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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 26 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

RAINY RAINY

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CROSS CAMPUS U.S. Senator John McCain sits down with the News. Check

out the News’ website to see an exclusive Q&A interview that the Senator gave the News when he visited campus on Monday. Not a millionaire, but $9,300.

Joey Yagoda ’14 walked away with $9,300 in winnings after appearing on Tuesday’s episode of “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?” The Calhoun junior left after he was asked a question about what Disney theme park workers had been forbidden to do until 2000. The answer? Grow facial hair.

Elm City ranks the banks. New Haven Mayor John DeStefano Jr. unveiled the city’s inaugural Community Impact Report Card, which rated 11 city banks in 30 categories. The report covered topics including banking fees and the home loan application process, and aimed to give residents a better understanding of local banks.

A LIE OF THE MIND DRAMAT SEASON GROWS DARK

FOOD

CITY HALL

MEN’S GOLF

NYC chef visits Yale to discuss sustainable and local food options

SUSTAINABILITY LEADER STEPS DOWN

Bulldogs win home tournament, take Macdonald Cup

PAGES 6-7 CULTURE

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 12 SPORTS

History boosts recruitment GRAPH COMPARISON OF ENROLLMENT IN MAJORS 250

History Economics Political Science

200

BY LAVINIA BORZI AND MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS

150

recruitment panel session in the coming weeks, and council members are planning smaller events where students can meet professors and history majors. The council also discussed implementing several curricular reform initiatives, including the creation of survey courses and focused programs

Students have expressed confusion and frustration in response to yesterday’s newsthat Silliman College’s annual Safety Dance has come to an end. The decision to cancel the event, which has taken place 13 consecutive years, came after this year’s Safety Dance on Saturday, when eight students were transported to Yale-New Haven Hospital for alcohol-related reasons. After students received a warning from Silliman College Master Judith Krauss in a Friday email that she was considering ending future Safety Dances, dance organizers Hannah Fornero ’15 and Nicole de Santis ’15 told the News on Monday night that this year’s event was the college’s last. While the dance’s cancellation met significant resistance among students who claim it will not change alcohol culture at Yale, Krauss said she decided to cancel itbecause the risks associated with excessive alcohol use outweighed the event’s benefits. “Canceling the dance in and of itself is clearly not the solution to the problems with the alcohol culture at Yale, but it will provide one less campus-wide excuse for binge drinking”, Krauss said in a Tuesday email to the News. Krauss said she and Silliman College Dean Hugh Flick made the final call to end the dance, but added that she first discussed its health and safety concerns with the Silliman Activities and Administrative Committee, which was responsible for organizing the event. Though she acknowledged that students associate the dance with “Silliman pride,” Krauss said that “with each successive year there has been less to be proud of and

SEE HISTORY COUNCIL PAGE 4

SEE SAFETY DANCE PAGE 4

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50

What would you do for a Wenzel? The Yale College

Council wants to know. The YCC has partnered with Alpha Delta Pizza to launch a photo contest encouraging competitors to submit creative photos involving the sandwich. Submissions are due Oct. 14 and voting will take place from Oct. 11-15.

Register to vote! The Elm City Communities and Housing Authority of New Haven has launched “Your Vote Matters,” a series of voter registration drives that will run until Oct. 30.

Students criticize Safety’s end

0 2000-’01

2005-’06

2010-’11 DATA FROM YALE OFFICE OF INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH

BY JANE DARBY MENTON STAFF REPORTER In an effort to fight dwindling enrollment, the history department is creating recruitment events aimed at underclassmen. At this fall’s first meeting of the History Undergraduate Advisory Council Monday afternoon, recruitment efforts took center-

stage: students and Steven Pincus, Director of Undergraduate Studies in History, discussed creating targeted outreach events for freshmen and sophomores in order to bolster enrollment in a major that has faced a decline in popularity in recent years. In response to the 16-person council’s suggestions, Pincus said the department looks to host a

Mayor’s Ball helps the needy.

East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo Jr. has given $250 to four nonprofit organizations, including the East Haven Food Pantry, Connecticut Hospice, East Haven Rotary and the ALS Foundation. Stop, shop and get a free ride. Yale Transit will provide

shuttle stops to and from Stop & Shop on weekends. The shuttles will leave from Phelps Gate every hour from 8:35 a.m. to 5:35 p.m. and will leave Stop & Shop every hour from 9:05 a.m. to 6:05 p.m.

If food is not for you, try athletics. Olympic gold

medalist Taylor Ritzel ’10 will give a Master’s Tea at Trumbull College this afternoon. Ritzel won the gold in women’s eight rowing at the 2012 London Olympic Games.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1940 Yale professor Arnold Wolfers gives a lecture to an overflowing crowd of students called “The European War Spreads.” Wolfers warned students about the “German paradox” and said he felt Adolf Hitler may be preparing his troops for the United States’ entrance into the war — later known as World War II. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Admins, students discuss Greek life BY KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG AND JOSEPH TISCH STAFF REPORTER AND CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Fraternity and sorority leaders voiced concerns over the University’s changing approach to alcohol-related incidents and Greek-sponsored events at a Tuesday meeting with administrators. The meeting presented an opportunity for Greek leaders to provide feedback concerning three new policies impacting fraternities and sororities — one requiring all off-campus parties with over 50 attendees to register with the Yale College Dean’s Office registration policy, another prohibiting Greek organizations from holding fall rush for freshmen, and new tailgate regulations banning kegs and U-Hauls and preventing tailgating activities from continuing past kick-off — said John Meeske, associate dean for student organizations and physical resources, in an email to Greek leaders. Additionally, the meeting also gave administrators an opportunity to introduce a proposed “rush form,” in which groups will be required to describe their spring semester rush plans. All three sorority presidents and six fraternity leaders were present, in addition to Meeske and Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry. Ben Singleton ’13, former president

of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity, said students primarily objected to the unprecedented liability concerns that new offcampus party regulations create for Greek leaders. “While the policy requiring registration of off-campus parties was instituted to promote safety, several fraternity and sorority members feel that it has unfairly been used against them,” he said. Singleton said Greek leaders fear the new policies promote an alcohol culture focused on disciplinary action, instead of one concerned with safety and individual responsibility. He said he can recall at least one incident at SAE when fraternity leaders were held accountable for a student’s excess intoxication and subsequent transport to Yale Health. He added that he was frustrated that the administration did not consider the safety precautions the fraternity already has been in place, such as a policy requiring all party attendees to present identification before entering. The meeting’s attendees also discussed a recent change in the Connecticut State underage drinking law, which as of Oct. 1 increases punishment for property owners who knowingly, recklessly or with criminal negligence permit minors to consume alcohol on their property. Singleton said Greek leaders SEE FRAT MEETING PAGE 4

Social Security central to Senate race

BENJAMIN ACKERMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

In a tightening Senate race, candidates address Social Security and Medicare in new attacks. BY PAYAL MARATHE STAFF REPORTER With just over a month before Election Day, U.S. Senate candidates Chris Murphy and Linda McMahon have recently focused their attention on two hot-button issues — Social Security and Medicare. The race for retiring Conn. Sen. Joseph Lieberman’s seat has grown increasingly important within the past several months, as election victories in a handful of key states will ultimately determine which party controls the Senate. In light of the race’s significance, the candidates have shifted their energy from criticizing the opponent’s per-

sonal finances in favor of directing a greater focus toward arguing policies that primarily affect the elderly. According to the latest U.S. census data, Conn. has the ninth largest proportion of state residents over the age of 65, and Murphy and McMahon are hoping the new campaign focus will draw these key voters on Election Day. The most recent round of political attacks began when Democrat Murphy called McMahon’s stance on Social Security “radical” at a rally in Hartford last Thursday. He was referring to McMahon’s endorsement of a “sunset provision” for Social Security — a SEE SENATE RACE PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Such a prime example of a first world problem.” ‘BLT233’ on ‘PUT YOUR yaledailynews.com/opinion

Read this twice T

his past week, after a long night of writing, reading and generally feeling frustrated at and about my pile of work that seems never-ending, I got into bed with a book that I first read when I was ten. I’ve read the book maybe six or eight times over the past many years, and often it feels like I know the characters inside the story as well as my own family. Almost as soon as I learned to read, I started to re-read. I indulged in what I’ve come to call “comfort reading.” I have a list of maybe thirty books on rotation that I turn to when I’m feeling particularly tired, stressed or off-balance. Most of them are books from childhood: Anne of Green Gables, Little Women. It’s heavy on nineteenth-century English novels, classic fantasy novels and science fiction. I have a book to suit each mood and each set of intimidating circumstances: friends, romance, school, work, travel. And yet, I am self-conscious about this re-reading. I don’t like to talk about my need to re-read books from childhood or books that tend to be classified under subgenre headings like “Romance” or “Fantasy.” As an English major, I’m supposed to be focusing my attention on “real” literature, the stuff that people in tweed write volumes with two-part titles about. So I do my re-reading out of sight, a private self-indulgence that I don’t want my professors — or my highbrow friends — to find out about. Then it occurred to me that most people have something they do that they prefer to keep private, for fear they’ll be judged about what it symbolizes about their character or intellect. Yale has a culture of encouraging students to avoid disclosing embarrassing or vulnerable sides of themselves. Instead, we are taught and re-taught to focus on meaningful pursuits and taking ourselves and our education seriously. How do we reconcile this, then, with our very real need for some small self-indulgences that make us feel safe? I decided to find out. This past week, I had to lead a getting-to-know-you game (you know the kind: Everyone has to think of something to share about themselves, usually something completely trivial). I decided to ask the question that has been bothering me: What’s your greatest self-indulgence? Everyone in the group laughed awkwardly, but when they saw that I meant it — and was pre-

pared to share mine — they ’fessed up. T h e answers varied: Some watched bad TV shows, ZOE read MERCER- some trashy maga z i n e s GOLDEN (something Meditations that I, too, have been guilty of, much to the chagrin of my feminist mother), some read niche blogs religiously. Few of us were comfortable talking about these proclivities, but we all did them whenever we could.

TAKE THE GUILT OUT OF GUILTY PLEASURE. I’ve been wondering ever since what seems so damaging about these personal revelations: Do we really believe someone will think less of us for admitting to a passion for the Kardashians or chick lit? How much is this judgment completely self-imposed, as the product of our own embarrassment? Or how much is it the product of an external environment, like Yale’s in which certain activities are privileged over others? I don’t have easy answers to these questions. But what I do know is that having a conversation with this group of people made me feel like I knew them intimately in a very short period of time. I don’t need to know your favorite color, ice cream flavor or birthday: I know the thing you do when you’re feeling stressed or anxious. And you know the same about me. The actions that we do repeatedly define us, and we should feel comfortable being open with our indulgences if they’re legal and don’t cause harm to others. And while sharing rarely feels easy, it allows us to build community and discover other people who love what we love. In the end Yale’s job isn’t to make you as pretentious as possible, it’s to challenge you to be more yourself. ZOE MERCER-GOLDEN is a senior in Davenport College. Her column runs on Wednesdays. Contact her at zoe.mercer-golden@yale.edu .

GAME FACE ON’

YALE TALKS SAFETY DANCE POINT

COUNTERPOINT GUEST COLUMNIST IKE LEE

GUEST COLUMNIST KYLE KRZE SOWIK

Blame ourselves We can dance for dance’s end if we want to J

ust in case midterms have got you living in Bass without any social interaction, let me break it to you now: Safety Dance is no more. When I woke up and saw the headline ‘Safety dance canceled’ blazed across the News’ webpage during the wee hours of yesterday morning, I thought either my lack of sleep had me seeing things or it was just a joke piece that found its way online. Even when I realized it was true, I couldn’t help but feel ambivalent. Who cares? There are other things to do on campus. However, as comments on the article poured in throughout the day, I realized that ambivalence had no place here. There was much talk about the University’s incoherent drinking policies, potential disciplinary actions against binging and even personal attacks on Master Krauss. But most of the comments were missing the point: the end of Safety Dance is just another episode to remind Yale that all is not well when it comes to drinking and binging. Whether you’re a binger, responsible drinker or as dry as Tim Tebow, eight serious hospitalizations and a fully packed Yale Health in one night is a problem. Treating it as anything else is ignorant denial. Most student conversations about alcohol at Yale seem to always end up blaming administrators for not doing enough to cultivate a better drinking culture on campus. But Safety Dance wouldn’t be any safer were the administration to pursue a strictly non-disciplinary policy for alcohol-related incidents. Indeed, some University programs aimed at affecting student behavior are laughable, as is the case with the CCE program, which does more to cripple Froyo World’s reputation than anything else. Yale can only do so much to encourage students to make the best decisions for themselves, which makes SAAC’s decision to cancel Safety Dance that much more noble. Master Krauss made clear yesterday that the decision was one made out of concerns for both liability and student safety. I doubt this is a political statement. Krauss is a nurse by training, making it both her profes-

sional responsibility and duty to care for others. It’s apparent what effects she hopes ending Safety Dance will have. Skeptics will respond by arguing that canceling a single dance isn’t going to stop binge drinking. However, there is also no denying that large social events such as Safety, Spring Fling and even The Game encourage a culture of irresponsible behavior unlike that of a regular weekend night out. Whether or not anyone would like to admit it, the fact of the matter is that with the absence of Safety Dance, Yale will have one less night of widespread intoxication every year.

