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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 46 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

42 44

CROSS CAMPUS Get your game face on.

Tickets for the Harvard-Yale game on Nov. 17 will go on sale at 9 a.m. today and can be picked up at the Yale Athletics Ticket Office adjacent to the Payne Whitney Gymnasium. The Game tickets cost $20 for one discounted ticket and $35 for one full-price guest ticket, and will be distributed on a first-come, first-serve basis. Boola boola!

MEN’S HOCKEY IN SPLIT WEEKEND, ELIS BEAT HARVARD

MARIE ANTOINETTE

FALL SHOW

THROUGH THE LENS

Rep show paints portrait of historic queen, thoughts on democracy

JOHN MULANEY DELIVERS YALECENTRIC LAUGHS

Allie Krause ’14 records the best of campus Halloween celebrations

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 CULTURE

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 10 PHOTOGRAPHY

Elis clinch title

Indigo Blue closure weighed

VOLLEYBALL

BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER

But before you celebrate.

The Freshman Class Council is once again facing issues with its Harvard-Yale game T-shirt design. The proposed design, which featured the Harvard logo above the word “Cheaters,” has been rejected by the Yale Licensing Office based on Harvard’s criteria. The back of the shirt, which reads “Putting the ‘Veritas’ in ‘Lux et Veritas,’” may not need to change. New Jeremy Lin? Former Yale basketball captain and forward Reggie Willhite ’12 has been selected in the fifth round of the D-League draft by the Reno Bighorns. Last year, Willhite was named to the All-Ivy second team and was selected as the Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year, the first Yalie to earn that distinction. Bulldogs in need. Yale will continue to provide ice and discounted $5 hot lunches in Commons throughout the week for those still affected by Hurricane Sandy. In addition, the University has created a new link on the Emergency Management site that lets Yalies in need email in their emergency requests and be paired up with another member of the Yale community willing to help. Future leaders of the world, unite. Applications for retired

four-star general Stanley McChrystal’s “Leadership” seminar have been released and were emailed to students in the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs program on Friday morning. This will be the third year McChrystal offers the course, which received over 250 applications for 20 spots last year.

Breaking the habit. A recent study conducted by Yale School of Medicine researchers says young children who receive scratch-off lottery games as gifts are more likely to begin gambling earlier in life than those who do not. The research was based in part off a survey of more than 2,000 high schoolers in the state. Back in power. Most schools

are poised to reopen this week as the destruction left in Sandy’s wake begins to recede. New Haven counted fewer than 1,300 residential and business outages as of Sunday morning.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1946 Assistant Dean Richard Carroll praises Yalies for their voting enthusiasm. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Two weeks after the University ended its nine-year relationship with Indigo Blue — a nonprofit center for Buddhist life at Yale — students remain upset over its abrupt termination and the administration’s decision to cut ties with the program’s leader, former Buddhist Chaplain Bruce Blair ’81. Though University Chaplain Sharon Kugler met with students on Sunday to discuss potential programs to replace Indigo Blue, nearly half of them walked out in the middle of the conversation, expressing dissatisfaction with the way in which Yale has handled the situation. Both Kugler and Blair sent emails to students previously involved in Indigo Blue last Tuesday stating their desire to focus on providing adequate resources for Buddhist students in the program’s absence rather than reasons for the its end. Blair told the News Sunday that

YALE VOLLEYBALL TOOK DOWN PENN AND PRINCETON TO LOCK DOWN ITS THIRD STRAIGHT IVY TITLE PAGE B1

SEE INDIGO BLUE PAGE 4

Grad study spaces created BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER After graduate students complained about the lack of 24-hour workspaces, Graduate School Dean Thomas Pollard has worked to convert odd spaces across campus — including the Dean’s Suite in the Hall of Graduate Studies — into designated work areas. Continuing an initiative begun last year, Pollard has transformed roughly 2,000 square feet of classrooms, office space and other areas into work and study spots for humanities and social science graduate students. These changes followed a Graduate Student Assembly survey conducted in the 2010-’11 academic year that alerted Pollard to the lack of 24-hour study space, collaborative workspace and rooms in which to meet with undergraduates. Though the newly created study spaces have helped

several large departments, including English and History, Pollard is still working to accommodate the needs of students in other departments like Philosophy. “I am surprised that no one tried to fix this obvious problem in the past,” Pollard said. “I think that we have made good progress, but I consider the success to date only to be a down payment on what actually needs to be done in the future.” Dean Plummer, who assisted Pollard with the initiative, said the search for new work-

which are already occupied. He and Pollard converted parts of the Graduate School Admissions Office into classrooms, freeing up actual classrooms near departments for use as study spaces. They also converted the suite of bedrooms in the Hall of Graduate Studies traditionally reserved for the Graduate School dean into workspaces for history graduate students. Additionally, Plummer and Pollard worked to increase keycard access to preexisting areas, including the faculty room in LC for English graduate students and provide DEAN PLUMMER

Graduate students can now enjoy the nearly 200,000 square feet of newly completed 24-hour workspaces. places is challenging, since the Dean’s Office is unable to create new spaces but must instead work within the parameters of areas already designated for the Graduate School, many of

24-hour access to rooms in 451 College St. for religious studies and comparative literature students.

South Asians celebrate culture BY COLLEEN FLYNN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Nearly 1,100 people filled Woolsey Hall on Friday night to see a colorful celebration of South Asian dance, music and even a live episode of Yale’s own “Indian Idol.” Roshni is the largest event put on by Yale’s South Asian Society (SAS) in the fall semester, with 11 performances ranging from Nepali ethnic dance to South Asian a cappella music by Sur et Veritaal. Since Roshni began in 2002, it has evolved from drawing small crowds in Battell Chapel to celebrating its second year in Woolsey Hall this past Friday. And to SAS President Anjali Ambani ’14, Roshni is a particularly important event for SAS

because it demonstrates that the South Asian community is indeed a significant population at Yale with its own identity. “We’re trying to figure out how to make the Asian stereotype less East Asian,” she said, noting the diversity of the Asian-American population. SAS Vice-President Bibhusha Dangol ’14 said she feels that the Asian American Cultural Center represents more East Asian groups, which are much more common at Yale. Ambani described SAS as important due to the common experience of South Asians, both from America and abroad. “I’m from Nepal and I think that having SAS gives me a place SEE ROSHNI PAGE 5

SEE STUDY SPACES PAGE 5

Parents seek schooling BY MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER Over the weekend, New Haven educated an inaugural class of parents with the launch of the city’s latest school reform initiative — Parent University. Designed to teach parents how to help their children succeed in school, Parent University offers workshops and educational resources for parents of New Haven public school children. On Saturday, Gateway Community Col-

lege hosted the program’s first event, which included more than 35 classes ranging from college preparation to child development. Event coordinators said they were pleased with the program’s turnout, which drew approximately 300 registered attendees. Organizers added that only standing room was available for some of the most popular classes. Parent University is expected to continue throughout the year, hosting smaller functions in local neighborhoods and another city-wide event in the

spring. “Parents are our first and most important teachers. Parent engagement is vital to the success of our students and for New Haven School Change,” Mayor John DeStefano Jr. said. “Today’s Parent University is part of what will be a broad and sustained effort to engage parents and to provide all families the tools and support they need to help their children succeed.” Organizers said Parent University workshops were SEE PARENT SCHOOL PAGE 4

PHILIPP ARNDT/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

MonstRAASity, a Raas/Garba dance team, was one of the groups featured at Roshni on Friday. The event drew an audience of over 1,100.


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “By simply checking every box with (D) or (R) next to it, we perpetuate yaledailynews.com/opinion

Don’t forget the search I

n September, the search for Yale’s next president was the hot topic. We read about it in the News and debated it in dining halls. Come October, our interest waned. The Corporation stopped emailing and students stopped caring. Now, you almost never hear someone discuss the search process or predict whom the trustees will pick. This short attention span is troubling. Our community has abandoned a once-in-twodecades chance to discuss how we should govern the University and what its very purpose is. In some regards, Yale’s attention deficit is not surprising. We live in an American culture captivated by the shallow 24-hour media culture. Yale can do better. Our ivory towers are supposedly the last bastion of deep thinking, a place of complex ideas and rigorous thought. Our community should have the patience to sustain a public conversation about the search for more than a month. It’s easy to ask why we should care. The Corporation will choose the next president in a few months. What is to be gained from rehashing a moot point? Today, our input matters little, even less than it did a month ago. Yes, our input won’t sway the process, at least not at this point. But when we talk about who we want to replace Levin, when we talk about the ideal Yale president and when we each talk about our own vision for the University — we broach larger conversations too often avoided. And having those conversations may very well influence the priorities and actions of Yale’s next president, regardless of who he or she may be. Pick just one topic inherent in the debate over the presidential search: the role of higher education, and specifically Yale, in America. Contrast, for instance, Kingman Brewster’s moral leadership in the turbulent 1970s with current University President Richard Levin’s reluctance to articulate his own values over the course of his tenure. Brewster’s speeches reverberated around the country; they provided not just Yale, but America with a moral vision. And Brewster surrounded himself with likeminded men, from civil rights activist and University Chaplain William Sloan Coffin, Jr. ’50 to corporation member John Lindsay ’44, the thenmayor of New York. In contrast, President Levin, along with much of his administration, stays out of the public limelight, both at Yale and nationally (though the recent

public discussions he chaired on economics and the election are a notable exception NATHANIEL and, from point of ZELINSKY my view, very welcome). On point W h e n we debate whether we want a Brewster or a Levin, we debate the purpose of a place like Yale. Are we simply a business (albeit, a unique one) bent on offering products called education and research? Or are universities more than that? Are they the moral and intellectual core of a society, with a responsibility to guide our nation? What is holding Yale back from having these conversations? In addition to our short attention span, two other factors come into play.

MANAGING EDITORS Gavan Gideon Mason Kroll

SPORTS Eugena Jung John Sullivan

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The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2014. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

O

n Nov. 4, 2008, I crowded into Grant Park alongside 240,000 other entranced Americans to watch the newly elected Barack Obama give his victory speech. As results from the last couple of states came in, we passed the time by singing “Solidarity Forever” and jumping up and down to get a good view of Michelle’s newest dress. We knew we had won hours before the official outcome was announced. The excitement pulsing through the crowd was electrifying. All of the hard work each and every one of us had put into the Obama campaign had finally paid off. Yes we could, and yes we did. The country was finally going to change. I won’t be in Chicago this year on Election Night. President Obama won’t be giving a speech to hundreds of thousands of people who have been standing outside for hours. Instead, he’ll be speaking at an indoor event with 10,000 ticket-holding attendees. It will be a very different picture. Elections were an important part of my childhood. I made signs for Ralph Nader in my firstgrade classroom in 2000, and I crossed my fingers in front of the

TV on Election Night in 2004 to no avail. But in 2008, I fell in love with a candidate. I campaigned in Indiana on the weekends — even when cranky voters told me I couldn’t have formed real opinions at age 14. I stayed up late at night reading every article, re-watching every debate and Saturday Night Live sketch. I watched the “Yes We Can” video so many times that I pretty much memorized it, and I was jealous that I hadn’t come up with the Obama Girl idea first. When Election Day rolled around, I hated the fact that I hadn’t been born just three years earlier so that I could cast a vote for Barack. I consoled myself with the thought that in four years I could re-elect him. I’ll be walking to the New Haven Public Library tomorrow to vote for President Obama, but I’m not nearly as excited about it as I thought I would be four years ago. I haven’t done one bit of campaign work for him this year, instead choosing to spend my time working on the Chris Murphy senatorial campaign. Obviously I want the president to win, but I can’t imagine having the same feeling of elation about his

victory tomorrow night as I did in 2008. It’s a typical story. And it really shouldn’t be. We all got excited about Obama because, for once, the election wasn’t one where you picked the lesser of two evils. Young voters didn’t vote for Obama out of a dislike for John McCain. They voted for him because they wanted him to be their president. After watching the country’s politics shift farther and farther to the right, people were ready for a change. I’ll admit it — I held Obama to almost impossible standards. We all did. We wanted him to be the answer to all of our problems, when really he was just a mainstream Democrat with a cool team of celebrities and social networking sites. Obama has, by normal standards, been a pretty good president. He repealed “don’t ask, don’t tell,” got a version of health care reform through a difficult Congress and started to get America back on its feet after the eight Bush years. But he could’ve done so much more. Maybe Obama is a moderate at heart and we just didn’t know it at the time. But the hundreds of thousands of people cheering in

Grant Park the night he won the presidency were not moderates. They wanted universal healthcare, they wanted out of the Middle East, they wanted an end to tax breaks for the rich and they wanted affordable higher education. Even if Obama wanted to walk the middle-of-theroad, “bipartisan” line, it wasn’t what the people who dedicated months or years of their lives to his campaign wanted him to do. He let those people down. This year, those dedicated supporters from four years ago are grudgingly standing by his side, if they’re even there at all. He has four years to turn that around though, I believe. Without the looming threat of reelection, maybe he’ll finally be the candidate we all wanted four years ago. Or maybe I’m just being a naïve optimist again. “But in the unlikely story that is America, there has never been anything false about hope.” Obama told us this in January of 2008. Now it’s time for him to show us the truth in those words. DIANA ROSEN is a freshman in Pierson College. Contact her at diana.rosen@yale.edu .

