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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 21 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

RAINY T-STORMS

67 75

CROSS CAMPUS

CREATIVE SPACE THESPIANS FIND ROOM ON CAMPUS

BUDGET WOES

BLACKOUTS?

M. SOCCER

Gov. Dannel Malloy’s quest for a balanced budget is far from over

UTILITY WORKERS THREATEN STRIKE OVER CONTRACT

Undefeated No. 2 UConn overpowers Yale with 2-0 shutout at Reese

PAGES 8-9 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 7 CITY

PAGE 14 SPORTS

For country or for Yale?

WANTED: student input. In

an email to students Tuesday afternoon, the Yale College Council asked students to fill out a survey so they can compile the results and include them in a report sent to former YCC President and the student liasion to the presidential search commmittee Brandon Levin ’14. Sample questions from the survey: “How should the next Yale University President approach the YaleNew Haven relationship?”; “Do you think diversity should be a consideration in the Yale University Presidential search?”; and “How should the next Yale University President approach Yale Athletics recruitment?”

They really want your opinions. As student leaders,

members of the YCC executive board are holding office hours this week in Bass Café and Commons, to hear student feedback on topics like “financial aid, support for athletes and Yale’s international expansion.”

High holiday interrupted.

Today is Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for Jewish people. Fasting began Tuesday evening. At the Reform Kol Nidre services at United Methodist church Tuesday evening, a man interrupted toward the end of services, walked up and down the aisle, and started shouting about his respect for and pride in the Jewish people.

What a tease! Though a key part of Yom Kippur is fasting, the menu in the residential college dining halls includes a number of traditional Israeli dishes, such as Matzoh Ball Soup and Lemon Mint Israeli Couscous. Pretty logical. Cross Campus favorite prof. Raul Sauced sent an email to students Tuesday encouraging those able to secure tickets to Aung San Suu Kyi’s talk tomorrow to skip his First-Order Logic class, which conflicts with the lecture, and attend the talk. To hand out the two VIP tickets he will be unable to use, Saucedo sent out a nonviolence-themed logic problem. The first two to answer the question via email got the tickets. Higgins email. A graduate

student was robbed at the corner of Dwight and George Streets Tuesday evening, according to an email from Yale Police Chief Ronnell Higgins. The student was approached by three men, one of whom pulled out a handgun and stole cash from the student. No injuries were reported, Higgins said.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1968 Mark Rudd, the leader of the Columbia University chapter of the radical leftist group Students for a Democratic society, will join leaders from European SDS groups to speak at Woolsey on Sunday. Rudd would go on to co-found the Weather Underground. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

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New frat clashes with Yale policy BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER

the NROTC orientation. As soon as the ceremony ended, Clapper gathered his belongings and arrived on Old Campus to participate in the sixday Yale FOOT hiking trips. This fall marks the first time since 1970 that ROTC has existed on Yale’s campus. Twelve Yale students have been assigned the rank of Midshipman Fourth Class, forming the first Naval ROTC platoon at Yale since the program left the University in the wake of Vietnam War protests, and eight Yalies have been assigned the rank of Cadet Fourth Class, joining 30 other cadets from six other universities in Connecticut to form Air Force ROTC Detachment 009, which is based at Yale.

Though Yale’s newest fraternity Beta Upsilon Chi (BYX) has announced a policy of admitting only Christians, it will have to change its membership rules if it intends to comply with Yale’s anti-discrimination policies. Victor Hicks ’15, the founder and president of Yale’s chapter of BYX, which is the largest Christian fraternity in the country, told the News last week that only Christian students are eligible for membership, though anyone is welcome to attend the fraternity’s social events. But exclusivity on the basis of religion is against Yale’s anti-discrimination policies, Associate Dean for Student Organizations and Physical Resources John Meeske told the News Monday, though he declined to comment further on how the Dean’s Office may deal with the fraternity going forward. The website of the BYX national organization stipulates that “each of our members is a professing Christian and exhibits a willingness to serve in Christ’s Kingdom.” Chapters at other universities that have similar anti-discrimination policies have pressured their universities to change their regulations to allow the fraternity to remain Christianonly. In 2006 and 2007, Christian groups filed lawsuits at the district and circuit level on

SEE ROTC PAGE 4

SEE BYX PAGE 6

Twenty Yalies came to campus this fall not only to be students but also to become soldiers. For the first time in four decades, ROTC groups have been established at the University — setting cadets on the task of once again merging the military with the academic. DANIEL ZELAYA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

BY DAN STEIN STAFF REPORTER At 5:30 a.m., Josh Clapper ’16 woke up. He had five minutes to stand at attention, brush his teeth and put on his uniform.

UPCLOSE Clapper attended his morning workout, showered quickly and joined the other participants of the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps summer orientation program for morning chow. He couldn’t speak to any of them. Instead, he looked straight ahead, or down at his food. Eye contact was pro-

hibited. The rest of the day was spent studying military history and learning how to march in formation. By 9 p.m., Clapper had reached lights out. But he still had to polish his shoes and memorize rank structures for the next day. In a few hours, he would have to rise again for a one-hour shift to practice standing watch during the night. “One day we’ll be leading 20 to 30 enlisted men,” Clapper said. “[Orientation] helps us to understand the enlisted experience.” After six more days of “indoc” — short for “indoctrination” — Clapper exchanged his khaki uniform for hiking gear. He returned to Yale for a pinning ceremony in Woolsey Rotunda with the nine other Yalies who had also completed

Alums locked in tight race for Congress BY NICOLE NAREA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Following a nail-biting primary season, Republican State Sen. Andrew Roraback ’83 and Democrat Elizabeth Esty LAW ’85 have continued to clash in a neck-and-neck battle for Connecticut’s 5th District congressional seat. Close races like that in the 5th District — for a seat which U.S. Rep. Chris Murphy vacated to run for the state’s open U.S. Senate seat — have garnered national attention as the election season grinds on toward November. As a result, both Esty and Roraback will likely receive assistance from high-profile politicians in their parties due to the “polarization” and increasingly “national tone” of state politics, said Gary Rose, a professor of political science at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield. Though Connecticut traditionally votes Democratic, Roraback, a moderate conservative who is serving his sixth term as a state senator, emerged as a strong contender in a race that several political analysts, including the Rothenberg Political Report, dubbed a “toss-up.” “When the liberals call it a toss-up, it is very bad news for Elizabeth Esty,” Roraback wrote in an Aug. 28 release on his campaign website.

Students navigate Yale Dining plans

Though Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73, a Democrat who won his first term in 2010, called the race “very important” for the party’s quest to gain control of the House of Representatives, David Cameron, a Yale professor of political science, said the House is likely to remain in Republican hands regardless of the outcome.

When the liberals call it a toss-up, it is very bad news for Elizabeth Esty. ANDREW RORABACK Republican candidate for Connecticut’s 5th District congressional seat Still, every seat counts in advancing the Democratic agenda, said Comptroller Kevin Lembo, a Democrat. The polls, however, provide neither candidate confidence with Election Day just weeks away. The Roraback campaign released a Sept. 6 survey that shows him seven points ahead of Esty, but another poll conducted by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee suggests Esty is ahead by about the same margin. But Rose said that Esty — SEE HOUSE RACE PAGE 6

STEPHANIE RIVKIN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Mostly due to high overhead and labor costs, all the meal plans Yale Dining offers cost roughly the same amount. BY MADELINE MCMAHON STAFF REPORTER Yale Dining offers several different meal plans to cater to preferences of various types of students, including early risers who regularly eat three meals per day and students living off-campus who eat at dining halls less frequently. But no matter which meal plan students choose, they pay roughly the same price.

NEWS ANALYSIS The majority of undergraduates — who are required to select a meal plan if they

live on campus — purchase the “full meal plan,” which allots students 21 meals per week for $2,925 per semester, said Howard Bobb, Yale Dining’s finance director. While nine students on the full meal plan interviewed said they generally do not eat all 21 meals each week, they said they chose that option because it costs the same amount per semester as the “Any 14” meal plan, which allows students 14 meals per week. Bobb said the two plans cost the same because of the high operating costs of maintaining all residential college dining halls, adding that the cost of any plan SEE DINING PAGE 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012

OPINION

.COMMENT “I come from a culture where creating your own Wikipedia page is yaledailynews.com/opinion

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— financial and image-wise — depends on globalization, many would argue that the opening of a new college 311 years after the birth of its American counterpart would be a brilliant deal, sweetened by the Singaporean government’s financial muscle and keenness at having Yale open shop. However, the concerns now being raised are at two distinct levels, both of them having much to do with the balance between global advancement and liberty. First is the obvious concern over the curtailing of liberties on the campus of YaleNUS, with local laws clamping down on political activism and sexual orientation. Second, however, is the notion that liberty and freedom are not relative ideas or lofty motifs tucked away in a dusty old book but real issues that we can and must judge according to quasi-universal standards. The freedom enjoyed in Yale’s Singaporean variant must be akin to the sort experienced on the greens of New Haven. The premise of institutional success has hence been attacked in both Yale’s venture to Singapore and the introduction of the draconian FISA Amendments Act. Opponents have believed that their liberties and freedoms are too dear to be sacrificed, no matter what prudential justification authorities may provide. Both initiatives show some promise on the whole — who doesn’t want to catch terrorists or open the doors of a liberal education to an ever-expanding array of people? But what the virulent opposition to both displays is the truth that the part may be as important as the whole, and even the smallest part must not be forgotten. The journalists or innocents who could be caught in a loophole in the FISA Amendments Act may be such a part, but violating their inalienable rights represents a failing of the entire initiative. All the students enrolling at Yale-NUS may not engage in political activities or have sexual orientations that the authorities would take issue with, but the hindrances faced by those who do will deliver a verdict against that institution. And the defense of these parts — the defense of the rights of the individual — is a dream that must never be allowed to die.

I

t has been exactly a month since I moved in. I’m not pining for my family. I don’t miss my dog. (Does that make me a terrible person?) And I don’t feel like my suite is someone else’s room. I just really want someone to hold the door. Honestly, I never considered myself a true Southerner. Sure, I was born and raised in Dallas, but my parents are both transplants, so I spent vacations shuttling coast to coast. I never acquired even the slightest tinge of a Texas drawl, and I always choose black coffee over sweet tea. One night during Camp Yale, someone asked me if I was from New York. I took it as a compliment and almost bashfully corrected him. It felt a little like revealing some deep dark secret. My uprooted state has not awakened some latent desire to purchase cowboy boots or return to three-digit temperatures or hang a Texas flag above the mantelpiece in my common room. And yet I miss the little things I never really noticed. Like having someone hold the door. When a high school friend’s

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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

father attended Yale in the ’70s, bringing his yes ma’ams, no sirs and careful Southern manners to the newly coeducational campus, a female student confronted him: “I can hold the [expletive] door myself!” He was left standing on the landing, sputtering apologies, promising it would never happen again. And I get it — I’m a card-carrying “no really, I’ll pay for dinner” feminist. But I’m not above what I previously believed to be common courtesy. Men of Yale — and sure, why not, women too — can you honestly not wait the five seconds it takes to let me through? To be clear, I don’t truly think less of those who unintentionally slam doors in my face. I have learned to be okay having to swipe myself in to the Berkeley courtyard when my lunch buddies have passed through the gates without so much as a backward glance and are already halfway to the Tofu Provencal — a dish so un-Southern it may stifle any door-holding inclinations. Yet what’s really so surprising is not the absence of the gesture but the fact that I notice its absence.

When I graduated from my all-girls high school in full-on Southern belle regalia — floorlength white dress and white hat adorned with fresh flowers — I thought I was leaving behind a tradition where advertisements for engagement rings once ran in the commencement program and shooting your first deer was a typical rite of passage. But — and here I guess I shouldn’t be surprised — somewhere along the 18 years of TexMex Sunday night dinners and drives down bluebonnet-lined highways, a little bit of Texas seeped into my being. It shows when I smile at people I don’t know when I pass them on the sidewalk and they give me a look like, “Do I know you?” and when I’m taken aback when my suitemate’s parents introduce themselves by first name rather than Mr. and Mrs. Smith. It shows when I accidentally refer to Shake Shack as Steak Shack and when I try to explain the agonies of this summer’s moral dilemma — to eat or not to eat at Chick-fil-A. It shows when I take my toothbrush and toothpaste out of my monogrammed shower caddy,

when I fill up my monogrammed water bottle before class, when I take notes in my monogrammed notebook and hang up reminders on my monogrammed magnet board, when I come back from my shower wrapped in my monogrammed towel and when I leave for the weekend with my monogrammed suitcase. (Apologies to my monogrammed picture frame — I didn’t know how to fit you into the narrative — and any other monogrammed items that I may have unintentionally left unmentioned.) Up to this point, I never knew that this Southern side existed, and I certainly didn’t think it would present itself so clearly. I expected to come to college to learn new things and have new experiences that would shape my character, but in my first weeks I’ve instead realized that a daily interaction I barely noticed at home is a part of who I am. So call me a Southern belle, or call me old-fashioned, but please just hold the door. CAROLINE SYDNEY is a freshman in Silliman College. Contact her at caroline.sydney@yale.edu .

C O N T R I B U T I N G I L LU ST R AT O R K AT E M C M I L L A N

All roads lead to Chipotle

DHRUV AGGARWAL is a freshman in Jonathan Edwards College. Contact him at dhruv.aggarwal@yale.edu .

PHOTOGRAPHY Emilie Foyer Zoe Gorman Kamaria Greenfield Victor Kang Henry Simperingham

EDITORIALS & ADS

‘RIVER_TAM’ ON ‘THE CONSERVATIVE SIDE OF YALE’

Just hold the door, y’all

Applying yourself

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frowned upon.”

