — has justifiably become a national concern. In fact, like the election, you may be sick of reading about it (sorry). While the jury is still out on whether climate change contributed to Sandy’s strength, it is refreshing to see that many Americans have moved away from arguing whether climate change is occurring and are instead wondering what we can do about it. Broadly, there are two avenues we need to pursue. First, we need to reduce our damage rate by initiating more stringent regulations on greenhouse gases. This act would serve two purposes — as a country, we could reduce our contribution to climate change and we would also be setting an important example to the rest of the world, particularly China and India, two huge greenhouse gas producers who have been similarly irresponsible. Regulation is a vague and sometimes scary term, particularly when wielded by fossil fuel-funded politicians, but it doesn’t have to be painful for business. In August, the Obama administration implemented new regulations that would improve the fuel economy of cars by almost double by 2025 — a move that was endorsed by most major car manufacturers. Not only will these new car standards save consumers money and hopefully reduce our dependency on foreign oil, their approval by car industry officials shows that big business can be painted more green. Similar regulations can and should be put into place for other sectors. Unfortunately, we can’t do much about the greenhouse gases that have already been released in the atmosphere, and we must also develop and implement better ways of protecting ourselves in extreme weather. If climate scientists are right, we Northeasterners may be facing more frequent hurricane hits. As a born and bred Connecticut girl, this freaks me out. As Sandy showed, one of the most frightening consequences of being in the line of a hurricane is the storm surge. Sandy’s power was such that, when combined with

an hour or two. However, some afflictions of the heart and lungs can take days to weeks and even months to heal. Early in my career, I thought to myself that, although we have a reliable way of doing heart surgery, we have no reliable way of supporting circulation and oxygenation of a man that can buy him some time until we figure out how we can fix his heart and lungs.

BY PATRICK CASEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

KAREN TIAN/ILLUSTRATIONS EDITOR

a full moon high tide, the storm surge topped 13 feet in some locations. Some coastal communities had a defense mechanism in place. Stamford is protected by a movable sea barrier and was completely insulated from the storm surge. Movable sea barriers are like gates — they can swing open or flip up from the ocean floor. While they have downsides — for example, they could be disruptive to aquatic ecosystems — they have been

implemented in a number of places and seem like a pragmatic solution to protect cities such as New York from billions of dollars in damage, even if they cost a lot to construct. Due to development, many coastal areas have lost wetland areas that can help protect against storm surges by acting as giant sponges. It is time to consider how to best restore wetland areas, which could complement movable sea barriers in protecting against flooding.

Aside from massive flooding, thousands of people lost power for extended periods of time — some people still don’t have power — thanks to wind and water damage from Sandy. Losing electricity is awful, particularly when air conditioning or heating are required. Overhead wires and power substations that lie close to the water will always be liabilities, so we need to consider more stable means of powering our buildings. Geothermal

wells, a fairly common heating/ cooling option in countries like Iceland and China, may be one option. Geothermal wells are essentially underground pipes circulating fluid deep enough to pick up heat (or get rid of heat as needed) that can then be extracted at the surface. They have less of a carbon footprint because there is no combustion of fossil fuels and while initially expensive to install, the energy savings can, in the long-term,

offset the cost. We’ve wasted enough time arguing over the reality of climate change — and time is precious. We need to take concrete action not only to curb our greenhouse emissions but also to protect ourselves against future Frankenstorms. SAHELI SADANAND is a graduate student in the Department of Immunobiology. Contact her at saheli.sadanand@yale.edu .

Yale has teamed up with the Brazilian government to provide educational and funding opportunities for Brazilian students in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. Members of Yale’s faculty and administration and Brazilian officials met on Oct. 25 to announce Yale’s new partnership with Science Without Borders, an initiative run and funded primarily by Brazil’s federal government. By 2014, the program intends to qualify 100,000 Brazilian undergraduate and graduate students for the opportunity and financial means to study sciences abroad. As a participating university, Yale will accept students and visiting faculty from Brazil to a variety of its programs in the sciences. Science Without Borders will provide advantages for Yale students and faculty as well, said School of Medicine pediatrics professor Michael Cappello. Yale faculty will be able to apply for funding from Science Without Borders to do collaborative projects with researchers in Brazil. “There are opportunities at many levels — student, postdoctoral fellow and faculty — for engagement between researchers at Yale and researchers in Brazil, so I think it’s an outstanding program,” Cappello said. Brazil’s government is looking for ways to train scientists and engineers beyond the capacity of its own universities to fill the demands of the country’s rapidly growing economy. In 2011, the government announced that Science Without Borders will spend $2 billion by the end of 2014 on 75,000 scholarships to send Brazilian science students abroad. The grants made available to Brazilian students by Science Without Borders will fund most Brazilian participants for up to 12 months of study or research work in a foreign institution. The program also provides grants to fully fund Ph.D. students earning a degree abroad. Universities in countries including France, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom are also participants in the program. The bulk of Yale’s participants in Science Without Borders will be graduate students and faculty,

