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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 41 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

HURRICANE HURRICANE

58 61

CROSS CAMPUS

MEN’S HOCKEY ELIS TAKE TWO TO BEGIN SEASON

CAMPUS SURVEY

ARCHITECTURE PH.D.

CANVASSING

Administrators look to measure attitudes toward sexual climate

PROGRAM AIMS TO INCREASE COLLABORATION

Yale Dems worked voters in Pennsylvania, hoped to make a difference

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CULTURE

PAGE 5 CITY

Campus braces for hurricane 2:00 P.M. Fri (30 mph)

Saved by the bell. Or weather.

The Yale Admissions Office has extended the deadline for Early Action applicants to midnight on Nov. 5 in light of Hurricane Sandy, which is expected to hit New Haven this morning. The extension, which gives students an additional four days to complete their application, will also apply to supporting documents sent on an applicant’s behalf.

2:00 P.M. Thurs (35 mph)

2:00 P.M. Wed (40 mph) NEW HAVEN

Celebrating her life. For her 23rd birthday, friends of Marina Keegan ’12 produced a tribute of the late writer’s work, selecting their favorite quotations from Keegan’s writings and taking photos of those quotes in places they found meaningful. One of the quotes chosen read “There can always be a better thing!” while another said “What we have to remember is that we can still do anything.”

NEW YORK 2:00 P.M. Tues (55 mph) 2:00 A.M. Tues (75 mph)

Forecast track 2:00 P.M. Mon (80 mph)

Bursting our foam bubble.

Ending decades of tradition and the rampant spread of pink eye, Toad’s Place has announced that it will temporarily suspend foam parties until further notice because the club’s insurance carrier would not cover the soapy events. As of now, it remains unclear whether this policy will be permanent.

They think he can. Sixty-eight Nobel Laureates, including seven Yalies, have signed an open letter endorsing Barack Obama for president. In the letter, the scientists argue that Obama has remained committed to sciencebased decision making and investments in science and technology research. In other election news. Former Yale lineman Pat Moran ’12 was forced to resign from his father’s — U.S. Representative Jim Moran (D-VA) — re-election campaign after the younger Moran was caught on video considering a plan to cast up to 100 fraudulent ballots. The plan, which involved voting in the place of 100 registered citizens who rarely voted, would have required forged utility bills and bank statements. And still more election drama.

Yale alum Amy Biviano ’97, who is running for a legislative seat in Spokane Valley, Wash., has come under fire for appearing topless in a 1995 Playboy photo shoot that featured “Women of the Ivy League.” Biviano has defended her decision as a confidencebuilding experience.

Second the best? For

employers, Yale graduates are the second-most desirable in the world, falling only behind Harvard, according to a recent survey published in The New York Times.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1993 Yale Police officers complain about the department’s new location, which recently moved from Broadway to York Street. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

3-day forecast cone (two-thirds of historical official forecast errors over a 5-year sample fall within the cone)

2:00 A.M. Mon (75 mph)

SOURCE: GOOGLE CRISIS MAP

Classes cancelled across campus BY JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTER For the first time in 34 years, all classes and extracurricular activities on Yale’s campus have been canceled, according to University Vice President Linda Lorimer. Hurricane Sandy — a massive storm that Lorimer called “a very unusual set of weather circumstances” — is expected to hit New Haven today, and University administrators have effectively shut down Yale’s campus in response to the impending severe

weather. Administrators also decided to close libraries, offices and Commons dining hall so nonessential staff do not have to come to campus. The decision to implement the emergency response came from concern for the safety of those living on campus as well as those who travel to school, largely due the high winds that could bring down branches and power lines, Lorimer said. “Obviously the storm has unprecedented potential, and we [are] taking SEE UNIVERSITY RESPONSE PAGE 6

Timeline for new colleges still unclear

City, state prepare for Sandy BY JASMINE HORSEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In the days leading up to Halloween, Hurricane Sandy is set to strike the Elm City. Sandy, which has already claimed the lives of 58 people in the Caribbean, is expected to make landfall early Tuesday morning in New Jersey and severe weather is projected to hit Connecticut Monday. In a Sunday afternoon press conference, Mayor John DeStefano Jr. called for a state of emergency in the city, ordering an

SEE CITY RESPONSE PAGE 6

Buddhist chapel shut down BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER

With only two-fifths of the funding for the project, an empty seven-acre site and no starting date set for construction, the future of Yale’s two new residential colleges is uncertain. While University officials said Yale remains committed to building the two new residential colleges, construction will not begin until Yale raises the roughly $300 million in outstanding costs for the project. The decision of when to start construction will likely fall to the new University president, current President Richard Levin said, adding that the Development Office is focusing on fundraising for core University operations for the remainder of his term. Architecture School Dean Robert A.M. Stern, whose firm designed the new colleges, said he is disappointed by the delays, and he expressed concern over whether the project will go ahead at all. “There has been discussion about making an intramural sports field,” Stern said. “It would be unfortunate if people fell in love with this idea and forgot about the colleges.”

Students hoping to attend nightly Buddhist meditation sessions in Battell Chapel found an empty room last Monday. Last week, the University ended its nine-year relationship with Indigo Blue, a nonprofit center for Buddhist life at Yale, and its director Bruce Blair ’81, said University Chaplain Sharon Kugler in a Friday email to the News. All programs hosted by Indigo Blue — such as its daily candle-lit space for quiet conversation and prayer called Stillness & Light and Buddhist chanting and meditation sessions — have been discontinued. The Buddhist Chapel, which was formerly housed in the Branford Memorial Room in Harkness Tower and renovated at the end of last semester, was closed and dismantled this weekend. Kugler said the Chaplain’s Office plans to meet with Buddhist students throughout November to determine future programming, but weekly Zen Buddhist meditation sessions will still be held in the interim beginning on Wednesday in Welch Hall’s Breathing Space, led by a representative from the Yale Stress Center. “We have decided it would be best to go in a different direction to serve our Buddhist community,” she said. Kugler did not specify why Indigo Blue was discontinued. Blair did not

SEE RESIDENTIAL PAGE 4

SEE BUDDHIST CHAPEL PAGE 4

BY YANAN WANG AND JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTERS

evacuation of flood-prone regions, opening an Emergency Operations Center and announcing plans to close New Haven public schools and senior centers on Monday and Tuesday. The state will also see some closures, as Gov. Dannel Malloy announced a Declaration of Emergency on Saturday and ordered all non-essential state employees not to report to work Monday after consultation with state agency officials. “Residents should take this storm

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The end of Yale’s partnership with Indigo Blue, a nonprofit Buddhist center, means that all programs hosted by the center will be discontinued.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “One doesn't need a lawgiver or a super thinker or a philosopher yaledailynews.com/opinion

Don't fear Sandy H

urricane Sandy has arrived. People along the Eastern Seaboard are hoarding water. Governments and schools are shutting down. In a lovely throwback to the last century, I saw a young couple at Rite Aid yesterday actually buying candles, lest the storm knock out their battery supply as well as the city’s electrical grid. And at Yale, today’s classes have been cancelled, effectively extending Yale’s debut fall break another day. Yale hasn’t had a snow day since 1978. Even then, in a blizzard featuring more than two feet of snow and winds that could give Sandy a run for her money, classes were cancelled on Governor Ella T. Grasso’s order, not any Yale administrator’s. I used to have this theory about Yale: The University didn’t acknowledge the existence of calendars or weather. Time, national holidays, physical danger — none of these things mattered to the stalwart force of Yale. We didn’t observe national holidays — save Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Classes aren’t of uniform length, and they don’t start at normal times like 11:30; no, for whatever reason, we’ll take the 11:35 start, please. The last time Yale sent its students home was during the American Revolution. The University stood above all external influences, I thought. It was a true haven of learning, a place where we could take ourselves just a bit too seriously, where we could proudly know that we stopped for nothing. Snow could come, and we’d trudge through it to class, maybe throwing a snowball along the way. Men from across the world could fly airplanes into a national landmark just 80 miles down the highway, and we’d soldier on, mourning and debating and wondering together but keeping our minds on Kant or calculus all the while. Kant and calculus, you see, aren’t affected by terrorists or hurricanes. But that fierce — perhaps even blind — confidence is fading away. This year, Yale discovered not only the existence of national holidays but also the concept of fall break. And now there’s some rain and wind, and the University is telling us to stay home, forget about our studies and just — please, kids — be careful. Yes, I appreciate the extra day to sleep in and the extra hours to work on my senior essay, but I see fear creeping into our castles. It’s reasonable to be afraid of a storm that might knock down trees, flood the streets or even kill civilians. There are a lot of people who don’t have the luxury of living in castles. But we do have the luxuries of Yale’s housing and closely clustered buildings. That’s one

of the things Yale gives us: the chance to devote ourselves to our studies and extracurricular occupations even JULIA when every FISHER external force is screaming School of for us to take a break and Fisher huddle up. It’s reasonable to be afraid, but it’s equally reasonable — and much healthier — to see the storm coming and be excited. Stuck inside all day? Movies! Winds that can knock you off your feet? Sounds like an adventure I wouldn’t want to miss. Ten years ago, I saw fear’s power to sap life. The D.C. metropolitan area was struck by snipers who killed people on the street at random. No one went outside except to run from a building to a car. Recess was held indoors. Little League games were cancelled. If the police had caught the killers a few days later than they did, we might have seen the king of all ironies: Halloween defeated by crippling fear. Today, we live in a world choked by fear. It’s everywhere. We’re afraid that the man across the street is a rapist. We tread lightly with our jokes for fear of being condemned for political incorrectness. We’re genuinely concerned that the country could not survive a Mitt Romney administration. Fear is not a thing to be proud of. It works slowly but powerfully to crush spirits. Deprived of the things we love in life — the sheer joy of each day — we turn sour and sullen. When we are infected by fear, we see the world as an enemy, and soon enough we begin to see each other as enemies, too. What unites us and uplifts us, on the other hand, is our power to celebrate and explore when the natural reaction is fear. The world may send us hurricanes, snipers, snowstorms or war, but there’s no bolder response than to push ahead, to meet the storm with equal gusto rather than to shrink away. Turn each threat into an adventure, and nothing can stop you. That’s what Yale has been doing for three centuries, and, even if our University has abandoned the task, it’s what we should all be doing. So I’ll be outside today, dodging flying branches and trying to stay on my feet. I hope you’ll join me.

T

he list of interrogators is long: Parents. Cousins. Former professors. Current professors. And, chiefly, fellow students. They all have one question: “What are you doing next year?” I can’t complain too much. For the past three years, I myself often asked The Question to seniors. It always seemed like the perfect conversation starter — especially with a momentary acquaintance. The senior could say something snappy; I could respond. Awkward silence defeated. Score one for the small talk. In retrospect, I owe my friends — the seniors of yesteryear, now gainfully employed desk jockies — heaps of apologies. Being on the receiving end of The Question isn’t too fun. Maybe I’m just speaking for myself, but I suspect most seniors would agree with me: The Question brings our anxiety to the surface. We don’t know what we will be doing and we don’t want to be reminded. As an underclassman, I probably did recognize how uncouth The Questions was — as I am sure my interrogators do now. And I doubt this public service announcement will stop anyone from asking a senior about “next

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year.” Why? Because The Question has more do with the asker than the answerer. At Yale, success comes NATHANIEL in a particular that we ZELINSKY form all know but bears repeatOn Point ing — because we never talk about it. The ideal student is social but not a drunkard smart, but not a section jerk and involved to the hilt in extracurriculars, among which there is a clearly defined hierarchy. He should be spontaneous, entrepreneurial and down-to-earth. And, most of all, the successful Yalie does not care about success. That last criteria, to borrow from Joe Biden, is a load of malarkey. Deep down, most of us, especially underclassmen, are fixated on achieving success. How do I know? Well, for one, I fixated — a lot — as a freshman, sophomore, and junior. Frankly, I am willing to call the Yale emperor naked. We all care about success, and we care about what other people think about our success.

But don’t take my word for it. Underclassmen reveal their emotions too — every time they ask the “next year” question. That’s the key to why The Question will always be asked, despite its uncouthness. Askers want to know that it’ll all be okay: that, at the end of the day, there is a job, with its own stamp of social approval, to top off their Yale career with socially approved success. Because, every day, they constantly measure themselves: “Am I doing enough?” Mired in the drudgery of extracurriculars they joined largely in order to gain a title, they feel the ambiguity of not knowing how to succeed — because achieving the right success at Yale is a very murky business indeed. Sometimes, I wish I could fly back in time to freshman year. I would tell myself that that Yale is not an incubator of success. It is what George Pierson ’26 wrote: “At once a tradition, a company of scholars, a society of friends.” But you know what? Past me probably wouldn’t have gotten the message. I would have thought that future me was a cheesy idealist. Or worse — someone unsuccessful, trying to justify my lack of success. Past me would

have pooh-poohed future me and walked on, straight into the mess of anxious ambiguity so pervasive we dare not speak its name. What did Pierson really mean, that past me would not understand? “Tradition.” Traditions are long, unlike our transitory success — they extend behind us and ahead of us. They make our resumes pale in perspective, and they link us to something greater than ourselves. “Scholars.” That is who, at our ideal, we are. Yet we never embrace it. We skim. We do just enough academically to get by passably well (for many, an A-minus in an easy gut). “Friends.” That is the thing that gets hit the hardest in our quests for success. When we start judging, we naturally look to our roommates and say, “who am I compared to him?” So, underclassman: ask The Question; know what it means; maybe, then, you can bring us little closer to Pierson’s vision of Yale. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T TA O TA O H O L M E S

Cooking Dad’s slippers M

y dad whips up a mean slice of toast. His freshly brewed tea is hard to beat, and his omelettes are amazingly edible. That said, when my mom left more than two weeks ago to visit family in China, she took fundamental solo-husband-survival precautions and left a week’s worth of home-cooked meat dishes in the freezer. My dad, like many of yours, I imagine, needs meat to survive. Unfortunately, he just isn’t particularly adept at cooking it himself. My mother’s stay slowly trickled over the expected eight days, and I began to joke to my friends that my dad had probably resorted to eating his own shoe leather. (Don’t worry — he didn't.) But while he managed to satiate his hunger (one frozen stir-fry at a time), it was loneliness that proved more difficult to stave off. My parents both work primarily at home, a relatively solitary lifestyle but for the presence of each other. My dad couldn’t pull an aluminumwrapped plate of company out of the freezer quite as easily.