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST CA R O L I N E SY D N EY

For success, protect liberty mong the Cold War’s more fascinating legacies, the tales of double agents and dangerous subterfuge are the stuff novels are made of. In an age when gathering information was crucial to maintain the balance of power in a nuclear age, it was perfectly in order for Ted Kennedy, the Senate’s liberal lion, to introduce the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in 1977, providing a judicially mandated framework for the surveillance of foreign entities in the States. Partially curbing liberties seemed not such a bad price to pay to preserve American foundations in the face of Red Terror. But in the post-9/11 world, such measures face more vocal opposition. The Bush administration was often accused of engaging in a systematic campaign of wiretapping and snooping, violating core Fourth Amendment rights. What’s more, amendments to the FISA provided retroactive immunity to the government agencies responsible for wiretapping and the telecom companies abetting it. Electronic surveillance no longer needed the approval of the FISA court set up under Kennedy’s original 1977 bill. Two weeks ago, the House of Representatives voted to extend the FISA Amendments Act for the next five years without much real debate or discussion. The core question during the Cold War — which is now asked more confidently — is whether drastic times call for such drastic measures. That question sets up many others about freedom and how far the rights in the Constitution can be interpreted. The preservation or advancement of society as a whole — or the greater good — is often cited as a justification for the state stepping into our lives, livelihoods and bedrooms. But there are dissenting voices that see the balance between civil liberties and national security deteriorating. A recent ruling by a federal judge of the Southern District of New York struck down a provision of the FISA Amendments Act, which allowed the government to indefinitely detain someone “substantially supporting” terrorists. This ambiguous wording meant that even people like journalists talking to terrorist fronts or informers without disclosing their location or other information could face the prospect of being shipped off to a holding center. Yale-NUS College prompts the same questions. In an age where a university’s success

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COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 21

M

y last few weeks have been full of applications — mine and other people’s. As someone who is helping evaluate two sets of applications and writing many more than two sets of applications, I can say loudly and firmly that applications stink. Writing them stinks, but reading them may stink even more. I hate trying to find the graceful balance between selling yourself and not sounding like a total tool, the reckless editing necessary to make your point coherent, the lies of over-enthusiasm we all tell. I am tired of reading boring paragraphs — mine and other people’s — that do little more than tell me how badly someone wants a particular opportunity. Reading applications that make the same mistakes as mine reinforces my discomfort with my own writing and holds me accountable in a punishing kind of way. Perhaps what is hardest to deal with about applications is the scent of desperation that inevitably seems to hover over all of them. We wouldn’t apply if we didn’t want something — the time and energy simply wouldn’t be worth investing. But at the same time, the time and energy we invest

make us more vulnerable to rejection: We have put ourselves forward to be judged, and to be found wanting seems a cruel ZOE MERCER trick after all our hard work. GOLDEN I certainly struggle to jusMeditations tify hard work in the face of what can seem like imminent failure: I want to protect myself from the fallout of disappointment. Likewise, I want to protect others from the same sense of failure. Turning down lovely, qualified people is definitely the worst part of conducting any application process. But the very presence of applications reinforces the notion that not everyone can win, and, sadistically, victory wouldn’t feel sweet unless we know we were chosen. How, then, do we apply ourselves to the task of writing applications in the face of uncertainty and our own insecurities? The best answer I can give is probably too easy: We can’t get what we

want unless we reach for it. The challenge is to become self-confident enough that failure doesn’t hurt too much and to convince yourself that, no matter the outcome, you did your best. Yet there is also pleasure in writing applications. I have learned more about myself in the last few weeks of writing applications than I did in the previous months of simply living. I have reevaluated what brings me joy, what I want my future to look like and who I am when pretense and anxiety are stripped away. I have a different sense of how my interests inform each other and how I can use my skills to make the world better. Writing nice things about myself has also been an unexpected ego boost, one that is thankfully tempered by my concerns about the outcome of the applications themselves. Reading applications has also taught me — in a short period of time — a lot about human beings, collectively and individually. I now feel (maybe erroneously) that I can distinguish someone with genuine enthusiasm for and knowledge of a subject from one who is simply spinning words for the sake of it. I have a better sense of what quali-

ties I value in friends, co-workers and employers. Becoming conscious of other people’s insecurities by reading applications — and also what people love and value about themselves — has validated my own fears of inadequacy and my desire to affirm what I believe I do well. In the end, win or lose, a good application is a joy to read and practically writes itself. The amount of effort required in writing a good application reminds us how hard it is to know ourselves intimately and how much work is entailed in keeping up with our own changing interests and desires. Even in my irritation, I have come to be grateful both for the ways I have had to apply myself and for the ways I have watched other people apply themselves. Both have shown me the value of wanting something and working for it, how we can bridge the gap between desire and outcome and the importance of speaking honestly and fully about who we are. ZOE MERCER-GOLDEN is a senior in Davenport College. Contact her at zoe.mercer-golden@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012

· yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

16

Rank of CT in U.S. AIDS cases through 2008

The state of Connecticut reported 16,127 AIDS cases cumulatively, from the beginning of the epidemic through December 2008. Connecticut is ranked 16th-highest among the 50 states in cumulative reported AIDS cases.

Yale AIDS project Malloy’s budget battles far from over to launch website BY HAYLEY BYRNES AND JANE DARBY MENTON CONTRIBUTING REPORTER AND STAFF REPORTER After receiving a sizable grant this summer, the Yale AIDS Memorial Project is preparing to launch an interactive website by the end of January in an effort to expand its reach beyond campus. The initiative, begun in 2010 by Christopher Glazek ’07, documents the lives of members of the Yale community who perished during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s and aims to raise awareness about the impact of the disease in the United States. The project received a $50,000 grant in July to create a website featuring interactive profiles of the Yale graduates and affiliates who have died from AIDS. Richard Espinosa ’10, the project’s director, said he hopes the creation of the website will encourage undergraduate participation in the effort. “It’s really important for us to be engaging current and future students of the project,” Espinosa said. “The goal is to eventually create some sort of network of localized AIDS memorials that piece by piece start to give a sense of not only the enormity of the epidemic but also the individuals that were affected.” Espinosa said the website will help broaden the YAMP’s audience, creating a commemorative platform that can be used by other universities and institutions. Espinosa said there is an “endemic lack of knowledge” of the 1980s AIDS outbreak, which he believes can be improved through a largescale memorial for victims of the disease. He added that he hopes the project will become self-sustainable as campus groups add profiles and cultivate interest. While the initiative is currently focused on the Yale community,

Glazek said the project is intended for a national audience. “The limitation with a lot of AIDS memorials that already exist is that they’re not very accessible for those not acquainted with people who died,” Glazek said. “A priority of ours to make sure we’re producing editorial content that anyone can read or be interested and that the digital platform we create can be used by other schools too.” Over the summer, YAMP published a journal with profiles of eight Yale students, faculty members and employees who perished in the AIDS epidemic. Organizers said the journal was intended to solicit interest in the project and make people aware of the impact AIDS has had on the Yale community. Adela Pinch ’82, who reflected on the life of her classmate John Wallace ’82 in the journal, noted that universities often commemorate those who have died in large-scale tragedies and said the YAMP website could offer a modern means of remembering those who perished in the AIDS epidemic. Another contributor to the project, Will Schwalbe ’84, said he was involved in activism as a student during the AIDS crisis, and is “thrilled” that people today are recognizing the lives lost in the epidemic. “I hope this project both moves [people] and makes them angry. Because they should be angry at this crisis,” Schwalbe said. “AIDS was people, was classmates, was alumni.” The Yale AIDS Memorial Project will hold its first on-campus information session on Oct. 6. Contact HAYLEY BYRNES at hayley.byrnes@yale.edu and JANE DARBY MENTON at jane.menton@yale.edu .

YALE AIDS MEMORIAL PROJECT

The Yale AIDS Memorial Project wants to expand its reach with a new interactive website, funded by a newly obtained $50,000 grant.

JESSICA HILL/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Despite Gov. Dannel Malloy’s efforts to eradicate the state’s fiscal woes, a new report projects a budget shortfall of $26.9 million for fiscal year 2013. BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Despite significant improvement in the state’s fiscal health, Connecticut continues to face a budget shortfall. A report released Thursday by Secretary of Policy and Management Ben Barnes and addressed to Comptroller Kevin Lembo projected a $26.9 million shortfall in Connecticut’s general fund for the 2013 fiscal year, citing the anemic national economic recovery as well as lackluster revenue from sales taxes and Indian gaming. Despite aggressive budgetary measures by the administration of Gov. Dannel Malloy — including achieving billions of dollars of savings in the form of tax cuts and state employee concessions — the state’s fiscal future remains tied to unpredictable national economic headwinds. State Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney, a New Haven Democrat, described the current shortfall as “relatively minor”

compared to 2011, when the state faced a deficit of over $3 billion. “We’ve grappled with much greater budgetary problems,” Looney said. Looney noted that the remaining shortfall will likely be “handled administratively,” with small cuts helping the state to balance its budget. These would come in addition to $1.5 billion in higher taxes on income, sales, luxury goods and cigarettes, as well as $2 billion in union concessions already introduced to reduce shortfalls on the state’s 2011 and 2012 budgets. Malloy’s budget for 2013 predicts a historically low spending growth rate of 2.6 percent, compared to last year’s actual spending increase of 5.2 percent. The budget also anticipates revenue growth of 3.1 percent. But the state’s finances are not yet on sound footing, and the budget’s predictions may need to be further revised throughout the year. “Although it’s early in the fiscal year, we are always monitor-

ing spending trends and evaluating alternatives,” said Gian-Carl Casa, a spokesman for the Office of Policy and Management. Slow levels of economic growth across the country are already generating concerns amongst state administrators. “The revenue forecast that underlies the [fiscal year] 2013 budget assumes a modestly accelerating national expansion that is yet to materialize,” Barnes told CT News Junkie. He added that “gridlock and political brinkmanship at the national level” continue to lead to uncertainty in the state’s revenue forecast. In his report, Barnes noted that the state is already experiencing an unexpected $100.0 million deficit in the Department of Social Services’ Medicaid accounts due to increasing caseloads in the Low Income Adults program, as well as increased use of medical services. In an attempt to close the budget gap, Malloy’s office submitted an application to the

Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, a federal agency, to impose an asset test on the program, according to Kathleen Kabara, a spokeswoman for the state’s Department of Social Services. The test would prevent those with assets over $10,000 from participating in the program, which provides medical assistance to those who otherwise could not afford it. The test could cause as many as 13,000 residents to be removed from the program, according to CT News Junkie. Kabara declined to speculate on the effect that such a test would have on Connecticut’s poor. On Monday, Lembo will release further details on the state’s current fiscal health in a monthly report. Looking ahead, Malloy already faces an estimated $423 million budget shortfall in 2014. Contact MATTHEW LLOYDTHOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

Innovation and Design Center plans events BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER With a newly renovated space and nearly 200 prospective members, the Yale Center for Engineering Innovation and Design is looking to host a variety of student events this semester in an effort to continue expanding its presence on campus. CEID Director Eric Dufresne said the center is in the final planning stages of lectures, workshops and study breaks targeted at Yale’s design and innovation community. Those involved with the CEID and students in Yale’s design community said they hope undergraduate groups will use the center to host events, and that the space will become a gathering place for those interested in design and innovation at the University. “The events at the CEID will demonstrate the breadth of the center,” CEID Assistant Director Joseph Zinter said. “You’ll be just as likely to find a workshop on programming a microcontroller as you would a lecture from an MD discussing the design opportunities in the operating room [or] an info session on how to find venture capital for your idea.” In the coming weeks, Dufresne said events will include

a number of speakers and lecturers in a format similar to that of residential college Master’s Teas. Potential speakers include Segway Personal Transporter inventor Dean Kamen and Charigami founder Zachary Rotholz ’11. The center will also offer a series of training workshops on using the CEID’s tools and equipment led by CEID staff members, some of which will be repeated throughout the year. CEID student aid Ellen Su ’13, who will lead a workshop on using MakerBot, a 3D printer, said she aims to instruct CEID members while also providing general information to students interested in the center. Not all events that will take place at the CEID will be directly hosted by the center. Yale’s chapter of Design for America, a national group that promotes innovative design, hopes to use the CEID to host several events — including a conference for DFS chapters along the Eastern Coast on the weekend of Nov. 3. For other events, the CEID will co-sponsor the activities along with an undergraduate organization. Dufresne said the center plans to partner with the Yale Entrepreneurial Society to host a career fair specifically geared toward technologyoriented start-up businesses. Entrepreneurial Society Co-

President Tony Wu ’13 said he think the CEID is an ideal host for the Oct. 19 event. “CEID feels like the right place for [the event], being the new buzz on the engineering side of campus,” Wu said. “We hope to provide students, especially those with an interest in STEM careers and technology in general, a resource in addition to the traditional UCS career fair.” The CEID requires a staff member to be present at events attended by non-CEID members, Su said. She added that if a club wanted to hold regular meetings at the center, special arrangements could be made for the entire club to attend an orientation session for new CEID members together. Of 17 students interviewed, eight said they would like to see the CEID focus on planning events that would help tighten ties in the design and engineering communities on campus. Kimberly Moore ’14, an applied physics major, said Yale’s focus on the liberal arts has made it difficult for her to find a community of STEM-oriented students on campus. She called the CEID a step in the right direction for creating such a community, adding that the center seems to be marketing itself to the student body more effectively than other science

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The newly renovated Center for Engineering Innovation and Design hopes to bring together Yale’s design and engineering community. organizations have. Allison West ’14, a mechanical engineering major, also said that the CEID has the potential to be a home to Yale’s design and engineering community. “Yale already offers a rigorous

engineering education, but the CEID has the potential to create what the department currently doesn’t have a home for — a collaborative engineering community on campus,” she said. The CEID opened on Aug. 26

as part of Yale’s freshman orientation. The development of the CEID cost $6.5 million. Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

38.5

Percent of newly commissioned officers that were ROTC in 2010 In 2010, the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) graduates constituted 38.5 percent of all newly commissioned U.S. Army officers.

ROTC groups adjust to life at Yale BEAU BIRDSALL ’16 BRANCH

Navy

J O R D A N B R AV I N ’ 1 6

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

COLLEGE

Saybrook

Older sister in ROTC at Georgetown

MAJOR

FACT

BRANCH

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Navy

Uncle in the Navy

COLLEGE

Silliman

FACT

Mechanical Engineering

ERIC ABNEY ’16

Involved in Yale Glee Club and ballroom dance

HOMETOWN

MAJOR

Prospective EP&E

JOHN BODEAU ’16

HOMETOWN

Kiev, Ukraine BRANCH

Navy

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

COLLEGE

Davenport

Grandfather fought in WWII

MAJOR

FACT

Engineering

BRANCH

Air Force

Plays club baseball

COLLEGE

Saybrook

Father served for 13 years as a flight surgeon

MAJOR

FACT

Mechanical Engineering

Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif.

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Sprinter in high school; ran 22.5 miles in 24 hours at “Reach the Beach”

DANIEL J O S H CCABALLERO L A P P E R ’ 1 ’15 6 BRANCH

Navy

COLLEGE

Morse

MAJOR

Member of Yale Faith in Action

Mathematics HOMETOWN

Pharr, Texas

HOMETOWN

Edina, Minn.

ROTC FROM PAGE 1 While an Army ROTC unit has not yet returned to campus, these midshipmen and cadets share a unique mission: to discover whether Yale and ROTC can coexist — whether these two institutions are functionally and intellectually compatible — or whether after 40 years Yale and the U.S. military have drifted apart from one another. Quoting what Provost Peter Salovey told him, Clapper said he and the other Yale cadets must live “two lives at once.”