alongside research cooperation with Brazilian universities. Yale genetics and cell biology professor Lynn Cooley said in an email that the Yale’s biological and biomedical sciences department will accept applications from Brazilian students to participate in any of its 12 Ph.D. programs. “However, Science Without Borders is brand new, so we do not yet know how many students will end up in biology and biomedical sciences programs,” she said. Cappello, who was present at the ceremony announcing Yale’s participation in the program, said he looks forward tothe new partnership. “They demonstrate that Brazil recognizes its both obligation and opportunity to train first-rate scientists, and they recognize that doing so in partnership with an institution like Yale will allow them to accelerate that process,” he said. Yale has relationships with universities in Brazil that predate Science Without Borders. For the past four summers, Cappello himself has played a major role in running a School of Medicine program that has hosted three to five graduate students or post-doctoral fellows from the University of São Paulo to conduct research. Though Yale anticipates participating in this exchange, there is some uncertainty regarding how some of the program’s logistics will work. “We are eager to have more Brazilian students in our department. It will take some time however to work out how the mechanisms in the SWB program fit with our research and degree programs,” said professor Holly Rushmeier, chair of Yale’s Computer Science Department, in an email. Cappello expressed similar sentiments about how the new agreement with Brazil will work in practice. “It’s actually quite a broad-based program. Some of these initiatives may be more easily adapted to Yale’s existing structures, some of them may require some degree of adjustment or negotiation,” he said. Brazil produces 30,000 engineers a year, according to a March issue of The Economist. Contact PATRICK CASEY at patrick.casey@yale.edu .

Citizen Science project takes flight

KATHRYN CRANDALL/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Previous spring bird walks have resulted in the identification of 43 species of bird, along with providing avian education for students.. BY KATHRYN CRANDALL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Yale Citizen Science project kicked off its first fall semester with a bird walk held Friday afternoon. The Citizen Science project, created in the spring of 2012, is the result of a partnership between the Peabody Natural History Museum and the Yale Office of Sustainability. The project hosted four bird walks over the course of the spring semester and observed and documented 43 different bird species on Yale’s campus. In addition to the bird walks, the project arranged training sessions to educate students, faculty and staff about the different birds that can be found on Yale’s campus and how to properly document their findings. These findings will be used by the Yale Grounds Maintenance Department to decide locations of future building projects, said David Heiser, head of education and outreach at the Peabody. “We hope that more members of the Yale community will be able to better understand the urban ecology of the Yale campus so that we can all be better land stewards of our campus and our communities,” said Amber Garrard, education and outreach coordinator at the Office of Sustainability. This year the Yale Citizen Science project is focused on reaching out to greater numbers of people from the Yale community, Garrard said. She added that any interested participant can become a citizen scientist.

“Everyone from experienced birders to new students is more than welcome to join us,” Garrard said. In the brief time that this program has existed, it has already attracted about 170 “unique individuals” to the various training sessions and bird walks that have occurred since spring, Heiser said. There were, however, only 13 people in attendance at Friday’s bird walk, all from various backgrounds including graduate students, undergraduate students and Sterling Memorial Library staff.

It’s about building a community of active and aware members. AMBER GARRARD Education and outreach coordinator, Office of Sustainability The group was equally diverse in its expertise. Some members had never attended a bird walk, while others like David Tan — a foreign exchange student from Singapore — have been “birding” for over 10 years. The tour was led by Kristof Zyskowski, Peabody collections manager, and Jim Sirch, coordinator of public education at the Peabody, and took off at noon from Beinecke Plaza and finished the exploration at 1 p.m. in the Grove Street Cemetery. By the end of the walk, the group had observed approximately eight different

