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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 31 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLEAR

61 47

CROSS CAMPUS Operation successful.

City leaders have praised New Haven’s new teacher evaluation system after 90 percent of Elm City teachers this year scored in the top three categories: “exemplary,” “strong” and “effective.” This year, 13 percent of teachers were ranked “exemplary,” compared to only 8 percent last year. Are you hungry for good food? If you answered yes to

this question, turn to the Yale College Council for help. In conjunction with Yale Dining, the YCC is launching its “Beat Meal Ever” contest for its second year. Students are invited to go online and pick their ideal dining menu for one day. Winners will be served that dinner on Oct. 18, just in time to stay fit before stocking up on Halloween candy.

Turning the tables. After the Senate debates on Sunday, U.S. Representative Chris Murphy pulled five percentage points ahead of opponent Linda McMahon, the Republican nominee for the seat. Of 500 likely voters polled, 51 percent said they would support Murphy while 46 percent said they were in favor of McMahon. The poll had a 4.5 percent margin of error and was conducted by conservative-leaning pollster Rasmussen Reports. Invading the Twitterverse. A

new Twitter account surfaced Tuesday morning called “YaleWantsTheD,” a parody of the popular “SheWantsTheD” Twitter account. As of Tuesday night, the account was following 190 people and had roughly 40 followers.

Giving back. Yale employees and couple Barbara and Kumpati Narendra have established an endowment fund to help support the Peabody Museum’s mineral and meteorite collections. Barbara Narendra has worked at the museum for more than 30 years as a museum assistant, and Kumpati Narendra serves as an electrical engineering professor and the director of the Center for Systems Science in the Yale School of Engineering.

ART PROJECT YALE SCHOOLS COLLABORATE

WOMEN

VALET

PHOTOJOURNALISM

Female leaders talk success, biases in the workplace

UNION STATION SEES PARKING UPGRADE

Photographer discusses evolution of professional style

PAGES 8-9 CULTURE

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 NEWS

Search outlines ideal candidate THE YALE COMMUNITY HAS HIGH EXPECTATIONS FOR THE NEXT PRESIDENT. WHILE OUR PERSPECTIVE WILL CONTINUE TO EVOLVE THROUGHOUT THE SEARCH PROCESS, IT IS CLEAR THE FOLLOWING WILL BE IMPORTANT WHEN CHOOSING THE NEXT PRESIDENT OF YALE: YALE’S PRESIDENT MUST DEMONSTRATE, THROUGH ACTIONS AND LEADERSHIP, THE HIGHEST ETHICAL AND MORAL STANDARDS. YALE’S PRESIDENT MUST EMBODY AN UNWAVERING COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE IN THE UNIVERSITY’S CORE ACTIVITIES AND, IN PARTICULAR, THE UNIVERSITY’S MISSION TO CREATE, PRESERVE AND DISSEMINATE KNOWLEDGE. HE OR SHE WILL BE A SCHOLAR AND EDUCATOR WITH THE HIGHEST INTELLECTUAL STANDARDS AND A DEMONSTRATED COMMITMENT TO high expectations› humility ›highest ethical and moral standards › leadership ›unwavering commitment to excellence ›integrity ›gi\j\im\Xe[[`jj\d`eXk\befnc\[^\›empathy › scholar and educator›respect strong partnership with the community ›Zi\Xk`m`kp›^cfYXc\em`ifed\ek›ÓjZXcXe[fg\iXk`feXc[`jZ`gc`e\› curiosity › identify outstanding talent ›\ù\Zk`m\[`^`kXcjkiXk\^p›]fiZ\]lcglYc`Z X[mfZXk\›i\c`j_[`m\ij`kp›generosity › humor ›n`cc`e^e\jjkfc`jk\e›high expectations›_ld`c`kp›highest ethical and moral standards›c\X[\ij_`g› lenXm\i`e^Zfdd`kd\ekkf excellence›`ek\^i`kp›preserve and disseminate knowledge›\dgXk_p› jZ_fcXiXe[\[lZXkfi›respect strong partnership with the community›Zi\Xk`m`kp› ^cfYXc\em`ifed\ek› fiscal and operational discipline ›Zli`fj`kp›`[\ek`]pflkstanding talent›\ù\Zk`m\ digital strategy› forceful public advocate›relish [`m\ij`kp›^\e\ifj`kp› _ldfi›n`cc`e^e\jjkf c`jk\e›high expectations›humility ›highest ethical and moral standards› leadership › lenXmering commitment to excellence ›integrity › prej\im\ and dissemi- nate knowl- edge ›em- pathy › scho lar and

high expectations› humility › highest ethical and moral standards ›leadership ›unwavering commitment to excellence ›integrity ›gi\j\im\ Xe[[`jj\d`eXk\befnc\[^\›empathy scholar and educator›respect strong partnership with the community ›cre Xk`m`kp›^cfYXc\em`ifed\ek›ÓjZXcXe[fg \iXk`feXc[`jZ`gc`e\›curiosity › identify outstanding talent›\ù\Zk`m\[`^`kXcjkiXk\^p ›]fiZ\]lcglYc`ZX[mfZXk\›i\c`j_[`m\ij`kp› generosity ›humor ›n`cc`e^e\jjkfc`jk\e› high expectations›_ld`c`kp›highest ethical and moral standards›c\X[\ij_`g›lenXm\i`e^ commitment to excellence›`ek\^i`kp›preserve and disseminate knowledge›\dgXk_p› jZ_fcXiXe[\[lZXkfi›respect strong partner ship with the community›Zi\Xk`m`kp›^cfYXc \em`ifed\ek› fiscal and operational disci pline ›Zli`fj`kp›`[\ek`]pflkjkXe[`e^kXc\ek \ù\Zk`m\[`^`kXcjkiXk\^p› forceful public ad vocate›i\c`j_[`m\ij`kp›^\e\ifj`kp›_ldfi ›n`cc`e^e\jjkfc`jk\e›high expectations ›humility ›highest ethical and moral standards›leadership ›lenXm\i`e^ commitment to excellence ›integrity ›gi\j\im\ and disseminate knowledge › empathy › scholar and educator › respect strong partnership with the commue`kp›Zi\Xk`m`kp ›global environment› humility › highest ethical and moral standards › leadership › unwavering commitment to excellence › integrity › gi\j\im\ and disseminate knowl\[^\›empathy ›jZ_fcXi and educator ›respect strong partnership with the community ›Zi\Xk`m`kp ›^cfYXc\em`ifed\ek› ÓjZXcXe[ operational discigc`e\› curiosity › identify outstanding

YDN

BY SOPHIE GOULD AND JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTERS After efforts to gather student, faculty and alumni opinion on the search for a new Yale president, the Search Committee released a statement Tuesday morning outlining the most important qualities University President Richard Levin’s successor must possess. The committee wrote

that the person who will replace Levin at the end of the academic year must be “a scholar and educator” with a commitment to administrative duties, among other qualities. The statement was published on the Yale website and included in a Yale News email to students Tuesday, but only two of 10 students interviewed Tuesday were already aware of its existence. All students and faculty interviewed agreed with

the basic ideas outlined in the statement, though many added that they consider it to be overly general and ineffective. “The statement reflects the important themes that the committee has identified,” said Search Committee member Judith Chevalier ’89, a finance and economics professor at the School of Management. “Of course, feedback was solicited widely and not every attribute to be

Metro-North satisfaction rises

The 39 Connecticut people who were treated for fungal meningitis have been cleared of the disease, officials said on Thursday. The patients were not in critical condition.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1925 The University announces the 25 incoming freshmen from Connecticut who will receive free tuition for their first year at the college. Officials also announce the 10 students who will receive the Sterling Memorial New Haven and New Haven High School Scholarships, which grant free tuition for all four years. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

VIVIENNE ZHANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Satisfaction among passengers with the Metro-North railroad is on the rise. BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While New England railroad lines can be prone to delays of service or crowded rail cars, a new report from the Metropolitan Transit Authority showed customer satisfication with the Metro-North railroad is on the rise. Overall, 93 percent of passengers who took part in the annual MTA study expressed approval of the rail operator’s service, marking themselves as either “satisfied” or “very

satisfied.” While that figure experienced a modest increase from 89 percent in the previous year, the spike in “very satisfied” customers was greater — 40 percent of respondents this year were “very satisfied” compared to 33 percent in 2011. The overall satisfaction rating, on-time performance rating and ratings for the Hudson, Harlem and New Haven lines all rebounded to their 2010 levels. Jim Cameron, chairman of the Connecticut Rail Commuter Council — a 15-memSEE METRO-NORTH PAGE 6

BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER When members of the inaugural Yale-NUS class open their student handbooks next August, they will find specific rules pertaining to political life on campus. The Yale-NUS Board of Governors voted at a meeting last month to accept a set of policies proposed by Pericles Lewis, president of the Singaporean liberal arts college, that will prevent students from creating campus branches of existing Singaporean political parties, in accordance with the nation’s law. The policies, which have not yet been formally published, will allow students to create and join any other type of student group, including organizations that represent different political ideologies but that are unaffiliated with current political parties in Singapore.

I see no reason why there couldn’t be a political union that functions similarly to the [Yale Political Union]. CHARLES BAILYN Yale-NUS Dean of Faculty

considered was included in the statement.” According to the statement, the new president must be a global thinker, exemplify the “highest ethical and moral standards,” maintain a positive relationship with New Haven and embrace the diversity of the Yale community. Students and faculty interviewed said they appre-

Lewis said he will be ultimately responsible for ensuring students comply with the established protocols. He added that the YaleNUS governing board communicates with the Singaporean Ministry of Education on a regular basis and also receives legal advice to ensure policy decisions comply with the nation’s laws.

SEE SEARCH PAGE 4

SEE YALE-NUS PAGE 4

Chapel-Howe proposal passes BY DIANA LI STAFF REPORTER

Coast is clear, for now.

Yale-NUS parties policy set

Despite contentious debate about a new apartment complex at the corner of Chapel and Howe Streets, the New Haven Board of Zoning Appeals unanimously approved an application for development at its monthly meeting Tuesday night. Although local residents and officials raised concerns that a proposed 136-unit apartment complex would create more private parking spaces while damaging local historical properties, the five members of the zoning board approved the application, submitted by Stamford-based construction firm RMS Companies. The proposed project will rehabilitate 169 Dwight St. and 175 Dwight St., while it will demolish the building at 1249 Chapel St. Two interviewed members of the Board said after the vote that the project would promote economic development in the area despite the planned demolition of a historical building. “In an ideal world, we’d like to save all the historical buildings, but it doesn’t work that way,” said Patricia King, one of the members present at the meeting. “These developers all have different financial issues they have to worry about … They’re saving two [historical buildings], and you can’t always get everything you want.” King said that the development would be a “significant improvement” because some of the proper-

ties involved in the project have been vacant, adding that the application demonstrated that the proposal qualified for the approval that the developer was seeking.

In an ideal world we’d like to save all the historical buildings, but it doesn’t work that way. PATRICIA KING Board member Fellow Board of Zoning member Victor Fasano agreed. Looking at what he said was the “big picture,” the plan would be a major development for the area as a whole. The new apartment complex would revitalize the neighborhood and bring in new residents who will enliven the area by supporting business, said Deputy Director of Economic Development for New Haven Tony Bialecki last Thursday. Some local residents complained that the apartment complex would include 90 private parking spaces and fail to alleviate the demand for public parking, since the new parking spots would be reserved for the apartment’s residents. The new complex will be located across the street from Yale’s parking lot on Chapel Street, which is also not available for public use. Fasano addressed this concern at SEE DEVELOPMENT PAGE 6


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Yale students are adults. They're not children.” yaledailynews.com/opinion

Identity talk T

wo experiences in the past few weeks have set me thinking about identity, and how we talk about identity in our politically correct age and diverse community. Two weekends ago, one of my housemates made Chicken Tikka Masala. When I walked to the kitchen to put away my dishes, I cracked what seemed to me an inoffensive joke. “Hey, I’m so glad that you made British food.” Picture at least one completely aghast face at the dinner table. In one fell swoop, I’d managed to alienate a dinner party. Aghast, I explained that the origins of Chicken Tikka Masala, which, according to the most popular narrative tradition, lie in immigrant restaurants in Northern England and Scotland. I shared that I had recently seen a well-received play in London that further perpetuated the story of Chicken Tikka Masala’s British origins, and that I’d read countless stories over the years about Chicken Tikka Masala’s popularity in the U.K. Indeed, it’s been called the National Dish of the U.K. by more than one British official and newspaper. While they finally forgave me for my awful, tongue-incheek, post-colonial joke, I left the kitchen feeling bewildered. Without trying, I had blundered into a whole series of questions about race, power, and the norms associated with both. I felt tremendously guilty about having implied something I never meant to, and also sad that I hadn’t been given the benefit of the doubt. A few days ago, while preparing for a group presentation, one member of my team wanted to propose a strategy that targeted particular ethnic communities because these communities tended to have a stronger sense of collective identity. I pushed back, arguing that I didn’t want to focus our presentation on race, and that I was afraid that our teachers and classmates would respond poorly to a policy proposal that made assumptions about race and community. He told me (I’m paraphrasing) that I was being culturally insensitive and had misunderstood him, that I didn’t understand these issues because I’m not from one of these communities. I have a huge amount of respect for this person, who tends to be thoughtful about questions of identity. I left the room again overwhelmed and bewildered, concerned that I’d said something irredeemably wrong and shattered a working relationship.

While we got through our differences and were able to finish the presentation, I’m still preoccupied by the specters that ZOE accusation MERCER- his raised. Was I GOLDEN being culturally insensitive Meditations by not wanting to make his policy recommendation? And what can I do in the future to promote dialogue about questions of diversity, while avoiding offending others unintentionally? I’ve had several conversations with friends over the last few days and weeks about these situations. Most friends — people of all racial, gender, religious and sexual identities — expressed a concern that at some point they had been unintentionally offensive to someone with a different set of self-identifying traits because of ignorance or thoughtlessness. They said that they rarely knew how to begin to have conversations about identity without sounding condescending, bigoted or hopelessly ignorant. White friends in particular expressed this concern: they didn’t know whether it was appropriate to ask questions about what life is like for others, and if it was intrusive to ask to be taught. Like me, they were terrified that they had said or would say the wrong thing in the future. Sometimes side-stepping identity issues — as I tried to — is more offensive than having a conversation. Over time, resentment and antagonism builds. We want to live in a community and world that addresses these questions as soon as possible. So what’s the solution to this problem? Talking, and through that, making ourselves open to constructive criticism and to learning about each other and ourselves. In the future, I’m going to seize moments like these as opportunities to build more transparent relationships and a greater understanding of what it means to come from a different world. Maybe this, then, is the best way to start a conversation like those I’ll be starting in the future: “I want more than anything to have a better sense of you; I hope in turn you’ll try to know me, and believe me when I say that I never meant to offend.”