BALANCING CREDITS

In last week’s session of “Introduction to Naval Science,” or NAVY 111, the midshipmen were asked to draw the chain of military command all the way down to themselves. As they scribbled away on the chalkboard, they referred to each other by last name only, but called their two instructors “sir” and “ma’am.” Trying to decide where to begin, one midshipman declared, “the President is at the top!” At its core, ROTC is a financial scholarship intended to support the development of leaders for the military. Rather than enlist directly after high school, ROTC students attend non-military colleges and take advantage of a more traditional college experience. They begin their military careers afterward at the level of an officer. The scholarship carries with it steep requirements: the hourand-15-minute long Navy class meets on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons, and the students also attend a two-hour laboratory on Wednesday afternoons. The Air Force cadets meet for a “Leadership Laboratory” and have class for three hours once a week. Both groups also have physical training, or “PT,” sessions at 6:30 a.m. at least once a week. Lieutenant Molly Crabbe, one of two primary administrators and advisors for the Naval ROTC program, said that Yale has “rolled out the red carpet” for them and provided the program with extensive resources. Colonel Scott Manning and Captain Timothy Secor from the Air Force unit echoed Crabbe’s sentiments that Yale has been supportive of ROTC. The Air

Force ROTC program makes use of office and classroom spaces and Payne Whitney Gymnasium for conditioning and group exercises. But students do not receive any academic credit for ROTC-led courses at Yale. “We hate to see them do the work and not get credit,” said Manning, the commanding officer for Air Force ROTC at Yale, then adding that students coming to Yale for ROTC from Sacred Heart University have been approved to receive graduation credit for the same courses. Manning said the other universities participating in Yale’s program are still deciding whether to award credit to their own students. When the ROTC courses were introduced at Yale by the new unit leaders, Dean of Undergraduate Education Joseph Gordon said they were reviewed by an ROTC advisory committee composed of Yale faculty and administrators. This committee decided not to recommend any courses this year to a second committee that would have been able to award them credit. Beau Birdsall ’16, the current platoon commander of the Naval ROTC, said that some midshipmen have asked why they are required to take a class without gaining credits toward graduation. As a mechanical engineering major, Birdsall is already taking 4.5 Yale credits this term. When compared to time commitments of other Yale courses, the Naval ROTC classes equal about two Yale credits, meaning that the midshipman is carrying the equivalent of 6.5. Midshipman Matt Smith ’16 said that “a few non-ROTC” kids even came to their class during shopping period, but none enrolled. Smith said he believes that these students chose not to enroll in the class because of the lack of credit. Only Air Force cadets in history professor Paul Kennedy’s “Military History of the West since 1500” gain credit for time spent in a class also required for the ROTC program. The class has been approved according to the national Air Force ROTC standards, and Manning serves as a teaching fellow for one section

of the course, which all Air Force students joined along with a few other Yale students. Smith said he believes this system of having Yale professors “sponsor” ROTC classes may be a way to work for credit. Crabbe said she hopes the ROTC “Navigation” class that will be offered next semester could also potentially receive a QR credit in the future. Commander James Godwin, commanding officer for Naval ROTC at both Yale and College of the Holy Cross, works with the Yale administration to facilitate the new ROTC program. While he said he understands that the ROTC classes can be viewed as “vocational,” he noted that Cornell offers some credit for ROTC courses. Four out of Cornell’s five undergraduate schools allow students to receive credit for ROTC classes, with the exception being the College of Arts & Sciences. Still, Air Force Cadet Tyler Detorie ’16 said that receiving credit for the classes is unimportant to him. “No one’s making me going to class,” he said. “I’m doing this because I want to do this.”

THE CHOICE TO SERVE

Participating in ROTC has been a long-term goal for some students. Of the 19 ROTC students interviewed, 16 said they have at least one family member with experience in the military. Detorie, whose father serves as an Air Force Wing Commander at nearby Bradley Field in Connecticut, said he has always wanted to be a pilot. “I’ve been around the air force all my life,” Detorie said. But for other students with parents in the military, the choice to join ROTC was less clear. Clapper’s father attended the Naval Academy and spent five years serving on submarines; his mother served in the Navy. Following in his parents’ footsteps could have been the obvious choice. Instead, Clapper had some doubts. As he began considering filling out the ROTC application in early April of his junior year of high school, Clapper said he found himself asking, “Do I want to be a part of something so big where I

don’t have my own free will?” Clapper eventually worked out a compromise with his parents — he plans to try ROTC for a year and leave if he decides he no longer wants to be in the program. Midshipman Drew Denno ’16, whose father serves as the Commander of the Naval Sub Base at New London, Conn., said his experience in ROTC has been “a bit different” than his experiences with the Navy growing up. “I’m used to seeing everyone at an equal level,” Denno said. “But now I’m at the bottom of the totem poll.” Other cadets have less of a family connection to the military, or to the nation that they will protect and defend. Birdsall came to Yale after growing up in Kiev, Ukraine. With his parents serving as Christian missionaries in the European nation, ROTC was a way for his family to pay for college — his sister was already in ROTC at Georgetown, though no one their family had previously served. Birdsall is one of two international students in the Naval platoon. Midshipman Miranda Melcher ’16 grew up in Beijing, China. No one else in her family has served in the military, but Melcher chose the experience — a decision she said her parents called “a little weird” — because she saw it as “the best leadership training you can get.” “Considering that I didn’t grow up here, it’s a good way to learn about the country that I’m from,” she explained.

‘A POSITIVE FACTOR’

Each prospective ROTC student must apply both to the ROTC program and to the universities they want to attend. A high school student can begin the application process for an ROTC scholarship near the end of their junior year until the winter of their senior year. On these applications, the students list the schools to which they are applying, and the national ROTC offices of the Navy or Air Force work to match accepted ROTC scholars with open spaces in the programs at the school they prefer. According to Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffery

ANDREW M I C H A E LHENDRICKS H E R B E R ’ ’14 16 BRANCH

Air Force COLLEGE

Saybrook

Grandfather was in the Army, Cousin in Marines for a long time FACT

HOMETOWN

Sugarland, Texas

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Brenzel, an ROTC scholarship is taken into account when applications are reviewed. “We do consider the award of an ROTC scholarship as a positive factor in our evaluations, but as with all applicants it is only one factor of many in a comprehensive and holistic review,” Brenzel said in an email to the News. He added that the success the scholarship recipients have already shown in order to receive the award means they have “a high potential for success at a place like Yale.” Midshipman Gabrielle Fong ’16 said the attention Yale gives to ROTC status during the admissions process is beneficial for the University. “Just like we need athletes or musicians, we need ROTC kids,” she said. Twenty-nine high school students received ROTC scholarships and indicated Yale as a desired placement, according to Crabbe. Out of those 29, only 13 or 14 were admitted to Yale, and only nine passed their physical tests and ultimately matriculated. ROTC scholarships can cover tuition — not room and board — but they require applicants to commit to an area of study for their college careers that cannot easily change. Naval ROTC scholarships fall into three tiers: a first tier for engineering majors, a second for math and science majors, and a third for all other majors. Students committing to majors in the first two tiers are more likely to receive scholarships because most funding goes toward the first two tiers. The Air Force follows a similar model for allocating scholarships. Detorie, who applied as a mechanical engineering major, said that he has little ability to change his course of study. “If I really needed to, I might have a chance to but it’s very slim,” he said. Cadet Renee Vogel ’16 said she would not have participated in ROTC if she had not received a scholarship in the third category. “I would never have done ROTC if I was locked into a technical major because I’m not a technical person,” Vogel said. When asked whether this early

On varsity cross country and track teams

selection of an academic path is antithetical to Yale’s commitment to intellectual exploration and freedom, Yale College Dean Mary Miller cited the examples of other scholarships, especially those intended for international students, that place limitations on what recipients can study. “If that student chose to give up that scholarship, that student is totally eligible for Yale financial aid, in all the normal ways,” Miller said.

ATHLETICS, THEATER

For members of Yale’s ROTC programs, learning to become an officer is not enough. Many made the decision to come to Yale rather than a service academy because of the opportunities outside of the classroom that Yale offers. “At the academy, people say they wished they had done something like ROTC, because it was a little too cookie cutter,” Fong said. Crabbe, who attended Annapolis after high school, said the Naval Academy can be a difficult place. She said she “didn’t have a ton of contact with officers,” during her time there, “especially female officers.” Fong said she has benefited from the example and mentorship of Crabbe, whom she calls “a woman who can control as easily as a man.” Fong and Melcher are the only girls in the Yale Naval ROTC program. At Yale, Fong said she feels the female midshipmen are respected. Fong was selected to serve alongside Birdsall as the second in command of the platoon. At least five of the 20 Yale ROTC students turned down spots at the service academies to be a part of the new Yale units. One of them was Cadet John Keisling ’16, who chose Yale over the Air Force academy for the diversity of opportunity. “At the end of four years, I’m a second lieutenant either way,” Keisling said. Keisling has been determined to make the most of his time at Yale, beginning by walking on to the varsity track team to run the 400 and 800-meter races. Four out of the 20 Yale ROTC students are also varsity athletes. Vogel competes in the pole vault for the women’s track team and Detorie

MIRANDA J O H N K EMELCHER I S L I N G ’ 1’16 6

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

BRANCH

Air Force

Father was a general

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

COLLEGE

Branford

Uncle and Grandfather were Army

MAJOR

FACT

FACT MAJOR

Applied Mathematics

WILLIAM G R O F F ’ 1’14 6 ANDREW HENDRICKS BRANCH

Air Force

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Physics

Father current Air Force officer, Grandfather retired Air Force

HOMETOWN

FACT

COLLEGE

Saybrook MAJOR

Prattville, Ala.

Plays clarinet in the YPMB

HOMETOWN

Fairfax Station, Va.

Gave marching orders at ribbon-cutting ceremony

Electrical Engineering

MICHAEL J O H N K EHERBERT I S L I N G ’ 1’16 6 BRANCH

Navy

COLLEGE

Saybrook

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Grandfather in Naval Reserve

HOMETOWN

East Hampstead, N.H.

Walked onto varsity track, running 400 and 800 meters

MIRANDA MELCHER ’16 BRANCH

Navy

Economics

Involved in the LEAD program

Branford MAJOR

Modern Middle Eastern Studies

HOMETOWN

Denver, Colo.

None

COLLEGE

FACT MAJOR

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

HOMETOWN

Beijing, China

FACT

Grew up in China because parents wanted family to learn Chinese


YALE DAILY NEWS ·

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

FROM THE FRONT DL R EE R W DDEETNONROI E’ 1 ’61 6 TY

J OSSAHM CCLOAHPEPN E R’ 1 5’ 1 6 BRANCH

Air Force COLLEGE

Saybrook

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

BRANCH

Navy

Father was a general

COLLEGE

Timothy Dwight

FACT MAJOR

Applied Mathematics

Started “Wounded Warrior” Club in high school

DSRAEMW CDOEHNENNO ’ 1’ 156

Fairfax Station, Va.

Mechanical Engineering HOMETOWN

BRANCH

Navy

COLLEGE

Calhoun MAJOR

History

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

HOMETOWN

Washington, D.C.

Thursday is uniform day. Last Thursday in a classroom on the fourth floor of 55 Whitney Avenue, freshmen Air Force cadets in USAF 101, “Foundations of the Air Force,” were both wearing uniforms and talking about them. “Who do we wear our uniforms for?” Air Force Captain Bai Zhu asked her cadets in class last Thursday. She told her cadets that she believes they wear uniforms for the American people, the people that they defend. Clad in their matching light blue shirts, dark blue pants and nametags, the cadets focused on proper grooming standards and how to maintain the military uniform. “It’s great for somebody to be able to stop us and learn about the military,” Clapper said. Multiple midshipmen and cadets mentioned being stopped by people on the street on Thursdays when both Naval and Air Force students

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Mystic, Conn.

Joined hybrid race car team, loves to work on cars

Air Force

MAJOR

Mechanical Engineering HOMETOWN

Wethersfield, Conn.

Morse

FACT

Involved in Yale Students for Christ and YPU Conservative Party

MAJOR

Political Science

G TA YB LR ER IEL D LEET O FO RN I EG ’’1166

HOMETOWN

Louisville, Ky. BRANCH

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Air Force

Father is Wing Commander of 103rd Air Wing at Bradley Field

Saybrook MAJOR

Mechanical Engineering

FACT

Wants to be a pilot

HOMETOWN

Canton, Conn.

TIMELINE ROTC AT YALE 1917 Army ROTC is established at Yale. 1926 Yale Naval ROTC is one of the first six units established nationwide. It will go on to be termed one of the “Original Six” units. 1946 Air Force ROTC is established at Yale. 1957 Yale ends its Air Force ROTC unit. 1970 Naval and Army ROTC leave Yale.

DANIEL ZELAYA/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Cohen said his path to ROTC illustrates the major benefit of bringing ROTC back to Yale: Cohen attempted to be a part of Army ROTC last year, but found it to be “logistically really, really hard” to travel between Yale and the University of New Haven. Cohen quit before ever officially joining the program. However, he decided to rejoin once there was a program based at his own campus. “This is not just ROTC at Yale, but Yale ROTC,” Cohen said. The impact of ROTC has not ended with the participants. About 15 of Cohen’s friends and Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity brothers came to Friday’s ceremony to support him. Andrew Goble ’15 said he was excited at the opportunity to “support soldiers” and one of his own friends. “This was one of his long term goals — he’s lucky that it came to Yale while he was here,” Goble said.

BEYOND FOUR YEARS

By joining the ROTC unit a few weeks into the year, Cohen did not have the opportunity to experience “indoc.” Yet he is one of the program’s two sophomores, and therefore one of the two oldest midshipmen in the platoon. As the first ROTC class at Yale in 40 years, these students have no upperclassmen leadership to

help guide them. This presents both a challenge and opportunity for the cadets in the program. This chance to be a part of the first year of the platoon drew many of the students to it, but many mentioned that the group often lacks the knowledge and traditions imparted by upperclassmen. As they walk around campus, Smith said that they only have to be accountable to one another — not upperclassmen — to create the traditions of their program over four years. “Indoc” for the Yale platoon was not led by other Yale cadets, because Yale has no upperclassmen in the Naval ROTC program. Instead, the week was led by upperclassmen from nearby universities with ROTC. Compared to indoctrination, he said, being at Yale feels “different to not have someone pointing out what’s wrong with your uniform and wrong with your salute every morning,” Smith said, as upperclassmen from Holy Cross and Wooster Polytechnic Institute did. Midshipman Fong said the “indoc” experience tests “all those other motives, parents who wanted you to [be in ROTC] or the scholarship money, and those don’t carry you through.” As the current ROTC students grow into leadership roles, they

are also growing toward positions as leaders for the country. “Students here are constantly challenged to see the big picture in their courses, and that type of thinking in combination with military training can be really powerful,” said Ret. Gen. Stanley McChrystal, who teaches a seminar on leadership at Yale, in an email to the news. “Each of their intellectual cornerstones will be questioned and challenged,” Navy Assistant Secretary Juan Garcia III told the News at Friday’s welcome ceremony. In May 2016, many of these cadets and midshipmen will begin their commitments to their branch, which could range from two to 10 years. All said they are not yet sure whether the Navy or Air Force will be a life-long career for them, or whether they will leave the military once they have completed their time commitment. “At this point I see it as a shortterm. I don’t see myself as a navy man for the rest of my life,” Midshipman Daniel Caballero ’15 said. “You never know,” Birdsall said, “being in the Navy is different from being a midshipman.” Until then, ROTC students return back to their common rooms each night to be Yalies once again.

L UMCA ATS TS S AM N IFTOHR D ’ 1 6’ 1 6

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

BRANCH

Air Force

None

COLLEGE

Ezra Stiles

None

COLLEGE

COLLEGE

On the college program, not scholarship program

are required to be in uniform and “thanked for their service,” which they said they found funny or uncomfortable since they have not truly “served” yet. Last Friday, the Naval unit donned their “summer whites” while the Air Force cadets added ties and jackets to their uniforms for the official ceremony welcoming ROTC back to Yale’s campus. With all the fanfare, it isn’t as if ROTC students are invisible on campus. Instead, some ROTC members have said they enjoy the prominence and the opportunity for students to question them about the program. Birdsall said that he and others in the platoon were concerned before arriving on campus about whether ROTC would be criticized by their Yale peers. “Coming here, I thought it might happen, but it hasn’t,” Birdsall said. Midshipman Fong said that wearing the uniform has helped to connect the two branches of ROTC members at Yale as well, as they nod to one another in passing on the streets. At the base of the interaction is an unavoidable fact that every member of ROTC is also a Yale student. “The challenge is to live all the parts of Yale,” Clapper said. Part of that challenge is reconciling the fun of college with the responsibilities of a future officer. When asked about the policy on weekend activities, Birdsall, who was selected to be the Platoon Commander for the first semester based on his performance at “Indoc,” said that the common understanding is that “some guys are going to go out and get some alcohol in their system.” With regard to ROTC policy on the issue, Birdsall said, “They don’t want us to bring discredit on the Navy.” Clapper echoed Birdsall, saying that they have been instructed to behave as if always in uniform. For Sam Cohen ’15, ROTC has not dramatically changed his ability to be a Yale student. Instead, he views the program as a “complement to Yale life.” “You still stay up and get a Wenzel,” Cohen said, “but then you have to be up at 6:30 a.m. for PT on Monday morning.”