GUE ST COLUMNIST HANNAH MOGUL -ADLIN

Harm and consent I

am tired of hearing that I am immoral. It’s never said directly, just constantly insinuated by those hoping to frame the discussion as one in which I am always deviant, forever barred from the moral high ground. “Homosexuality is threatening the moral fabric of our society.” “Those liberals with their moral relativism.” “Atheists can’t have morals.” No, actually, I have a pretty rock-solid moral framework. My atheism and my queerness together inform a morality that is, at its core, based in harm reduction and consent. It’s not relative, it’s not arbitrary and I am willing to bet that a society woven from my moral fabric would be a lot happier and more productive than one that spends its energies trying to deduce how millenniaold instructions should be implemented in modern public policy, contrary to evidence ranging from cognitive science to teen pregnancy rates. I value evidence over belief because my community has been one of many persecuted by blind belief masquerading as virtuousness. Question: Is a politician who

uses her religion to justify policies that have been driving queer high schoolers to commit suicide acting morally? And if you find that the fault lies in her interpretation of her religion, why is your interpretation is better, more correct, more moral? Is it because you perhaps find something objectively wrong with driving teenagers to suicide as a matter of public policy? It’s quite possible to get to the same position without a belief in God, and it’s only with a belief in God that one can tenably hold the position that such a policy is moral. No, religion is not inherently moral, as victims of witch-burnings, caste systems, stonings, genocide and colonialism should remind us. Religion is dangerously divorced from reality, and observing reality is the only means we have to assess what harms are being done, to whom and in what context. In judging morality through a rational, evidencebased framework, rather than the self-contradictory and mutable frameworks provided by religion, what emerges is the fundamental importance of human dignity. Respect for human dignity is

manifested in our interpersonal relationships as consent. Consent is the cornerstone of any credible morality, and not just in the context of sexuality. More broadly applied, consent implies respecting the autonomy and agency of all people, respecting their right to participate in the decisions that affect their lives and judging policies and actions that would limit their autonomy or agency as immoral except when necessary to protect the autonomy and agency of others. These, of course, are some of the fundamental principles on which this country was founded, and unfortunately, they have never been fully realized. And they will continue to be realized only for the most privileged and elite of our society until we fully and completely reject irrational, arbitrary and faith-based moral frameworks in favor of those which protect the dignity of everyone, including those outside of the norm of white heterosexual cis male Christianity. Both queerness and atheism, as political positions, reflect the process of relentlessly questioning society’s assumptions, and so

rejection of the supernatural and of heteronormativity go hand in hand — both are constructs that seek to control human behavior and limit our possibilities. The only limits that are important are those that prevent actual harm to others. Neither my atheism nor my queerness are indicators of a lack of morality — on the contrary, they both affirm that morality is not relative to the instructions given by authority, but absolute: based on consent and the harm done to others. No one basing morality on religion, defined by its lack of evidence, gets to have a discursive monopoly on morality. Slippery slope arguments favored by religious conservatives are meaningless within a framework based on consent. If someone can’t see a bright, clear line between homosexuality and pedophilia, between uninhibited female sexuality and rape culture, it’s their moral framework that needs a checkup, not mine. HANNAH MOGUL-ADLIN is a senior in Trumbull College. Contact her at hannah.mogul-adlin@yale.edu .

GUE ST COLUMNIST HARVEY XIA

The misconception about philosophy

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NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .

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'MEEP15' ON 'THINK BEFORE YOU VOTE'

GUE ST COLUMNIST DIANA ROSEN

DO WE WANT A BREWSTER OR A LEVIN? First, we lack the vocabulary. Most students and faculty don’t know about Yale history or the history of higher education in America. We don’t know about the Yale Report of 1828 or the Harvard Red Book, to name just two important documents in the field of university history. Without facts or precedent, it’s difficult to discuss much of anything. Second, we lack the mechanisms to have conversations. Sure, we have dining halls, where most serious Yale discussion happen. But we often self-segregate, choosing to talk to people with the same opinion. In an ideal world, every freshman would take a class on the purpose of higher education, with a smattering of Yale history and traditions thrown in. In addition to facilitating these conversations, such a class would impact how students approach their four years at Yale. Admittedly, this utopian curriculum is likely a pipe dream. Instead, we can only hope that the Yalies will once regain interest in the presidential search and, in the process, ask crucial questions about the nature of the university.

partisan politics”

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission. Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Marissa Medansky and Dan Stein Opinion Editors Yale Daily News opinion@yaledailynews.com

COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 46

D

uring a zip-lining trip last summer, my tour guide chatted with me as he readied my gear, and asked the question college students hear so often: “What are you majoring in?” I told him I wasn’t sure, but I was seriously thinking about philosophy. “Oh come on!” he said, chuckling. “Are you just doing that for the chicks?” This is one of many off-putting responses I get when I tell people I’m interested in being a philosophy major. Some people caution me, saying that philosophy is impractical and doesn’t lead to any decent jobs. Other people express a veiled disgust, implying that philosophy is a useless and selfindulgent amusement. Sometimes when I tell my friends that I have to write a difficult philosophy paper, they say, “Psht, you can easily write anything for those.” Among all of these reactions is the common misconception that philosophy is somehow an illegitimate — or, at least, less legitimate — area of academic study. I find this ironic because philosophy is one of the most important and influential fields; just look at history. But, in responding to these mistaken views, I think it is better

to first clarify what studying philosophy actually means. Philosophers are not self-entitled dilettantes who play intellectual games from the comfort of their armchairs. Philosophers are not eccentric idealists who have hopelessly lost touch with reality. I assume philosophy has a bad name partly because the public generally sees philosophy as defined by crazy, abstract ideas not grounded in immediate reality. Yes, some of these ideas are a part of philosophy, but they are not its focus. Philosophers specialize in how to think more than what to think. I rarely complete a philosophy course or finish a philosophical book feeling like I have learned any hard facts — unlike I feel after a science course. Instead, I gain an understanding of how and why this philosopher argued this specific idea in this specific way. It’s the how and the why that matter the most in philosophy. Contrary to popular belief, there is no room for nonsense in real philosophy. Essays must be highly analytic: before advancing original claims, one must demonstrate that he understands the idea he is responding to. This involves taking apart the text piece by

piece and unraveling the underlying logical structure. It involves resolving obscurities and making controlled inferences. Philosophy does not provide an opportunity to say whatever you want, arguing using random, subjective ideas. It is a process that demands careful, disciplined thinking: one in which you often spend more time thinking about what to say than actually saying it. I met with Shelly Kagan my first week here and talked with him about free will. I thought I was well-prepared: I had read the books, watched the lectures and thoroughly thought about the ideas myself. But everything fell apart in my mind when I started chatting with Shelly. He took apart my assumptions, exposed the flaws in my arguments and showed me how I was philosophizing with a bad approach. This came as a shock because I had consciously tried to avoid all of the above. But I was also inspired because I experienced firsthand how serious Yale’s Philosophy Department, and philosophy in general, is — how philosophers hold themselves and their students to such high intellectual standards. Philosophy underlies every academic discipline — the com-

plete opposite of what many think. I encounter explicit mentions of philosophy in all of my other classes. My chemistry professor often brings up Occam’s razor and a priori knowledge. My English professor uses the Greek topoi, or generative questions, as a way to direct our writing. My biology professor connects physiological concepts about life to a grander picture of humans as subjects to the physical laws of the universe. Being a philosopher means having the ability to apply philosophical methods and ideas to other fields. It means having the intellectual pragmatism to bring ideas out of the abstract realm and into the real world. Philosophy doesn’t just exist in its own separate sphere, apart from everything else. So, the answer is no: I’m not just interested in philosophy to impress girls. I’m not just interested in philosophy because it’s an easy major to breeze through. I’m interested in philosophy because I want to sharpen my intellectual skills, make a significant impact on the world and most importantly, simply because I love it. HARVEY XIA is a freshman in Berkeley College. Contact him at harvey.xia@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“I have seen all, I have heard all, I have forgotten all.” MARIE ANTOINETTE QUEEN OF FRANCE

CORRECTION FRIDAY, NOV. 2

Due to an editing error, the article “Candidates campaign unopposed” misstated the number of registered Democrats in Connecticut.

Fall Show draws laughs

SARA MILLER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale hosts women’s conference BY HANNAH SCHWARZ CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Last Saturday, speakers at the Women in Leadership Conference encouraged women to achieve success in their careers so that work environments become more conducive to raising families. Roughly 300 Yale students came to the Sterling Law Auditorium to attend the conference, an annual event hosted by Yale’s Women’s Leadership Initiative. The conference included three keynote speakers — Anne-Marie Slaughter, former head of policy for the State Department; Marie Wilson, founder of the White House Project; and Jennifer Holleran, executive director of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s nonprofit Startup: Education — and 12 profession-specific panels on government, finance, law, marketing, STEM and media. Slaughter’s address focused on ways in which women can use their strengths to become effective leaders. “Women are really good at bringing many disparate things together and multitasking,” she said. “We are great connectors, and [we’re] very good at standing up for [our] values.” Women are more likely to advocate for intervention in Libya, and they primarily work on societal and humanitarian issues within the State Department, she said, adding that the causes dominated by women are those that will ultimately solve international conflict. Slaughter also discussed her wellknown article called “Why Women Still Can’t Have it All” that ran in the July/ August issue of the Atlantic Monthly and said she hoped to spark conversation about the next wave of feminism, which she thinks should focus on maintaining both a demanding career as well as a family. In her speech, she also advocated for employers offering paid family leave as an essential change for the United States and said because the next generation of women will live longer, they should take the time to enjoy having a family, while also aiming for a successful career. Slaughter said that before making the decision to leave the State Department to spend more time with her family, she “could not have predicted that [she] would

HANNAH SCHWARZ/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Anne-Marie Slaughter, former head of policy for the State Department, spoke on Saturday about how women can become more successful leaders. say no to a chance to go to a higher position [within the State Department].” She added that the hardest aspect of leaving was acknowledging to herself that she “wanted to be home.” To become strong leaders, Holleran said, women must be clear about their home and work priorities while finding ways to connect informally on a regular basis with other smart women. She added that she does not allow herself to be away from her home and three-year-old twins for more than a “certain” number of days at a time. Wilson said women who pursue creative and ambitious ideas will often find their ideas shot down. “If you’re a hopeful person, you’re going to attract discouragement,” she said. “If you’re doing amazing things, you’re going to attract despair.” Nancy Yao Maasbach, executive direc-

tor of the Yale-China Association, spoke in the “Women in the World” panel and said past generations of women did not have as many international career opportunities. Cheryl Doss, another panelist and senior lecturer in economics and global affairs, said she often sees students struggling with “how to be successful and have a life.” “Who you marry matters,” she added. Lucia Huang ’14, president of the Women’s Leadership Initiative at Yale, said she overheard “great” conversations between attendees and panelists after the events. Last weekend’s conference marks the fifth annual Women in Leadership Conference that Yale’s Women’s Leadership Initiative has hosted. Contact HANNAH SCHWARZ at hannah.schwarz@yale.edu .

Stand-up comedian John Mulaney headlined at this year’s Fall Comedy Show. BY ISAAC STANLEY-BECKER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When stand-up comedian and writer John Mulaney took the stage at Saturday’s Fall Comedy Show, he quickly informed audience members that he was afraid of them. “When I think of Yale, I really just picture a bunch of William Howard Tafts walking around,” he explained. “That’s pretty intimidating.” Mulaney, whose parents both attended Yale Law School and whose sister attended Yale College, used his knowledge of the University to tailor his jokes to Yale, quipping about the YaleHarvard rivalry and his parents’ memories of Bill Clinton LAW ’73. The Fall Comedy Show, sponsored by the Yale College Council, drew over 700 attendees to Woolsey Hall and began with performances by Ryan Bowers ’14 and Shon Arieh-Lerer ’14, the two winners of the YCC’s Last Comic Standing competition. Students interviewed said they appreciated Mulaney’s Yalespecific humor, and Mulaney explained in an interview with the News that he always tries to tailor his material to his audience. “I like to acknowledge where I am,” Mulaney said. “Especially at a place like a college, where I walk in thinking, ‘This’ll be fun. These are sharp, smart young people’ — to me, Yale seems really smart and sly.” Mulaney writes frequently for Saturday Night Live and has performed on Comedy Central, Late Night with Conan O’Brien and Jimmy Kimmel Live. In 2010, Mulaney spoke at a Master’s Tea, joking Saturday about the title “Master’s Tea” for including “two of the most terrifying words I can think of. We got rid of masters in America a long time ago.” Mulaney’s set also included a joke detailing when his Yahoo! email account was hacked, resulting in a spam email to his entire contact list. The email included a link to a website advertising “herbal Viagra,” he said, adding that the link was so long and complicated that it “looked like the HIV virus written out.” In an unscripted portion of his performance, Mulaney walked over to two pairs of female underwear that had been thrown from the audience at student comedian Arieh-Lerer, whose performance parodied a German drill sergeant teaching a humor seminar.

