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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 16 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY SUNNY

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CROSS CAMPUS

‘IVY STYLE’ F.I.T. CELEBRATES PREP FASHION

OBAMACARE

FRACKING

W. GOLF

Number of uninsured in Connecticut falling, report finds

TRADEOFFS SCRUTINIZED AT FORESTRY PANEL

Elis open season with 15-stroke win at Dartmouth

PAGES 8-9 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

PAGE 14 SPORTS

Christians form Greek alternative

Stormy night. A big time storm slammed Connecticut Tuesday evening, triggering a flash flood warning, a severe thunderstorm warning and a tornado watch for New Haven. Over 41,000 Connecticut residents lost power, including several hundred in New Haven, according to United Illuminating.

BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER

Raise your voice. Charles

Goodyear ’80 and Paul Joskow GRD ’72, chair and vice-chair of the presidential search committee, sent an email Tuesday to Yale College students, inviting them to an open forum to discuss the search for Yale’s next president. The forum will be held Sept. 28 at 2:30 p.m. in Battell Chapel.

video explaining those members’ interest in the fraternity. Hicks and the seven other founding members of Yale’s BYX chapter, along with some members of the national organization, held their initiation ceremony on Aug. 27, roughly six months after Hicks first decided to establish a Christian fraternity on campus.

Eric Yee ’12 was arrested in Santa Clarita, Calif., Monday after he allegedly posted comments on ESPN’s website saying he was watching children and would not mind killing them. After an ESPN employee at the company’s Bristol, Conn., headquarters notified local police of Yee’s posts on Sunday, police notified Santa Clarita Valley Station, which initiated surveillance of Yee’s home until a search warrant was obtained, the Associated Press reported. Police found several guns at Yee’s home and arrested him on suspicion of making terrorist threats. “We take all these kinds of threats serious, especially with the climate of other shootings around the nation over the past year,” Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department Lt. Steve Low told the Associated Press. Though authorities did not specify how serious the threat was, an ESPN spokesman told the Associated Press that Yee made the threatening posts in a reader response section to an online story about new Nike sneakers that retail at $270 — a price that other readers commented might lead to children possibly getting killed. In his post, Yee allegedly

SEE FRAT PAGE 4

SEE YEE PAGE 6

R.I.P. 29-year-old Joseph

Mirvil was shot and killed around 7:30 Tuesday evening at the Church Street South housing complex near Union Station, the Associated Press reported. As of press time, there was no word of any arrest.

Announcement. In an

email to students, the Yale College Council announced the winners of last week’s election for each college’s representatives and laid out goals, including “reviewing new policies regarding tailgates and off-campus life; a new online hub and events calendar for Yale students; increased options for Gender Neutral Housing; improved access to mental health resources; extended deadlines for Credit/D/Fail; new and improved events; and a report of student opinion to select the successor to Yale University President Richard Levin.”

Dead heat. A new poll from the University of Hartford and the Hartford Courant shows Democrat Chris Murphy and Republican Linda McMahon locked in a tie in the race to replace U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman ’64 LAW ’67. The poll shows Murphy ahead, 37-33, with a 4.4 percent margin of error. Thirty percent of voters remain undecided.

EMILIE FOYER/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Eight founding members registered the Christian fraternity Beta Upsilon Chi with the Yale College Dean’s Office this year. BY CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTER The newest fraternity on campus is seeking to strengthen the Christian community and provide a social alternative to traditional Greek activities. Unlike existing campus fraternities, the new group — Beta Upsilon Chi (BYX) — will host only non-alcoholic social

events and work to help Christian students at Yale develop their faith, said Victor Hicks ’15, the chapter’s founder and president. While members of BYX, which is registered with the Yale College Dean’s Office, must be practicing Christians, Hicks stressed that all students are welcome at the fraternity’s social events regardless of their religious beliefs. “If somebody was inter-

ested in the group and was not Christian … unfortunately, we would not allow them to be able to rush the chapter,” Hicks said. “Being a brother of the fraternity is being a Christian. It’s one of the requirements.” BYX’s national organization requires new chapters to have at least eight founding members, raise a $2,000 registration fee and create a

Library to compile City to unveil new Medieval materials scholarship program BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER

Alive and voting. A ballot cast by an elderly woman in the Windsor, Conn., Democratic primary for the fifth General Assembly District nomination may end up deciding the race: It was originally unopened because it was marked deceased, before reports came in that the woman is, indeed, alive. The vote could actually become pivotal, as the race is currently tied, with 774 votes for Leo Canty and 774 for Brandon McGee. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1963 At the request of Provost Kingman Brewster, the executive board of the Yale Political Union withdraws its invitation to segregationist Alabama Gov. George Wallace to address the YPU on Nov. 4, saying his presence would impair relations between Yale and New Haven’s black community. Submit tips to Cross Campus

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Yee ’12 jailed on threat charges

VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

A new reference collection will be housed in Sterling Library’s Linonia and Brothers reading room. BY RISHABH BHANDARI AND ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA CONTRIBUTING REPORTER AND STAFF REPORTER A recent shelving mistake in Sterling Memorial Library led administrators to accelerate plans to create a reference collection that the Medieval Studies program has been seeking for more than 10 years. After professors expressed concern that 25 frequently used reference materials were mistakenly transferred from Sterling’s Starr Reference Room to the Library Shelving Facility (LSF) in Hamden, the Library decided to expedite the process of bringing together 3,000 volumes of medieval reference works such as bibliographies, dictionaries, encyclopedias, handbooks and cat-

alogues. The collection will be compiled in Sterling’s Linonia and Brothers reading room once the ongoing renovations in Sterling are completed at the end of the 2012-’13 academic year, said Alan Solomon, head of humanities collections and research education. “Everyone in the Medieval Studies [program] is in unison in saying this needed to happen and it’s a great stride for the community,” said Aaron Vanides GRD ’16, adding that having all the resources in one room is akin to chemists having all their equipment in a single space. Solomon said the idea for a Medieval Studies reference collection has circuSEE LIBRARY PAGE 6

Marking another step toward City Hall’s goal of creating a “college-going culture” in New Haven, city and state officials are announcing today a college scholarship and preparatory program that will serve about 3,000 seventh-grade students in New Haven, East Hartford and Waterbury. The new initiative, which school officials are calling the Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Program, or “GearUp,” will follow one cohort of students from seventh grade through high school and their first year of college. Funded through a $31.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education, the program will be run jointly by the New Haven Public Schools, Southern Connecticut State University and the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education. GearUp will provide college preparatory services as well as college scholarships to all students who graduate from high school, get accepted to college and meet certain program eligibility criteria. Mayor John DeStefano Jr., assistant superintendent of schools Imma Canelli and other political and education officials will unveil the program at a press event in the King-Robinson Interdistrict Magnet School on Fournier Street at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon. “Innovative GearUp programs

that intervene early give students the opportunity to determine if they are ready for college and can make all the difference in whether they attend college,” said Robert Kennedy, president of the Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education. “These grants provide the mentoring and support that gives thousands of students a chance to achieve academic success in post-secondary education.”

Innovative GearUp programs that intervene early … can make all the difference. ROBERT KENNEDY President, Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education New Haven public schools spokeswoman Abbe Smith said GearUp also creates a relationship between public schools and state public universities — GearUp students who chose to attend Southern Connecticut State University or another Connecticut State University System school may have their tuition reduced or waived altogether. Both Smith and New Haven spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ’04 declined to comment on specific details of GearUp, SEE SCHOLARSHIP PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT yaledailynews.com/opinion

TABLE TENT BAN’

Making time for reflection

GUEST COLUMNIST XIUYI ZHENG

A lesson in civility I

call my parents about once a week. My mom, always the practical one, goes to painstaking lengths to make sure that I am not overspending my money (difficult to do in New Haven), that I have been checking ticket prices for my flight back home (haven’t done that yet) and so on. Dad, a university professor, is more interested in the classes I’m taking, and he likes to discuss politics and social issues. That is why I was a little surprised when it was my mom who brought up the ongoing dispute between Japan and China over the Senkaku/ Diaoyu Islands. Both countries assert sovereignty over the islands, and the issue has long been a focal point of nationalist antagonism, especially for the Chinese. The Japanese government’s decision last week to purchase the islands from a private Japanese owner have sparked mass demonstrations and riots across China. My mom, being who she is, wasn’t exactly concerned about who the islands actually belonged to. She was much more worried about the safety of our car, a newly purchased Toyota Corolla. As the political tension escalated in the past week, reports of vandalism and rioting have become commonplace in Chinese cities. Japanese department stores, Japanese cars (most of which, ironically, are made in China) and anything with so much as a Japanese character on it have become the targets of nationalist hatred. Things are relatively calm in Shanghai, but, as my mom said, it doesn’t hurt to be careful. She was especially thankful that I had already returned from my summer in Japan. Given the precarious situation Japanese nationals currently face in China, she said she would have been worried for my welfare if I were still there. She feared that Chinese citizens in Japan faced retaliatory action from locals and even the Japanese government. While I understand where she was coming from, based on my experiences in Japan this summer, I think her concerns are misplaced. I spent this summer studying Japanese in Hakodate, a small tourist town off the southern coast of Hokkaido. Growing up in China, I had been conditioned to dislike Japan, through the thick sections recounting Japanese war atrocities in my history textbooks and the countless repetitive TV dramas and movies set during the war period.

“Let’s get to work on making the food not suck — we can talk about the ads once we make some headway on that.” ‘BASHO’ ON ‘DINING CONSIDERS

During my time in Japan, however, I was struck most by how much I felt at home. Not only were the people of Hakodate extremely friendly and hospitable, but they impressed me deeply with their civility and sense of community. I rode a bike to school every morning, and I was surprised by how courteously drivers would stop their cars at intersections, patiently waiting for cyclists and pedestrians to cross. Many times I had already stopped my bicycle, or the crossing signal had already expired, but people stopped their vehicles anyway and insisted that I pass first. Has anyone been so nice to you that you felt almost embarrassed not to take up his or her offer? I found myself in such situations all the time in Japan. Once at the annual Summer Festival in Hakodate, I was trying to buy some food at a booth for 300 yen but found out that I didn’t have enough cash on me. I tried to explain to the shop owner that I didn’t have enough money, and a customer standing next to me immediately reached into his pocket and asked, “How much do you need? 100 yen? 200?” It was during these moments, and when I was offered cheesecake and sushi by people I had just met while watching a parade, and when the participants came down to chat with the crowd because everybody knew everybody, and when the policemen kneeled down to play with the children, that I felt a genuine desire to be a member of this community, foreign yet somehow close to the heart. The people of Hakodate taught me the power of civility and mutual respect in breaking down national and cultural boundaries. Conversely, the embarrassing events in China demonstrate precisely the lack of these qualities in contemporary Chinese society today. Now is a difficult time to be proud to be Chinese. Chinese citizens must think deeply about how we must face and change a society in which frustration and hatred seem to have overshadowed reason and civic virtues in the name of patriotism. I am happy to tell Chinese mothers that they needn’t worry about their children in Japan, but I am sorry to remind them that they still have to be careful with their cars. XIUYI ZHENG is a junior in Davenport College. Contact him at xiuyi.zheng@yale.edu .

S

ixty percent is a failing grade. Sixty percent is also where the high school graduation rate for Chicago Public Schools hovers. It’s a shame when any child doesn’t pass, but when failure happens at this rate, it’s an educational crisis. When ninetenths of the students in this system are low-income and more than four-fifths are minorities, it’s a profound social and racial injustice. And when the eventual alternatives are for these students to become fodder for back-breaking minimum-wage slavery, unemployment lines, homeless shelters, prisons and morgues, it’s a national tragedy. Welcome to American education, circa 2012; this is what is at stake. Pundits have spilled veritable rivers of ink (keystrokes, really) since the Chicago teachers’ strike began last Monday. But they have barely begun to scratch the surface of the kind of sea change in national mindset we need to achieve to set our schools on track. Much of the discussion in the wake of the ongoing strike has been deep down in the policy weeds, where bickering about school day length and the weight of standardized testing reigns. These issues are incredibly important, and I find these discussions fascinating. But the

MICHAEL MAGDZIK Making magic

more I think about it all, the more I worry that Chicago’s latest iteration of the boisterous American education debate is emblematic of an all-toohuman failing. We have a tendency to miss the forest for

the trees. What is that forest, the macro picture, exactly? It is nicely encapsulated by two statistics. One: A quarter of public high school students are not graduating on time, if they graduate at all. The other: Demographers tell us that, as of 2009, people under 20 years of age made up over a quarter of the U.S. population, or roughly 75 million. Taken in conjunction, these facts indicate that this is a problem of colossal proportions, and one that is likely to become worse as even more children (the majority of them historically disadvantaged minorities) wind their way through the system. Seriously, people, it’s time to pay attention. Seeing the forest also involves panning out from schools for a moment, to a global econ-

omy that is rapidly changing in unforeseen ways. More and more businesses are choosing to invest in capital instead of labor, for a host of sensible reasons. Machines don’t take vacation or sick time or maternity leave. They don’t require safe working conditions. They don’t force employers to shell out for payroll taxes. They don’t need human resources departments or managers. And they don’t leave your company or die after you’ve spent precious time and money training them. Machines are pretty much more attractive in every way — for business owners. This is why, in industry after industry, people are being replaced by incredibly capable robots. Back to the schools. We produce millions of kids who are functionally illiterate and can’t solve basic math problems. Even the ones who make it through high school don’t have particularly employable skills. In an economy where many of the brightest are struggling to find steady jobs, we really expect them to do fine as capital continues to replace labor? Some of the answers floated to this problem have already crept into the education debate: Narrowly-tailored, vocational education. Re-training after job loss. But these do not take into account the system we are work-

ing with. People who never learned to read cannot be trained to function in the new economy, no matter what new kinds of jobs get invented. What are you going to retrain them to do, when they start from such a low base? Biochemical engineering? Consulting? Programming? Truth be told, the pitiful amount of funding and collective attention we’ve put into raising and teaching children is largely to blame. This is what looking at the forest means. The education debate is a fire that has given off a lot of heat but little light, particularly when our leaders stay out of it for political expediency (Obama) or offer platitudes like “increasing choice” (Romney). Our leaders need to inspire dramatic American unification behind the cause of education, instead of letting lip service carry the day. If we’re to fix schools to a degree that will make a difference before it is too late, education needs to become a topic on par with the sacred space the economy and jobs have occupied in our public sphere. Those issues and education are more linked now than ever before, because the old jobs are not coming back. MICHAEL MAGDZIK is a senior in Berkeley College. Contact him at michael.magdzik@yale.edu .