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Navy

FACT

Grandfather had ROTC scholarship but never comissioned

WARNER P E T E R OVERHAUSER N G U Y E N ’ 1 ’16 5 BRANCH

BRANCH

Father is Commander of Sub Base at New London, Conn.

FACT

UNIFORM DAY

GW AIBLRLIIE ALML E G RFO OFNFG ’ ’1166

MAJOR

HOMETOWN

plays for the varsity men’s soccer team. During season, varsity athletes in ROTC are exempted from attending the “PT” sessions of their ROTC unit. Asked if he was concerned that Detorie might get injured during his dual commitment, Yale men’s soccer coach Brian Tompkins said in an email to the News that he believes Detorie “can handle the rigors of physical training.” “If anything I think his soccer conditioning will help him with ROTC,” Tompkins added. Crabbe called Naval ROTC “a little more challenging” than the academy experience because of the dual role of each participant as both a student and a midshipman. “It takes a really diligent student to balance both of those roles,” she said. Four of the Naval midshipmen are involved with the Yale Political Union, and two are hoping to become part of the Tory Party. Melcher joined the avant-garde theatre troupe called “Control Group,” an artistic opportunity that seems a long way from the rigidity of the military. Now she not only wears the costumes of the stage but also the uniforms of the United States Navy.

“ROTC is about giving everybody an opportunity.” JAMES WALKER AMERICAN CLERGYMAN

Tutors with MathCounts and is involved in WYBC Radio

HOMETOWN

MAY 26, 2011 University President Richard Levin signs an agreement with U.S. Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus to establish a Naval ROTC unit at Yale, the first in Connecticut. SEPT. 12, 2011 University President Richard Levin and United States Secretary of the Air Force Michael B. Donley sign an agreement Monday to establish a branch of the Air Force ROTC at Yale.

“It’s normal, he’s just another guy,” said Thomas Shi ’16 of his roommate Cadet Keisling. Together, suitemates Eve Roth ’16 and Midshipman Fong will help each other get through Yale. “We’ll both be up at some ungodly hour. I’m cramming for science while she’s ironing her white uniform,” Roth said. Contact DAN STEIN at daniel.stein@yale.edu .

BRANCH

Henderson, Nev.

Air Force

COLLEGE

COLLEGE

MAJOR

MAJOR

Pierson

Applied Mathematics

WARNER L U C A S OVERHAUSER S A N F O R D ’ 1’16 6

MAY 5, 2011 Faculty approve resolutions allowing ROTC to return to campus.

R E N E E VO G E L ’ 1 6

Trumbull

FACT

DEC. 22, 2010 President Barack Obama signs the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the policy prohibiting open gay and lesbian personnel from serving in the military.

Political Science

A NMDARTET W SHMEINTDHR ’I1C6K S

HOMETOWN

Las Vegas, Nev. BRANCH

Air Force COLLEGE

Saybrook

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Father was a general

BRANCH

Navy

COLLEGE

Silliman

FACT MAJOR

Applied Mathematics HOMETOWN

Fairfax Station, Va.

Has a cousin at The Citadel

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Father was in Navy and went to Naval Academy

MAJOR

Computer Science HOMETOWN

Chicago, Ill.

FACT

Involved in the YPU Tory Party

FAMILY TIES TO MILITARY

Father was pilot for 23 years, F-22 test pilot FACT

Received Commander’s Leadership Scholarship


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS ·

FROM THE FRONT

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

“God made so many different kinds of people. Why would he allow only one way to serve him?” MARTIN BUBER AUSTRIAN PHILOSOPHER

Christian frat’s rule meets Yale policy Dining cites labor costs for high prices

BYX FOLO FROM PAGE 1

behalf of BYX against the University of Georgia and the University of Florida. Rather than go through with the lawsuit, the University of Georgia altered its policy to accommodate BYX’s membership requirements. The University of Florida followed after a circuit court ruled that the school must recognize BYX. The University of Missouri also withdrew its demands that BYX comply with its anti-discrimination policy after the Christian Legal Society sent a letter to the school’s administration citing legal precedents.

DINING FROM PAGE 1 would likely never fall below $2,925 per semester no matter how many meals it included. Director of Residential Dining Cathy Van Dyke SOM ’86 added that Yale has a commitment to keep a certain number of employees since dining hall workers are unionized, which adds to labor costs.

If you miss breakfast, the full meal plan is expensive, but you pay for the convenience.

If a school … [doesn’t] allow any discrimination by their student groups, that is a legitimate policy.

PATRICK CAGE ’14

ADA MELOY General counsel, American Council on Education But recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions have established that universities are within their rights to deny official recognition and funding to student organizations that discriminate on the basis of religion. In 2010, the Supreme Court ruled that a policy at the University of California’s Hastings College of the Law that prevented discriminatory organizations from registering with the school was constitutional. “Essentially what that case says is that if a school has a discrimination policy that says that they don’t allow any discrimination by their student groups, that is a legitimate policy that the school can have,” said Ada Meloy, general counsel at the American Council on Education. According to the Undergrad-

EMILIE FOYER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

The eight founding members of the Yale chapter of BYX, with the president, Victor Hicks ’15, pictured in the center. The new student organization may already be in violation of the University’s anti-discrimination policy. uate Regulations, “undergraduate organizations are expected to adhere to the University’s equal opportunity policies.” Yale’s equal opportunity statement prohibits the school from discriminating on the basis of “sex, race, color, religion, age, disability, or national or ethnic origin.” Meeske said the only exception to the rule is that some organizations can be open to only one gender. “The only exceptions would be things like a male-only or female-only singing group or sports group,” he said. “There are some exceptions that recognize that there are some activ-

Esty, Roraback battle for open House seat HOUSE RACE FROM PAGE 1 who prioritizes women’s issues, Medicare and Social Security — would likely “ride on the coattails” of Chris Murphy’s Senate campaign and President Barack Obama’s reelection campaign, giving her an advantage over Roraback among the district’s moderate conservatives. Esty has also benefited from generous donations from Connecticut Democrats, raising over $2 million in campaign finances, co m pa re d to Ro ra ba c k ’s $500,000 budget, according to the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonprofit, nonpartisan research group. Roraback’s failure to garner significant financial support from Republicans may be due in part to his effort to separate himself from the national party’s identity, Rose and Cameron said. “It’s becoming a common strategy in this race for [GOP] House candidates to distance themselves from the presidential nominee with his many recent gaffes,” said Zak Newman ’13, president of the Yale College Democrats. Roraback has vehemently rejected any association with the more right-wing factions of the Republican Party, such as the Tea Party. He threatened to take legal action against a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee advertisement aired on local television stations that he said misrepresented his stance on Republican vice-presidential nominee Paul Ryan’s budget plan, painting Roraback as a hardline Republican with a Tea Party affiliation, said Steve Bassermann ’07, his campaign manager, in a Monday press release. The economy may prove to be a decisive issue for voters in the 5th District, said Jeb Fain, a member of Esty’s campaign staff. Esty has promised to

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ESTY, RORABACK CAMPAIGNS

Elizabeth Esty LAW ’86 and state Senator Andrew Roraback ’83 are in the middle of a tight race for the Connecticut fifth district seat in the House of Representatives. repeal tax breaks for the wealthy in order to help fund manufacturing growth and job training, Fain said. Roraback’s economic proposals center on fiscal austerity and stimulation of job growth in the private sector. “I got in this race because I’m concerned about what’s happening to the middle class in America,” Esty told the News, calling the Washington establishment “completely broken.” The Yale College Democrats have turned out in support of Esty, organizing weekly phone banks to contact voters and conduct polls. They hope to visit the 5th District on Oct. 6 to canvass with Murphy and Esty, said Nicole Hobbs ’14, the Dems’ events coordinator.

ities that need to be a specific gender.” Hicks, who could not be reached for comment on Tuesday, told the News last week that “being a brother of the [BYX] fraternity is being a Christian. It’s one of the requirements.” Yale’s chapter of Alpha Epsilon Pi, a Jewish fraternity, takes a different approach as it does not restrict membership to Jewish students and has “several” non-Jewish members, according to AEPi president Daniel Tay ’14. “We look for people that embrace [the religious] side and can appreciate that side of the fraternity, but ultimately

the goal is to find people who fit in with our culture in a holistic sense,” said Tay, adding that AEPi hosts both religious and secular events. BYX is currently registered with the Yale Dean’s Office and has eight members — the minimum required to found a BYX chapter according to the national fraternity’s policies. Since fraternities and sororities at Yale are no longer allowed to hold rush in the fall, BYX will invite freshmen to rush the fraternity starting in the spring term. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .

“Labor is the number-one cost [because of] the number of dining halls and number of facilities,” Bobb said. ”We still have to cover the overhead costs of all of the colleges [themselves].” With the Any 14 meal plan, students are given $150 to spend at retail dining outlets such as Durfee’s, though the full meal plan does not give students any additional money. Yale Dining also offers an “anytime” meal plan allowing students unlimited meals for $2,996 per semester with $70 worth of points to spend at retail dining outlets. Though all students interviewed said they feel the dining plans are overpriced, Yale Dining’s options are significantly less costly than plans at many of Yale’s peer schools. Comparable meal plans at Harvard and Princeton both cost over $5,000. Brown offers a plan that allots seven meals per week at a price above $3,000. Bobb said Yale Dining monitors the weekly, monthly and yearly transactions indicating

the amount of meals per week students eat so the dining halls can provide just enough food. He added that the dining halls would not have enough food if each student came to every meal they were allotted. All students interviewed said even though they do not eat the total number of meals on their plans, they are generally satisfied with the plans because of the convenient payment system and the close proximity of dining halls. “If you miss breakfast, the full meal plan is expensive, but you pay for the convenience,” said Patrick Cage ’14. Van Dyke said Yale Dining refers students who express desire to get off the meal plan to Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry, though Gentry said he has not heard of any requests from students living on campus to opt out of the meal plan.. Jenny Donnelly ’13, who lives on campus, said she tried to opt out of a meal plan because she is gluten-intolerant and has certain dietary restrictions. Though she approached Yale Dining to discuss moving off of a plan, she said, she was told she must remain on a plan but could work with her residential college’s dining hall manager to find more gluten-free options. “I end up spending more [money] outside the dining hall than in it,” Donnelly said. “I think when it’s that many people [to serve] and you have restrictions and you’re a picky eater, you should be able to [get off the meal plan].” Students were able to change their meal plans this fall between Aug. 20 and Sept. 14. Contact MADELINE MCMAHON at madeline.mcmahon@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

“Do not wait to strike till the iron is hot; but make it hot by striking.” WILLIAM BUTLER YEATS IRISH POET AND PLAYWRIGHT

Utility workers prepare to strike over contract BY MONICA DISARE AND JONATHAN REED STAFF REPORTER AND CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Blackouts may be in store for some parts of Connecituct as workers in one of the state’s two largest utilities prepare to strike if its parent company, Northeast Utilities, refuses to budge on its proposed contract. Employees of Connecticut Light & Power will vote on the proposed four-year contract on Oct. 3. Northeast Utilities spokeswoman Tricia Taskey Modifica said the deal would add 30 new jobs and provide a 2.75 percent pay increase during the first three years and then a 2.5 percent pay increase in the contract’s final year. But the union is unlikely to approve the contract as it stands, said Frank Cirillo, the business manager for the union representing CL&P workers, as it does not meet workers’ needs for staffing and medical coverage. If Northeast Utilities refuses to make concessions, he added, workers are ready to strike. “If the company refuses to negotiate, we’ll strike the properties whenever we feel like it,” Cirillo said. “If we have to strike, it’s the company that’s forcing us to do this.”

Though Modifica said she believes that the company currently employs the appropriate number of workers for its day-today operations, Northeast Utilities is willing to add the new jobs as a compromise. She said that it is standard utility practice to hire staff based on a company’s average workload, and bring in more experienced crews to help during storms and other emergencies. “To hire more workers would be imprudent if there isn’t enough work to go around,” Modifica said. But Cirillo said the current situation is not acceptable. In recent months, he said, workers have been forced to work 14 weekends in a row due to insufficient staffing. Having to hire supplementary crews can be dangerous in an emergency situation, Connecticut Comptroller Kevin Lembo said. Lembo emphasized the need to avoid a repeat of what took place last year during Tropical Storm Irene, when some customers were forced to go without power for two weeks as CL&P and United Illuminating Company, the state’s other major utility, brought in supplementary crews from out of state. “Utility represents a critical part of our infrastructure, and we

can’t wait 12 days to have replacement workers,” Lembo said. Cirillo also argued that CL&P workers’ benefits are insufficient. Currently, he said, a retiree with a family plan pays close to $1,500 a month for health coverage. Due to understaffing, morale around the workplace is “lousy,” he said, and the proposed contract does little to alleviate these problems. “We’ve been working without a contract since June 1 and been continually abused,” said Cirillo. Modifica said union leadership has attempted to use the media to distort facts, while in reality the company values their employees’ hard work and has presented a fair offer. She also stressed that the contract would ensure four years of job security. But Cirillo said he hopes that Northeast Utilities will return to the bargaining table before the union meets to vote, since the current offer is unlikely to be accepted. CL&P was founded in 1917 and provides power to 1.2 million customers in 149 cities and towns across Connecticut. Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu and JONATHAN REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .

HARRY SIMPERINGHAM/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

When Tropical Storm Irene struck at the beginning of the last academic year, Connecticut’s utilities had to bring in work crews from out of state to repair downed lines, causing delays that officials hope to avoid in the future.

PR expert urges scientist advocacy BY NICHOLAS SMITH CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Environmental communications expert Keri Bolding argued that scientists should take an active role in promoting energy efficiency and sustainability in a Tuesday night talk at Kroon Hall. Bolding, the vice president of the nonprofit public relations firm Resource Media, discussed techniques of using scientific facts to persuade people to make environmentally conscious decisions before a crowd of roughly 40 students, professors and community members. Though some in the audience challenged her stance that scientists should engage the public, Bolding countered that scientists are the most credible

sources on environmental issues and thus have a responsibility to deliver their knowledge to the community. She said advocates should target people who are skeptical of taking action to combat climate change but who also seem receptive to new ideas. In order to form a persuasive argument, she said, advocates first need to gain a thorough understanding of an audience’s values and knowledge of environmental issues through public opinion research. Advocates must identify how willing people are to pay costs and to make long-term changes, she said. “When people hear the term ‘climate change,’ they have all these preconceived notions,” she said. “Sometimes they’re negative and sometimes they’re pos-

itive.” In delivering information to the public, Bolding stressed the importance of being concise and “clear about what’s at stake when you’re talking about the climate.” She emphasized the need to offer scientific facts in a story-like way, adding that she hopes a prominent, credible “hero” will emerge who can persuade people that climate change is a clear and present danger while also remaining optimistic about the future. “‘Junk food for fish’ sounds a lot better than ‘nitrogen pollution,’” Bolding said. Some environmental scientists in the audience raised concerns about the feasibility of arguing persuasively while also remaining factually accurate. One argued that a scientist’s

role is not to be a hero by relating information to the public, adding that persuasion inherently requires the skewing of facts. In response, Bolger stated that scientists are more credible sources of information than politicians, and it is important that scientists serve as “trusted messenger[s]” for the community. Six audience members interviewed all reacted positively to the talk. Kay McDonald, a New Haven resident, said Bolding was “very persuasive” herself and thought that the talk on the whole was “remarkable.” Nora Hawkins FES ’14, a student at the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, was “thrilled” by the talk, as it addressed the interesting challenge of encouraging “scientists

to have better sound bytes about climate change without skewing the science.”