In the weeks leading up to this new and glorious fall break, I toyed with a hodgepodge of potential ways to spend it. A cabin in Vermont? Perhaps a hiking trip to New Hampshire or Maine? I thought about inviting two suitemates home; my Facebook newsfeed notified me of some classmates galumphing around London. My mom was still in China, and my thoughts in lecture continually drifted off to visions of my dad gnawing on his L.L. Bean slippers. On top of everything, the weather was looking grim — meteorological PMS to the upcoming “Frankenstorm.” By Tuesday afternoon, as the sky began to drizzle, I just wanted to go home, read by the fire, and, if my dad was going to eat his slippers, to at least marinate and bake them for him first. When my mom heard that I’d decided to head straight home and pass up what she’d misinterpreted as hoards of Yalies pleading for my company, she told me that she and my aunt were deeply impressed and extremely grateful. When she told my 26-year-old Chinese

cousin that I had passed up fun invitations in favor of going home and spending time with my dad, he was so touched that he apparently began crying. My aunt told me I was such a good daughter, and asked me repeatedly what I wanted her to buy me, until I finally relented and said I like boots, but I already had a pair so I said it wasn’t necessary. “I’m buying you boots,” she said, and there was no further arguing. All of my Chinese relatives (and there are many), it turned out, were moved by what had been to me a simple desire to relax by the wood stove, hang out with my dad and spend time with my now halfblind, half-deaf golden lab. To me, the admiration was unexpected — my actions complied with one of China’s most hallowed social codes: filial piety. Filial piety aside, this praise felt wrong. Was going home to spend time with family over friends an action that merited commendation? How mediocre of a daughter must I be? Admittedly, over the last three or four years, I’ve been strikingly absent from home:

my parents are lucky to see me for more than two weeks of summer, and I haven’t been around for spring break since 10th grade. The truth is, I don’t seem to be an anomaly: over the course of a year, the bulk of my fellow Yalies pass similarly brief stints at home. Our families generally tend to encourage our endeavors and joke (or pretend to joke) about how they never see us anymore. What has changed, at least for me, is that all my life my parents have been the ones supporting me. Only recently have I realized that they also need me to support them. I’m not about to return every weekend, and my mom and dad yet again won’t have my company over spring break, but I feel a greater pull towards home than I have ever before. And above all, I never again want to be praised for coming home to keep my dad company and cook his slippers. TAO TAO HOLMES is a junior in Davenport College. Contact her at taotao.holmes@yale.edu .

A problematic political trend I

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king.”

was forewarned. Before I arrived at Yale as a freshman, many members of my family warned me. Yale would be too liberal, they cautioned. Especially on the issue of Israel, Yale was a veritable bastion of leftism. What I have actually found at Yale is more troubling than the hardcore liberalism my family warned me about. I have observed a massive and pervasive amount of fiscal conservatism. What my family warned me about was the Yale that they knew from their youth — the radical utopia of the 1960s. The Yale where 400 of 1,000 graduating seniors in 1968 declared their intention to dodge the draft. The Yale where in 1970 President Kingman Brewster made classes optional in the face of aggressive radicalism. But that Yale is gone. Its long-haired, pot-smoking, pseudo-Communist students have been replaced with upper-middle-class kids possessing a strange, center-left sense of apathy. Yalies are, for the most part, socially liberal. Even most of Yale’s outspoken conservatives are moderate enough on social issues. Many support gay marriage or the legalization of marijuana. They are against the war in Afghanistan and for greater privacy and respect for individual choice. Their social ideology is largely libertarian — keep the government out of my head, my

classrooms and my bedroom. But their fiscal ideology is decidedly rightwing. They are against expanSCOTT sive welSTERN fare programs and governA Stern ment spendPerspective ing. They want entitlements to be reined in and the deficit to be slashed. At least from my experiences, they have vague notions that government is too big and that success should not be taxed. According to an April 2012 poll conducted by The Politic, a Yale undergraduate journal, Yalies expressed significantly more support for issues such as gay marriage and the legalization of marijuana than for raising taxes on the top 1 percent. Even though a majority of students favored raising taxes on the wealthy, it is notable that they supported this 15 or 20 percent less than these other contentious issues. “I think very few ‘liberal’ Yalies are particularly liberal on both social and fiscal issues,” said Christian Vazquez ’13, a selfidentified social moderate and fiscal conservative. Vazquez represents a growing number of students who share this ideology.

“Americans since the 1990s have tended to identify more with their social views on issues than their fiscal views,” Vazquez said. “As a results Yale’s ‘liberal’ campus is really only socially liberal with most Yalies having a somewhat vested interest in the fiscal status quo of conservatism.” This brand of conservatism has always seemed somewhat elitist to me: the idea that if you don’t need anyone else’s help, no one else should either. It fits quite well with the sense of entitlement and superiority that is possessed by some people at Yale — people on the left and right. A great number of Yale students are the product of either elite prep schools or elite suburban public schools, at which their worth is socialized into them. They are used to being the best and brightest; they didn’t need anyone’s help to get where they are today, they say. They worked for it, damn it, and it took time and effort and no small amount of stress. Many kids from urban public schools feel the same way, because they shone in spite of less privileged beginnings. They did it, after all, so anyone else can, too. Here’s the problem with this ideology: Not everyone can pull themselves up by their bootstraps. You did — you were valedictorian, debating champion, National Merit Scholar, Olympian

or all of the above — but you probably had a remarkable amount of support from your parents. Studies have shown that the single greatest determining factor in a child’s success is parental support. That Yalies are wealthier than most is less important than the fact that their parents probably stressed education more than most. There are exceptions to this rule, obviously, but most Yale students come from beginnings that in some way pushed them to succeed. Not everyone gets those opportunities and encouragement. Some need government aid to bridge the gap. After all, we all benefit from government programs, though some do more than others. But slightly higher taxes, slightly bigger bureaucracy — to many Yalies, these are too much to bear. The radical liberalism of Yale’s recent past and the social liberalism of its present obscure the fiscal conservatism of its present and, I fear, its future. Yalies’ extraordinary success is callusing them against the struggles of others, and, strange though it may sound, shaping their fiscal ideology in a way that my family should truly have been worried about. SCOTT STERN is a sophomore in Branford College. Contact him at scott.stern@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Dialogue should simply be a sound among other sounds, just something that comes out of the mouths of people whose eyes tell the story in visual terms.” ALFRED HITCHCOCK ENGLISH FILM DIRECTOR

CORRECTIONS AND C L A R I F I CAT I O N S TUESDAY, OCT. 23

The article “Faculty growth stagnates” mistakenly suggested that Edward Kamens, chair of the East Asian Languages and Literatures Department, said it would be impossible to add a position in Korean literature as part of a larger expansion of Korean studies at Yale due to the limited resources currently available. In fact, he said that if his department were given resources for expansion, it would likely seek authorization to add a position in Korean literature if it were part of a larger expansion of Korean studies. TUESDAY, OCT. 23

The article “Empty factory to become lofts” inaccurately described the startup Higher One and mistakenly stated that it moved into the Science Park neighborhood last March. In fact, it has been in Science Park since 2004 and decided to move to the Winchester Arms factory in March.

City debates tax-exempt bonding BY DIANA LI STAFF REPORTER New Haven officials are struggling to find the best way to finance out-of-court settlements resulting from recent lawsuits. Last Wednesday, New Haven Budget Director Joe Clerkin and City Controller Mike O’Neil asked the Board of Aldermen’s finance committee to grant tax-exempt status on potential bonds to pay for two cases,

Aponte v. Gonzalez and Martone v. City of New Haven, which together cost the city $900,000. While the city may ultimately decide not to use tax-exempt bonds to finance payments for the cases, aldermen questioned whether this was an appropriate use of tax-exempt bonding and decided to table the item, postponing the vote to a later date. “We have accumulated a fund deficit in our self-insurance fund over the past few years,” Clerkin said. “There is no easy way of

TUESDAY, OCT. 23

The article “Native American student community grows” mistakenly suggested that the NACC had canceled plans to move to its new location at 26 High St. TUESDAY, OCT. 23

The article “Campus climate weighed” inaccurately described the role of Title IX coordinators. It also inaccurately paraphrased the response of administrators to Emily Hong’s ‘14 question regarding the training offered to Yale faculty.

Second climate survey begins BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER Though the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights closed its investigation into Yale’s sexual climate this past summer, the University is continuing to evaluate its resources for addressing and reporting sexual misconduct. Yale’s 15 Title IX Coordinators are seeking input from the student body and holding focus groups with randomly selected participants from across the University this November in order to compile a second campus sexual climate survey. The previous assessment, conducted by the Advisory Committee on Campus Climate, released its report in September 2011, and concluded that the University needed to communicate sexual misconduct matters more effectively with the student body and conduct regular climate assessments. The current assessment will focus on measuring the success of programs implemented in the past year, assessing general campus attitudes toward Yale’s sexual climate and defining the University’s areas for improvement. “The broad and ongoing engagement of the Yale community is essential in order for us to prevent and address sexual misconduct most effectively and to work together to strengthen our culture of respect and responsibility,” University Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Provost Stephanie Spangler said in an email to the News Sunday. After 16 students and alumni filed a Title IX complaint against the University in March 2011, Yale responded by creating the Advisory Committee on Campus Climate and increasing the presence of Title IX coordinators on campus. As part of the second campus climate assessment, members of the Yale Community can provide feedback by email, anonymously online or in person, and Spangler’s office will arrange focus groups to bring together students, faculty and administrators in Yale College and the professional schools. Spangler said the campus climate reassessment will evaluate several distinct areas: how the Yale Community perceives and understands the campus sexual climate and University resources for addressing sexual misconduct, whether students and faculty feel that they can affect Yale’s sexual climate and what additional actions the University might take to prevent and address sexual misconduct. In his official response to the findings of the original campus climate assessment, University President Richard Levin committed the University to conducting regular appraisals of campus sexual climate.

Title IX Coordinators — who are spread across Yale College, the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the professional schools — have met monthly since last spring and have been planning a second climate assessment for several months, said Joan Channick DRA ’89, School of Drama Title IX Coordinator. “The population of the University turns over frequently so it’s always useful to get an understanding of what people’s understandings and attitudes are at all levels,” Channick said. “You can’t assume, with the high turnover of University populations, that whatever attitudinal assessment done [before] is still accurate.” The original Advisory Committee assessment was conducted with 12 focus groups in each of the residential colleges and two at graduate schools, said Pamela Schirmeister ’80 GRD ’88, Title IX Coordinator for Yale College and the Graduate School. Because coordinators have had more time to prepare, the current survey will be more comprehensive, Schirmeister said.