bird species, from the common grackle to the slightly more elusive blue jay. Though no new bird species were observed on Friday’s walk, participants said they left the walk satisfied. “I look forward to future events through the Citizens Science project,” Abhinav Gupta ’13 said. In addition to expanding the number of citizen scientists, the Peabody Museum has designed a new database to capture bird and plant sightings from around campus. This database will serve as the primary portal to organize data collected by citizen scientists, including species they have seen, the time of day, the location and any photos they have taken. “Ideally, citizen scientists will record data from specific locations of their choice on a regular basis so that we can begin to develop trending data,” Heiser said. Heiser added that the Citizens Science project will move forward with its efforts to promote a healthy relationship between the campus and its natural ecosystem. Garrard said the program also hopes to develop a culture of citizen scientists. “It’s about building a community of active and aware members,” she said. The next scheduled bird walk will occur from noon to 1 p.m. on Nov. 28, leaving from the Peabody Museum lobby. Contact KATHRYN CRANDALL at kathryn.crandall@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Academic review considers tenure ACADEMIC REVIEW FROM PAGE 1 Review Committee, and their divisional advisory committees will soon contact department chairs for additional input so that each division can present a “broad view” of the challenges it faces, Berry said. Berry said the Academic Review will evaluate how Yale can allocate its resources to respond to emerging academic fields to remain a top educational and research institution. “You would not want to have the departments of 1850 or 1950 now,” he said. “It’s a hard question of, ‘How does the University renew itself and look to new fields without losing the strengths it already has?’” The committee has already begun to discuss the rising ratio of tenured to non-tenured professors, Berry said, which was a central concern of the report on faculty resources released by a separate committee last spring. The committee, chaired by economics professor William Nordhaus ’63, proposed that Yale set tenure ratio guidelines that would require departments with a percentage of tenured faculty exceeding the specified ratio to focus on searches at the junior faculty level. In June 2012, Provost Peter Salovey postponed a decision on the proposal until “further study” could be done. Berry said the Academic Review Committee hopes to take a position on the tenure ratio issue — a “relatively separate question” from the other issues in the academic review — before the committee releases its full recommendations on the allocation of resources. Though Berry said Salovey has told the committee that “this is not a budget exercise,” he added that it is important for the committee to develop an understanding of University finances before making any decisions. “I’m an economist, and we live in the real world,” Berry said. “It

wouldn’t do any good to make a recommendation that was infeasible from a budget perspective.” Salovey said he wants the committee to base its budgetary decisions primarily on “intellectual concerns and academic values,” adding that he does not intend to rush the committee to finish its review. The committee could continue working past the end of the 2012-’13 academic year, Salovey said in a June memo to faculty. Five other committee members declined to comment for this story. Yale’s last academic review was held between 1990 and 1992 under then-University President Benno Schmidt. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .

TIMELINE HISTORY OF YALE’S ACADEMIC REVIEWS 1979–’81 Under former Provost Georges May, the review recommended reducing ladder faculty positions by about 4 percent. 1990–’92 Under then-University President Benno Schmidt, the review caused controversy when it initially called for a 10.7 percent reduction in the size of the faculty. After professors protested, the planned figure was ultimately reduced to 6.6 percent. 2012–? A committee chaired by economics professor Steven Berry is yet to make a recommendation on the size of the faculty, which currently stands at 682.

Reverend Abraham Pierson: Yale’s First President. According to his tombstone, Reverend Abraham Pierson was born in Southampton, Long Island in 1646. His father, Reverend Abraham Pierson Sr., presided over the Puritan (Congregational) church in Southampton. In 1701, Pierson became the first rector of Yale University, a school he helped found. At the time, Yale was still known as the Collegiate School. Pierson is considered to be the University’s first president.

Salovey praised as artist SALOVEY FROM PAGE 1 Center Director Amy Meyers said. “I am confident that this support, given sincerely as provost, will now be extended in the presidency.” Among the uncompleted projects of the Area Arts Plan is the renovation and expansion of the School of Drama’s aging buildings. School of Drama Dean James Bundy said in an email that since Salovey served as provost when the plans for these buildings were set in motion, it will be easy for him to get the projects up to speed. Jock Reynolds, director of the YUAG, said he expects the transition between the two Presidents to be “seamless and joyous.” While the School of Music’s Sprague Hall and Leigh Hall were revamped during Levin’s term, Hendrie Hall — which houses the school’s opera, brass and percussion departments, as well as undergraduate music groups — is yet to undergo renovation. Salovey said in an email that he expects to move forward with capital projects on both the drama and music campuses during his presidency, citing plans to raise funds for a new School of Drama theater to replace the Yale Repertory Theatre and to complete the Hendrie Hall renovation. Though the plans for Yale’s 13th and 14th residential colleges include space for a new undergraduate theater facility, Salovey said the theater — in addition to the colleges themselves — will require additional major donations that he will pursue as president. But the most “visible” aspect of Levin’s legacy at the School of Drama has been the expansion of its financial aid program, Bundy said. He explained that as provost, Salovey had already closely collaborated with the school about its budget process, calling Salovey “instrumental” in maintaining the school’s affordability through the economic recession. The School of Drama’s financial aid budget is now $6.1 million, as opposed to the $1.4 million available when Bundy assumed the position of dean in 2002, the News reported in February. Levin also helped the School of Music solicit a $100 million donation to grant free tuition for all its students — Yale’s largest donation to date.