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST J O NAT H O N CA I

The pleasure of creation I

was expecting my first Master’s Tea to be a highly refined sort of deal, a roundtable discussion with tea, crumpets and crustless sandwiches with watercress slightly protruding out the sides. After arriving at the Morse College common room, I realized that there was no round table rimmed with cute porcelain plates, that this was no klatch with traipsing minstrels. It was quite a casual affair, with paper plates for cookies and hot water dispensers to make tea. I plopped down on one of the remaining soft chairs and waited intently for the speaker, Glenn Kelman, to emerge out of some hole in the wall. He arrived, not by crashing through the roof like some god (though I will describe his godlike characteristics later), but by strolling through the glass antechamber. Glenn Kelman’s company, Redfin, aims to make real estate more transparent to customers, as real estate agents are not always entirely invested in their clients’ interests. Kelman spoke of the cultural divide between local real estate agents and software engineers and the consequent Redfin-

driven collision between these two parties. But as he started off his talk, he decided he wasn’t going to make a pitch for his company; rather, he said he was going to focus on saying something that would help us. He regaled us with tales of his self-proclaimed “bizarre” childhood and the twoand-a-half day period when he was forced to choose between medical and business school. He performed his speech with a metrical eloquence and distinct humor. What resonated with me the most from Kelman’s talk was a specific quote by Edmund Bergler, the ostensible psychoanalyst of modernist poets such as T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound. “The megalomaniac pleasure of creation,” Bergler says, “produces a type of elation which cannot be compared with that experienced by other mortals.” Kelman told us that he enjoyed creating things, a love of creation universal to the hacker who writes a line of code, the artist who paints a watercolor, the writer who crafts a short story, the researcher who formulates a new idea. For Kelman, Redfin was

that creative construct, which he described as moral, soulful and ultimately beautiful. This creative force, Kelman contended, is not present within the bastions of investment banks and consulting groups. His assertion echoes entreatments by the late Marina Keegan ’12, in her article “Even artichokes have doubts,” for the 25 percent of employed Yale graduates who enter finance and consulting groups to re-evaluate their choices and wonder if their more creative and risky ventures are worth sacrificing. The “megalomaniac pleasure of creation” evokes images of God-like grandeur. For me, it elicits a line from my high school anthem: “for the splendor of creation that draws us to inquire.” And I inquire this: Do we, as Yale students, have the courage to risk everything we have to take that inspired creative leap, to make the most of our cradle rocking above the abyss and jump, so that one day posterity might marvel and be “drawn to inquire” about our work? It takes a certain kind of person to want to create and develop

something new. These are the hipsters, the iconoclasts, the mavericks. The road is risky; the project must be pursued with more hard work and dogged ferocity than can be imagined. As Kelman noted in his talk, students at Ivy League schools are often trained to be analytical and risk-averse, many opting for professions in medicine, law and finance, clinging to the traditional rungs of social hierarchy. But if we are not the ones willing to innovate, then who is? Talent and resources abound at our beloved institution. I can think of few places better equipped with the tools to begin engaging students in creative undertakings; we should take advantage of that. More Yalies should indulge in the “megalomaniac pleasure of creation” — Yale is not only the easiest but also the safest place to do so. And more important, I want to see Yalies follow through and take their creative charisma beyond these bright college years. JONATHON CAI is a freshman in Ezra Stiles College. Contact him at jonathon.cai@yale.edu.

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E

very year during the Jewish High Holy Days, I am reminded of how terrible I am at sitting still. The prospect of being without my phone, reading or doing any immediate tasks for several hours is initially very appealing — thank you, God, that I have the perfect excuse to be unreachable — but 15 minutes into a service, I become antsy. My inability to go longer than a quarter of an hour without fidgeting or making long mental to-do lists is a source of great personal frustration. I think of myself as someone who enjoys and often longs for quiet, but when faced with imposed time for reflection, I find myself yearning for external stimulation. When I drag my attention back to the task at hand — prayer and self-reflection — I feel that I’m missing the point: Shouldn’t I want to take time out to think over the past and look to the future? And because I want to make space for reflection in my life, shouldn’t I be delighted when handed the opportunity? The answer to both questions should be a resounding yes, but it isn’t that simple. My life at Yale is fast-paced enough that sitting in silence for two hours without taking notes has become a profoundly

foreign concept. I’ve b e c o m e uncomfortable with the idea that time spent seemingly unproducZOE MERCER- tively — that is, without a GOLDEN pile of work or at least a Meditations great conversation to show at the end — can be productive. It forces a kind of engagement with the self that I avoid when I let my only silent moments be those when I am reading, running or sleeping. It’s become easier for me to use silent moments as opportunities for planning future activity, rather than embracing introspection. I was forced to ask myself that question while I fidgeted in services two days ago: Am I avoiding myself — and if so, why? What was, ironically, so disquieting about spending time alone, in silence, for more than a few moments? Something clicked, unexpectedly, when I asked myself that question. I’d let my busyness

become a means of ignoring the insecurities that I don’t like to look at too closely. When alone, my fears about past experiences and worries about future mistakes rear their ugly heads much more dramatically. With other people, surrounded by noise, I can suppress these fears. Alone, with my hands empty, I can’t avoid them. Judaism speaks of the importance of listening to the still small voice within — the voice of your soul or spirit. The High Holy Days are an opportunity to locate that voice and pay attention to what it has to say. Wisely, services on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are structured so that there are many opportunities for silent and repetitive prayer so that the internal voice is heard, almost inevitably. My voice this year was a little weak — I hadn’t listened in a while — but what it told me took me by surprise. Let yourself be bored, sometimes, it said. Find moments when you can be instead of do. Probably because my voice was smarter and sassier than I am, I was disarmed by what I heard. Being bored is one of my least favorite sensations, but it’s probably healthy for me to experience from time to time: It forces me to encounter the self I’m often trying

to avoid. When there’s nothing to do, after all, you’re left only with yourself. I was also reminded that forming an attachment to yourself is the same as building a great friendship: It takes time, openness and a willingness to make yourself vulnerable in order to create intimacy and comfort. My unease about being alone — and the rustiness of my inner voice — is a reminder that I’ve invested almost no time and made limited attempts at internal disclosure since coming to Yale, for fear of what I’d find. As I left services, the last echo of the still, quiet voice whispered that one of the great joys of life is loving your own company. Outside Battell, I made my new year’s resolution: to find ways to listen better than I had before and to learn how to savor my own company. Come Yom Kippur, I hope I can sit silently more comfortably than I did during Rosh Hashanah. But if not, I’ve still got my still, small voice, whose sass and wisdom will, I hope, bring me back to myself. ZOE MERCER-GOLDEN is a senior in Davenport College. Contact her at zoe.mercer-golden@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

NEWS

“Ah, but a man’s reach should exceed his grasp, or what’s a heaven for?” ROBERT BROWNING ENGLISH POET AND PLAYWRIGHT

CORRECTION

Street outreach workers request grant money

THURSDAY, SEPT. 6

The article “Library launches ‘Scan and Deliver’ service” incorrectly referred to the Geology & Geophysics Library as the Forestry Library.

Number of Conn. uninsured declines BY MATTHEW LLOYD-THOMAS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The share of Connecticut residents living without health insurance is on the decline, according to a Census Bureau report. The findings, part of a larger nationwide report on income, poverty and health insurance released last week, show that the number of uninsured in the state declined from 397,000 in 2010 to 303,000 in 2011, meaning that 8.6 percent of Connecticut’s population is currently uninsured. Largely a result of increased reliance on federal programs, the decline mirrors a national trend in which the overall proportion of uninsured people in the United States moved from 16.3 percent in 2010 to 15.7 percent of the population in 2011, bringing the total number of uninsured from 50 million to 48.5 million. Most of the decrease in the number of U.S. uninsured is attributable to the fact that young adults can now remain on their parents’ health insurance plans until the age of 26, a key provision of the landmark Affordable Care Act passed in 2010. The law, also known as Obamacare, played a less significant role in Connecticut, where almost all young adults have been able to remain on their parents’ plans until 26 since the passage of a 2008 law. The drop in uninsured Connecticut residents is due primarily to an increase in the number of residents on Medicare and Medicaid. As Connecticut continues to struggle with high unemployment, many residents have lost access to employer-based health coverage. “Though we have seen some improvement, it does seem that some of the effects of the recession are still lingering on,” Census Bureau analyst Jennifer Day said. According to the non-profit advocacy organization Connecticut Voices for Children, in 2000’01, 78 percent of Connecticut residents under 65 had employerbased health coverage. By 2010’11, that number declined to 69.8 percent. In response to last week’s Census Bureau report, Connecticut Voices for Children attributed the relative steadiness of the number of uninsured to efforts made

by state policy makers to expand access to Medicaid and Healthcare for UninSured Kids and Youth (HUSKY) — a Connecticut health insurance program for children, their parents, and pregnant women.

Our administration’s goal is to make sure all children and adults in Connecticut have access to quality, affordable health coverage and care. ELIZABETH BENTON ’04 City Hall spokeswoman “Our administration’s goal is to make sure all children and adults in Connecticut have access to quality, affordable health coverage and care,” Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman said. “Whether that coverage is offered through employers, a public program or the private marketplace, residents of our state have a variety of options to enroll in a medical plan.” In New Haven, lack of insurance among children and pregnant women continues to be a problem, although the city has worked to guide those groups toward government resources. “The city works hard to identify uninsured residents and to connect them to existing programs such as Medicaid,” City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ’04 said, adding that the city “works with families to identify children eligible for Medicaid and to make sure they are properly enrolled and remain enrolled.” The Affordable Care Act was signed into law in March 2010 and includes provisions that prevent insurers from denying coverage based on pre-existing conditions and a mandate that, beginning in January 2014, almost all Americans have health insurance. Contact MATTHEW LLOYDTHOMAS at matthew.lloyd-thomas@yale.edu .

BY DIANA LI STAFF REPORTER The Street Outreach Worker Program, established by the city in response to rising youth gun violence in 2007, asked the Board of Aldermen’s public safety committee Tuesday night to accept their application for a $200,000 grant from the Community Foundation of Greater New Haven. Barbara Tinney, the executive director of the New Haven Family Alliance — which runs the outreach worker program — and Shirley West, an NHFA supervisor, presented their organization’s plans to decrease street violence in hopes that the committee would ultimately recommend the acceptance of the grant to the full Board of Aldermen, which must approve it.

A kid can call us at 3 o’clock, 4 o’clock in the morning and we get up and we go, because it may save that kid’s life. DOUGLAS BETHEA Street Outreach Worker Program “Our mission has been to reduce youth gun violence through several methods, including outreach, engagement, interventions, trips, social activities, and advocacy in schools and communities,” Tinney

said, adding that the current funding for the program has been inadequate and they need more to keep their services running. The program works with local schools, law enforcement, and social service agencies to support teenagers in New Haven. According to West, the outreach workers have a unique ability to resolve conflicts that start as small events, such as muggings or disagreements on Facebook, but quickly escalate to lethal violence. Also present were three outreach workers and approximately 10 teenagers who participate in the program. One teenager said his outreach worker spent three days a week with him and helped him get a job; another said that the program provided him and many other teenagers in the community with “father figures” they otherwise did not have. Douglas Bethea, a head street outreach worker, said he took a job with the program because his son was killed in 2006 and he saw the program as an opportunity to help calm the violence that took his child’s life. “These outreach workers take these kids on trips to basketball games and baseball games, and we do one-on-one mentoring and counseling with these kids. We have conversations with them if they’re going through something, and we’re their advocates,” Bethea said. “A kid can call us at 3 o’clock, 4 o’clock in the morning and we get up and we go, because it may save that kid’s life.” Trent Butler, another outreach worker, explained that the group wants to reduce gun accessibility, which has increased sharply in the past few years, he said.