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The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2014. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

Focus on authenticity Y

esterday, the New York Times reported that Dr. Michael Anderson of Canton, Ga. advocates prescribing the focus-enhancing drug Adderall to children who he admits have not been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. He writes a prescription because these children are victims of underfunded schools. He says he seeks to "even the scales" for children who struggle to learn in inadequate schools. Many physicians accuse him of putting children at physical and psychological risk with the prescription of this psychotropic drug, while disregarding the protocol of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Every day at Yale — perhaps especially at this time of year when midterms are in full force — students abuse Adderall and Ritalin to enhance study abilities. For me, "abuse" refers to the consumption of these drugs without an honestly obtained prescription. Their prevalence on campus ranges from a single dose the night before an exam

to addiction. Humanities majors and engineers alike know the advantages these drugs offer. It's certainly not exclusive to Yale — high-achieving college and high school students nationwide take advantage of the study drugs to boost their grades. The abuse of Adderall gives students an unfair edge over others, undermining the level playing field that we should expect from our community. When someone can focus that much more on his paper or study for that much longer for her exam, it disrespects the efforts of their suitemates and teammates. In the same way that Adderall allegedly "evens the scales" for students in inadequate middle schools, it gives an unfair testing advantage to college students who choose to abuse it. Even on individual assignments, study drugs undermine the authenticity and academic integrity for which we should strive. It scares me to think that my friends and classmates are putting their bodies at risk for better grades. Though long-term health

effects of Adderall and Ritalin are unknown, the risks include high blood pressure and addiction. But Yalies know how to evaluate health risks. We embrace our own vices every time we skip out on a good night's sleep or down that third (or fourth or fifth) beer. Though I care immensely about the health of my peers, I know that we each have to learn to make our own decisions — it’s the only way we can define who we are. For many people at Yale, it's hard to imagine how we earned a place amongst such bright, passionate learners. For some of us this can breed a feeling of inadequacy: Why couldn't I figure out that reaction mechanism? Why don't I ever add worthwhile insight in section? Too often, these insecurities and perfectionist tendencies create a maelstrom of stress that seems inescapable. For some, achieving more with Adderall creates an escape. No one has to turn to this inauthentic solution. But for whatever reason — perhaps the shortcom-

ings of mental health services or unrealistic expectations for ourselves — Yalies are abusing these study drugs in the same way that professional athletes wrongly use performance-enhancing steroids. The value of a Yale diploma relies on the academic integrity we must uphold. However, the reasons we do not plagiarize or peek at another’s test conflict with our drive to achieve our academic goals. Those goals mean nothing without integrity. It pains me to see the ambitious pre-med, who will one day hold the power to prescribe Adderall, abusing it to get to medical school. I hate knowing that the brilliant essay my English class is workshopping might come at the expense of its writer’s health. Yalies are some of the most intelligent, hard-working students in the country. Each of us must create our own authentic legacy here, sans amphetamines. AMY NAPLETON is a junior in Trumbull College. Contact her at amy.napleton@yale.edu .

GUE ST COLUMNIST DIANA ENRIQUE Z

The myth of the Latino vote I

genuinely look forward to the debates, the speeches at the DNC and the RNC and voter outreach programs that generate mountains of press. But nothing makes me grimace more than the discussion of the “Latino vote.” Because I wish it was that simple. Really, it’s a myth. Even at Yale — in La Casa Cultural, Yale’s Latino cultural house — we are splintered into numerous cultural groups: all sensitive to our countries of origin and our traditions. The Latino population includes at least 19 different cultural groups; uniting groups across these disparate interests is a serious challenge to organizers within La Casa. There isn’t a solid voting bloc here that can be won in its entirety through a speech by Julian Castro, the mayor of San Antonio, at the Democratic National Convention. Florida Republican Senator Marco Rubio cannot win every Latino vote through his own version of the DREAM Act, a bill to provide a pathway to citizenship for undocumented students. I’ve watched socially conser-

vative preachers turn out their congregations for Democratic candidates because the party made targeted outreach efforts to these communities and addressed their concerns. Senator Rubio and other political figures appeal to voters’ social concerns and immigration interest groups in Florida. Campaigns translate their ads into Spanish and hire volunteers to answer calls in Spanish and Portuguese. The election cycle is working hard to gain our attention in every venue they can. For some of us, immigration is the main issue on the political table. Many of the students I work alongside at Yale feel a little safer because over the summer the Obama administration offered them the deferred action program, protecting them from immediate deportation. A few of them are now protected by this status and are now reaching out to other students at Yale and in New Haven who can benefit from this government program. This bill only applies to a very small subsection of the population. For many of us, this means our families are still concerned about our uncles, neighbors or

friends whose fates are less certain. We feel there is still a lot to be done. We live under the knowledge that the Obama administration has deported more people in the last four years than the Bush administration in eight. We watch Obama speak in carefully selected sites, like Miami Dade County, a site with a wellknown majority Latino population. For years, immigration activists have demanded that President Obama follow through on his promises to our community. Through this election cycle, he has simply repeated these unfulfilled promises and his wish to keep families together. Many of my friends in La Casa are second- or third-generation immigrants. They primarily focus on aiding their own communities here in the United States. They see disparities in education and affordable healthcare as the most pressing issues in this election. They see their taxes increasing locally, and they have a hard time saving enough money to support their families. All of these issues come up in different spaces, at

different times in our communities, and we don’t always agree on the solutions. I am a first-generation immigrant and for every day I’ve been at Yale, immigration has been the issue at the front of my mind. My time and my focus has been torn between my community in Mexico and everything I left behind there, and my community here in the United States. But ultimately all of us are voting for candidates who address our concerns — all we ask for is follow-through. In the same way that some members of my community will vote for the Republican ticket because they identify with the social principles they stand for, others will vote for Democrats because they hope Obama will increase access to jobs for minority communities. For the Latino community to continue turning out at the polls, our politicians can no longer throw out empty buzzwords and unrealized policies. DIANA ENRIQUEZ is a senior in Saybrook College. Contact her at diana.enriquez@yale.edu .

GUEST COLUMNIST COURTNEY HODRICK

Outgrowing pre-professionalism

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S

eniors are interviewing for jobs this week, and it’s stressing me out. Those of you who are older and more stressed about this than I am should pause before rolling your eyes. Yes, I’m a freshman — young enough both to see the moonlight over Old Campus and to be continually surprised by how beautiful it is. I may still be in awe of my surroundings and desperate to soak up everything that Yale has to offer, but I’m also young enough to still be a little bit scarred by the memory of the college application process. Every moment of recollection of how lucky I am to be here comes with a reminder of the effort that getting here took: the late nights writing papers, the months when SAT scores and GPA’s felt like a numerical representation of my worth and the constant question that preceded every choice — “how will this look to colleges?” Maybe that mindset was a product of my own neurosis, or maybe it came from attending a high school whose sports teams, I kid you not, played in the Ivy Preparatory School League. My

classmates and I attended one of the “best high schools in the country,” but there were times when it felt like we weren’t going to school to receive an education, but rather to earn admission to the so-called best colleges in the country. Many of my teachers were truly inspiring and my extracurricular experiences were enriching, but high school often felt less like an intellectual journey and more like an unrelenting treadmill of exams and papers that tired me out without taking me anywhere. Those of us who could set the treadmill on the highest setting and stay on the longest would end up at places like Yale, or those schools in Cambridge and New Jersey. That was how the world worked. It was a world that I was lucky to be a part of, but one with a deeply flawed value system. No matter where we went to high school, we’re now attending one of those best colleges in the country. Going to Yale sets us on a path, we’re told, to attend the best law, medical and graduate schools in the country, or to take some of the best jobs. Our Yale degrees will take us

amazing places, but those destinations should define neither our Yale experience nor our worth as people. The future is looming, and we need to prepare for it, but our time at Yale should not serve solely to set up whatever comes after graduation. In short: pre-professionalism really scares me. Walking through Cross Campus, I overhear students comparing MCAT and LSAT scores. When I asked upperclassmen what language I should study, I was told that Chinese is useful for business, German is useful for graduate school, and Russian will kill my GPA. One of my friends wants to read some of the so-called Great Books in class, but she doesn’t know if her premed requirements will give her room for a class with that much reading. No matter how many late nights I spend debating philosophy, it’s hard to avoid encounters that make me worry that I should start dusting off my running shoes and preparing to hop back on the achievement treadmill. I catch myself wondering whether studying abroad or doing a summer internship would look bet-

ter, and then I have to ask: who exactly is looking? Though the idea that we come to college to find ourselves is trite, there’s truth in clichés, and finding ourselves should entail something more than choosing which all-powerful judges to try to impress. Call me naïve, but I want to receive my education in an environment that fosters a love of learning, an environment that encourages risk-taking. I’m not saying that the future isn’t important. We should constantly aim to do as much as we can with the talents and the opportunities that we’ve been given. Nevertheless, I wonder if we could be just as successful after Yale without making success after Yale our only goal. If we really just focused on learning the material in our classes and participating in organizations we love, would we build strong resumes without even noticing? The woods are scary, but we can do more than run on treadmills. COURTNEY HODRICK is a freshman in Saybrook College. Contact her at courtney.hodrick@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Science without religion is lame, religion without science is blind.” ALBERT EINSTEIN

Valet service pulls into station BY ROSA NGUYEN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As of Oct. 2, Metro-North and Amtrak passengers can avoid the hassles of crowded garages with a new valet parking service. Union Station is the state’s first train terminal to offer valet parking — one solution to the city’s ongoing shortage of parking availability. A collaboration between the Department of Transportation and Park New Haven, an operator of six parking garages in the city, the service is available to New Haven residents for $20 a day. After commuters leave their vehicles in front of Union Station, valets will move the cars to a lot west of the station or to a lot at the former Coliseum three blocks away. Returning commuters can use a “Rapid Return” program, through which they can text or call the valet service 20 to 30 minutes before arrival for their car to be moved to the entrance of Union Station. “[The valet parking service] fits well with what we’re trying to promote in a transportation center — the most user-friendly travel possible,” said William Kilpatrick, executive director of Park New Haven.

Seventy-five to 100 New Haven residents have used the valet parking system, though numbers are expected to rise as awareness of the service spreads, said Kilpatrick. The day after the program’s launch, over 20 cars had already been valet-parked. Kilpatrick said although the service has not had any direct advertisement, information about the program has been posted on the Park New Haven website and continues to draw media coverage.

This is the kind of innovation that our customers are increasingly looking to us for. JAMES REDEKER Department of Transportation commissioner Thus far the service has been running smoothly, with only one delay caused by a passenger who failed to text in advance, Kilpatrick said. He added that the area in which cars are entrusted

to valets is “a limited amount of space with a lot of activity” and an increased number of valets have thus been staffed outside Union Station. “We are trying to put customer convenience and service first, and this is the kind of innovation that our customers are increasingly looking to us for,” said Department of Transportation commissioner James Redeker. “Our goal is satisfied customers, and the availability of a valet parking service, especially during a harsh New England winter, is something that many will welcome.” In addition to the valet parking service, Park New Haven is considering further developments to improve the efficiency of New Haven parking lots. Kilpatrick cited added pay stations where residents can pay for parking and way-finding technology to direct drivers to available parking spaces as new innovations that will alleviate vehicular congestion in downtown garages. Park New Haven officials are also discussing the construction of another garage on the west or east side of the Union Station Parking Garage. “The best option has not yet been determined,” Kilpatrick

VIVIENNE ZHANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The Department of Transportation and Park New Haven introduced valet parking to Union Station. said. The valet parking service will be available Monday through Friday from 6:00 am to 2:00 am.

After 180 days of operation, Park New Haven will evaluate the effectiveness of the program and consider potential adjustments.

Contact ROSA NGUYEN at rosa.nguyen@yale.edu .

Female leaders consider success Lectures explore science, religion

BY CORINNE KENTOR CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Five female leaders in politics and business, each from different nations, defended their right to be influential and successful in their respective industries before a group of roughly 80 people Tuesday evening. The Yale World Fellows program, along with four other partner organizations, brought together the five women from several different employment sectors — including politics, non-profits, business and academia — to explore the biases preventing contemporary women from attaining prominence in the professional world. Panelists, who were all Yale World Fellows, spoke before a group comprised of Fulbright scholars, feminists, future coast guard officers, special interest representatives, graduate students, current world fellows and professors. Discussion focused on the depletion of female leadership among the various industries, and solutions such as improved availability of child care options were offered. “The question is no longer why we need women leaders,” said Priya Natarajan, moderator and Yale astronomy and physics professor. “Rather, [it is] how can we

BY TIANYI PAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Female leaders in politics and business from left to right: Sisonke Msimang, Marlene Malahoo Forte and Priya Natarajan. nurture women leaders.” The panelists — Mi-Hyung Kim, general counsel of the

PARTICIPANTS HOW TO NURTURE WOMEN LEADERS PANEL PRIYA NATARAJAN INDIA Professor, Astronomy & Physics, Yale Chair, Yale Women Faculty Forum

MI-HYUNG KIM SOUTH KOREA Yale World Fellow ‘05, Young Global Leader Executive Vice President and General Counsel, Kumho-Asiana Business Group

MARLENE MALAHOO FORTE JAMAICA Yale World Fellow ‘07, Young Global Leader Senator, Jamaica

SISONKE MSIMANG SOUTH AFRICA Yale World Fellow ’12, Young Global Leader Executive Director, Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa

RUCHI YADAV INDIA Yale World Fellow ’12 Senior Program Officer, The Hunger Project, India YALE WORLD FELLOWS

Kumho Asiana Business Group; Marlene Malahoo Forte, a Jamaician senator; Sisonke Msimang, the executive director of the Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa; and Ruchi Yadav, the senior program officer of the Indian branch of The Hunger Project — disagreed on a variety of issues affecting femininity in the workplace, particularly the practice of “reserving” certain leadership positions for qualified women. Forte said she thinks that experience, rather than gender, should dictate hiring practices, but Msimang said she believes quotas are necessary to overcome generations of unfair treatment. Yadav said she agrees, adding that half of the countries in the world have utilized quotas in politics over the past 20 years, so the practice “cannot necessarily be wrong.” Quotas do not merely increase female representation, but they serve a larger social purpose as well, she said. “Election is about representation, not just qualifications,” she said. “Everybody’s voice needs to be heard.” All panelists said they strongly believe that systemic cultural changes need to be made if women expect to see any social or political change. Kim said that with better child care initiatives in place, women will be able to balance motherhood and professionalism, rather than choose between the two. The problem today is not how to get women into the workplace, but rather how to keep them there, she said. The panel concluded with a discussion of sisterhood and feminism. Speakers said they recognize a generational gap preventing young women today from identifying with the “bra-

burning” stereotypes of the 1960s. Natarajan said modern discussions of feminism must move away from asking whether women can help each other in the workplace, and should instead focus on giving the female half of the population a voice in contemporary business and politics. Three female students from the United States Coast Guard

The question is... how we can nurture women leaders. PRIYA NATARJAN Panel moderator Academy who attended the talk said they already feel pressure to eventually choose between career and family. “[This issue] comes up in the military especially. I’m already saying ‘I’m going to have to choose someday’” said Maddie Ede, a student at the United States Coast Guard Academy. Michael Cappello, director of the Yale World Fellows program, said he felt the event succeeded not only as a discussion of female leadership, but also as an example of the diversity of experience within the World Fellows network. The World Fellows Program sponsors events and discussions throughout the academic year aimed at enhancing cross-disciplinary dialogue and action in the academic world. Contact CORINNE KENTOR at corinne.kentor@yale.edu .