When people hear the term “climate change,” they have all these preconceived notions. KERI BOLDING Vice president, Resource Media Margaret Shultz ’16 said the talk was “thought-provoking and revealing,” also noting that the topic of the discussion created considerable tension among audience members. “There was a lot of frustra-

tion in the room, which I think is endemic of frustration people feel right now about the dichotomy between what we know and what we’re doing and how to communicate what we know,” she said. The talk was part of a speaker series called “‘C’ Words: Addressing Climate Change Without Talking About Climate Change,” which is co-hosted by the Yale Center for Environmental Law and Policy and the Yale Climate and Energy Institute. The next event in the series on Oct. 16 will feature John Walke, senior attorney and Director of Clean Air Programs with the National Resources Defense Council. Contact NICHOLAS SMITH at nicholas.smith@yale.edu .

Interested in illustrating for the Yale Daily News?

CONTACT DAVID YU AT david.yu@yale.edu


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ARTS & CULTURE

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS COLE PORTER Winner of the first Tony Award for best musical for “Kiss Me Kate,” Cole Porter defied his family’s wishes and became a Broadway composer, writing both the lyrics and the music for his songs. Less notably perhaps, Porter composed the football fight song “Bulldog!”

Theater policies move toward centralization

ing after they had already received another venue. “You end up not knowing who really needs it or who already has three other theaters they could potentially go up in,” she added. On Tuesday night, the Arts and Awards committee informed applicants which venue their show had been assigned and whether it had received a Creative and Performing Arts award. Eighty-two percent of those who requested spaces for a theater show received their first or second choice theater, Cahan said in an email. Prior to this first-of-its-kind meeting, she added, administrators supporting theater production on campus “had no idea how many students received their preferred theater choice or how many needed to scurry around searching for back up options.” “We felt strongly that it was important to try to address a problem that had come to our attention thanks to

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students, Dean Cahan and the concerns of the masters’ offices: the processes across the colleges, as well as that of the Off-Broadway Theatre, were not as well-integrated,” said Stephen Pitti, the master of Ezra Stilles college and current chair of the Committee. “It was a lot more work for everybody, students and those of us reading applications … [this] is a common deadline for applications and notifications to rationalize the process somewhat.” Ethan Karetsky ’14, the producer for this semester’s staging of “Spring Awakening” and a member of the group of students that worked with Cahan on her presentation to the Council, said that enabling shows to find out about their venue and funding earlier will enable an expansion of Yale students’ production timelines, thus permitting a “smoother” production process. Karetsky said he saw the system as “backwards,” in that students

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applied to colleges for venue bookings and funding months after they began working on their productions. He added that students often had to make purchases of props and other design elementsout of pocket before even knowing whether they would receive a CPA award. Cahan said she became increasingly aware of such complaints when students directly approached her regarding them during the last academic year, during which she became more involved in Undergraduate Production (previously the Office of Undergraduate Productions) after the head of the office left his post in the fall. The dean then convened a meeting, she said, to bring together thirty leaders in theater and other performance arts, including opera and dance, to discuss issues facing students dealing with the OUP and the venue allocation system. The largest question on their minds was clear, she said. “Before the meeting, I sent out a

questionnaire in which I asked students to evaluate the theater situation on campus,” Cahan said. “The single most frequently cited complaint was difficulty in finding theater venues.” Davis said her experience dealing with requests for bookings as a residential college theater manager left her hoping that the Council of Masters could better define and “mainstream” the application process, so that all theater managers were aware of the shows asking for space in various colleges and could better coordinate how to place each in a venue that suited its needs. The new application for Creative and Performing Arts Awards funding asks students to clearly define their top choices for weekends during which to stage their shows and venues in which to house them. “In working with the OUP and the new leadership there and thinking about the different possibilities that we could tap into with an online

AMBER EDWARDS

Celebrations honoring songwriter Cole Porter 1913, whose senior year at Yale was exactly a century ago, begin Thursday witha cabaret Centennial Gala.

What do the lyrics of Broadway classics “Anything Goes” and “Kiss Me Kate” have in common with Yale football songs? All were written by Cole Porter 1913, one of the most prolific songwriters of the 20th century. On Thursday, two cabaret performances will kick off a year’s worth of events celebrating 100 years since the iconic musician’s graduation from Yale College.

“We shouldn’t lose the opportunity here at Yale to celebrate one of the luminaries of the 20th century,” said Sarah Peterson, who works in the Jonathan Edwards College Master’s Office and is both performing at the cabaret and acting as producer for the Centennial Gala. “We’re making as much tumult as we can.” Amber Edwards ’82, one of the self-described “instigators” of the yearlong celebration, said she hopes that the cabaret will serve

to “throw the gates open wide for everyone to come up with their own Cole Porter project.” The show will include individual renditions of Cole Porter classics, as well as performances by both the Whiffenpoofs of 2012 and a smaller group of recent Whiffenpoof alumni who will seek to recreate the sound and feel of the group when Cole Porter was a member, said former Whiffenpoof Ben Watsky ’13. While the Centennial Gala will celebrate Porter’s life and work

as a whole, it will focus particularly on commemorating Porter as a Yale undergraduate. Porter was “a big man on campus,” said Edwards, participating in everything from the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and the Pundits to the Glee Club and Whiffenpoofs, both of which regularly perform his songs today. Porter also wrote over 300 songs during his time as a student, said history professor Jay Gitlin ’71 MUS ’74 GRD ’02, including popular football fight

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system of application registration, it became clear that it would be possible to coordinate rankings of desires for certain spaces, and if that were collected in a database, it would be easy to allocate [venues],” said Jonathan Holloway, the master of Calhoun College and current chair of the Council. Holloway added that he believes a “tension” exists between residential colleges’ attempt to control their performance spaces and the theater community’s desire to allot spaces more centrally. Stuart Teal ’14, the manager of the Saybrook Underbrook and a board member for the Yale Drama Coalition, said he understands that college masters need to be the advocates of the view that colleges must be respected as separate entities, but said he believes centralization and uniformity are still essential. “From the theater community’s point of view, it’s a little unfair,” Casey said. “There are colleges that

100 years later, Cole Porter still ‘most entertaining’

BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER

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songs “Bulldog” and “Bingo” that are still sung today. “He gave us our anthems,” said Gitlin, noting that Porter was also voted “the most entertaining member of his class.” Watsky noted that over the course of the year he spent touring with the Whiffenpoofs, Porter was always the first alumnus mentioned in their introduction. “It’s been a hundred years, and he’s still the most famous one,” said Watsky, “I think that’s pretty remarkable.”

The next big event on the horizon is a concert reading of “Kiss Me Kate” scheduled to take place at the University Theatre on Jan. 19. Renowned British conductor David Charles Abell will be directing the orchestra in his own newly reconstructed rendition of one of Porter’s most famous musicals. According to Edwards, Abell has personally reworked the score from every available copy, including those in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, to bring the music back to Porter’s original intent. The main roles in the show will be played by eminent Yale alumni in both the music and theater worlds, including famed soprano Sari Gruber ’93 and Broadway star Michael Cerveris ’83. The chorus and the minor roles will be filled with both undergraduates and School of Drama students, creating a unique “meeting of paths” between students and several generations of Yale alumni in the performing arts, said Alex Ratner ’14, the show’s student musical director. Having many different people perform their own interpretations of Cole Porter songs is an appropriate celebration of the songwriter’s legacy: in Porter’s day, “the song was the star,” Gitlin said, “often more than its performer.” Writing in an age before recorded music meant that Porter and his contemporaries made money by selling sheet music, so Porter himself designed much of his work intending it to be learned and sung by as many as people as possible. “These songs are so rich,” Gitlin said. “There’s just so much you can do with them.” The cabaret will take place in two shows on Thursday, the first in the JE master’s house at 5:30 p.m. and the second in the Branford common room at 6:30 p.m. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

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don’t have theaters … if someone is in Berkeley, you have no college space to apply to [and] it’s important to remember that these theaters are very different and they’re not all equal by any means: it’s not just that different kinds of productions should go up in different theaters — there are theaters that are better quality than others, based on when they were built.” Karetsky said the theater venues on campus could be divided into three styles: the largest, such as the Off-Broadway Theatre, the Whitney space, and the Morse/Stiles Crescent Theatre; medium-sized venues, such as the Saybrook Underbrook and the Calhoun Cabaret; and the smallest, which would include the Davenport/ Pierson theater, the Jonathan Edwards theater and the Nick Chapel space in Trumbull College. “I think that now, with more communication between the colleges, [the Council] will be able to better allocate theaters within these ranges so that

shows will get what they desire and what they deserve,” Karetsky said. Krier said that the allocation process this fall included considerations about qualities of particular theaters that specific shows might need. Pitti added that he believes Krier’s presence at the meeting, in her new role as head of Undergraduate Production, facilitated the process as she served “as a resource across these colleges.” That office “used to be seen as a police force when it was the OUP,” Karetsky said. “It’s changed to become a supporting organization, a nurturing organization … I think the difference is that [Krier] is just such a warm person … she wants to enable creativity.” Four students involved in theater at Yale said they believe Krier has managed to further boost Undergraduate Production’s image as more of a resource for students than a limiting force.

Krier said one of her priorities is to encourage advance planning among students seeking to stage productions, so that UP staff can be available to help them plan much earlier in their process. One new change that will encourage such thinking, she said, is that the venue and CPA awards granted on Tuesday will be valid all the way up to spring break, as opposed to the previous system of their only being available during the semester in which they were awarded. Krier said this policy means that more students will be able to plan productions for the first two months of the spring semester while being certain that they will have institutional funding. “Allow[ing] CPA awards and theater awards to go all the way to spring break was done in the hope that we’ll see more arts programming in January and February, which are fallow periods in the arts,” Pitti said. He added that the Council is “very

summer break

This past Monday, for the first time in recent memory, representatives from every administrative office concerned with undergraduate theater production at Yale came together to allocate residential college theater spaces and arts funding for shows hoping to go up between now and the beginning of Spring Break. Spring semester meetings between students in the performing arts community and Susan Cahan, associate dean for the arts, had revealed that the unclear theater allocation system was “one of the biggest — maybe even the biggest — concerns” for undergraduates in the performing arts scene, said Irene Casey ’14, the president of the Yale Drama Coalition. “Basically, the system [was] fairly chaotic,” Casey said. “Before, we worked on all kinds of levels and all the theaters functioned almost independently of each other. It would be difficult for a show to juggle all of those different theaters, and you could be halfway through rehearsals and have a set design already and then find out that you didn’t have the theater you wanted to have.” After Cahan and Kathryn Krier DRA ’07, the head of Undergraduate Production at Yale College, presented student concerns about the allocation of theater spaces to the Council of Masters last spring, the Council’s Arts and Awards Committee introduced a new, more integrated application system for theater venues this fall. Students were encouraged to submit venue and funding applications for any shows planned to go up before spring break by Sept. 17, Cahan said, in order to receive a response a week later. Administrators and students said the new policy would enable greater advanced planning into the spring semester and reduce uncertainty among those seeking to put up productions while meeting the various deadlines for different college theaters. Calhoun Cabaret manager Meredith Davis ’13, who serves as president of the Yale Dramatic Association and was also among the group Cahan consulted, said the previous system left students applying to multiple residential college theaters for fear of not getting a booking at any, and even, on occasion, failing to cancel one book-

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BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER

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likely” to introduce another CPA funding deadline in late March or April to enable students to plan for shows in another ‘fallow period’: the beginning of the fall semester. Teal said, though, that he hopes that the Council will sit down to hold collaborative talks with students before enacting any new policies. “I don’t think everyone is involved in the conversation that should be,” he said. “It is more than just a bilateral problem … all the students can meet with Cahan all they want, and who she talks to is the Council … it’s sort of one to one to one, and there’s never been a point where everybody involved has sat down and talked to one another.” Pitti said the Council will prioritize being responsive to students as it continues to make decisions in the coming months. “I think this is a great step forward and I think that having all of the people who allocate the theater spaces come together at the end of the pro-

cess talk is key but I do think that it would be great to take an even larger step forward to look at — I think it’d be great to have more clarity about why certain shows will be given theaters, for instance,” Casey said. Cahan said one of her main goals during the process of developing these policies is to engage with students more collaboratively while reducing anxiety they have had about putting up shows. Still, she added, “There will be enough residual chaos to please even the most chaos-loving Yale College student,” she added. “Even if the chaos is only the chaos of the creative process.” Yale’s campus is home nine primary venues for performance arts shows and rehearsals, according to the Undergraduate Prodcutions website. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

When William Shakespeare met George Orwell BY JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTER When most people think of a Shakespearean comedy, the phrase “dystopian metropolis center in a 20th-century netherworld” rarely comes to mind. Yet that’s how Alexi Sargent ’15, director of this fall’s Dramat Experimental Production, “Measure for Measure,” describes the Vienna brought to life on the Yale Repertory Theatre stage this weekend. This dystopian concept pervades the set, a dark trellis of misaligned gridding and protruding shards of a city. The nontraditional setting evokes works like “1984” by George Orwell and “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley, and is meant to reflect the play’s themes of political corruption and the darkness of human desires. The production’s staging fits the comedy’s widespread categorization as one of Shakespeare’s “problem plays.” Sargent said the one rule of comedy the play does not break is that no characters die, although the darkly humorous “Measure for Measure” pushes the envelope in a scene in which a character narrowly evades getting beheaded. “The unrecognizable, modern setting draws attention to the play’s moral struggle, which can happen anywhere, anytime, to anyone. It can happen in your home,” said stage manager Pek Shibao ’15. Sargent said he wanted highlight the Orwellian elements of the play by creating a Vienna that is a character in and of itself, calling it “a city that has the trappings of a totalitarian order that has fallen by the wayside.” When the character of Angelo reactivates laws against fornication and enacts a secret police, the stage’s city is plastered with posters of Angelo’s face, echoing Orwell’s idea of “Big Brother.” “They don’t say ‘Angelo is watching you,’ but it’s close enough,” Sargent added. Set designer Jonah Coe-Scharff ’14 drew inspiration from early

Soviet-era Structuralists like Yakov Chernikov to create the imposing set. “Like the play, the set is about the failure of grids,” Sargent said. “There are painted pieces that represent the city, its buildings and industrial smog, that are all not quite aligned with grids imposed by the trellis that is basis of the set.” Sargent added that since the character of the Duke is described in the text as “the duke of dark corners,” the design team wanted to create a “set with dark corners,” filled with secrets that are revealed throughout the play. Marisa Kaugars ’15 designed the play’s costumes to reflect the duality of the city: the clean, sharp world of Angelo and the Duke, and Vienna’s seedy “underbelly.” “Aesthetically, the underworld is more retro, the upper world is more futuristic,” Kaugars said, adding that experimenting with materials led her to create pieces like a chain mail skirt and a basket reed headpiece. Shibao said these two distinct worlds create more activity and confusion in the play, which this production highlights by only using 12 actors for about 25 roles. “There are many layers of people coming and going,” Shibao said. “It’s basically a huge mess, except for the parts where Angelo is trying to restore order, but of course that doesn’t work out very well.” He said this created a sense of tension that “everything’s waiting to snap at some point.” Actor Lucie Ledbetter ’15 said the dystopian vision reflects “The Hunger Games,” which is an appropriate choice for “Measure for Measure.” “A lot of times, Shakespeare plays are interpreted with pop culture to just be a cool setting, but I think in this way, that decision makes sense,” Ledbetter said, adding that the theme of political corruption is especially applicable to the modern world. “Measure for Measure” opens Thursday at 8 p.m. and runs through Saturday. Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .

TORY BURNSIDE-CLAPP/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The set design of the Dramat’s production of Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure” is meant to evoke the layers of characters, “dark corners” and “failures of grids” that fill the story.


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ARTS & CULTURE

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS COLE PORTER Winner of the first Tony Award for best musical for “Kiss Me Kate,” Cole Porter defied his family’s wishes and became a Broadway composer, writing both the lyrics and the music for his songs. Less notably perhaps, Porter composed the football fight song “Bulldog!”

Theater policies move toward centralization

ing after they had already received another venue. “You end up not knowing who really needs it or who already has three other theaters they could potentially go up in,” she added. On Tuesday night, the Arts and Awards committee informed applicants which venue their show had been assigned and whether it had received a Creative and Performing Arts award. Eighty-two percent of those who requested spaces for a theater show received their first or second choice theater, Cahan said in an email. Prior to this first-of-its-kind meeting, she added, administrators supporting theater production on campus “had no idea how many students received their preferred theater choice or how many needed to scurry around searching for back up options.” “We felt strongly that it was important to try to address a problem that had come to our attention thanks to

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students, Dean Cahan and the concerns of the masters’ offices: the processes across the colleges, as well as that of the Off-Broadway Theatre, were not as well-integrated,” said Stephen Pitti, the master of Ezra Stilles college and current chair of the Committee. “It was a lot more work for everybody, students and those of us reading applications … [this] is a common deadline for applications and notifications to rationalize the process somewhat.” Ethan Karetsky ’14, the producer for this semester’s staging of “Spring Awakening” and a member of the group of students that worked with Cahan on her presentation to the Council, said that enabling shows to find out about their venue and funding earlier will enable an expansion of Yale students’ production timelines, thus permitting a “smoother” production process. Karetsky said he saw the system as “backwards,” in that students

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applied to colleges for venue bookings and funding months after they began working on their productions. He added that students often had to make purchases of props and other design elementsout of pocket before even knowing whether they would receive a CPA award. Cahan said she became increasingly aware of such complaints when students directly approached her regarding them during the last academic year, during which she became more involved in Undergraduate Production (previously the Office of Undergraduate Productions) after the head of the office left his post in the fall. The dean then convened a meeting, she said, to bring together thirty leaders in theater and other performance arts, including opera and dance, to discuss issues facing students dealing with the OUP and the venue allocation system. The largest question on their minds was clear, she said. “Before the meeting, I sent out a

questionnaire in which I asked students to evaluate the theater situation on campus,” Cahan said. “The single most frequently cited complaint was difficulty in finding theater venues.” Davis said her experience dealing with requests for bookings as a residential college theater manager left her hoping that the Council of Masters could better define and “mainstream” the application process, so that all theater managers were aware of the shows asking for space in various colleges and could better coordinate how to place each in a venue that suited its needs. The new application for Creative and Performing Arts Awards funding asks students to clearly define their top choices for weekends during which to stage their shows and venues in which to house them. “In working with the OUP and the new leadership there and thinking about the different possibilities that we could tap into with an online

AMBER EDWARDS

Celebrations honoring songwriter Cole Porter 1913, whose senior year at Yale was exactly a century ago, begin Thursday witha cabaret Centennial Gala.

What do the lyrics of Broadway classics “Anything Goes” and “Kiss Me Kate” have in common with Yale football songs? All were written by Cole Porter 1913, one of the most prolific songwriters of the 20th century. On Thursday, two cabaret performances will kick off a year’s worth of events celebrating 100 years since the iconic musician’s graduation from Yale College.

“We shouldn’t lose the opportunity here at Yale to celebrate one of the luminaries of the 20th century,” said Sarah Peterson, who works in the Jonathan Edwards College Master’s Office and is both performing at the cabaret and acting as producer for the Centennial Gala. “We’re making as much tumult as we can.” Amber Edwards ’82, one of the self-described “instigators” of the yearlong celebration, said she hopes that the cabaret will serve

to “throw the gates open wide for everyone to come up with their own Cole Porter project.” The show will include individual renditions of Cole Porter classics, as well as performances by both the Whiffenpoofs of 2012 and a smaller group of recent Whiffenpoof alumni who will seek to recreate the sound and feel of the group when Cole Porter was a member, said former Whiffenpoof Ben Watsky ’13. While the Centennial Gala will celebrate Porter’s life and work

as a whole, it will focus particularly on commemorating Porter as a Yale undergraduate. Porter was “a big man on campus,” said Edwards, participating in everything from the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity and the Pundits to the Glee Club and Whiffenpoofs, both of which regularly perform his songs today. Porter also wrote over 300 songs during his time as a student, said history professor Jay Gitlin ’71 MUS ’74 GRD ’02, including popular football fight

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system of application registration, it became clear that it would be possible to coordinate rankings of desires for certain spaces, and if that were collected in a database, it would be easy to allocate [venues],” said Jonathan Holloway, the master of Calhoun College and current chair of the Council. Holloway added that he believes a “tension” exists between residential colleges’ attempt to control their performance spaces and the theater community’s desire to allot spaces more centrally. Stuart Teal ’14, the manager of the Saybrook Underbrook and a board member for the Yale Drama Coalition, said he understands that college masters need to be the advocates of the view that colleges must be respected as separate entities, but said he believes centralization and uniformity are still essential. “From the theater community’s point of view, it’s a little unfair,” Casey said. “There are colleges that

100 years later, Cole Porter still ‘most entertaining’

BY ANYA GRENIER STAFF REPORTER

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songs “Bulldog” and “Bingo” that are still sung today. “He gave us our anthems,” said Gitlin, noting that Porter was also voted “the most entertaining member of his class.” Watsky noted that over the course of the year he spent touring with the Whiffenpoofs, Porter was always the first alumnus mentioned in their introduction. “It’s been a hundred years, and he’s still the most famous one,” said Watsky, “I think that’s pretty remarkable.”

The next big event on the horizon is a concert reading of “Kiss Me Kate” scheduled to take place at the University Theatre on Jan. 19. Renowned British conductor David Charles Abell will be directing the orchestra in his own newly reconstructed rendition of one of Porter’s most famous musicals. According to Edwards, Abell has personally reworked the score from every available copy, including those in the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, to bring the music back to Porter’s original intent. The main roles in the show will be played by eminent Yale alumni in both the music and theater worlds, including famed soprano Sari Gruber ’93 and Broadway star Michael Cerveris ’83. The chorus and the minor roles will be filled with both undergraduates and School of Drama students, creating a unique “meeting of paths” between students and several generations of Yale alumni in the performing arts, said Alex Ratner ’14, the show’s student musical director. Having many different people perform their own interpretations of Cole Porter songs is an appropriate celebration of the songwriter’s legacy: in Porter’s day, “the song was the star,” Gitlin said, “often more than its performer.” Writing in an age before recorded music meant that Porter and his contemporaries made money by selling sheet music, so Porter himself designed much of his work intending it to be learned and sung by as many as people as possible. “These songs are so rich,” Gitlin said. “There’s just so much you can do with them.” The cabaret will take place in two shows on Thursday, the first in the JE master’s house at 5:30 p.m. and the second in the Branford common room at 6:30 p.m. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

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don’t have theaters … if someone is in Berkeley, you have no college space to apply to [and] it’s important to remember that these theaters are very different and they’re not all equal by any means: it’s not just that different kinds of productions should go up in different theaters — there are theaters that are better quality than others, based on when they were built.” Karetsky said the theater venues on campus could be divided into three styles: the largest, such as the Off-Broadway Theatre, the Whitney space, and the Morse/Stiles Crescent Theatre; medium-sized venues, such as the Saybrook Underbrook and the Calhoun Cabaret; and the smallest, which would include the Davenport/ Pierson theater, the Jonathan Edwards theater and the Nick Chapel space in Trumbull College. “I think that now, with more communication between the colleges, [the Council] will be able to better allocate theaters within these ranges so that

shows will get what they desire and what they deserve,” Karetsky said. Krier said that the allocation process this fall included considerations about qualities of particular theaters that specific shows might need. Pitti added that he believes Krier’s presence at the meeting, in her new role as head of Undergraduate Production, facilitated the process as she served “as a resource across these colleges.” That office “used to be seen as a police force when it was the OUP,” Karetsky said. “It’s changed to become a supporting organization, a nurturing organization … I think the difference is that [Krier] is just such a warm person … she wants to enable creativity.” Four students involved in theater at Yale said they believe Krier has managed to further boost Undergraduate Production’s image as more of a resource for students than a limiting force.

Krier said one of her priorities is to encourage advance planning among students seeking to stage productions, so that UP staff can be available to help them plan much earlier in their process. One new change that will encourage such thinking, she said, is that the venue and CPA awards granted on Tuesday will be valid all the way up to spring break, as opposed to the previous system of their only being available during the semester in which they were awarded. Krier said this policy means that more students will be able to plan productions for the first two months of the spring semester while being certain that they will have institutional funding. “Allow[ing] CPA awards and theater awards to go all the way to spring break was done in the hope that we’ll see more arts programming in January and February, which are fallow periods in the arts,” Pitti said. He added that the Council is “very

summer break

This past Monday, for the first time in recent memory, representatives from every administrative office concerned with undergraduate theater production at Yale came together to allocate residential college theater spaces and arts funding for shows hoping to go up between now and the beginning of Spring Break. Spring semester meetings between students in the performing arts community and Susan Cahan, associate dean for the arts, had revealed that the unclear theater allocation system was “one of the biggest — maybe even the biggest — concerns” for undergraduates in the performing arts scene, said Irene Casey ’14, the president of the Yale Drama Coalition. “Basically, the system [was] fairly chaotic,” Casey said. “Before, we worked on all kinds of levels and all the theaters functioned almost independently of each other. It would be difficult for a show to juggle all of those different theaters, and you could be halfway through rehearsals and have a set design already and then find out that you didn’t have the theater you wanted to have.” After Cahan and Kathryn Krier DRA ’07, the head of Undergraduate Production at Yale College, presented student concerns about the allocation of theater spaces to the Council of Masters last spring, the Council’s Arts and Awards Committee introduced a new, more integrated application system for theater venues this fall. Students were encouraged to submit venue and funding applications for any shows planned to go up before spring break by Sept. 17, Cahan said, in order to receive a response a week later. Administrators and students said the new policy would enable greater advanced planning into the spring semester and reduce uncertainty among those seeking to put up productions while meeting the various deadlines for different college theaters. Calhoun Cabaret manager Meredith Davis ’13, who serves as president of the Yale Dramatic Association and was also among the group Cahan consulted, said the previous system left students applying to multiple residential college theaters for fear of not getting a booking at any, and even, on occasion, failing to cancel one book-

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likely” to introduce another CPA funding deadline in late March or April to enable students to plan for shows in another ‘fallow period’: the beginning of the fall semester. Teal said, though, that he hopes that the Council will sit down to hold collaborative talks with students before enacting any new policies. “I don’t think everyone is involved in the conversation that should be,” he said. “It is more than just a bilateral problem … all the students can meet with Cahan all they want, and who she talks to is the Council … it’s sort of one to one to one, and there’s never been a point where everybody involved has sat down and talked to one another.” Pitti said the Council will prioritize being responsive to students as it continues to make decisions in the coming months. “I think this is a great step forward and I think that having all of the people who allocate the theater spaces come together at the end of the pro-

cess talk is key but I do think that it would be great to take an even larger step forward to look at — I think it’d be great to have more clarity about why certain shows will be given theaters, for instance,” Casey said. Cahan said one of her main goals during the process of developing these policies is to engage with students more collaboratively while reducing anxiety they have had about putting up shows. Still, she added, “There will be enough residual chaos to please even the most chaos-loving Yale College student,” she added. “Even if the chaos is only the chaos of the creative process.” Yale’s campus is home nine primary venues for performance arts shows and rehearsals, according to the Undergraduate Prodcutions website. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

When William Shakespeare met George Orwell BY JULIA ZORTHIAN STAFF REPORTER When most people think of a Shakespearean comedy, the phrase “dystopian metropolis center in a 20th-century netherworld” rarely comes to mind. Yet that’s how Alexi Sargent ’15, director of this fall’s Dramat Experimental Production, “Measure for Measure,” describes the Vienna brought to life on the Yale Repertory Theatre stage this weekend. This dystopian concept pervades the set, a dark trellis of misaligned gridding and protruding shards of a city. The nontraditional setting evokes works like “1984” by George Orwell and “Brave New World” by Aldous Huxley, and is meant to reflect the play’s themes of political corruption and the darkness of human desires. The production’s staging fits the comedy’s widespread categorization as one of Shakespeare’s “problem plays.” Sargent said the one rule of comedy the play does not break is that no characters die, although the darkly humorous “Measure for Measure” pushes the envelope in a scene in which a character narrowly evades getting beheaded. “The unrecognizable, modern setting draws attention to the play’s moral struggle, which can happen anywhere, anytime, to anyone. It can happen in your home,” said stage manager Pek Shibao ’15. Sargent said he wanted highlight the Orwellian elements of the play by creating a Vienna that is a character in and of itself, calling it “a city that has the trappings of a totalitarian order that has fallen by the wayside.” When the character of Angelo reactivates laws against fornication and enacts a secret police, the stage’s city is plastered with posters of Angelo’s face, echoing Orwell’s idea of “Big Brother.” “They don’t say ‘Angelo is watching you,’ but it’s close enough,” Sargent added. Set designer Jonah Coe-Scharff ’14 drew inspiration from early

Soviet-era Structuralists like Yakov Chernikov to create the imposing set. “Like the play, the set is about the failure of grids,” Sargent said. “There are painted pieces that represent the city, its buildings and industrial smog, that are all not quite aligned with grids imposed by the trellis that is basis of the set.” Sargent added that since the character of the Duke is described in the text as “the duke of dark corners,” the design team wanted to create a “set with dark corners,” filled with secrets that are revealed throughout the play. Marisa Kaugars ’15 designed the play’s costumes to reflect the duality of the city: the clean, sharp world of Angelo and the Duke, and Vienna’s seedy “underbelly.” “Aesthetically, the underworld is more retro, the upper world is more futuristic,” Kaugars said, adding that experimenting with materials led her to create pieces like a chain mail skirt and a basket reed headpiece. Shibao said these two distinct worlds create more activity and confusion in the play, which this production highlights by only using 12 actors for about 25 roles. “There are many layers of people coming and going,” Shibao said. “It’s basically a huge mess, except for the parts where Angelo is trying to restore order, but of course that doesn’t work out very well.” He said this created a sense of tension that “everything’s waiting to snap at some point.” Actor Lucie Ledbetter ’15 said the dystopian vision reflects “The Hunger Games,” which is an appropriate choice for “Measure for Measure.” “A lot of times, Shakespeare plays are interpreted with pop culture to just be a cool setting, but I think in this way, that decision makes sense,” Ledbetter said, adding that the theme of political corruption is especially applicable to the modern world. “Measure for Measure” opens Thursday at 8 p.m. and runs through Saturday. Contact JULIA ZORTHIAN at julia.zorthian@yale.edu .