“The youth now have access to far greater weapons now than maybe five years ago,” Butler said. “I’ve seen kids as young as 12, 13 years old with guns and weapons: automatics, nine millimeters, glocks, some I can’t even pronounce,” Butler said. “I just know they’re guns, big guns — guns bigger than some of the guys who are carrying them.” The program currently has 202 participants, and Tinney said they intend to reach other young people through conflict resolution and community events. Tinney said that the rise of the program was part of the reason why this past summer was one of the “most peaceful summers” New Haven has seen. She attributed part of the program’s success to the outreach workers’ ability to identify and engage with the New Haven youth, and she said that they were effective despite the fact that law enforcement has not always been entirely accepting of them. “Many of our most effective outreach workers have been formerly incarcerated, and there are some folks in law enforcement who don’t think people can change,” Tinney said. “There is a sentiment among some folks in the courts that law enforcement ought to be done by law enforcement agents, but [these outreach workers] have effective working relationships with neighborhoods that we are most concerned about.” The Board of Aldermen will vote on whether to approve the grant on Oct. 3. Contact DIANA LI at diana.li@yale.edu .

New contract avoids bus driver strike BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER Parents of the 18,000 New Haven students who take the bus to and from school can breathe a sigh of relief — the school district’s bus company has reached a “tentative deal” on new contracts with the unionized bus drivers, defusing a situation that many feared would devolve into an extended strike. The bus company, First Student Inc., and the bus drivers’ union, Local 2001, finally came to a deal at around 2:30 p.m. on Monday afternoon, First Student spokeswoman Maureen Richmond said. The agreement comes after tensions flared on Thursday when over 150 Local 2001 bus drivers briefly struck at First Student’s bus yard in Middleton, Conn., over the thenongoing contract renegotiations. The brief rally ended before Thursday afternoon bus routes because representatives from the two parties agreed to renew negotiations later that evening, Local 2001 and First Student spokespeople said, so there was ultimately no interruption in bus service. Nonetheless, yesterday’s deal assuages local concern that the situation could regress into a long-term strike — disrupting bus service and blocking student access to schools. “I applaud both sides for putting chil-

dren first and working together to reach a deal that protects kids and is fair to both bus drivers and First Student,” said Superintendent of Schools Reginald Mayo in a Sept. 18 press release. “Our top priority is always the safety and well-being of every student of New Haven Public Schools.” Mayor John DeStefano Jr. offered similarly encouraging remarks to contract stakeholders as well as teachers, principals, and other school staff who watched the situation unfold. He added that “the agreement respects the interests of all involved and allows [New Haven] kids to continue to have a productive school year.” Yesterday’s deal marks the culmination of contract renegotiations that have been ongoing since the previous First Student contract with Local 2001 expired on June 30, Richmond said. Chief among the union concerns with the new contract were wages, health insurance, and student behavior on buses, spokespeople for both negotiating parties said. While neither Richmond nor Local 2001 communications director Ben Phillips would elaborate on the specifics of the agreement, which has yet to be finalized, Richmond said the two groups are crafting a three-year contract. Phillips expressed union support for the deal, noting that “both sides negotiated in good faith” and that “the bargaining

team representing the bus drivers offered a strong and near-unanimous recommendation for the agreement’s ratification.” First Student spokesman Timothy Stokes added that the two parties “appreciated [parents’ and school officials’] patience and support as we worked to reach an agreement.”

I applaud both sides for putting children first and working together to reach a deal that protects kids and is fair. REGINALD MAYO Superintendent of New Haven Public Schools The tentative deal now requires union ratification to be finalized and implemented. Phillips said a ratification vote for the agreement will likely be held next week. The union’s 325 drivers collectively operate approximately 300 bus routes. Michelle Hackman contributed reporting. Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .

Eidelson ’12 leads effort to reimagine Goffe St. Armory BY ASHTON WACKYM CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As a committee created by the New Haven Board of Aldermen considers plans for the historic Goffe Street Armory, Ward 1 Alderwoman Sarah Eidelson ’12 is leading the charge to transform it into a community center. The Goffe Street Armory Planning Committee met Tuesday night to brainstorm uses for the space and hear suggestions from community organizations that might eventually run programs there. Though by the end of the meeting four sheets of easel paper were covered with ink, committee members remained undecided as to what purposes the Armory should serve. But Eidelson and Ward 28 Alderwoman Claudette Robinson-Thorpe, the two organizers of the committee, were adamant that at least a portion of the space should be transformed into a community center. “I think the brainstorm tonight was really informative,” Eidelson said after the meeting. “I think there is huge potential for the armory to be a community space.” The building, which takes up roughly one city block and offers over 155,000 square feet of available space, was last used by two National Guard units over four years ago. In July, the Board approved a $2.8 million grant for the Armory’s repair and established the planning committee. In

coming months, the committee will continue to meet with community members and local organizations in an effort to consider everyone’s opinions. Because of the building’s size, some meeting attendees proposed using the space as a “multi-purpose complex.” Rachel Heerema, the executive director of Citywide Youth Coalition, a network of people who promote youth success in the New Haven area, said the Armory could offer commercial retail space and office space for different types of city or community-based organizations. Others suggested that it could house services and facilities including legal and health services, rental space, performing arts areas, tutoring centers, a library and fitness centers. Even the idea of a pool was mentioned. Despite the myriad of ideas that circulated, almost everyone agreed that some of the space should be used as a youth center of some sort. Some of the services suggested for such a youth center were college preparation, driver’s education, a technology center and an arts center. But the transformation will not happen overnight. According to Robert Smuts ’01, the city’s chief administrative officer, the rehabilitation of the facilities could take 15 to 18 months. Damaged floors, holes in the roof, an antiquated heating and cooling system and aging elevator cords

ASHTON WACKYM/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Aldermen met Tuesday night to discuss ideas for potential uses of the old Goffe Street Armory. are just some of the repairs that need to be completed. In the meantime, an amendment to the grant developed by Eidelson aims to use the Armory’s redevelopment to add jobs to the

city. The amendment requires that the city employ as many New Haven residents as possible in the process of restoring the building. “I think there are a lot of needs in this community,” Smuts said.

“The Armory ideally is a resource that can help enhance or provide new services to compliment what is here.” The Goffe Street Armory Planning Committee will hold its next

meeting to discuss the project further on Tuesday, Oct. 16. Contact ASHTON WACKYM at ashton.wackym@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 ¡ yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Honor everyone. Love the brotherhood. Fear God. Honor the emperor.� 1 PETER 2:17

Christian fraternity joins Greek life

New city scholarship program on tap SCHOLARSHIP FROM PAGE 1

munity. Though the Yale administration has limited Greek life events in recent months — including banning freshman fall rush and restricting tailgating activities — Tay said he does not think a new fraternity will increase tensions between administrators and Greek organizations. “I think if anything, having another fraternity helps, especially one that’s aimed toward a particular purpose,� he said. “I think it shows that fraternities are about finding a kind of connection that is valuable in a unique way.� BYX is also known as “Brothers Under Christ� and is the largest Christian fraternity in the country.

such as what criteria students must meet to receive scholarships, how much scholarship funding students will receive and how tuition reductions at in-state institutions will be determined. That information, they said, will be made public at Wednesday’s press event, which will take place in front of an audience of students who will be eligible for the program. But Smith did confirm that college preparatory programs offered through GearUp will include tutoring services, mentoring initiatives, workshops and summer programs. Those offerings will be financed with the Department of Education grant, and the remaining funds will be divided among eligible students in the form of scholarships, she added. “We really don’t know the specifics of scholarship amounts yet, in part because it will depend on how many students qualify,� Smith said. The GearUp grant was first announced by Gov. Dannel Malloy in May. The funding aims to increase the number of low-income students prepared to enter and complete post-secondary education as well as to help alleviate some of the financial difficulties those students face when considering higher education. “We need to better understand and break down the barriers Connecticut’s students face when they are preparing for higher education,� Malloy said in May. “Access to higher education is critical not only for these students’ own future personal success, but for Connecticut’s future economic success as well.� To be eliglble for GearUp benefits, students must be enrolled in the seventh grade at one of 12 schools throughout New Haven, East Hartford and Waterbury.

Contact CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .

SUB FROM PAGE #

ABRAHAM KILLANIN

The new chapter of Beta Upsilon Chi has hosted alcohol-free social events with fellow Christian groups Yale Students for Christ and Athletes in Action. FRAT FROM PAGE 1 Hicks said he was motivated to form a chapter of BYX in part because of his dissatisfaction with Yale’s current social options. “I felt as if Christians on campus‌ felt pressured to drink and get involved with drugs on campus,â€? Hicks said. “And I kind of wish that I would have had a Christian fraternity like this where I was able to not worry about drinking at a party, not worrying about peer pressure.â€? Since its founding, the chapter has hosted two social events — one with Yale Students for Christ and another with Christian group Athletes in Action — which drew roughly 30 and 60 attendees, respectively, Hicks said.

Members will be asked to pay dues of $250 per semester, he said, and the organization will offer scholarships to those with demonstrated financial need. The chapter plans to hold its inaugural rush in the spring, since administrators banned fall rush for freshmen beginning this academic year. The group is currently meeting in various locations in the residential colleges, but Hicks said he plans to move to a house with the brothers in the 2013’14 academic year — establishing it as the permanent off-campus location for the organization. Sarah Rosales ’14, a student leader at Yale Students for Christ, said she thinks the new fraternity will create “a lot more unity within the body of Christ at Yale.� Though the fraternity will not

be open to female Christians, Rosales said she there is no need for a Christian sorority at Yale, explaining that Yale’s female Christian students are already “very intentionally� part of each others’ lives. Christian sorority Delta Psi Epsilon considered expanding to Yale in spring 2011, but the chapter was not established because of uneven enrollment among the University’s existing sororities. The launch of BYX brings the number of Yale’s religious fraternities to two. Unlike BYX, Jewish fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi does not limit membership based on religious beliefs. Daniel Tay ’14, president of AEPi, said he thinks another organization based around a “common culture� would be a “great� addition to the campus com-

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“We’ll be deciding what goes on our air … based on the simple truth that nothing is more important to a democracy than a well-informed electorate.” WILL MCAVOY CHARACTER, HBO’S “THE NEWSROOM”

Pataki urges political involvement Journalist McKibben rails

against fossil fuel emitters BY JONATHAN REED CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

PETEA SUWONDO/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Former New York Gov. George Pataki ’67 spoke at a Pierson Master’s Tea Tuesday night. BY AMY WANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Former governor of New York George Pataki ’67 spoke Tuesday night about the political polarization currently facing the nation and the importance of youth participation in politics. Pataki, who served three consecutive four-year terms as governor from January 1995 to December 2006, addressed an audience of about 50 at the Pierson College Master’s House. He spoke about significant political issues facing the nation — particularly polarization and political apathy among citizens — and appealed to audience members to engage with politics and the government. “Quite simply, we are in enormously difficult times as a country,” Pataki said in his opening remarks. “When you look at where we are now with trilliondollar deficits, Americans living in poverty — it’s inexcusable. It’s our government that’s been catastrophically broken for quite some time.” Pataki criticized American political parties and leaders for being too polarized and “ideologically locked.” The current Obama administration is “failing the American people,” he said, because it is too liberal and does not represent the majority of Americans who see themselves in the “middle ground.”

This extreme polarization of parties is largely responsible for the nation’s widespread political apathy, he added. Pointing to the ongoing presidential campaign, Pataki also said that political candidates should provide a “clear and positive” message for people to rally behind, rather than only pointing to the failings of past governments and casting blame. Pataki encouraged citizens to consider their own opinions on political matters instead of relying on the black-and-white visions put forth by bipartisan politics. He told his audience that most Americans today believe in “success coming from the people” because they doubt the government’s ability to effect change, and argued that a successful government would try to solve the nation’s problems without trying “to force you into an ideology.” Throughout the talk, Pataki continuously stressed that citizens — especially students and other young voters — with strong political beliefs should step up and make their ideas heard. “We have to fix the government, and apathy doesn’t do that,” he said. “Apathy lets those who are removed from us continue to play their own game while we are left on the outside. If you are a hard-working person, you can just soar — you can make a difference. If you get

involved, it has an impact.” Pataki recalled his experience on Sept. 11, 2001 as one example of when he was inspired by Americans. Though the day’s events displayed the “worst of humanity,” he said they also showed the “best of humanity” when hundreds of people lined up in the streets of New York City to donate blood. Students said they enjoyed Pataki’s talk, describing it as both educational and motivating. Nitika Khaitan ’16 said many of the comments Pataki made were “very inspiring.” As an international student, Khaitan said she was interested to hear Pataki’s perspective on American politics. Anna Baron ’16 also called Pataki’s talk inspirational. “I’m from New York, so I always grew up hearing Governor Pataki’s name,” she said. “I feel honored to have met him. I feel really inspired right now to actually do something about the political climate in our country.” Pataki served as chairman of the Conservative Party of the Yale Political Union during his time at the University. He attended law school at Columbia University and began his political career in 1981 as mayor of Peekskill, New York. Contact AMY WANG at xiaotian.wang@yale.edu .