The centuries-old debate between science and religion will be re-explored at Yale in this month’s Dwight H. Terry lecture series. Distinguished historian of science Keith S. Thomson, a former dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, delivered the first of the fourpart lecture series, entitled “Jefferson and Darwin: Science and Religion in Troubled Times,” Tuesday afternoon in the Whitney Humanities Center auditorium. The talks examine the inherent conflict between science and religion through two intellectual giants of the 18th and 19th century, Thomas Jefferson and Charles Darwin, who struggled to reconcile the two world views. In Tuesday’s inaugural lecture, Thomson focused on the experiences of Thomas Jefferson, whose deistic beliefs compelled him to ignore scientific explanations to natural phenomena. “Jefferson was just as confused as the rest of us,” Thomson said. Well-versed in geology and orology, the study of mountains, Jefferson was convinced that a higher power was responsible for creating mountains and other feats of nature. Although Jefferson was fascinated by fossils, he never once used the word “fossil” in his writings, Thomson said. Jefferson also did not believe in animal extinction, Thomson added, because he could not grasp the idea that God would create animals and then completely destroy them. Thomson opened Tuesday’s lecture by putting the debate between science and religion in a broad context. The crux of the problem, he said, is balancing new knowledge with previously held beliefs. As science rapidly produces new information and new ways of looking at the world, individuals must constantly try to accommodate and reconcile this knowledge with their prior convictions. Thomson said he seeks to base his discussion on individual experiences by examining the lives of iconic figures. As a result, the debate is “much more accessible,” said Derek E.G. Briggs, director of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. By examining the life of Jefferson, a man who attempted to foster conventional religious views onto science, Thomson concluded that there will always be difficulties reconciling the two. “The lecture was very help-

ful in understanding Jefferson as a person in terms of his complexity, and exposing him as a man of contradictions,” Achutha Raman ’16 said. Some attendees said they think that science and religion can coexist. Professor Dale Martin, Woolsey Professor in Religious Studies and the Interim Chair of the Terry Lectureship, said the two are separate discourses. “It is not the job of Christian theology to question string theory, but on the other hand, science can’t address the fundamental issues theology addresses, either,” he added. The next lecture in the Terry series will examine Charles Darwin and how his discoveries in science contributed to his agnostic beliefs, despite his Christian background. Titled “The Devil and Mr. Darwin: Creation and ‘The Origin,’” the lecture will take place at Whitney Humanities Center at 4:00 p.m. on Thurs. Oct. 11. The Terry lecture series was established in 1905 by a gift from Dwight H. Terry of Bridgeport, Conn. Contact TIANYI PAN at tianyi.pan@yale.edu .

THOMAS JEFFERSON TRIVIA RELIGION

Thomas Jefferson, while a deeply religious man, believed that faith was a personal matter. He believed that the government had no right to get involved with a person’s religion and advocated the separation of church and state. SLAVERY

Thomas Jefferson was publicly opposed to slavery. When he represented Virginia at the Continental Congress in 1783, he proposed a bill that would outlaw slavery in all new territories acquired by the federal government. His proposal was defeated by one vote. WINE

Jefferson was one of the preeminent wine connoisseurs of his age. His home, Monticello, had an enormous wine cellar that was 17 and a half feet long, 15 feet wide and 10 feet high.


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNSDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

22

Yale-NUS develops club policies

Number of presidents of Yale University

Reverand Abraham Pierson became Yale University’s first president in 1701. His tenure lasted six years until his death in office. Richard Levin became president of the University in 1993.

Presidential search progresses

EARL LEE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

University President Richard Levin will step down in June. SEARCH FROM PAGE 1 AVA KAUFMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Yale-NUS recently accepted policies that will prohibit students from creating branches of existing Singaporean political parties. YALE-NUS FROM PAGE 1 “While there won’t be the equivalent of the Yale Democrats or Republicans, I see no reason why there couldn’t be a political union that functions similarly to the [Yale Political Union],” YaleNUS Dean of Faculty Charles Bailyn said. “Political interest groups that aren’t directly connected with a political party — like the YPU’s Party of the Right and Independent Party — are fine.” While Singaporean law forbids students from forming campus chapters of political parties, students may participate in established national parties off-campus. Bailyn said he expects many students, faculty and staff to do so. Lewis said that apart from branches of existing political parties, the only student groups that will not be allowed on campus are clubs that show disrespect for specific religions or

racial groups. He added that Kyle Farley, who became Yale-NUS dean of students on Sept. 28, will be responsible for preventing the creation of any such groups on a day-to-day basis. Yale-NUS administrators will advise students not to engage in illegal activities, Lewis said, adding that the Singaporean government will only become involved if illegal activity does occur. Lewis said all Yale-NUS members will have the option to gather for discussion on campus facilities, including a hall that can hold 300 people, a gym and several dining halls. Because Singaporean law treats public and private events differently, off-campus demonstrations will require advance notice and a police permit, he said. Under Singaporean law, political protests are only allowed in the Speakers’ Corner at Hong Lim Park. Both Lewis and Bailyn said that no public figure invited to speak on campus will be denied

a chance to do so on political grounds, though anyone who aims to disrespect particular religious or racial groups will not be permitted to speak. Lewis added that partisan or political campaigning and fund-raising will also not be permitted.

I think the powers that be recognize the value of open discussion as my country moves forward. RAYNOR TEO ’14 Singaporean Yale student Bailyn said Farley will lead the further development of the college’s policies concerning oncampus student activity. Farley declined to comment in detail about those policies because he said he is still settling into his

new post. Rayner Teo ’14, a Singaporean Yale student who is co-president of the Malaysian and Singaporean Association, said he thinks open debate will inevitably develop on the Yale-NUS campus. “I think the powers that be recognize the value of open discussion as my country moves forward,” he said. “What remains to be seen, really, is how YaleNUS students will make the most of the space that already exists for open and free expression, negotiate the obstacles and help the broader community solidify the gains that have been made over the last few years in the public discourse.” Roughly 150 students are expected to matriculate at YaleNUS College next August. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .

ciate that the statement is generally representative of their views but added that they cannot find anything with which to disagree due to the statement’s broad scope. “On the whole, this was an OK statement with predictable language,” classics professor Egbert Bakker said. “These are words that don’t mean much to me — they go without saying.” Though he agrees with the statement’s goal of finding a scholar to serve as president, Bakker said the document does not address several notable faculty concerns, including the controversy surrounding Yale’s partnership with the National University of Singapore in the creation of a liberal arts college. Overall, Bakker said, the statement only contains “language positive about Yale and all the beautiful things we do together.” English professor David Kastan said the statement’s release makes the search process as transparent as it can be given the inherent confidentiality required in searches for administrators. He added that the statement, like any other “job description,” cannot detail the exact qualities the committee is looking for in Levin’s successor. Search Committee Student Counselor Brandon Levin ’14 said he was not involved in drafting the statement but noted that its existence is “direct evidence” that the Search Committee considered student input. When asked to name parts of the document

that echo student opinion, he did not provide specific examples but said he heard students discuss “almost everything” in the statement. He added that almost 1,000 students took the Yale College Council’s presidential search survey, and over 300 students spoke with him during office hours and other meetings. Three students interviewed said the statement made no steps toward giving students a formal voice in the search process. Yoni Greenwood ’15, one of the leaders of Students Unite Now — an organization that has worked to ensure student voice is heard in the search process — criticized the manner in which the statement was released to the student body. “If the search process was being run properly, it would have been sent out in an email from the Search Committee to the entire Yale community,” he said, adding that the statement was announced in a newsletter that required students to click on three separate links in order to access its text. Zach Blickensderfer ’16 said he agrees with the qualifications outlined in the statement, adding that he appreciates the emphasis it places on diversity and scholarship. The presidential search began Aug. 31, a day after Levin annouced his plans to step down from his post in June 2013. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu . Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NEWS

PAGE 5

65

Countries Kike Calvo has traveled

Calvo’s photos have taken him from Australia to Brazil, Egypt, Thailand and many other countries around the world.

Photojournalist chronicles human life BY ROSA NGUYEN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER On Tuesday afternoon, international photographer Kike Calvo presented on his professional evolution from photographing nature to documenting human life. Calvo, a photojournalist who works for National Geographic and the New York Times among other publications, gave a lecture to almost 40 Yalies in a Davenport College Master’s Tea titled “Life as a Photographer.” During his talk, Calvo displayed a slideshow of pictures illustrating his development from a 17-year-old wildlife photographer to an experienced chronicler of different aspects of humanity, such as a series on Columbian ballerinas. Calvo said he transitioned to a more sophisticated style of photography to raise awareness about problems faced by society. “Would I like to be an artist who takes pictures of great whites jumping out of the water, or would I like to be an artist who makes people think?” Calvo said. Calvo discovered his passion for photography at an early age, he said, but still fantasized about working on Wall Street for financial reasons. But when his father, respected radio personality and journalist Enrique Calvo, died of lung cancer in 1992, Calvo decided to “do what made [himself] happy” and pursue photography as a career. At the start of the presentation, Calvo showed attendees a series of his early works, which included pictures documenting elements of nature and several animals. But all of his early photographs lacked any human presence. Calvo then presented photographs taken on an Antarctic expedition — a series

from the beginning stages of his interest in photographing humans, he said. To close, Calvo presented a sequence of photographs depicting indigenous Columbian people, the final stage of his development as a photojournalist. Calvo said his earlier photographs aimed to show perfection found in nature, but he later focused on human subjects because they illustrate the flaws that can be found in humanity. Though his work has been used in publications from the Wall Street Journal to Vanity Fair, Calvo said he does not use Photoshop to alter his original work because he wants to preserve photographs as documentation

Would I like to be an artist who takes pictures … or would I like to be an artist who makes people think? KIKE CALVO Photojournalist for future generations. “The amazing thing about photography is that it will become history,” Calvo said. “[Photographs] are records of the future.” Calvo — who recently moved to New Haven for roughly two years — said he plans to “share [his] knowledge with the photo community” at Yale. Succeeding as a professional photographer, Calvo said, can be “like the Hunger Games” because of the industry’s competitiveness, but he encouraged Yalies to find inspiration in his story and continue to pursue their career aspirations. Amateur photographer Ste-

VICTOR KANG/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Kike Calvo, a photojournalist whose work has been featured in the Wall Street Journal and Vanity Fair, delivered a Master’s Tea Tuesday afternoon. panie Wisowaty ’16 said she appreciated Calvo’s strong vision as well as his incorporation of human elements into his body of work. Susanna Benjamin ’15,

another aspiring photographer, said she agreed with Calvo’s claim that photographers and photojournalists need to maintain a consistent level of quality throughout their career.

“His life journey was amazing — going from aesthetics to changing people’s lives,” Benjamin said. Calvo recently launched a photo contest ending in Febru-

ary in which participants submit a photograph documenting Latin America. Contact ROSA NGUYEN at rosa.nguyen@yale.edu .

YPU debates campaign finance BY DHRUV AGGARWAL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER David Bossie, president and CEO of Citizens United, delivered an address on the importance of free speech in politics at the Yale Political Union Tuesday evening, evoking distinctly different reactions from the parties on the left and the right. In his talk on the topic “Citizens United is Good for Democracy,” Bossie discussed his belief that ensuring First Amendment rights will lead to a better democratic system. Bossie is well known for winning a 2008 Supreme Court case that overturned the McCain-Feingold Act, which prohibited corporations and non-profits from contributing to certain campaign ads. He addressed the case in his speech, saying that it extended participation in the political process to a group that had previously been underrepresented. “The McCain-Feingold Act was used to freeze people out of the political process,” he said. “We need more speech, not enforced silence.” Bossie said that in 2007, Citizens United produced a movie critical of presidential candidate Hillary Clinton ’73, but the Federal Election Commission prevented the organization from airing the movie under a provision of the McCain-Feingold Act. Bossie said he then took

the FEC to court, claiming that their actions violated his group’s First Amendment rights. After several months of court hearings, the Supreme Court struck down some provisions of the McCain-Feingold act, and the FEC subsequently allowed Citizens United to air the movie — a decision that Bossie called “a David and Goliath story.”

The McCain-Feingold Act was used to freeze people out of the political process. DAVID BOSSIE President and CEO, Citizens United Bossie said he has found that liberal-leaning corporations are often exempt from funding regulations — such as Sony and Lionsgate, which Bossie said funded director Michael Moore’s film, “Fahrenheit 9/11,” a film that is “political and paid for by corporations.” In addition, Bossie criticized the “left in Hollywood” and the “liberalleaning press” for promoting Democratic causes without regulation. Bossie’s speech met considerable opposition from audience members. Dominick Lawton ’13, former speaker of the YPU, said he thinks Bossie should have

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

addressed the problem of disproportionate representation by drawing a distinction between those with financial power and those without it. “I think Bossie was dishonest by contrasting the voice of the left with that of the right, instead of those with massive control versus those with little control,” he said. “How much you spend is directly proportional to how much you are heard.” In response to negative reaction to his speech, Bossie said that despite potential differences in campaign spending, Americans can make “intelligent” decisions come election time. He added that the Citizens United decision “helped level the playing field.” Julie Aust ’14, a YPU member who helps coordinate speakers, said the group invited Bossie because of the Citizens United court decision’s influence on campaign spending this election year. “Citizens United was the biggest case in decades and influenced Americans’ way of looking at politics”, she said. “It was an exciting idea to have the discussion before the election”. Roughly 90 students attended the talk, which took place in Linsly-Chittenden Hall. Contact DHRUV AGGARWAL at dhruv.aggarwal@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 ¡ yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT New development approved

“Nothing gives me as much pleasure as travelling. I love getting on trains and boats and planes.� ALAN RICKMAN ACTOR

New cars please customers METRO-NORTH FROM PAGE 1

DIANA LI/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Despite concerns over the Chapel West development’s private parking spaces, the proposal ultimately passed unanimously. DEVELOPMENT FROM PAGE 1 Tuesday’s meeting. “I understand [the concern about parking], but in the development of the plan, some compromise was made,� Fasano said. “It was determined that because of the layout of the aisles for parking, [the project] would

use a smaller piece of land than ordinarily required.� Fasano added that because the parking was residential, cars would not disturb the surrounding area by entering and exiting the complex constantly. RMS founder and lead project developer Randy Salvatore told the News last

Thursday that he is willing to make compromises with local New Haven residents, pledging to allow a reduction in the size of the parking lot if residents desired. He also made the building facade appear more like a retail location after hearing residents’ complaints. The New Haven Preserva-

tion Trust, the Chapel West Services District and the city’s Department of Economic Development declared their support for the application to the News last Thursday.