The population of the University turns over frequently so it’s always useful to get an understanding of … people’s attitudes at all levels. JOAN CHANNICK Title IX coordinator, School of Drama She added that the participants for the new focus groups will be randomly selected. “[In Yale College], we are running a focus group for sophomore women, one for sophomore men, one for women’s groups, for sports captains … ” Schirmeister said. “There will be less of a likelihood of a homogenous response because of random selection.” Schirmeister said the Title IX coordinators will either facilitate the focus group meetings or take notes and listen to participants’ comments. She added that pilot focus groups have been conducted with the Title IX Coordinators, the Graduate Student Assembly and the student life deans for the graduate and professional schools. Schirmeister will personally be involved in 19 focus groups, she said. The Advisory Committee on Campus Climate, which compiled the first campus climate report, is not involved in the reassessment. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

JACOB GEIGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Supreme Court ruled in Ricci v. DeStefano that the city’s decision to discard the results of a job test for firefighters was discriminatory.

making the deficit go away, but there has to be an alternative one way or the other: You can’t just say we’re not going to bond for it. The deficit still exists, and [the Board] needs to replace it with another solution if they reject it.” City Hall spokesperson Elizabeth Benton ’04 said Wednesday’s meeting aimed to decide whether to “preserve the option” of giving these bonds tax-exempt status, enabling the city to realize lower borrowing costs. New Haven is self-insured — when the city owes money as a result of a lawsuit, it pays out of its own budget and is not insured by an outside company, she added. However, tax-exempt bonding is usually only used for capital expenses, such as building roads, schools, construction projects and other expenses that are seen as having long-term value, Benton said. Wednesday’s meeting asked the Board’s finance committee to approve this type of bonding for an expense that is usually not paid for in this manner. The city used this method of tax-exempt bonding to help pay for the Ricci v. DeStefano case, in which the city borrowed about $6 million after the Supreme Court ruled that the city’s decision to discard the results of a job test for firefighters was discriminatory, Benton said. Clerkin said the meeting was supposed to be about the tax-exempt status of the bonds — the IRS requires that the city obtain approval from the Board of Aldermen in order to make these bonds tax-exempt — but that it “devolved to the larger question about whether [court settlements are] something we should be bonding for in the first place.” Clerkin added that potential alternatives include raising taxes and cutting services, though he said he was unsure about the existence of other alternatives. Ward 5 Alderman and Board President Jorge Perez explained that the Finance Committee

chose to postpone the vote to a later date because its members felt they needed more information, such as how the city can prevent cases where it pays for settlements using bonds in the future, how the city gets into these economic situations in the first place, whether voting to grant tax-exempt status to these bonds will set a precedent for tax-exempt bonding, and what the exact alternatives are. The circumstances around Wednesday’s request were different from those surrounding the Ricci case, he added. “[During Ricci v. DeStefano], we didn’t have a lot of choice. They were asking for $6 million and we were dealing with an $8 million deficit,” Perez said. Ward 7 Alderman Doug Hausladen, who serves on the finance committee, said that the city is already facing a sizeable amount of debt and that the Board needs to keep in mind that while bonding might be easy now, the city may struggle in the future when it has to pay back the bonds. He echoed Perez’s sentiments, saying that the committee needed more information before it could make a decision about whether it wanted to preserve the ability of the city to take out tax-exempt bonds to pay for these settlements in the same way it paid in the Ricci case. “If this really is the second time we’re doing something along these lines, setting a precedent isn’t something you want to do lightly: We tabled it to give more time to do a little research on everything so we’re not rushing into a precedent,” Hausladen said. “$500,000 here, $500,000 there adds up, and in theory, if we had a healthy city budget with a healthy reserve fund, we’d be able to swallow these losses without bonding.” The Ricci v. DeStefano case was decided in June 2009. Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu .

Arch. Ph.D. program’s presence grows BY YANAN WANG STAFF REPORTER In the coming weeks, the School of Architecture’s “Dialogues” series will reinforce increased collaboration between the school’s Ph.D. students and other members of Yale’s architecture community. The series — which will include three events this semester — was established last year to foster conversation among doctoral candidates, professional students and faculty members, Surry Schlabs ’99 ARC ’03 GRD ’17 said. This effort to better integrate the Ph.D. program with the school aligns with a growing trend to bring together architecture students pursuing different degrees, he added. Though housed in the same building as other architecture programs, the Ph.D. program differs from the school’s other offerings in its focus on theory and scholarship rather than preprofessional training. “The Ph.D. program is treading new ground as it grows and finds its identity,” Kyle Dugdale GRD ’15 said. Four years ago, the School of Architecture became the last of its peer institutions, such as Harvard, Columbia and MIT, to develop a doctoral curriculum, Dean Robert A.M. Stern said. Although thenDean Thomas Beeby expressed the need for a Ph.D. program as early as 1990, it was only in 2009 that the school was able to procure the money to begin accepting applications. The school’s Ph.D. program differs from its competitors by requiring all its candidates to have practiced architecture for at least one year in addition to their scholarly research, Stern said. Kurt Forster, director of graduate studies at the school, said this condition underlies the school’s progressive view of the academic field’s future. “The profession is no longer going to run on the standard track of mere commentary,” Forster said. “Instead of teaching only things that are remote, our Ph.D. students will be able to look at the involvement of architecture in the

life of society at large.” Schlabs, who worked as a practicing architect for eight years before deciding to pursue a Ph.D., agreed that it is helpful to have practical experience to inform his academic work.

Our Ph.D. students will be able to look at the involvement of architecture in the life of society at large. KURT FORSTER Director of graduate studies, School of Architecture “It’s important to have a firm grasp of what it means to design and make something,” Schlabs said. “Our experience in the profession will be a huge asset when we teach studio classes.” When the Ph.D. program was first established, Stern said students requested to be housed in Rudolph Hall, where the classrooms and the offices for the School of Architecture are situated. Their integration within the professional school sets them apart from other graduate students at Yale, many of whom do not have a physical space to call their own, said Joseph Clarke GRD ’15, who will lead the first “Dialogues” seminar this semester. He explained that working in the same building has allowed them to “integrate practice and scholarship under the same roof.” Schlabs said he and the other doctoral students are “still growing into their relationship with the school,” and “Dialogues” is an essential step toward forging stronger ties with both the school and the neighboring History of Art Department. He noted that one of the things that initially attracted him to the program was its interdisciplinary nature, citing the discussion series as a way of fostering “collegial dialogue” between scholars and practitioners of other disciplines. At each “Dialogues” event,

architecture Ph.D. students give brief presentations on their research, followed by commentary from a faculty member of the student’s choice. The discussions are generally attended by a few dozen architecture students and faculty, Forster said. Schlabs added that “Dialogues” uses a conference room as opposed to a lecture hall to emulate the seminar structure, allowing faculty and students to engage with each other in “a more personal way.” Architecture professor EevaLiisa Pelkonen, who participated in the series last year as a faculty commentator, said she is enthusiastic about the efforts Ph.D. students are making to connect their research to the professional aspects of the school and other departments within the University. This semester’s seminars, for instance, will feature faculty from the Music, History of Art and Literature departments. “They have introduced a new level of intellectual exchange,”

Pelkonen said. “The School of Architecture is not always as engaged with the rest of Yale as we could be, and the Ph.D. candidates have created a window to the University at large. In their short time here, they have accomplished things that the faculty hasn’t been able to accomplish.” Despite the school’s recent focus on the Ph.D. program, Stern noted that the school is “notoriously underfunded” and has only been able to take two doctoral candidates every year since each student is supported entirely by scholarships. But he added that while the program may expand in the future, its current size allows students to receive a great deal of personal attention. The first seminar in the “Dialogues” series will be led by Clarke and music professor Brian Kane, who will speak on “The Invention of Mass Acoustics.” Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu .

ARCHITEC TURE DEGREE S M. Arch I — “First Professional Degree”

A professional architecture degree that prepares students for accreditation internships and the exams necessary for pursuing a practicing license. Can be earned in a span of three to threeand-a-half years. Candidates are free to pursue a variety of disciplines in their undergraduate years. M. Arch II — “Post-Professional Degree”

Designed for students who already hold a Bachelor of Architecture or its equivalent and want to strengthen their theoretical understanding of the field. Requires two years of full-time residency and gives students freedom to explore their work in a variety of contexts in addition to more traditional studio classes. M.E.D. — “Research-Based Thesis Program”

Research-based program intended for post-graduate and mid-career professionals interested in pursuing two years of advanced architectural studies. The full-time residency program culminates in a written thesis or independent project. Ph.D. Program — “Doctor of Philosophy”

Prepares students for careers in academia, museum curatorship, publishing and cultural advocacy and administration. Equips candidates with the skills to become effective teachers of architecture and its relationship to culture at large. Spans five years and culminates in an 8,000 word dissertation and oral examination.


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Thousands of candles can be lighted from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.” BUDDHA

Students face ‘abrupt’ closure of Indigo Blue BUDDHIST CHAPEL FROM PAGE 1 respond to multiple requests for comment, but students in communication with the former chaplain said that currently, Blair is primarily concerned with the well-being of the community. All students interviewed who are involved with Indigo Blue said they do not know the circumstances surrounding the program’s termination or Bruce Blair’s departure. A notice was posted on the door of the Buddhist Chapel in Branford informing students of the end of Indigo Blue programs last Tuesday morning, said Geoffrey Liu MED ’15, a Buddhist student who has opened the shrine every morning for the last year. Heshika Deegahawathura ’14, president of the Buddhist Advisory Board: Undergraduate at Yale, said those involved with the Buddhist community are “shocked” because they had no prior warning and no students were consulted before the program’s closure.

We don’t advertise the Buddhism element of it though we follow a Buddhist philosophy. SIMON SONG ’14 Head Coach, Football

Bruce Blair founded the program in 2003 to provide services to Yale’s Buddhist community because no official Buddhist program existed at the time, said his son, Nate Blair ’11. Though Indigo Blue was an organization independent from Yale and was funded primarily through donations, the University gave Indigo Blue office space in Welch Hall, the Chapel space and a stipend of roughly $8,000 per year, he said. “[Indigo Blue] has been struggling financially the whole time,

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Students involved with Indigo Blue were not warned or consulted prior to the program’s termination. with very little help from Yale or interest in helping from Yale,” Nate Blair said. Since Indigo Blue’s closure and Bruce Blair’s departure, students and alumni involved with the Buddhist community have discussed the change over email and through word of mouth, said Hung Pham ’15, a representative of the Buddhist Chaplaincy on the InterReligious Leadership Council. He said that last Wednesday, roughly

10 students met in the Buddhist Chapel during regular meditation hours to share stories about personal experiences with Bruce Blair. A concerned group of undergraduates, graduate students and alumni also plan to write letters to University officials and to meet with Kugler next week, Pham said. Brendan Ross ’13, a student involved with Indigo Blue, said students are upset that the organization was shut down without any

explanation. “No one’s trying to create a protest. We all just feel hurt by the fact that this happened so abruptly and we don’t know why, so people are reaching out,” Ross said, adding that over 80 students are involved in the conversation. Deegahawathura said the daily programming offered by Indigo Blue served the needs of students from many different Buddhist sects, several of which require daily

Colleges await change in leadership RESIDENTIAL FROM PAGE 1 Levin announced official plans for the new residential colleges in June 2008 — three months before the onset of the worldwide financial downturn. Originally slated for completion in fall 2013, the University postponed the start date for construction indefinitely once the recession began. Workers on the site at Prospect Triangle are currently close to completing the installation of new underground utilities and moving the existing ones, University Spokesman Tom Conroy said, adding that workers are also leveling out parts of the site to prepare for erosion control before the winter season. Stern called the current state of the construction site “shovelready.” Chair of the Presidential Search Committee Charles Goodyear ’80 said that while the presidential search statement requires the new president to “protect and enhance the financial resources of the University through fundraising initiatives,” the committee is

not selecting the new president with the completion of the two colleges specifically in mind. “While the issues of ethics, integrity and excellence are paramount, the role of Yale’s President is not unidimensional, so there is no single issue — or single fundraising target — on which we expect to judge any candidate,” Goodyear said in a Saturday email to the News.

It was the right time for new colleges 10 years ago. No organism can go this long without new growth. ROBERT A.M. STERN Dean, School of Architecture Stern expressed regret that the forthcoming change in University leadership — along with the upcoming retirement of Edward Bass ’67, a supporter of the new colleges, from his position as Yale Corporation Senior Fellow — places the residential college project at risk of falling

to the wayside. He emphasized a need for a new capital campaign comparable to the Yale Tomorrow campaign in order to procure the necessary funds. Conroy said that since preparations for construction on the site are almost complete, funding remains the only obstacle preventing the project from breaking ground. He emphasized the University’s commitment to building the new residential colleges. Joan O’Neill, vice president for development, said there is no way to tell how many donations or how much time it will take to raise the remaining funding for the colleges, but she added that her office is continuing to discuss the project with donors. Levin said the decision to begin construction likely will not come for a few years, since he is focusing on securing donations for operating costs this year to give his successor flexibility in decision-making. “It’s possible someone will come forward with a large gift, but it’s not likely,” Levin said. “I’ve been trying.” Multiple staff members of the

University Facilities Planning and Construction department deferred comment on the new colleges to Conroy, who said in an email last Tuesday that a comment from the department “will generally have to await future decisions by the University leadership.” Project Engineer and Superintendent Doug Somers of Turner Construction Company, the company building the new colleges, also deferred comment to University staff. Stern said that the project’s continued postponement is frustrating in light of the University’s “desperate need” for new housing facilities. “It was the right time for new colleges 10 years ago,” Stern said. “No organism can go this long without new growth.” Stern’s firm, Robert A.M. Stern Architects, completed designs for the colleges in March 2012. Contact YANAN WANG at yanan.wang@yale.edu . Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .

TIMELINE NEW RESIDENTIAL COLLEGES JUNE 2008 University President Richard Levin announces plans to establish two new residential colleges, increasing Yale College’s enrollment by 15 percent. APRIL 2009 The Yale Corporation meets to discuss the implications of the recession and decides to postpone construction indefinitely. FEBRUARY 2012 Robert A.M. Stern Architects erects a design mock-up of the new colleges on Winchester Ave. to test potential construction materials. APRIL 2012 RAMSA issues the final set of construction documents.

VICTOR KANG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The University postponed the start date for construction of the new residential colleges — once slated for completion by fall 2013 — after the onset of the Great Recession.