Panel discusses fracking tradeoffs BY DAVID CHI CONTRIBUTING REPORTER A panel hosted by the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies convened yesterday afternoon to discuss hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, a controversial method of extracting natural gas from beneath the earth’s surface. The panelists included John Hofmeister, the founder and CEO of Citizens for Affordable Energy and a former president of Shell Oil Company; Bill McKibben, an environmental journalist described by Time magazine as “the world’s best green journalist” and the founder of 350.org; James Saiers, a professor of hydrology and chemical engineering at the environment school; and Sheila Olmstead, a fellow at Resources for the Future. The panelists discussed not only the technology behind fracking but also its economic and political implications. Roughly 100 individuals from across the Yale campus, including students from Yale College and the School of Management, attended the discussion, titled “Hydraulic Fracking: Bridge to a Clean Energy Future?”

Saiers opened the panel by addressing trade-offs of fracking. He argued that while natural gas on its own cannot produce American energy independence, it will be a part of any U.S. energy portfolio. He said the priority should be minimizing the environmental damage caused by fracking.

There’s a need to address climate change in the context of business. TYLER VAN LEEUWEN SOM ’14 Taking an even more profracking stance, Hofmeister said he believes that natural gas is not a bridge but rather “a highway to the future.” He recounted the dirty, noisy and smoky conditions he had previously seen at a fracking site, but he also expressed his belief that engineering will significantly improve the process. McKibben disagreed, saying that switching from coal to natural gas is not an efficient way to reduce carbon emissions. Even

if the entire world switched to natural gas tomorrow, the “redline,” representing the maximum safe emissions of carbon dioxide, would still be crossed within 16 years, he said. McKibben directed some of his arguments against the fossil fuel industry’s political power, noting Shell’s significant involvement in the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The panel agreed upon a few key points, chief among them that there remain gaps in current knowledge about fracking. “Science has huge questions to resolve [around fracking],” Olmstead said. Panelists also reached a consensus around the idea that the environmental costs of fracking and natural gas have not yet been completely studied. Attendee Tyler Van Leeuwen SOM ’14 said both the public and private sectors will have to cooperate to address climate change. “There’s a need to address climate change in the context of business,” Van Leeuwen said. The event was recorded and can be viewed on Yale’s website. Contact DAVID CHI at david.chi@yale.edu .

Famed environmental journalist and activist Bill McKibben urged a crowd of over 250 students Tuesday night to support a reduction in fossil fuel emissions to stem global warming. At a Yale Political Union debate, titled “Resolved: Divest from Fossil Fuels,” McKibben argued that society must find ways to restrict corporations from emitting fossil fuels without facing appropriate repercussions. McKibben has authored several books on curbing climate change, including “The End of Nature,” which was considered the first book related to global warming when it was published in 1989. “We need to figure out ways to take away the social license of the fossil fuel industry,” he said. “Companies investing in fossil fuels are investing in the richest industry on the planet, so it won’t be easy … [These companies] have become an outlaw force, an outlaw against the laws of physics and chemistry.” While different YPU parties took opposing stances on how to best combat global warming, McKibben stressed that there should be “no particular partisan cast to these ideas.” McKibben said he thinks everyone has a stake in this problem, adding that the issue should excite students’ moral sympathies and their instincts for self-preservation. “This is between human beings on the one side and chemistry and physics on the other,” he said. To encourage students to take

action, McKibben discussed an organization he spearheaded four year ago called “350. org,” which has advocated for reduced emissions in 188 countries across the globe. The group has held roughly 20,000 demonstrations thus far, McKibben said, and the organization will launch a campaign this November to “speak truth” about the fossil fuel industry’s power. Jeremy Weltmer ’13, former YPU floor leader of the right, led the opposition side, arguing that the companies responsible for much of fossil fuel emissions are also investing heavily in clean energy alternatives, so they deserve continued support rather than divestment.

This is between human beings on the one side and chemistry and physics on the other. BILL MCKIBBEN Environmental journalist and activist McKibben refuted Weltmer with reference to the fact that BP sold all of its divisions in solar, power and wind energy fields two years ago. Responding to a question about how college activism could affect change in the fossil fuel industry, McKibben said he believes Yale students have the ability to argue persuasively for fossil fuel reductions. With the correct mix of politeness and confrontation, he said, Yale students could make an impact alongside fellow college students around the country.

Five audience members praised McKibben’s clarity and conciseness, as well his ability to simplify a complicated topic. Amalia Halikias ’15, a member of the Independent Party, said she thought the debate was incredibly informative, as she previously knew very little about the scope of fossil fuels’ impact on global warming. Josh Revesz ’13 said he agreed with most of McKibben’s stance and was not convinced by Weltmer’s argument because oil companies would reduce their profit margins by developing clean energy technologies. Party of the Left member Stephen Marsh ’13, who gave a speech supporting McKibben’s position, said he thought McKibben provided a strong moral case. He added that while he thought speakers on the opposing side also gave well-presented speeches, he found some hard to believe because their logic was circular. Pleased by the large student turnout, Harry Graver ’14, speaker of the YPU, said he thought the debate was a success. “Bill McKibben was engaging, understandable, and I liked that he did not focus on the hard science parts of the global warming debate,” said Graver, also a staff columnist for the News. “Everyone I think left with questions to ask themselves on how their feelings on the issue have changed.” McKibben graduated in 1982 from Harvard, where he was president of the Harvard Crimson newspaper. Contact JONATHAN REED at jonathan.t.reed@yale.edu .


PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Yee ’12 arrested after threats

Linonia and Brothers Reading Room Linonia and Brothers, two rival literary and debating societies at Yale, donated their respective literary collections to the University at the time of the formation of Yale’s central library in 1871. The donation is commemorated in the Linonia and Brothers Reading Room at Sterling Memorial Library.

Medieval materials find home in SML

YEE FROM PAGE 1 said his actions would be like the July shooting in Aurora, Colo., that killed 12 people and injured 58 others. Yee was being held in jail Tuesday on $1 million bail. Tuesday evening calls to his family were unreturned. In the wake of Yee’s arrest, two schools near his house — Arroyo Seco Junior High School and Santa Clarita Elementary School — notified their students about the arrest but did not shut down for the day. Yee was expected to graduate in May 2012 with a degree in economics, but he withdrew from Yale in May for undisclosed reasons, the Associated Press reported. University spokesman Tom Conroy said Tuesday night that Yee is not currently enrolled at Yale. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

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VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

A recent shelving mistake led to the creation of a centralized space for the medieval studies collection in Sterling Memorial Library’s Linonia and Brothers Reading Room. LIBRARY FROM PAGE 1 lated since the 1990s, but it “never materialized.” He added that when he recently approached University Librarian Susan Gibbons about the idea, she said it “was an excellent idea and had been thinking about it independently.” The 25 reference materials were mistakenly taken from Sterling to create space for materials being transferred from the Seeley G. Mudd Library, which will be demolished to make way for the two new residential colleges. Solomon said the Library has prioritized moving “underutilized” books to LSF, adding that bibliographies are not frequently used in many

fields. Once the Library received complaints about the transfer of the Medieval Studies materials, the books were returned to Sterling within two days, History Department Director of Graduate Studies Anders Winroth said. Winroth said the bibliographies are incredibly important for students and professors in the interdisciplinary Medieval Studies program, which draws on fields such as history, English and theology. Unlike many other subjects, Medieval Studies has digitalized few of its reference materials in part because of their old age, Winroth said. “I use these bibliographies all the time. You constantly go from the bibliographies to the books and back and forth,” Winroth said. “I use some of

them so frequently I have personal copies in my own office.” Vanides, who is working towards a Ph.D. in Medieval Studies, said the collection will enhance his efficiency, adding that hopefully scholars will “stumble upon pertinent research more easily if [the materials are] all unified.” The Library aims to transfer all of Mudd Library’s books to either Sterling or LSF by March or April of 2014, Solomon said. In order to stay on schedule, he said Mudd Library transfers 1,700 linear feet of books every two weeks, which translates to roughly 10,000 books. Through this rapid process, Solomon said roughly 10 to 20 books per

month are mistakenly sent to LSF and must be recalled. He said the current renovations in Sterling have added to the challenge of transferring the materials out of Mudd Library. “There has lately been significant movement of both people and books within Sterling, and as a result everything has been in flux,” Solomon said. In addition to housing the Medieval Studies research collection, the L&B room will continue to hold popular fiction as it was intended to do so when SML opened in 1931. Contact RISHABH BHANDARI at rishabh.bhandari@yale.edu and ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 74.

FRIDAY

High of 71, low of 49.

High of 74, low of 56.

WATSON BY JIM HORWITZ

ON CAMPUS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19 12:00 PM “A Woman in the Crossfire” — A Lecture by Samar Yazbek. The talk is co-sponsored by The Orville H. Schell, Jr. Center for International Human Rights at Yale Law School, the Journal of Middle East Women’s Studies, the Council on Middle East Studies, and the MacMillan Center. Syrian author and journalist Samar Yazbek will give her account of Syria’s tyrannical regime. Institution for Social and Policy Studies (77 Prospect St.). 5:30 PM Kahn’s Vision for the Yale Center for British Art. Peter Inskip, one of the authors of “Louis I. Kahn and the Yale Center for British Art: A Conservation Plan,” discusses what this means for Kahn’s New Haven masterpiece, a building which was the subject of two separate commissions to the architect and was completed over a period of years after his death in March 1974. Yale Center for British Art (1080 Chapel St.).

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 20 4:30 PM The Y Syndicate meets with Professor Jim Sleeper. Professor Sleeper has criticized Yale-NUS, the Jackson Institute and its Global Affairs major, secret societies, Grand Strategy, and other Yale institutions for failing the liberal arts tradition. Beinecke Plaza, Alumni War Memorial. 8:00 PM The Fatal Eggs by Mikhail Bulgakov. In 1928, renowned zoologist Vladimir Ipatyich Persikov discovers a “red ray” that stimulates rapid reproduction in frog eggs. When a chicken plague decimates the Russian countryside, the government seizes his discovery, setting in motion a series of catastrophes. Yale Cabaret Theater (217 Park St.).

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 8:00 PM American Night: The Ballad of Juan Jose. As Juan José feverishly studies for his citizenship exam, his obsession to pass takes him on a fantastical odyssey through U.S. history guided by a handful of unsung citizens who made courageous choices in some of the country’s toughest times.. University Theater (222 York St.).

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CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 1983 movie about a taxi company 6 Place for a sala 10 Home on the range 14 Kukla’s dragon friend 15 Israeli weapons 16 Optic layer 17 Leader for whom Houston’s airport is named 19 Really tired 20 Highlands honey 21 Narrow-bodied river fish 22 Intrinsically 23 Christmas __ 24 “The Chimpanzees of Gombe” writer 27 Fixed, in a way 29 Farm feed item 30 Salon supply 31 Saloon orders 32 Hot tub reaction 33 Bit of background in a Road Runner cartoon 34 “Superfudge” novelist 38 Nick and Nora’s pooch 41 Cold War agcy. 42 Shell propellers 45 Starfish arm 46 WWII craft 47 Not a good thing to be at the wheel 49 Pro Football Hall of Famer nicknamed “Crazylegs” 53 Traffic cops gp.? 54 Maxim 55 Do lunch, e.g. 56 Speaker with a .345 career batting average 57 Stallion feature 58 TV series that first aired 9/23/1962 whose family shares first names with 17-, 24-, 34- and 49Across 61 Henry VIII’s fourth 62 Verdi slave 63 Squander 64 Ponies up 65 Office furnishing

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66 Some McFlurry ingredients DOWN 1 Zigzag hole feature 2 Chop chopper 3 __ held: in few hands, as stock 4 Snob’s affectations 5 Avoid, as an issue 6 Like many Miamians, by birth 7 Clear blue 8 Girl sib 9 Campfire remains 10 Like ice or dice 11 Run-of-the-mill 12 Spotty condition? 13 Kneecap 18 “I say!” 22 Patio planter 24 Savior in a Bach cantata 25 Purpose 26 Interstate H-1 locale 28 __ vu 32 “Modern Family” network 33 Square food?

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

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9 7 1 5 8 7 6 4 1 5 (c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Salt sprinkle 36 Himalayan myth 37 Dance in a pit 38 Visitors center handout 39 Zoe of “Avatar” 40 Abuse of power 43 Flower for one’s honey 44 Foreknow, as the future 46 Caustic stuff

9/19/12

47 Part of a Molière comédie 48 Avoids an F 50 Arches with pointed tops 51 Oboist’s supply 52 Noted vowel seller 56 Nicholas II, e.g. 58 Wee bit 59 Hotfoot it, oldstyle 60 Pair

2

4 6 3

5 6 9

2

1 6 2 7 1 7 8 3 9 6


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE

Ivy Style The exhibit will run from Sept. 14 to Jan. 5, 2013, at the Museum at FIT in New York. Curated by the deputy director of the museum Patricia Mears, the exhibit is arranged thematically to recreate the sartorial liveliness of an Ivy League university campus.

‘Ivy Style’: a sartorial history

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 5:30 P.M. WED. SEPT. 19

Moore ART ’13 shows paintings at The Study

KAHN’S VISION FOR THE YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART Peter Inskip of the London-based Peter Inskip + Peter Jenkins Architects will visit Yale to speak about his work on the conservation of Louis Kahn’s iconic YCBA building.

Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St.

4:30-5:30 P.M. WED. SEPT. 19 ROBERT DAY: WHERE I AM NOW Storyteller and author Robert Day will read from his new book, “Wehere I am Now.”Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.