ENDING SAFETY DANCE WAS A REALITY CHECK. Of course, the solution is not to go ahead and remove every large social event on campus fueled by the naïve hope that binge drinking will suddenly disappear. What we need to do first is fully accept that us overachieving, overcommitted, and over-intoxicated Yalies have a problem. Perhaps the difficulty of doing this lies in the fact that we’re just not used to being told something is wrong. We’re the “successful” ones who made it here. We’re reminded every day of our strengths and places we’ll be able to go, and we’re fed a false illusion daily that everything is fine and dandy because we’re at Yale. As a campus, we need to sober up. Let’s lay off on blaming the administration. After all, they’re doing it for a reason: Yalies don’t know how to drink, and it’s harming not only the students, but the University’s image as a leader as well. Let’s stop accepting that certain nights will lead to inevitable blackouts. Let’s stop thinking that alcohol is the essential social lubricant for a good time. These attitudes are what led to the end of Safety Dance, and it’s these attitudes that need to go. IKE LEE is a sophomore in Ezra Stiles College. Contact him at ike.lee@yale.edu .

I

imagine my trip to Safety Dance this year was typical for a Yale student. I suited up (hot pink shirt and a silver blazer, both collars popped) and tried once again to hit that high note in “Take On Me.” I’m not sure whether it’s the neon colors or just the fact that the dance typically falls right when we all need a relief from the stress of midterms, but everyone has a special brand of excitement for the night of Safety. But let’s go back to Saturday afternoon. I skimmed a forwarded email about how the administration “give[s] serious consideration to discontinuing [the dance] in future years” because of student binge drinking. To me, it seemed like a disgruntled master attempting to place blame on the shoulders of students just looking to make the most of their Saturday nights while their livers were young enough to take it. Yesterday, I was shocked to hear that Silliman’s master actually took action. Considering it was a campuswide party, eight students taking a trip to the hospital didn’t seem largely out of the ordinary, especially when only three of those students were actually at the dance. For some of us, these experiences are exactly what college is about. We live for the first time, we experiment, we drop classes, change majors, discover who we are, and sometimes, we exceed our limits. I appreciated the freedom that accompanied the alcohol policy that was taught last year. I’m sure everyone has heard it from his/ her dean: “Drinking is a health issue before it’s a disciplinary issue.” And so the conversation on campus followed. Students said it was okay if you went to Yale Health, just as long as you left early enough in the morning. Other than an awkward meeting with your dean, the problem ended with you realizing how terrible it is to wake up in a hospital. I saw it happen to some of my closest friends last year. I even carried one of them to the Yale shuttle. It seemed that they learned their lessons, and that seems to me like a process that works. No one has told students that there has been a formal change in the alcohol policy. So by cancelling Safety Dance, Yale has

created a paradox where alcohol consumption is supposedly a health issue, yet it has administered a large-scale punishment in the event of these hospitalizations. This was a college-sponsored dance. Who knows what would have happened to those in charge of Safety if they had simply been a registered campus party like the rest of ours? I’m not sure exactly what caused this reversal in policy, but the death of Safety seems to be right on par with tailgates that end at kick-off, or registered parties entertaining visits from the Yale Police Department even when they haven’t been too loud. Yale administration is continuing to say to students: “Read between the lines — if you drink, we will shut you down.” My prediction is that students will just binge drink for another dance. By shutting down registered parties, or punishing fraternities when a student at their party exceeds their limit, Yale is unintentionally telling students that necessary hospitalizations will become a statistic used against the student body. If Yale punishes us for seeking help, we will be afraid of going to the hospital when we need to. Yesterday, administrative outrage was due to students waking up safely at the hospital. If administrators truly want to crack down on discipline, somewhere along the line a student’s safety is going to suffer.

YALE NEEDS A COHERENT ALCOHOL POLICY. Yale administrators should be standing by their message that they are here to keep us safe when we make mistakes, rather than punishing us all when a few students learn their limits. Bringing back Safety Dance goes along with what Yale really needs to reaffirm: student safety is still our number one priority. With this in mind, cancelling Safety seems to be far too literal. KYLE KRZESOWIK is a sophomore in Morse College. Contact him at kyle.krzesowik@yale.edu .

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How about a plan?

PRINT ADV. MANAGER Sophia Jia

SUBMISSIONS

All letters submitted for publication must include the author’s name, phone number and description of Yale University affiliation. Please limit letters to 250 words and guest columns to 750. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit letters and columns before publication. E-mail is the preferred method of submission. Direct all letters, columns, artwork and inquiries to: Julia Fisher, Opinion Editor, Yale Daily News http://www.yaledailynews.com/contact opinion@yaledailynews.com

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olitics is a game. That’s understandable: Opposing parties must try to convince us that their candidate is best — and that other candidate is the worst menace to society since some bad event a long time ago that no one actually remembers. It’s ridiculous what our political sphere has become. Candidates produce so many words in speeches, op-eds and emails, but say very little. In a recent Wall Street Journal op-ed, Governor Mitt Romney wrote that we need to “restore the three sinews of American influence: our economic strength, our military strength and the strength of our values.” Cool story, bro. But how? In the New England Journal of Medicine, President Barack Obama wrote that “we need a permanent fix to Medicare’s flawed payment formula that threatens physicians’ reimbursement, rather than the temporary measures that Congress continues to send to my desk.” Okay, but how? I find myself asking “how?”

over and over again. I took the liberty of subscribing to the campaign email lists of both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. I wanted to assess for myself which campaign would eloquently share tangible solutions to the many issues facing the nation. I wasn’t asking for much, just a plan. It was a decision I soon regretted. After all, each campaign has essentially two goals. The first is to sell themselves out to their constituents and independents; that’s people like me. But candidates are also trying to stir up some resentment: To attack the other guy. Amidst these two contradictory goals, constructive conversation and planning have given way to “Win a meal with Barack Obama” and “Fly with Mitt.” This sort of advertising would have been blasphemous in previous elections. Seriously, could you imagine “Flying with Richard Nixon” or “Having a meal with Harry Truman?” When does this pandering end? Will the candidates resort to coming to people’s homes, presenting them with Publisher’s House

Sweepstakes checks in order to get elected? I would rather take a candidate who has some quirks and flaws, but has feasible plans in order to get things done, than a mannequin of a candidate. I believe the United States would be better off as well. But the public eats this kind of advertising up. We feast on it day after day, like the free Swedish Fish or Sour Patch Kids from the Chaplain’s Office. I understand that candidates must put their best faces forward to gain votes. But is this kind of political pandering really what the American public wants? We shouldn’t only demand plans from our candidates, though: We should demand they improve those plans by working together. I’m sure if you sat down an informed Democrat and an informed Republican in some undisclosed location and told them to develop a plan to get back home — and fix the country while they’re at it — they would work together, cooperating and collaborating, to complete their task.

Why can’t this be the case for American politics today? How badly does the brown stuff have to hit the fan in order to force political deadlock to look more like Kumbaya around a campfire? One could blame the party system for its rigidity, the media for its calls for a superhero candidate, the public for not constructively holding elected officials to higher standards and so on. However, we need to realize one thing: If we as people lose sight of the need for rational thought to solve our problems, things will get worse. To fix things, we need everyone. Not just the 1 percent, 99 percent or 47 percent, but 100 percent. That’s right, everyone needs to play a role in whatever capacity possible. It is too important not to, and apathy and needless division won’t cut it. Let’s hope the debates provide some of this constructive dialogue. Actually, who am I kidding? That would never work. MORKEH BLAY-TOFEY is a senior in Trumbull College. Contact him at morkeh.blaytofey@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS MICHAEL ANTHONY Chef Michael Anthony of New York City’s Gramercy Tavern won Best Chef of New York City May 7, 2012 at the annual James Beard Foundation Awards. The Foundation was established by cookbook author and teacher James Beard to educate professional chefs.

CORRECTIONS TUESDAY, SEPT. 18

The article “Handelsman talks scientific education” incorrectly stated that University of Wisconsin professor Howard Temin won the Nobel Peace Prize. In fact, he won the Nobel Prize in Medicine.

NYC chef talks local food

City sustainability faces uncertainty BY NITIKA KHAITAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Following the premature departure of its director, Christine Eppstein Tang, the New Haven Office of Sustainability is evaluating its earlier initiatives to plan for the future of Elm City environmental efforts. The Office of Sustainability previously consisted of Tang and of Giovanni Zinn ’05, who served as a consultant from City Hall’s engineering department. While Tang’s replacement has not yet been named and the appointment of a new director is contingent upon funding, Zinn has received a full-time city position and is serving as the acting head of the Sustainability Office. Tang’s position was created by a three-year contract largely supported by a federal grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, which ended in September. City Hall had found additional funding for what would have been the last six months of Tang’s contract from a variety of sources, the largest being energy conservation funds, and is still deliberating on the possible uses of the funds now that Tang has left. As director, Tang worked to improve city sustainability in different areas including food policy, community outreach and recycling, Chief Administrative Officer Robert Smuts ’01 said. She also worked on putting together an “overarching” sustainability plan for the city, Smuts said, which treated the city both as a corporate entity and as a community. The plan — which is nearly finished but was put on hold as Tang contemplated leaving — touched on several sustainability issues such as transportation, land use, air and water quality. Smuts said the sustainability plan will need coordinated effort as it is launched, meaning it will require a person to dedicate significant

time and effort to it for successful implementation. In the wake of Tang’s departure, City Hall may decide to discontinue a stand-alone Office of Sustainability depending on the availability of funds. In this case, initiatives covered by the Office of Sustainability would be housed in other departments. Zinn, who Smuts said handled many of the day-to-day operations of the Office of Sustainability under Tang, will continue his work on these initiatives. His responsibilities include the relaunch of the recycling program, which according to Smuts involved community outreach and saved the city hundreds of thousands of dollars. They also include energy conservation projects in City Hall, such as switching off the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems when not in use and installing energy-efficient ultra LED light bulbs in street lamps across New Haven. The city also undertook initiatives to improve air and water quality, including retrofitting charging stations at the New Haven port to make it one of the cleanest in the county. All of these programs, City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ’04 said, are a “win-win” for the city, as they are environmentally friendly and help the city save money in the future. New Haven’s recycling initiatives alone, Smuts added, have more than doubled the amount of material recycled in the Elm City and saved City Hall hundreds of thousands of dollars since they began. Zinn could not be reached for comment. Of the 10 largest cities in New England, New Haven is home to the highest percentage of people who walk to work. Contact NITIKA KHAITAN at nitika.khaitan@yale.edu .

SARAH STRONG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Mike Anthony, the executive chef of Gramercy Tavern, spoke at a Calhoun Master’s Tea Tuesday about sustainable food practices. BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Mike Anthony admitted he was a “finicky eater” growing up, but the executive chef of New York City’s Gramercy Tavern restaurant praised the diversity of food while speaking at Yale on Tuesday afternoon. At a Calhoun Master’s Tea co-sponsored by the Yale Sustainable Food Project that drew around 50 students, Anthony spoke briefly about his culinary training in several countries and his passion for sustainable cooking. Anthony — who earlier this year won the James Beard Foundation’s award for best chef in New York City — described his restaurant as “the standard-bearer of American cooking.” Speaking primarily about his restaurant’s sustainable practices, Anthony said he focuses on using local food. When the ingredients come from the surrounding community, he said, the food better represents the city’s culture and the diner feels more invested in the food. “Every bite should tell a story,” he said. “In New York, we can tell that story any way we choose, but I think the story is more powerful when it’s the story of the region.” Anthony said that after graduating from the University of Indiana-Bloomington, he traveled to Japan and worked on a dairy farm, a bakery and eventually a restaurant. Seeking Western training, he left Japan for France, adding that once there, he noticed the similarities between French and Japanese cooking.

“I was really floored with the way both of these societies dealt with seasonality and with regionality,” he said. At Gramercy Tavern, Anthony employs a specific “farm-to-table” approach — where chefs draw on ingredients from certain local vendors. Gramercy Tavern buys produce at the Union Square Green Market, a farmers’ market three blocks from the restaurant to which regional farmers commute four times a week, he added.

Ultimately, it is true that eating is a politial act. I want to know where food comes from. MIKE ANTHONY Chef, Gramercy Tavern Anthony said his interest in sustainable eating practices emerges from his responsibility to his wife and three daughters to provide them with healthy and environmentally friendly food options. “Ultimately, it is true that eating is a political act,” Anthony said. “I want to know where food comes from.” Anthony noted that his regional approach was part of a general trend toward sustainability, though the larger population had for generations lost interest in agriculture. Still, the chef said that while healthy food

was “real food — that is, unprocessed food,” many segments of the population do not have access to those options. Instead, he added, the best alternative can be farmers’ markets. Anthony also introduced the audience to Micah Fredman ’10, a line cook at Gramercy Tavern who graduated from Yale with a humanities degree and discovered a love of cooking when working at Miya’s Sushi the last few months of his senior year. Hallie Meyer ’15, whose father owns Gramercy Tavern, attended the tea and said she admires Anthony greatly. “He’s probably one of the chefs that I respect the most of my father’s restaurants,” she said. “Gramercy Tavern’s ethos is the one with which I feel the most connected.” Rachel Schoening ’15, who spent two summers working at fine dining restaurants, said she was disappointed that despite Anthony’s “eloquence” he “didn’t really get down to the nitty-gritty of being a chef.” The tea was followed by a private dinner hosted by Calhoun College Master Jonathan Holloway. The five students at the dinner — which the students cooked together with Anthony and Fredman — earned their seats through a haiku competition on the topic of food. The restaurant’s owner is Danny Meyer, whose Union Square Hospitality Group includes Shake Shack. Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .

Speaker discusses dwindling middle class BY MAREK RAMILO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As the American economy continues to climb out of its 2008 financial crisis lows, the disappearing middle class remains a problem, said a top Indian official Tuesday afternoon. In a lecture entitled “Are Capitalism and Democracy Failing Us?” India’s chief economic adviser Raghuram Rajan said the crisis was caused by policies with short-term visions intended to increase equality rather than elitist or corporatist policies. Because of their lack of longterm vision, the income equality policies did not provide a longterm solution to the income gap and ultimately contributed to the disappearance of the middle class — a trend Rajan said will be hard to reverse. The talk, which drew over 100 students and New Haven residents, garnered positive responses from audience members interviewed. “The elite across the world are doing very well, while the people who were falling behind and were ostensibly to be helped by these policies are even worse off,” Rajan said of the short-term economic equality policies. Rajan said the United States has not completely resurfaced since the financial downturn because the middle class has disappeared following a decrease in skilled routine jobs, like low-level clerk positions, and unskilled routine work, like textile production jobs. These jobs disappeared with the rise of advanced technologies and

outsourcing, Rajan added. The American workforce is currently dominated by non-routine skilled laborers, like doctors or lawyers, and non-routine unskilled workers, like gardeners and fast food cooks, further expanding the split between extreme upper and lower classes. Rajan said the widening income gap causes the lower class to overspend in an attempt to keep pace with the wealthy, thereby accumulating more and more debt, as has been the case “in areas with greater income inequality” across the United States.

The people who were falling behind and ostensibly to be helped by these policies are even worse off. RAGHURAM RAJAN Chief Economic Advisor, India “We need to combat this, not just the perception, but the reality that, in fact, there is a bifurcation of ways in many industrial economies,” Rajan said. “A way for those who go to elite schools, who come from elite families, who have access to wonderful jobs, and a different way for those who have never been to all these places, a way, which typically leads down rather than up.” Rajan, who previously said industrialized economies still

stand a chance of restoring their middle classes by focusing on education, rather than through large-scale government intervention in the economy. A strong middle class is necessary to balance capitalism with democracy and make a full recovery from the effects of the global recession, Rajan said. In an attempt to illustrate the effects of middle-class resurgence on recovering industrial economies, Rajan referred to the United States’ and the United Kingdom’s respective growth after World War II. Following a number of measures that contributed to a healthier middle class — including increases in construction in Europe, restoration of trade activity and a heavy focus on education — the United States and the United Kingdom were able to emerge from the damage caused by both WWII and the Great Depression, Rajan said. Four audience members interviewed said they enjoyed the talk. Maya Major ’15 said she appreciated that Rajan discussed modern politics rather than just abstract theory. “[Rajan] was very enlightening about the effects of elite capitalism and how it is affecting the middle class,” said Paul Michaelson, another attendee. Rajan’s most recent book, “Fault Lines: How Hidden Fractures Still Threaten the World Economy,” won the Financial Times’ Business Book of the Year award for 2010. Contact MAREK RAMILO at marek.ramilo@yale.edu .

MICHAEL WUERTENBERG/CREATIVE COMMONS

Raghuram Rajan discussed the the widening income gap Tuesday to over 100 students and New Haven residents.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY,OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Greek leaders voice concerns

“A people without the knowledge of their past history, origin and culture is like a tree without roots.” MARCUS GARBY BLACK NATIONALIST

Dept. looks to underclassmen HISTORY COUNCIL FROM PAGE 1

SAMANTHA GARDNER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Greek leaders met with administrators to discuss changes to student life policies.. FRAT MEETING FROM PAGE 1 are working to implement practices that would safeguard them from such punishments, such as using licensed bartenders at their events. John Stillman ’14, vice president of communications for the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity, said Greek leaders and the University discussed finding a “mutually agreeable role for the fraternity to occupy on campus.” He added that administrators and Greek leaders “agreed to update each other on what they think will be the best

course of action” regarding the implementation of the regulations. The group plans to hold another meeting before the semester’s end. Alpha Epsilon Pi President Daniel Tay ’14 said he appreciated that the meeting provided a forum allowing Greek leaders to hear each other’s perspectives, adding that it was “a chance for [him] to learn the experiences of a lot of other fraternity leaders.” Tay said he did not come away from the meeting having learned anything “momentous.”

“We still want to follow the rules, everybody is just looking to ensure the safety of all the students,” he said. “That was true even before new regulations.” The Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and the Zeta Psi fraternity were unable to send representatives because the majority of their members had football practice. Contact KIRSTEN SCHNACKENBERG at kirsten.schnackenberg@yale.edu . Contact JOSEPH TISCH at joseph.tisch@yale.edu .

Thirteen-year tradition ends

of study called “pathways.” “One thing we feel the history department doesn’t do well is cater to the interests and intellectual needs of first- and second-year students,” Pincus said. “Many students don’t know enough about the history department as they do about other options when it comes time to choosing a major.” Though history was the most subscribed area of study for much of the past three decades, only 136 seniors majored in the department last year — 81 fewer than in 2002. The decrease placed history behind political science and economics in popularity. At Monday’s meeting, students emphasized the need for more social ways to make freshmen and sophomores aware of the department’s resources before they choose a major. Noting that little has been done in the past to market the major, council members suggested the department hold events designed to introduce underclassmen to students and professors, a method of recruitment they said was employed by many other majors including English and anthropology. “I think other majors do a better job of publicizing their offerings and reaching out to freshmen by having classes specifically geared toward them and/or information sessions that target them,” said Allison Lazarus ’14, a member of the Advisory Council. In the absence of targeted outreach, Pincus said many students decide to be history majors because they take a class that sparks their interest. But most courses within the department are highly specific, which Pincus said leaves many students unaware of the range of

legislative term for placing an expiration date on a law unless it is renewed.

[McMahon] is doing everything she can to hide her views from Conn. voters. ELI ZUPNICK Spokesman for Murphy

After hospitalizations Saturday, Silliman administrators decided to cancel Safety Dance. SAFETY DANCE FROM PAGE 1 more to be concerned about.” She declined to comment further on her reasons for canceling the event. While students interviewed said Krauss’ decision to discontinue the dance because of excessive intoxication was misguided because binge drinking will still occur elsewhere on campus. Ericka Saracho ’14 said students will find reasons to drink even without a college-wide dance such as the Safety Dance.

“It’s not going to change the way people drink,” she said. Shuaib Raza ’14 said the minimal alcohol safety education students receive upon arriving at Yale leaves them unprepared to deal with alcohol “in a responsible way.” Two students said they are concerned that the dance’s cancellation will prevent other students from seeking needed medical attention in future alcoholrelated incidents out of fear that administrators will cancel other events. Silliman College currently has no

plans to organize another campus-wide event, Krauss said, adding that SAAC will likely use allotted funds for a Silliman-only event. In an earlier interview, she said in the past few years costs from the Safety Dance have typically exceeded Silliman’s budget by $1,000 to $2,000. Roughly 2300 students attended this year’s Safety Dance, held in Commons. Contact LAVINIA BORZI at lavinia.borzi@yale.edu . Contact MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

Contact JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .

Murphy, McMahon ramp up attacks SENATE RACE FROM PAGE 1

JAMES LU/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

opportunities within the major. Since last year, he said the department has been working to develop “sophisticated survey courses” geared towards freshmen and sophomo res, which will be offered in the 2013-’14 school year. Pincus said he also hopes to make the major more accessible by expanding seminar opportunities for freshmen and sophomores. Last semester, the department renamed their junior seminars “undergraduate seminars” and required each professor to reserve at least two spots for sophomores. This semester, the department also doubled the number of freshmen history seminars offered to six. Pincus said he eventually hopes to expand the major’s online presence, sharing student and faculty research and creating a network within the department, but he added he will have to wait until the department completes curricular reforms. Students within the history department remain enthusiastic about what the major has to offer: all seven history majors interviewed praised the quality of the department’s faculty and its emphasis on independent research. Rachel Rothberg ’14, a member of the Student Advisory Council, said it is important for the major to attract high numbers of excited underclassmen entering each year, as student enthusiasm and interest allow the department to maintain its “outstanding” faculty and resources. Last year, 176 students majored in political science and 170 majored in economics.

Murphy told the Huffington Post he was “shocked” by McMahon’s comments, adding it would be a “disaster for Conn. seniors” if Social Security were to be phased out over the next decade. On Monday, seniors protested outside of McMahon’s North Haven headquarters, carrying signs that read “Celebrating 75 Years of Social Security.” M c M a h o n ’s campaign responded by claiming that Murphy took her remarks out of context. McMahon was simply pointing out that the program would need alterations in order to be realistically sustained, but she would never vote to dissolve it, campaign spokesman Todd Arbajano said. In her comments at the April Tea Party meeting, McMahon did not specify a specific end date for Social Security but rather called for bipartisan revision. “We cannot continue doing things the way we are doing with Social Security,” McMahon said. “We’re simply going to be bankrupt and have to take a look to make sure that 10, 15 years down the road it’s still going to fund itself.” Murphy’s campaign followed up by criticizing McMahon for failing to elaborate on specific policies to modify Social

Security that she would support. According to Eli Zupnick, spokesman for Murphy, McMahon “doesn’t want to talk about her right-wing plans on the campaign trail.” “She is doing everything she can to hide her views from Conn. voters who have rejected these policies over and over, but our campaign is going to make sure voters learn the truth about McMahon’s record and her right-wing policies that are wrong for middle-class families,” Zupnick said. Arbajano responded to the Murphy campaign’s criticsm by defending McMahon’s desire to establish checks on both Social Security and Medicare finances, adding that the Republican candidate would never consider privatizing Social Security. M u r p h y h a s re c e n t ly attempted to link McMahon’s platform to vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan’s proposal to convert Medicare into a premium support system. But the Republican candidate has distanced herself from the Ryan plan, Arbajano said, adding that “Linda McMahon will never support a budget that cuts Medicare or Social Security.” The most recent Real Clear Politics poll puts Murphy ahead of McMahon by two percentage points, widening his lead since the Social Security conversation first began last week. Social Security and Medicare reform is widely expected to be a major topic during this Sunday’s televised debate between the Senate candidates. It will be the first of four debates agreed upon by both campaigns. The Oct. 1 Real Clear Politics poll predicted McMahon receiving 41.7 percent of the popular vote and Murphy receiving 43.7 percent with a 2.2 percent margin of error. Contact PAYAL MARATHE at payal.marathe@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Chance of rain with a high near 76. Calm wind becoming east between 5 and 8 mph.

FRIDAY

High of 76, low of 56.

High of 77, low of 54.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3 5:00 PM The Franke Lectures in the Humanities: “Ragging in the Classics: The Story of Music in James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man.” Lecture and concert. James Tatum, Dartmouth College professor, will give this lecture as a part of a series funded by the Franke family intended to bring important topics in humanities to a wide audience. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), Aud. 7:00 PM The Yale Political Union debates with Professor Seyla Benhabb: “Resolved, Yale Should Be Run As A Business Corporation.” William H. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), Sudler Hall. 8:00 PM Satisfaction As A Senior. Yale Communication and Consent Educators will lead a student panel and discussion on ways to lead a happy, healthy and fulfilling senior year. Refreshments will be served as in the spirit of senior year acronyms. Viva Zapata Restaurant (161 Park St.).

WATSON BY JIM HORWITZ

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4 8:00 PM Mindfulness Meditation Group: Sitting meditation followed by a discussion/informal lecture on the practice of mindfulness meditation. Attendees should bring their own meditation cushion or bench. Dwight Chapel (67 High St.). 8:00 PM Concert: “New Music New Haven.” Concert: “New Music New Haven.” Featuring the world premiere of the piece, “Allegory of the Cave,” for string quartet and piano by composer Christopher Theofanidis. Morse College (302-304 York St.), Recital Hall

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5 5:30 PM Vietnamese Students Association at Yale hosts its annual Pho Night! YaleBe treated to three delivious kinds of pho, milk, tea, fried bananas and more. Afro-American Cultural Center (211 Park St.). 7:30 PM Out of the Blue performs its newest arrangements with its newest members. FroyoWorld (46 High St.).

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Max de la Bruyère, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

Want to write & draw a comic strip?

To visit us in person 202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE)

We’re looking for weekly comic strips for this page. If you’re interested, e-mail Karen at Karen.Tian@yale.edu .