SEPTEMBER 2012 Former Yale Corporation Senior Fellow Roland Bass ’68 tells the News that the University is “one or two gifts away from breaking ground” on the construction project.

prayer at an altar. The “abrupt” end of prayer hours and the dismantling of the Buddhist shrine has left students without a space to practice their faith, he added. Pham said Indigo Blue’s sacred spaces and meditation programs have also attracted students of non-Buddhist faith, adding that he estimates roughly 50 students regularly attend Stillness & Light. “We don’t advertise the Buddhism element of it though we fol-

low a Buddhist philosophy,” said Simon Song ’14, who frequented Stillness & Light. “It provides something different from the general Yale culture which can be kind of overwhelming or too stressful.” Over the past four years, 1.4 percent of Yale College students have identified as Buddhist. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“Laughter is an instant vacation.”

MILTON BERLE

AMERICAN COMEDIAN AND ACTOR

Over break, Yale Dems campaign in PA BY MICHELLE HACKMAN STAFF REPORTER In the final stretch of a hotly contested presidential election, the Yale College Democrats traveled to Pennsylvania over the fall break to campaign for President Barack Obama. Nearly 40 Yale students made the trip to Philadelphia on Thursday to canvass for the President in one of the states most crucial to his re-election strategy. Hosted by members of the University of Pennsylvania Democrats for their three-night stay, the Yale Dems called voters and knocked on doors in two counties outside Philadelphia and reminded them to turn out on Election Day. Zak Newman ’13, president of the Dems, said the group began discussions in July for a fall break trip to a swing state, since the break was scheduled close to Election Day. “We knew early on this election season that Pennsylvania was going to be an important state for the President,” said Nicole Hobbs ’14, the Dems’ elections coordinator and a trip organizer. “The Philadelphia area is crucial in this election, and the fact that it was logistically possible to go there and make a difference was a huge impetus in planning this trip.” Throughout the summer and into the fall, Obama has maintained a consistent lead of roughly 4 to 6 percentage points in polls against Republican challenger Mitt Romney in Pennsylvania. University of Pennsylvania Democrats President Andrew Brown

said new voter registration rules may be making the race tighter than polls show. In March, the Pennsylvania legislature passed a law requiring voters to produce photo identification before casting their votes. The law was widely criticized as an attempt to prevent Democratic-leaning voters from going to the polls, as the people who would be disenfranchised by it — those who could not easily reach a DMV or pay for ID cards — tend to support the president.

Pennsylvania is really becoming more of a swing state, and we can really use the support of groups like the Yale Democrats. ANDREW BROWN President, University of Pennsylvania Democrats

On Oct. 2, the state Supreme Court issued an injunction against the law, preventing it from taking effect until after the Nov. 6 election. Still, Brown said confusion surrounding the law will likely prevent many voters without proper identification from casting ballots. On Thursday afternoon, the Yale and Penn Dems kicked off their weekend of volunteering by calling voters to inform them that

they could go to the polls even if they did not possess photo IDs. “I talk anecdotally about the people who will be disenfranchised [by the law] having never had a real conversation with one of these people, and here I was on Thursday talking to 92-year-old women who couldn’t find their marriage certificates from 1960 and can’t easily make it to the DMV, but who still deserved to vote,” Newman said. On Friday and Saturday, the group traveled to Media and Bristol, suburbs outside of Philadelphia that are nestled in some of the state’s most competitive counties. They spent two days knocking on doors, attempting to persuade undecided voters and asking supporters to sign “commit to vote” cards. According to research done by Yale political science professor Alan Gerber, in-person canvassing is the single most effective strategy employed by political campaigns, as the face-to-face contact lingers longer in voters’ minds than TV ads or flyers. But for Eric Fein ’16, canvassing holds just as much benefit for the volunteers knocking on doors. “When I’ve been canvassing in New Haven, one of the things we ask is what issues are important to [the residents], and you get to hear about what the problems are in the New Haven community — so I remember how hard it is for people to find jobs, how hard it is for kids to find safe places to go after school,” Fein said. Maddie Vahey ’15, one of the out-of-state canvassing cap-

Students welcome recess BY KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG STAFF REPORTER Students kept busy on- and off-campus over fall break through activities ranging from the Yale College Council’s Block Party to New York City museum visits. During Yale’s first-ever fall break, which lasted from Wednesday, Oct. 24 through Sunday, Oct. 28, students who stayed in New Haven participated in activities such as those sponsored by the Yale College Dean’s Office or practices scheduled by their sports teams. Though many students went home for the recess, others traveled from campus in sponsored class trips or with student organizations. John Meeske, associate dean for student organizations and physical resources, said students will most likely have a similar fall break in the 2013-’14 school year. Students interviewed said they enjoyed the break because it gave them enough time to explore New Haven’s surrounding areas. “Fall break [offered] the opportunity to travel to New York or Boston or even somewhere rural on subsidized trips or with friends,” Eleanor Michotte ’15 said. “Students can really get to know a place outside the Yale bubble, the importance of which is not to be underestimated.”

Students can really get to know a place outside the Yale bubble, the importance of which is not to be underestimated. ELEANOR MICHOTTE ’15 Meeske said in an email to the News that some Universitysponsored activities, such as day trips to New York and discounted movie tickets, were more popular than anticipated, while Tuesday’s block party drew fewer attendees than expected, perhaps because of rain. Because only roughly 20 students signed up to travel to the Yale-Columbia game last Saturday, the Dean’s Office decided to subsidize train tickets instead of hiring a bus. Alvaro Rodrigo ’15, who attended the block party, said he thought many students declined to attend the event because of the rain, though he said the “wide variety of food trucks” was a major draw to the event. Athletes on all teams cur-

YALE COLLEGE DEMOCRATS

The Yale Democrats stopped by suburbs outside of Philadelphia attempting to persuade undecided voters. tains for the Dems, explained that she canvasses nearly every weekend because she feels guilty for not having taken a semester off to work on the president’s campaign. She added that she considers canvassing an essential college pastime. “You always hear of stories of aunts and uncles and parents who remember when they were canvassing for so-and-so in college,

and I want to make sure I have those memories,” she said. But the Dems did not travel to Pennsylvania only to volunteer. After their first day of canvassing, the Penn Dems invited the Yale Dems to a party complete with politically-inspired cocktails, including the “Clinton Cooler,” the “Obamba” and the “Debbie Wasserman Schultz.” “I think it was a big success and

In hopes of spurring economic development, Gov. Dannel Malloy visited New Haven last week to announce a series of policies designed to foster new business growth and create “innovation hubs” throughout Connecticut. Malloy’s policies are part of the state’s Innovation Ecosystem program, which aims to grow the Connecticut economy through an array of financial, technical and professional resource offerings for businesses. As part of the program, Malloy announced plans to start four state “innovation hubs” — local offices that will house Innovation Ecosystem resources and help businesspeople network. The hubs, which will be located in Stamford, Hartford, Storrs and New Haven, will cost $5 million initially and are funded through Malloy’s 2011 Jobs Bill.

ALLIE KRAUSE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

rently in season and the basketball teams remained on campus to attend mandatory practices. But Graham Landy ’15, a member of the sailing team, said the break allowed his team more flexibility in their practice schedule — Landy traveled to Newport, R.I. on Friday to train with alumni for the College Sailing Match Race Championship in November. Several classes held class trips over fall break to expand on current classwork. Students enrolled in “Major English Poets” classes took a field trip over fall break to The Cloisters Museum in Manhattan on Wednesday. Trip participant Madeleine Welte ’15 said the visit, which was fully subsidized excepting lunch, was optional but included 40 students, the maximum number of students that the trip could accommodate. She added that the trip tied directly into the medieval book “Canterbury Tales,” required reading for the class this fall. Angela Ning ’14 said that 15 students from her “History of the Body” class traveled to the “Bodies: The Exhibition” in Manhattan over break. The lab course “Dynamic Earth in the Field and Laboratory” took a five-day trip over break to conduct research in the Canadian Appalachians. Undergraduate organizations also led trips over the recess to

engage in activities beyond the Yale campus. The Yale College Democrats went to Pennsylvania over break to volunteer on President Barack Obama’s re-election campaign — calling voters to clarify recent changes in Pennsylvania voter identification laws and canvassing near the University of Pennsylvania campus in West Philadelphia. The Women’s Leadership Initiative hosted a job shadowing trip in Manhattan, in which participants were paired with individuals from a variety of fields, such as finance and journalism. Trip organizer Danielle Ellison ’15 said fall break allowed more students to come on the trip than had been possible in previous years. “Even when we would hold job shadowing day on a Friday, sometimes that still meant missing class,” she said. “Last spring’s job shadowing day had eight mentors and mentees at a post-work dinner get together, while this year we had 24 mentors and mentees.” According to the 2013-’14 academic calendar, Yale’s next fall break will begin on Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013. Contact KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG at kirsten.schnackenberg@yale.edu .

Contact MICHELLE HACKMAN at michelle.hackman@yale.edu .

State ‘innovation hubs’ target growth BY MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER

Yale students took advantage of recreational offerings provided by the Dean’s Office, including subsidized trips to New York.

a partnership that we can expand on in the future,” Penn Dems President Brown said. “Pennsylvania is really becoming more of a swing state, and we can really use the support of groups like the Yale Democrats.” The U.S. presidential election will take place on Nov. 6.

We’ve learned that entrepreneurs want to be in places with the best networks. CATHERINE SMITH Commissioner, Conn. Department of Economic and Community Development “Connecticut has long been the home of discovery and innovation,” Malloy said in a press release. “Connecticut’s Innovation Ecosystem will help expand the number of new businesses that choose to start and run their operations in the state, creating high-skill jobs with good wages and benefits; strengthening our communities; and enhancing the quality of life for all our citizens.” Each of the innovation hubs will provide support for entrepreneurs ranging from mentoring services to small grants. Malloy added the hubs will also function as collaborative workspaces where entrepreneurs with varied business interests and expertise will be able to work together. Tim Shannon, a venture partner at financial firm Canaan Partners, lauded the state’s plan to encourage local business colaboration. He said the Innovation Ecosystem program “will help build communities that connect technologists, scientists and innovators, resulting in a more vibrant entrepreneurship ecosystem that will naturally attract more talent and venture opportunities.” The state also has plans to expand the impact ecosystem beyond the four hubs — according to a press release from Malloy’s office, a network of collaboration will be established across Connecticut that will be accessible to all entrepreneurs in Connecticut. More communication between state officials and business leaders through the innovation networks will allow the state to better track economic development and target resources more effectively, the press release said. “We’ve learned that entrepreneurs want to be in places with the best networks — be they technical, financial or social — which enable

them to explore and test great ideas and to find the partners, attract the investment, and connect with the customers they need to grow,” said Catherine Smith, commissioner of the Department of Economic and Community Development and chair of Connecticut Innovations. “With the addition of Connecticut’s Innovation Ecosystem, we continue to build our world-class program of economic development and to cultivate a business climate that is second to none.” New Haven’s hub includes a specific set of programs on the horizon. These programs include Grove Co-working Space, A100, the CEO Bootcamp, the Entreprenuer’s Forum, the Founder’s Fund Fellowship, LaunchHaven and Nutmeg Studios. While the programs aim to give local businesses a leg up in the workplace, each has a different approach to tackle the problem. A100, for example, will help university engineering students enter the workforce. The CEO Bootcamp is designed to train company CEOs in the market demand for their product, and the Entreprenuer’s Forum is a bimonthly dinner that encourages local business owners to attend and discuss ideas. “I think the focus is on small business, and that’s how we’re going to grow jobs,” said Kelly Murphy, the economic development administrator for the city of New Haven. She added that in a recent city survey, 7,600 people identified themselves as independent contractors, which is a large number for a small city. Connecticut’s Innovation Ecosystem follows the creation of Still Revolutionary, a program that is designed to highlight the positive impact of companies and business people in Connecticut. Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .

JOCELYN AUGUSTINO/CREATIVE COMMONS

Gov. Dannel Malloy stopped by New Haven last week to discuss the state’s Innovation Ecosystem program.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT First cancellation of classes in 34 years UNIVERSITY RESPONSE FROM PAGE 1 care of [faculty] and staff and graduate students who don’t live on campus,” she said. “The prudent course of action was to cancel classes.” Lorimer said the University will likely issue a curfew to all students tomorrow, instructing them to stay in their residential halls during a certain time period. She said the school cannot predict when the curfew will go into affect, but it is dependent on when the high winds hit New Haven. The University will issue a statement concerning Tuesday’s classes by 2 p.m. today. University spokesman Tom Conroy said the University is on “full alert” and well-prepared to mitigate the effects of the storm. Lorimer said Yale’s facilities department is prepared to intervene and “attend to any damages” if water floods a basement or a tree falls, adding that she and other administrators will staff an emergency operations center beginning at 8 a.m. Parking and Transit Manager Edwin Bebyn said in an email that all campus shuttle services stopped at midnight Sunday night.