RII

Open for Lunch and Dinner

)JHI4USFFU/FX)BWFO $5t   )PVST.5IBNUPQNt'4BNUPQN Great deal For Yale students!! Price are: $ 5.00 to $ 12.50 Try the best arepas in town!! ___Z]JIUJIKWUŒ___IaIZMXIKWU

Visit our Food Trucks: Food Cart at corner of Cedar St and Congress Ave Monday through Friday 11:00 am to 2:00 pm

Food Cart at corner of York St and Elm St Monday through Saturday 10:30 am to 5:00 pm

BZBSFQB!HNBJMDPNtQIPOF  

Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu .

ber body appointed by the state legislature that acts as a liaison between commuters and the state Department of Transportation, Metro-North and the Shore East Line railroads — said a major factor in the customer satisfaction increase is the gradual introduction of a new rail car model. “In rush hour, you have about a one-third chance of your train being made of new cars, and on weekends it’s about a 50-50 chance. That makes the commute a lot more reliable and pleasurable,� Cameron said. According to an MTA press release, 405 of the new model cars will replace the old fleet. Cameron said 125 of those cars are already in service. Metro-North spokeswoman Marjorie Anders said that the new M-8 rail cars are brighter, cleaner and more reliable. Specifically, she said, they come equipped with more comfortable seats and larger windows. “Just about everything is different,� she said. Cameron also attributed the bounce in ratings to the “mild winter� of the past year. In the previous winter, he said, “so many cars were out of service that they had to cut trains from the timetable.� While Metro-North trains operate on-schedule 97 percent of the time, Cameron said the company has perennially struggled to communicate with customers during disruptions. Metro-North is stepping up its efforts to improve on that front, he added. “Whether it’s the conductors on the train themselves, the public address system on the plat-

form or any of the many electronic platforms that are being used — email, Twitter, texting services, third-party applications — I think the railroad could score more points in improving its communication,� Cameron said. “I think they’ve come a long way, I give them credit for having really turned that around, but I think that there’s still room for improvement there.� Daniel Tahara ’14, whose parents live in the New Rochelle area, said his three trips with Metro-North this semester have been more comfortable as a result of the newer cars, which he said are cleaner than the old models. Cameron said trains are sometimes dirty because there is not always enough time for them to be cleaned at the end of a line before they have to depart again. The addition of more rail cars to Metro-North’s fleet will allow the rest time for trains to be cleaned more frequently, he added. Sigrid von Wendel ’12, who lives in New York City, is more impressed with the new fleet’s technology. She and her boyfriend, Raphael Shapiro ’13, have big ideas for how they plan to use amenities on the new cars. “We are going to have a little snack spot,� she said. “We’re going to get a power strip and have a blender. The possibilities with all the outlets on the new Metro-North trains are just limitless — you could bring your espresso machine on the MetroNorth train right now.� Effective Oct. 14, MetroNorth will increase service by over 5 percent. Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

A slight chance of showers after noon. Cloudy, with a high near 65. 20 percent chance of precipitation.

TOMORROW High of 61, low of 42.

FRIDAY High of 63, low of 38.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10 7:30 PM Just One Paycheck Away: A Panel On Homelessness In New Haven. Want to deepen your understanding of the issues of hunger and homelessness in New Haven? We’ll be having a panel discussion and Q&A with local advocates and service providers. We’ll discuss: WHO experiences homelessness? WHAT is their life like? WHERE can they find support? WHY do people experience homelessness? And, most importantly, HOW can you help? Join us for what is sure to be an informative event! All are welcome — you don’t have to be a member of YHHAP! LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), Rm. 102. 7:30 PM American Baroque Orchestra Welcomes Jaap Schroder And The Skalholt Quartet. This wonderful period instrument quartet from Iceland, in a rare United States appearance, will perform music of Boccherini, Haydn and Purcell. Then they will join forces with ABO in a performance J.S. Bach’s famous Brandenburg Concerto no. 3. Renowned baroque violinist, Jaap Schröder, who plays in the quartet, will also lead the Bach. $18 in advance, $20 at the door; Students Pay-As-You Can Admission. Yale Divinity School (409 Prospect St.), Marquand Chapel.

WATSON BY JIM HORWITZ

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 11 5:45 PM Swing Dance Lessons: Intro To Swing I. Learn the basics of lindy hop and six count swing – we’ll start with the swing out, learn some snazzy turns, then learn how to put everything together to have an awesome dance on the social floor. No partners required. Close-toed shoes recommended. Graduate Professional Student Center At Yale (204 York St.). 8:00 PM American Night: The Ballad Of Juan Jose. As Juan José feverishly studies for his citizenship exam, his obsession to pass takes him on a fantastical odyssey through U.S. history guided by a handful of unsung citizens who made courageous choices in some of the country’s toughest times. American Night: The Ballad of Juan Joséis a provocative, irreverent and hilarious mix of past and present, stereotype and truth. University Theatre (222 York St.).

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Editor in Chief Tapley Stephenson, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (OppositeFOR JE) RELEASE OCTOBER 10, 2012

Interested in drawing cartoons for the Yale Daily News? CONTACT KAREN TIAN AT karen.tian@yale.edu

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Aphid’s meal 4 Marsh bird 9 Neil Simon’s “__ Suite” 14 Communication at Gallaudet U. 15 Concert venue 16 Bona fide 17 *Role in the films “Wichita” and “Tombstone” 19 Opposite of après 20 Place for un chapeau 21 Miracle-__ 22 Get-up-and-go 23 Opera featuring Iago 25 Lint collector 27 It may be set or set off 29 Glowing, perhaps 30 Cleaning closet item 33 Nautical pole 35 Spry 37 Will Smith title role 38 French noble 39 Trail behind 40 Grape-growing spot 42 Back when 43 Put to shame 45 Mutineer 46 Neither mate 47 Noisy quarrel 48 “Hotel Rwanda” tribe 50 Compote ingredient 52 Fired on 55 __ of Gibraltar 58 Source of lean red meat 60 Pertaining to planes 61 Pope after Sergius II 62 Rip to pieces, and a hint to what’s hidden in the answers to this puzzle’s starred clues 64 Lexus competitor 65 Malady with swelling 66 “Norma __” 67 Potter’s apparatus 68 “Count me out” 69 Part of DOS: Abbr.

Want to place a classified ad? CALL (203) 432-2424 OR E-MAIL BUSINESS@ YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

10/10/12

By Matt Skoczen

DOWN 1 Managed 2 So far 3 *Protection for jousters 4 “Mangia!” 5 Genetics pioneer Mendel 6 Derrière 7 2001 bankruptcy filer 8 Brew source 9 *2000s documentary whose first episode was “From Pole to Pole” 10 Video game stage 11 Ice cream thickener 12 Criticize with barbs 13 DOJ employee 18 “We want to hear the story” 22 Devil’s work 24 *One who was held up, most likely 26 Land 28 Mozambique neighbor

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU MEDIUM

8

9

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

30 *Indoor antenna 31 Lotion addition 32 Gibson __ 33 Diagnostic test 34 Comic strip possum 36 Beetle juice? 41 Lather again 44 Flu fighter’s episode 49 Seizes unlawfully 50 Renaissance __

10/10/12

51 Start a hole 53 Variety 54 Big name in raingear 55 Picnic side 56 One helping after a crash 57 Cad 59 Cass’s title 62 “Spare me the details,” in brief 63 Backpacked beast

6 4 8 1

3 8 7 9 2 1 5 8 2 9 1 3 7 8 4 5 9 3 6 8 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS

“All the best performers bring to their role something more, something different than what the author put on paper. That’s what makes theatre live. That’s why it persists.” STEPHEN SONDHEIM

Artistic laboratory comes to life

Putting Goya to music

4:00-5:00 P.M. WED. OCT. 10

BY ERIC XIAO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As he sat in the audience in Carnegie Hall over a decade ago, Wei-Yi Yang GRD ’04 promised himself he would one day perform the masterpiece he heard that night — and now, he will finally fulfill that promise. Yang, an internationally renowned pianist and a professor at the School of Music, will give the first performance of this year’s Horowitz Piano Series in Morse Recital Hall tonight, performing music by both Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel. But the main piece in his repertoire will be Enrique Granados’s “Goyescas,” a piano suite based on the art of Spanish romantic artist Francisco Goya, whose work will be projected onto a screen during the performance. Yang said that the connection between the suite and its artistic inspiration has left a significant impact on how he chooses to interpret the work.

HIROSHIMA: THE LOST PHOTOGRAPHS Join the 2012 Poynter Fellow in Journalism at a JE Master’s Tea to hear the tale of 700 lost photographs. Jonathan Edwards College, Master’s House

5:15-6:15 P.M. THURS. OCT. 11 THE POETRY OF KABBALAH, THE KABBALAH OF POETRY Find out more about the celebrity phenomenon that’s all over the news through a poetry reading. Marquand Chapel

5:30-7:30 P.M. THURS. OCT. 11 GALLERY+DANCE Watch the Yale University Art Gallery transform as dancers from several Yale groups collaborate on a group of sitespecific performances. Yale University Art Gallery

The works moved to a darker plane as [Goya] was losing his mind. SAGA BLANE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Left: AJ Artemel ARC ’14 pulls yellow paper out of his shirt during his team’s presentation; Right: Participants of “XS” discuss Artemel’s team’s project, a disfigured talking toy.

7:30-9:30 P.M. FRI. OCT. 12 FALL CONCERT — YALE CONCERT BAND Join the bands for their season opener featuring John Mackey’s “Asphalt Cocktail.” Woolsey Hall

1:30-2:30 P.M. SAT. OCT. 13 HIGHLIGHTS TOUR Take your parents on a tour of the newly renovated art gallery. If they’re repeat visitors, don’t worry — it’s different every time.

On Sunday, a man wielding a cordless reciprocating saw, a woman with a tiny microscope and an architecture student with a clove of garlic, among others, brought to life a new artistic collaboration that unites eight of Yale’s schools. Assembled by Saga Blane ARC ’13 as her master’s thesis project, “XS” creates a space for participants — 41 Yale community members from disciplines ranging from architecture to environmental science — to share ideas and explore interests outside of their respective schools. Through an online collab-

4:00-6:30 P.M. SAT. OCT. 13

Afro-American Cultural Center, Art Gallery

2:00-5:00 P.M. SUN. OCT. 14 PUPPET & ART WORKSHOPS Prepare for Fair Haven’s carnival and Day of the Dead parade with this interactive workshop. Bregamos Community Theater

4:00-6:00 P.M. MON. OCT. 15 CYANIDE AND HAPPINESS Learn more about illustration and comics with Rob DenBleyker, the man behind Cyanide and Happiness. Davenport College, Common Room

5:00-6:00 P.M. MON. OCT. 15 GHASSAN ZAQTAN: BILINGUAL ARABIC AND ENGLISH POETRY READING Explore the complex art of translation with one of the most celebrated poets of the Arab world. Whitney Humanities Center, Rm. 208

not to create a polished final product, but rather to serve as an incubator for creativity. The exhibit at the end of the year, she said, will focus on presenting this process itself to the public. This discussion will take place, in part, at the six workshops, each of which will have a theme drawn from the ideas in Daniel Pink’s book about right-brain thinking, “A Whole New Mind”: play, design, story, empathy, meaning and symphony. Sunday’s workshop, which about 25 of XS’ members attended, investigated “play.” To that extent, Blane said she hoped the participants would find ways to physically represent ideas they had discussed

previously by making art on-site. “Creativity happens with other people,” said Matthew Claudel ’13, one of five undergraduates at the workshop. “You have to work together, and you have to start somewhere. This was a good place to start.” Jeppson began the workshop by asking each of the participants to share with the group a tool and a verb they brought that speaks to their creative method. Tools ranged from a permanent marker to a cordless reciprocating saw, and verbs from “to enchant” to “to everything.” The participants then divided into the six small teams to which

they had been assigned prior to the event. Jeppson gave each a black plastic garbage bag and duct tape. He also provided six unique items for each group to take, such as an inflatable dinosaur and a talking fur-covered plastic toy. After half an hour, the teams presented their work. One of the pieces consisted of the talking toy, with its fur and body parts removed and then melted back together, suspended with string over the backs of three chairs. “This piece is called the Death of the Id, its insides displayed like viscera,” AJ Artemel ARC ’14 explained as he pulled out a long piece of yellow trace paper that he had stuffed under his shirt and let it fall to the

The ‘Follies’ of Danny Burstein

Yale University Art Gallery

HARD WORKS AT YALE EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION Check out a new display of artist Gordon Skinner’s mask-like portraits that explores the difficult personal history of the artist’s subjects.

oration system and a series of six workshops, Blane said she hopes the group’s yearlong discussions will culminate in a zine and a spring exhibition. The project’s budget is $20,000, of which only $4,700 has been confirmed, Blane said. “There are so many excited and dynamic graduate and undergraduate students at Yale, and too often we get siloed,” said Jake Jeppson DRA ’12, who directed the workshop on Sunday. “To be able to come into a space and share our backgrounds from our various forms of training is only going to make the work more exciting and our own education more exciting.” Blane explained that XS’ goal is

BY IKE SWETLITZ CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Danny Burstein had a good year: He recently garnered a Drama Desk Award, an Outer Critics Circle Award and his third Tony Award nomination for his leading role as Buddy Plummer in Follies, Stephen Sondheim’s 1971 musical about a showgirls’ reunion. The 48-year-old Burstein has also acted in popular TV shows, like Boardwalk Empire and Louie, and in the critically acclaimed movie Transamerica. The News interviewed Burstein after a Monday master class in musical theater he led through the Theater Studies program.

QWhen did you start acting?

A

I started acting professionally when I was 19. I got an offer to do a job at the St. Louis Muny, which is an outdoor theater in St. Louis, obviously — it is the largest outdoor theater in the country — and I did a production of the Music Man with Jim Dale and Pam Dawber.