“When a female fan throws underwear at you, aren’t you supposed to take it?” Mulaney asked the audience. YCC President John Gonzalez ’14 said turnout was down from last year’s Fall Comedy Show, but that last year’s problems with the sound system were fixed on Saturday. Gonzalez added that Mulaney’s improvisation gave energy to his routine.

I like to acknowledge where I am, especially at a place like a college ... To me, Yale seems really smart and sly. JOHN MULANEY Stand-up comedian “I loved that he had a full-on conversation with a student sitting in the first row,” he said. “He asked him about his major and what he wanted to do and then was able to make jokes about Australian news correspondents. He was such an engaging guy, even without being offensive.” Students interviewed said they enjoyed Mulaney’s performance because it centered around Yale. Clara Sachsse ’13 said she is familiar with Mulaney’s material, but that his jokes on Saturday night were all new to her. “I’m so glad it was new because I’ve heard all his old stuff,” she said. “And I loved that he was able to make so many of the jokes relate to Yale.” Beth Labossiere ’14 agreed and called the Master’s Tea joke “spot-on.” Though several students in the first few rows were drinking from a flask during the show, neither Gonzalez nor YCC events coordinator Bryan Epps ’14 said they witnessed students drinking. “I wasn’t aware of that,” Epps said. “We hired Contemporary Services Corporation to help check people in and make sure people were disposing of liquids. We do the best we can, but people are inevitably going to sneak something in.” Mulaney has released two stand-up comedy albums, 2009’s “The Top Part” and 2012’s “New in Town.” Contact ISAAC STANLEYBECKER at isaac.stanley-becker@yale.edu .

At Rep, a nuanced ‘Antoinette’ BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER “America is a doomed experiment,” declares Marie Antoinette in a new play at the Yale Repertory Theatre by award winning playwright David Adjmi. The show, which opened at the Rep on Oct. 26 and will run through Nov. 17, creates an intimate psychological portrait of the French queen, while using her narrative to explore questions about the nature of democracy, sovereignty and power, said director Rebecca Taichman DRA ’01. The show is both a world premiere and the first ever co-production between the Yale Rep and Harvard’s American Repertory Theater, where it ran from Sept. 1 to Sept. 29 before coming to New Haven. In moving to New Haven, however, the play has adjusted to reflect more consistently its dark themes. While based in historical fact, Adjmi said “Marie Antoinette” is an intensely personal interpretation of the title character. Because the play’s events unfold entirely through the eyes of Antoinette, the play changes in tone, genre and style as she goes through “psychic shifts,” Adjmi explained. “Antoinette” has also changed significantly since its run in Cambridge, Taichman said, explaining

JOAN MARCUS/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

“Marie Antoinette,” by award-winning playwright David Adjmi, will run at the Yale Repertory Theatre until Nov. 17 .

that the production team treated Yale’s show as a chance to look at the play anew rather than as a mere continuation of the A.R.T.’s production. “We changed really 50 percent of the show,” Taichman said. “There was such a sense of dynamism … in terms of people completely mining it and looking at it with fresh eyes.” While the Rep’s production retained nearly the entire cast of the original, actress Marin Ireland replaced Brooke Bloom in the title role. The change in leading lady altered the show’s blocking — the way actors move within the performance space — to realign with the “very different instincts” Ireland brought to the show, Adjmi said. The radical difference in venue at Yale also gives the Rep’s production a different feel, said actress Hannah Cabell, who plays the roles of Yolande de Polignac and Mrs. Sauce. At the A.R.T., the team performed in a house with 1,200 seats rather than the Yale Rep’s 487, making audiences at the Rep feel that they were seeing a “spectacle” while remaining removed from what was happening onstage, she said. “There they were watching a doll house … [At the Yale Rep] they seem to feel much more involved in the play, like they’re inside the doll house with us,” Cabell said. Adjmi explained that the team also made significant, more intentional adjustments to the staging of the show, both to streamline the storytelling and to change subtly the tone of the story being told. The largest of these changes was the elimination of a “raucous, ribald” dance number featuring Marie and her courtiers dancing in bikinis and feather headdresses to contemporary pop music, said actor David Greenspan, who plays the sheep. This change contributed to an overall effort to humanize characters who had seemed “much more cartoony” at the A.R.T. and to emphasize the show’s darker, human story, Taichman said. At the A.R.T., Antoinette went through several prolonged, performative costume changes that made her “seem very partygirlish in a very obvious way,” Adjmi said. Now the number of onstage costume changes has been pared down, and the ones that remain are performed with feverish rapidity. Speeding up the show’s pacing helps to portray Antoinette’s “sense of dislocation, the speed with which she has to invent herself over and over again,” Adjmi explained. Cabell agreed that this modification intensifies the experience of seeing the play. “It doesn’t let you off the train once you’re on it,” she said. “The momentum starts, and it just keeps driving.” In eliminating some emphasis on

Antoinette’s frivolity, the Yale production “trusts the play a little bit more to do its own work,” Taichman said, adding that this tonal shift brings the show’s two acts together into “a coherent event.” Antoinette’s feeling of “asphyxiation” is what forms the emotional core of the show, she said. “[The Yale production] has strains of sadness in it earlier now than it did before,” Taichman said.

[The show] doesn’t let you off the train once you’re on it. The momentum starts, and it just keeps driving. HANNAH CABELL Actress Though “Antoinette” is an exploration of freedom in all its kinds, ranging from emotional and political to “wild, Dionysian” freedom, the show is ultimately about the queen’s own entrapment in the face of so many forces she cannot control, Adjmi said. In the course of the play Antoinette declares that people are not sovereign and fundamentally unable to govern themselves, a claim that is particularly resonant this election season, Taichman said. “I was really thinking about the efficacy of democracy,” Adjmi said. “It’s a question I still have.” Adjmi explained that the play is struggling to forge a relationship between “personal … existential” freedom and the kind of freedom possible within the political structures it examines. The Yale production in particular is running right alongside the lead up and immediate aftermath of tomorrow’s election, which Greenspan said makes the play’s political themes especially resonant with audiences. Adjmi wrote the play in 2007 before the “Occupy Wall Street” movement emerged. But audiences viewing the show this year already have “a really concrete vocabulary for this idea of the 99 percent and the one percent,” Taichman said. “It’s a lens through which people can watch it … we’re participating in a larger dialogue.” Taichman added that she hopes the play spurs conversation as people decide how to vote tomorrow. Rebecca Taichman staged the world premiere of Adjmi’s play “The Evildoers” at the Yale Rep in 2008. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012· yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Students upset over chapel’s closure INDIGO BLUE FROM PAGE 1 he still will not discuss reasons behind the decision but that he hopes to work with the University to address the new programs and potentially re-establish a relationship in the future. “[Not disclosing the reasons] provides an opportunity to resolve the issues, [and] the relationship be restored in some fashion,” Blair said. Blair said he hopes to help address the current problems resulting from the program’s end — including the significant effect it has had on the Buddhist student community at Yale. The University abruptly cut ties with Indigo Blue and former Chaplain Bruce Blair on Sunday, Oct. 21, without disclosing any specifics surrounding the decision. He said he does not want the program’s closure to fall victim to “politics” or excessive speculation. While he initially refrained from making a statement following the termination of Indigo Blue, Blair said he sent the email on Tuesday to address student confusion because he “felt like [his] silence was exacerbating things.”

TIMELINE INDIGO BLUE FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 The last Stillness & Light is held in Battell Chapel. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21 Bruce Blair is notified that the University is terminating its relationship with Indigo Blue. University Chaplain Kugler begins to inform students in individual meetings. SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28 The Buddhist shrine in Branford’s Harkness Tower is dismantled. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30 Kugler and Blair both send emails to Yale’s Buddhist community explaining the closure of Indigo Blue. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 Blair hosts Indigo Blue’s regular “Fellowship in the Round” session at his house and invites Yale students. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4 Students meet with Kugler to discuss Buddhist life at Yale moving forward.

At Sunday’s meeting, which was the first of three planned meetings between students and Kugler, students brought up concerns about the need for a new Buddhist shrine and their desire for a program with space for quiet contemplation — similar to Indigo Blue’s Stillness & Light, said attendee Geoffrey Liu MED ’15. The Buddhist Chapel, which was formerly housed in the Branford Memorial Room in Harkness Tower and renovated at the end of last semester, was closed and dismantled following Indigo Blue’s cancellation. The meeting was capped at 20 students, six of whom were Chaplain’s Office peer liaisons, and five to seven students were turned away, as was Bruce Blair’s

If the allegations are so serious, the response … should not have been the one that it was. GEOFFREY LIU MED ’15 son Nate Blair. Roughly halfway into the meeting, eight students walked out citing dissatisfaction with the way in which administrators listened to student concerns, Liu said. Liu said that in the discussion, Kugler stated that she refused to discuss the dismissal of Blair or reasons behind the termination of Indigo Blue, but explained that she did not initially inform students about Blair’s departure because she wanted to tell Blair himself first. Kugler also raised the possibility of hiring a new Buddhist chaplain, said attendee Simon Song ’15, but she stated that the budget would only allow such a position to be part time, or 15 to 18 hours per week. Patrick Cage ’14, another attendee, said Kugler told them she would consider restoring Branford Chapel as a shrine but that she expected that hours would be restricted and that other groups would be granted rights to the space. He added that Kugler accommodated suggestions to establish a student-run version of Stillness & Light, but she said such a program could not run beyond midnight for security reasons. Kugler deferred comment to University Spokesman Tom Conroy, who said he would not comment beyond saying “the Chaplain’s Office has ended its arrangement with [Blair] and his organization.”

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite a Sunday meeting arranged by the Chaplain’s Office, students remain upset at the decision to terminate Yale’s relationship with Indigo Blue. According to Liu, Simon Song ’14, who was the first to leave the meeting, said during the meeting that he could not remain present and watch Buddhist students get increasingly upset at the tone of the meeting. “The University has a different understanding of what is going on,” Song said. “We don’t feel the sincerity of the Chaplain’s Office to address student concerns.” Despite the efforts made by administrators to facilitate a smooth transition after Bruce Blair’s departure, students said they are still upset at the abrupt-

ness and secrecy surrounding the decision. Kerri Lu ’14, a student who attended many Indigo Blue events, said he has spoken with many other students involved in the program, but he has never heard of students having negative experiences with the former chaplain. But four students interviewed said that they experienced negative interactions with Blair that caused them to stop attending Indigo Blue programs. Shon Arieh-Lerer ’14, who attended several Indigo Blue

activities his freshman year, said that after he accidentally set off an alarm in Harkness Tower one night, Bruce Blair yelled at him and used offensive language. Arieh-Lerer said that after approaching Blair several times following the incident, Blair eventually refused to speak to him again. “He kind of turned me off of Buddhism, ironically,” he said. “I felt like what he was doing was trying to test my faith … like a cult leader.” Julia Schlesinger ’15, a student formerly involved with Indigo

Blue, said she believes Bruce Blair genuinely helped many students but that his “eccentric approach” may occasionally hurt sensitive students. Friends of Indigo Blue, an organization started by students and alumni to support each other and request response from administrators, currently has 150 members on its panlist and 30 submissions of personal experiences with Indigo Blue. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

Parent University begins PARENT SCHOOL FROM PAGE 1 designed to help parents improve their own lives and the lives of their children. Classes focusing on students included, “How to Read with Your Child,” “Cyber Bullying and Social Networking” and “Success in Science,” while classes designated for parental improvement included “Parent Success Plan” and “Employment Marketing Profile.” Susan Weisselberg, chief of Wraparound Services, which provides social and emotional counseling for students enrolled in New Haven’s public school system, said the parental evaluations collected at the end of workshops were “very positive”. “People are very energized and excited by the event, which makes it very fulfilling,” Weisselberg said. Abbe Smith, director of communications for New Haven public schools, said many of the most popular classes were ones that addressed child development and college planning. During “College Planning 101,” for example, parents learned how to apply for financial aid. Lisa Pressey, the parent of a New Haven eighthgrader, said she attended Parent University to learn about the New Haven Promise scholarship. She called Promise “empowering” and said Parent University exceeded her expectations. The class titled “Addressing the Needs of Urban Boys” garnered a lively discussion about the challenges of raising boys in the city. Brett Rayford, director of

adolescent and juvenile services for the Department of Children and Families, spoke about how to help boys navigate career paths, deal with the loss of a father and build interest in education.