Obviously the storm has unprecedented potential … The prudent course of action was to cancel classes. LINDA LORIMER Vice president, Yale University Surrounding universities including the University of New Haven, Sacred Heart University, Southern Connecticut State and the University of Hartford all canceled today’s classes as well. Dining halls will remain open for all three meals, though students who do not live in their residential colleges are encouraged to stay indoors, according to an email sent by Jonathan Edwards College Dean Jody Spooner ’91. Colleges handed out bags of snacks, sandwiches and water bottles Sunday evening to provide sustenance to freshmen on Old Campus and

annexed upperclassmen. Students took advantage of the opportunity to stock up on food for the next few days. Will Heffner ’16 walked back from Saybrook with two large bags of food and a multi-pack of juice bottles. “It’s not stealing food,” Heffner said. “It’s the Hunger Games, OK?” he added, pointing out a nearby Saybrook freshman who carried even more snacks back to Lanman-Wright Hall. Ryan Proctor ’16 said he was one of several freshmen who ran around Old Campus in excitement when the cancellation was announced. He added that it was a “weird feeling” to get excited about a hurricane, and that he would probably use the night to do some work. Sarah Matthes ’13, co-editor-in-chief of The Yale Literary Magazine, said she had to postpone part of the magazine’s essential content selection process on Monday night. She said she does not think the shuffle will be a major problem, and the group probably would have cancelled the meeting without the mandate from the school to accommodate members stranded off campus. Despite the inconvenience, Matthes did not complain about the weather. “Oh, it’s great,” Matthes said. “Everyone’s super excited about it and they’re going to have great parties.” Abby Johnson ’15 said she was relieved that her professor postponed her Wednesday midterm for “Issues Approach to Biology.” “I have a lot of work this week I have to do, so thankfully I can postpone studying bio,” she said. The last cancellation of classes and activities across the University came during the “Blizzard of ’78,” a February snowstorm that resulted in over two feet of snow blanketing New Haven. Lorimer said Governor Ella T. Grasso shut down Connecticut roads for the occasion. Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALE DAILYNEWS. COM

“It was like being in the eye of a hurricane. You’d wake up in a concert and think, ‘Wow, how did I get here?’” JOHN LENNON FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE BEATLES

DeStefano orders evacuation CITY RESPONSE FROM PAGE 1 very seriously,” DeStefano said. “We cannot mandate anyone to evacuate, but I strongly encourage all residents in flood-prone regions to do so. Failure to evacuate will place residents in danger as well as any personnel who might have to respond in the event of an emergency.” According to meteorologists, wind speeds could reach sustained levels of over 75 mph, rainfall could total nearly 6 inches in areas and New Haven stands nearly a 50 percent chance of seeing at least a 5-foot storm surge, potentially reaching up to 11 feet under certain conditions. The storm’s intensity is expected to peak Monday afternoon and evening, meteorologists predict. DeStefano’s evacuation order will take effect on Monday at 8:30 a.m. and last until noon high tide Tuesday. With predicted storm surges more than double those of Hurricane Irene in 2011, which knocked out power to over half the state and killed a total of 56, DeStefano warned citizens to avoid driving if possible. Career High School will serve as an emergency shelter, with the Red Cross providing food, blankets, pillows and cots. Malloy, who called Sandy “the largest threat to human life that our state has experienced in anyone’s lifetime,” said coastal areas in Connecticut can expect to see the worst flooding in 70 years and power outages could last for an extended period of time. Malloy signed an executive order Sunday night that extended the deadline for voter registration from Oct 30. to Nov. 1 in anticipation of the storm, and added that he will hold three media briefings Monday at

the state Emergency Operations Center to keep Connecticut residents updated about the impact of the storm. In addition, Malloy requested that President Barack Obama declare a pre-landfall emergency in Connecticut, which Obama approved Sunday night. The designation allows the state to request funding and other assistance to help mitigate the effects of Sandy. He said Sandy poses a “real threat of drowning” to those living in coastal regions, adding that emergency crews will likely not be able to rescue those swept away by Sandy while the storm is at its peak.

It was the right time for new colleges 10 years ago. No organism can go this long without new growth. ROBERT A.M. STERN Dean, School of Architecture

“When I spoke with President Obama this afternoon, it was clear that he and other federal emergency management officials are taking this threat as seriously as we are,” Malloy said. “As the hours go by, we are more and more certain that Hurricane Sandy will have a substantial impact on our state and I do not want to wait to get this process going.” Dubbed “Frankenstorm” due to proximity to Halloween, the storm could be the worst the U.S. has ever faced, weather experts have said. The collision of Sandy, a late summer hur-

ricane, with two inland winter weather systems during a full moon and high tides has led officials to predict it will exceed the $16 billion of damages caused by Hurricane Irene last year. Yale Police Department Assistant Chief of Police Steven D. Woznyk said the city and Yale have been working together to ensure campus safety. “Yale and New Haven have been making the necessary preparations for the impending storm,” Woznyk said. “Yale’s emergency operations team is taking the necessary precautions to keep the campus safe and running smoothly throughout the storm.” While Hurricane Irene caused relatively little damage to Yale last year, meteorologists forecast Sandy will be worse in its storm surge, wind speed, location and angle of approach. And while Irene was downgraded to the category of tropical storm before it reached New Haven, Sandy will continue to grow after the storm makes landfall. But Rudi-Ann Miller ’16 said she feels reassured that Yale is well prepared to face the storm. “As a Jamaican who’s grown up and experienced many different hurricanes of more significant strength, I feel pretty safe,” she said. “I think Yale has done a really great job of coordinating their emergency efforts, so I feel like there’s nothing to worry about really.” After the National Weather Service rated Sandy’s surge potential at 5.7 on a 6.0 scale, New York shut down its mass transit and regional rail service at 7 p.m. Sunday. Contact JASMINE HORSEY at jasmine.horsey@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

NEWS

“I dream music but I cannot make any because here there are not any pianos … In this respect this is a savage country.” FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN POLISH COMPOSER AND PIANIST

Sterling inaugurated as Div. School Dean

Grant funds ‘Technologies’ BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER Three months after receiving a $1.95 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the Graduate School is using some of the funds to create a new concentration for Ph.D. students. “Technologies of Knowledge,” the new concentration, will bring together 12 third-year Ph.D. students from various disciplines to partake in a two-semester interdisciplinary seminar on the technologies involved in disseminating knowledge. Participating students will begin the program this spring and receive an additional year of funding to pursue interdisciplinary research. Yale College Dean Mary Miller said the concentration will broaden students’ research horizons and enrich their academic work, which she said she hopes will give students a competitive edge in the job market for professors.

Why would you need to get 10 humanists together to study with three humanities majors? JORDAN BROWER GRD ’16 JACOB GEIGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Gregory Sterling, the newly appointed dean of the Divinity School, spoke about adjustment in the face of a new religious climate. BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER In a ceremony featuring both formal speeches and prayers, Gregory Sterling was officially appointed dean of the Divinity School last Tuesday afternoon. Approximately 150 people gathered to witness the event, which took place in Marquand Chapel in the Sterling Divinity Quadrangle and included a worship service and a speech by University President Richard Levin. During the hour-long ceremony, Sterling gave a keynote address entitled “The Mystery of God: Imagining the Church of the 21st Century” in which he spoke about the importance of adjustment in the face of growing religious change while preserving the Divinity School’s, and one’s own, religious identity. During his speech, Sterling said he hopes to maintain the quality of the Divinity School’s education in traditional areas of theology while also adapting the school to the modern religious climate. “We do not and cannot live in an isolated corner of the world,” Sterling said. “Thinking globally and interreligiously are not options — they are required for living in the 21st century.” Sterling said in his address that Christianity in North America is in a state of decline, adding that as the number of Christians in the northern hemisphere is decreasing, Christianity in Latin America and Africa is growing. He added that it would be irresponsible for the Divinity School and the religious community at large to fail to respond to these demographic trends in Christianity. Sterling said it is important for the religious and secular facets of society to interact given the shifting roles of Christianity in the 21st century. Though Sterling said he wants

to pioneer new efforts in the Divinity School — such as a University-wide initiative on faith and peace and hour-long leadership courses taught by prominent individuals with theological backgrounds — he added that he aims to preserve the Divinity School’s educational heritage. “The Yale Divinity School has for many years offered outstanding training in classical theological disciplines,” he said. “I pledge to continue that tradition.” Levin said Sterling has the University’s full support as he encourages the study of all religions during his term as a Divinity School dean. Three audience members interviewed said they appreciated the concision of the hourlong ceremony and its discussion of Christianity’s place in modern society. Marilyn Kendrix DIV ’13 said she was pleased that the ceremony’s message stressed the need to listen to the word of God at a school that is a part of a secular university. Eddie Kjelshus, a former reverend at the Calvary Baptist Church in New Haven, said the service was “short, prompt and well-written.” He said he thinks Sterling rightly addressed the church’s need to balance between adjusting to an increasingly modern society and preserving study of old religious texts. “The service was concise but right on target,” said Barb Gillette, a singer in Marquand Chapel’s choir. “It was kept simple and that was the beauty of it.” Sterling took office in August 2012 after serving as the Dean of Graduate Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .

“This will be the systematic process of bringing students together from different disciplines to work with a team of faculty, who themselves come from different disciplines,” Miller said. “We were looking at what would be a topic that would allow for emergence of new questions and new knowledge.” As part of the grant’s aim to enhance humanities education at Yale, students

in the new seminar will discuss the transmission of knowledge across cultures and civilizations, examining topics such as university education, writing systems, libraries, film and digital media. The class will be co-taught by classics professor Emily Greenwood, philosophy and psychology professor Tamar Gendler ’87 and film and humanities professor Francesco Casetti. Gendler said the Mellon concentration will expose students to important work in other fields and different research methodologies, adding that while disciplinespecific study leads to strong academic work, it is also inward-focused. “Undergraduate study is cross-pollinated,” Gendler said. “I think [the Mellon concentration] is a way of recognizing the importance of disciplinary study and getting thoughts, techniques and methods formed in the context of these disciplines circulated more widely in the Graduate School.” Though other academic departments and programs at Yale also incorporate interdisciplinary study, Gendler said she is not aware of programs at other graduate schools that create “institutional structure” to bring students together to discuss a particular topic and integrate the discussions across disciplines. The professors teaching the course said a few students have already expressed interest in the concentration, though they expect to hear more when news of its creation has spread. Jordan Brower GRD ’16, a film studies and English Ph.D. student, said the directors of graduate studies for both of his departments circulated information about the program last week. Brower said he supports the initiative but added that he questions the value of its interdisciplinary

“TECHNOLOGIES OF KNOWLEDGE” UNDERLYING QUESTIONS

How people think, know and assimilate thoughts and information SAMPLE TOPICS

The human body as an instrument of knowledge, translation and consciousness ADMISSIONS

Applications are due Nov. 19 for students in their second year of a Yale Ph.D. program

approach given that it does not extend into disciplines outside the humanities. “The different humanistic approaches are much closer to each other than those used in communications studies or sociology or in the Law School,” Brower said. “Why would you need to get 10 humanists together to study with three humanities majors?” Brower said further information about the program would clarify some of these questions. The Mellon Grant also funds a series of ten faculty workshops to examine strategies to enhance the teaching of humanities in Yale College and a program for postdoctoral fellows that has not yet been formalized, Miller said. Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .

Pianist plays on historical instruments BY RISHABH BHANDARI CONTRIBUTING REPORTER On Sunday afternoon, a sold-out audience at Yale’s Collection of Musical Instruments was treated to a glimpse of 19th century France. Yves Henry, a celebrated French pianist and teacher at the Conservatoire de Paris, played pieces by his 19th century compatriot Claude Debussy and Polish Frédéric Chopin on a Pleyel piano built in 1842 and an Érard piano built in 1881. Both pianos, which permanently reside in Yale’s collection, are rare: fewer than 10 of each model in North America today remain in playable condition, said Nicholas Renouf, the curator of the Collection of Musical Instruments. Henry explained that performing on pianos from the time period of a given composition can lend a performer further insight into the composer’s thought process. Edson Scheid MUS ’11, a member of the Yale Baroque Ensemble who plays a historical violin, emphasized the importance of instruments in understanding and evaluating a composer’s works. It’s difficult, he explained, to fully appreciate Bach while playing a modern Steinway rather than an instrument for which Bach’s music was intended. “It helps you understand [composers’] genius and how they pushed the limits of their instrument,” Scheid said. “It’s about understanding what ideas the composer had. You are dealing with what they were dealing with.” While historic pianos are often similar to their modern counterparts in appearance, their inner materials and structures may vary, said Paul Nemeth MUS ’12, a bass player who intends on specializing in historical performance. Contemporary pianos, for instance, have felt covering their inner hammers, while older pianos instead use leather or feathers. This difference results in modern pianos’ loud volume, a dynamic that changes interpretations of older music. Henry said the study of historical instruments is especially important for understanding Chopin, the only composer of his generation to write exclusively for piano. While many of Chopin’s contem-

JOYCE XI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Celebrated French pianist Yves Henry played selections from Chopin and Debussy on two historical pianos in a sold-out Sunday exhibition. poraries did not write specific “innuendos” into their scores to allow each musician flexibility in interpretation, Chopin was extremely focused on details, which modern musicians can only understand through studying the instruments available to him at the time.