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Hunger hint 5 Shorn shes 9 Indonesian island 13 Pinza of “South Pacific” 14 Pulsate 16 Yaks, e.g. 17 Endures an onslaught of criticism 20 Prognosticator 21 RR terminus 22 Center opening? 23 Aus. setting 24 Puts the kibosh on 26 Kind of contact banned by the NFL 32 Golden Bears’ school, familiarly 33 “Joanie Loves Chachi” co-star 34 Like James Bond 35 Carpeting computation 37 Cyclist Armstrong, or what completes the ensemble found in the four long across answers 40 It may be impish 41 24-hr. news source 43 “If __ a nickel ...” 45 Category 46 Use a sun visor, say 50 Currently occupied with 51 She, in Lisbon 52 Justice Dept. bureau 55 Greeting card figure, maybe 56 Pacific Surfliner and Acela 60 Vulnerable spot 63 Muslim pilgrim 64 Passover month 65 Melville South Seas novel 66 Candy bar with a cookie center 67 More than just hard to find 68 Stir-fry cookware DOWN 1 Cop’s quarry

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10/3/12

By Michael Dewey

2 Côte d’__: French resort area 3 Padre’s boy 4 Mass reading 5 Unworldly 6 Spark, as an appetite 7 Unit of energy 8 Such that one may 9 Put (down) on paper 10 Car bar 11 Prez’s backup 12 Opponent 15 “__! that deep romantic chasm ...”: Coleridge 18 Hitchhiker’s aid 19 Neck parts 24 Lining with decorative rock 25 Slimy garden pest 26 Severe 27 Nicholas Gage memoir 28 Mexican aunt 29 Antarctica’s __ Byrd Land 30 Pandora’s boxful 31 Six-mile-plus run, briefly 32 Rotating machine parts 36 In the sack

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU HARD

5 8 4

6 9

5

6 7 1 (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

38 Activist Guevara 39 Nonowner’s property right 42 Commonly long garment 44 __ blues: Mississippi genre 47 “Eat up!” 48 Frequent final soccer score 49 Peter who cowrote “Puff, the Magic Dragon”

10/3/12

52 Berliner’s eight 53 Leave out of the freezer 54 Pacific archipelago 56 Triumphant cries 57 Magazine filler 58 Eccentric sort 59 B’way hit signs 61 Veto 62 General linked with chicken

4

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 5:30-6:30 P.M. WED. OCT. 3

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS RICHARD MONTOYA Richard Montoya founded the politically charged performance group Culture Clash in 1984 with five other performers. A self-proclaimed “Chicano,” his work critically examines the complex interplay between issues of race and class.

“A Lie” showcases dark storyline

A new exhibit at the Yale Center for British Art opening Thursday tells the story of an 18th century shipwreck and the artwork aboard that continues to engage researchers today. Organized by Scott Wilcox, Chief Curator of Art Collections at the British Art Center, “The English Prize: The Capture of the Westmorland, an Episode of the Grand Tour” will detail the voyages of a British merchant ship filled with 50 crates of artwork purchased by young British travelers. Professor José María Luzón Nogué of the University of Madrid, who contributed to the exhibit, said that the paintings include six late 18th century watercolors by John Robert Cozens, which have never been displayed before and uniquely showcase Cozens’ early style. Amy Meyers, director of the British Art Center, said the gallery will provide an excellent platform for the next stages of research on the Westmorland. “This exhibition will allow the new discoveries to move forward in such a significant way and will showcase them to Yale students and the public with extraordinary clarity and poignancy,” Meyers said.

Excited to check out the new YCBA exhibition on Thursday? Get a sneak peak with this talk by the experts. .Yale Center for British Art

4:00-5:00 P.M. THURS. OCT. 4 WORD MAGIC: VICTORIAN CHARM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE Academic colloquium focusing on Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” and Christina Rossetti’s “Echo.” LC Hall, Rm. 319

6:30-7:30 P.M. THURS. OCT. 4 WAYS OF SEEING SOUND: THE INTEGRAL HOUSE. First lecture of the School of Architecture’s “Sound of Architecture” symposium. Hastings Hall, Paul Rudolph Hall

8:00-10:00 P.M. THURS. OCT. 4

Morse Recital Hall

2:00-4:00 P.M. FRI. OCT. 5 STAGE COMBAT Learn the art of fighting on stage from School of Drama professor Michael Rossmy. Broadway Rehearsal Lofts, Dance Studio

7:00 P.M. FRI. OCT. 5 MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL The world’s first travelling global film festival comes to Yale.

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Yale Dramat’s newest show, “A Lie of the Mind,” centers around an abusive marital relationship and features a darker and more intense tone than previous Dramat shows. BY ERIC XIAO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As members of the Yale Dramat prepare for their newest show, they are grappling with the play’s emphasis on the dark side of love and memories. The Dramat’s latest experimental production, Sam Shepard’s 1985 play “A Lie of the Mind,” opens Thursday night. Directed by Kate Heaney ’14, the play will be performed at the Yale Repertory Theater and centers on two families in the American West that are connected by the abusive relationship between married

YALE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SEASON OPENER The YSO’s first concert of the year, featuring Thomas Murray, organ, and Matthew Griffith, clarinet. Woolsey Hall

6:30-8:30 P.M. TUES. OCT. 9 A SEPARATION (IRAN, 2011) Improve your movie knowledge with this Oscar winner for Best Foreign Film. Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium

couple Beth and Jake. President of the Dramat Board Meredith Davis ’13 explained that the serious themes of the production contrast with the more happygo-lucky Fall Mainstage, “The Drowsy Chaperone,” adding diversity to the season as a whole. While most of the cast members have participated in other shows during their time at Yale — including the similarly dark “The Marriage of Bette and Boo” and “Blood Brothers” — the three cast members interviewed all said that none of the themes in those works were as haunting or intense as those in “A Lie of the

By MAYA AVERBUCH CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The annual week long New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema (NEFIAC) showcases films from Latin America, Spain and Portugal in New Haven and nearby college towns. Margherita Tortora, the festival’s artistic director and New Haven coordinator, helps select films and invites speakers to the festival. NEFIAC, which is now in its third year, also hosts panel discussions about topics such as the promotion of human rights through film and the relationship between graphic advertising art and the film industry. The News interviewed Tortora, a senior lector in the Spanish and Portuguese department, after a screening of the Ecuadorian documentary “Undocumented” to explore her thoughts on planning the festival, which will screen its final films in New Haven today. is the reason for having a festiQ:valWhat like this in New England?

A

7:00-8:00 P.M. TUES. OCT. 9 SELLING THE SIXTIES: HOW MADISON AVENUE DREAMED THE DECADE A film screening and discussion for those who haven’t already had enough Mad Men. LC Hall, Rm. 101

Mind.” Several of the play’s eight actors portray characters whose lives and backgrounds are vastly different from their own. Stephanie Brandon ’13, who plays the older woman Lorraine , said getting into the mindset of her character was a “learning process.” In order to familiarize herself with the experiences of the elderly, Brandon recalled stories she had heard from family, friends and acquaintances who had gone through similar issues. Bonnie Antosh ’13, whose character Beth suffers brain trauma from the physical abuse in her marriage,

said that she did a great deal of reading on the medical and psychological effects of spousal abuse in addition to speaking with various rape crisis and domestic abuse centers in her home state of South Carolina. When Heaney and Head Producer Natalia Forbath ’15 submitted their proposal to stage “A Lie of the Mind,” the Dramat Executive Board was highly impressed with how Heaney explored the concept of memory in her plans for the production, Davis said. In Shepard’s story, the way the characters relate to their own memories impacts the relation-

ships they are able to form with each other, Marina Horiates ’15, who plays Sally, said, adding that her character’s interactions with her brothers are impacted by the way each relates to their father’s death. “[Heaney] was very articulate about her vision,” Davis said. The set will feature columns placed around the stage and a “memory wall” running along the back, both of which display photos from the chacters’ lives, Heaney said, explaining that the memories “create the very plane of where the characters are.” Assistant Stage Manager

Kathryn Osborn ’15 said on Monday night that the production was running smoothly and ahead of schedule. Horiates said that the actors are all incredibly dedicated and energetic and have developed strong relationships with each other, which has contributed to the play’s success. “I’m just so inspired by everyone in this cast,” she said. “A Lie of the Mind” will run from October 4 to October 6. Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

Behind the scenes of NEFIAC: An interview with Margherita Tortora

Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium

8:00-10:00 P.M. SAT. OCT. 6

YCBA unveils treasure

No Way, Juan José

BY ELAINA PLOTT CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

REDISCOVERING THE ENGLISH PRIZE: A CONVERSATION

NEW MUSIC NEW HAVEN Featuring the world premiere of Christopher Theofanidis’ “Allegory of the Cave.”

PAGE 7

The New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema started as an idea between me and my good friend Annia Bu, who is a Cuban actress; Leonel Limonte, who is the president of NEFIAC; and José Torrealba, from Providence. José Torrealba had the Providence Latin American Film Festival, and Annia was invited there to show her film “Los dioses rotos (Fallen Gods),” and since she is my friend, she invited me to go. I [have been] a cinephile for many years; I go to many film festivals. We were just talking over lunch with José and Leonel, and they said, “Gee, we know so many filmmakers between us, and so many wonderful works that hardly anybody gets to see. We should unite and have a regional film festival.”

QHow do you find the films?

A

. Most of the actors, directors and producers are my friends. I just say I want a Columbian movie, I contact

my friends who are Columbian actors, filmmakers and producers, and say, “Hey, what do you recommend from Columbia?” I’m very privileged in that way. I said, “I know all these wonderful people who do all these great creative works. It’s selfish to keep that to myself.” I want to share it with the community … We have several programs of short films, feature films — both comedy and drama — and we have documentaries like the one you are seeing today. We try to get a nice variety of films. None of the films are more than two years old, so they’re all new films, and we try to concentrate on emerging filmmakers.

are some of the works that you QWhat have seen at this film festival that you think really stand out?

A

The one on Saturday called “Aquí Entre Nos (Between Us)” by Patricia Martínez de Velasco. That won the highest audience award in Mexico. It’s her first feature film, and it’s already won many, many prizes. The main actor won the Best Actor Ariel, which is like the Mexican Oscar … Jordi Mariscal’s film, “Canela,” is a beautiful film for the whole family, but especially for young people, and he presented the film in Columbus School in Fair Haven to all the children, who just loved it. In fact, one of the comments of a 10-year-old there was that he wants to grow up to be a filmmaker. We always try to do activities with the city in the schools.… In the audience, we have a wonderful mixture of people from the university and the greater New Haven community. I think that is very important, because there are so many people who have never set foot in Yale, because it’s sort of like this untouchable space, [and there are] a lot of Yale students who really don’t know much about our community here; they live in a little bit of an isolated space. I love getting the greater New Haven community and the Yale community together.

QHow many countries are represented?

A

Seventeen countries in over 60 films during the whole week here at Yale.

MARIA DOLORES SANCHEZ-JAUREGUI ALPANES Senior Research Fellow at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art

“The English Prize” is divided into three parts. The first room contains images and documents detailing the history of the Westmorland itself, from its capture by French warships in 1779 to the journey of the artwork on board, which eventually landed in the hands of King Carlos III of Spain. The exhibit then explains the background story of the original owners of the artwork by outlining their European travels on the Grand Tour, the capstone of classical education among wealthy British students. The paintings, sculptures and other materials aboard the Westmorland fill the following two rooms.

“R

YCBA

This cinerarium, currently on display at the YCBA, was found on the Westmorland. But Wilcox said that many aspects of research into the Westmorland remain unfinished, an element of the tale that he tried to showcase in the “Grand Finish” room. “These three parts document just one milestone of the story. A lot more about the Westmorland remains to be identified,” Wilcox said. Meyers said this “unfinished” aspect of the Westmorland research is characteristic of several of the center’s exhibitions, though the Westmorland is “particularly special.” “The depth of richness and scholarship in this project among the international community is an incredible teaching tool, and for Yale students especially. In studying cultural and political phenomena of the past, one needs to look back to these critical moments to truly understand artistic culture,” Meyers said. Scholarly interest in the Westmorland began in the late 1990s when Nogué and his team of researchers uncovered original Roman urns aboard the ship. Surprised by how little information was known about the urns, he said he sent a letter to the Real Academia de Bellas Artes — where the bulk of the Westmorland artwork remains today — asking for more details. When scholars there, too, turned up empty, Nogué set out to uncover the origins behind the mate-

rials. But Nogué never predicted that his “detective work” would ultimately uncover 700 other works of art from the Westmorland. “We never imagined this would lead us to the rest of the cargo,” Nogué said. Thus commenced a major research endeavor. Nogué enlisted the help of Maria Dolores Sanchez-Jauregui Alpanes, senior research fellow at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, who Nogué said would prove invaluable in discovering the stories behind hundreds of the materials. “The challenge of uncovering who these people were and using 18th century archives to find out has been really rewarding,” Alpanes said. “It’s great to look at a piece that we began with no knowledge about and now be able to say what it is, who owned it, and where it was going.” Both Alpanes and Elisabeth Fairman, Senior Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at the British Art Center, assisted with the curation of the exhibit. “The English Prize: The Capture of the Westmorland, an Episode of the Grand Tour” will remain open from Oct. 4, 2012 to Jan. 13, 2013 in the Yale Center for British Art. Contact ELAINA PLOTT at elaina.plott@yale.edu .

Gallery 195 hosts local artists BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER

many films do you look at before QHow narrowing them down?

A

I’d say at least 300 films. I started in March.

what basis do you decide what QOn panel discussions will be about?

A

[The filmmakers] were here, and I wanted people to hear them speak and see the differences and similarities between making a film in Mexico, making a film in Cuba, making a film in the Dominican Republic, Argentina, Puerto Rico and Ecuador.