It is not cool to be smart, and we’ve got to change that. BRETT RAYFORD Director of adolescent and juvenile services, Department of Children and Families While workshops covered a broad spectrum of topics, parents attending the event often questioned how to apply class strategies to their own lives. One parent raised her hand and said it was hard to get urban boys interested in education because boys who do well in school are ridiculed as “talking white” or “acting white.” Rayford talked about solutions to the problem. He suggested a “rite of passage” for boys or career interest tests to help students think about healthy careers early on in their education. “It’s been there since I was a boy,” Rayford responded. “We devalue those who are focused on academics. It is not cool to be smart, and we’ve got to change that.” He added after listening to the first session of “Addressing the Needs of Urban Boys,” a group of parents discussed forming a

group to try to mitigate the problem. Pressey said she hopes that group comes together and that such a committee could include parents, teachers, administrators and students. “The whole community needs to be involved,” Pressey said. “It affects everybody.” Carla Chappel, the parent of a local eighth-grader, said she thought the class on urban boys’ development was valuable, but she had reservations about the first class she attended, which discussed how parents can communicate with their school. She said that while the administrator presenting at Parent University seemed to have a good system in place for parent communication, she is concerned that not all administrators have equally effective systems. New Haven public school representatives said they hope to have workshops for parents throughout the year at local venues including libraries and schools. In the spring, they said they plan to have another citywide Parent University at a setting similar to Gateway Community College. Parent University provided child care services during the weekend event for children ages 3 to 12 at the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School. Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY. cc.yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT

“Cinema in India is like brushing your teeth in the morning. You can’t escape it.” SHAHRUKH KHAN INDIAN FILM ACTOR KNOWN AS “THE KING OF BOLLYWOOD”

Pollard creates student workspaces

BEFORE

AFTER DEAN PLUMMER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

This room, in the basement of LC, was a previously a neglected media lab. Now, the old technology has been cleared out to create a new space for English students to study, collaborate and meet with undergraduates. STUDY SPACES FROM PAGE 1 Though graduate students can access Yale’s libraries, which operate under limited hours, Plummer said graduate students lacked places to study or perform their duties as teaching assistants when the libraries were closed, which undergraduates can find in their residential colleges. “I had assumed that all graduate students had some space, at least some shared space, since all science students have a lab bench and a desk,” Pollard said. “To my surprise many humanities students had no space to meet each other, to meet the students in their sections or to work.” Claudia Calhoun GRD ’14 said lack of space is especially problematic for teaching assistants who need to meet with students

and added that she heard of one graduate student who printed business cards that listed Blue State as his office location. Calhoun noted that students have already begun to use the new spaces.

Interdisciplinary spaces are limited, and to have one would create not just an academic but social community. SHAWN TA GRD ’17 While Shawn Ta GRD ’17, an East Asian languages and literature graduate student, said he appreciates Pollard’s effort

to allot more areas for student use, he added that students would benefit more from having spaces open to all graduate students rather than just those within a particular department. “This isn’t just about TFs having departmental spaces,” Ta said. “Interdisciplinary spaces are limited, and to have one would create not just an academic but social community.” Results from the 2010-’11 GSA survey revealed that while all the science and social science departments that responded had at least 24-hour access to some area, six humanities departments — Renaissance Studies, Spanish and Portuguese, American Studies, German, Film Studies and History — completely lacked access to study spaces.

at jane.menton@yale.edu .

This is one of the rooms opened for History majors in the Hall of Graduate Studies. All the furniture comes from extras stored by the provost’s office in areas around campus.

Contact JANE DARBY MENTON

South Asian community asserts identity ROSHNI FROM PAGE 1 to fit in,” Dangol said. This year, Yale’s South Asian community is taking further steps to assert South Asian American identity by hosting a conference in the spring for South Asian students along the East Coast. Spearheaded by Sonya Prasad ’15 and Arvind Mohan ’14, the conference seeks to empower and inspire South Asian Americans and promote service and activism throughout the South Asian Community, Prasad said. After working with the East Coast Asian American Student Union — which annually hosts the largest Asian-American student conference in the nation — Prasad said she noticed that few academically-oriented conferences catered to the South Asian community specifically. Still, Roshni’s sheer size helps draw attention to South Asian students at Yale. “I thought it was really cool to see the different cultures presented,” said attendee Megan Phelan ’15. “I had no idea most of these cultural events existed.” Friday’s show featured multiple forms of Indian dance, with several performances by Yale’s competitive South Asian dance

teams that perform year-round. The newest of these teams, MonstRAASity, which began last semester and performs Raas, a type of Indian folk-dance that uses wooden sticks, made its first public appearance. The show also included singing and small comedic sketches, as well as dances featuring each individual class. The senior class drew the widest group of participants, with 70 students participating in the dance.

The idea of Roshni is not to be limited to South Asian people. It’s about people who love the culture. ANJALI AMBANI ’14 President, South Asian Society “The main purpose of Roshni is to get everyone together for an hour and a half to experience and enjoy it with [the performers] and see what South Asian culture is all about,” said Anand Khare ’15, SAS cultural chair . The organizers have been working for a month and a half to

publicize the show by advertising to undergraduate and graduate students and faculty, and by posting flyers in South Asian restaurants to attract New Haven community members, Khare said. The performers rehearsed for over a month, with some choreography work beginning during the summer, Dangol said. Khare said that this year, one of the organizers’ main goals was to publicize Roshni not only to the South Asian community, but also to engage members of other cultures. Many of the performers in the show, especially in the senior act, were not South Asian, which Khare said was a tribute to SAS members in their enthusiasm bringing others into the organization. “The idea of Roshni is not to be limited to South Asian people. It’s about people who love the culture,” Ambani said. “It’s a way of expressing ourselves as a community to Yale.” SAS developed the Roshni showcase in 2002 as a Diwali holiday event but altered it to a secular celebration in 2003. Contact COLLEEN FLYNN at colleen.flynn@yale.edu .

PHILIPP ARDNT/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Roshni included dances featuring each individual class, such as the Sophomore Show (pictured).


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 ¡ yaledailynews.com

AROUND THE IVIES

“Growing up, my dolls were doctors and on secret missions. I had ‘Barbie Goes Rambo.’� ZOE SALDANA ACTRESS

T H E D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

Swaying the vote, one Barbie at a time

Sexual assault addressed

BY GLENN SHRUM STAFF WRITER The Obama Shrine began in 2008 with just a stone with “Obama� painted on it. It has now become a community talking point with a large array of colorful dolls, signs and slogans. The shrine belongs to Jacqui Bowman, a former consulting scholar for the Penn Museum who earned a certificate of executive administration from the University. The shrine is Bowman’s front porch on 43rd Street near Baltimore Avenue. Bowman herself is not a United States citizen and cannot vote. With the project, she said, “If I can get someone to vote who may not have voted otherwise, that’s like having a chance to vote.� Bowman and her teenage daughter, Ella Serpell, created the shrine four years ago. She called Obama’s win “an extraordinary moment in American history.�

[Putting the shrine on Twitter] seemed like a way to give it a permanent record, a new life. JACQUI BOWMAN Owner, The Obama Shrine The house is barely visible from down the street, but closer up, it’s impossible to miss. More than 30 Barbie, action figures and other dolls, of different sizes and colors, stand on the porch rail holding signs and flags. Other dolls are tied to a large sheet of black mesh that hung from the porch’s ceiling. A banner bearing the shrine’s

Twitter handle — @ O ba m a S h r i n e — figures prominently among the decorations. The idea to put the shrine on Twitter, BowPENN man said, was her daughter’s. “To us, it seemed like a way to give it a permanent record, a new life,� Bowman said. Currently, @ObamaShrine has 33 followers and has posted more than 150 tweets. In addition, Bowman compared her shrine to blogging, adding that “my message literally builds up with time.� Each addition to the shrine pertains to some political issue or event, giving it some currency and relevance. For example, near the bottom of the shrine, Bowman placed a “binder of women� — an actual binder, filled with magazine clippings of female models, created in response to a comment made by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Some neighbors, like Roxanne Johnson, believe the shrine reflects the character and energy of the neighborhood. Johnson, who lives across the street, explained that when she first saw the Obama Shrine, she wasn’t sure what to make of it. “There are a lot of symbologies going on� in the decorations, she said, noting the use of rainbow coloring on the shrine and the pervasive commentary on women’s issues. Though she had a mixed impression of some of the shrine’s ideology, she explained that only in West Philadelphia “could someone not only put this up, but also not have anyone immediately dismantle it.�

BY MICHELLE DENISE L. FERREOL STAFF WRITER When students vote for Undergraduate Council president this fall, they can also cast a vote calling on Harvard to revise its policies for handling sexual assault. Thanks to an online petition that garnered the 670 signatures required by the Council to create a ballot question, voters may indicate their approval of a long list of changes to Harvard’s practices. The referendum calls for Harvard to endorse the concept of “affirmative consent� to sex, more clearly define “mental incapacitation� that renders a person unable to consent, adopt BGLTQ-inclusive language in its assault policies and increase the transparency of the case review process. Kate Sim, who created the successful petition along with Pearl Bhatnagar, described the referendum as “a signal of our agency as students in claiming our mental and physical safety on campus.� Launched early Thursday morning, the petition garnered more than 300 undergraduate signatures in its first 12 hours online and achieved the 670-signature target Friday evening. Bhatnagar said that the response indicates broad student interest in changing sexual assault policies, and UC Student Initiatives Committee Chair Nicholas W. Galat added that the upcoming vote will reinforce that. “Taking this issue to a referendum will give the UC a more credible stance on what the students want and will allow us to directly say that we do speak for the students,� Galat said. The last time the University made substantial changes to its sexual assault policies was in 2003. This summer, two stranger rapes — the first in 12 years — were reported at Harvard. And since Harvard announced its intention not to change its policies despite a federal investi-



gation into sexual assault policy at Yale and Harvard Law School, and more recently a former Amherst College student HARVARD made waves nationwide by publishing an essay on the school’s insensitive response to her rape, Bhatnagar said Harvard should be reconsidering its approach to handling assaults.

Even student activists who don’t normally care about the UC will have reason to log into the system to vote. DARRAGH NOLAN UC Rules Committee chair, Harvard University “In light of the recent reviews that our peer institutions have pursued, this is a chance for Harvard to improve upon the safety mechanisms that it already has in place for its students,� she said. UC Rules Committee Chair Darragh Nolan said that students last petitioned for a UC ballot referendum in 2006, when undergraduates passed a referendum calling for the University to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions from their 1990 level by 11 percent by 2020. This year, three questions have made it to the ballot through student — the sexual assault one, a call for Harvard to divest from fossil fuels and a petition for the Harvard Management Company to take responsibility for the funds collected by the Fair Harvard Fund created last year. Of the increase in ballot questions, Chloe S. Maxmin, a member of Students for a Just and Stable Future who

spearheaded the petition for the fossil fuels referendum, said, “It’s incredible to see how many students have gotten involved in the campaigns and how many students are really latching onto these movements. ‌ This is a really powerful tool. It’s a way to show the administration that the students really care.â€? Maxmin is also a Crimson editorial editor. Nolan foresees even more ballot questions in elections to come. “I imagine that there will probably be an increase in petitions as more and more students hear about it,â€? he said. “Even student activists who don’t normally care about the UC will have reason to log into the system and vote.â€? Though there is currently little information in the UC constitution about how ballot questions are run, Nolan said that legislation is being created to streamline the process. If the UC votes to pass the legislation, there will be two times during the school year when a referendum can be put forth to the student body: on the UC presidential ballot in the fall, and in a special referendum email sent to the student body following spring break. Twenty-five percent of the undergraduate population will have to vote for the referendum for the UC to officially endorse the petition’s stance on the issue. “Kate and Pearl were already working on a campaign to bring this issue to the administration’s attention,â€? Dudley House representative Sahil A. Khatod said. “But they hadn’t been talking to the UC, so I told them that the UC would be the best place to push for a referendum.â€? According to representatives, the petition coincides with recent initiatives that the Council has pursued. UC Student Life Committee Chair Michael C. George said that the Council has recently talked with the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention and Response about improving safety on campus.