4 P.M. THURS. SEPT. 20 DAVID LIDA: MEDICO NOIR Journalist David Lida, who has conducted investigations on behalf of Mexican defense lawyers fighting death penalty cases in the United States, will present a talk. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.

“A well-dressed man is a man whose clothing calls attention to the man not his wardrobe. It should reflect the intellect, the passion and the looks of the man and not represent whatever is the current style — it’s ageless.” RICHARD PRESS, FORMER PRESIDENT OF J. PRESS

6:30-7:30 P.M. THURS. SEPT. 20 GRACE PATUWO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BETWEEN LANDSCAPE AND ARCHITECTURE In the latest Thursday night lecture at the Yale School of Architecture, Diana Balmori and Joel Sanders will speak on landscape architecture. Paul Rudolph Hall, 180 York St.

5-6 P.M. THURS. SEPT. 20 JACK HITT Author and journalist Jack Hitt will give a talk titled “The Adverb Done It: How Forensic Science and Neuroscience are Catching the Bad Guys,” centering on the character of the ‘language detective.’ Anlyn Center, 300 Cedar St.

12 P.M. FRI. SEPT. 21 FURNITURE STUDY TOUR The American Decorative Arts Furniture Study provides an extensive view of American furniture from the last five centuries. No advanced registration is required to participate on the tour.

The Fashion Institute of Technology museum unveiled a new exhibit last Friday, titled “Ivy Style,” which features the enduring classic menswear of the 20th century that formed on elite college campuses. BY GRACE PATUWO STAFF REPORTER NEW YORK — A taste of the Ivy League has descended into New York’s Chelsea neighborhood with the opening of the “Ivy Style” exhibit at the Fashion Institute of Technology Museum last Friday. Focusing on menswear, the show traces the evolution of classic American style from the elite campuses of yesteryear to the runways and streets of today. The exhibition evokes a university setting with ensembles reminiscent of Ivy League campuses. At the very center of the exhibition space, a crowd of mannequins clothed in modern and period pieces stands in the middle of a grassy quad against the backdrop of a neo-Gothic façade akin to Calhoun College. At the other end of the room, athletic wear and school sweaters are displayed underneath argyle-patterned stained glass while a lounge, campus shop, class-

room and dorm room line the sides. From Nantucket reds to navy blazers, “Ivy style” occupies a well-established niche in American dressing. But even with perennial popularity of preppiness, many attendees at the opening reception said that they were not sure what to expect of the exhibit itself before they arrived. “I thought it might be something like an ode to Ralph Lauren, J. Press and Brooks Brothers,” said Columbia alum Matthew Foley, an account executive with designer Thom Browne, one sponsor of the exhibit. “But I really love how it presents the history of the Ivy style instead.” Widely regarded as an all-American look, Ivy League dressing actually had its origins in adaptations of the Englishman’s wardrobe at the turn of the 20th century.During the interwar years, the exhibit’s introductory inscription explained, Brooks Brothers and J. Press pioneered a redesign of British univer-

sity-wear to outfit the young men of Yale, Harvard and Princeton; the designers reached college students through stores on their campuses. After World War II, this style of dressing expanded beyond the elite class as servicemen on the G.I. Bill diversified and democratized college campuses. With increasing media coverage, the Ivy look soon reached national proportions in the 1950s as movie stars began copying the style, said Richard Press, the grandson of the founder of J. Press and a consultant on the exhibit. “The highlight of my career,” Press said, “was when Frank Sinatra walked into J. Press, gave me a terrifying look-over and said ‘Let me see the 38-regulars because it’s time that I want to dress like an Ivy Leaguer.” A former president of the New Haven-based family business, Press himself is a Dartmouth man (“I wanted to get away from New Haven for a little while!” he said).

In 2009, when the recession filled the nation with economic uncertainty, the comforting and familiar Ivy style again entered the arsenal of American fashion. This is, perhaps, of no surprise as fashion trends often reflect national sentiments: For example, colorless, utilitarian clothing pervades throughout periods of economic decline. Unlike its brightly-hued preppy cousin, Ivy is a pure style that balances functionality and effortlessness, said exhibit curator Patricia Mears, deputy director of The Museum at FIT. “I was particularly struck by how handsome and well-dressed, but also how at-ease, young men from Ivy League campuses looked in archival images from the 1920s and 30s,” she said of the inspiration for the exhibit. While modern iterations may push the boundaries of classic dressing, timelessness still dominates the exhibit’s display: A line

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Paintings by Mario Moore ART ’13 recently went on view at the gallery of The Study hotel.

of historic class jackets fits in even across the aisle from updated Ralph Lauren and Thom Browne looks from the latest season. One item in particular speaks to the enduring nature of the Ivy style: a Yale jacket lent to the exhibition by Riley Scripps Ford ’10. Ford received the navy sack suit — originally worn by his greatgrandfather Warren Scripps Booth in the early 20th century — on his birthday just before entering Yale. “At the same time my grandmother gave me this, we were getting our college assignments so it really got me excited about Yale,” Ford, a former staff columnist for the News, said. “When I got to Yale, it made me even more excited about the traditions in general. On the off-chance that my children go to Yale, I think it would be really cool if I could give this to them someday.”

BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Mario Moore ART ’13 does not have to walk very far to view his work on display: a new show of Moore’s paintings is located conveniently at The Study hotel, right across the street from his studio in the School of Art’s Green Hall. After receiving his BFA from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit in 2009, Moore worked as a set sculptor before coming to Yale to pursue graduate studies. The News spoke with Moore about his show at The Study and about the relative limits of painting versus drawing.

Q

A

The subject mainly deals with people in general — in conflict, people in conflict. I guess it has to do with societal hierarchies — being a black man or a black woman in America. It deals with those issues.

Contact GRACE PATUWO at grace.patuwo@yale.edu .

specific prompt this? QDid something Well, I’m from Detroit, so I guess

Eye candy: Bakery shows tasty art

Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

8 P.M. FRI. SEPT. 21 - 8 P.M. SAT. SEPT. 22

BY ERIC XIAO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

“24 HOURS AND CHANGE” The Yale Drama Coalition presents its second 24-hour theater festival, in which participants script, stage and perform original 15-30 minute plays in 24 hours. Location TBD

SAM GARDNER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Katalina’s Bakery on Whitney Avenue hosted an artist reception to open a new collection of treat-themed paintings on view at the bakery.

To start off, what’s the subject of the show?

Call it a feast for the eyes. On Tuesday evening, Katalina’s Bakery on Whitney Avenue held an artists’ reception for the food-inspired art exhibition it currently houses, titled “Five Course Meal. Paintings and photographs of pancakes, fruit and — overwhelmingly — cake, hung on display around the bakery. Katalina Riegelmann, the owner of Katalina’s Bakery, said she eagerly agreed to host the exhibition when Debbie Hesse, director of artistic services and programs for the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, first approached her with the idea for a show. “It’s nice to see people’s perspectives on what looks yummy to them,” Riegelmann said. Riegelmann said she could relate to the abstract nature of much of the art on display because tapping into the abstract has always been important to her as she thinks of new recipes for her baked goods. For example, Riegelmann said that for her, abstract thinking can manifest as choosing to use curry and cilantro in a pastry paired with lime frosting. She attributed part of the success of each creative recipe to the New Haven community, which she claims “just eats it up.” Aside from the physical appeal of the food they depicted, four of the five artists whose work is featured said they emphasized a metaphorical significance of their work as well. Artist Alexis Neider said that her paintings of cakes cause the viewer to think about “family, and ritual, and nostalgia.”

“All kinds of things happen in life, but you can always go back to your family,” Neider said. For artist Barbara Marks, the significance of sweets goes far beyond their meaning to an audience. Memories of baking birthday cakes for her late husband, who passed away five years ago, inspired Marks to create paintings of cakes. Marks said she began painting abstract black-and-white cakes when a friend asked her if she had any pieces that could fit an upcoming show that revolved around the concept of “noir” art. Marks noted that her agreement to display her work at that exhibition was the true origin of her current artistic career. Marks said that gradually, her painted cakes each started having “their own personality” and “their own lives.” Now, she focuses on how each of her paintings affects the viewer, and how that effect is achieved through the color scheme. “I am always interested in how color elicits emotion,” she said. Artist Joan Fitzsimmons referred to the metaphorical aspect of food as a “complex emotional dynamic.” Fitzsimmons’ own work includes black-and-white photographs, said she was inspired by the inherent beauty of decorative cakes. For her part, artist Laura Barr said she focused on “the beauty of simple, everyday objects” in her paintings of berries and honey. The show will be on view through Nov. 2. Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

A

being from a Midwestern city, because Michigan is majority white. So there’s a lot of racial issues, even in a big city, but it’s not the same issues you’d see in a southern 60s, 50s kind of place. But it’s kind of hidden. Weird things happen.

New Haven influenced that impresQHas sion?

A

Yeah, because I feel like there’s a disconnect between the city-dwellers and Yale. There’s that tension there.

QWhat subjects do you keep coming back to?

A

I think I always come back to portraiture, because I feel like it’s a way to connect a person with an image, [to] connect a person with a person within an image.

Q

And are there specific models you come back to?

A

No, I don’t have specific models, but specific ideas, dealing with hair and beauty in black women, and the power of a black figure within a painting and what that means.

QHow do you pick what gets shown?

A

Well, here, I had to edit down, because I had some stuff that probably wouldn’t be too acceptable to a hotel. Like, there was one piece with a middle finger, just a portrait of me with a middle finger. People probably wouldn’t be too comfortable seeing that on a hotel wall, so I just tried to find stuff that I felt would fit the space.

Q

And you have another show right now, in Detroit?

A

Yeah, I have a show at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. It’s a group show. That’s

not a solo show. do artists go to school? QWhyThat’s a great question. For the most

A

part, it’s to connect with other people. It’s basically a huge network. I see it as a networking opportunity, a way to develop your ideas because you’re learning from people that are essentially in the business. Like in any other field, we want to learn from the best. You gotta go talk to the best.

QI always thought of art as a solitary craft.

A

Well sometimes it can be, you know, the artists in their studio, not talking to anybody, not eating any food, going hungry — a starving weird guy. But it’s actually good to have a community in life, to talk to people and get your ideas flowing.

do both etchings and paintings. How QYou do you approach those differently?

A

I approach the etchings differently. I have a lot more freedom with etching and drawing than with painting. I started painting senior year of high school, but I’ve been drawing since I was a little kid. I feel like the graphic space of a drawing is a lot freer than a painting to me. I’m trying to learn a new approach. I’m trying to feel that out in my paintings.

do you decide when a painting is finQHow ished?

A

Oh man, that’s a good question. You almost never know. Because I can say a painting’s finished, especially in this program, and then you get, “You got this to do. You should do that. That’s wrong. You need to wipe that out. You need to paint this over.” But I think it’s just when I’m trying to get my point across and I feel like that’s what’s coming across, then I consider it done.

you got your BFA you worked as a QAfter set sculptor on film sets. What does that entail?

A

A set sculptor works in the warehouse, essentially, with the contractors, the carpenters, the plant guys, the set director guys, and we basically construct the set that the film’s gonna happen on. So, I worked on the movie “Real Steel,” with Hugh Jackman and I worked on “Red Dawn,” which is soon to come out as a remake of the 80s [movie] Red Dawn. Basically, all we did was sculpt rocks and trees, Every tree and rock that you see in a movie is probably not even real, it’s probably a foam object and then they put plaster over it and they paint it and make it look real. My boss sculpted an entire tree just so they could shoot it up.

still sculpt? QDo youYeah, I’m actually working on some

A

sculpture this year. I’m trying to get back into it. Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE

Ivy Style The exhibit will run from Sept. 14 to Jan. 5, 2013, at the Museum at FIT in New York. Curated by the deputy director of the museum Patricia Mears, the exhibit is arranged thematically to recreate the sartorial liveliness of an Ivy League university campus.

‘Ivy Style’: a sartorial history

THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 5:30 P.M. WED. SEPT. 19

Moore ART ’13 shows paintings at The Study

KAHN’S VISION FOR THE YALE CENTER FOR BRITISH ART Peter Inskip of the London-based Peter Inskip + Peter Jenkins Architects will visit Yale to speak about his work on the conservation of Louis Kahn’s iconic YCBA building.

Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St.

4:30-5:30 P.M. WED. SEPT. 19 ROBERT DAY: WHERE I AM NOW Storyteller and author Robert Day will read from his new book, “Wehere I am Now.”Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.

4 P.M. THURS. SEPT. 20 DAVID LIDA: MEDICO NOIR Journalist David Lida, who has conducted investigations on behalf of Mexican defense lawyers fighting death penalty cases in the United States, will present a talk. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.

“A well-dressed man is a man whose clothing calls attention to the man not his wardrobe. It should reflect the intellect, the passion and the looks of the man and not represent whatever is the current style — it’s ageless.” RICHARD PRESS, FORMER PRESIDENT OF J. PRESS

6:30-7:30 P.M. THURS. SEPT. 20 GRACE PATUWO/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BETWEEN LANDSCAPE AND ARCHITECTURE In the latest Thursday night lecture at the Yale School of Architecture, Diana Balmori and Joel Sanders will speak on landscape architecture. Paul Rudolph Hall, 180 York St.