Meyers said Salovey’s connection to the British Art Center is evident in his position on the Board of Governors of the Paul Mellon Center for Studies in British Art, the institution that organizes the Yale-in-London program and maintains relationships between the center and art institutions in the United Kingdom. She added that Salovey and his wife, Marta Moret SPH ’84, are frequent visitors to the Center who “make it a point to come to events.”

He cares about what we care about, a hallmark of being a true Yalie. ANDREW LEU ’13 Dean of the School of Architecture Robert A.M. Stern noted that Salovey’s experience as dean of Yale College will help him to “understand the psyche of undergraduates,” an ability that Salovey has demonstrated in his visible involvement in Yale’s undergraduate art scene. He has starred in multiple Yale Symphony Orchestra Halloween shows, playing roles such as the genie from Aladdin and a kidnapped Yale administrator. “He’s been willing to come to Mory’s at 11:00 at night or climb Harkness at 7:00 in the morning to shoot with us,” said Wells Andres ’13, a violinist in YSO. Salovey’s hobbies speak to his personal connection to the arts as well. As Director of Undergraduate Studies of the Music department Patrick McCreless said in an email, “How can you go wrong with a Yale President who plays in a bluegrass band?” Since being appointed Yale’s 23rd president last Thursday, Salovey has continued to reach out to artistically inclined undergraduates. Andrew Leu ’13 said he received an email on Monday morning saying his photo of snow-covered Hillhouse Avenue had been selected to inaugurate a new tradition Salovey is putting in place, in which a student’s photograph will be featured on his annual holiday card and party invitations.

“It’s very encouraging to see that Salovey is taking an interest in students’ works,” Leu said. “This is an excellent way to get in touch with students and foster the art scene at Yale. He cares about what we care about, a hallmark of being a true Yalie — supporting the endeavors, artistic or otherwise, of your peers.” Salovey’s activities outside of his role as a Yale administrator have also won him praise from members of the University’s arts community, many of whom described him as a participant in the arts as well as a fierce supporter of them. “Peter Salovey is not only a great supporter of the arts — he’s also an artist himself,” Associate Dean of the Arts Susan Cahan said in a Thursday email. “As a musician and a psychologist, he understands creativity and the nature of non-verbal communication. His appointment marks an exciting new era for the arts in Yale College.” Bimal Mendis, the director of undergraduate studies at the School of Architecture, expressed hope that Salovey’s “artistic flair” will be transformed into change on the institutional level. Mendis, who called the incoming president a “complete person in the model of the liberal arts,” noted that he would like to see more emphasis on the visual arts within the University’s core curriculum. While acknowledging that Levin has strengthened Yale’s arts disciplines on the whole, Mendis said he hopes Salovey’s administration will usher in an age in which visual arts are considered a more intrinsic part of the liberal arts education. Associate Dean of the School of Art Sam Messer said Salovey’s involvement with the visual arts at Yale has extended beyond New Haven to his role as a trustee of the Yale Summer School of Art and Music that takes place in Norfolk, Conn. annually. Salovey and Moret have been New Haven residents since they arrived in the city as graduate students 30 years ago. Sarah Swong contributed reporting. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu . Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

Showers, mainly before 3pm. High of 51, falling to around 46 by 5pm. Northwest wind 9 to 15 mph.

TOMORROW

THURSDAY

High of 48, low of 31.

High of 48, low of 32.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13 5:30 PM East Asia Faculty Forum: Islands in Dispute. The panelists will first analyze the geographic disputes that have dominated the news this past summer and fall: the Kuril Islands, Dokdo/Takeshima, Senkaku/Diaoyutai, and the South China Sea, before discussing the conflicts more generally and answering questions from the audience. Linsly-Chittendon Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 101. 7:00 PM “Silver Linings Playbook” (USA, 2012) / Sneak Preview. Sneak Preview of the film, “Silver Linings Playbook” (USA, 2012) 35mm. It was nominated for a People’s Choice Award, and appeared in theToronto International Film Festival. The film is directed by David O. Russell. Starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, Robert DeNiro and Chris Tucker. Followed by a Q&A with producer Bruce Cohen. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Doors open at 6:45pm, first come first served. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium.