Q

ears for each other and I think it works out pretty well. I know some peoples who are actors and are married to other actors, and they become competitive, but that’s never even occurred to me to be like that. Not with your spouse, for God’s sake. You love them with all your heart, and when they shine, you shine. just starred in Stephen QYou Sondheim’s musical Follies. Did you meet Sondheim?

A

I’ve known Stephen Sondheim since I was 18. I met him when I was a kid. I was doing a production of [Sondheim’s] Merrily We Roll Along in college, and I wrote him a letter with all these questions, and he wrote me back and said, “You know, all those questions would have to be answered in a letter the size of War and Peace, but here’s my phone number. Why don’t you come on over, and we’ll talk, and I can answer your questions.” So I went over, and we spent three hours over a carafe of wine at his place in New York, and I had a mini master class that I [will] hold onto for the rest of my life. He’s a very generous, brilliant, wonderful man.

You’ve been in movies, plays, musicals and TV shows — how does your acting differ in all those different modes?

Q

A

A

You know what, each one is different … It’s all about honesty. You have to be honest in every one of the different media that you work in], and once you can fake that, you’re golden.

So what did he teach you in that master class?

I couldn’t make it about one particular thing, but basically it was about integrity, that it’s all about the work, not about having an ego, but making sure that it’s always about the work.

married to an actress, And you taught a master QYou’re right? What’s it like for Qclass today, at Yale. What an actor to be married to an actress?

A

It’s wonderful. If she is doing well, I’m happiest. In a weird way, I’d rather her to really be wonderfully successful and shine. I love her so much. We help each other on various projects, we’re the eyes and

did you try to teach?

A

I taught basically that. I tried to impart those same words, and I mean it, that it’s all about the work. We all are very sensitive creatures, but you have to leave your ego at the door and really come together: It’s a collaborative art.

WEI-YI YANG, GRD ‘04 floor. Asked if the toy’s voice had changed, Artemel responded, “not discernibly.” Blane said she felt the event was a success, despite having been unable to predict exactly what would come of such a collaboration. “I think it was good to get more comfortable, working with people and talking,” Claudel said of the event. Blane created XS under the supervision of School of Architecture professor Eeva-Liisa Pelkonoen. Contact IKE SWETLITZ at isaac.swetlitz@yale.edu .

Yang has wanted to play “Goyescas” since he heard Spanish pianist Alicia de Larrocha perform the piece when he was still a teenager. “It left an indelible impression on me,” Yang said, though he added that he has never before performed the entire suite, calling it “monstrously difficult.” Yang said he studied Goya’s art in preparation for the performance, paying multiple visits to the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection of Goya’s etchings to make sure he showcases the similarities between the artist’s life and

YALE SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Wei-Yi Yang GRD ’04 has always wanted to perform “Goyescas.” the progression of the piece. The final sections of the piano suite, Yang explained, need to parallel Goya’s mental degeneration, making it important for the pianist to explore the concepts of “insanity, death and hallucination” in his interpretation. “The works moved to a darker plane as [Goya] was losing his mind,” Yang said, explaining that he needs to reflect this, since, “otherwise, the music will sound too sweet.” Yang also described the characteristically “Spanish” nature of the piece as a key theme for performers to emphasize. Its rhythm, which at times mimics Spanish dance music, must be clear, he said, since Spanish dance music is “immediately recognizable in the rhythm.” Yang added that the harmonic patterns in the piece are “coloristically” important but should not overwhelm its focus on melody that is characteristic of folk songs. The rest of Yang’s reper-

toire, which consists of “La serenade interrompue” by Claude Debussy and “Alborada del Gracioso” by Maurice Ravel — both French composers — complements the emphasis on Spain by providing alternate cultural lenses through which to view the overall performance, he said. Boris Berman, artistic director of the piano series, said the opportunity to experience a piece of music alongside the material that inspired its composer is rare. “When you’re playing this kind of music, it’s great to have a visual image to go with,” Olivia Pavco-Giaccia ’16, a cellist in the Yale Symphony Orchestra, said. The Horowitz Piano Series was named in honor of 20th century pianist Vladimir Horowitz, whose archived works were donated to the School of Music after his death. Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

‘Shaping Community’ explores identity

recently won a string QYou of awards for your performance in Follies. How do you deal with the attention?

A

That’s nice, that’s icing on the cake, but that’s never what you do it for. It’s a nice pat on the back, it’s always nice to be invited to the party, but everyday I’m just thinking about how to make the role that I’m playing better, at any particular time. I love the work, so that’s why I’m there. But when those [awards] come along, it’s a wonderful pat on the back and it certainly feels good.

done the voice-over QYou’ve for a few video games, such

as “Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas.” Do you enjoy video games?

A

You know what, I don’t. I don’t even own the ones that I’ve done. But having said that, my kids love them, and I had a great time doing them, but at a certain point I stopped doing them because they were so ridiculously violent that I just had to go, “You know what, this is ridiculous. I gotta stop.”

Q

Back to Yale. In 2006 you played in The Drowsy Chaperone. That musical is actually the Fall Dramat Mainstage here at Yale. Any advice about that show for the actors?

A

Just have fun. If they have half the fun that we had when we did the show, they’ll be just fine. It’s a show with a lot of heart and a lot of love, and, meeting all the kids that I met today — talented, smart, wonderful kids — if they’re any indication, they’re gonna have a great show.

KERRI LU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A three-part exhibit exploring the Jewish tradition of eruvim opened yesterday at the Slifka Center, the Institute of Sacred Music and the School of Art.

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Danny Burstein led a master class on musical theater on Monday. — but that’s psychotic behavior. I don’t believe in that. No, you can’t do that. what character have you QSoplayed and had the hardest time identifying with?

A

you ever gotten too QHave close to a character?

God, I don’t know. I love the challenge every time, and I use my imagination to make myself hopefully fit in with each particular character. I know, it sounds dramatic — you know, “Oh, I identified with this character so much that I pulled my hair out when I got home at night” — but it’s not really like that for me, anyways.

A

Q

Never. I don’t believe in that. I’ve had friends who’ve gone over the edge sometimes — they take it home

But for some people it is?

A

Sure, it can be, when they cross that line. But that becomes pathological, and that’s crazy. It’s all about being able to play [the character] and not bring it home — not if you want to have a wife and kids, and a house and a car and normal things.

QWhat’s your next project?

A

The next project I’ve already started. It’s another Broadway show, it’s a 1937 play called Golden Boy, and that’ll be on Broadway at the Belasco Theater. Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .

BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER A new three-part exhibit spanning campus highlights the traditional Jewish practice of eruvim through multiple art media. “Shaping Community: Poetics and Politics of the Eruv” opened yesterday at the Institute for Sacred Music, the Slifka Center and the School of Art. Each part of the exhibit presents a different angle on the traditional Jewish boundary — the eruv — that extends the private domain of a Jewish home into the public sphere, allowing certain practices that are limited by Jewish customs to private spheres to be extended to communal areas. Though the creation of eruvim is governed by complex religious rules, the exhibit dissects these technicalities to relate the custom to everyday life, curator Margaret Olin said. “The [exhibit] shows how even this very technical thing can relate to broad artistic interests,” artist Ben Shachter said.

Martin Jean, director of the Institute of Sacred Music, said that while not everyone in the Yale community — even some Jewish people — is aware of or holds to the practice of an eruv, the topic still raises poignant issues of how visible one’s identity is. Though the exhibit was originially planned as a hallway gallery, Olin decided to expand it to multiple locations after realizing the extent of artists’ interest in the topic. “An eruv is a potent metaphor for community relations, for the way people interrogate their own identities and for the way people distribute and articulate space,” Olin said. “Shaping Community” originally developed out of Olin’s interest in Jewish visual culture, she explained. Olin was inspired to investigate the place of eruvim in the Yale community after she discovered 1980s installation artist Sophie Calle’s work, of which “Erouv de Jerusalem,” a map accompanied by photographs of eruv markers, will be shown at the School of Art. This exhibit, which will also include work by video artist Shi-

rin Neshat, focuses on the theme of internalizing borders, Olin said. “This Token Partnership,” the segment of the exhibit housed in the Institute of Sacred Music, focuses on the definition of eruvim — both physically and conceptually — instead. Olin, who is one of several artists displaying work in this portion of the exhibit, created a photographic series concentrating on the New Haven eruv that is meant to show “what the eruv is made of and how it fits into the community.” This display is paired with maps that Shachter created through stitching and paint. Shachter’s work explores the theme of laws and rule-making, both municipal and religious, and he employs the real rules of eruvim in creating his maps. “Conceptual artists from the 1960s set up rules that guided and limited their work,” Shachter explained. “I found rules I found interesting.” The show’s inclusion of alternative media takes shape outside the Institute of Sacred Music gallery with a laser eruv installation. Created by

Elliot Malkin, the piece is a “wire constructed out of light,” which, though invisible to the human eye, divides the space of the courtyard. In conceptualizing the piece, Malkin meant to extrapolate the ancient practice of defining eruvims to the future. “All of our cultural artifacts evolve alongside our technological environments,” Malkin said. “That’s what this is about — the next step.” The Slifka Center localizes the show’s overall theme by exploring eruvim in Israel. One artist, photographer Dani Bauer, depicts a hill demarcated by a new eruv line. The hill denotes a dynamic between the visible and the invisible, Bauer said, because it is simultaneously the location of an eruv and a reminder of a former Palestinian settlement. Both aspects are present but invisible to the uninformed. Formal opening receptions for the exhibits, which will include talks by the curator, take place Oct. 18. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

Be aware of sound This past weekend archite c t s , engineers, historians and artists convened at the School of Architecture to participate in “The ASHLEY Sound of ArchiBIGHAM tecture” symposium. Organized School of by p ro fe s s o r Architecture Kurt Forster and Joseph Clarke GRD ’15, the symposium attempted to explore the complex relationship between architecture and sound. Should architects learn how to design spaces for the consumption of sound such as concert halls or amphitheaters, or should they focus on how the everday sounds of the built environment impact people’s perception of space? The discussion of sound in the discipline of architecture addresses many challenges. As many of the speakers noted, humans have developed in a primarily visual-based culture. Whether walking through a city or staring at a computer screen, we consume thousands of images everyday and are able to montage and reorganize visual information in our minds. In contrast, our culture has learned to control and separate sounds. We have turned into connoisseurs of the recorded sound while discounting the everyday sounds created by interactions with our designed environments. Overcoming the difficulties inherent in discussing architecture and sound, Elizabeth Diller best addressed this relationship in her keynote address “B+/A-” in which she spoke about her firm’s recent renovation of Alice Tully Hall at the Lincoln Center in New York City.

SOUND IS AS INTEGRAL A DIMENSION OF ARCHITECTURE Tully Hall was designed as a center for music performance, and Diller detailed the engineering challenges in making it perform to acoustic standards. More importantly, however, Diller’s lecture focused on the desire to create intimacy through the space’s design. Her link between sound and intimacy is useful in discovering how sound can become a spatial construct. Architects can design spaces that intentionally manipulate sounds through the use of materials, proportion and form. Diller demonstrated that when architects are challenged to define intimacy, much less create it, issues of design get much more complicated. Architecture in its most primitive function brings people together — it instills a sense of community, provides shared experience and connects people to their physical environment. Architecture provides both physical stimulation and emotive effects through materials and spatial relationships. As a sensory phenomenon and cultural production, sound is as integral a dimension of architecture as the materials with which we build, as Kurt Forster noted. It is impossible to inhabit a room without being aware of the sounds that are unique to that space. In the end, should architecture concern itself with engineered acoustics or everyday sounds? This question was ultimately the basis of the dialogue’s strength. Architects should focus on neither and both at the same time. The symposium left participants with a deeper awareness of the complicated and rich relationship between sound and architecture and its latent potential. Architects may not understand yet how to implement these themes into their work, but they will certainly be aware of these intersections and possibilities. When walking down the street, sitting in a classroom or clinking glasses at a reception in Rudolph Hall, we will all be listening more carefully to the world around us. Ashley Bigham is a student at the Yale School of Architecture. Contact ASHLEY BIGHAM at ashley.bigham@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS

“All the best performers bring to their role something more, something different than what the author put on paper. That’s what makes theatre live. That’s why it persists.” STEPHEN SONDHEIM

Artistic laboratory comes to life

Putting Goya to music

4:00-5:00 P.M. WED. OCT. 10

BY ERIC XIAO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As he sat in the audience in Carnegie Hall over a decade ago, Wei-Yi Yang GRD ’04 promised himself he would one day perform the masterpiece he heard that night — and now, he will finally fulfill that promise. Yang, an internationally renowned pianist and a professor at the School of Music, will give the first performance of this year’s Horowitz Piano Series in Morse Recital Hall tonight, performing music by both Claude Debussy and Maurice Ravel. But the main piece in his repertoire will be Enrique Granados’s “Goyescas,” a piano suite based on the art of Spanish romantic artist Francisco Goya, whose work will be projected onto a screen during the performance. Yang said that the connection between the suite and its artistic inspiration has left a significant impact on how he chooses to interpret the work.

HIROSHIMA: THE LOST PHOTOGRAPHS Join the 2012 Poynter Fellow in Journalism at a JE Master’s Tea to hear the tale of 700 lost photographs. Jonathan Edwards College, Master’s House

5:15-6:15 P.M. THURS. OCT. 11 THE POETRY OF KABBALAH, THE KABBALAH OF POETRY Find out more about the celebrity phenomenon that’s all over the news through a poetry reading. Marquand Chapel

5:30-7:30 P.M. THURS. OCT. 11 GALLERY+DANCE Watch the Yale University Art Gallery transform as dancers from several Yale groups collaborate on a group of sitespecific performances. Yale University Art Gallery

The works moved to a darker plane as [Goya] was losing his mind. SAGA BLANE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Left: AJ Artemel ARC ’14 pulls yellow paper out of his shirt during his team’s presentation; Right: Participants of “XS” discuss Artemel’s team’s project, a disfigured talking toy.

7:30-9:30 P.M. FRI. OCT. 12 FALL CONCERT — YALE CONCERT BAND Join the bands for their season opener featuring John Mackey’s “Asphalt Cocktail.” Woolsey Hall

1:30-2:30 P.M. SAT. OCT. 13 HIGHLIGHTS TOUR Take your parents on a tour of the newly renovated art gallery. If they’re repeat visitors, don’t worry — it’s different every time.