T H E C O R N E L L D A I LY S U N

THE MACMILLAN CENTER

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE WEEK

Cornell data exposed

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BY AKANE OTANI STAFF WRITER The personal information of up to 2,000 people was exposed to the public for five days on a computer in Cornellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s athletics department, a University administrator confirmed Thursday. Donald Sevey, director of information systems, said that the University discovered that a file server containing â&#x20AC;&#x153;confidential dataâ&#x20AC;? about thousands of people was accessible by the public for a period of time. He said that he does not know if anyone maliciously used the data while it was exposed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if the data was breached. We just know that there was an incident where a file server was opened to the public, and when â&#x20AC;Ś we actually looked at it and saw what kind of data was on the server, we found that there was confidential data,â&#x20AC;? Sevey said. Sevey could not say who, if anyone, had been affected by the incident, but said that the University examined the data

and notified all individuals whose information had been exposed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know the CORNELL s ta t u s o f the records. I just know that we went through and identified people by name and social security number and notified [them],â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if there were students, staff.â&#x20AC;? Sevey said that, in addition to contacting all the individuals who may have been affected, the University is treating the incident â&#x20AC;&#x153;very seriously.â&#x20AC;? Matt Varble was first shocked, then angered, when he received the letter from Cornell notifying him of the security breach. The letter, dated Oct. 18, said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regrettably, we determined that from September 5, 2012 to September 10, 2012 some personal information was accessible via the web, from a computer used in the Athletics depart-

ment. Our examination of the computer revealed that your name and Social Security number may have been put at risk.â&#x20AC;? The letter said that the University has â&#x20AC;&#x153;taken steps consistent with industry best practices to secure this data against unauthorized access.â&#x20AC;? It went on to offer Varble free access to â&#x20AC;&#x153;IDTheftSmart Service,â&#x20AC;? an online credit-monitoring service from risk-consulting company Kroll Advisory Solutions. Varble said he was confused as to why a computer in the Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s athletics department contained his personal information â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 12 years after he graduated from Cornell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What does the athletics department have to do with this? I was not an athlete and there was information on their computers,â&#x20AC;? he said. Varbleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s anger over the breach was heightened by the fact that, three days before he received the letter from Cornell, his bank account in Wells Fargo was locked because someone had tried to access it multiple times.

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TUESDAY

Areas of frost before 8am. Otherwise, sunny, with a high near 50. Low of 24.

High of 46, low of 31.

WEDNESDAY High of 48, low of 37.

A CANDIDATE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT BY ILANA STRAUSS

ON CAMPUS MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5 4:00 PM “U.S. Leadership and the Future of Global Health” Join the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute (GHLI) for its first speaker of the “Leadership in Global Health Speaker Series,” a venue for Yale students and the community to learn from innovative leaders committed to global health. Speaker Jim Kolbe currently serves as a Senior Transatlantic Fellow for the German Marshall Fund of the United States, where he advises on trade matters and effectiveness of U.S. assistance to foreign countries, on U.S.-E.U. relationships, and on migration and its relationship to development. Jim has also served for 20 years on the Appropriations Committee of the House of Representatives and was chairman of the subcommittee responsible for funding global health programs. Co-sponsored by the Student Global Health and AIDS Coalition. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Room 211.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6 4:30 PM Let Freedom Sing: American Folksongs and Spirituals Featuring students from Richard Lalli’s MUSI 222: “The Performance of Vocal Music” seminar. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium. 5:30 PM Ballet Technique Class Work with instructors from the New Haven Ballet. Free admission. Sponsored by the Dance Studies curriculum housed in Theater Studies and the Alliance for Dance at Yale. Broadway Rehearsal Lofts (294 Elm St.), Room 303.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7 12:00 PM Lunchtime Chamber Music Chamber music ensembles will perform. Free admission and open to the general public. Sprague Memorial Hall (470 College St.), Morse Recital Hall.

TO READ THE WHOLE STORY, GO TO: HTTP://CANDIDATEINKINGARTHURSCOURT.BLOGSPOT

This is a special strip: I will decide who will win the kingship based on your responses, America. To vote, simply go to the various booths I’ve set up around the country on Nov. 6 and vote for either Obama or Romney.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

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CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Chinese temple instrument 5 Nestling noises 10 Leave at the altar 14 Diva’s showpiece 15 Group of experts 16 Pierre’s possessive 17 Return on one’s investment, in slang 20 Replay technique, briefly 21 Relaxing time in the chalet 22 “There oughta be __” 25 Hi-fi spinners 26 Plain dessert 30 Playing decks 35 Diplomatic bldg. 36 Juanita’s aunt 37 Yukon’s country 38 Prada imitation, perhaps 42 More greasy 43 Extended family 44 “Bon voyage!” 45 Fruity-smelling compound 46 Jay-Z, for one 49 L.A. bus-and-rail org. 51 Speak indistinctly 52 Begin 57 Gate-hanging hardware 61 Announce one’s arrival gently ... as opposed to words that start 17-, 26-, 38- and 46-Across 64 Voting no 65 In an unusual way 66 Student’s stressor 67 Very familiar note recipient? 68 “Fetch my smelling salts!” 69 Avg. levels DOWN 1 Goes on and on 2 Unwritten 3 Barcelona boy 4 Joke writer 5 HMO alternative 6 Musical sensitivity 7 One-named Irish folk singer

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11/5/12

By Patti Varol

8 Magazine with a Stylewatch spinoff 9 Eat noisily, as soup 10 Elbows rudely 11 “In the morning” radio host 12 Security device 13 __ torch: patio light 18 Finish the laundry 19 Perform another MRI on 23 Oldman or Newman 24 Ragamuffin 26 Orange __ tea 27 Old Dodge autos 28 Horseshoeshaped fastener 29 “The Trial” writer Franz 31 Furthermore 32 Synagogue scholar 33 Times to send in the troops 34 “Full House” costar Bob 37 Panama crosser 39 Co. in Paris 40 “Sesame Street News Flash” reporter

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(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

41 Hula swivelers 46 Family-friendly, filmwise 47 German coal valley 48 Native American groups 50 Sierra Nevada resort 52 Tax-sheltered accts. 53 Store opening time

11/5/12

54 The “I” in IHOP: Abbr. 55 End-of-the-week letters 56 Scandinavian literary collection 58 Bakery call 59 Happy 60 Spreading trees 62 Ancient 63 Yiddish cries of dismay

8 5 2 9

1 5 2 1 4 7 9 4 5 6 5 7 6 9 4 7 4 2 1


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

WORLD

“Hatred is blind, as well as love.” OSCAR WILDE IRISH WRITER AND POET

Greece faces decisive votes BY DEMETRIS NELLAS ASSOCIATED PRESS ATHENS, Greece — Greece’s coalition government is facing two crucial votes this week in its effort to secure a portion of a bailout loan by creditors that will stave off threatened bankruptcy. Along with the inevitable strikes that are expected at least through Thursday, and possibly throughout the week, the coalition has to rein in its own fractious MPs, with the smaller partner saying it will vote against the bill and the other two parties facing possible dissent within their ranks. Democratic Left leader Fotis Kouvelis reiterated his opposition to further cuts in wages, pensions, benefits and other labor market

reforms contained in the omnibus bill after a late Sunday meeting with conservative Prime Minister Antonis Samaras. This means he will vote against the whole bill, since the government has decided to place all the bill’s provisions in a single article in a “take it or leave it” message to the MPs. “It is not my intention to cause a fracture in the government,” said Kouvelis, who repeated that his party will not leave the government and will vote for the 2013 budget, which is contingent upon the spending cuts envisaged in the omnibus bill. A vote on the omnibus bill will most likely take place on Thursday and the budget vote will take place at midnight on Sunday. Usually, Greece voted on the budget at the last session before Christ-

mas recess but has brought the vote forward and accelerated the debating schedule at the insistence of its Eurozone partners, who said it should do so before the meeting of Eurozone finance ministers on Nov. 12. Passage of the omnibus bill and the budget is necessary for Greece to finally get a delayed euro 31.5 billion installment from the bailout aid, without which, as prime minister Samaras has said, the country will go bankrupt in mid-November. Evangelos Venizelos, the socialist leader, will meet with his own deputies Monday to brief them of the final contents of the bill and to prod them to vote for it. Party officials were saying they expected about six dissidents.

It is not my intention to cause a fracture in the government. FOTIS KOUVELIS Leader, Democratic Left

KOSTAS TSIRONIS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Fotis Kouvelis, whose Democratic Left Party is a partner in Greece’s governing coalition, addresses the media after meeting with Prime Minister Antonis Samaras.

The coalition government has 175 MPs in the 300-member parliament, including 127 from conservative New Democracy, 32 from socialist PASOK and 16 from the Democratic Left. Four MPs of the three parties have recently declared themselves independent. The bills only need a simple majority of those present to pass and the Democratic Left’s opposition to the bill should not threaten its passage. Also, dissidents are being pressed to abstain from the vote, which would lower the number of votes needed for passage. But a passage with fewer than 151 votes would be a big blow to the coalition government and reinforce the opposition’s argument that it lacks legitimacy to pass such measures. Alexis Tsipras, leader of the main opposition Radical Left Coalition, on Sunday called for elections as the only way out. His party is leading recent opinion polls.

Abbas violates refugee taboo BY AMY TEIBEL ASSOCIATED PRESS JERUSALEM —The Palestinian president has set off a strident debate by shattering a once-inviolable taboo, publicly suggesting his people would have to relinquish claims to ancestral homes in Israel. Mahmoud Abbas’ comments on the refugee issue, made in an interview on Israeli TV over the weekend, triggered hot responses from Palestinians and Israelis alike. In Israel, it suddenly put the long-sidelined issue of peace talks back in the Israeli public’s consciousness ahead of parliamentary elections. Palestinians have maintained for six decades that Arabs who either fled or were expelled from their homes during the fighting that followed Israel’s 1948 creation, as well as all their descendants, all have the right to reclaim former properties in what is now Israel. Israel says a mass return of these people, believed to number some 5 million, would spell the end of Israel as the Jewish state. Also, Israel rejects the concept of a legal “right of return.”

In the interview, Abbas was asked about his birthplace of Safed — now a town in northern Israel. He told the interviewer that while he would like to visit, he doesn’t claim the right to live there. “I am a refugee, but I am living in Ramallah (in the West Bank). I believe that the West Bank and Gaza is Palestine. And the other parts is Israel,” Abbas said in English. “I want to see Safed. It is my right to see it, but not to live there,” he said.

President Abbas is a failure … He is a man who makes concessions for free. IYAD ALOTOL Government employee, Rammallah The comments were widely seen as an acknowledgment that return of all the refugees would be impossible. While Palestinian officials privately acknowledge that, they have been reluctant to say so in public. His adviser, Nimr Hammad, said Abbas was being “realistic.”

“He knows he can’t bring back 5.5 million Palestinian refugees to Israel,” Hammad said. Some West Bank Palestinians were disappointed that their leader had made an overture to Israel without receiving any gestures in exchange. “President Abbas is a failure,” said Iyad Alotol, a government employee in Ramallah. “He is ceding the right of return without getting anything from the Israelis. He is a man who makes concessions for free.” Abbas, an outspoken proponent of a diplomatic solution with Israel, has little to show for his efforts. He has seen his popularity steadily decline in the West Bank, and in 2007, he lost control of the Gaza Strip to the rival Islamic militant Hamas. Condemnation of Abbas predictably was harsh in Gaza. Hamas rejects negotiations and believe only violence will persuade Israel to give up captured territory. Gaza Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh termed Abbas’ remarks “extremely dangerous.” At demonstrations in Gaza on Saturday, some protesters burned posters of a smiling Abbas, and others emblazoned the word “traitor” on posters of the Palestinian leader.

HATEM MOUSSA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Palestinians protest against president Mahmoud Abbas in the Jabaliya Refugee Camp in the Gaza Strip.