ZERO LIKE ME BY REUXBEN BARRIENTES

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14 8:00 PM Marie Antoinette. The young queen Marie Antoinette delights and inspires her French subjects with her three-foot tall wigs and extravagant haute couture. But times change and even the most fashionable queens go out of style. In David Adjmi’s humorous and haunting Marie Antoinette, idle gossip turns more insidious as the country revolts, demanding liberté,égalité, fraternité. Yale Repertory Theatre (1120 Chapel St.). 9:15 PM “Going Deep” Theology Study. God, faith, evil … does it ever make sense? Come and discuss the questions we all have. Lots of thinking and even more grace. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Rm. 006.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15 2:00 PM Global Brigades Honduras Trip Information Session. Interested in helping the financial state of developing worlds? Bass Library (110 Wall St.), Rm. L70.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 College donor, often 5 401(k) cousin, briefly 8 Garden ground cover 13 Mount Olympus wife 14 Break bread 16 Novelist Zola 17 “As if!” 20 Halley’s sci. 21 Full of vitality 22 Ideological suffix 23 Lift with effort 25 ’60s counterculturist Timothy 27 “As if!” 31 Rants about the boss, e.g. 34 Jacob’s brother 35 Niagara Falls prov. 36 Gorky Park city 37 Like hor. puzzle answers 38 “As if!” 40 Hostility 41 Started, as a keg 43 P.I. 44 Hypnotic trance breaker 45 “Friend __?” 46 “As if!” 48 Pal of Threepio 50 Not at all droopy 51 Intro makers 52 One might say “shay” for “say” 54 Inevitable end 57 “As if!” 61 Honolulu hello 62 Egg on 63 Sculling gear 64 Headwear in iconic Che posters 65 Many ESPN fall highlights 66 Way to be tickled DOWN 1 Cry of enlightenment 2 Film heroine with memorable buns

CLASSICAL MUSIC 24 Hours a Day. 98.3 FM, and on the web at WMNR.org. “Pledges accepted: 1-800345-1812” Tuesday is Opera night!

THE TAFT APARTMENTS Studio/1BR/2BR styles for future & immediate occupancy at The Taft on the corner of College & Chapel Street. Lease terms available until 5/31/13. It’s never too early to join our preferred waiting list for Summer/Fall 2013 occupancy. Public mini-storage available. By appointment only. Phone 203-495-TAFT. www.taftapartments.com.

CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

11/13/12

By Jeff Chen

3 Java vessels 4 “Grumpy Old Men” co-star 5 Rite words 6 Modern caller ID, perhaps 7 Part of A.D. 8 Drop-line link 9 Wrigley Field judges 10 Mouthing the lyrics 11 Red Skelton character Kadiddlehopper 12 Cooped-up layer 15 Bird on old quarters 18 Earl __ tea 19 Groundbreaking tool 24 Greenland coastal feature 26 Company that rings a bell? 27 “Marvy!” 28 Green grouch 29 “Star Trek” velocity measure 30 Word in many university names

Want to place a classified ad?

Monday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

32 Bar mitzvah reading source 33 Didn’t lose a game 36 Java order 38 Off! ingredient 39 Mike, to Archie 42 Upscale sports car 44 Perch on 46 Like babes 47 Dennis the Menace’s dog

SUDOKU EASY

11/13/12

49 Pay extension? 51 Stallion or bull 53 Craig Ferguson, by birth 55 Asian tongue 56 Bring home 57 “Marvy!” 58 Monopoly token 59 Has too much, briefly 60 Clucking sound

2 8 5 6 7 3 9 1 1 9 8 7 4

1 6

7 4 8 4 6 9 8 2 7 2 5 9 8 5 4 7 3 3 4 9 6 7 5 1

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YALE DAILY NEWS 路 TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

SPORTS

“Success is not the result of spontaneous combustion. You must first set yourself on fire.” FRED SHERO FORMER PHILADLEPHIA FLYERS HEAD COACH