On Sunday, a man wielding a cordless reciprocating saw, a woman with a tiny microscope and an architecture student with a clove of garlic, among others, brought to life a new artistic collaboration that unites eight of Yale’s schools. Assembled by Saga Blane ARC ’13 as her master’s thesis project, “XS” creates a space for participants — 41 Yale community members from disciplines ranging from architecture to environmental science — to share ideas and explore interests outside of their respective schools. Through an online collab-

4:00-6:30 P.M. SAT. OCT. 13

Afro-American Cultural Center, Art Gallery

2:00-5:00 P.M. SUN. OCT. 14 PUPPET & ART WORKSHOPS Prepare for Fair Haven’s carnival and Day of the Dead parade with this interactive workshop. Bregamos Community Theater

4:00-6:00 P.M. MON. OCT. 15 CYANIDE AND HAPPINESS Learn more about illustration and comics with Rob DenBleyker, the man behind Cyanide and Happiness. Davenport College, Common Room

5:00-6:00 P.M. MON. OCT. 15 GHASSAN ZAQTAN: BILINGUAL ARABIC AND ENGLISH POETRY READING Explore the complex art of translation with one of the most celebrated poets of the Arab world. Whitney Humanities Center, Rm. 208

not to create a polished final product, but rather to serve as an incubator for creativity. The exhibit at the end of the year, she said, will focus on presenting this process itself to the public. This discussion will take place, in part, at the six workshops, each of which will have a theme drawn from the ideas in Daniel Pink’s book about right-brain thinking, “A Whole New Mind”: play, design, story, empathy, meaning and symphony. Sunday’s workshop, which about 25 of XS’ members attended, investigated “play.” To that extent, Blane said she hoped the participants would find ways to physically represent ideas they had discussed

previously by making art on-site. “Creativity happens with other people,” said Matthew Claudel ’13, one of five undergraduates at the workshop. “You have to work together, and you have to start somewhere. This was a good place to start.” Jeppson began the workshop by asking each of the participants to share with the group a tool and a verb they brought that speaks to their creative method. Tools ranged from a permanent marker to a cordless reciprocating saw, and verbs from “to enchant” to “to everything.” The participants then divided into the six small teams to which

they had been assigned prior to the event. Jeppson gave each a black plastic garbage bag and duct tape. He also provided six unique items for each group to take, such as an inflatable dinosaur and a talking fur-covered plastic toy. After half an hour, the teams presented their work. One of the pieces consisted of the talking toy, with its fur and body parts removed and then melted back together, suspended with string over the backs of three chairs. “This piece is called the Death of the Id, its insides displayed like viscera,” AJ Artemel ARC ’14 explained as he pulled out a long piece of yellow trace paper that he had stuffed under his shirt and let it fall to the

The ‘Follies’ of Danny Burstein

Yale University Art Gallery

HARD WORKS AT YALE EXHIBITION OPENING RECEPTION Check out a new display of artist Gordon Skinner’s mask-like portraits that explores the difficult personal history of the artist’s subjects.

oration system and a series of six workshops, Blane said she hopes the group’s yearlong discussions will culminate in a zine and a spring exhibition. The project’s budget is $20,000, of which only $4,700 has been confirmed, Blane said. “There are so many excited and dynamic graduate and undergraduate students at Yale, and too often we get siloed,” said Jake Jeppson DRA ’12, who directed the workshop on Sunday. “To be able to come into a space and share our backgrounds from our various forms of training is only going to make the work more exciting and our own education more exciting.” Blane explained that XS’ goal is

BY IKE SWETLITZ CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Danny Burstein had a good year: He recently garnered a Drama Desk Award, an Outer Critics Circle Award and his third Tony Award nomination for his leading role as Buddy Plummer in Follies, Stephen Sondheim’s 1971 musical about a showgirls’ reunion. The 48-year-old Burstein has also acted in popular TV shows, like Boardwalk Empire and Louie, and in the critically acclaimed movie Transamerica. The News interviewed Burstein after a Monday master class in musical theater he led through the Theater Studies program.

QWhen did you start acting?

A

I started acting professionally when I was 19. I got an offer to do a job at the St. Louis Muny, which is an outdoor theater in St. Louis, obviously — it is the largest outdoor theater in the country — and I did a production of the Music Man with Jim Dale and Pam Dawber.

Q

ears for each other and I think it works out pretty well. I know some peoples who are actors and are married to other actors, and they become competitive, but that’s never even occurred to me to be like that. Not with your spouse, for God’s sake. You love them with all your heart, and when they shine, you shine. just starred in Stephen QYou Sondheim’s musical Follies. Did you meet Sondheim?

A

I’ve known Stephen Sondheim since I was 18. I met him when I was a kid. I was doing a production of [Sondheim’s] Merrily We Roll Along in college, and I wrote him a letter with all these questions, and he wrote me back and said, “You know, all those questions would have to be answered in a letter the size of War and Peace, but here’s my phone number. Why don’t you come on over, and we’ll talk, and I can answer your questions.” So I went over, and we spent three hours over a carafe of wine at his place in New York, and I had a mini master class that I [will] hold onto for the rest of my life. He’s a very generous, brilliant, wonderful man.

You’ve been in movies, plays, musicals and TV shows — how does your acting differ in all those different modes?

Q

A

A

You know what, each one is different … It’s all about honesty. You have to be honest in every one of the different media that you work in], and once you can fake that, you’re golden.

So what did he teach you in that master class?

I couldn’t make it about one particular thing, but basically it was about integrity, that it’s all about the work, not about having an ego, but making sure that it’s always about the work.

married to an actress, And you taught a master QYou’re right? What’s it like for Qclass today, at Yale. What an actor to be married to an actress?

A

It’s wonderful. If she is doing well, I’m happiest. In a weird way, I’d rather her to really be wonderfully successful and shine. I love her so much. We help each other on various projects, we’re the eyes and

did you try to teach?

A

I taught basically that. I tried to impart those same words, and I mean it, that it’s all about the work. We all are very sensitive creatures, but you have to leave your ego at the door and really come together: It’s a collaborative art.

WEI-YI YANG, GRD ‘04 floor. Asked if the toy’s voice had changed, Artemel responded, “not discernibly.” Blane said she felt the event was a success, despite having been unable to predict exactly what would come of such a collaboration. “I think it was good to get more comfortable, working with people and talking,” Claudel said of the event. Blane created XS under the supervision of School of Architecture professor Eeva-Liisa Pelkonoen. Contact IKE SWETLITZ at isaac.swetlitz@yale.edu .

Yang has wanted to play “Goyescas” since he heard Spanish pianist Alicia de Larrocha perform the piece when he was still a teenager. “It left an indelible impression on me,” Yang said, though he added that he has never before performed the entire suite, calling it “monstrously difficult.” Yang said he studied Goya’s art in preparation for the performance, paying multiple visits to the Yale University Art Gallery’s collection of Goya’s etchings to make sure he showcases the similarities between the artist’s life and

YALE SCHOOL OF MUSIC

Wei-Yi Yang GRD ’04 has always wanted to perform “Goyescas.” the progression of the piece. The final sections of the piano suite, Yang explained, need to parallel Goya’s mental degeneration, making it important for the pianist to explore the concepts of “insanity, death and hallucination” in his interpretation. “The works moved to a darker plane as [Goya] was losing his mind,” Yang said, explaining that he needs to reflect this, since, “otherwise, the music will sound too sweet.” Yang also described the characteristically “Spanish” nature of the piece as a key theme for performers to emphasize. Its rhythm, which at times mimics Spanish dance music, must be clear, he said, since Spanish dance music is “immediately recognizable in the rhythm.” Yang added that the harmonic patterns in the piece are “coloristically” important but should not overwhelm its focus on melody that is characteristic of folk songs. The rest of Yang’s reper-

toire, which consists of “La serenade interrompue” by Claude Debussy and “Alborada del Gracioso” by Maurice Ravel — both French composers — complements the emphasis on Spain by providing alternate cultural lenses through which to view the overall performance, he said. Boris Berman, artistic director of the piano series, said the opportunity to experience a piece of music alongside the material that inspired its composer is rare. “When you’re playing this kind of music, it’s great to have a visual image to go with,” Olivia Pavco-Giaccia ’16, a cellist in the Yale Symphony Orchestra, said. The Horowitz Piano Series was named in honor of 20th century pianist Vladimir Horowitz, whose archived works were donated to the School of Music after his death. Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

‘Shaping Community’ explores identity

recently won a string QYou of awards for your performance in Follies. How do you deal with the attention?

A

That’s nice, that’s icing on the cake, but that’s never what you do it for. It’s a nice pat on the back, it’s always nice to be invited to the party, but everyday I’m just thinking about how to make the role that I’m playing better, at any particular time. I love the work, so that’s why I’m there. But when those [awards] come along, it’s a wonderful pat on the back and it certainly feels good.

done the voice-over QYou’ve for a few video games, such

as “Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas.” Do you enjoy video games?

A

You know what, I don’t. I don’t even own the ones that I’ve done. But having said that, my kids love them, and I had a great time doing them, but at a certain point I stopped doing them because they were so ridiculously violent that I just had to go, “You know what, this is ridiculous. I gotta stop.”

Q

Back to Yale. In 2006 you played in The Drowsy Chaperone. That musical is actually the Fall Dramat Mainstage here at Yale. Any advice about that show for the actors?

A

Just have fun. If they have half the fun that we had when we did the show, they’ll be just fine. It’s a show with a lot of heart and a lot of love, and, meeting all the kids that I met today — talented, smart, wonderful kids — if they’re any indication, they’re gonna have a great show.

KERRI LU/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A three-part exhibit exploring the Jewish tradition of eruvim opened yesterday at the Slifka Center, the Institute of Sacred Music and the School of Art.

JENNIFER CHEUNG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Danny Burstein led a master class on musical theater on Monday. — but that’s psychotic behavior. I don’t believe in that. No, you can’t do that. what character have you QSoplayed and had the hardest time identifying with?

A

you ever gotten too QHave close to a character?

God, I don’t know. I love the challenge every time, and I use my imagination to make myself hopefully fit in with each particular character. I know, it sounds dramatic — you know, “Oh, I identified with this character so much that I pulled my hair out when I got home at night” — but it’s not really like that for me, anyways.

A

Q

Never. I don’t believe in that. I’ve had friends who’ve gone over the edge sometimes — they take it home

But for some people it is?

A

Sure, it can be, when they cross that line. But that becomes pathological, and that’s crazy. It’s all about being able to play [the character] and not bring it home — not if you want to have a wife and kids, and a house and a car and normal things.

QWhat’s your next project?

A

The next project I’ve already started. It’s another Broadway show, it’s a 1937 play called Golden Boy, and that’ll be on Broadway at the Belasco Theater. Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .

BY CYNTHIA HUA STAFF REPORTER A new three-part exhibit spanning campus highlights the traditional Jewish practice of eruvim through multiple art media. “Shaping Community: Poetics and Politics of the Eruv” opened yesterday at the Institute for Sacred Music, the Slifka Center and the School of Art. Each part of the exhibit presents a different angle on the traditional Jewish boundary — the eruv — that extends the private domain of a Jewish home into the public sphere, allowing certain practices that are limited by Jewish customs to private spheres to be extended to communal areas. Though the creation of eruvim is governed by complex religious rules, the exhibit dissects these technicalities to relate the custom to everyday life, curator Margaret Olin said. “The [exhibit] shows how even this very technical thing can relate to broad artistic interests,” artist Ben Shachter said.

Martin Jean, director of the Institute of Sacred Music, said that while not everyone in the Yale community — even some Jewish people — is aware of or holds to the practice of an eruv, the topic still raises poignant issues of how visible one’s identity is. Though the exhibit was originially planned as a hallway gallery, Olin decided to expand it to multiple locations after realizing the extent of artists’ interest in the topic. “An eruv is a potent metaphor for community relations, for the way people interrogate their own identities and for the way people distribute and articulate space,” Olin said. “Shaping Community” originally developed out of Olin’s interest in Jewish visual culture, she explained. Olin was inspired to investigate the place of eruvim in the Yale community after she discovered 1980s installation artist Sophie Calle’s work, of which “Erouv de Jerusalem,” a map accompanied by photographs of eruv markers, will be shown at the School of Art. This exhibit, which will also include work by video artist Shi-

rin Neshat, focuses on the theme of internalizing borders, Olin said. “This Token Partnership,” the segment of the exhibit housed in the Institute of Sacred Music, focuses on the definition of eruvim — both physically and conceptually — instead. Olin, who is one of several artists displaying work in this portion of the exhibit, created a photographic series concentrating on the New Haven eruv that is meant to show “what the eruv is made of and how it fits into the community.” This display is paired with maps that Shachter created through stitching and paint. Shachter’s work explores the theme of laws and rule-making, both municipal and religious, and he employs the real rules of eruvim in creating his maps. “Conceptual artists from the 1960s set up rules that guided and limited their work,” Shachter explained. “I found rules I found interesting.” The show’s inclusion of alternative media takes shape outside the Institute of Sacred Music gallery with a laser eruv installation. Created by

Elliot Malkin, the piece is a “wire constructed out of light,” which, though invisible to the human eye, divides the space of the courtyard. In conceptualizing the piece, Malkin meant to extrapolate the ancient practice of defining eruvims to the future. “All of our cultural artifacts evolve alongside our technological environments,” Malkin said. “That’s what this is about — the next step.” The Slifka Center localizes the show’s overall theme by exploring eruvim in Israel. One artist, photographer Dani Bauer, depicts a hill demarcated by a new eruv line. The hill denotes a dynamic between the visible and the invisible, Bauer said, because it is simultaneously the location of an eruv and a reminder of a former Palestinian settlement. Both aspects are present but invisible to the uninformed. Formal opening receptions for the exhibits, which will include talks by the curator, take place Oct. 18. Contact CYNTHIA HUA at cynthia.hua@yale.edu .

Be aware of sound This past weekend archite c t s , engineers, historians and artists convened at the School of Architecture to participate in “The ASHLEY Sound of ArchiBIGHAM tecture” symposium. Organized School of by p ro fe s s o r Architecture Kurt Forster and Joseph Clarke GRD ’15, the symposium attempted to explore the complex relationship between architecture and sound. Should architects learn how to design spaces for the consumption of sound such as concert halls or amphitheaters, or should they focus on how the everday sounds of the built environment impact people’s perception of space? The discussion of sound in the discipline of architecture addresses many challenges. As many of the speakers noted, humans have developed in a primarily visual-based culture. Whether walking through a city or staring at a computer screen, we consume thousands of images everyday and are able to montage and reorganize visual information in our minds. In contrast, our culture has learned to control and separate sounds. We have turned into connoisseurs of the recorded sound while discounting the everyday sounds created by interactions with our designed environments. Overcoming the difficulties inherent in discussing architecture and sound, Elizabeth Diller best addressed this relationship in her keynote address “B+/A-” in which she spoke about her firm’s recent renovation of Alice Tully Hall at the Lincoln Center in New York City.