[Using historical instruments] helps you understand how [composers] pushed the limits of their instrument. EDSON SCHEID MUS ’11 Member, Yale Baroque Ensemble Nemeth attributed the scarcity of concerts using older instruments to the increased difficulty of playing them. He

related the concert to his own experience playing a late 18th century baroque bass as an undergraduate at Juilliard, explaining that many techniques learned for modern bass do not transition well to historic instruments. “It was really interesting because everything I worked on with my modern bass went away … I sounded so bad,” Nemeth said. “You had to relearn how to do things and it was so much more difficult.” Miki Sawada MUS ’14, a pianist who attended Sunday’s performance, explained that historical performance is simply different rather than more difficult, adding that practice on an older instrument can help a performer acclimate to older music. Henry’s master class originally scheduled for today has been cancelled due to Hurricane Sandy. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu .

OPINION. YOUR THOUGHTS. YOUR VOICE. YOUR PAGE.

Send submissions to opinion@yaledailynews.com


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NEWS

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PAGE 9

NATION & WORLD

“The first rule of hurricane coverage is that every broadcast must begin with palm trees bending in the wind.” CARL HIAASEN AMERICAN JOURNALIST, COLUMNIST AND NOVELIST

Storm wreaks havoc on presidential race BY JOSH LEDERMAN AND STEVE PEOPLES ASSOCIATED PRESS CELINA, Ohio — Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama frantically sought to close the deal with voters with precious few days left in an incredibly close race as this year’s October surprise — an unprecedented storm menacing the East Coast — wreaked havoc on their best-laid plans. Ever mindful of his narrow path to the requisite 270 electoral votes, Romney looked to expand his map, weighing an intensified effort in traditionally left-leaning Minnesota. Obama sought to defend historically Democratic turf as the race tightened heading into the final week. Wary of being seen as putting their political pursuits ahead of public safety, the two White House hopefuls reshuffled their campaign plans as the storm approached. Both candidates were loath to forfeit face time with voters in battleground states like Virginia that are likely to be afflicted when Hurricane Sandy, a winter storm and a cold front collide to form a freak hybrid storm. “The storm will throw havoc into the race,” said Sen. Mark

Warner, D-Va. Obama, preparing to depart for Florida Sunday, a day early to beat the storm, got an update from disaster relief officials before speaking by phone to affected governors and mayors.

Obviously, we want unfettered access to the polls, because we think the more people that come out, the better we’re going to do. DAVID AXELROD Top adviser, Obama campaign “Anything they need, we will be there,” Obama said. “And we are going to cut through red tape. We are not going to get bogged down with a lot of rules. We want to make sure that we are anticipating and leaning forward.” An opportunity for Obama to demonstrate steady leadership in the face of crisis was offset by the risk that the federal government, as in past emergencies,

Syria truce collapses BY ZEINA KARAM ASSOCIATED PRESS BEIRUT — Syria’s air force fired missiles and dropped barrel bombs on rebel strongholds while opposition fighters attacked regime positions Sunday, flouting a U.N.-backed cease-fire that was supposed to quiet fighting over a long holiday weekend but never took hold. The failure to push through a truce so limited in its ambitions — just four days — has been a sobering reflection of the international community’s inability to ease 19 months of bloodshed in Syria. It also suggests that the stalemated civil war will drag on, threatening to draw in Syria’s neighbors in this highly combustible region such as Turkey, Lebanon and Jordan. “This conflict has now taken a dynamic of its own which should be worrying to everyone,” said Salman Shaikh, director of the Brookings Doha Center think tank. The U.N. tried to broker a halt to fighting over the four-day Eid al-Adha Muslim feast that began on Friday, one of the holiest times of the Islamic calendar. But the truce was violated almost immediately after it was supposed to take effect, the same fate other cease-fires in Syria have met. Activists said at least 110 people were killed Sunday, a toll similar to previous daily casualty tolls. They include 16 who died in an airstrike on the village of al-Barra in northern Syria’s mountainous Jabal al-Zawiya region. The Observatory also reported a car bomb that exploded in a residential area in the Damascus neighborhood of Barzeh and wounded 15 people, but the tar-

get was not immediately clear. Though Syria’s death toll has topped 35,000, the bloodiest and most protracted crisis of the Arab Spring, the West has been wary of intervening. There is concern about sparking a wider conflagration because Syria borders Israel and is allied with Iran and the powerful Lebanese militant group Hezbollah. There are already increasing incidents of the civil war spilling across borders. Many in Lebanon blame Syria and Hezbollah for the Oct. 19 car bomb that killed the country’s intelligence chief. The assassination stirred up deadly sectarian tensions in Lebanon, where Sunnis and Shiites are deeply divided over the Syrian civil war, raising the specter of renewed sectarian fighting. Lebanon’s two largest political coalitions have lined up on opposite sides of Syria’s civil war. Hezbollah and its partners who dominate the government have stood by Assad’s regime, while the Sunni-led opposition backs the rebels seeking to topple the Syrian government. Assad and many in his inner circle are Alawites — an offshoot of Shiite Islam and a minority in Syria — while the rebels come mostly from the country’s Sunni majority. Iraqi Shiites also increasingly fear a spillover from Syria. Iraqi authorities on Sunday forced an Iranian cargo plane heading to Syria to land for inspection in Baghdad to ensure it was not carrying weapons, the second such forced landing this month. The move appeared aimed at easing U.S. concerns that Iraq has become a route for shipments of Iranian military supplies that could help Assad battle rebels.

NARCISO CONTRERAS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A Syrian resident walks at sunset through downtown Aleppo, Syria as mortar explosions, not seen, sound in the distance.

could be faulted for an ineffective response, with the president left to take the fall. Obama canceled campaign stops Monday in Virginia and Tuesday in Colorado to monitor the storm but planned to go forward with other events Monday in Florida and Ohio, with former President Bill Clinton at his side. He planned to return to Ohio on Wednesday with stops in Cincinnati and Akron, followed by a Thursday swing through Springfield, Ohio; Boulder, Colo.; and Las Vegas. Romney nixed three stops in up-for-grabs Virginia on Sunday, opting instead to campaign with running mate Paul Ryan in Ohio before heading Monday to Wisconsin, where Romney has chipped away at Obama’s lead. “Let’s today when we get home put in our prayers the people who are in the East Coast in the wake of this big storm that’s coming,” Ryan said in Celina, Ohio. Vice President Joe Biden canceled a Monday event in New Hampshire, and Romney’s wife, Ann Romney, called off her Monday events. Campaign staffers planned to collect supplies for Virginia storm victims, and a Republican Party spokesman said Romney’s campaign bus would be

CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney waves to supporters as he arrives at a campaign stop in Worthington, Ohio. used for “relief efforts throughout the East Coast.” Also vexing to Obama and Romney was the prospect that bad weather could hinder early voting and get-out-the-vote efforts.

“Obviously, we want unfettered access to the polls, because we think the more people that come out, the better we’re going to do,” said David Axelrod, a top adviser to Obama’s campaign. “To the extent that it makes it

harder, that’s a source of concern.” In Virginia, one of the most competitive states in the race, election officials eased absentee voting requirements for those affected by the storm.


PAGE 10

NEWS

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

Heavy rain, with a high near 62. Very windy, with a northeast wind 30 to 40 mph, gusts as high as 70 mph

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

High of 63, low of 47.

High of 54, low of 42.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30 6:10 PM “Law in the Struggle for Social Justice in South Africa” A talk by human rights lawyer and activist Fatima Hassan, who is the Tom and Andi Bernstein Senior Visiting Human Rights Fellow at Yale Law School. She has worked on public interest litigation, education, training and legal reform on behalf of people with HIV/AIDS in South Africa through her decade-long work with the AIDS Law Project and her legal representation of the Treatment Action Campaign (TAC). Yale Law School (127 Wall St.), Room 122.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 11:59 PM YSO Halloween Show Your presence is requested at the Yale Symphony Orchestra’s annual Halloween Show, a spectacular fusion of cinema and symphony! Doors open at 11:00 p.m. Important: Woolsey Hall tickets are sold out. Please purchase SSS 114 overflow tickets as an alternative. Overflow tickets are $10 and must be purchased in advance from YSO members at the the Woolsey Rotunda from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday to Wedneday. Woolsey Hall (500 College St.).

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1 2:30 PM Microsoft’s Head of Research and Strategy Discusses “Tomorrow’s Technologies” Craig Mundie, chief research and strategy officer at Microsoft, will talk about how computer technolgy will continue to shape the future and demonstrate new technologies in development at Microsoft. Audience members will have a chance to try out the technologies demonstrated by Mundie after his talk. Mundie is Yale’s 2012 Gordon Grand Fellow. Kroon Hall (195 Prospect St.), Burke Auditorium.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

5:00 PM The Inaugural Franke Program in Science and the Humanities Lecture: Steven Pinker Harvard University’s Steven Pinker will present “The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined.” Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Auditorium.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

Want to write & draw a comic strip? We’re looking for weekly comic strips for this page. If you’re interested, e-mail Karen at Karen.Tian@yale.edu .

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (OppositeFOR JE) RELEASE OCTOBER 29, 2012

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Golf pros regularly break it 4 Gemologist’s weight 9 Force back 14 “__ had it up to here!” 15 Single-celled critter 16 Bo’s’n’s “Hold it!” 17 Blink of an eye 18 Rocky, for one 19 Midterms and finals 20 Do-or-die moment 23 “Para __, oprima numero dos”: customer service option 24 Woos 27 Crystal ball consulter 28 Bringing up the rear 31 Cut back 32 Offbeat 35 Cowboy’s footwear 37 Pieces on a board 38 When the Brontës wrote 43 Cannes crony 44 Arrow-shooting god 45 Prez before Jack 46 Prefix with second 48 Computer operator 50 Bottom-line concern 54 Hole for a shoelace 56 Heart, soul, or heart and soul 59 Precisely 62 Cheer for a diva 64 Fragrant compound 65 Game based on crazy eights 66 Seethed 67 Underground Railroad traveler 68 Fort Worth sch. 69 Stockpile 70 Repaired, as a shoe 71 “But then again ...” DOWN 1 The Fishes of the zodiac 2 Opposed (to)

THE TAFT APARTMENTS Studio/1BR/2BR styles for future & immediate occupancy at The Taft on the corner of College & Chapel Street. Lease terms available until 5/31/13. It’s never too early to join our preferred waiting list for Summer/ Fall 2013 occupancy. Public mini-storage available. By appointment only. Phone 203-495-TAFT. www.taftapartments.com.

CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

10/29/12

By Don Gagliardo & C.C. Burnikel

3 Bon Appétit offering 4 Mountain retreat 5 BP merger partner 6 Drugstore name derived from the prescription symbol 7 Genesis sibling 8 Infield protection 9 Betting odds, e.g. 10 Bring into balance 11 Deli meat 12 Body shop quote: Abbr. 13 Many USMA grads 21 Card worth a fortune? 22 Squid relatives 25 Palm smartphone 26 Mail out 29 Belittle 30 Trinity member 33 Deer mom 34 “Sex for Dummies” author, familiarly 36 “__War”: Shatner novel 38 Rooftop rotator 39 Uncertain response

Want to place a classified ad?

Saturday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU EASIEST

3 9 5 2 9 6 3 (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

40 Wide-screen technique introduced in the ’50s 41 Island in the Aegean 42 CSA general 47 Antipasto tidbits 49 Beach house, maybe 51 At one’s post 52 Wall-mounted candleholder

10/29/12

53 Embark 55 “Holy moly!” 57 “Date Night” actor Carell 58 Destroy, as documents 60 Miss Trueheart of “Dick Tracy” 61 Nobel Peace Prize city 62 Painter’s deg. 63 Caribbean liquor

8 7 5 3 9

7 8 6

7 2 1

2 6 5 4 1

9 7 1 5 2 7

5


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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

S

tudents spent the first fall break in Yale history studying, campaigning, relaxing and enjoying the outdoors. Photographers ALLIE

KRAUSE ’15, ANNELISA LEINBACH ’16, EMILIE FOYER ’13, TORY BURNSIDE-CLAPP ’15 and VIVIENNE ZHANG ’15 doc-

umented the break.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NFL N.Y. Giants 29 Dallas 24

NFL Miami 30 N.Y. Jets 9

SPORTS QUICK HITS

REMEMBERING COACH MORIARTY MEMORIAL SERVICE FRIDAY A service will be held Friday at 10:30 a.m. in Battell Chapel for Philip E. Moriarty, who served as a swimming and diving coach for Yale for 44 years. As head coach for 17 seasons, Moriarty’s teams went 195–27. He passed away at 98 on Aug. 17 in Mystic, Conn.

NFL New England 45 St. Louis 7

PREMIER Man Utd 3 Chelsea 2

ATP SWISS Del Potro 6 6 7 Federer 4 7 6

MONDAY

MEN’S CROSS COUNTRY NUSSBAUM ’15 NAMED ALL-IVY After his 10th-place finish at the Ivy League Heptagonal Championships on Saturday at Princeton, runner Matthew Nussbaum ’15 was chosen for the All-Ivy Second Team. At Heps, Nussbaum took 21 seconds off his personal record time, giving him an 8K time of 24:05.

“I think [Scott Ambrust ’14] is a guy that relishes the big moments in games.” BRIAN TOMPKINS HEAD COACH, MEN’S SOCCER YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

M. HOCKEY

MEN’S HOCKEY IS BACK The Bulldogs opened their season on a strong note with a 2–2 draw against Dartmouth and a 3–2 comeback win over Princeton at the Ivy Showcase. PAGE B3 JOY SHAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Clinton Bourbonais ’14 assisted both goals scored by forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 in Yale’s 2–2 draw against Dartmouth on Friday.