XC closes season

Elis falter upstate WOMEN’S HOCKEY FROM PAGE 12 another goal in the second period before exploding for three goals in the final period. Saints forward Abbey McRae recorded a hat trick, including two power play goals. Kelly Sabatine added another power play goal, and St. Lawrence converted three of its seven five-on-four opportunities. “We are a good enough hockey team that we can set the pace of the game,” defender Jamie Gray ’13 said. “We did that on Saturday in the first period and capitalized on the opportunity. As the game progressed we began to take penalties and didn’t give ourselves the chance to get back to our systems and even play.” The previous night against Clarkson, the Elis allowed three goals in an even shorter span and found themselves trailing 3–0 less than 10 minutes into the first period. With the exception of the 3–0 win over Colgate that stands alone in the victory column, the Bulldogs have allowed at least 2 goals in a single period in every game this year. Yale has surrendered at least four goals

in each of its last four games as well. “It’s a matter of putting all of our efforts together for a whole game. It’s not easy, but we know we can do it,” captain Alyssa Zupon ’13 said. Against Clarkson, the floodgates opened early. The Golden Knights scored two goals in a 47-second span early in the first period and added another at the halfway point. Yale’s only score came from Gray in the third period off of assists from forwards Jamie Haddad ’16 and Janelle Ferrara ’16. Nineteen of the team’s 28 points this season have been recorded by the class of 2016. The Bulldogs remain optimistic about the rest of the season. “We just need to keep trusting our system and believe that we’re on the path towards success,” Zupon said. This weekend Yale will play its fourth and fifth games against a ranked opponent as No. 4 Mercyhurst University visits Ingalls Rink on Friday and Saturday. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Defender Jamie Gray ’13 tallied her first goal of the season and gave the Bulldogs their only goal in the third period of a 4–1 loss to Clarkson. ANNE-SOPHIE HARLING/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s team finished in seventh out of 37 teams, while the men’s team placed eighth out of 34 squads. CROSS COUNTRY FROM PAGE 12 Lunn, Alexander Conner ’16 and Demetri Goutos ’13 also scored for the Elis, placing 53rd, 59th and 70th, respectively. “I was very happy with how the meet went,” Lunn said. “We were able to end the season on a high note.” The women’s team began the day seeking to recover from a subpar fifth place finish at the Ivy League Championship. Led by Liana Epstein ’14, who covered the six-kilometer course in 20:42.9 and finished 25th overall, the squad placed third among Ivy League teams on Friday. Captain

Nihal Kayali ’13, Emily Stark ’16, Elizabeth Marvin ’13 and Caitlin Hudson ’13 closely followed Epstein in rounding out the Eli top five: They finished 42nd, 44th, 49th and 55th, respectively. “It was a much improved performance off of Heps,” women’s team head coach Amy Gosztyla said. “We definitely ended with a good, strong team performance.” Gosztyla, however, expressed disappointment that the team did not qualify for nationals with their performance. “It was definitely a bittersweet end to the season,” Kayali said. “Ultimately, as a team, [we] weren’t able to achieve a lot of the

goals we set at the beginning.” Because neither team qualified for the national championship meet, Friday’s race signified the end of the cross-country careers of 15 Eli seniors. The women’s team bade farewell to Jennifer Donnelly ’13, Jennifer Downing ’13, Tori Flannery ’13, Annelies Gamble ’13, Phoebe Gaston ’13, Jacque Sahlberg ’13, Hudson, Kayali and Marvin, while the men’s team said goodbye to Timothy Hillas ’13, Sam Kirtner ’13, Michael Pierce ’13, Matthew Twaites ’13, Goutos and Lunn. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

Yale falls to Harvard MEN’S SQUASH FROM PAGE 12 integral part of the team this year.” Against Harvard on Sunday, the Bulldogs had a tougher run, losing 5–4. Only three of the nine matches were won decisively in three sets. Rookies Sam Fenwick ’16 and Zachary Leman ’16 both held their own in their first collegiate tournament. Caine showed up to play this weekend, with two consecutive wins against top players helping solidify his status as a Division One squash player. He defeated Harvard’s Julian Kirby 3-2. “Eric Caine was outstanding,” team captain

Hywel Robinson ’13 said. “To pick up the win over Kirby of Harvard, who was a top national recruit, as a walk-on was one of the best wins I have ever seen.” Robinson has been added to the lineup this year at the No. 2 position after being out for a lengthy amount of time last season due to an injury. He says that the team is looking to increase its fitness levels and improve its racket skills. The Elis will resume competitive play Nov. 30 against Franklin and Marshall. Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu .

Swimming pulls out victory over Columbia SWIMMING FROM PAGE 12 led by a mere seven points going into the final event: the 400 freestyle relay. Yale’s top relay team of Cynthia Tsay ’13, Weaver, Callie Fosburgh ’16 and Molly Albrecht ’13 lagged behind Columbia after the first leg, but Weaver’s 51.35 split, the fastest of the event, put Yale ahead for good. Fosburgh increased the lead and Albrecht swam the anchor leg as the team hung on for a two-second margin of victory. The final score was 158–142. Weaver noted the importance of the team’s training for the meet, but she stressed that the contest was just the first of many. “We trained hard for it, but we treated it as just another dual meet,” she said. The freshmen performed particularly well for the Elis, oftentimes outpacing Columbia’s own freshmen and making an impact in every event. Eva Fabian ’16 and Fosburgh had impressive outings. Fabian placed first in both the 500- and 1000-yard freestyle, while Fosburgh won the 200-freestyle and produced the second fastest split in the deciding freestyle relay. In addition, the freshmen managed many second-, thirdand fourth-place finishes, winning the team additional points. “We won all of the close races,” Weaver said. “Even if it was a battle for fourth or fifth, we would push for fourth.” Other standouts included Alex Forrester ‘13, who won three events, and Molly Albrecht, who pulled out a narrow 0.01 second victory in the

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s team topped Columbia by a score of 170–140, and the women’s team prevailed 158–142 over the Lions. 200-yard backstroke. The men’s team also won 11 of their 16 events but produced a greater margin of victory than the Yale women. The Elis bested Columbia 170-140, prevailing over a rival that finished one place ahead of them at last year’s Ivy League championships. “We couldn’t have planned a better start to the season,” said

team captain Jared Lovett ’13. “We always want to beat Columbia.” Alwin Firmansyah ’15 and Andrew Heymann ’15 excelled for the men’s team, winning three events apiece. Firmansyah placed first in the 100- and 200-yard butterfly events and the 100-yard freestyle. Heymann won the 100- and 200-

yard breaststroke, as well as the 200-yard individual medley, each time finishing just ahead of a Columbia swimmer. Firmansyah pointed to his mental preparation and focus as keys in his success. “[Head coach Tim Wise] did a great job at teaching us the right mindset,” he said. “I guess it was confidence. It really is a mental

sport.” The sophomores’ performances did not go unnoticed by Lovett, who said that the two have elevated their swimming to a new level this season. He also stressed the importance of maintaining focus through the rest of the season. “I’ll do everything I can to keep the team focused and

enthusiastic about the prospect of what we can accomplish this season,” he said. “We have the personnel, we just have to get after it.” The Bulldogs head to Boston on Friday for a three-day invitational at Boston University. Contact DIONIS JAHJAGA at dionis.jahjaga@yale.edu .


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

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IVY LEAGUE LASTNAME FIRSTNAME SOCCER ’## HEADLINE BROWN CORNELL, HEADLINE EARN NCAA BIDS Text Ivy The textLeague text text champion text textBig textRed textwill text text. Text host Syracuse text text in atext first-round text textontext— Thurstext text day. Brown text received text textantext at-large text text bid text and textvisit will textDrexel text text ontext Thursday text text fortext its firsttext text text round game. text Both text text the text Bears text and text thetext text text text Dragons weretext among text the textlast textteams text text text text picked totext participate text text.in the tournament.

THE GAME 2012 FIRSTNAME LASTNAME ’## HEADLINE HEADLINE HARVARD-YALE TICKETS AVAILABLE TextYale The text College text textCouncil text text sent textout text antext text. Text email Sunday text text nighttext announcing text text text— that text texttotext tickets Thetext Game textare text still text fortext saletext at textYale the textAthletics text text Ticket text text Office. text text Student text text texttickets section text text aretext available text text fortext $20text text each and text text student text text maytext purchase text text antext text text text additional guest textsection text text. ticket for $35.

NFL Tennessee 37 Miami 3

“Text text text text text “Typically…we swim text text text text much stronger in text the text texthalf. textWe text text second like the text text text text. comeback mentality.” FIRSTNAME LASTNAME JOAN WEAVER’## ’13 WOMEN’S SWIMMING YALE DAILY NEWS · TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

Men’s squash opens season BY ADLON ADAMS STAFF REPORTER Last weekend, the men’s squash team came in a close second against a heavily favored No. 3 Harvard squad at the Brady Squash Center.