SOUND IS AS INTEGRAL A DIMENSION OF ARCHITECTURE Tully Hall was designed as a center for music performance, and Diller detailed the engineering challenges in making it perform to acoustic standards. More importantly, however, Diller’s lecture focused on the desire to create intimacy through the space’s design. Her link between sound and intimacy is useful in discovering how sound can become a spatial construct. Architects can design spaces that intentionally manipulate sounds through the use of materials, proportion and form. Diller demonstrated that when architects are challenged to define intimacy, much less create it, issues of design get much more complicated. Architecture in its most primitive function brings people together — it instills a sense of community, provides shared experience and connects people to their physical environment. Architecture provides both physical stimulation and emotive effects through materials and spatial relationships. As a sensory phenomenon and cultural production, sound is as integral a dimension of architecture as the materials with which we build, as Kurt Forster noted. It is impossible to inhabit a room without being aware of the sounds that are unique to that space. In the end, should architecture concern itself with engineered acoustics or everyday sounds? This question was ultimately the basis of the dialogue’s strength. Architects should focus on neither and both at the same time. The symposium left participants with a deeper awareness of the complicated and rich relationship between sound and architecture and its latent potential. Architects may not understand yet how to implement these themes into their work, but they will certainly be aware of these intersections and possibilities. When walking down the street, sitting in a classroom or clinking glasses at a reception in Rudolph Hall, we will all be listening more carefully to the world around us. Ashley Bigham is a student at the Yale School of Architecture. Contact ASHLEY BIGHAM at ashley.bigham@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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NATION

T Dow Jones 13,473.53, -110.12 NASDAQ 3,065.02, -47.33

S Oil 22.35, +0.61

Fewer states to affect race BY THOMAS BEAUMONT ASSOCIATED PRESS HARRISBURG, Pa. — So much for Mitt Romney’s plans to compete for Democratic-trending Michigan or Pennsylvania. And what about President Barack Obama’s early hopes of fighting it out for Republican-tilting Arizona, Georgia or Texas? Forget them. The presidential battleground map is as compact as it’s been in decades, with just nine states seeing the bulk of candidate visits, campaign ads and get-outthe-vote efforts in the hunt for the 270 Electoral College votes needed for victory. That means just a fraction of Americans will determine the outcome of the race for the White House. “It’s difficult if not impossible to pull new states into that kind of competition,” said Tad Devine, a Democrat who long has helped his party’s presidential nominees craft state-by-state strategies to reach the magic number. A month before Election Day, that means both candidates are concentrating their precious time and money in the handful of states that still seem to be competitive: Ohio, Florida, Nevada, Colorado, Iowa, Virginia, North Carolina, New Hampshire and Wisconsin.

Politics in the country have become homogenized regionally and culturally. STEVE SCHMIDT Veteran of Republican presidential campaigns Obama succeeded in expanding the map in 2008 by winning the traditionally Republican states of Indiana, North Carolina and Virginia. But it took a Democratic tidal wave to do so, and he was the exception in a nation that’s grown increasingly polarized, with demographic shifts heralding Democratic victories in the Northeast and on the West Coast and Republican dominance in the West and South. “Politics in the country have become homogenized regionally and culturally,” said Steve Schmidt, a veteran of Republi-

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S&P 500 1,441.48, -14.40

T Gold 122.05, -2.33 T Euro $1.28, -0.0001

Sandusky to get at least 30 years BY MARK SCOLFORO ASSOCIATED PRESS

CAROLYN KASTER/AP PHOTO

President Barack Obama speaks at a campaign event at The Ohio State University Oval in Columbus, Ohio on Tuesday. can presidential campaigns. So, he added: “You’re left with the only states that have the population and demographic mix where it’s in question who is going to be on top at the finish line.” TV ad money — the best measure of whether a campaign is competing in a state — shows that 93 percent of the $746 million spent so far, or $697 million — has poured into the nine battleground states. Less than a quarter of the nation’s voters live in those states. The trend is clear. Over the past 20 years, markedly fewer states have been competitive in presidential elections. In 1992, there were 33 decided by fewer than 10 percentage points. In 2008, just 15. Despite seemingly having the money to compete on a bigger playing field, neither Romney nor Obama is going after some states that long had been perennial swingvoting battlegrounds. Romney hasn’t given any love to New Mexico, which now tilts Democratic because of an influx of Hispanics. And the GOP didn’t even consider competing in other traditionally Democratic states

where the GOP had spent money in past presidential elections, including Minnesota, Oregon, Washington and Maine. Obama, for his part, opted against competing in Indiana, a traditionally Republican state that’s only grown more conservative after Obama’s surprise victory there four years ago. The president also ceded Missouri; it was a presidential bellwether for years before it voted for Republican John McCain over Obama in 2008. And, unlike four years ago, there’s been no talk about trying for North Dakota or Montana. Aides to both men had mused about waging fights on the opponent’s turf. But it hasn’t happened. Flash back to four years ago. With a month to go in the 2008 election, Obama and McCain were advertising and campaigning in 21 states. Obama was either trying to win — or force McCain to spend money — in GOP strongholds of Arizona, Indiana, Missouri, Montana and North Dakota. McCain was running ads in Democrat-leaning Minnesota and Pennsylvania.

BELLEFONTE, Pa. — In what sounded at times like a locker room pep talk, Jerry Sandusky rambled in his red prison suit about being the underdog in the fourth quarter, about forgiveness, about dogs and about the movie “Seabiscuit.” With his accusers seated behind him in the courtroom, he denied committing “disgusting acts” against children and instead painted himself as the victim. And then, after he had said his piece, a judge sentenced him to 30 to 60 years in prison Tuesday, all but ensuring the 68-yearold Sandusky will spend the rest of his life behind bars for the child sexual abuse scandal that brought disgrace to Penn State and triggered the downfall of his former boss, football coach Joe Paterno. He leaves behind a trail of human and legal wreckage that could take years for the university to clear away. “The tragedy of this crime is that it’s a story of betrayal. The most obvious aspect is your betrayal of ten children,” Judge John Cleland said after a hearing in which three of the men Sandusky was convicted of molesting as boys confronted him face to face and told of the lasting pain he had inflicted. The judge said he expects Sandusky to die in prison. In a disjointed, 15-minute address before he learned his sentence, Sandusky said: “In my heart I did not do these alleged disgusting acts.” Sprinkling his remarks with sports references, the former assistant coach spoke of being locked up in a jail cell, subjected

to outbursts from fellow inmates, reading inspirational books and trying to find a purpose in his fate. His voice cracked as he talked about missing his loved ones, including his wife, Dottie, who was in the gallery. “Hopefully we can get better as a result of our hardship and suffering, that somehow, some way, something good will come out of this,” Sandusky said. He also spoke of instances in which he helped children and did good works in the community, adding: “I’ve forgiven, I’ve been forgiven. I’ve comforted others, I’ve been comforted. I’ve been kissed by dogs, I’ve been bit by dogs. I’ve conformed, I’ve also been different. I’ve been me. I’ve been loved, I’ve been hated.” Sandusky was convicted in June of 45 counts, found guilty of raping or fondling boys he had met through the acclaimed youth charity he founded, The Second Mile. He plans to appeal, arguing among other things that his defense was not given enough time to prepare for trial after his arrest last November. Among the victims who spoke in court Tuesday was a young man who said he was 11 when Sandusky groped him in a shower in 1998. He said Sandusky is in denial and should “stop coming up with excuses.” “I’ve been left with deep painful wounds that you caused and have been buried in the garden of my heart for many years,” he said. Another man said he was 13 in 2001 when Sandusky lured him into a Penn State sauna and then a shower and forced him to touch the ex-coach. “I am troubled with flashbacks of his naked body, something that will never be erased from my memory,” he said.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

WORLD

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS BENJAMIN NETANYAHU Netanyahu has been prime minister of Israel since 2009. He also served in that capacity from 1996 to 1999. He has been the Israeli minister of finance and foreign affairs.

Israeli leader calls for early elections BY ARON HELLER ASSOCIATED PRESS JERUSALEM — Israel’s prime minister on Tuesday ordered new parliamentary elections in early 2013, roughly eight months ahead of schedule, setting the stage for a lightning quick campaign that will likely win him re-election. For nearly four years, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has presided over a conservative coalition that has proven stable in a country where governments rarely serve out a full term. Re-election could grant him a fresh mandate to continue his tough stance toward Iran’s suspect nuclear program,

put the already deadlocked peace process with the Palestinians further into deep freeze and complicate relations with the U.S. if President Barack Obama is re-elected. In a nationally televised address, Netanyahu said he was forced to call the snap polls after his coalition could not agree on a budget. “I have decided that it is in Israel’s better interest to go to elections now and as quickly as possible,” he said. “For Israel, it is preferable to have as short a campaign as possible, one of three months over one that would last in practice an entire year and damage Israel’s economy.”

With no viable alternative on the horizon, Netanyahu is expected to easily be re-elected as prime minister: He is riding a wave of popularity and his opposition is fragmented and leaderless. The next vote had been scheduled for a full year from now, although speculation had been growing for weeks that the current government’s days were numbered and that Netanyahu would call for an early vote. The immediate reason for the snap elections was the coalition’s inability to pass a 2013 budget by a Dec. 31 deadline, but Netanyahu has long been rumored to be leaning toward elections, given his

high standings in opinion polls, the lack of a clear rival and fears the economy could weaken next year. A recent poll in the Haaretz Daily found that 35 percent of Israelis believe Netanyahu is most suited to being prime minister, more than double that of his closest rival, Labor leader Shelly Yachimovich. The survey questioned 507 people and had a margin of error of 4.2 percentage points. Netanyahu said he spent Tuesday holding talks with his coalition partners and “came to the conclusion that at this time it is not possible to pass a responsible budget.”

He listed his accomplishments, saying his government had boosted security at a time of regional turmoil and improved the economy despite the global economic meltdown. Parliament reconvenes next week for its winter session without the annual budget in place. At that time, Netanyahu is expected to formally dissolve parliament. Netanyahu also has little political incentive to wait until October 2013 — and give his opponents a chance to gain ground — when he is well-positioned to win re-election. Opinion polls put Netanyahu’s Likud Party far ahead of its rivals.

But the election results could alter the makeup of his coalition government, which is currently comprised mostly by religious and nationalist parties. In the 120-seat parliament, no single party controls a majority, resulting in the need for coalition governments usually headed by the leader of the biggest party. The dovish Labor Party, now a small faction, is running a distant second, having seen its support grow after mass social protests against the country’s high cost of living. Its leader, Yachimovich, who is a former journalist, is running solely on jobs and the economy.

TGIWEEKEND YOU LIVE FIVE DAYS FOR TWO.

Email ydnweekendedz@panlists.yale.edu and write about it.


PAGE 12

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

AROUND THE IVIES

90

Percentage of Native American population killed by diseases brought to the New World by European arrivals, according to some estimates.

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

Students host cultural vigil BY D. SIMONE KOVACS STAFF WRITER Native Americans at Harvard College commemorated indigenous cultures that existed before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Americas with candles at their Candle Held Vigil on Monday. Around 40 students and members of the Harvard community gathered outside Matthews Hall to remember the impact of indigenous people in history and

to advocate for the university to change the name of the holiday. “We hold [the vigil] HARVARD every year to remember where we came from in the past,” said April A. Sperry ’13, the secretary of NAHC. “I think it’s important to remember where we came from and where we’re going.”

Cesareo Alvarez ’13, the president of NAHC, welcomed the attendees and asked for everyone to introduce themselves before leading the group in a moment of silence and reflection on the history of indigenous peoples in the Americas. Alvarez said that NAHC’s goal is to get the University to change the name of the holiday, calling it “Fall Weekend” or “Indigenous People’s Day” like some other universities. “Columbus Day isn’t univer-

sally celebrated on campus,” he said. “This day misrepresents — distorts — our history.” Alvarez said he hopes that NAHC can join with the Latino community in the college to make their voice on the issue heard. Sperry said that changing the name of the holiday in the University would make it more inclusive of indigenous people. “By calling it Columbus Day, I think people forget that indigenous people were here first and remain here,” she said.

L. Fay Alexander ’14, who came to support her friends at the vigil, also said that she would like to see the university change the name of the day. “Hopefully the University will take note of groups like NAHC that wish for them to just change the name of the day and respect the culture,” she said. Shelly C. Lowe, the executive director of the Harvard University Native American Program, explained to the crowd that the event was held outside of Mat-

thews Hall because in 1996 alumni placed a plaque on the building that commemorates the 1650 Charter, which called for the education of both Native American and English students. Alvin H. Warren, a student at the Harvard Kennedy School, closed the vigil with a prayer. After the vigil, the attendees walked together to Winthrop house and gathered to socialize and eat fry bread, a traditional Navajo Native American food.

T H E C O L U M B I A D A I LY S P E C TAT O R

BC counseling center offers fewer free sessions BY EMMA GROSS STAFF WRITER Barnard’s Rosemary Furman Counseling Center has reduced the number of free sessions it offers every student from 10 per year to eight per year, according to members of Barnard’s Student Government Association. Barnard Dean Avis Hinkson told Spectator that the number of students using Furman has increased over the years and that she asked the counseling center last semester to consider offering fewer free sessions with a goal of reducing wait times. “The issue becomes, can you get an appointment when you need it?” Hinkson said. “And certainly, counseling services is one of those things that you don’t want to hear, ‘Wow, it sounds like you’re really upset.

Let’s talk in three weeks.’ That’s not helpful.” According to SGA vice presiCOLUMBIA dent Julia K e n n e d y, approximately a third of Barnard’s student body gets counseling at Furman, although the average student uses only five of her free counseling sessions per year. The main reason why students don’t use all of their free sessions, SGA members said, is that if Furman counselors determine that a student requires more care than Furman can provide, they’ll often refer her to an outside resource after a few visits. Still, Kennedy said that the eight-session limit is more of

a guideline than a hard-andfast rule, which is why no public announcement has been made about the change. “If they’ve reached 10 and need more, then they aren’t going to be denied an 11th session,” Kennedy said. “They would always see someone during an emergency.” The decision to reduce the number of free sessions follows administrators’ recent decisions to close the Barnard pool and reduce the physical education requirement, decisions which have prompted some students to question Barnard’s attitude toward student wellness. Kennedy, though, said that she does not think the change affects Furman’s mission of promoting student wellness. She noted that Well Woman is another campus resource for student wellness.

OLACHI OLERU/COLUMBIA DAILY SPECTATOR

Members of Barnard’s Student Government Association discussed the counseling center Monday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNEDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

“Golf is a game that is played on a fiveinch course — the distance between your ears.” BOBBY JONES AMATEUR GOLFER AND 7-TIME MAJOR CHAMPION

Bulldogs finish in 10th spot BY GIO BACARELLA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As the women’s golf team teed off at the Lady Pirate Invitational on Monday, the cold and rainy weather in North Carolina proved to be no kind alternative to the New England climate.