TORY BURNSIDE-CLAPP/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The set design of the Dramat’s production of Shakespeare’s “Measure for Measure” is meant to evoke the layers of characters, “dark corners” and “failures of grids” that fill the story.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T Dow Jones 13,457.55, -0.75%

UNITED NATIONS — Confronting global tumult and Muslim anger, President Barack Obama exhorted world leaders Tuesday to stand fast against violence and extremism, arguing that protecting religious rights and free speech must be a universal responsibility and not just an American obligation. “The impulse towards intolerance and violence may initially be focused on the West, but over time it cannot be contained,” Obama warned the U.N. General Assembly in an urgent call to action underscored by the high stakes for all nations. The gloomy backdrop for Obama’s speech — a world riven by deadly protests against an antiIslamic video, by war in Syria, by rising tension over a nuclear Iran and more — marked the dramatic shifts that have occurred in the year since the General Assembly’s last ministerial meeting, when democratic uprisings in the Arab world created a sense of excitement and optimism. Obama had tough words for Iran and condemned anew the violence in Syria as Bashar al-Assad tries to retain power. Six weeks before the U.S. presidential election, an unmistakable campaign element framed Obama’s speech as well: The president’s Republican rival, Mitt Romney, has tried to cast him as a weak leader on the world stage, too quick to apologize for American values. Romney, speaking at a Clinton Global Initiative forum just miles from the U.N., avoided direct criticism of Obama in deference to the apolitical settings of the day, but he said he hoped to return a year

later “as president, having made substantial progress” on democratic reforms. Obama, likewise, avoided direct politicking in his speech but offered a pointed contrast to his GOP opponent’s caught-ontape comment that there is little hope for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. “Among Israelis and Palestinians,” Obama said, “the future must not belong to those who turn their backs on a prospect of peace.” Secretary-General Ban Kimoon’s opening state-of-theworld speech to the General Assembly’s presidents, prime ministers and monarchs sketched the current time as one when “too often, divisions are exploited for short-term political gain” and “too many people are ready to take small flames of indifference and turn them into a bonfire.” The leaders are assembled here as anger still churns over a madein-America video that mocked the Prophet Muhammad. The video helped touch off protests throughout the Muslim world that have left at least 40 people dead, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya. Obama, a onetime professor of constitutional law, delivered what amounted to a lecture on what he presented as the bedrock importance of free speech, even if it comes at a price. He stressed that just as the “cruel and disgusting” video did not reflect U.S. values, the backlash against it did not represent the views of most Muslims. Still, he said, “the events of the last two weeks speak to the need for all of us to address honestly the tensions between the West and the Arab world that is moving towards democracy.”

Obama said the notion of controlling information is obsolete in the Internet age, “when anyone with a cellphone can spread offensive views around the world with the click of a button.” But he said leaders must be swift to respond to those who would answer hateful speech with violence and chaos. In his last international address before the November elections, the president had strong words for the leaders in Iran and Syria but broke no new ground on any actions the U.S. might take.

The United States will do what we must to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. BARACK OBAMA President, United States of America He warned that while there is still hope of resolving the dispute over Iran’s nuclear program through diplomacy, “that time is not unlimited.” Without laying out specifics, he added: “The United States will do what we must to prevent Iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon.” As for the rising violence in Syria, Obama told the U.N. delegates, “The future must not belong to a dictator who massacres his people. If there is a cause that cries out for protest in the world today, it is a regime that tortures children and shoots rockets at apartment buildings. We must remain engaged to assure that what began with citizens demanding their rights does not end in a cycle of sectarian violence.”

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Obama campaign has momentum — and nerves BY JULIE PACE ASSOCIATED PRESS CHICAGO — Six weeks from Election Day, President Barack Obama’s campaign has momentum — and a big case of nerves. Top advisers are both relishing in Obama’s edge in key battleground state polling and warning it can change in an instant. They’re wary of the many factors that still could derail the Democrat’s campaign, from simmering tensions in the Middle East to the three highstakes presidential debates. They’re worried, too, about a flood of negative advertisements from Republican-leaning outside groups and potential complacency among Democratic voters and volunteers who think the race is a lock for Obama. Also weighing on them: unforeseen domestic or international events that can shake up a close race in the homestretch. “I can only worry about what I can control,” says Jim Messina, Obama’s campaign manager. For now, that means the overall campaign strategy. Yet, even there, Obama’s team is being careful: the Democrat is considering making a late play for traditionally Republican Arizona — either to win it or to force rival Mitt Romney to spend money to protect GOP turf — but advisers are weighing the potential that a move like that could backfire by leaving fewer resources for more competitive states. With just over 40 days until the election and with many states already voting, public and internal polls show Obama leading Romney in many of the eight or so battleground states that will determine the election. But both campaigns are mindful that much can happen in the homestretch, and advisers for each candidate expect the numbers to tighten as more voters tune into the race in the final weeks. By the day, both sides are adjusting their strategies in key states and monitoring how, in voters’ eyes, signs of growth in the economy square with an unemployment rate that remains above 8 percent. The race had been deadlocked until recently when Obama edged ahead in polling after his convention. Even so, neither candidate has been able to put the race out of reach of their opponent, despite the sluggish economy

Obama has presided over and a series of missteps by Romney. At Obama’s Chicago campaign headquarters, the mood underscores the balance the campaign is trying to strike: optimism about the trajectory of the race with cautiousness about all the things that could shift the dynamics. Obama aides are focused on bolstering getout-the-vote operations in battleground states to buffer against any late shifts in the race, countering negative ads by a crush of Republican-leaning super political action committees — and living by the mantra of not making too much out of any one poll or event. Last week, campaign staffers were ordered to be restrained in their response and avoid appearing as though they were declaring victory prematurely when a video surfaced showing Romney telling wealthy donors that 47 percent of Americans believe they are victims. And earlier this month, the campaign sought to keep its focus on the economy, the No. 1 issue for voters, rather than get dragged into a foreign policy debate after a U.S. ambassador and three other Americans were killed in Libya. The worry about next week’s presidential debate — the first of three in as many weeks — is clear at the downtown high rise that houses Obama’s campaign inner circle and hundreds of staffers. On Oct. 3, most Americans will for the first time see the two men standing side by side, a visual that could make Romney seem more presidential to some voters. And the high-stakes showdowns always carry the potential for a slip-up that can be hard to recover from just weeks before Election Day. Obama has spent the past few weeks preparing for the debates, though advisers won’t say much about it — other than to try to lower expectations for Obama and raise them for Romney. Advisers argue that the debate format — limited to 90 minutes — works against the sometimes long-winded Obama, who they cast as the underdog on a debate stage. As Obama adviser Robert Gibbs put it in a CBS interview: “Mitt Romney, I think, has an advantage because he’s been through 20 of these debates in the primaries over the last year. He even bragged that he was declared the winner in 16 of those debates.”


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

A chance of light rain before 8am, then scattered showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 75.

TOMORROW

FRIDAY

High of 71, low of 54.

High of 67, low of 55.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 12:00 PM “Sisterhood across the Color Line? Audre Lorde, German Women, and Feminist Solidarities.” Katharina Gerund will examine Audre Lorde’s transatlantic journeys and her interactions with Afro-German and white German women in order to explore the possibilities and limits of feminist solidarities across “the color line.” 230 Prospect St. 8:00 PM Organ performance by Francesco Cera. Francesco Cera is an Italian organist regarded as one of Italy’s leading early music specialists; he has taught master classes at universities across the Unites States and Europe and has payed as a soloist in Ensemble Arte Musica at international festivals. He will be playing the music of Bach, Merula, Trabaci, and Frescobaldi. Marquand Chapel (409 Prospect St.).

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 8:00 PM Premiere: Yale Dramat’s production of “Measure for Measure.” “Measure for Measure” is Shakespeare’s most provocative and paranoiac play, a portrait of a city in turmoil thanks to its citizens’ unruly desires and its rulers’ oppressive hypocrisy. A panoply of comedic characters from Vienna’s underbelly round out this vivid, voluptuous, politically charged morality tale. Yale Repertory Theatre (1120 Chapel St.).

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 9:00 AM “The Pink Hard Hat Event.” Employees of Tucker Mechanical, Yale Cancer Center, and Yale School of Medicine will wear pink hard hats and arrange themselves in the shape of a ribbon in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. The event is sponsored by EMCOR Group. Dr. Anees Chagpar will speak at the event. Amistad Park.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

11:30 AM “No Small Matter: Making Early Childhood Interventions Effective.” Harold Alderman, Human Development Economist for the World Bank, will give a lecture on the importance of investing in early childhood programs in developing countries in order to reduce the impact of poverty. William L. Harkness Hall (100 Wall St.), room 116.

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CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Stir-fry additive 4 [frog lands in pond] 8 Remote control battery 14 Baba of folklore 15 Bindle carrier 16 “Zip your lip!” 17 Diarist Anaïs 18 “Gotta hit the hay” 20 Future snakes, perhaps 22 Regards highly 23 Elementary school fundamentals 25 Cut from the same cloth 29 Lemon and lime 30 Swift means of attack? 32 Put into words 33 Poe’s “ungainly fowl” 36 D.C. athlete 37 Mom’s behavior warning 41 __ of Good Feelings 42 Gives the heaveho 43 Rap’s __ Wayne 44 With-the-grain woodworking technique 46 Theater sections 48 Canadian pump sign 49 Marks to brag about 54 “Why bother?” 56 Color property 57 Canned pasta brand 61 “Characters welcome” network 62 Receive, as a radio signal 63 South American country at 0 degrees lat. 64 Looney Tunes collectible 65 Structural threat for many a house 66 Gels 67 Towel lettering

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9/26/12

By Jeffrey Wechsler

DOWN 1 “The Balcony” painter 2 Insult 3 Cookies with a bite 4 Chi preceder 5 Solitary sorts 6 Beyond zaftig 7 Baudelaire, par exemple 8 Evaluates 9 Quark’s locale 10 Global networking pioneer 11 Girl in a pasture 12 Gossipy Smith 13 OCS grads, usually 19 “__ Rosenkavalier” 21 Bed or home ending 24 “Over here!” 26 Reader with a sensitive screen 27 Modern site of Mesopotamia 28 Keeps after taxes 31 Like Big Ben 33 Big chunk of Eur. 34 Framed work

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU HARD

4 1 2 8

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 No. twos 37 Nothing more than 38 Eye part 39 Surpassed in extravagance 40 Elie Wiesel work 45 Large eel 46 Took it on the lam 47 Grandchild of Japanese immigrants

9/26/12

50 Little one 51 Traditional doings 52 “That has __ ring to it” 53 Elite Navy group 55 Kent State’s home 57 Norm: Abbr. 58 Water filter brand 59 Whichever 60 Airline to Oslo

5 1

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YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012 ¡ yaledailynews.com

WORLD

“QThe transition from tyranny to democracy is very hard. ‌ And the brutality of the Assad regime is unacceptable.â€? JACOB LEW WHITE HOUSE CHIEF OF STAFF

UN chief action to end war in Syria BY EDITH LEDERER ASSOCIATED PRESS UNITED NATIONS — Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon demanded international action to stop the war in Syria, telling a somber gathering of world leaders Tuesday that the 18-month conflict had become “a regional calamity with global ramifications.� In sharp contrast to the U.N. chief, President Barack Obama pledged U.S. support for Syrians trying to oust President Bashar Assad — “a dictator who massacres his own people.� Opening the U.N. General Assembly’s annual ministerial meeting, Ban said in his state of the world speech that he was sounding the alarm about widespread insecurity, inequality and intolerance in many countries. Putting the spotlight on Syria, the U.N. chief said “the international community should not look the other way as violence spirals out of control.� “We must stop the violence and flows of arms to both sides, and set in motion a Syrian-led transition as soon as possible,� he said. While Obama didn’t call for an end to the violence, he made no mention of arming the opposition and stressed the importance of ensuring “that what began with citizens demanding their rights does not end in a cycle of sectarian violence.� “Together, we must stand with those Syrians who believe in a different vision — a Syria that is united and inclusive, where children don’t need to fear their own government, and all Syrians have a say in how they are governed, Sunnis and Alawites, Kurds and Christians,� said Obama, who arrived at the U.N. after Ban spoke. “That is what America stands for; that is the outcome that we will work for — with sanctions and consequences for those who per-

secute; and assistance and support for those who work for this common good,â€? the U.S. president said. Ban, declaring that the situation in Syria is getting worse every day, called the conflict a serious and growing threat to international peace and security that requires attention from the deeply divided U.N. Security Council. That appears highly unlikely, however, at least in the near future. Russia and China have vetoed three Western-backed resolutions aimed at pressuring Syrian President Bashar Assad to end the violence and enter negotiations on a political transition, leaving the U.N.’s most powerful body paralyzed in what some diplomats say is the worst crisis since the U.S.Soviet standoff during the Cold War. Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff, whose country by tradition is the first to speak, supported the secretary-general, saying: “There is no military solution to the Syrian crisis. Diplomacy and dialogue are not just our best option: they are the only option.â€? With the Security Council unable to act, the Emir of Qatar, Sheik Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, said Arab countries should intervene “out of their national, humanitarian, political and military duties and do what is necessary to stop the bloodshed ‌ in order to guarantee a peaceful transition of power in Syria.â€? He cited a similar precedent when Arab forces intervened in Lebanon in the mid-1970s to stop the civil war “in a step that proved to be effective and useful.â€? French President Francois Hollande said almost 30,000 people have died and asked: “How many more deaths will we wait for before we act? How can we let the paralysis of the United Nations to continue?â€? “I know one thing is certain, the Syrian regime will never again take

its place in the council of nations. It has no future among us,� he said. He called on the United Nations to protect “liberated zones� within Syria and to ensure humanitarian aid to refugees.

We must stand with those Syrians who believe ‌ in a Syria that is united and inclusive. BARACK OBAMA President, United States of America Ban also expressed profound concern at continuing violence in Afghanistan and Congo, increasing unrest across west Africa’s Sahel region where al-Qaida has made inroads, and the “dangerous impasseâ€? between Israelis and Palestinians that may close the door on the two-state solution. The “shrill war talkâ€? by Israel in recent weeks, in response to its belief that Iran is pursuing nuclear weapons, “has been alarming,â€? Ban said, and Tehran’s rhetoric threatening Israel’s existence is unacceptable. “Any such attacks would be devastating,â€? he said, reminding the presidents, prime ministers, monarchs and diplomats from the 193 U.N. member states of the need for peaceful solutions and respect for international law. “Leaders have a responsibility to use their voices to lower tensions instead of raising the temperature and volatility of the moment,â€? he said. Alluding to the recently circulated amateur video made in the U.S. which attacks Islam and denigrates the Prophet Muhammad, Ban said that “in recent days we have seen hate speech and violent responses that perpetuate a cycle of blind violence.â€?