QWhat did they have to say?

A

Most countries now are finally passing a “law of cinema” to support making films in their country. Some of them, like Mexico, are starting to pass laws that movie theaters have to dedicate a certain percentage of their screening rooms to national cinema, which never was the case, because everything was always controlled by the distributors and the movie theaters. But in some places, this is starting. Jordi Mariscal was saying, “It’s so frustrating to make a movie in Mexico, and then hardly any of our movies are shown in movie theaters.”

role do film festivals like this QWhat have in supporting the filmmakers?

A

Well, we give them a place to show their films!

Contact MAYA AVERBUCH at maya.averbuch@yale.edu.

The challenge of uncovering who these people were and using 18th century archives to find out has been … rewarding.

BY SHON ARIEH-LERER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPY EDITOR

Margherita Tortora co-founded a regional film festival devoted to Ibero American cinema.

Two area artists came together in mid-September to present an interdisciplinary collection of canvas and textile works at New Haven’s Gallery 195. The catch? They had never met each other until the day their artwork was hung. The artists — Sarah Goncarova of New Haven and Thomas Edwards ART ’83 of Killingsworth, Conn. — came together to display their work after Debbie Hesse, programs director of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, invited them to be part of the council’s quarterly exhibit. Hesse said she saw potential for collaboration in the artists’ shared architectural backgrounds and naturalist styles. Despite these similarites, Goncarova said she felt the spacial constraints of Gallery 195 — located in a hallway in a New Haven bank building — forced her to adapt her artistic style, while Edwards said the work he displayed did not differ from his norm. Though each of her works on display at the gallery takes up most of the wall from floor to ceiling, Goncarova, who creates a countoured effect by fitting textiles such as cloth and yarn over a frame, said she had to scale down her art for this particular space. Her textiles are generally much larger, she said, with the biggest over 18 feet tall . Goncarova said she created all three of her display pieces specifically for the Gallery 195 show, but one of them, intended to invoke a rushing waterfall, did not turn out the way she had initially wanted it to. Despite her intentions, she said she feels that the end result was more akin to a trickle. Undaunted, she said she intends to pursue the idea further after the show. “Each piece of arts builds off of those before it,” she said. “I’m going to go back to this idea [of water] again

ANNELISA LEINBACH/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Sarah Goncarova explains her waterfall-like textile sculptures at Gallery 195. after this show, and this time, I’m going to get the rushing just right.” And though Goncarova had to go back to the drawing board to create art for the show, she said even her largest-scale works take no more than a month to complete. Edwards also created new works for the show, many of which were inspired by the daily walks he takes in the woods near his Killingworth home and by the work of Impressionist painters including Rembrandt and Van Gogh — portraits of whom Edwards painted for the exhibit. His displayed art consists mostly of small canvas landscape and portrait work. “I wanted to create something new for this show,” Edwards said. “About half of [the paintings] were created in the last few months.” Hesse said the two artists complement each other due to the simi-

lar themes in their work. “I strive to pair artists whose works create a dialogue about conceptual and formal art ideas and find intersections between the artworks that might not be apparent otherwise,” she said. Edwards taught at Yale from 1983 to 1985 and is now a professor at Central Connecticut State University. He has previously displayed work at the Smithsonian Institute and the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. Goncarova has shown her work in California and New York, in addition to several New Haven studios. Edwards’ and Goncarova’s work will hang at Gallery 195 — located at 195 Church Street — until December 14. Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .

acist” is the wrong word for “American Night: The Ballad of Juan José.” If English had a word for “not-racist,” that would also be the wrong word. If English had a word for “notn o t - ra c i s t” SHON that might ARIEHbe the right wo rd . But LERER English, language of brutYale Rep ish AngloOppressors, is not self-aware enough to have a word for “not-not-racist.” And so it takes a play like “American Night” to illustrate exactly what the term means. This is a play that is so self-congratulatory about being anti-racist that it accidentally manages a new and puzzling form of meta-racism. The play attempts to be a satirical romp through the parts of American history that you didn’t learn about in school — the oppressive and hypocritical parts — seen through the eyes of Juan José, a Mexican immigrant studying for his citizenship exam. But this conceit is ineffective because a contemporary Yale Rep audience — and this is a contemporary play — has in fact learned these parts of American history at great length. The play clearly panders to an educated liberal audience that already identifies itself as notracist: there are countless Mitt Romney jokes and Mormons are presented as intrinsically funny. So if the play is to be a successful satire of racism, it should subvert our educated liberal complacency and expose us as actually subtlety racist in some sort of revealing and funny way. Unfortunately, the form of racism “American Night” takes on is not-not-not subtle. The play is filled with obsolete racist archetypes. Most notable is a Japanese game-show host who brings on sumo wrestlers and instructs losing contestants to perform seppuku. The host and a couple other characters are played in unabashed stereotypes — by white and Asian actors alike — complete with bows and the phonetic switching of “L”s and “R”s. On a surface level, this is supposed to expose to the audience how ridiculous and untrue common portrayals of minorities can be. But in effect, the play offers us a chance to earnestly laugh at stereotypes, while assuring us that we’re not actually racist because were watching and presumably enjoying a hyper-liberal pro-immigrationrights play that has a Mexican protagonist, refers to America as “stolen Indian land” and features a female Muslim student proclaims “give me your young, give me your weak!” This play is a guilty pleasure without the guilt or the pleasure. To a critical audience with a sense of humor (me), the play is entertaining because it works as an unintentional satire of satire. The caricatures are as over the top as the message is confusing and heavy-handed. And where the play doesn’t derive humor from not-not-racism, it derives humor from references that were already worn out in 2001. Apparently anachronistic references to the mere existence of Google and texting count as topical humor. The actors, however, did the best they could with what the script demanded, and the set-design was very well thought-out and dynamic. Ouch. Shon Arieh-Lerer is a dramaturgy student and a junior in Ezra Stiles College. Contact SHON ARIEH-LERER at shon.arieh-lerer@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 5:30-6:30 P.M. WED. OCT. 3

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS RICHARD MONTOYA Richard Montoya founded the politically charged performance group Culture Clash in 1984 with five other performers. A self-proclaimed “Chicano,” his work critically examines the complex interplay between issues of race and class.

“A Lie” showcases dark storyline

A new exhibit at the Yale Center for British Art opening Thursday tells the story of an 18th century shipwreck and the artwork aboard that continues to engage researchers today. Organized by Scott Wilcox, Chief Curator of Art Collections at the British Art Center, “The English Prize: The Capture of the Westmorland, an Episode of the Grand Tour” will detail the voyages of a British merchant ship filled with 50 crates of artwork purchased by young British travelers. Professor José María Luzón Nogué of the University of Madrid, who contributed to the exhibit, said that the paintings include six late 18th century watercolors by John Robert Cozens, which have never been displayed before and uniquely showcase Cozens’ early style. Amy Meyers, director of the British Art Center, said the gallery will provide an excellent platform for the next stages of research on the Westmorland. “This exhibition will allow the new discoveries to move forward in such a significant way and will showcase them to Yale students and the public with extraordinary clarity and poignancy,” Meyers said.

Excited to check out the new YCBA exhibition on Thursday? Get a sneak peak with this talk by the experts. .Yale Center for British Art

4:00-5:00 P.M. THURS. OCT. 4 WORD MAGIC: VICTORIAN CHARM IN THEORY AND PRACTICE Academic colloquium focusing on Coleridge’s “Kubla Khan” and Christina Rossetti’s “Echo.” LC Hall, Rm. 319

6:30-7:30 P.M. THURS. OCT. 4 WAYS OF SEEING SOUND: THE INTEGRAL HOUSE. First lecture of the School of Architecture’s “Sound of Architecture” symposium. Hastings Hall, Paul Rudolph Hall

8:00-10:00 P.M. THURS. OCT. 4

Morse Recital Hall

2:00-4:00 P.M. FRI. OCT. 5 STAGE COMBAT Learn the art of fighting on stage from School of Drama professor Michael Rossmy. Broadway Rehearsal Lofts, Dance Studio

7:00 P.M. FRI. OCT. 5 MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL The world’s first travelling global film festival comes to Yale.

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Yale Dramat’s newest show, “A Lie of the Mind,” centers around an abusive marital relationship and features a darker and more intense tone than previous Dramat shows. BY ERIC XIAO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As members of the Yale Dramat prepare for their newest show, they are grappling with the play’s emphasis on the dark side of love and memories. The Dramat’s latest experimental production, Sam Shepard’s 1985 play “A Lie of the Mind,” opens Thursday night. Directed by Kate Heaney ’14, the play will be performed at the Yale Repertory Theater and centers on two families in the American West that are connected by the abusive relationship between married

YALE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SEASON OPENER The YSO’s first concert of the year, featuring Thomas Murray, organ, and Matthew Griffith, clarinet. Woolsey Hall

6:30-8:30 P.M. TUES. OCT. 9 A SEPARATION (IRAN, 2011) Improve your movie knowledge with this Oscar winner for Best Foreign Film. Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium

couple Beth and Jake. President of the Dramat Board Meredith Davis ’13 explained that the serious themes of the production contrast with the more happygo-lucky Fall Mainstage, “The Drowsy Chaperone,” adding diversity to the season as a whole. While most of the cast members have participated in other shows during their time at Yale — including the similarly dark “The Marriage of Bette and Boo” and “Blood Brothers” — the three cast members interviewed all said that none of the themes in those works were as haunting or intense as those in “A Lie of the

By MAYA AVERBUCH CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The annual week long New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema (NEFIAC) showcases films from Latin America, Spain and Portugal in New Haven and nearby college towns. Margherita Tortora, the festival’s artistic director and New Haven coordinator, helps select films and invites speakers to the festival. NEFIAC, which is now in its third year, also hosts panel discussions about topics such as the promotion of human rights through film and the relationship between graphic advertising art and the film industry. The News interviewed Tortora, a senior lector in the Spanish and Portuguese department, after a screening of the Ecuadorian documentary “Undocumented” to explore her thoughts on planning the festival, which will screen its final films in New Haven today. is the reason for having a festiQ:valWhat like this in New England?

A

7:00-8:00 P.M. TUES. OCT. 9 SELLING THE SIXTIES: HOW MADISON AVENUE DREAMED THE DECADE A film screening and discussion for those who haven’t already had enough Mad Men. LC Hall, Rm. 101

Mind.” Several of the play’s eight actors portray characters whose lives and backgrounds are vastly different from their own. Stephanie Brandon ’13, who plays the older woman Lorraine , said getting into the mindset of her character was a “learning process.” In order to familiarize herself with the experiences of the elderly, Brandon recalled stories she had heard from family, friends and acquaintances who had gone through similar issues. Bonnie Antosh ’13, whose character Beth suffers brain trauma from the physical abuse in her marriage,

said that she did a great deal of reading on the medical and psychological effects of spousal abuse in addition to speaking with various rape crisis and domestic abuse centers in her home state of South Carolina. When Heaney and Head Producer Natalia Forbath ’15 submitted their proposal to stage “A Lie of the Mind,” the Dramat Executive Board was highly impressed with how Heaney explored the concept of memory in her plans for the production, Davis said. In Shepard’s story, the way the characters relate to their own memories impacts the relation-

ships they are able to form with each other, Marina Horiates ’15, who plays Sally, said, adding that her character’s interactions with her brothers are impacted by the way each relates to their father’s death. “[Heaney] was very articulate about her vision,” Davis said. The set will feature columns placed around the stage and a “memory wall” running along the back, both of which display photos from the chacters’ lives, Heaney said, explaining that the memories “create the very plane of where the characters are.” Assistant Stage Manager

Kathryn Osborn ’15 said on Monday night that the production was running smoothly and ahead of schedule. Horiates said that the actors are all incredibly dedicated and energetic and have developed strong relationships with each other, which has contributed to the play’s success. “I’m just so inspired by everyone in this cast,” she said. “A Lie of the Mind” will run from October 4 to October 6. Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

Behind the scenes of NEFIAC: An interview with Margherita Tortora

Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium

8:00-10:00 P.M. SAT. OCT. 6

YCBA unveils treasure

No Way, Juan José

BY ELAINA PLOTT CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

REDISCOVERING THE ENGLISH PRIZE: A CONVERSATION

NEW MUSIC NEW HAVEN Featuring the world premiere of Christopher Theofanidis’ “Allegory of the Cave.”

PAGE 7

The New England Festival of Ibero American Cinema started as an idea between me and my good friend Annia Bu, who is a Cuban actress; Leonel Limonte, who is the president of NEFIAC; and José Torrealba, from Providence. José Torrealba had the Providence Latin American Film Festival, and Annia was invited there to show her film “Los dioses rotos (Fallen Gods),” and since she is my friend, she invited me to go. I [have been] a cinephile for many years; I go to many film festivals. We were just talking over lunch with José and Leonel, and they said, “Gee, we know so many filmmakers between us, and so many wonderful works that hardly anybody gets to see. We should unite and have a regional film festival.”

QHow do you find the films?