5-6 P.M. THURS. SEPT. 20 JACK HITT Author and journalist Jack Hitt will give a talk titled “The Adverb Done It: How Forensic Science and Neuroscience are Catching the Bad Guys,” centering on the character of the ‘language detective.’ Anlyn Center, 300 Cedar St.

12 P.M. FRI. SEPT. 21 FURNITURE STUDY TOUR The American Decorative Arts Furniture Study provides an extensive view of American furniture from the last five centuries. No advanced registration is required to participate on the tour.

The Fashion Institute of Technology museum unveiled a new exhibit last Friday, titled “Ivy Style,” which features the enduring classic menswear of the 20th century that formed on elite college campuses. BY GRACE PATUWO STAFF REPORTER NEW YORK — A taste of the Ivy League has descended into New York’s Chelsea neighborhood with the opening of the “Ivy Style” exhibit at the Fashion Institute of Technology Museum last Friday. Focusing on menswear, the show traces the evolution of classic American style from the elite campuses of yesteryear to the runways and streets of today. The exhibition evokes a university setting with ensembles reminiscent of Ivy League campuses. At the very center of the exhibition space, a crowd of mannequins clothed in modern and period pieces stands in the middle of a grassy quad against the backdrop of a neo-Gothic façade akin to Calhoun College. At the other end of the room, athletic wear and school sweaters are displayed underneath argyle-patterned stained glass while a lounge, campus shop, class-

room and dorm room line the sides. From Nantucket reds to navy blazers, “Ivy style” occupies a well-established niche in American dressing. But even with perennial popularity of preppiness, many attendees at the opening reception said that they were not sure what to expect of the exhibit itself before they arrived. “I thought it might be something like an ode to Ralph Lauren, J. Press and Brooks Brothers,” said Columbia alum Matthew Foley, an account executive with designer Thom Browne, one sponsor of the exhibit. “But I really love how it presents the history of the Ivy style instead.” Widely regarded as an all-American look, Ivy League dressing actually had its origins in adaptations of the Englishman’s wardrobe at the turn of the 20th century.During the interwar years, the exhibit’s introductory inscription explained, Brooks Brothers and J. Press pioneered a redesign of British univer-

sity-wear to outfit the young men of Yale, Harvard and Princeton; the designers reached college students through stores on their campuses. After World War II, this style of dressing expanded beyond the elite class as servicemen on the G.I. Bill diversified and democratized college campuses. With increasing media coverage, the Ivy look soon reached national proportions in the 1950s as movie stars began copying the style, said Richard Press, the grandson of the founder of J. Press and a consultant on the exhibit. “The highlight of my career,” Press said, “was when Frank Sinatra walked into J. Press, gave me a terrifying look-over and said ‘Let me see the 38-regulars because it’s time that I want to dress like an Ivy Leaguer.” A former president of the New Haven-based family business, Press himself is a Dartmouth man (“I wanted to get away from New Haven for a little while!” he said).

In 2009, when the recession filled the nation with economic uncertainty, the comforting and familiar Ivy style again entered the arsenal of American fashion. This is, perhaps, of no surprise as fashion trends often reflect national sentiments: For example, colorless, utilitarian clothing pervades throughout periods of economic decline. Unlike its brightly-hued preppy cousin, Ivy is a pure style that balances functionality and effortlessness, said exhibit curator Patricia Mears, deputy director of The Museum at FIT. “I was particularly struck by how handsome and well-dressed, but also how at-ease, young men from Ivy League campuses looked in archival images from the 1920s and 30s,” she said of the inspiration for the exhibit. While modern iterations may push the boundaries of classic dressing, timelessness still dominates the exhibit’s display: A line

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Paintings by Mario Moore ART ’13 recently went on view at the gallery of The Study hotel.

of historic class jackets fits in even across the aisle from updated Ralph Lauren and Thom Browne looks from the latest season. One item in particular speaks to the enduring nature of the Ivy style: a Yale jacket lent to the exhibition by Riley Scripps Ford ’10. Ford received the navy sack suit — originally worn by his greatgrandfather Warren Scripps Booth in the early 20th century — on his birthday just before entering Yale. “At the same time my grandmother gave me this, we were getting our college assignments so it really got me excited about Yale,” Ford, a former staff columnist for the News, said. “When I got to Yale, it made me even more excited about the traditions in general. On the off-chance that my children go to Yale, I think it would be really cool if I could give this to them someday.”

BY YUVAL BEN-DAVID CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Mario Moore ART ’13 does not have to walk very far to view his work on display: a new show of Moore’s paintings is located conveniently at The Study hotel, right across the street from his studio in the School of Art’s Green Hall. After receiving his BFA from the College for Creative Studies in Detroit in 2009, Moore worked as a set sculptor before coming to Yale to pursue graduate studies. The News spoke with Moore about his show at The Study and about the relative limits of painting versus drawing.

Q

A

The subject mainly deals with people in general — in conflict, people in conflict. I guess it has to do with societal hierarchies — being a black man or a black woman in America. It deals with those issues.

Contact GRACE PATUWO at grace.patuwo@yale.edu .

specific prompt this? QDid something Well, I’m from Detroit, so I guess

Eye candy: Bakery shows tasty art

Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

8 P.M. FRI. SEPT. 21 - 8 P.M. SAT. SEPT. 22

BY ERIC XIAO CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

“24 HOURS AND CHANGE” The Yale Drama Coalition presents its second 24-hour theater festival, in which participants script, stage and perform original 15-30 minute plays in 24 hours. Location TBD

SAM GARDNER/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Katalina’s Bakery on Whitney Avenue hosted an artist reception to open a new collection of treat-themed paintings on view at the bakery.

To start off, what’s the subject of the show?

Call it a feast for the eyes. On Tuesday evening, Katalina’s Bakery on Whitney Avenue held an artists’ reception for the food-inspired art exhibition it currently houses, titled “Five Course Meal. Paintings and photographs of pancakes, fruit and — overwhelmingly — cake, hung on display around the bakery. Katalina Riegelmann, the owner of Katalina’s Bakery, said she eagerly agreed to host the exhibition when Debbie Hesse, director of artistic services and programs for the Arts Council of Greater New Haven, first approached her with the idea for a show. “It’s nice to see people’s perspectives on what looks yummy to them,” Riegelmann said. Riegelmann said she could relate to the abstract nature of much of the art on display because tapping into the abstract has always been important to her as she thinks of new recipes for her baked goods. For example, Riegelmann said that for her, abstract thinking can manifest as choosing to use curry and cilantro in a pastry paired with lime frosting. She attributed part of the success of each creative recipe to the New Haven community, which she claims “just eats it up.” Aside from the physical appeal of the food they depicted, four of the five artists whose work is featured said they emphasized a metaphorical significance of their work as well. Artist Alexis Neider said that her paintings of cakes cause the viewer to think about “family, and ritual, and nostalgia.”

“All kinds of things happen in life, but you can always go back to your family,” Neider said. For artist Barbara Marks, the significance of sweets goes far beyond their meaning to an audience. Memories of baking birthday cakes for her late husband, who passed away five years ago, inspired Marks to create paintings of cakes. Marks said she began painting abstract black-and-white cakes when a friend asked her if she had any pieces that could fit an upcoming show that revolved around the concept of “noir” art. Marks noted that her agreement to display her work at that exhibition was the true origin of her current artistic career. Marks said that gradually, her painted cakes each started having “their own personality” and “their own lives.” Now, she focuses on how each of her paintings affects the viewer, and how that effect is achieved through the color scheme. “I am always interested in how color elicits emotion,” she said. Artist Joan Fitzsimmons referred to the metaphorical aspect of food as a “complex emotional dynamic.” Fitzsimmons’ own work includes black-and-white photographs, said she was inspired by the inherent beauty of decorative cakes. For her part, artist Laura Barr said she focused on “the beauty of simple, everyday objects” in her paintings of berries and honey. The show will be on view through Nov. 2. Contact ERIC XIAO at eric.xiao@yale.edu .

A

being from a Midwestern city, because Michigan is majority white. So there’s a lot of racial issues, even in a big city, but it’s not the same issues you’d see in a southern 60s, 50s kind of place. But it’s kind of hidden. Weird things happen.

New Haven influenced that impresQHas sion?

A

Yeah, because I feel like there’s a disconnect between the city-dwellers and Yale. There’s that tension there.

QWhat subjects do you keep coming back to?

A

I think I always come back to portraiture, because I feel like it’s a way to connect a person with an image, [to] connect a person with a person within an image.

Q

And are there specific models you come back to?

A

No, I don’t have specific models, but specific ideas, dealing with hair and beauty in black women, and the power of a black figure within a painting and what that means.

QHow do you pick what gets shown?

A

Well, here, I had to edit down, because I had some stuff that probably wouldn’t be too acceptable to a hotel. Like, there was one piece with a middle finger, just a portrait of me with a middle finger. People probably wouldn’t be too comfortable seeing that on a hotel wall, so I just tried to find stuff that I felt would fit the space.

Q

And you have another show right now, in Detroit?

A

Yeah, I have a show at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. It’s a group show. That’s

not a solo show. do artists go to school? QWhyThat’s a great question. For the most

A

part, it’s to connect with other people. It’s basically a huge network. I see it as a networking opportunity, a way to develop your ideas because you’re learning from people that are essentially in the business. Like in any other field, we want to learn from the best. You gotta go talk to the best.

QI always thought of art as a solitary craft.

A

Well sometimes it can be, you know, the artists in their studio, not talking to anybody, not eating any food, going hungry — a starving weird guy. But it’s actually good to have a community in life, to talk to people and get your ideas flowing.

do both etchings and paintings. How QYou do you approach those differently?

A

I approach the etchings differently. I have a lot more freedom with etching and drawing than with painting. I started painting senior year of high school, but I’ve been drawing since I was a little kid. I feel like the graphic space of a drawing is a lot freer than a painting to me. I’m trying to learn a new approach. I’m trying to feel that out in my paintings.

do you decide when a painting is finQHow ished?

A

Oh man, that’s a good question. You almost never know. Because I can say a painting’s finished, especially in this program, and then you get, “You got this to do. You should do that. That’s wrong. You need to wipe that out. You need to paint this over.” But I think it’s just when I’m trying to get my point across and I feel like that’s what’s coming across, then I consider it done.

you got your BFA you worked as a QAfter set sculptor on film sets. What does that entail?

A

A set sculptor works in the warehouse, essentially, with the contractors, the carpenters, the plant guys, the set director guys, and we basically construct the set that the film’s gonna happen on. So, I worked on the movie “Real Steel,” with Hugh Jackman and I worked on “Red Dawn,” which is soon to come out as a remake of the 80s [movie] Red Dawn. Basically, all we did was sculpt rocks and trees, Every tree and rock that you see in a movie is probably not even real, it’s probably a foam object and then they put plaster over it and they paint it and make it look real. My boss sculpted an entire tree just so they could shoot it up.

still sculpt? QDo youYeah, I’m actually working on some

A

sculpture this year. I’m trying to get back into it. Contact YUVAL BEN-DAVID at yuval.ben-david@yale.edu .


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY.

cc.yaledailynews.com

S

CROSS CAMPUS

T

SALT LAKE CITY — President Barack Obama declared Tuesday night the occupant of the Oval Office must “work for everyone, not just for some,” jabbing back at Mitt Romney’s jarring statement that as a candidate, he doesn’t worry about the 47 percent of the country that pays no income taxes. Romney neither disavowed nor apologized for his remarks, which included an observation that nearly half of the country believe they are victims and entitled to a range of government support. Instead, Romney cast his comment as evidence of a fundamental difference with Obama over the economy, adding the federal government should not “take from some to give to the others.” As the rivals sparred with seven weeks remaining in a close race for the White House, two GOP Senate candidates publicly disavowed Romney’s remarks and Republican officials openly debated the impact that a series of controversies would have on the party’s prospects of winning the presidency. Top Republicans in Congress declined through aides to

offer their reaction to Romney’s remarks - just as they generally refrained from commenting a week ago when he issued a statement that inaccurately accused the Obama administration of giving comfort to demonstrators after they breached the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. The most recent controversy in a campaign filled with them was ignited by the emergence of a videotape, made last May, in which Romney told donors at a fundraiser that 47 percent of Americans pay no income taxes. They “believe the government has a responsibility to care for them ... believe that they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you name it. That that’s an entitlement.” He said, “I’ll never convince them they should take personal responsibility and care for their lives.” In a next-day interview on Fox, the network of choice for conservatives, Romney said he didn’t intend to write off any part of a deeply divided electorate, including seniors who are among those who often pay no taxes. Instead, he repeatedly sought to reframe his remarks as a philosophical difference of opinion between himself and Obama. “I’m not going to get” votes

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Dow Jones 13,564.64, +0.09%

from Americans who believe government’s job is to redistribute wealth,” he said, adding that was something Obama believes in.

One thing I’ve learned as president is that you represent the entire country. BARACK OBAMA President, United States of America He also said he wants to be president so he can help hardpressed Americans find work and earn enough so they become income taxpayers. Romney didn’t say so, but the U.S. income tax is designed to be progressive, so those who earn the most theoretically pay the most. Through programs as diverse as Social Security, Medicare, health care and food stamps, the government collects tax revenue and pays it out in the form of benefits for those who qualify. Obama responded during an appearance on the David Letterman show.