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Iran ayatollah is poster boy for influence in Iraq BY QASSIM ABDUL-ZAHRA AND LARA JAKES ASSOCIATED PRESS BAGHDAD — After years of growing influence, a new sign of Iran’s presence in Iraq has hit the streets. Thousands of signs, that is, depicting Iran’s supreme leader gently smiling to a population once mobilized against the Islamic Republic in eight years of war. The campaign underscores widespread doubts over just how independent Iraq and its majority Shiite Muslim population can remain from its eastern neighbor, the region’s Shiite heavyweight, now that U.S. troops have left the country. The posters of Grand Ayatollah Ali Khamenei first appeared in at least six Shiite neighborhoods in Baghdad and across Iraq’s Shiite-dominated south in August, as part of an annual pro-Palestinian observance started years ago by Iran. They have conspicuously remained up since then. “When I see these pictures, I feel I am in Tehran, not Baghdad,� said Asim Salman, 44, a Shiite and owner of a Baghdad cafe. “Authorities must remove these posters, which make us angry.� In Basra, located 340 miles south of the capital, they hang near donation boxes decorated with scripts in both countries’ languages — Arabic and Farsi. A senior official in Baghdad’s local government said municipal workers fear retribution from Shiite militias loyal to Iran in if they take them down. He himself spoke on condition anonymity out of concerns for his safety. One such militia, Asaib Ahl al-Haq, even boasted that it launched the poster campaign, part of a trend that’s chipping away at nearly a decade’s worth of U.S.-led efforts to bring a Western-style democracy here. Sheik Ali al-Zaidi, a senior official in the militia, said they distributed some 20,000 posters of Khamenei across Iraq. He said Khamenei “enjoys public support all over the world� including Iraq, where he “is hailed as a political and religious leader.� Asaib Ahl al-Haq, or Band of the People of Righteousness, carried out deadly attacks against U.S. troops before their withdrawal last year. This month, the group threatened U.S. interests in Iraq as part of the backlash

over a film mocking the Prophet Muhammad. Iraqi and U.S. intelligence officials have estimated that Iran sends the militia about $5 million in cash and weapons each month. The officials believe there are fewer than 1,000 Asaib Ahl al-Haq militiamen, and that their leaders live in Iran. Tensions between Iraq and Iran have never fully dissipated over their 1980-’88 war that left nearly half a million dead. But Iran’s clout with Iraq’s Shiites picked up after Saddam Hussein’s fall from power in 2003, and, in many ways, accelerated since the U.S. military pulled out. Iran has backed at least three Shiite militias in Iraq with weapons, training and millions of dollars in funding. Billion-dollar trade pacts have emerged between Tehran and Baghdad, and Iran has opened at least two banks in Iraq that are blacklisted by the United States.

When I see these pictures [of Grand Ayatollah Ali Khamenei], I feel I am in Tehran, not Baghdad. ASIM SALMAN Shiite and Baghdad business owner Religious ties also have been renewed, with thousands of Iranian pilgrims visiting holy Shiite sites in Iraq daily, including in Najaf, where Iranian rials are as common a currency as Iraqi dinars, and Farsi is easily understood. The posters may reflect a push among some Shiite groups for a clerical system similar to Iran’s. Tehran is widely believed to be lobbying for a member of its ruling theocracy, Grand Ayatollah Mahmoud Hashemi Shahroudi, to succeed Iraq’s 81-year-old Shiite spiritual leader, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani. Al-Sistani opposes a formal political role for Iraq’s religious establishment, while Shahroudi is part of Iran’s system of “velayat-e-faqih,� or rule by Islamic clerics. Iraq’s Sunnis and Kurds, however, have no taste for blurring Shiite politics and religion.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012

· yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

Obama and Romney want regular NFL referees to come back Both President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney agree that the NFL should settle an ongoing labor dispute with the referees union. Both politicians commented on the dispute following the defeat of the Green Bay Packers by the Seattle Seahawks, 14-12 Monday night after a hotly contested call in the final minute of the game. Substitute referees have been officiating games during the lockout.

Elis hold own in UConn matchup M. SOCCER FROM PAGE 14 But the shrewd visiting keeper read Lachenbruch’s intent and quickly jumped up to wrestle the ball down. Thalman said the offensive line opened up numerous scoring opportunities, but he added that the players must learn to capitalize on their attempts. For the rest of the first half, the Bulldogs effectively shut down the visitors’ renewed offensive drive, with another memorable save from Thalman, but the hosts could not retaliate on offense. The game began to go awry for the Bulldogs just 10 minutes before the break.

UConn is best for a reason, but I’m happy that we [held our own] in the second half well. BRIAN TOMPKINS Head coach, men’s soccer Smashing through Yale’s tight defense, Connecticut’s Allando Matheson maneuvered through the Elis defense and fired a shot that blazed past Thalman to bring the first half to a close with UConn up 1–0. In the next half, the Bulldogs played more aggressively on offense in an attempt to level the scoreboard. Forward Mitch Wagner ’16 made his first shot on target just two minutes into the half, but UConn defenders blocked the attempt. Ten minutes into the second half, the Elis again allowed UConn to get a shot on goal. Coming off an assist from Carlos Alvarez, Mamadou Diouf ham-

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Midfielder Tony Wilbar ’13 had a shot against Connecticut Tuesday night. Yale will look to rebound from its loss when it faces Harvard on Saturday. mered the ball past Thalman’s glove tip and shook the back of the Yale net. “UConn is best for a reason, but I’m happy that we [held our own] in the second half well,” head coach Brian Tompkins said. The Bulldogs went all out offensively to make up for the two-goal deficit. Although for-

ward Jenner Fox ’14 found a chance to score three minutes before the match was over, the visitors’ goalie once again made a quick cleanup of a shot that might have broken the shutout. “In the beginning we probably respected [UConn] too much, but then we started playing our game but were not lucky to catch a cou-

ple breaks,” Wilbar said. Elis recorded nine fewer shots (6–15) but blocked three more shots than UConn (4–1). Connecticut Public Broadcast Network showed the match on tape delay Tuesday night. Tompkins said the breakout performances from Wagner, midfielder Peter Ambiel ’15 and

Maricic ’13 plays in inline worlds

midfielder Tony Wilbar ’13 stood out as positive moments of the matchup to bring into Yale’s game against Harvard this Saturday. The Elis will travel to Boston this weekend to take on archrival Crimson and repeat last year’s victory. Tompkins said the Harvard game is all about confidence. “We are very excited since Ivy

League matches are totally different,” Wilbar added. “We are looking forward to it and beating Harvard highlighted our team’s career.” Kickoff is slated for Saturday at 7 p.m. Contact EUGENA JUNG at eugene.jung@yale.edu .

Cargill ’13 leads running backs FOOTBALL FROM PAGE 14 advantage of every chance he got. He averaged 3.9 yards his first two years while sharing carries with other running backs, including Alex Thomas ’12, and had a 126yard performance against Dartmouth in 2010. Cargill’s crowning achievement, however, came when Thomas was injured in Yale’s 37–25 loss to Penn last year. Playing in an October snowstorm at Columbia the next week, Cargill had the game of his life. “There is a very real zone that you get in in certain situations,” Cargill said. “The weather was so bad that I just extracted myself from the situation — I was on autopilot.” Cargill “autopiloted” to 230 yards on 42 carries, both career

highs, as Yale defeated the Lions 16–13. Even as a senior, Cargill has not asked for the spotlight. Reno said that rather than wanting all the carries, Cargill talks about the idea of a “three-headed monster” with tailbacks Tyler Varga ’16 and Khalil Keys ’15. The result has been a Bulldog ground attack that has averaged 4.3 yards per carry this season. It was no surprise, then, that Cargill, an unofficial leader, was elected by his teammates to officially represent the Blue and White in the season-opening coin toss at Georgetown on Sept. 15. The Bulldogs will face Colgate at home on Saturday. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Nick Maricic ’13, right, had a 2.99 goals against average on the ice for Yale last season, but lowered his GAA by more than a point at inline worlds. M. HOCKEY FROM PAGE 14 respectively. Maricic and Barron were the youngest — and the only two current collegiate players — on the American team, which also included NCAA ice hockey graduates and a few inline hockey players who compete professionally in Europe. Both Maricic and Barron said they enjoyed playing together for the same team, and Barron added that they have been friends and competitors since they were about 8 years old. Maricic said they grew up about 15 minutes away from each other in their home state of California. “We always have a friendly banter going back and forth,” Maricic said. “I think I had the upper hand after sophomore year, but then he scored a nice goal on me last season so it’s pretty even now.” “He’s a great goalie,” Barron said of Maricic. “He definitely makes us feel comfortable back there.” Others shared Barron’s opinion of Maricic: he was named Team USA’s player of the game after it defeated Great Britain 18–1 on June 6. He finished the tournament with a 1.75 goals against average and a .902 save percentage, while stopping 65 of 72 shots on net.

Inline hockey differs from ice hockey in that it is played on roller blades and is a non-contact sport. Also, there are only four players and one goalie per team and the games take place on an Olympic-sized rink.

[Nick Maricic ’13] is a very calm guy, which makes him an asset on the floor while the game is going on. Some goalies get rattled or down on thesmelves and his solid demeanor was a huge asset for us. JOE COOK Coach, USA national inline hockey team Maricic said he grew up playing inline hockey, which is more popular than ice hockey in warmer, southern climates, but switched to ice hockey when he was 12. “Without hitting, [inline hockey]

becomes more of a skill game,” Maricic said. “[As a goalie] you don’t have the same mobility on Rollerblades because you can’t slide, so you really have to anticipate the plays.” Maricic first met Joe Cook, coach of the national inline hockey team since the summer of 2011, when he was playing for a Californian inline hockey team at the North American Roller Hockey Championships in Florida. Cook invited Maricic to join the national team in January. Cook said that Maricic was “spectacular” as a goalie, even though the team finished fifth overall in the tournament. “[Maricic] reads plays well as a goaltender, which is important,” Cook said in an email to the News. “He is a very calm guy, which makes him an asset on the floor while the game is going on. Some goalies get rattled or down on themselves and his solid demeanor was a huge asset for us.” The Bulldogs’ conference season will start on Nov. 2 and 3 with games at Dartmouth and Harvard, respectively. Maricic and Barron will not face off again until Feb. 2, when Yale hosts Quinnipiac. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

In last season’s snowy win against Columbia, running back Mordecai Cargill ’13 had a career-high 230 yards on 42 carries.

T t c


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

MLB N.Y. Yankees 3 Minesota 1

MLB Philadelphia 6 Washington 3

SPORTS QUICK HITS

KENDALL POLAN ’14 IVY LEAGUE PLAYER OF THE WEEK Polan, a setter on the volleyball team, was named Ivy League Player of the Week for the second time this season after superb games against Albany and Brown over the weekend. Jesse Ebner ’16, a middle blocker, earned a spot on the Ivy League Honor Roll.

SOCCER Chelsea 6 Wolves 0

CFL B.C. Lions 19 Edmonton 18

y

ERICA BORGO ’14 IVY LEAGUE HONOR ROLL Borgo, a midfielder on the field hockey team, earned a spot on the Ivy League Honor Roll this week after tallying a goal and an assist in Sunday’s win over Sacred Heart. Borgo, who was named First Team All-Ivy League last season, has two goals in seven games this year.

VOLLEYBALL Harvard 3 Holy Cross 1

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“[As a goalie] you don’t have the same mobility on rollerblades because you can’t slide, so you really have to anticipate the plays.” NICK MARICIC ’13 GOALIE, MEN’S HOCKEY

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2012

· yaledailynews.com

Elis shut out by national No. 2 UConn MEN’S SOCCER

BY EUGENA JUNG STAFF REPORTER The University of Connecticut, ranked second in the nation, snapped Yale’s undefeated streakwith a 2–0 shutout Tuesday. Despite demonstrating good form with increased ball possession and a high-pressure defense, the Bulldogs (3–4–2) were not able to break through the tight defensive wall of Connecticut’s national soccer powerhouse. “Although they were a very good team, it was unfortunate for us to give up two goals,” said captain and goalkeeper Bobby Thalman ’13, who made four saves in the game. UConn (8–0–1) started off strong. Just 10 minutes after the kickoff, forward Stephen Diop rifled a shot just near the rear of the opponents’ goalposts, but Thalman waved it off. For the next 10 minutes, the visitors took to the offensive and were able to take three consecutive shots to shake up the hosts. UConn maintained control of the game for the first 20 minutes. Then after some effort to move deeper into the opponents’ zone, forward Conner Lachenbruch ’15 found an opening at 21:50, as he received a pass from midfielder Kevin Michalak ’15 and shrewdly tapped the ball 20 yards towards the goal.

Yale’s four-game undefeated streak ended in a 2–0 loss Tuesday night at the hands of the national powerhouse Huskies.

SEE M. SOCCER PAGE 13

CONNECTICUT 2, YALE 0

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

UCONN

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1

2

YALE

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Yale goaltender Bobby Thalman ’13 made four saves and allowed two goals against a Connecticut squad that is undefeated in 11 games so far this season.

Cargill ’13 runs with new role BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER Almost four years ago, running back Mordecai Cargill ’13 ran for 99 yards and a touchdown to lead Glenville High School in Cleveland to a 30–6 victory over John Marshall High School. The win propelled Glenville to No. 9 in the ESPN Rise national rankings for Oct. 7, 2008.

FOOTBALL Lounging while on duty at the Yale Laundry Service room in Swing Space, Cargill acknowledged that a lot has changed since his high school days in Cleveland. “As a senior in high school I was a little bit wild and unrestrained,” Cargill said. “My coaches over the course of four years have kind of reined me in and taught me the intricacies of the position … how to read defenses, set up blocks.” Cargill’s time at Yale was itself almost blocked. As National Signing Day came his senior season, Cargill had not even heard from Yale. He said that he was considering a postgraduate year at the Hun School in Princeton, N.J., in order to try and play for an Ivy League school the next year. Then Cargill answered a phone call, and on the other end was

Yale’s former head coach Tom Williams. It was a call, Cargill said, “[that] basically changed my life.” Williams has since been replaced, but new head coach Tony Reno is impressed with the player and leader that Williams left behind. “He’s got the ability to run people over and he’s got the ability to run by people,” Reno said. “Very few guys have that ability.” Reno added that Cargill has good vision and makes his cuts well, but it is Cargill’s leadership that is most impressive. According to Reno, Cargill has put the success of the team over his own personal achievements. Cargill himself emphasized his desire to mentor the team’s younger running backs, continuing the tradition that helped him to learn his craft. Cargill’s efforts have not just been noticed by the coaching staff, offensive lineman William Chism ’15 said. “It’s an honor blocking for Mo,” Chism said. “He inspires us, especially when things are going wrong.” But back when Cargill arrived in New Haven as a freshman, he ran into blockers of a different sort — this time on the depth chart. Undeterred, Cargill took SEE FOOTBALL PAGE 13

STAT OF THE DAY 1

Maricic goes international

YALE ATHLETICS

In June, Nick Maricic ’13 competed for Team USA in the International Ice Hockey Federation InLine Hockey World Championship. BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER Yale goalie Nick Maricic ’13 and Quinnipiac defender Loren Barron have a particularly longstanding hockey rivalry: For over a decade, the pair have faced off against each other in minor leagues, then as juniors in the USHL and now at the collegiate level. But this past June, Maricic

and Barron finally suited up for the same side as they competed for Team USA in the 2012 International Ice Hockey Federation InLine Hockey World Championship.

MEN’S HOCKEY The 17th annual tournament, which took place in Ingolstadt, Germany, in early June, brought together eight inline hockey

teams from the United States, Canada, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, Slovenia and Sweden. Team USA was undefeated in the preliminary round, but was upset in overtime by Finland in the quarterfinals. Canada finished the weeklong tournament in first place, followed by Germany and Slovenia in second and third, SEE M. HOCKEY PAGE 13

THE NUMBER OF SHOTS ON GOAL THE MEN’S SOCCER TEAM TOOK IN LAST NIGHT’S 2-0 LOSS TO NO. 2 CONNECTICUT AT REESE STADIUM. Midfielder Conner Lachenbruch ’15 had Yale’s best chance as the Elis became the ninth team the Huskies have shut out this season.


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