A

. Most of the actors, directors and producers are my friends. I just say I want a Columbian movie, I contact

my friends who are Columbian actors, filmmakers and producers, and say, “Hey, what do you recommend from Columbia?” I’m very privileged in that way. I said, “I know all these wonderful people who do all these great creative works. It’s selfish to keep that to myself.” I want to share it with the community … We have several programs of short films, feature films — both comedy and drama — and we have documentaries like the one you are seeing today. We try to get a nice variety of films. None of the films are more than two years old, so they’re all new films, and we try to concentrate on emerging filmmakers.

are some of the works that you QWhat have seen at this film festival that you think really stand out?

A

The one on Saturday called “Aquí Entre Nos (Between Us)” by Patricia Martínez de Velasco. That won the highest audience award in Mexico. It’s her first feature film, and it’s already won many, many prizes. The main actor won the Best Actor Ariel, which is like the Mexican Oscar … Jordi Mariscal’s film, “Canela,” is a beautiful film for the whole family, but especially for young people, and he presented the film in Columbus School in Fair Haven to all the children, who just loved it. In fact, one of the comments of a 10-year-old there was that he wants to grow up to be a filmmaker. We always try to do activities with the city in the schools.… In the audience, we have a wonderful mixture of people from the university and the greater New Haven community. I think that is very important, because there are so many people who have never set foot in Yale, because it’s sort of like this untouchable space, [and there are] a lot of Yale students who really don’t know much about our community here; they live in a little bit of an isolated space. I love getting the greater New Haven community and the Yale community together.

QHow many countries are represented?

A

Seventeen countries in over 60 films during the whole week here at Yale.

MARIA DOLORES SANCHEZ-JAUREGUI ALPANES Senior Research Fellow at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art

“The English Prize” is divided into three parts. The first room contains images and documents detailing the history of the Westmorland itself, from its capture by French warships in 1779 to the journey of the artwork on board, which eventually landed in the hands of King Carlos III of Spain. The exhibit then explains the background story of the original owners of the artwork by outlining their European travels on the Grand Tour, the capstone of classical education among wealthy British students. The paintings, sculptures and other materials aboard the Westmorland fill the following two rooms.

“R

YCBA

This cinerarium, currently on display at the YCBA, was found on the Westmorland. But Wilcox said that many aspects of research into the Westmorland remain unfinished, an element of the tale that he tried to showcase in the “Grand Finish” room. “These three parts document just one milestone of the story. A lot more about the Westmorland remains to be identified,” Wilcox said. Meyers said this “unfinished” aspect of the Westmorland research is characteristic of several of the center’s exhibitions, though the Westmorland is “particularly special.” “The depth of richness and scholarship in this project among the international community is an incredible teaching tool, and for Yale students especially. In studying cultural and political phenomena of the past, one needs to look back to these critical moments to truly understand artistic culture,” Meyers said. Scholarly interest in the Westmorland began in the late 1990s when Nogué and his team of researchers uncovered original Roman urns aboard the ship. Surprised by how little information was known about the urns, he said he sent a letter to the Real Academia de Bellas Artes — where the bulk of the Westmorland artwork remains today — asking for more details. When scholars there, too, turned up empty, Nogué set out to uncover the origins behind the mate-

rials. But Nogué never predicted that his “detective work” would ultimately uncover 700 other works of art from the Westmorland. “We never imagined this would lead us to the rest of the cargo,” Nogué said. Thus commenced a major research endeavor. Nogué enlisted the help of Maria Dolores Sanchez-Jauregui Alpanes, senior research fellow at the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, who Nogué said would prove invaluable in discovering the stories behind hundreds of the materials. “The challenge of uncovering who these people were and using 18th century archives to find out has been really rewarding,” Alpanes said. “It’s great to look at a piece that we began with no knowledge about and now be able to say what it is, who owned it, and where it was going.” Both Alpanes and Elisabeth Fairman, Senior Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at the British Art Center, assisted with the curation of the exhibit. “The English Prize: The Capture of the Westmorland, an Episode of the Grand Tour” will remain open from Oct. 4, 2012 to Jan. 13, 2013 in the Yale Center for British Art. Contact ELAINA PLOTT at elaina.plott@yale.edu .

Gallery 195 hosts local artists BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER

many films do you look at before QHow narrowing them down?

A

I’d say at least 300 films. I started in March.

what basis do you decide what QOn panel discussions will be about?

A

[The filmmakers] were here, and I wanted people to hear them speak and see the differences and similarities between making a film in Mexico, making a film in Cuba, making a film in the Dominican Republic, Argentina, Puerto Rico and Ecuador.

QWhat did they have to say?

A

Most countries now are finally passing a “law of cinema” to support making films in their country. Some of them, like Mexico, are starting to pass laws that movie theaters have to dedicate a certain percentage of their screening rooms to national cinema, which never was the case, because everything was always controlled by the distributors and the movie theaters. But in some places, this is starting. Jordi Mariscal was saying, “It’s so frustrating to make a movie in Mexico, and then hardly any of our movies are shown in movie theaters.”

role do film festivals like this QWhat have in supporting the filmmakers?

A

Well, we give them a place to show their films!

Contact MAYA AVERBUCH at maya.averbuch@yale.edu.

The challenge of uncovering who these people were and using 18th century archives to find out has been … rewarding.

BY SHON ARIEH-LERER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPY EDITOR

Margherita Tortora co-founded a regional film festival devoted to Ibero American cinema.

Two area artists came together in mid-September to present an interdisciplinary collection of canvas and textile works at New Haven’s Gallery 195. The catch? They had never met each other until the day their artwork was hung. The artists — Sarah Goncarova of New Haven and Thomas Edwards ART ’83 of Killingsworth, Conn. — came together to display their work after Debbie Hesse, programs director of the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, invited them to be part of the council’s quarterly exhibit. Hesse said she saw potential for collaboration in the artists’ shared architectural backgrounds and naturalist styles. Despite these similarites, Goncarova said she felt the spacial constraints of Gallery 195 — located in a hallway in a New Haven bank building — forced her to adapt her artistic style, while Edwards said the work he displayed did not differ from his norm. Though each of her works on display at the gallery takes up most of the wall from floor to ceiling, Goncarova, who creates a countoured effect by fitting textiles such as cloth and yarn over a frame, said she had to scale down her art for this particular space. Her textiles are generally much larger, she said, with the biggest over 18 feet tall . Goncarova said she created all three of her display pieces specifically for the Gallery 195 show, but one of them, intended to invoke a rushing waterfall, did not turn out the way she had initially wanted it to. Despite her intentions, she said she feels that the end result was more akin to a trickle. Undaunted, she said she intends to pursue the idea further after the show. “Each piece of arts builds off of those before it,” she said. “I’m going to go back to this idea [of water] again

ANNELISA LEINBACH/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Sarah Goncarova explains her waterfall-like textile sculptures at Gallery 195. after this show, and this time, I’m going to get the rushing just right.” And though Goncarova had to go back to the drawing board to create art for the show, she said even her largest-scale works take no more than a month to complete. Edwards also created new works for the show, many of which were inspired by the daily walks he takes in the woods near his Killingworth home and by the work of Impressionist painters including Rembrandt and Van Gogh — portraits of whom Edwards painted for the exhibit. His displayed art consists mostly of small canvas landscape and portrait work. “I wanted to create something new for this show,” Edwards said. “About half of [the paintings] were created in the last few months.” Hesse said the two artists complement each other due to the simi-

lar themes in their work. “I strive to pair artists whose works create a dialogue about conceptual and formal art ideas and find intersections between the artworks that might not be apparent otherwise,” she said. Edwards taught at Yale from 1983 to 1985 and is now a professor at Central Connecticut State University. He has previously displayed work at the Smithsonian Institute and the Library of Congress in Washington D.C. Goncarova has shown her work in California and New York, in addition to several New Haven studios. Edwards’ and Goncarova’s work will hang at Gallery 195 — located at 195 Church Street — until December 14. Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .

acist” is the wrong word for “American Night: The Ballad of Juan José.” If English had a word for “not-racist,” that would also be the wrong word. If English had a word for “notn o t - ra c i s t” SHON that might ARIEHbe the right wo rd . But LERER English, language of brutYale Rep ish AngloOppressors, is not self-aware enough to have a word for “not-not-racist.” And so it takes a play like “American Night” to illustrate exactly what the term means. This is a play that is so self-congratulatory about being anti-racist that it accidentally manages a new and puzzling form of meta-racism. The play attempts to be a satirical romp through the parts of American history that you didn’t learn about in school — the oppressive and hypocritical parts — seen through the eyes of Juan José, a Mexican immigrant studying for his citizenship exam. But this conceit is ineffective because a contemporary Yale Rep audience — and this is a contemporary play — has in fact learned these parts of American history at great length. The play clearly panders to an educated liberal audience that already identifies itself as notracist: there are countless Mitt Romney jokes and Mormons are presented as intrinsically funny. So if the play is to be a successful satire of racism, it should subvert our educated liberal complacency and expose us as actually subtlety racist in some sort of revealing and funny way. Unfortunately, the form of racism “American Night” takes on is not-not-not subtle. The play is filled with obsolete racist archetypes. Most notable is a Japanese game-show host who brings on sumo wrestlers and instructs losing contestants to perform seppuku. The host and a couple other characters are played in unabashed stereotypes — by white and Asian actors alike — complete with bows and the phonetic switching of “L”s and “R”s. On a surface level, this is supposed to expose to the audience how ridiculous and untrue common portrayals of minorities can be. But in effect, the play offers us a chance to earnestly laugh at stereotypes, while assuring us that we’re not actually racist because were watching and presumably enjoying a hyper-liberal pro-immigrationrights play that has a Mexican protagonist, refers to America as “stolen Indian land” and features a female Muslim student proclaims “give me your young, give me your weak!” This play is a guilty pleasure without the guilt or the pleasure. To a critical audience with a sense of humor (me), the play is entertaining because it works as an unintentional satire of satire. The caricatures are as over the top as the message is confusing and heavy-handed. And where the play doesn’t derive humor from not-not-racism, it derives humor from references that were already worn out in 2001. Apparently anachronistic references to the mere existence of Google and texting count as topical humor. The actors, however, did the best they could with what the script demanded, and the set-design was very well thought-out and dynamic. Ouch. Shon Arieh-Lerer is a dramaturgy student and a junior in Ezra Stiles College. Contact SHON ARIEH-LERER at shon.arieh-lerer@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

NEWS

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

657

Number of signatories on Economists for Romney Economists for Romney is a statement pledging support for presidential candidate Mitt Romney’s campaign signed by economists from around the nation, including Brown professor George Borts.

THE DARTMOUTH

Ivy presidential searches coincide BY STEPHANIE MCFEETERS STAFF REPORTER With Yale University President Richard Levin and Princeton University President Shirley Tilghman stepping down at the end of the academic year, three Ivy League schools are currently seeking new college presidents. Dartmouth Presidential Search Committee Chair Bill Helman said that while the universities’ searches may impact one another, the committee is focused on choosing a candidate that fits the college’s unique needs. The Presidential Search Committee was formed in May after former College President Jim Yong Kim was appointed to lead the World Bank and Carol Folt, formerly the college’s provost, was appointed interim president for the 2012-’13 school year. Levin announced his intention to step down in August, while Tilghman announced her decision in September. Brown University also recently completed a presidential search after former President Ruth Simmons announced her decision to step down in September 2011. Christina Paxson, former dean of

the Woodrow Wilson School of International and Public Affairs DARTMOUTH at Princeton, was announced as Brown’s 19th president in March after a six-month search process. She assumed the university’s top position on July 1, the same day Folt became interim president. Helman said he consulted administrators at Brown and other peer institutions that recently completed presidential searches to discuss best practices and has communicated with members of search committees at Yale and Princeton. Approximately 300 American colleges and universities conduct presidential searches each year, according to higher education consulting firm AGB Search Principal Jamie Ferrare. Given the high turnover rate of high-level college administrators, candidates are occasionally considered by several institutions, but it is rare for the same candidate to be considered in the final stages of two uni-

versities’ searches, he said. Yale, Princeton and Dartmouth’s simultaneous presidential searches may increase competition in attracting certain highly visible candidates, AGB Search consultant Jim Davis said. AGB Search is not involved in any of the current Ivy League presidential searches. Even though they are highly demanding, Ivy League presidencies are among the most highly sought positions in academia, according to National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities Communications Director Tony Pals. Each institution’s unique attributes play a major role in its final selection of a president, and each school will attract its own individual pool of candidates, Ferrare said. “It becomes a matter of fit,” Ferrare said. AGB Search consultant Bruce Alton said that while there may be overlap among Dartmouth, Princeton and Yale’s candidate pools, it is unlikely that all three institutions will end up pursuing the same individual. While there may be a number of candidates qualified to lead a particular institu-

tion, choosing the right president requires a match between the candidate and the specific school. Just as Dartmouth students may have applied to multiple universities, in the end, they chose to attend the college due to its unique attributes, he said.