S&P 500 1,459.32, -0.13%

T Euro $1.3037, -0.0613

Chicago teachers vote to return to classroom BY SOPHIA TAREEN AND TAMMY WEBBER ASSOCIATED PRESS CHICAGO — Chicago’s teachers agreed Tuesday to return to the classroom after more than a week on the picket lines, ending a spiteful stalemate with Mayor Rahm Emanuel over teacher evaluations and job security, two issues at the heart of efforts to reform the nation’s public schools. Union delegates voted overwhelmingly to suspend the strike after discussing a proposed contract settlement that had been on the table for days. Classes were to resume Wednesday. Jubilant delegates poured out of a South Side union hall singing “solidarity forever,” cheering, honking horns and yelling, “We’re going back.” Most were eager to get to work and proud of a walkout that yielded results. “I’m very excited. I miss my wstudents. I’m relieved because I think this contract was better than what they offered,” said America Olmedo, who teaches fourth- and fifthgrade bilingual classes. “They tried to take everything away.” Mayor Rahm Emanuel called the settlement “an honest compromise” that “means a new day and a new direction for the Chicago public schools.” “In past negotiations, taxpayers paid more, but our kids got less. This time, our taxpayers are paying less, and our kids are getting more,” the mayor said, referring to

provisions in the deal that he says will cut costs. The walkout, the first in Chicago in 25 years, shut down the nation’s third-largest school district just days after 350,000 students had returned from summer vacation. Tens of thousands of parents were forced to find alternatives for idle children, including many whose neighborhoods have been wracked by gang violence in recent months. Union President Karen Lewis said the union’s 700-plus delegates voted 98 percent to 2 percent to reopen the schools. “We said that we couldn’t solve all the problems of the world with one contract,” Lewis said. “And it was time to end the strike.” Tuesday’s vote was not on the contract offer itself, but on whether to continue the strike. The contract will now be submitted to a vote by the full membership of more than 25,000 teachers. The walkout was the first for a major American city in at least six years. It drew national attention because it posed a highprofile test for teachers unions, which have seen their political influence threatened by a growing reform movement. Unions have pushed back against efforts to expand charter schools, bring in private companies to help with failing schools and link teacher evaluations to student test scores. Said Shay Porter, a teacher at the Henderson Academy elementary school: “We ignited the labor movement in Chicago.”


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

AROUND THE IVIES

Canadian Idol “Canadian Idol” was the Canadian reality television competition show which aired from 2003 until its suspension in 2008. The show, based on the British show “Pop Idol,” was hosted by Ben Mulroney — son of a former Canadian Prime Minister.

T H E D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

Penn welcomes ‘Canadian Idol’ star

Allston residents call for detailed plans

BY HUIZHONG WU STAFF WRITER University of Pennsylvania’s class Of 2016 features one student all the a cappella groups would love to have. Kalan Porter, a Wharton freshman, was the “Canadian Idol” winner in 2004 and has an eight-year music career to his name, all before starting at Penn. However, his music career is taking a breath as he pursues his undergraduate degree here. “I was running my own small business essentially with my music,” Porter said, explaining his decision to come to Penn. “I have something to learn about the business end of things [and] this is sort of one of the best business schools in the world.” Porter is older than the typical freshman at age 26, and he comes with much more life experience than many of his peers having had a successful music career in Canada with two albums, both making the top 10 in Canada. “He is the highest selling Canadian idol ever. He’s also the highest-selling Canadian debut album to date,” said Nicole Hughes, a professional songwriter who’s worked with Porter in the past. “He’s pretty gigantic.” His music career was spurred when he won “Canadian Idol” at 18. “It was all kind of a whirlwind. I still look back and it’s almost like a traumatic experience — I’ve blocked it out in my mind — when your life is changing that fast, it’s a process,” he said of his time on “Idol.” He is grateful for his time on “Idol,” citing “the opportunities it gave me, the doors it opened.” Porter had grown up playing music all his life. He took clas-

BY MERCER COOK STAFF WRITER

IDREES SYED/DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

The 2004 Canadian Idol winner Kalan Porter has joined the University of Pennslyvania’s class of 2016. sical violin and viola lessons prior to the show. He also played in several bands in PENN high school with both friends and family. However, he was never formally trained in voice. It was a big leap for 18-yearold Porter coming from Medicine Hat, Alberta — a rural area where his neighbors were a good 10 minutes away. He then moved 1,800 miles away to Toronto. “I moved there for the TV show and then never left,” he said. “It was a real whirlwind.” However, Porter revealed that he did not initially want to even try out for “Idol.”

“My mom really pushed me into doing it,” Porter said. “I thought I was too cool. I was in an indie band … but then I went to an audition and saw that really I could make a career of it and so I changed my view.” Despite lacking a formal background in voice, Porter won, with good reason. “When he opened his mouth, I was blown away,” Hughes said, referring to the first time they worked together on a song. “He’s such an incredible singer.” After his stint on “Canadian Idol,” Porter produced two albums and toured the country giving concerts. As he was starting work on his second album in 2006, he received bad news. “I was at a high point and then I found out my mom had breast cancer,” he said.

For many Allston residents, the devil is in the details. After a summer during which Harvard made large strides in planning for development across the Charles River, Allston residents said that they are anxious because of the lack of details in the University’s plan, especially concerning the much-discussed Barry’s Corner Housing and Retail Commons. In the last few months, Harvard brought on a third party developer, Samuels and Associates, to help create the new Barry’s Corner area and announced that the reimagined Allston Science Center will house, among other areas, stemcell research and bio-engineering facilities. The University updated residents of its progress at Harvard-Allston Task Force meetings throughout the summer. Ray V. Mellone, an Allston resident and the chairman of the Task Force, praised Harvard’s efforts to keep the community informed on the “overall quality of their thinking”, but said the University’s presentations were not specific and “left a lot to be desired.” Mellone worried that the proposed Barry’s Corner Complex, as it stands, will not realize the University and the community’s expressed desires to make Barry’s Corner a vibrant and lively community center. “Right now, it seems generic,” Mellone said. “It doesn’t seem to have a kind of interest for most of the community.” Barry’s Corner, along with the new Science Complex, has been one of the focal points of University development efforts since Harvard released its first Institutional Master Plan for Allston development in 2007. In that plan, the University aimed to make Barry’s Corner a vibrant community center which would attract locals from both sides of the Charles River. However, plans for Allston development were put on hold in 2009 in the wake of the recent financial crisis. The halt left a huge hole on the plot where Harvard once envisioned a $1 billion science complex devoted to stem cell research— a decision which sparked tension between Har-

vard and the community. Task Force member Harry E. Mattison echoed Mellone’s anxiety about the University’s lack of concrete plans for Barry’s Corner. He hoped the UniHARVARD versity would re-engage with the idea of creating some sort of cultural center, an idea which, Mattison says, the community strongly supports. “Harvard for years talked about there being some major cultural institution or activities,” Mattison said. “We want that. If it’s a CVS, a bank, and an AT&T store, it’s not going to be a place people want to come to—it’s not going to be a particularly attractive draw.” Harvard’s Associate Vice President for Public Affairs and Communications Kevin Casey emphasized that the University’s goals are in line with the community’s. “Harvard shares the community’s interest in enlivening Barry’s Corner,” Casey wrote in an emailed statement, unable to be reached by phone because he was out of the office. “The master planning process introduced a range of potential future uses in Barry’s Corner that will help to enliven the area, increase pedestrian activity, and further knit together the University and the community.” Chief Planner Kairos Shen of the Boston Redevelopment Authority, the city body which will decide this fall whether Harvard can pursue its new master plan, could not be reached for comment on Monday. Task Force member John Cusack, who was one of two Allston residents selected by the University to help choose a developer for Barry’s Corner, was optimistic about the future of the planning process. “I think they’re trying to work with the needs and requests of the community,” Cusack said. “We’re starting to see at least some ideas of looking for things that the community wants.” Mattison said that to address the current issues causing anxiety in the community, the nature of the conversations between residents and the University would have to change.


PAGE 12

NEWS

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS YUNEL ESCOBAR Escobar, a shortstop for the Toronto Blue Jays, was suspended for three games by the team after wearing eye-black with an anti-gay slur in Spanish during a game on Saturday against the Boston Red Sox.

Forster ’13 reflects on career BY ALEX EPPLER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER As the women’s soccer team prepares for Ivy League play, which begins on Saturday at Princeton, midfielder Kristen Forster ’13 has already established herself in the League. On Sept. 17, Forster was named Ivy League Player of the Week after leading the Elis in consecutive victories over Saint Peter’s University, Iona College, and Central Connecticut State University. Not only did Forster score three goals over the course of the week’s matches, but the goals proved decisive tallies in each game. The News caught up with Forster to talk about her recent success, team dynamics, and the squad’s future.

Q

You were just named Ivy League Player of the Week. Could you talk a little bit about what the week was like?

A

It was a pretty big week for us. We got three wins coming off our two losses in Chicago, so I think it was exactly what we needed going into Ivy play this weekend; to just gain some momentum and be in some close games where everyone could contribute and just build some confidence, and it was good that each game we got better and better, I think.

I guess just never stop working. You know we had our fair share of chances in the Iona and Central games, myself included, and we should’ve put some of them away earlier, but everyone just kept working hard and eventually found our way to the goal. you tell me a little bit QCan more about the Iona game? It sounded wild.

A

We were up 1–0 until the last three minutes or so of the game, and just had a little mental lapse and a little defensive breakdown, and they ended up tying it up. But after losing in overtime to Loyola out in Chicago, we sort of got together and decided that we weren’t going to make a habit out of losing overtime games, because there’s nothing worse than playing an extra 20 minutes and walking away with a loss. We basically just decided A, we’re not going to lose any overtime games and B, we don’t want to lose at home. And then it was about, I think, two minutes into overtime, it was just sort of like a scramble. We got all the right bounces and it was me and the keeper [laughs].

you?

A

Technically, sure. So how do you find yourself in the right place at the right time?

A

Q

Q

A

[laughs] Technically.

Q

Well I guess that’s what it is, being in the right place at the right time. I don’t know,

I’ve been very, very happy with it so far. I think this is the most, I want to say this is the best, of the four years I’ve been here. This is the best team chemistry we’ve ever had, and I think that goes a long way both on the field and off the field as far as everyone’s work ethic and just being positive towards each other … The atmosphere of Ivy League games is just so different than anything else, it just really comes down to whatever team wants it more. I think right now our team is in a really good place. Working hard, working for each other.

team begins Ivy League QThe play on Saturday. What are you most looking forward to?

A

Saturday’s the biggest game of our season so far, and it’s sort of a test of how prepared we are, what we’ve been doing since last November basically to prepare for the play again. Everything in the offseason, in the summer, preseason, nonconference play, it’s all going to be a test on Saturday. Everyone’s really excited and just anxious. I just want to get it underway.

that the most memoraWhat can we expect from the QWas ble moment of the week for Q team for the rest of the year? Yeah it was a great week, three good wins, but what it comes down to is now is where it all starts to count … It’s great to be 5–3 going into Ivy play, but this is where it all starts to matter. In the long run it’s about winning these seven Ivy League games … The ultimate goal is to win the championship.

You scored three game-winning goals [this past week].

A

So how’s the season been so far for the team?

A

Well, hopefully an Ivy L ea g u e c h a m p i o n s h i p [laughs]. That would be ideal, but all we can do really is just keep working hard at practice, on the field, and just keep supporting one another.

Q

It’s the beginning of your senior year. How are you hoping to close out your Yale career?

A

I guess it really hits you that it’s the last season that you

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Kristen Forster ’13 earned second team All-Ivy and first team All-New England honors last year. have, the last time you’re going to step on the field. We’ve all been, all of us seniors have been playing since we were little kids so, I think it’s finally becoming real. I’m just excited for these last Ivy games to be honest with you. There’s nothing like playing against these rivals, and it’s just a completely different

McCoy honored for accomplishments MCCOY FROM PAGE 14 The confusion was righted, and she went on to win varsity letters in her freshman and sophomore years and was the only non-senior selected to the Academic All-Ivy team in spring 2011.

“[McCoy is] one of the best academic kids that we’ve ever recruited.” DAVID SHOEHALTER Head coach, track and field Shoehalter said that while academics and extracurriculars often overshadow her athletic achievements, she has “improved steadily” as a hurdler and is committed to the team. He added that he spoke with Fink and supported McCoy during the selection process, though he did not nominate her himself. Outside her academic and athletic life at Yale, McCoy has been an active leader and participant in extracurricular activities. In addition to being a FOOT leader and a Junior Class Council representative, she currently serves as one of the Branford freshman coun-

selors and sings for Whim ‘n Rhythm. “She’s got so many interests, it’s hard for her to focus on one thing,” Shoehalter said, calling her a “superstar.” McCoy’s friends and suitemates echoed Shoehalter’s statement. Sunny Jones ’13, who lives with McCoy this year, called her “a ball of energy.” Jones added that because McCoy has “touched every sphere of Yale,” she is a great freshman counselor. Freshman and sophomoreyear roommate Miriam Lauter ’13 called McCoy the “nicest, warmest, kindest person ever.” Lauter exposed one flaw of McCoy’s, however: Her room tends to be messy. In winning the Gordon Brown Prize, McCoy joins well known company, including George H. W. Bush ’48 and, most recently, Patrick Witt ’12. McCoy said she found it funny to win an award originally given for manhood. “It’s odd, considering I’m a woman,” she said. The prize, which has existed since 1913, was first awarded to a female, Mindy Rosenbaum ’85, in 1984. Contact JOSEPH TISCH at joseph.tisch@yale.edu .

keep getting closer every time we compete, and it’s nice to focus on something else we can control.” The Yale women were led by strong individual performances from Ghei and Sun Gyoung Park ’14, both of whom set personal records over the weekend, according to Rompothong. Park finished tied for third and three more Yalies, Marika Liu ’15, Caroline Rouse ’15 and Seo Hee Moon ’14 finished in the top nine for the tournament. Ghei won her individual title with consistent rounds of 71 and 72 and edged BU’s Kristyna Pavlickova by two strokes. The

you planning on conQAre tinuing to play competitive soccer after graduation?