W. GOLF The Elis posted a 10th place finish with their opening score of +20 in the tournament, hosted by East Carolina University at the Greenville Country Club. Originally intended to be a two-day tournament with three rounds, it was ultimately shortened to 18-holes when the final two rounds of play were rained out. Intermittent showers and a major rain-delay during the opening round forced the Bulldogs to huddle under trees in between holes. “As the ground got wetter and the wind picked up, the course played longer,” Caroline Rouse ’15 said. “It was definitely a challenge.” Even with a competitive field, which included many nationally ranked teams and individuals, the Bulldogs had a solid performance. While they finished in seventh at last year’s tournament, they were only seven strokes away from second place this year.

Playing in New England prepares you for wind, rain sleet and all sorts of bad weather. CATHERINE ROUSE ’15 Women’s golf “Whenever you have a weather delay, it interrupts one’s rhythm in different ways,” head coach Chawwadee Rompothong said. “Occasionally, there would be downpours and depending where you were on the course, it would affect some people more than others.” Rouse said everyone maintained a “great attitude” despite

YALE ATHLETICS

The women’s golf team had both their second and third-round matches rained out this weekend. the weather, adding that she is confident the team’s total would have improved if they had played the final rounds. “Unfortunately, the course was just unplayable,” Rouse said. Rouse demonstrated an impressive short game during the opening round. With clutch putts on her back nine,

a chip-in and three birdies in a row, her consistent play allowed her to close at even-par, a score that put her in a tie for 4th place overall and landed her a spot on the All-Tournament Team. “I’ve been working to improve around the greens, so it was nice to see results,” Rouse said. Her strong performance was also due in part to the team’s

preparedness for harsh weather conditions. “Playing in New England prepares you for wind, rain, sleet and all sorts of bad weather,” Rouse said. “I told myself I’d played in those conditions before and could do it again.” Teammate Sun Gyoung Park ’14 also appeared on the leaderboards with a score of +4 in the

Elis see strong run W. TENNIS FROM PAGE 14 together up until our very last match,” Guzick said. “Neither of us played very well in our semifinal match, and it was a disappointment. It kind of tainted the very end.” In singles, Li won two matches on the first day before falling 6–0, 6–1 to Princeton’s Katherine Flanigan in the semifinal. Amos lost in the first draw to Marketa Placha of Charleston Southern, but she continued on to win her first match in the consolation bracket. Guzik also lost in the first round, to Julienne Keong of Dartmouth, but she advanced all the way to the finals in the consolation bracket. Hamilton beat Sarah O’Neil of Cornell in the first draw before falling to Nevena Selekovic of Saint John’s. Guzick said she particularly looked forward to playing at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, a site Yale travels to just once each year. “It’s so exciting, motivational, inspirational, to be able to play on the same courts that U.S. Open champs get to play on,” Guzick said. The Bulldogs will next take the court when Yale hosts the ITA Regional Championships. Guzick said the team was prepared for the quick turnaround before the Regional Championships. “We actually had a talk about it today,” Guzick said. “The coach sat us down, and [said that] we have eight practices until regionals. We have 23 hours of tennis to play. We’re going to make the most out of it.” The ITA Regional Championships will take place from Oct. 18 to Oct. 23. Contact PATRICK CASEY at patrick.casey@yale.edu .

first round, leaving her in a tie for 24th place. The Bulldogs only have one fall tournament left this season. They will travel to Bethlehem, Pa. for the Lehigh Invitational at the Saucon Valley Country Club on Oct. 20. “We are looking to continue to play consistently and try to go as low as possible,” Rompothong

GRAHAM HARBOE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Contact GIO BACARELLA at giovanni.bacarella@yale.edu .

Seeking tolerance PREJUDICE FROM PAGE 14

In the women’s doubles finals, two freshman-sophomore pairs played against each other for the first time in tournament history.

said. “Saucon Valley is a spectacular course, but is very challenging. Hopefully we will have good weather.” After the Lehigh Invitational, the team will have a break until March.

Escobar for three games for writing an anti-gay slur on his eye black for all to see. Significant homophobia in sports exists outside of America, too. Consider German soccer. In early September, Chancellor Angela Merkel moved to support homosexual soccer players in the German Bundesliga after one gave an anonymous interview in which he lamented that he could not possibly come out as gay and continue to enjoy his lifelong dream of playing toptier professional soccer. And one more example, just to show how this problem spans the gamut of professional sports: just days ago, Puerto Rican featherweight Orlando Cruz became the first openly gay professional boxer. “I have always been and always will be a proud gay man,” said Cruz. Thankfully, Cruz experienced a wave of support following his announcement. In the past few years, there has been much progress in legalizing same-sex marriage. Besides the president’s support of same-sex marriage, six states have fully legalized same-sex marriage, with three more primed to do so, pending November referenda. Of course, homosexuals still have it tough, and not only in sports. But in several other public professions, such as politics, we see openly homosexual people thriving. The world of professional sports is different: it has been traditionally dominated by the image of “manly” and, by implication, heterosexual men.

This is what makes Kluwe’s amusing rant actually very important. The road that will take our society forward towards full acceptance of any sexual orientation necessarily goes through professional sports. And the only way to remove the roadblocks and to drive through freely is through forceful statements of discontent from the inside.

PROFESSIONAL ATHLETES MUST ALSO FIGHT HOMOPHOBIA This acceptance isn’t limited to professional sports. Yes, random people listen to professional athletes much more than they listen to, say, a Yale athlete, but it’s not really the random people that matter — it is the people who play, who will grow up to become “baseball men” and “football men” and who will devote their lives to playing and teaching their game. If, while in college and on younger teams, these athletes are not only taught, but shown, the obvious fact that sexual orientation has absolutely nothing to do with athletic prowess and that bigotry is both unacceptable and stupid, professional sports will naturally follow suit. Contact JOSEPH ROSENBERG at joseph.rosenberg@yale.edu .


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MLB San Francisco 2 Cincinanti 1

SPORTS QUICK HITS

MLB Oakland 2 Detroit 1

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FOOTBALL TEAM PARTNERS WITH AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY When the Bulldogs host Lafayette on Saturday at the Yale Bowl, the team will sell “Balloons of Hope” and cards in memory of those who have battled and in honor of those who continue to battle cancer.

KELLY JOHNSON ’16 NAMED IVY ROOKIE OF THE WEEK The freshman setter was named Ivy League Rookie of the Week for the second time this season yesterday. Johnson picked up 44 assists, a .405 hitting percentage and 22 kills in road wins over Dartmouth and Harvard this weekend.

NBA Milwaukee 97 Cleveland 80

NBA Chicago 92 Memphis 88

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“I’ve been working to improve around the greens, so it was nice to see results. CAROLINE ROUSE ’15 WOMEN’S GOLF YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 10, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

GUEST COLUMNIST JOSEPH ROSENBERG

Viking punts prejudice C

Elis clinch second in doubles BY PATRICK CASEY CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Four players from the women’s tennis team represented Yale this weekend at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center Women’s College Invitational. Madeleine Hamilton ’16 and Amber Li ’15 won three doubles matches in their first tournament playing together as a pair before losing to a Princeton duo in the championship.

W. TENNIS

hris Kluwe occupies one of the least attention-garnering positions on the football field — how many NFL punters can you name? — but the Minnesota Viking is certainly gregarious off of it. About a month ago, Kluwe wrote an open letter to Emmett C. Burns, Jr., a Maryland Democratic state delegate, that quickly went viral. Kluwe’s letter harshly (and quite hilariously) rebuked Burns’ recent request that the Baltimore Ravens silence their linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo, who has openly supported a Maryland ballot initiative that would legalize same-sex marriage. Burns’ letter to the Ravens’ owner asked that he “inhibit such expressions from your employees and that [Ayanbadejo] be ordered to cease and desist such injurious actions.” Kluwe had a field day with the letter, telling Burns, “Your vitriolic hatred and bigotry make me ashamed and disgusted to think that you are in any way responsible for shaping policy at any level.” Kluwe also criticized Burns for his assertion that politics have “no place in a sport.” Many professional sports remain institutionally homophobic. This forces a number of homosexual players and others involved with professional sports in myriad ways to remain in the closet. For example, there is not one openly gay player in any of America’s three major sports leagues: the NFL, the NBA and the MLB. Chances are that among the over 3,000 athletes in these three leagues there are quite a few homosexuals. The former owner of Major League Baseball’s Pittsburgh Pirates, Kevin McClatchy, came out as gay just two weeks ago, years after leaving baseball for good. To give you an idea of the homophobia McClatchy likely faced while involved in baseball, just days before McClatchy came out, the MLB suspended Toronto Blue Jays’ shortstop Yunel

On Saturday, Hamilton and Li cruised past a Dartmouth team with an 8–1 win in the first draw of the tournament. They followed up that performance the next day by defeating a pair from Army 8–4 in the quarterfinal and then beating a Brown team 8–6 in the semifinal. But on Monday, Princeton’s Lindsay Graff and Amanda Mulianwan proved to be too much for the Yale pair. Hamilton and Li lost 8–3 in the championship to clinch second place. “I thought that because it was our first time out there playing together … we did really well,” Li said. “But I feel like we did not play our best in the finals and … I feel like we still could’ve won that match, so it’s kind of a bittersweet feeling.” This weekend’s match was the first year two freshman-sophomore pairs faced off in the women’s doubles finals of the tournament. Li and Hamilton were joined at the tournament in Flushing Meadows, N.Y. by teammates Sarah Guzick ’13 and Courtney Amos ’16. Ree Ree Li ’16 was slated to appear in the tournament but had to drop out because of illness. Amos and Guzak also competed in the doubles tournament. They won their first match 8–3 against players from Charleston Southern University and then defeated a North Carolina State pairing 8–2 the following day. The duo fell to Brown 8-1 later that day in a semifinal match. “I think that we played very well

SEE PREJUDICE PAGE 13

SEE TENNIS PAGE 13

GRAHAM HARBOE/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s tennis team played at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center, the annual site of the U.S. Open.

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST JAC K D OY L E

Let’s get away from the sensationalism B

eer and chicken. Marriage troubles. Pain medication abuse. Scandalous golf outings. Sounds like the plot to a crappy daytime soap opera, doesn’t it? Nope. These are the headlines that define the Boston Red Sox season in 2012. Headlines about pitching ERA’s, batting averages, and lineups were conspicuously secondary. While eight elite teams battle in the MLB playoffs this month, the Red Sox will be sitting at home watching from the couch. I mention the Red Sox not to lament in the demise of my favorite team, but to highlight an increasingly troubling trend in professional sports media in which sensationalism and artificial controversy have become the norm. We’ve all seen it. We’ve seen ESPN hype up each Monday Night Football matchup — which they own rights to air live — as the must-see game of the week, regardless of the opponents involved. We’ve seen analysis of

LeBron James’s confidence after each quarter of the NBA finals. We’ve read the names and personal history of each replacement NFL referee who botched a call. We’ve seen Eli Manning be touted as an elite quarterback after a big win, and then squashed a week later when he throws two interceptions in a loss. For sports fans, this deluge of media coverage seems heavensent. But sometimes — as in the case of the 2012 Red Sox — it can be dangerous. After a historic collapse last season, in which the Sox blew a nine-game playoff lead in September, fans needed something — anything — to blame. And, unfortunately, the local media was all to eager to provide it. Following the 2011 season, the Boston Herald came out with reports that Red Sox pitchers drank beers and ate fried chicken in the clubhouse while games were going on during the September collapse. The Boston Globe then “cited sources” saying that the Sox much-loved

manager, Terry Francona, could not control the situation because he had marriage troubles and took too much pain medication. And finally, after a disappointing start to the 2012 campaign, The Sports Hub, a Boston sports radio station, chastised ace Josh Beckett after he went golfing on his offdays despite missing a start for injury. The sensationalism in Boston sports media, in fact, has reached an almost comical point. After the Sox fired their 2012 manager, Bobby Valentine, due to their poor performance this year, Boston-born sports columnist Bill Simmons geared up for the media’s reaction. “Sunday’s Boston Globe is going to feature one of those ‘According to sources’ stories that says Bobby lost the clubhouse in spring training, sold crystal meth out of a trailer and made a snuff film in Fenway’s bullpen car,” he wrote in his column last week. “They should turn this into NESN’s next terrible reality series.” Whether true or not — and

STAT OF THE DAY 10

some of these reports have been outright denied by players and managers alike — there is no underestimating the detrimental affect that the negative media attention had on the Sox this season. Amid intense scrutiny in a town where the happenings of Fenway Park matter more to locals than the decisions on Beacon Hill, the Sox had their worst season since 1965.

SENSATIONALIZED SPORTS COVERAGE HELPED RUIN A TEAM THAT WE LOVED TO WATCH While a host of factors lead to the Sox demise this season, the negative media attention was near the top of the list. “Those are critics who refer to

what you do on the field — why you’re not hustling, why you’re not performing, why your velocity’s down, why your bat speed is not there — those types of things I agree [with],” Red Sox slugger David Oritz told reporters after a game back in August regarding the media attention in Boston. “But when I see a person criticizing players for having a couple of beers, I mean, that’s just trying to create controversy not related to what we’re supposed to be doing here, so that I don’t agree with.” And it’s not just a problem in Boston. This type of sports coverage is becoming common place in a digital age in which local newspapers, official team blogs and ESPN’s ever-increasing number of channels have us covered 24 hours a day, seven days a week. With so much sports information, media outlets push beyond the field to get entertaining stories, regardless of how speculative or weak in evidence they might be. From a fan’s perspective, the

unfortunate aspect of this trend in sports media is not that the line between on-field performance and off-field personal issues has been blurred. Rather, exaggerated stories and smear campaigns have permeated onto the field and affected the performance of team and athletes themselves. The 2012 Boston Red Sox offer such a cautionary tale, in which the clout of overwhelming, sensationalized sports coverage helped ruin a team that we loved to watch. I get it. Drama sells. For fans, every “anonymous team source,” every suspicion, every scandal stirred up by local sports media whets our appetite. But it’s time for professional sports media to get away from the beer and chicken, from the marriage troubles and medication abuse accusations, and instead shift our focus back to the field. The athletes and games we love to watch will be better because of it. Contact JACK DOYLE at jack.doyle@yale.edu .

THE YALE WOMEN’S GOLF TEAM FINISHED IN 10TH PLACE AT THE LADY PIRATE INTERCOLLEGIATE TOURNAMENT ON TUESDAY.


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