Being compared to these other schools further underscores the ways in which we are unique. JUSTIN ANDERSON Director of Dartmouth Media Relations The three schools differ in many ways, and candidates interviewed by the Presidential Search Committee have expressed interest in Dartmouth as a distinct institution, Helman said. “The candidates the committee has spoken with are really excited about what Dartmouth is and what it can be,” Helman said. Since Princeton and Yale announced that they are seeking new university presidents, there

has been increased media attention on the searches, according to Director of Media Relations for the College Justin Anderson. “Being compared to these other schools further underscores the ways in which we are unique, and I think that will ultimately serve us well,” Anderson said. In conducting university presidential searches, hiring committees are considering a wider base of candidates than in previous searches, Davis said. Potential candidates for university presidents include university provosts or other top university administrators, education agency officials, leaders of national organizations in the field of higher education and other individuals with management and fundraising experience, he said. Search committees sometimes seek nontraditional candidates such as corporate executives or military leaders whose main careers have been outside the realm of higher education. Ivy League universities often consider provosts from other schools in the Ivy League to be strong candidates, Davis said. Prior affiliation to a school or any of its constituencies can also give

candidates an advantage in the process. Individuals are attracted to university presidencies for the leadership opportunities that they provide, Alton said. “People don’t come into education for the money,” he said. Patricia Lee said that the new president must be aware of the college’s culture. “He’s managing the people who are managing us, so having an understanding of the college and a sensitivity to student culture is really important in setting the tone,” she said. Kim’s departure after three years as college president is atypical when compared to other university presidents, according to Davis. Although average university presidential tenures have shortened over the past few decades due to increased demands on presidents, the average tenure is five to seven years, and institutions typically seek presidents who will serve seven to 10 years, he said. Upon stepping down at the end of this academic year, Levin will have served as Yale’s president for 20 years and Tilghman will have led Princeton for 12 years.

T H E D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

T H E B R O W N D A I LY H E R A L D

Penn approves ASL minor

Econ prof declares support for Romney

BY HUIZHONG WU STAFF REPORTER As students settle into their class schedules with the drop period coming to a close Oct. 12, the American Sign Language/Deaf Studies minor is also settling in as an officially recognized academic track. The six-course minor was approved by a unanimous vote by the School of Arts and Sciences faculty last April, becoming the first program of its kind in the Ivy League. According to ASL Program Coordinator Jami Fisher, who is also a lecturer within the department, the minor focuses heavily on advanced ASL and linguistics courses. Among the program requirements, the minor features an AcademicallyBased Community Service component — a capstone course in which students collaborate with the Pennsylvania School for the Deaf. The program is also highly interdisciplinary, Fisher added. Students may apply one credit from a course outside of ASL — in topics ranging from the psychology of languages to biomedical engineering — to complete the program. “We have students taking ASL that come from all different major backgrounds, and there are often courses pertinent to both their major and ASL,” she said. “We want to show how ASL is really useful in all facets of research and professional experiences.” While Fisher said most students have not formally declared the minor yet, she added that many have expressed an interest in pursuing it. “We have a very large incoming

cohort of ASL 1 students. All four sections are full,” she said of one of the first requirements for pursuing the minor. T h o u g h PENN upperclassmen may retroactively declare the ASL/ Deaf Studies minor, Fisher said she does not know of any students graduating this school year who will do so. Most of the students who have indicated interest in the minor are currently sophomores or juniors. Many of these individuals are members of Penn in Hand — a student

group for those interested in ASL and deaf culture. Penn in Hand was heavily involved in petitioning for the minor’s approval last semester. According to Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences Dennis DeTurck, the level of student engagement in developing the minor has been part of what makes the program so unique. “It’s really a tribute to the hard work of the students … who didn’t give up on the program,” he said. Penn in Hand President and college junior Connor Bartholomew said she is currently trying to plan out the rest of her courses so that she will have enough time to earn the ASL/Deaf Studies minor.

IDREES SYED/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Penn students Kelby Reed and Connor McLaren take an ASL/Deaf Studies course in Williams Hall, marking the first semester of the ASL/Deaf Studies minor.

BY MARIA BASHKTOVA STAFF WRITER Professor of Economics George Borts recently signed his name to a statement of support for Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s proposed economic policy, joining more than 640 economists, including six Nobel Laureates, on the list titled “Economists for Romney.” The statement of support outlines Romney’s proposed fiscal policies, which include cutting taxes, limiting federal spending to 20 percent of the economy to cut down on the federal debt, reducing the growth of Social Security and Medicare, decreasing federal economic regulations, reforming national health care legislation and encouraging the use of domestic energy resources. Disappointment with the current administration’s economic policy, the importance of this presidential election and his respect for other economists who signed the statement factored into his decision to add his name, Borts said. Roberto Serrano, chair of the economics department, declined to comment on Borts’ endorsement. Many other faculty members have taken public stances to support liberal political candidates and liberal policy, wrote Terrence George ’13, president of the Brown Republicans, in an email to The Herald. These have included professors who have protested the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps at Brown, supported the Occupy movement and signed leftist political petitions, he

BROWN

said. George added that Borts should receive “the same level of quiet acceptance” from the Brown community as members of the faculty who voice liberal

views. Though Borts’ support for a Republican presidential candidate may place him in the minority of the University community, differing views can foster intellectual diversity and discussion, said Sofia Fernandez Gold ’14, president of the Brown Democrats. Fernandez Gold said that she would be happy taking classes from professors of all political inclinations, as long as the professor’s personal views do not get in the way of teaching or result in discrimination. “We can only truly understand why we believe what we do when our ideas are challenged, and we’re forced to defend them,” she said. “If I always stayed out of a classroom where a conservative professor was teaching, I don’t think I would learn a lot.” “I try to stay on the economics, and also, if I do deal with issues that are controversial, I try to be sure that I will assign both positions. I don’t feel as if I’m there to proselytize,” Borts said. But he added that he will voice his opinion if asked and that the atmosphere at the University is one of free speech, which leads to healthy discussion among faculty and students.


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 ¡ yaledailynews.com

NATION AND WORLD

“Tracy took advantage of my white guilt, which is to be used only for good like overtipping and supporting Barack Obama!� LIZ LEMON “30 ROCK� CHARACTER

Romney sees poor reviews NYPD monitors Facebook

BY DAVID ESPO ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — On the eve of the first presidential debate, the early autumn Republican reviews are in for Mitt Romney’s presidential campaign, and they are not pretty. In some states, candidates who share the Nov. 6 ballot with the former Massachusetts governor already have taken steps to establish independence from him. Party strategists predict more will follow, perhaps as soon as next week, unless Romney can dispel fears that he is headed for defeat despite the weak economy that works against President Barack Obama’s prospects. Former Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, who headed the Republican Party when it won control of Congress in the 1990s, said disapprovingly over the weekend that Romney’s campaign has been focusing on polling, political process and campaign management. “It’s about everything but the issues. It’s about everything but Obama’s policies and the failures of those policies,� he said. Matthew Dowd, who was a senior political adviser to President George W. Bush, said the Romney campaign was almost guilty of political malpractice over the summer and during the two political conventions. It “left the playing field totally to Barack Obama and the Obama campaign� and “`basically set the tone for the final 60 days of this campaign, which put them behind after the conventions,� said Dowd, who worked for Democrats before signing on with Bush, a Republican. He and Barbour both spoke on ABC. Ed Gillespie, a senior adviser to Romney, defended the cam-

BY TOM HAYS ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — Police investigating two gangs called the Very Cripsy Gangsters and the Rockstarz didn’t need to spend all their time pounding the pavement for leads. Instead, they fired up their computers and followed the trash talk on Facebook. “Rockstarz up 3-0,� one suspect boasted — a reference to the body count from a bloody turf war between the Brooklyn gangs that ultimately resulted in 49 arrests last month. Authorities in New York say a new generation of gang members is increasingly using social media to boast of their exploits and issue taunts and challenges that result in violence. And police and prosecutors have responded over the past several years by closely monitoring Facebook and other sites for leads and evidence. On Tuesday, New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly announced plans to beef up the NYPD’s cyber crackdown by expanding the use of aggressive online investigative tactics and doubling the size of the department’s gang unit to 300 investigators. The reinforcements will focus less on established gangs like the Bloods and Crips and more on loosely knit groups of teenagers who stake out a certain block or section of a housing project as their turf and exact vengeance on those who trespass or fail to show the proper respect. “By capitalizing on the irresistible urge of these suspects to brag about their murderous exploits on Facebook, detectives

BRIAN OLLER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, speaks in Pueblo, Colo. paign in a conference call with reporters on Monday. “Our message is very clear, which is we cannot afford four more years like the last four years. And we need a real recovery, we need policies that are going to help,� he said. Republicans say there is time for Romney to steady his campaign but only if he acts quickly. Recent public polls show Obama moving out to a modest lead in most if not all of the battleground states where the race will be decided. But Republicans with access to Romney’s polling data said Tuesday that he has begun regaining some support among independent voters, enabling him to cut into

the president’s advantage. It is unclear how long congressional candidates are willing to wait for a turnaround. Several Republican strategists point to this week, which includes the debate and Friday’s release of September unemployment figures. Some Republicans who are in periodic contact with the campaign say Romney’s strategists have concluded that a recent uptick in public optimism, coming on top of Obama’s success to date, complicates the attempt to defeat the president solely on the basis of pocketbook issues. In recent days, Romney has emphasized criticism of the

president’s foreign policy, particularly in the Middle East, where a terrorist attack at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, left Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans dead. Barbour, echoing what others say privately, was dismissive of the suggestion that Romney should spread his campaign focus. The public is “concerned about how backwards the Middle East has gone during the last year. But they’re much more concerned about their children having jobs, about them being able to pay for their health insurance, for $3.85 gasoline,� he said.

used social media to draw a virtual map of their criminal activity over the last three years,� the commissioner said in remarks prepared for delivery at a law enforcement convention in San Diego. Examples of the public displays of digital bravado abound. In the Brooklyn case, suspects sought to intimidate informants by posting court documents containing their names, authorities said. In another throwdown, the Rockstarz posted a photo of a Very Cripsy member and the comment, “He is scared. Look at him.� Police say much of the potentially incriminating material they gather can be found on Facebook profiles that are public. But as part of its new, stepped-up efforts, the department will refine and expand use of a tactic instrumental in the three-year Brooklyn gang investigation — having officers adopt Internet aliases, create phony profiles and seek to “friend� suspects to gain access to nonpublic information, officials said. Donna Lieberman, executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union, said the NYPD “has the right, indeed the obligation, to pursue effective avenues for investigating criminal gang activity, and that includes using Facebook and other social media.� But she said such methods must be closely monitored so they don’t become “a vehicle for entrapment or unauthorized surveillance.� Police and prosecutors insist they are following strict legal protocols.

Georgian president concedes BY LYNN BERRY ASSOCIATED PRESS TBILISI, Georgia — Defying expectations, President Mikhail Saakashvili conceded Tuesday that his party had lost Georgia’s parliamentary election and his opponent had the right to become prime minister, setting the stage for political turmoil in the final year of his presidency. The new Georgian government will be led by billionaire businessman and philanthropist Bidzina Ivanishvili, who made his fortune in Russia and until recently was little-known to the 4.5 million people in his homeland on the Black Sea. In one notable accomplishment, it was the first time in Georgia’s post-Soviet history that the government changed by the ballot box rather than through revolution. Saakashvili came to power through the peaceful Rose Revolution after a rigged parliamentary vote in 2003.

By conceding defeat even before the results of Monday’s election were released, the 44-year-old Saakashvili defied the opposition’s expectations that he would cling to power at all costs and preserved his legacy as a pro-Western leader who brought democracy to the former Soviet republic. He also prevented potential violence on the emotionally charged streets of the capital, Tbilisi, where support for the opposition Georgian Dream coalition is strongest. Opposition supporters began celebrating as soon as the polls closed, and the mood could have turned ugly very quickly if they thought they were being deprived of a victory. The 56-year-old Ivanishvili, meanwhile, went immediately on the attack. Speaking at a televised news conference, he declared that most of the president’s widely praised reforms were a joke and said Saakashvili had deceived the Americans

into believing he was a democrat. He then called on Saakashvili to resign. “I don’t think our political battle was caused by any personal antagonism on my part toward Saakashvili,� he said. “But I have always blamed Saakashvili for what has gone wrong in Georgia, and I can repeat that today: This man’s ideology has established a climate of lies, violence and torture.� During his nearly nine years in power, Saakashvili has pushed through economic and political reforms and attracted international investment that has led to dramatic economic growth. Poverty and unemployment, however, remain painfully high. Still, many Georgians have turned against Saakashvili in recent years. Many accuse his United National Movement party — which has controlled not only the government and Parliament but also the courts and prosecutor’s office — of exercising authoritarian powers.

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

SPORTS

Sports IQ: In sailing, what is a “close haul” A close haul is a point of sail in which the boat is sailing as close to the wind as it can and its sails are trimmed very tightly.

Two Bulldogs qualify for Nationals BY J.R. REED CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Despite light wind and overcast and rainy conditions, Yale women’s sailors captain Emily Billing ’13 and Claire Dennis ’13 finished in the top five during the Intercollegiate Sailing Association’s (ICSA) New England Singlehanded Championship this past weekend. They will advance to ICSA Nationals for the fourth consecutive season.