Communists endorse Bo Xilai’s expulsion BY LOUISE WATT ASSOCIATED PRESS BEIJING — China’s ruling Communist elite have endorsed the expulsion of former high-flying politician Bo Xilai and approved final preparations for the party’s upcoming congress. The closed-door meeting of the Central Committee that ended Sunday was the last before Communist Party leader Hu Jintao and other government officials begin to cede power to Vice President Xi Jinping and others at the congress, which opens Thursday. The Central Committee said in a statement carried by the official Xinhua News Agency that it endorsed decisions to expel Bo and former Railways Minister Liu Zhijun from the Communist Party. Bo is accused of a range of misdeeds including covering up his wife’s murder of a British businessman. Liu faces corruption charges. Xinhua said Hu presided over the meeting and delivered a work report. It said Xi introduced a report of the current five-year session and an amendment to the party charter, both of which will be discussed at the congress. It gave no details. The leadership transition takes place as slowing economic growth in China is exacerbating public ill feelings over corruption, social injustice and policies that favor state-run companies and the elite over private enterprise and ordinary citizens. Abroad, China’s attempts to build good relations with neighbors have been set back by territorial spats with Japan, the Philippines and Vietnam, and Beijing feels hemmed in by a U.S. push to divert more military resources to Asia. The Central Committee applauded its performance over the past five years. “Faced with a complicated international environment and an arduous task of stable reform and development, the entire party under General Secretary Hu Jintao … withstood the test of all types of difficulties and risks.”

XINHUA, LI XUERE/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Hu Jintao addresses the Seventh Plenary Session of the 17th CPC Central Committee in Beijing. It said the economy had grown stably and rapidly, there had been major progress on reform and opening-up, and people’s living conditions had improved remarkably. The central committee did not signal any shifts in economic policies but said it would continue to shift the growth model to one more driven by domestic demand. The policy-setting committee also promoted two generals to the party commission that oversees the military: air force Gen. Xu Qiliang and Gen. Fan Changlong, a career soldier who runs the Jinan Military Area Command and took part in relief efforts after the Sichuan earthquake in 2008. The Central Committee is comprised of about 370 people from the upper ranks of the party, government and military. Bo’s ouster earlier this year widened rifts within a leadership that likes to project an image of unity. It also complicated the bargaining over the roster of new leaders.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

T NASDAQ 2,982.13, -1.26% T Oil $84.98, +0.14%

T S&P 500 1,414.20, -0.94% T

NATION

T Dow Jones 13,130.74, -1.05%

10-yr. Bond 1.73%, +0.01

T Euro $1.28, -0.02

Obama leads electoral race BY THOMAS BEAUMONT ASSOCIATED PRESS COLUMBUS, Ohio — President Barack Obama enters the final hours of the 2012 campaign with an edge in the hunt for the 270 electoral votes needed to win and more ways to reach that magic number. Yet the race is remarkably close in at least six states that could go either way, giving Republican Mitt Romney hope that he can pull off a come-from-behind victory. If the election were held now, an Associated Press analysis found that Obama would be all but assured of 249 votes, by carrying 20 states that are solidly Democratic or leaning his way — Iowa, Nevada and Pennsylvania among them — and the District of Columbia. Romney would lay claim to 206, from probable victories in 24 states that are strong

Republican turf or tilt toward the GOP, including North Carolina. Up for grabs are 83 electoral votes spread across Colorado, Florida, Ohio, New Hampshire, Virginia and Wisconsin. Of those, Republicans and Democrats alike say Obama seems in a bit better shape than Romney in Ohio and Wisconsin, while Romney appears to be performing slightly better than Obama or has pulled even in Florida and Virginia. The AP’s analysis is not meant to be predictive, but instead to provide a snapshot of a race that has been extraordinarily close from the outset. The analysis is based on interviews with more than a dozen Republican and Democratic strategists in Washington and in the most contested states; public polls; internal campaign surveys; early vote figures; spending on television advertising; candidate travel; and get-

Sandy victims battle cold, housing woes

KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., center, is asked whether the government would house people whose homes were devastated by Superstorm Sandy. BY MICHAEL HILL AND JENNIFER PELTZ ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — Shivering victims of Superstorm Sandy went to church Sunday to pray for deliverance as cold weather settling in across the New York metropolitan region — and another powerful storm forecast for the middle of the week — added to their misfortunes and deepened the gloom. With overnight temperatures sinking into the 30s and hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses still without electricity six days after Sandy howled through, people slept in layers of clothes, and New York City officials handed out blankets and urged victims to go to overnight shelters or daytime warming centers. At the same time, government leaders began to grapple with a daunting longer-term problem: where to find housing for the tens of thousands of people whose homes could be uninhabitable for weeks or months because of a combination of storm damage and cold weather. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said 30,000 to 40,000 New Yorkers may need to be relocated — a monumental task in a city where housing is scarce and expensive — though he said that number will probably drop to 20,000 within a couple of weeks as power is restored in more places. In a heavily flooded Staten Island neighborhood, Sara Zavala spent the night under two blankets and layers of clothing because the power was out. She had a propane heater but turned it on for only a couple of hours in the morning. She did not want to sleep with it running at night. “When I woke up, I was like, ‘It’s freezing.’ And I thought, This can’t go on too much longer,’” said Zavala, a nursing home admissions coordinator. Nearly a week after Sandy slammed into the New Jersey coastline in an assault that killed more than 100 people in 10 states, gasoline shortages persisted across the region, though oddeven rationing got under way in northern New Jersey in an echo of the gas crisis of the 1970s. Nearly 1 million homes and businesses were still without power in New Jersey, and about 650,000 in New

York City, its northern suburbs and Long Island. With more subways running and most city schools reopening on Monday, large swaths of the city were getting back to something resembling normal. But the week could bring new challenges, namely an Election Day without power in hundreds of polling places, and a nor’easter expected to hit by Wednesday, with the potential for 55 mph gusts and more beach erosion, flooding and rain. “Prepare for more outages,” said National Weather Service meteorologist Joe Pollina. “Stay indoors. Stock up again.”

Prepare for more outages. Stay indoors. Stock up again. JOE POLLINA Meteorologist, National Weather Service “Well, the first storm flooded me out, and my landlord tells me there’s a big crack in the ceiling, so I guess there’s a chance this storm could do more damage,” John Lewis said at a shelter in New Rochelle, N.Y. “I was hoping to get back in there sooner rather than later, but it doesn’t look good.” Churchgoers packed the pews Sunday in parkas, scarves and boots and looked for solace in faith. At the chilly Church of St. Rose in Belmar, N.J., its streets still slippery with foul-smelling mud, Roman Catholic Bishop David O’Connell said he had no good answer for why God would allow such destruction. But he assured parishioners: “There’s more good, and there’s more joy, and there’s more happiness in life than there is the opposite. And it will be back.” In the heart of the Staten Island disaster zone, the Rev. Steve Martino of Movement Church headed a volunteer effort that had scores of people delivering supplies in grocery carts and cleaning out ruined homes. Around midday, the work stopped, and volunteer and victim alike bowed their heads in prayer.

out-the-vote organizations. Both Republicans and Democrats say Tuesday’s election has tightened across the board the homestretch. Many factors are adding to the uncertainty, including early vote tallies, Election Day turnout and the impact of Superstorm Sandy in the East. There’s no telling the impact of Libertarian Party candidate Gary Johnson, who’s on the ballot in 48 states, including all the battlegrounds, or Virgil Goode, an ex-congressman from Virginia who’s running on the Constitution Party ticket. But here’s perhaps the biggest issue complicating efforts to get a handle on where the race really stands: different assumptions that each party’s pollsters are making about the demographic makeup of the electorate. Republicans are anticipating that the body of voters who end up casting ballots will be more like the 2004 elec-

torate, heavily white and male. Democrats argue that 2012 voters as a whole will look more like the electorate of four years ago when record numbers of minorities and young people turned out. The difference has meant wildly disparate polling coming from Republicans and Democrats, with each side claiming that it’s measuring voter attitudes more precisely than the opposition. Said Republican strategist Phil Musser: “The conviction with which both sides say they are on a trajectory to victory is unique.” Tuesday will determine which side is correct. For now, the gulf between the two sides’ polling has made it difficult to judge which candidate is faring better in the six up-for-grabs states. In the final hours of the campaign, national polls show a neckand-neck race for the popular vote.

CAROLYN KASTER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Barack Obama greets people as he arrives at a campaign event at the University of Cincinnati on Sunday.

Election continues despite storm BY DAVID CARUSO ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — Power generators are being marshaled, polling locations moved and voting machines hurriedly put into place as officials prepare to hold an national election in storm-ravaged sections of New York and New Jersey barely a week after Superstorm Sandy. Organizers expressed guarded confidence Sunday that the presidential vote will proceed with no major disruptions in most areas hit by the storm, though it was unclear whether the preparations would be enough to avoid depressed turnout in communities where people still lack power or have been driven from their damaged homes. Some voters will be casting ballots in places different from their usual polls. In Long Beach, N.Y., a barrier-island city that was inundated with water during the storm, the number of polling places will be cut to four, down from the usual 11. Residents of the devastated borough of Sea Bright, on the New Jersey shore, will have to drive two towns over to vote. But with two days to go until Election Day, officials in both states said Sunday that they were overcoming many of their biggest challenges. Hundreds of emergency generators have been rushed into place to ensure power at polling places, even if the neighborhoods around them are still dark. Electric utilities were putting a priority on restoring power to others and had assured election officials they would be up and running by Monday. Of the 1,256 polling locations in New York City, only 59 needed to be moved or closed, said Valerie Vazquez, a spokeswoman for the city’s Board of Elections. Most were in coastal areas of Brooklyn and Queens or other neighborhoods where buildings normally used for voting had been turned into shelters. In a few places, voters will be casting their ballots in tents, and some might be offered shuttle buses to get to polling spots moved miles from their homes. Some New York City leaders remained worried. Mayor Michael Bloomberg noted that the polling-place changes would affect some 143,000 New Yorkers. There were concerns about whether some poll workers might fail to show up, and as of Sunday night, the city’s voting informa-

KATHY WILLENS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

National Guard Spc. Kevin Van Zile unloads bottled water in Breezy Point, a neighborhood that was hard hit by Superstorm Sandy, in the Queens borough of New York. tion hotline was down. “Over the next day, it’s going to be critical that the Board of Elections communicate this new information to their poll workers,” he said. The board, which is independent of the mayor’s office, has historically had problems opening all voting locations on time, even in a normal year, the mayor noted. Just east of the city, in Nassau County, Elections Commissioner William Biamonte warned that some voting locations would have a “paramilitary look,” with portable toilets, emergency lighting and voting machines running off a generator. As of Sunday morning, the county had

266,000 homes and business without power — more than anyplace else in the state. Some 30 to 40 polling locations, out of 375 in the county, were expected to be changed because of storm problems. But Biamonte said he didn’t expect that the problems would keep large numbers of people from casting ballots. “I think people will be voting in lessthan-optimal situations, but they will not be voting in a way that disenfranchises them,” Biamonte said. Yet for some residents of the hardesthit areas, the hassle of having to travel even a few miles to find an open polling place was likely to be one burden too many.


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012路 yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

O

n All Hallows Eve, students across campus socialize, dance and show off costumes. Contributing photographer ALLIE KRAUSE documents the spooky and the not-so-spooky of Halloween at Yale.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL Pittsburgh 24 N.Y. Giants 20

NFL Denver 31 Cincinnati 23

SPORTS QUICK HITS

NFL Green Bay 31 Arizona 17

COLLEGE FB No. 4 Oregon 62 No. 17 USC 51

MONDAY

REGGIE WILLHITE ’12 SELECTED IN NBA D-LEAGUE DRAFT In the fifth round of the 2012 NBA D-League Draft on Friday, the Reno Bighorns chose Reggie Willhite ’12. He was named the Ivy League Defensive Player of the Year last season. The Bighorns are affiliated with the Memphis Grizzlies, Sacramento Kings and Utah Jazz .

YALE TO HOST NCAA GOLF REGIONAL FIFTH TIME HOSTING On Thursday, the NCAA announced that The Course at Yale has been selected to host regional playoffs for the 2015 Division I Men’s Golf Championship. The Course at Yale was once again recognized as the “Best Campus Course” by Golfweek in September.

COLLEGE FB No. 1 Alabama 21 No. 5 LSU 17

“Sometimes you gotta defend just on old fashioned guts and grit.” BRIAN TOMPKINS HEAD COACH, MEN’S SOCCER

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

VOLLEYBALL

YALE CAPTURES THIRD STRAIGHT IVY TITLE THE ELIS CLINCHED THEIR THIRD STRAIGHT IVY LEAGUE TITLE THIS WEEKEND. YALE’S THREE-PEAT IS THE FIFTH SINCE 1977. PAGE B3 SARAH ECKINGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yale currently leads Princeton by three matches with two games left in the season.

Bears blank Bulldogs

Hockey beats Harvard BY LINDSEY UNIAT AND ASHTON WACKYM STAFF REPORTER AND CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The men’s hockey team fought through two high-scoring games this weekend, falling to Dartmouth 7–4 on Friday night, but bouncing back to best Harvard 5–1 on Saturday.