Eli streak continues

Yale fumbles away a win BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER Yale ran 54 plays on offense on Saturday, but not one of those plays involved a player listed as a quarterback on the Elis’ roster.

FOOTBALL

SARA MILLER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Bulldogs clinched 3–1 victories over Columbia and Cornell this weekend and maintained their lead over second-place Tigers. BY KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTER The volleyball team notched 3–1 victories over Columbia and Cornell on consecutive nights this weekend to maintain its two-match lead over second-place Princeton.

VOLLEYBALL The Bulldogs (14–5, 10–0 Ivy) dropped two sets in one weekend for the first time in their Ivy schedule but still managed to extend their current

winning streak to 11 matches, the longest for the team since at least 2007. “I wouldn’t even know if [the streak] was a record or not,” head coach Erin Appleman said. “I just know we haven’t lost in the Ivy League. This is a remarkably great group of players that get along. I think that they’re accomplishing some fabulous things because our team chemistry is so good.” The action got off to a good start for the Bulldogs with a 25–15 win over Columbia in their first set of the weekend. But the Lions stormed back in the second set and took a 25–21 victory to

even the match at one set apiece. The two sides battled to a 10–9 Columbia lead but the Lions pulled away for good with an 8–3 run. Megan Gaughn led the way for Columbia with seven of her matchhigh 22 kills in that set. Gaughn’s 22 kills represented the highest kill total logged against the Bulldogs this season. “She’s a really great hitter,” middle blocker Jesse Ebner ’16 said. “She just mixes it up a lot. She used a lot of dif-

STAT OF THE DAY 277

SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE B2

Even with the personnel shortages, the Bulldogs (2–5, 1–3 Ivy) almost came away with a win at Columbia before falling 26–22 on Saturday, Running back Tyler Varga ’15 took the majority of snaps on Saturday, although he was occasionally relieved by wide receiver Henry Furman ’14. Although Columbia did not face a true quarterback, the Lions head coach Pete Mangurian said that he could not overcommit to the running game. “You’d love to say let’s put everybody up there and commit to the run,” Mangurian said. “If you watch what they do in the kicking game, what they do offensively, they’re not just going to run it every down. If you get your nose up in there too much, they’ll throw it over your head.” The Elis did run on 78 percent of their plays, compiling 262 yards on the ground. Varga led the way with 220 yards and three rushing touchdowns. In a wild fourth quarter that saw three lead changes, Yale’s ground attack gave them a 22–19 lead late in the game, but a fumble by Varga set up Columbia for a last-minute scoring drive. Varga coughed the ball up with 2:05 remaining, and Lions quarterback Sean Brackett led a 59-yard drive that he finished with a 2-yard strike to running back

Marcorus Garrett. “We turned the ball over twice [in the second half] and we didn’t get off the field at all on third downs,” head coach Tony Reno said. “If you do those two things it’s hard to win ball games.” Yale had taken the lead with 7:30 remaining in the fourth quarter when Varga cut back to his left, stiff-armed a defender and dove inside the pylon for a 25-yard scoring run. Running back Mordecai Cargill ’13 then punched the ball in for a two-point conversion to put the Elis up a field goal.

We turned the ball over twice and we didn’t get off the field at all on third downs. TONY RENO Head coach, Football Columbia (2–5, 1–3 Ivy) failed to tie the game when kicker Luke Eddy pulled his 41-yard field goal attempt wide left but were saved by Varga’s turnover. On the first drive of the game the Lions took a 3–0 lead with a field goal. But Yale’s defense held the Columbia offense scoreless until the fourth quarter after that. The Elis struggled to find a rhythm in the opening quarter on offense. Then Varga marched Yale 94 yards down the field to take a 7–3 lead on his 28-yard touchdown run with 13:34 left in the second quarter. SEE FOOTBALL PAGE B2

NUMBER OF ALL-PURPOSE YARDS GAINED BY TYLER VARGA ’15 IN YALE’S LOSS TO COLUMBIA. In an unconventional game, Varga was the main quarterback for Yale and the preferred run option, rushing for 220 yards and three touchdowns. Not to be outdone, he also returned kickoffs.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS JAMES HARDEN NBA guard James Harden was traded from the Oklahoma City Thunder to the Houston Rockets in a monster weekend trade just days before the NBA season begins on Tuesday. In exchange, the Thunder will receive rookie Jeremy Lamb and future draft picks.

Volleyball maintains Ivy No. 1

Bulldogs lack QBs in loss

VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE B1 ferent shots. In the first couple of games we were on our heels and she talked about how the one thing she hasn’t done in her career was beating Yale.” The third set was the most crucial of the night for the Elis. With the match tied at one, Columbia gave the Bulldogs all they could handle. The Lions built a quick 11–5 lead behind five Yale errors, but then setter Kelly Johnson ’16 took over the match. She logged five of her 13 kills overall to help Yale tie the set at 14. But the Bulldogs could not gain the lead despite Johnson’s scoring spree. Columbia pulled away following the tie and held a 22–18 lead following a Gaughn kill. But the Bulldogs pulled it together and, taking advantage of two Columbia errors, tied the score at 22. The two sides battled back and forth past the standard 25-point mark until libero Maddie Rudnick ’15 gave Yale the 2–1 win with her ninth service ace of the season. “I went back there thinking I was going to ace the ball,” Rudnick said. “I wanted the set to be over. I was looking for an ace and not looking to just keep the ball in.” Following a stress-free 25–19 win over Columbia in the fourth set, the Bulldogs turned their attention to Cornell on Saturday night. The Big Red put up a struggle in the first two sets of that match, playing to a 1–1 tie and matching the Elis in total points at 51 apiece. But the Big

Red ran out of gas and sputtered to just 24 points overall in the final two sets of the match. Although the Bulldogs have consistently outplayed their opponents at the end of sets this season, Cornell got the better of Yale at the end of a hotly contested opening game. The two sides were tied at 22, 24 and 26 but Cornell won the battle of wills to take a 28–26 victory. “We weren’t playing like ourselves and we just had to turn it around and make sure we were taking care of the ball,” Appleman said. “To me it’s about passing and serving and we weren’t doing that well.” But in the following set, Yale would not be outplayed down the stretch again. With the two sides tied at 21, the Bulldogs scored two straight and capped off a 25–23 victory with a Mollie Rogers ’15 kill. The Yale offense was again characterized by a multifaceted attack. In both of this weekend’s matches, four Elis recorded at least 10 kills, led by Johnson who hit 24. Setter Kendall Polan ’14 chipped in 66 assists over the course of the weekend to fuel the offense. The Bulldogs will hit the road this weekend to defend the top spot in the conference against Princeton and thirdplace Penn. Contact KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yale led 22–19 with 45 seconds left in the fourth quarter, but a last-minute Columbia touchdown put the Lions ahead for good. FOOTBALL FROM PAGE B1 The Lions capitalized on a Yale mishap to cut the lead to two when Varga couldn’t handle the snap. Varga fell on the ball in Yale’s own end zone and was tackled for a safety. “They made a mistake,” Columbia linebacker Ryan Murphy said. “They fumbled the snap and we were where we needed to be … [and we] capitalized on their mistake.” Yale expanded on its 7–5 halftime lead when Varga faked a hand-off and slipped across the goal line untouched for a 3-yard score and a 14–5 lead at 8:33 in the third quarter.

The Lions surged back, finding the end zone on their next two possessions. The first score came when wide receiver Jake Wanamaker hauled in Brackett’s lob to the back corner of the end zone from 4 yards out. After forcing a Yale three and out, Brackett led the Lions down the field. He scrambled and dove over the goal line from one yard out with 11:38 to go in the fourth quarter and retook the lead 19–14. Brackett was 33–47 for 328 yards and two scores through the air in addition to his rushing touchdown. His favorite target was wide receiver

Connor Neligan, who caught 11 passes for 138 yards. “Sean is putting the ball on the money every time,” Neligan said. “It feels good out there for the wide receivers.” Varga’s 220 rushing yards were the most ever by a Yale quarterback, breaking the record of 204 yards set by Nick Crawford ’92 against Penn in 1991. Yale stays on the road next Saturday to face Brown. SARA MILLER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

Yale will take on third-place Penn and second-place Princeton this weekend, aiming to keep the momentum going.

Women’s soccer ends Ivy scoring drought

Split for women’s hockey W. HOCKEY FROM PAGE B4 of the win. “[The victory] gives us a winning mentality and will give us more motivation for the future, knowing that we’re capable [of winning],” Martini said. The Eli freshmen played important roles in the team’s success this weekend. Before the season, when asked about the impact of the freshmen, head coach Joakim Flygh said he expected them to make their presence known.

[The freshmen] can all play and they’ll all contribute. They’ll get lots of opportunities to play…this year. JOAKIM FLYGH Head coach, Women’s Hockey

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Georgiana Wagemann ’15 scored just 48 seconds into the game, but one goal was not enough to avoid a 1–1 tie with the Columbia Lions. W. SOCCER FROM PAGE B4 ’16 and fired the ball past her to tie up the score. After both teams each had a one on the scoreboard, the game remained quiet through the end of regulation. In the first and second overtimes, the Bulldogs turned the heat back up. Yale attacked the Columbia net and while the Elis did not have a flurry of scoring chances, they did manage quality opportuni-

ties that almost put the game away. Midfielder Kristen Forster ’13 earned a couple opportunities in the Penn box in overtime, including a one-on-one with just the goalkeeper after midfielder Frannie Coxe ‘15 hit her with a beautiful cross. But almost scoring was not enough to give the Bulldogs another Ivy win. “It’s one of those things where you always want more,” Butwin said. Goaltending was strong on both

teams, and Yale goalkeeper Rachel Ames ’16 stopped five of six shots on goal for a save percentage of 0.833. In the Lion net, Gabby Dubick stopped one of one for a perfect save percentage. Dubick did not start, but came into the game just a minute after the kickoff when starting keeper Grace Redmon dove in an effort to stop Wagemann’s goal, but struck her head on the post. With just two games left in Ivy League competition, the Bulldogs

will go to Brown to take on the Bears this Thursday. Song and Butwin said the Bulldogs will keep focusing on quick play, strong starts and fast ball movement in preparation for the Bears. Kickoff Thursday is scheduled for 7 p.m. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .

“They can all play and they’ll all contribute,” Flygh said. “They’ll get lots of opportunities to play in games this year to prove themselves.” Four games into the season, four of the Bulldogs’ five goals have been scored by freshmen. Martini said she was glad to be able to meet her coach’s expectations and help the team win. “There was a lot of pressure to perform, especially as a rookie,” Haddad added. “People are scoping you out and trying to get a feel for who you’re going to be. I was just pumped that I could contribute to my team’s success.” Yale kicks off its home schedule this weekend at Ingalls Rink, playing Dartmouth on Friday and No. 9 Harvard on Saturday. Contact GRANT BRONSDON at grant.bronsdon@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

NBC Universal gains rights to Premier League coverage In an unprecedented deal, NBC Universal announced on Sunday that it has inked a three-year, $250 million contract to become the exclusive U.S. rights holder to the English Premier League. As part of its winning bid, NBC promises live coverage of all 380 soccer matches per season starting next year. NBC also holds the rights to television coverage of Major League Soccer.

Elis win in first weekend

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

FOOTBALL IVY 1

4

6

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

Harvard

3

1

0.750

6

1

0.857

Princeton

3

1

0.750

4

3

0.571

Penn

3

1

0.750

3

4

0.429

Cornell

2

2

0.500

4

3

0.571

Dartmouth

2

2

0.500

4

3

0.571

Brown

1

3

0.250

4

3

0.571

Columbia

1

3

0.250

2

5

0.286

Yale

1

3

0.250

2

5

0.286

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Columbia 26, Yale 22

Sat. Yale at Brown, 12:30 p.m.

VOLLEYBALL IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

1

Yale

10

0

1.000

14

5

0.737

2

Princeton

8

2

0.800

11

9

0.550

3

Penn

7

3

0.700

12

9

0.571

4

Columbia

5

5

0.500

10

9

0.526

Harvard

5

5

0.500

8

13

0.381

Brown

2

8

0.200

6

14

0.300

Cornell

2

8

0.200

6

15

0.286

Dartmouth

1

9

0.100

2

18

0.100

6 8

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Fri. Yale 3, Columbia 1 Sat. Yale 3, Cornell 1 JOY SHAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 tallied three of the Elis’ five goals in this weekend’s Ivy Showcase.

OVERALL

Fri. Yale at Penn, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at Princeton, 5:00 p.m.

MEN’S SOCCER IVY

BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER The men’s hockey scored a win and a tie in its opening weekend of the 2012-’13 season at the Ivy Showcase in Providence, R.I.