SAILING Eighteen sailors from 12 northeastern schools competed in 13 individual races last Saturday and Sunday during the event, hosted by Connecticut College at the mouth of the Thames River. Dennis placed third, while Billing finished in fourth and fellow Bulldog Urska Kosir ’15 finished just shy of the qualifying mark. Kosir ended the regatta in sixth place, two points behind the fifth-place finisher. Assistant Coach Bill Healy said the qualifying races went relatively well, although the Elis fell short on their goal of advancing all three sailors to Nationals. This marks the fourth consecutive year that Dennis and Billing have qualified for Singlehanded Nationals. Both sailors have been selected to represent the Bulldogs at the New England Championship for the past four years. Dennis said the weekend’s weather conditions went against her sailing strengths and made her races a lot more stressful than she had anticipated. “It was light, and, though it wasn’t absurdly shifty, there wasn’t a straight breeze at all,” Dennis said. “I would say the one thing that did play to my advantage was current, having grown up in San Francisco and understanding how the current could help me. But light air is just not my strength.” After day one of the two-day event, Dennis was in fifth place, Billing in seventh and Kosir in sixth. Dennis said that both she and Billing did not look at the results

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Two Bulldog sailors, captain Emily Billing ’13 and Claire Dennis ’13, advanced to ICSA Nationals for the fourth consecutive season. or think about the standings. “The first day was light, and I did not do very well until the last five races on Sunday when the breeze came in,” Billing said. “On Sunday, I just tried to start from scratch and not let previous races get into my head.” Despite a slow Saturday start during the first six races, Dennis and Billing regained their composure and, with sunny conditions surfacing on Sunday, sailed their way back into qualifying positions. “It was really close,” Healy said. “Only Dennis was in on

Saturday. Billing definitely had to make the biggest comeback, after being 20 points out at the end of Saturday. Dennis said it was really nice for Emily and her to qualify together for their fourth and final time together. Emily had a massively impressive last five races to qualify.” In the past three years at Nationals, Dennis has experienced success, finishing second her freshman year, winning the championship her sophomore year and finishing second last year. In addition, Billing finished sixth her freshman year, fourth

Strong weekend for Elis CROSS COUNTRY FROM PAGE 12 tain Kevin Lunn ’13, Kevin Dooney ’16 and Tim Hillas ’13 rounded out the top five for the Bulldogs. Lunn, Dooney and Hillas finished 61st, 67th and 76th overall, respectively. According to Lunn, both Nuss-

baum and Goutos “ran extremely well,” posting times that served as significant personal records. Harkins echoed the sentiment. “We were led obviously by Matt Nussbaum, who just had definitely the race of his career to this point,” Harkins said. “Demetri Goutos had the race of his career at this

point … We had a lot of good runs.” The men’s team will continue its season next Saturday at the New England Championships, while the women will compete at the same meet next Sunday. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

her sophomore year and third last year. Hosted by the University of California, Nationals will take place near the Belmont Pier in Long Beach, Calif. during the first weekend of November. “Long Beach could be any conditions at that time of year in Southern Calif.,” Dennis said. “But I think for both of us Nationals has always been a better regatta than our qualifier. It’s also a bit less stressful at Nationals because there’s no pressure to qualify for the next step.” Billing said she feels confi-

dent in the girls’ chances to finish their last college Nationals experience with strong performances. In the next month, the two Bulldogs will prepare to race against the 20 most elite collegiate laser radial sailors from around the country. Healy hopes the girls will practice twice a week with one of the three coaches to do their own practices separate from the rest of the team leading up to Nationals. The week before the Championship, the girls will be practicing every day.

“If we get enough practice, I’m confident we’ll be good,” Healy said. “The windier it is, the better the girls do. If wind picks up during Nationals, they’ll be the ones to beat.” Besides Dennis and Billing, the Yale men’s team captain Cam Cullman ’13 will represent Yale at Nationals on the men’s side. The Elis will participate in Women’s Navy Fall Intersectional this weekend at Navy. Contact J.R. REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

Yale stumbles on road FIELD HOCKEY FROM PAGE 12 last weekend, Yale failed to find the back of the net against Cornell (2–6, 2–1 Ivy), losing in a 1–0 overtime battle. Despite the Bulldogs’ 4–2 shot advantage in overtime play, the Big Red were able to keep the Bulldogs scoreless and find a winning goal of their own. Yale goalkeeper Emily Cain ’14 tallied eight saves against Cornell, while boasting a .742 save percentage overall. Yale has only lost four games to conference competitors over the past three seasons, including Saturday’s loss and an 8-0 shutout at the hands of Princeton last weekend. Cornell is currently tied for second

place in the Ivy League standings. Sharp said the team is unfazed by the outcomes of this weekend’s games and is looking forward to the rest of the season. “Our goal for the rest of the season is to approach every game, league or non-league, with the same positive attitude,” Sharp said. Yale will continue its regular season play this Saturday at No. 5 Virginia (11–2, 2–0 ACC) and this Sunday at Dartmouth (5-4, 2-1 Ivy). Both games are scheduled to begin at 12 p.m. Contact DINÉE DORAME at dinee.dorame@yale.edu .

Bulldogs bring Macdonald Cup home M. GOLF FROM PAGE 12

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s team placed seventh and the women’s team placed fourth at the Paul Short Invitational.

ally nothing,” Kushner said. “I wasn’t too worried that we were three back.” Kushner also noted that the course played the easiest that he had ever seen it play on Saturday due to its layout and the weather before the tournament. But he said he knew that the course would be extended for the tournament’s final day on Sunday. This served as an advantage to the Elis, who practice on the course at its most difficult. While the change in course layout on Sunday seemed to bother most teams in the tournament, the Bulldogs posted the same score on Sunday as they had on the shorter course on Saturday. Kushner finished the round a stroke under par, while Sam Bernstein ’14, Joe Willis ’16 and Davenport scored rounds of even par, one over par and two over par, respectively. As the men’s team competed at home, the women’s team traveled to Pennsylvania State University to compete at the Nittany Lion Invitational. Despite posting several solid individual rounds over the three days, the Elis ultimately ended in ninth-place with a score of

907 among a strong field of 17 teams. After Friday’s first round, the Bulldogs found themselves in twelfth place on the leaderboard with a score of 312. “As a team I don’t think we did very well the first day,” Shreya Ghei ’15 said. But the team showed huge improvement the next day, Ghei remarked, posting a score of 298 on Saturday, 14 strokes better than its Friday round. The team continued itsimproved play on Sunday, following up Saturday’s performance with a 297. While the team worked on its short game in the interval between Friday and Saturday’s rounds, women’s team head coach Chawwadee Rompothong said that the team still could have scored lower. “We didn’t take advantage of the par fives,” Rompothong said. The women’s team will continue its season next weekend at the Lady Pirate Intercollegiate in North Carolina, while the men’s team will next compete on Oct. 13 at the Big Five in Pennsylvania. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .


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“We were pretty confident that we’re at the level where we should be competing with nationally ranked teams.” NIHAL KAYALI ’13 WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY

DENISE DENIS AND CHERYL PETERSON NEW ADDITIONS TO SOFTBALL STAFF First-year head coach Jen Goodwin has rounded out her staff by adding assistant coach Denise Denis and volunteer assistant Cheryl Peterson. Denis is an instructor at Bobby Valentine’s Sports Academy and Peterson was a volunteer assistant at York College last year.

WOMEN’S CROSS COUNTRY TEAM NATIONALLY RANKED After finishing fourth at the Paul Short Invitational this weekend, the women’s cross country team was ranked No. 30 in the country by the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches’ Association. It was the team’s first national ranking in seven years.

MLB Toronto 4 Minnesota 3

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

Bulldogs win at home

Elis fall to No. 1 Syracuse BY DINÉE DORAME CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The field hockey team returned empty-handed from its trip to upstate New York this weekend. The Elis lost 1–0 in overtime to Cornell on Saturday and fell 5–0 to No. 1-ranked Syracuse the following day.

FIELD HOCKEY Despite the loss, the team had reason to be proud of its effort against the Orange. The Bulldogs (3–6, 1–2 Ivy) held the Orange scoreless in the second half, a feat that only one other team has accomplished this season. “We definitely take Syracuse as a learning experience,” Schlesier said. “Playing the No. 1-ranked team in the nation doesn’t happen every season, so we were excited to have pulled together to shut them out the second half.” Captain Maddie Sharp ’13 added that she was proud of the team’s strong defense, which held the top team in the country scoreless for 35 minutes. Syracuse forward Emma Russell scored the opening goal of the game off a crossing pass from the right side of the circle from teammate Liz McInerney. McInerney led the Orange with

MEN’S GOLF

two assists and scored a goal of her own. Orange midfielder Gillian Pinder tallied two goals four minutes apart and tied McInerney for the team lead with three points. For the Bulldogs, goalkeepers Heather Schlesier ’15 and Emily Cain ’14 split the playing time and finished with four saves apiece. Syracuse goalie Leann Stiver finished the game untested, as the Orange amassed a 13–0 advantage in shots on goal. Yale players said they hope to take away valuable lessons from the match against top-ranked Orange and establish a more cohesive style of play. “I definitely think that getting a few offensive opportunities on Syracuse was exciting and a great learning experience for our team,” Schlesier said. The Bulldogs have already faced No. 3 Connecticut and No. 4 Princeton this season, and they will take on No. 5 Virginia in their next game. After this weekend, the Elis will have played four of the top five teams in the country in their past six games. “We have had such a tough schedule this year and have played teams ranked in the top 20,” midfielder Erica Borgo ’14 said. Coming off a win over Sacred Heart SEE FIELD HOCKEY PAGE 11

MARIA ZEPEDA/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The defending champion Bulldogs claimed the Macdonald Cup on Sunday, finishing with a team score of 564. BY ALEX EPPLER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER After four straight bogeys on his previous four holes, William Davenport ’15 approached the tee box on the 240-yard par-three 13th hole of the Yale golf course on Sunday. Davenport’s first shot sailed directly onto the green, and he two-putted for par to break the string of bogeys. He carried this momentum through the rest of his round and played the final six holes one under par.

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Elis had a tough weekend, falling to No.1 Syracuse and Ivy rival Cornell.

From that point on, the men’s golf team left no doubt about its ability to defend its home course and home championship. After finishing Saturday’s competition in third place, the Eli men stormed back on Sunday to win the two-day Macdonald Cup for the second straight year with a final team score of 564. “It doesn’t get better than a come-from-behind victory on Sunday in golf,” men’s team head coach Colin Sheehan said. Sheehan said Davenport’s three-

under-par 67 round on Saturday represented his lowest score as a college golfer, while captain Bradley Kushner ’13 shot an even-par 70 in his first round. Saturday’s round of 282 left the Bulldogs three strokes off the pace set by Central Connecticut. But the Bulldogs did not allow themselves to be discouraged by their position after the first round. “Three back in golf is really actuSEE M. GOLF PAGE 11

Cross country teams climb into national rankings BY ALEX EPPLER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As the women’s cross country team toed the line at the start of the Paul Short Invitational Friday, Liana Epstein ’14 warmed up elsewhere, oblivious to the imminent start. After the starting gun fired, she sprinted to the starting line, running from the back of the 360-women field.

CROSS COUNTRY “The start was really hectic,” captain Nihal Kayali ’13 said, laughing. “The gun took us all by

surprise.” Epstein eventually moved through the pack to finish fourth out of the Bulldogs, helping to cap a superb day for both the men’s and women’s cross country squads at Lehigh University. Slogging through muddy conditions, the men scored 255 points and placed seventh out of 37 teams. The women scored 147 points and finished fourth out of 40 teams, earning their first national ranking since September 2005. On Tuesday the Bulldogs were ranked No. 30 in a poll conducted by the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country

Coaches’ Association.

We had some talks after [the Harvard] meet and kind of needed to change things around a little bit. PAUL HARKINS Head Coach, Men’s Cross Country Captain Nihal Kayali ’13 paced the Bulldogs, finishing 14th overall with a time of 20:50 on the

STAT OF THE DAY 67

five-kilometer course. Millie Chapman ’14, Emily Stark ’16 and Epstein followed her closely in 18th, 35th and 39th places, respectively. Elizabeth Marvin ’13, the team’s fifth runner, finished 41st overall and only 24 seconds behind Kayali. The small gap between the times of the team’s first and last-scoring members has been typical of the Elis this season. “There are always people who will step up and perform,” Kayali said. The Bulldogs finished in front of sixth-place Providence and seventh-place Villanova, who

are ranked seventh and ninth in the country, respectively. Kayali believed that victories over those teams could garner some national recognition for Yale’s team. Kayali also noted that beating those teams provided a large confidence boost for the team. “I think we were pretty confident that we’re at the level where we should be competing with nationally ranked teams,” she said. “But of course it was still a pleasant surprise to beat teams that are ranked that highly.” After a disappointing performance by the men’s team against Harvard two weeks ago, head

coach Paul Harkins said that he was very happy with his team’s performance at Lehigh. “We had some talks after [the Harvard] meet and kind of needed to change things around a little bit,” he said. The team performed well in its next appearance, overcoming the memory of its defeat against Harvard . Matthew Nussbaum ’15 led the way for Yale, finishing 21st overall with a time of 24:34 on the eight-kilometer course. He was followed closely by Demetri Goutos ’13 in 30th, while CapSEE CROSS COUNTRY PAGE 11

THE CAREER-BEST THREE-UNDER-PAR ROUND SHOT BY GOLFER WILLIAM DAVENPORT ’15 ON THE FIRST DAY OF THE MACDONALD CUP. DAVENPORT AND THE BULLDOGS WENT ON TO WIN THE TOURNAMENT FOR THE SECOND YEAR IN A ROW.


Today's Paper  

Oct. 3, 2012

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