M. HOCKEY

a threat from the pass so it was easier to be aggressive in that situation,” Cruz said. “But we had to be smart too because they could dump something over the top.” Yale’s dependence on running the football was evident from its first series onward. Williams ran for nine yards and a first down on the second play from scrimmage and went immediately to the sidelines after being tackled. The Bulldogs still had a chance to score thanks to 32 rushing yards from

The Bulldogs (2–1–1, 1–1–0 ECAC) faced their first conference competition of the season as they traveled to take on the Big Green (3–0–1, 2–0–0 ECAC) and the Crimson (2–1–0, 1–1–0 ECAC). With nine goals this weekend, the Bulldogs nearly doubled their scoring from last weekend when they tied Dartmouth 2–2 and beat Princeton 3–2 in the Ivy League Showcase at Brown. The Blue and White showed a strong offensive effort in both games this weekend, outshooting their opponents 39–23 on Friday and 49–29 on Saturday. Goalie Nick Maricic ’13 made 16 saves on Friday, and goalie Jeff Malcolm ’13 stopped 28 shots against Harvard on Saturday. Weak defensive play was a main factor in Friday’s loss. “We didn’t play well defensively, we turned the puck over at bad times, and made some poor puck decisions throughout the game [on Friday],” team captain and forward Andrew Miller ’13 said. Forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 added that although the Bulldogs generated more scoring chances, it was the Big Green that capitalized on its opportunities. Laganiere scored two of the team’s four goals on Friday, but forward Stu Wilson ’16 scored the team’s first goal of the night –

SEE FOOTBALL PAGE B2

SEE M. HOCKEY PAGE B2

ZOE GORMAN/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale was outgained 396–223 by Brown on Saturday while completing only four of 18 passes as a team. BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER “Under 50 percent.” That is how head coach Tony Reno described the injury status of quarterback Eric Williams ’16 after Williams took the field in Saturday’s game against Brown. Struggling through the pain of a separated non-throwing shoulder, Williams was unable to lead the Elis to victory over the Bears.

FOOTBALL Yale (2–6, 1–4 Ivy) was shut

out 20–0 by Brown (5–3, 2–3 Ivy) in Providence, R.I. on Saturday afternoon. It was the Bulldogs’ ninth loss in the past 14 meetings between the two teams. Brown held Yale scoreless for the first time since 1949. With running back Tyler Varga ’15 splitting time under center with the hobbled Williams, the Elis’ passing attack was severely limited, and Brown defensive back A.J. Cruz said that the Bears could focus more on stopping a Yale ground attack that is second in the Ivy League with 195.2 yards per game. “We didn’t see too much of

STAT OF THE DAY 72

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Antoine Laganiere ’13 scored two of the team’s four goals on Friday.

LENGTH (IN YARDS) OF LONGEST PUNT MADE BY KYLE CAZZETTA ’15 AGAINST BROWN. The career-long punt for Cazzetta boomed from the Yale 16 to the Brown 12-yard line. Cazzetta’s effort stopped the Bears from attempting a drive with just 47 seconds left in the first half.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012· yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS ANDREW LUCK The Indianapolis Colts quarterback threw for 433 yards and two touchdowns in a 23–20 win over Miami yesterday, setting an NFL record for single-game passing yards by a rookie. Luck broke Cam Newton’s record of 432 yards set last year.

Thalman leads Elis

Quarterback woes continue FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1

GRAHAM HARBOE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain Bobby Thalman ’13 stopped all 11 of Brown’s shots on goal after the Bears’ early score in the third minute. M. SOCCER FROM PAGE B4 into play. Jacobson corralled the ball and finished the rebound to knot the score at one goal apiece. “It was a really well-taken goal,” Tompkins said. “It was a great shot by Scotty and then Peter was in the right place at the right time to finish it off.” The teams played 90 more minutes, including two 10-minute overtime periods, yet neither squad was able to find the back of the net again. While Thalman said that both teams had scoring opportunities throughout the rest of the contest, Tompkins noted that Brown became more aggressive in the second half and that the Bulldog defense had to defend strongly. “Sometimes you gotta defend just

on old-fashioned guts and grit, and I think they did that really well yesterday,” Tompkins said.

While I get the credit for 11 saves, what really won us the game was the effort the guys on the field gave. BOBBY THALMAN ’13 Goalkeeper and captain, men’s soccer Thalman led the effort from the back. After the Bears converted their early goal, they put another 11 shots on the Bulldog net — all of which Thalman stopped.

Brown ended the contest with a 36–15 advantage in shots and a 12–4 edge in shots on goal. “What’s not going to show up in the box score, though, is all the blocked shots and the clearances that the defense had and everyone dropping back and making sure they’re in position,” Thalman said. “While I get the credit for 11 saves, what really won us the game was the effort the guys on the field gave.” Having amassed five points in the standings over their past three games, the Bulldogs will conclude their season at home this Saturday against Princeton. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

Bulldogs show promise despite stiff competition FENCING FROM PAGE B1 competition, which proved to be the team’s best performance. Since only 33 epeeists participated in the tournament, there were just two rounds of pools before the direct elimination bracket. “I think we did fairly well,” Shaffer said. “It’s a hard tournament, but we had some really good bouts. I think it was a good way to see where we are against the competition.” On Sunday, members of the men’s foil and saber squads also appeared on the leaderboards, due to an outstanding performances by the team’s newest members. Freshmen foilists Brian Wang ’16 and Jin Ishizuka ’16 placed 10th and 13th respectively in foil competition. Meanwhile, Hugh O’Cinneide ’15 of the saber squad finished in 11th place. “Overall, we probably didn’t do as well

Varga on the drive, but the field goal attempt of kicker Philippe Panico ’13 from 43 yards fell short. After Yale’s defense forced a threeand-out by the Bears, Williams returned to the field. Reno said the freshman quarterback and his perseverance are representative of a team that has been plagued by injuries this season. “[Williams] went from being out for the season to ready to go this week,” Reno said. “I give a lot of credit to a lot of players with injuries who just keep battling.” The injury clearly affected Williams’ accuracy, however. Cruz intercepted Williams’ first passing attempt of the day but the play was nullified by a pass interference penalty. The next play Williams threw down the right sideline, but again Cruz was there for the takeaway. Brown quarterback Patrick Donnelly then marched the Bears 80 yards down the field to take a 7–0 lead with 5:00 left in the first quarter. Bears fullback Cody Taulbee slipped out of the backfield and Donnelly found him wide open as he crossed the goal line from three yards out. According to Brown head coach Phil Estes, there has been increased pressure on Donnelly to perform due to the injuries in the Bears’ backfield. “I think there’s a lot more pressure on Patrick to make plays because our running game … is something that’s in the works right now,” Estes said. “We’ve had to plug in some wide receivers there.” The Bears tacked on three more points to push the scoring margin to 10 at the 10:32 mark in the second quarter when Alex Norocea’s 37-yard field goal try floated just over the crossbar. Turnovers — a common problem for the Elis this season — once again reared their ugly head in the first half. The Bulldogs gave up two interceptions and a lost fumble to push their Ancient Eight-leading total to 23 giveaways. The last of these turnovers was

Cruz’s second interception on the afternoon. He jumped into the passing lane at Yale’s 26-yard line, but wide receiver Cameron Sandquist ’14 knocked the ball from his hands and offensive lineman Ben Carbery ’15 dove on top of the loose ball at the 16. Brown doubled its lead to 20–0 in the third quarter. Norocea put Brown up by 13 with a career-long 46-yard field goal at the 8:52 mark and Donnelly capped off the scoring by rolling to his left and hitting wide receiver Jordan Evans with a 25-yard touchdown with 4:26 remaining. Estes said that Donnelly’s athleticism — he played in seven games for the basketball team last year — makes the signal caller comfortable on the run.

I give a lot of credit to a lot of players with injuries who just keep on battling. TONY RENO Head coach, football “It’s natural because he can run that he likes to make plays out of the pocket,” Estes said. The 20—0 defeat could have been even worse if not for the punting of Kyler Cazzetta ’15. The punter averaged 46.1 yards on his seven punts, which included a 72-yarder. Cazzetta pinned the Bears in deep with four punts on the 10-yard line or better. Reno said that a new rugby-style punting package aided Cazzetta. The Elis gained just 223 total yards on the day compared to Brown’s 396. Varga led all rushers with 104 yards and running back Mordecai Cargill ’13 added 87 more yards for Yale. Williams was just 4-15 passing on the days for 22 yards and two interceptions. Donnelly went 24-38 on the day for 232 yards and two touchdown passes. Yale returns home next Saturday to host Princeton (4–4, 3–2 Ivy). Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

Hockey splits weekend

as we had hoped to do, but we had a strong showing from our freshmen,” Cohen said. Cohen finished in 20th place in the men’s epee competition. The teams will build off what they learned at Penn as in-season practices continue. “For the next couple of weeks, the main focus point at practice will be to increase the competition level and bouting experience,” Shaffer said. “For a month or so, we’ve been working on drilling and conditioning. Now it’s time to put that towards a more competitive situation.” The Bulldogs will have their first team meet at Brandeis Invitational in Waltham, Mass. on Dec. 2. Contact GIOVANNI BACARELLA at giovanni.bacarella@yale.edu .

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis showed a strong offensive effort this weekend, outshooting their opponents on Friday and Saturday. M. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B1

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Brian Wang ’16 and Jin Ishizuka ’16 clinched 10th and 13th respectively in foil competition.

and the first goal of his Bulldogs career — just three minutes into the first period. But by the end of the first 20 minutes of play, the Bulldogs were down 3–2. In the middle of the second period, Dartmouth managed to score an even-handed goal, a power play goal and a shorthanded goal – all within a twominute period. Laganiere capitalized on a Bulldogs power play at 12:35, but the Blue and White could not make up the threepoint difference in the third period. “We did not capitalize on our chances and that has to change if we are to be a winning team,” Laganiere said. “We must be hungrier to score.” Saturday night the team must have been famished, as its 20-shot advantage led to a fourpoint victory over the Crimson. Forward Jesse Root ’14 scored three minutes into the game,

and Harvard managed to tie the first period 1–1. But that was the end of Harvard’s scoring for the night. Root scored again in the second period and forward Trent Ruffalo ’15 tipped in a power play goal at 4:39 in the third period. Forward Kenny Agostino ’14 made Yale’s last two points in the latter half of the third period for the 5–1 victory. Malcolm, who played in net on Saturday, said the team successfully adjusted its forecheck and managed the puck better. “We were relentless all over the ice and forced the Crimson back on their heels for most of the game,” Malcolm said. “Our special teams got the job done, which is something we take pride in.” Miller added that the team was able to learn from its mistakes on Friday and managed to play tougher, make the right plays and react well to one another. Laganiere said the way the team bounced back from its loss

was a good sign. He added that the success of a team is contingent on how it reacts to ups and downs during the season. “Anytime you lose a game, you can’t wait to get back on the ice to get the bad taste of losing out of your mouth,” Miller said. “And there isn’t much of a better way to do that than beating Harvard.” The last time Yale faced off against Harvard was in the quarterfinals of the ECAC playoffs last March. The Bulldogs lost the round two games to one, which cut their goal of the conference championship short. Next weekend, the Bulldogs will take on Clarkson and St. Lawrence on Friday and Saturday respectively in their first home games of the season. Puck drop will be at 7 p.m. at Ingalls Rink on both nights. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu . Contact ASHTON WACKYM ashton.wackym@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

“A good hockey player plays where the puck is. A great hockey player plays where the puck is going to be.” WAYNE GRETSKY HOCKEY HALL OF FAMER

Bulldogs Ivy Champions

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

FOOTBALL IVY 1

3 5

7

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

Harvard

4

1

0.800

7

1

0.875

Penn

4

1

0.800

4

4

0.500

Dartmouth

3

2

0.600

5

3

0.625

Princeton

3

2

0.600

4

4

0.500

Brown

2

3

0.400

5

3

0.625

Cornell

2

3

0.400

4

4

0.500

Columbia

1

4

0.200

2

6

0.250

Yale

1

4

0.200

2

6

0.250

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Brown 20, Yale 0

Sat. Yale vs. Princeton, 12:00 p.m.

VOLLEYBALL IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

1

Yale

12

0

1.000

16

5

0.762

2

Princeton

9

3

0.750

12

10

0.545

3

Penn

8

4

0.667

13

10

0.565

4

Columbia

7

5

0.583

12

9

0.571

5

Harvard

6

6

0.500

9

14

0.391

6

Cornell

3

9

0.250

7

16

0.304

7

Brown

2

10

0.167

6

16

0.273

8

Dartmouth

1

11

0.083

2

20

0.091

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Fri. Yale 3, Penn 1 Sat. Yale 3, Princeton 0

SARAH ECKINGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Fri. Yale at Harvard, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at Dartmouth, 5:00 p.m.