MEN’S SQUASH

VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Bulldogs fought past two opponents, Dartmouth and Princeton, to face the Crimson in a preseason scrimmage hosted by Yale. Team members said the event aimed to help them get a feel for where they stand relative to the other Ivies. “The team played really well this weekend, and we are happy with such a positive start to the season,” Richard Dodd ’13 said. “Harvard was expected to roll over most teams this season, and it was great that we clearly demonstrated that we have the ability to beat them.” In the first day of play, the Elis took on Dartmouth, which ended its 2011-’12 season with a No. 5 national ranking, just below Yale’s No. 4. Yale came out victorious with an easy 6–3 win. Later in the afternoon, Yale went on to defeat the Princeton Tigers in a close 5–4 battle. Dodd had one of the more memorable matches, taking out last year’s AllAmerican Honorable Mention Samuel Kang in five sets. “We’ve been working extremely hard the past few months, and while there’s still a lot of work to do. The training this fall paid off in a lot of the matches this past weekend,” Eric Caine ’14 said. “The freshmen stepped up as well and proved that they will be an SEE MEN’S SQUASH PAGE 11

The men’s squash team began its season with victories against Dartmouth and Princeton.

Outshot Elis fall twice BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIUBTING REPORTER The women’s hockey team was outshot almost three-to-one this weekend in two losses that pushed the Bulldogs’ losing streak to five games.

BY DIONIS JAHJAGA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Bulldogs added another chapter to the Yale-Columbia rivalry with a win in both men’s and women’s swimming last weekend.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY The Elis (1–7–0, 1–5–0 ECAC) managed a scant 31 shots while their opponents combined for 86 in a 4–1 defeat at No. 3 Clarkson University on Friday and a 5–1 loss at St. Lawrence University the following day. “If we can be more disciplined and stay out of the penalty box, that should help us generate more shots,” defenseman Tara Tomimoto ’14 said. Goaltender Jaimie Leonoff ’15 recorded 77 saves over the weekend and has made at least 31 saves in each game this season. Against St. Lawrence, Tomimoto struck first for the Bulldogs only seven minutes into the first period to give Yale its first lead in the past three

Bulldogs sink Lions in first meet SWIMMING

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yale struggled to create scoring opportunities against No. 3 Clarkson and St. Lawrence and managed only 31 shots between the two contests this weekend. games. It was Tomimoto’s first tally of the season and her first goal in almost two years after missing the entire 2011-’12 season with a concussion. “It was great to score after being

injured for so long,” Tomimoto said. But St. Lawrence leveled the score before the frame ended and added

After both teams competed in successful scrimmages against Southern Connecticut State University, Lehigh University and Colgate University over the past month, the women’s team opened its season on Friday against the Lions and the men’s team took to the pool the following day. The women’s team won 11 of the 16 events overall, including the first

five events of the meet. Captain Joan Weaver ’13 said that the Elis overcame a tendency to start slowly and opened the meet with a strong effort. “Typically, we tend to back-half our meets — we swim much stronger in the second half,” she said. “We like the comeback mentality. This time we made a conscious effort to start strong and be ready at the start instead of waiting and playing catch-up.” Columbia and Yale split the next six events, before the Elis regained the advantage with first-place finishes in the 500-yard freestyle and 100-yard butterfly events. The Lions had hung close to the Bulldogs throughout the day, and Yale SEE SWIMMING PAGE 11

SEE WOMEN’S HOCKEY PAGE 11

XC ends with solid finish BY ALEX EPPLER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As the men’s cross country team toed the line at the NCAA Northeast Regional Championship meet last Friday, the team confronted a new challenge. While the Elis typically run in eight-kilometer races, the last meet of the season would also prove to be the longest at 10-kilometers. Though captain Kevin Lunn ’13 noted that the extra two kilometers added a degree of difficulty to the race, he added that the team ran a very solid race.

“On the whole, everyone just performed up to or over their potential for the day,” Lunn said. “There was nothing more we really could’ve done so it felt good to go out on a race like that.”

CROSS COUNTRY At Friday’s regional meet, both the men’s and women’s teams rebounded from a disappointing Ivy League Heptagonal Championship meet two weeks ago. The women’s team finished with a score of 215, seventh out

of 37 teams, while the men’s team placed eighth out of 34 squads with a score of 248 points. Running in the final race of the day, the men’s team put forth one of its strongest efforts of the season. Matthew Nussbaum ’15 paced the Bulldog squad, completing the 10-kilometer course in 31:02.9 en route to finishing 24th overall. He was followed by John McGowan ’15, who finished second on the squad for the first time this year and 42nd overall.

STAT OF THE DAY 170

SEE CROSS COUNTRY PAGE 11

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kevin Stang ’16 and Mike Lazris ’15 took the top two spots for the Bulldogs in the 200yard backstroke at Saturday’s home meet against Columbia.

The number of points Yale men’s swimming and diving team earned against Columbia last Saturday. The Bulldogs defeated the Lions 170-130.


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