M. HOCKEY Yale tied Dartmouth 2-2 on Friday and bested Princeton 3-2 on Saturday in the tournament, which was hosted by Brown. “Overall our weekend was pretty positive,” goalie Jeff Malcolm ’12 said. “It was good to finally get into some games and feel that pace of play. Obviously getting the first win of the year is a great feeling for us.” While the weekend’s games do not count towards the team’s conference season standings, they still go on the team’s record and affect national and computer standings. Team captain and forward Andrew Miller ’13 said that the showcase games are just as important for the team as league games. Seniors goalies Malcolm and Nick Maricic ’13 each took to the net on Saturday and Friday, respectively. Malcolm saved 25 of 27 of Princeton’s shots

on net, while Yale outshot the Tigers with a total of 34. This was an improvement from Friday’s game, in which Dartmouth outshot Yale 37-20 and Maricic saved 35 of those for the tie. Maricic said he was pleased with the weekend’s outcome, and that the team improved as the showcase played out. “We started off a bit slow Friday night, but got better as the weekend progressed, which is what we want,” Maricic said. “For it being our first two games, we were pretty happy with our special teams, and are confident that they are only going to get better as we go on.” In Friday’s game, Yale successfully killed four of Dartmouth’s five power plays, allowing the Big Green’s game-tying goal at 16:56 in the third period. The Bulldogs did not capitalize on any of their three power plays against Dartmouth. But forward Jesse Root ’14 made good on Yale’s fourth power play of five on Saturday, scoring at 17:40 in the first period. Princeton scored twice in the second period, but Yale bounced back to lead the scoreboard 3-2 with goals by forward Kenny Agostino ’14 and forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 at

15:22 and 17:42, respectively, in the second period. Neither side scored in the third period. Laganiere gave a standout performance in the showcase, scoring the team’s two goals on Friday – both in the second period and within 10 minutes of each other – as well as the gameclinching goal on Saturday for a weekend-wide hat trick. Laganiere said he was impressed with the whole team’s performance in its first games of the year. He noted that the team is approaching the season with a “growth mindset” and that it still needs to make improvements to achieve its goal of winning a national championship later this season. Miller said Laganiere played fast, strong and physical, and “did what he does best — create chances on the ice.” Last year, Laganiere ranked second on the team in scoring with 19 goals and fourth in points with 33. Eight freshmen joined the team this year — all forwards and defensemen — and 16 players, including the team’s three goalies, have returned from last year . “The freshman jumped into the mix well,” Miller said. “Each year with seniors graduating,

people are placed into newer and bigger roles. This weekend was a good start to adapting to those new roles.” The Bulldogs (1-0-1) are coming off a strong season last year (16-16-3, 10-10-2 ECAC) that brought them through the first round of Eastern College Athletic Conference playoffs to the quarterfinals. Yale’s playoff run ended with an 8-2 loss to Harvard on March 11. Yale last faced off against Dartmouth in February, winning the match 5-3, and bested the Tigers in the first round of ECAC playoffs last March. The men’s hockey team has been particularly strong in recent years under the tutelage of Malcolm G. Chace Head Coach Keith Allain ’80. The Bulldogs have won two of the past four ECAC championships — in 2010-’11 and in 2008-’09 — and qualified for the NCAA East Regionals in both of those years. Allain could not be reached for comment on Sunday. Yale will hit the road next weekend for its first two conference games at Dartmouth on Friday and at Harvard on Saturday. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

Yale equalizes late to earn draw

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L D %

W L D %

1

Brown

4

0

1

0.900

12

1

2

0.867

2

Cornell

4

1

0

0.800

13

1

0

0.929

Dartmouth

4

1

0

0.800

8

6

0

0.571

4

Princeton

2

1

2

0.600

6

6

2

0.500

5

Yale

1

2

2

0.400

4

7

4

0.400

Columbia

1

2

2

0.400

3

7

4

0.357

7

Harvard

0

4

1

0.100

2

9

3

0.250

8

Penn

0

5

0

0.000

2

12 0

0.143

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Tie - Yale 1, Columbia 1 (2OT)

Sat. Yale at Brown, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S SOCCER IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L D %

W L D %

1

Princeton

6

0

0

1.000

12

3

1

0.781

2

Dartmouth

5

1

0

0.833

12

4

0

0.750

Penn

5

1

0

0.833

9

5

1

0.633

Harvard

2

3

1

0.417

8

5

3

0.594

Columbia

2

3

1

0.417

6

8

1

0.433

Yale

1

4

1

0.250

7

7

1

0.500

Brown

1

5

0

0.167

7

8

0

0.467

Cornell

0

5

1

0.083

1

13 1

0.100

4

6 8

LAST WEEK

THIS WEEK

Tie - Yale 1, Columbia 1 (2OT)

Thurs. Yale at Columbia, 7:00 p.m. Sun. Yale vs. Brown, 2:00 p.m.

MEN’S HOCKEY IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L D %

Cornell

0

0

0

0.000 2

0

0

1.000

Harvard

0

0

0

0.000 1

0

0

1.000

Dartmouth

0

0

0

0.000 1

0

1

0.750

Yale

0

0

0

0.000 1

0

1

0.750

Brown

0

0

0

0.000 1

1

0

0.500

Princeton

0

0

0

0.000 0

2

0

0.000

LAST WEEK

W L D %

THIS WEEK

Fri. Yale 2, Columbia 2 Sat. Yale 3, Cornell 2

Fri. Yale at Dartmouth, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale at Harvard, 7:00 p.m.

WOMEN’S HOCKEY IVY

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The Bulldogs tied the Lions in a 1-1 draw after two periods of overtime play. M. SOCCER FROM PAGE B4 With Armbrust’s 69th minute tally, Alers said that the Bulldogs gained more confidence. Armbrust’s strike represented his second game-tying goal in as many games — he also scored in the 70th minute of the Penn contest to knot the game at 1–1. “Scott’s an experienced player now, and I think he’s a guy that

relishes the big moments in games,” Tompkins said. While the match concluded without any further scoring, both teams nearly found the back of the net again. In the 89th minute of regulation, Sauerbier dribbled the ball past a charging Thalman towards the left side of the Eli goal. With Thalman out of the net, Sauerbier appeared to have a clear shot at the goal despite the

three Bulldog defenders in their penalty area. Yet defender Tyler Detorie ’16 managed to slide in front of Sauerbier’s shot to preserve the tie and send the game into extra time. In the 108th minute of the contest, the Bulldogs created a dangerous opportunity in front of the Lions’ net. Forward Jenner Fox ’14 lofted a ball into the Columbia penalty area to the chest of mid-

fielder Kevin Michalak ’15, who received the ball with Jackson’s back to him. Michalak, however, was unable to corral the ball for a shot, and the game ended in a draw. The Bulldogs will face unbeaten Brown this Saturday in Providence. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W L

%

Cornell

1

0

1.000

4

1

0.800

Harvard

0

0

0.000

2

0

1.000

Brown

0

0

0.000

1

1

0.500

Dartmouth

1

1

0.500

1

1

0.500

Princeton

0

0

0.000

2

2

0.500

Yale

0

1

0.000

1

3

0.250

LAST WEEK Fri.Yale 3, Colgate 0 Sat. Cornell 3, Yale 2

THIS WEEK Fri. Yale vs. Dartmouth, 7:00 p.m. Sat. Yale vs. Harvard, 4:00 p.m.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Patriots look to cross Atlantic and beat out Hurricane Sandy After a dominant 45–7 win over the St. Louis Rams on Sunday, the New England Patriots moved quickly to return to Boston with Hurricane Sandy fast approaching. Making things more difficult? The Patriots and Rams played in London at Wembley Stadium. In an attempt to return stateside, the Patriots will try to depart Heathrow at 5 a.m. BST on Monday.

Elis recover for draw

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite Scott Armbrust’s goal at 68:59, the Elis closed out the match against Columbia in a 1-1 tie. BY ALEX EPPLER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In the 69th minute of Saturday’s men’s soccer game, defender Nick Alers ’14 surprised the Columbia defense by dribbling the ball past the midfield line. He looked up to see midfielder Scott Armbrust ’14 streaking towards the top of Columbia’s penalty area. Alers threaded a pass

through several Columbia players to Armbrust and chipped a shot over Lion goalkeeper Kyle Jackson to tie the score at one goal apiece.

M. SOCCER Despite several scoring chances for both squads throughout the remainder of the game, the Bulldogs (4–7–4, 1–2–2 Ivy) and Lions (3–7–4, 1–2–2 Ivy) finished

their match locked in a 1–1 draw after two periods of overtime play at Reese Stadium. “I didn’t think that we were as engaged in the first half as we needed to be,” head coach Brian Tompkins said. “Our guys competed a lot better, we passed the ball better, we were a lot more dangerous in the second half.” Tompkins added that this progression echoed the Bulldogs’

previous match, last week’s 2–1 victory against Penn. In that game, the Elis surrendered a 65th minute penalty kick goal before roaring back to win with tallies in the 70th and 88th minutes. The Elis allowed the first goal of this weekend’s game as well. In the 14th minute, Columbia midfielder Henning Sauerbier separated himself from his defender deep in Yale’s defensive half and

received a pass from midfielder Kyle Culbertson to the right of the Bulldog goal. After taking several touches to create more space, Sauerbier fired a low shot past diving goalkeeper and captain Bobby Thalman ’13. “We’ve come out a little flatfooted in the first half this season and we’ve waited for them to score to give us a wake-up call,” Alers said, contrasting the Elis’

Bulldogs split weekend series

play in the two halves. “It was almost like night and day.” Tompkins said Yale did not pass the ball well in the first half, which enabled the Lions to apply strong pressure to the Eli back line. Alers added that the Bulldogs struggled to retain possession of the ball and allowed the Lions to pass around them in the opening period. SEE M. SOCCER PAGE B3

Early goal gives Elis first draw BY ASHTON WACKYM CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Going into Saturday’s game against Columbia, the Bulldogs had not scored a goal in 250 conesuctive minutes in Ivy League play. But forward Georgiana Wagemann ’15 broke that streak just 48 seconds into the game to put the Elis up 1–0 over the Lions.

W. SOCCER

and the Bulldogs proved too large of a gap to overcome. Despite the loss, which dropped the team’s record to 1–3–0 (1–1–0 ECAC), the Bulldogs remained optimistic about parts of the game. “We just need to stay crisp and keep our work ethic up, and the rest will come,” Haddad said. That first victory also matched Yale’s win total from a season ago when the Bulldogs ended the season on a 22-game winless streak. Martini recognized the importance

In the end, Yale (7–7–1, 1–4–1 Ivy) tied Columbia (6–8–1, 2–3–1 Ivy) 1–1 in two overtimes at Reese Stadium. After “chasing the game” in an Oct. 20 loss to Penn, in which the Bulldogs conceded first, the team took the field planning to take an early lead. “We needed to play quickly otherwise we knew we would be playing from behind,” captain Jenny Butwin ’13 said. Despite the fast start by the Bulldogs, the game’s momentum passed between the teams for the entire 110 minutes. Yale players said they expected the Lions to be a physically competitive team and thus came out aggressively, but the Eli offense could not keep up the pace. The Bulldogs’ intensity began to fade as the minutes passed. According to head coach Rudy Meredith, the Lions won more 50-50 balls as the game went on. “All of a sudden we started turning the ball over way too easily,” Meredith said. “I think that’s where the game started to change.” The heavy physical play and intensity of the Lions began to wear down the Bulldogs and Columbia was eventually able to equalize. Over the course of the game, Columbia recorded 13 fouls and a yellow card, while Yale had eight fouls. “They were more physical than we were,” forward Anne Song ’13 said. “The officiating was a littler looser and they let things go.” Keeping a one-goal lead for 89 minutes proved too formidable a challenge for the Elis, but they managed to hold the Lions at zero for 25 minutes into the second half. Near the 70-minute mark, Columbia midfielder Beverly Leon broke free and in a one-on-one opportunity against goalkeeper Rachel Ames

SEE W. HOCKEY PAGE B2

SEE W. SOCCER PAGE B2

JACOB GEIGER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

After winning just one game last season, the women’s hockey team has started off well with a weekend win and close loss to No. 2 Cornell. BY GRANT BRONSDON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In a strong second weekend of play, the women’s hockey team matched its win total from last season and put a scare in the second-best team in the country. The Elis’ 3–0 win over Colgate on Friday gave the team its first win of the season and the next night the Bulldogs narrowly lost 3–2 at No. 2 Cornell.

W. HOCKEY “This weekend, we proved to the

league and to ourselves that we can compete with anyone,” captain Alyssa Zupon ’13 said. “Losing was disappointing but there were many positives to take away, and both games were great team efforts.” The Bulldogs started conference play with a 3–0 shutout win on Friday afternoon, paced by goals from Zupon and forwards Jamie Haddad ’16 and Janelle Ferrera ’16. Defenseman Kate Martini ’16 assisted all three goals. Jaimie Leonoff ’15 had 31 saves en route to her first career shutout. Yale’s stellar penalty killing effort, stopping all four of the Raiders’ power plays,

was a huge part of the victory. Saturday’s game was a much more challenging matchup as the Elis went on the road against the No. 2 team in the nation, Cornell. Yale took an early lead in the first period on a power play goal by Haddad, but two quick Cornell goals in the second period neutralized its lead. Despite Martini’s game-tying power play goal halfway through the second period, a late goal by Cornell forward Jillian Saulnier 4:36 into the third period proved to be the difference in a 3–2 loss. Leonoff recorded 39 saves against Cornell, but a 42–10 shot disparity between the Big Red

Today's Paper  

Oct. 29, 2012

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