MEN’S SOCCER IVY

Yale’s three-peat is just the fifth since 1977 and the first since Cornell won three titles in a row from 2004 to 2006. BY KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTER If there was any doubt about the pecking order in Ivy League volleyball, it is gone now. The Bulldogs (16–5, 12–0 Ivy) clinched their third straight Ivy League title and their fourth in the past five seasons this weekend with 3–1 and 3–0 wins over Penn and Princeton on the road. Yale’s three-peat is just the fifth since 1977 and the first since Cornell won three titles in a row from 2004 to 2006. “I couldn’t be more proud of this team,” Yale head coach Erin Appleman said in an interview with Yale Athletics. “They’ve worked hard all season and earned this championship. They are a great group of athletes to work with and they deserve this title.” The Elis still have one week of Ivy play remaining with Dartmouth and Harvard traveling to New Haven this weekend. But with Yale currently leading Princeton (12–10, 9–3 Ivy) by three matches, the title is well in hand for the Bulldogs. Outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 put on her best offensive per-

formance of the season to lead Yale in the clincher on Saturday against the Tigers. The San Diego native logged 15 kills to the tune of a .316 hitting percentage, her highest in Ivy League play this season. “Mollie was so dominant,” setter Kelly Johnson ’16 said. “She was such a humongous part of our wins. It was so nice as a setter knowing that every time I set her the ball was going to be put away.” Rogers proved to be key in a first set that went down to the wire but resulted in a Yale victory. With the Elis leading 21–19 late in the set, an error from middle blocker Jesse Ebner ’16 allowed the Tigers to pull within one point. But the Bulldogs rattled off four straight kills, including two from Rogers, to take a 25–20 win. After a stress-free 25–16 win in the second set, Yale had to make a dramatic comeback in the third to complete the sweep. The Tigers took an early 10–3 lead with two service aces but the Bulldogs came roaring back with a 9–3 run. Rogers, Haley Wessels ’13 and Erica Reetz ’14 anchored the streak with two kills apiece to

pull Yale within one. From there, the two sides traded points all the way to a tie at 26, when the Bulldogs managed to pull away. Reetz put Yale ahead 27–26 with her sixth kill of the match and Princeton’s Kendall Peterkin committed an error to give Yale the win and the conference title. “We went in with the mentality of knowing that we didn’t need to get the win but we all wanted it,” Wessels said. “We had the attitude that we were going to do it and we did it. We had some rough patches but it all came together.” Although Saturday’s match against Princeton sealed the championship, Friday’s win against Penn (13–10, 8–4 Ivy) was just as crucial. Yale swept the Quakers when the two sides met on Oct. 13, but Penn refused to go down without a fight this time around. In the opening game, the two sides were neck-and-neck and played to 13 separate ties. But with the score knotted at 23 apiece, Rogers logged a kill and Penn’s Emma White committed an attack error to give Yale the 25–23 win and a 1–0 lead in the

match. But Yale could not carry the momentum to the second set as the Quakers jumped to a quick 3–0 lead. They led the rest of the way behind four kills and two assists both from setter Alex Caldwell and took a 25–19 win. That was the last time the Quakers led the Bulldogs all night. Penn did not hold a single lead in the final two sets as Yale posted identical 25–17 victories to extend their current win streak to 13 matches. “The first two games I think we came out a little bit timid and we weren’t being as aggressive as we should have been,” Johnson said. “During the last two games I think we turned it on and went all out. Our mentality changed and that changed everyone’s play on the court.” The Bulldogs will attempt to complete just the second 14–0 Ivy campaign in conference history and the first since Princeton accomplished the feat in 2007 this weekend, when Dartmouth and Harvard visit the John J. Lee Amphitheater.

a power play as time expired in regulation, giving Dartmouth new life. After goalkeeper Jaimie Leonoff ’15 was unable to corral Dartmouth forward Camille Dumais’ wrap-around shot from behind the net 3:49 into overtime, defender Morgan Illikainen slipped the puck past Leonoff for the game winner. Haddad had three assists and was part of seven total points from the freshman class against Dartmouth. Overall, freshmen have scored eight of the team’s nine goals and amassed 17 of the Elis’ 23 points. In Saturday’s game, Yale mustered a scant 12 shots and had no answer for the fierce Crimson attack, which scored twice in 20 shots on goal in the first period and coasted to a 4–0 victory. The Elis held Harvard scoreless in the second period, but allowed two more goals in the third, while never generating significant pressure on Crimson goalkeeper Emerance Maschmeyer. Leonoff, who was named the ECAC Goaltender of the Week for her performance last week against Colgate and Cornell, currently leads the conference in saves and is first in the country in saves per game among qualified goalies. She had 39 saves against

SCHOOL

W L D %

W L

D %

1

Cornell

5

1

0

0.833

14

1

0

0.933

2

Brown

4

0

2

0.833

12

1

3

0.844

3

Dartmouth

4

2

0

0.667

8

7

0

0.533

4

Princeton

3

1

2

0.667

7

6

2

0.533

5

Columbia

2

2

2

0.500

4

7

4

0.400

6

Yale

1

2

3

0.417

4

7

5

0.406

7

Harvard

0

5

1

0.083

2

10

3

0.233

8

Penn

0

6

0

0.000

2

13

0

0.133

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Tie - Yale 1, Brown 1 (2OT)

Sat. Yale at Princeton, 3:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L D %

W L D %

Harvard

4

0

0

1.000

4

0

0

1.000

Cornell

3

0

0

1.000

6

1

0

0.857

Dartmouth

3

0

0

1.000

3

1

0

0.750

Brown

0

3

0

0.000 1

3

0

0.250

Yale

0

3

0

0.000 1

5

0

0.167

Princeton

0

3

0

0.000 2

3

1

0.417

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Fri. Dartmouth 5, Yale 4–OT Sat. Harvard 4, Yale 0

Fri. Yale at Clarkson, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at St. Lawrence, 4:00 p.m.

MEN’S HOCKEY IVY

Dartmouth and 44 against Harvard and her play was crucial in enabling Yale’s attempt at a comeback against Dartmouth. “Jaimie has played outstanding so far this year. We know she is such a solid goaltender, and our confidence in her is crucial for our success this year,” Ferrara said.

Winning is about getting goals, regardless of how nice they look.

W L D %

W L D %

Dartmouth

2

0

0

1.000

3

0

1

0.875

Harvard

1

1

0

0.500

2

1

0

0.667

Yale

1

1

0

0.500

2

1

1

0.625

Cornell

0

0

0

0.000 3

0

1

0.875

Princeton

0

0

0

0.000 0

2

0

0.000

Brown

0

2

0

0.000 1

3

0

0.250

Fri. Dartmouth 2, Yale 2 Sat. Yale 5, Harvard 1

Haddad said the Bulldogs need to keep improving to remain competitive this week and beyond. “We need to be more aggressive by taking the puck to the net more,” Haddad said. “Winning is about getting goals, regardless of how nice they look.” Leonoff agreed that the team needs to improve and said that the Bulldogs must be in better shape than their opponents to be successful going forward. The Bulldogs head north to take on No. 4 Clarkson and St. Lawrence this weekend.

OVERALL

SCHOOL

LAST WEEK

JAMIE HADDAD ’16 Forward, women’s hockey

Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .

OVERALL

Contact KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .

Elis swept in opening weekend at home W. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4

OVERALL

THIS WEEK Fri. Yale vs. Clarkson, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale vs. St. Lawrence, 7:00 p.m.

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Jaimie Leonoff ’15 currently leads the nation in saves per game.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2012· yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

14-year-old golfer qualifies for Masters Guan Tianlang, a 14-year-old middle school student from Guangzhou, China, qualified for the 2013 Masters after winning the Asia-Pacific Amateur Championship in Thailand on Sunday. Tianlang is the youngest player to ever earn a spot in the Masters field. The teenager also made history earlier this year when he became the youngest player to compete in a European Tour event at age 13.

Bulldogs draw No. 11 Brown

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Captain Bobby Thalman ’13 and the Bulldog defense survived a 12–4 deficit in shots on goal to emerge with a 1–1 draw against No. 11 Brown on Saturday. BY ALEX EPPLER STATUS LINE The home team struck first only three minutes into Saturday night’s men’s soccer game at Brown. Bears forward Ben Maurey took advantage of an early opportunity as he poked a loose

M. SOCCER

ball past goalkeeper and captain Bobby Thalman ’13 off of a corner kick. Down a goal, on the road and facing the 11th-ranked team in the country, the Bulldogs appeared headed for a long night in Providence. Instead, the early tally served as a wakeup call for Yale (4–7–5, 1–2–3 Ivy). The Bulldogs quickly answered back and eventually finished in a 1–1 tie against Brown

(12–1–3, 4–0–2 Ivy), who stood atop the Ivy League standings entering the weekend’s match. “I thought it was a really impressive performance,” said defender Nick Alers ’14, who sat out the game with concussionlike symptoms. “It’s easy to get down on yourself when you’re playing the No. 11 team in the country on the road and you give up a goal two minutes in, but they

showed a lot of self-belief.” Both head coach Brian Tompkins and Thalman said the Bears never should have been awarded the third-minute corner. Thalman said the Bulldogs felt that a Brown player pushed defender Milan Tica ’13 into the ball to draw the corner. Still, the coach and captain added that the early tally galvanized the Bulldogs. “I thought that their goal

Fencing season begins

really sparked our guys,” Tompkins said. “Rather than treat it as a setback, I thought it really inspired our guys.” Thalman added that the experience of the Elis’ last two games made the team confident that they could rebound from the deficit. The squad went down a goal to Penn two weeks ago before tallies by Scott Armbrust ’14 and Peter Jacobson ’14 earned the Elis

their first conference win, and a goal by Armbrust last weekend finished the scoring for a 1–1 draw against Columbia. Armbrust and Jacobson again contributed to the Bulldogs’ comeback this weekend. In the 20th minute of the contest, Armbrust ripped a shot that caromed off the Bears’ crossbar and back SEE M. SOCCER PAGE B2

Shot differential sinks Elis BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER It was a tough weekend for the Yale women’s hockey team as the Bulldogs made their home debut, losing 5–4 in overtime against Dartmouth on Friday and getting shut out 4–0 by No. 6 Harvard the following day.

W. HOCKEY Both games were marked by a huge shot differential in favor of the Bulldogs’ opponents. In the first game of the weekend, Dartmouth outshot Yale 44–22, and the Harvard squad had 48 shots while Yale managed only 12. “We need to play more physical in our defensive zone and not let it be so easy for the other team to get to our net,” for-

ward Janelle Ferrara ’16 said. After Yale took an early lead on Friday with goals from Ferrara and forward Hanna Astrom ’16 less than a minute apart, Dartmouth came roaring back with four straight scores. An early third period goal by the Big Green put the Elis down 4–2, but a goal 8:27 into the period by Ferrara cut the deficit to one, and Kate Martini ’16 tied it up with 1:29 left amid a scrum of players in front of the goal. “It was good to see that we didn’t just roll over and quit after Dartmouth got two goals on us,” forward Jamie Haddad ’16 said. “It sends a message that each team is going to have to earn their win against us.” But Yale was unable to convert on SEE W. HOCKEY PAGE B3

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Lauren Miller ’15 took 10th place in the foil competition, which was the team’s best performance. BY GIOVANNI BACARELLA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The Bulldogs travelled to Philadelphia this weekend for the Penn State Garret Open, beginning their season with a promising start.

FENCING The men and women’s fencing teams each sent three members to the tournament. Each weapon was wellrepresented on the leaderboards for both days of the round-robin tournament. The Elis faced nine other teams, including Princeton, last

year’s Ivy League champion and NCAA runner-up. “[The Garret Open] is always a really hard tournament,” epeeist Peter Cohen ’14 said. “There are a lot of solid schools that come out, each with really good fencers. There are really no weak points in the lineups.” Foilist Lauren Miller ’15 said the team members agreed that there were no easy bouts throughout the tournament. Unlike regular season competition, the Garret Open is scored individually. It does not count toward the team record, nor is it factored into individual NCAA records, according to Miller.

“As challenging as the day was for everyone, it was a great reality check,” Miller said. “We had the opportunity to practice against talented fencers while not having to worry too much about losing bouts.” On Saturday, two members of the women’s epee squad made it into the direct elimination round after three rounds of highly competitive pools. Captain and epeeist Robyn Shaffer ’13 placed 14th in a field of 46 competitors. Not far behind was epeeist Katherine Miller ’16, who placed 16th. Lauren Miller took 10th place in foil SEE FENCING PAGE B2

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Elis overcame a 4–2 deficit to force overtime before falling, 5–4, to Dartmouth.


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