A

[Laughs] Probably not. No I mean, soccer’s been such a big part of my life for as long as I can remember that I’m sure I’ll

continue to play in some respect whether it be a co-ed league or just for fun, but there’s never going to be another time where it’s going to be as competitive. Contact ALEX EPPLER at alexander.eppler@yale.edu .

Appleman revamps program VOLLEYBALL FROM PAGE 14

YALE ATHLETICS

Dakota McCoy ’13 has volunteered for the Special Olympics and for DEMOS, a science teaching programs at local elementary schools.

Men finish 2nd in Newport GOLF FROM PAGE 14

atmosphere.

sophomore said that her putting gave her the advantage this weekend. “I putted really well, which was important because all of last year I wasn’t putting as well,” Ghei said. “I wasn’t holing shots from all over the course but I sank a lot of putts when I had the chance.” While the Dartmouth course that Ghei and her teammates faced was like a “miniature Yale” according to Rompothong, the men faced a much more unfamiliar environment in Newport. The first two rounds of the tournament were played at the Newport Country Club, wich Bernstein described as a windy, linksstyle course. The final round was played at

Carnegie Abbey. Both teams will return to familiar environs for their next matches, however. The women will contest the Yale Intercollegiate Tournament on their home course this weekend and the following weekend the men will play in the MacArthur Cup at the Course at Yale as well. “We’re going to be working hard in practice for our home tournament next weekend. We definitely want to play well,” Willis said. “Our focus is to try to win our home tournament.” Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.sullivan@yale.edu .

tournament match when they defeated Albany 3–1 in the first round. Winning was nothing new for Appleman, who worked as an assistant coach under Russ Rose at Penn State for eight seasons before coming to Yale. During her time with the Nittany Lions, who consistently field one of the top squads in the nation, Appleman coached in five Final Fours and won a national title in 1999. Appleman said she draws inspiration from Rose. “There are a lot of things [in our program] that come from coach Rose,” she said. “He’s one of the best out there right now, and we do a lot of the things he does because he does it right.” Yale’s success did not stop after the 2004 breakthrough. The Elis won the Ivy League crown in three of the past four seasons. In 2008, most likely the greatest Yale volleyball season of all time, the team won 13 of 14 Ivy League contests and another first-round NCAA tournament match against Ohio University. Three players from the team were named First Team All-Ivy, while outside hitter Cat Dailey ’10 was named the conference player of the year. Dailey is just one product of Appleman’s ability to lure elite talent to Yale. During her tenure, Yale players have been named to a postseason Ivy League All-Star team on 35 separate occasions, a conference high. Three current players interviewed cited recruiting as one of Appleman’s greatest strengths as a coach. Setter Kelly Johnson ’16, a recent recruit, said Appleman’s recruiting style set her apart from other college coaches. “When I went on my recruiting trip, the way she recruited was so pleasurable,” Johnson said. “She wasn’t the coach that was pressuring you so much that it made you nervous or unconfident about your decision. She made you feel good about yourself as a player.” This approach led to a few major hauls for the program. Since 2003, two Bulldogs, Dai-

YALE BULLDOGS

Volleyball head coach Erin Appleman has won four Ivy League titles in her nine seasons leading the Elis. ley and Kendall Polan ’14, earned the Ivy Player of the Year award while three, Alexis Crusey ’10, Polan and Mollie Rogers ’15, earned Ivy Rookie of the Year honors. Despite Johnson’s praise, Appleman added that when it comes to recruiting, Yale tends to sell itself. “I’m very fortunate to work at such a prestigious and incredible university,” she said. “I just kind of point that out to players. You have a chance to do it all here. You can win in the classroom and on the court.” This season, Yale will head into the Ivy schedule as favorites to win the team’s third title in a row. The Elis have a losing 3–5 record now, but the team has faced some difficult competition from outside the Ivy League. But regardless of how high the team manages to climb under Appleman in the future, Yale fans have no need to fear losing her to a larger, more established program. “I have had offers throughout the years,” Appleman said. “But I’ve really enjoyed working at Yale. I love the student-athletes and I like what Yale offers for me. In many ways, it’s a dream come true.” Contact KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .


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SOCCER Arsenal 2 Montpellier 1

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BOBBY THALMAN ’13 CANDIDATE FOR CLASS AWARD Thalman, a goalkeeper on the men’s soccer team, is among 30 student-athletes who have been nominated for the 2012 Senior CLASS Award, which honors student-athletes who excel both on and off the field. Thalman has made 35 saves so far this season for Yale.

KELLY JOHNSON ’16 CO-ROOKIE OF THE WEEK Johnson, a setter on the volleyball team, was named Ivy League CoRookie of the Week following her impressive performance at the University of San Diego Tournament this past weekend. Outside hitter Mollie Rogers ’15 earned a spot on the Honor Roll.

SOCCER Real Madrid 3 Man City 2

“We want to focus on what we can control rather than what other teams do.” CHAWWADEE ROMPOTHONG ’00 HEAD COACH, WOMEN’S GOLF

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

Appleman builds powerhouse BY KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTER Head volleyball coach Erin Appleman is closing in on a decade of dynastic success.

VOLLEYBALL Since her first season as head coach in 2003, Appleman has quietly built the volleyball team into an Ivy League powerhouse and accomplished feats that no other coach in Yale volleyball history can match. The program has won four of its five Ancient Eight titles under Appleman’s direction and has 98 conferences wins, the most of any Ivy team over the past nine seasons. Team captain Haley Wessels ’13 said Appleman’s competitive nature has fueled the team’s success during Wessels’ time at Yale. “Erin is the kind of woman that’s very competitive,” Wessels said. “She has instilled that in all of us. She has that wantto-win attitude and we go out there every day with that same attitude from her.” During her first two seasons in New Haven, Appleman revitalized Yale volleyball and raised the bar for Ivy League teams on the national stage. But things were not always so rosy for Yale volleyball. When Appleman took over the position from Peg Scofield, she was only the fourth head coach in the program’s history. Despite the long coaching tenures, Yale had not finished above third in the regular season standings since 1996, nor had the team won a league title since 1978. Although she was initially impressed with the team’s talent level, Appleman said she thought it needed a spark. “I thought we had some good athletes that just needed organization,” she said. “They just needed a little more discipline in order to be successful. They wanted to feel like their time was being put to good use so I think they were eager and desired to be successful.” It did not take Appleman much time to turn things around. In 2004, just her second season at the team’s helm, the Bulldogs reversed their fortunes in dramatic fashion. Not only did they win their first conference title in 26 years, but they also became the first Ivy League squad ever to win an NCAA SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE 13

McCoy ’13 wins F.G. Brown Prize BY JOSEPH TISCH CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Dakota McCoy ’13 wears many hats at Yale. She is a varsity athlete, a freshman counselor, a published researcher and a section leader for Whim ‘n Rhythm, and it might seem she does not have room for another feather in her cap. But the Branford resident, originally from Wexford, Pa., is the recipient of this year’s Francis Gordon Brown Prize, which is one of the University’s highest honors and is awarded to a senior at the start of each academic year. Branford Dean Hilary Fink, who nominated McCoy last semester, announced the award in an email to Branford students last Tuesday evening. Fink described the award as given to “the member of the Class of 2013 who most closely approaches the standards of intellectual ability, high personhood, capacity for leadership and service to the University set by Francis Gordon Brown, a distinguished alumnus in the Class of 1901.” McCoy, who goes by Cody, said she was humbled to have won. “I feel really honored, and I definitely recognize that I wouldn’t have won this without the support of a lot of people,” she said. The prize is just one of McCoy’s many achievements at Yale. An ecology & evolutionary biology major with a 3.94 GPA, she won the Goldwater Scholarship for independent research as a sophomore. She has written papers on paleontology, climate change and animal cognition, and traveled to Puerto Rico in 2011 for animal cognition research about monkeys. Additionally, she serves as president of the Yale Ecology & Evolutionary Biology Undergraduate Organization. Her academic advisor, Leo Buss, called her an “intensely curious … once in a decade student.” He pointed to her “amazingly eclectic” selection of courses, ranging from hieroglyphics to biology, and noted that she never takes easy classes. He added that she has sought out and formed relationships with some of Yale’s most challenging professors. McCoy’s relationship with Buss began in her freshman fall when she took his seminar “Collections

TOM CABLE

Dakota McCoy ’13, who throws javelin and hurdles for the track and field team, won a Goldwater Scholarship as a sophomore. at the Peabody Museum.” Buss described the caliber of work she did in that class as the foundation for published research, work on a level he had seen only “once before in 10 years” of offering the seminar. While McCoy takes her work seriously, she said she has received joking criticism from friends and family members. “My dad always jokes that I’m spending my Yale career playing with animals,” McCoy said. McCoy’s intellectual and academic career began long before she arrived at Yale. In the sixth grade,

she tested into and excelled at AP Calculus. Her father, a physicist, “treated [math] as a really fun activity,” she explained. McCoy’s two older sisters also served as teachers. “I would do their homework with them and read their books for fun,” she said. Before arriving at Yale, McCoy studied such topics as discrete mathematics and non-Euclidean geometry at colleges and universities near her hometown. Yale Track & Field coach David Shoehalter began recruit-

ing McCoy to Yale in the summer before her senior year. Shoehalter said she showed great athletic potential but stood out as “one of the best academic kids that we’ve ever recruited.” Surprisingly, because of her exceptional academic record, McCoy’s recruitment was not entirely seamless. “She was deemed by the NCAA to be ineligible because she didn’t have a high school math class on her transcript,” Shoehalter said. SEE MCCOY PAGE 13

Golf teams tee off with strong performances BY JOHN SULLIVAN STAFF REPORTER A stellar start to the season for the men’s golf team Monday and Tuesday was eclipsed only by the even stronger performance of the women’s golf team over the weekend.

GOLF

CHAWWADEE ROMPOTHONG

The women’s golf team won the Dartmouth Invitational Tournament last weekend by 15 strokes.

STAT OF THE DAY 2

The women’s team opened its season with a 15-stroke win at the Dartmouth Invitational Tournament. Shreya Ghei ’15 capped off the weekend by winning the individual title with a one-under par 143 over the two days of the tournament. The men carried the momentum of the women’s team the next two days and took second at the Adams Cup in Newport, R.I. “The team played really well,” Sam Bernstein ’14 said. “The conditions were tough — it was windy both days and both courses were pretty firm and fast. But we played really solid golf, and our top four guys showed that we can be com-

petitive not only with schools across the country but with schools in the Ivy League.” Bernstein led the Elis to an overall score of +23 over the three rounds of the tournament, which left them only a single stroke behind No. 22 University of Central Florida, who took first place in the tournament. The junior played consistent, opportunistic golf over the weekend for an even par performance that landed him the individual championship. Close on his heels was Joe Willis ’16, who finished second at +3 in his Yale debut. Despite his inexperience and the large footprints that Yale freshmen have left over the past few seasons — both Bernstein and Will Davenport ’15 won the Ivy League Rookie of the Year award over the past two seasons — Willis said that he was unaffected by the pressure. “I was a little bit nervous just as with any tournament on the first tee, but once the round got started the nerves weren’t an issue,” Willis said. “I just kept the ball in play. I

hit it pretty solid, and I made a few putts.” The men’s individual and team successes capped off a strong showing for the Elis that began three days earlier with the women’s team. The Bulldogs led Boston University by two strokes after the first day of competition and never relinquished that lead. The Elis were undaunted by the task of playing with the lead and dropped their team score to 295 on the second day of competition, leaving BU in the dust. The Bulldogs’ second-day 295 approached the team’s target of 288 — even par for the top four players — that head coach Chawwadee Rompothong ’00 set for the team at the beginning of the year. “Our team low is 292 and we want to break that,” Rompothong said. “We want to focus on what we can control rather than what other teams do. Our average was 310 last year and a score lower than 300 is great. It’s important that we SEE GOLF PAGE 13

THE NUMBER OF SEASONS AFTER SHE ARRIVED AT YALE THAT VOLLEYBALL HEAD COACH ERIN APPLEMAN FIRST LED THE TEAM TO AN IVY LEAGUE TITLE. It was the Elis’ first championship in 26 years. The team also won its first ever NCAA Tournament game that season.

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Sept. 19, 2012

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