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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · VOL. CXXXV, NO. 1 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

74 81

CROSS CAMPUS Welcome, welcome. After a

SUMMER DAZE ‘SO HOW WAS YOUR BREAK?’

YALE-IN-LONDON

WHILE YOU WERE OUT

Ritzel ’10, Brzozowicz ’04 and Cole ’07 bring home Olympic medals

In case you haven’t been keeping up, the News presents a digest of the top stories from the last few months.

PAGE B1 WEEKEND

PAGE 14 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

‘Independents’ takes Fringe Festival

summer filled with exploration of mind and body, eager members of the class of 2016 arrive on campus today, on a Friday so gloriously sunny it seems winter may never come. Aw.

Hope those boots were made for walking.For one freshman,

the journey to Yale has been quite the hike: Gabe Acheson ’16 promised in his admission essay that, if accepted, he would walk nearly 400 miles from his home in Baltimore to New Haven. He completed the 26-day trek on Thursday, the Baltimore Sun reported.

BY TAPLEY STEPHENSON STAFF REPORTER

A reminder. If Acheson wants help putting his experiences on paper, he better hurry: applications for creative writing courses are due today at noon. Athletic excellence. The Boston Red Sox fielded the first all-Yale battery in the Major Leagues since 1883 when pitcher Craig Breslow ’02 threw two pitches to catcher Ryan Lavarnway ’09 last Saturday. Sleepless in Spokane. Former U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker, who was named Yale’s first Kissinger Senior Fellow earlier this month, is facing drunk driving and hit-andrun charges in Washington state from an Aug. 14 incident. Authorities allege that Crocker hit a semi-truck in Spokane Valley, Wash., while trying to make a right turn from the left lane, and then registered .160 and .152 blood-alcohol content in successive breath tests, according to the Associated Press. Civic discourse. Republican U.S. Senate candidate Linda McMahon refused an invitation to a Tuesday debate with the Democratic candidate, U.S. Rep. Chris Murphy, but she did send two dozen supporters to pass out fliers and submit questions about Murphy’s jobs plan, CTNewsJunkie reports. Things come together. Chris

Magoon ’11 appeared on Good Morning America this week after he donated bone marrow to a cancer patient and mother of two who needed a transplant. The two met on GMA; Magoon registered as a marrow donor at an on-campus drive in honor of Mandi Schwartz ’11.

Shake Shack. The muchawaited opening of the New York-based burger joint is right around the corner — but not quite as soon had been hoped, due to delays in construction. It will be restauranteur Danny Meyer’s second location in Connecticut; the first opened in Westport last summer. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

2001 Yale University Properties announces that preppy clothing retailer J. Crew will open a New Haven store on Broadway, following the spring arrival of Urban Outfitters to the street.

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Zakaria ’86 resigns following plagiarism

LEE WEXLER

“Independents,” which premiered at Yale last fall, has had a successful showing at the New York Fringe Festival. BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER NEW YORK — For the team behind the ongoing production of “Independents,” this summer has posed challenges even more daunting than preparing an original student musical for its New York debut, following the death of the show’s playwright, Marina Keegan ’12, in

late May. In April, the New York International Fringe Festival informed the show’s creative team that “Independents” had been selected to be part of the Fringe season, an annual showcase for the work of young artists in the theater. Keegan had planned to meet with lyricist Mark Sonnenblick ’12, composer Stephen Feigenbaum ’12 MUS ’13 and director Char-

lie Polinger ’13 to work on revisions to the show before the Fringe Festival began in August. After her death, the three spoke with Keegan’s parents and decided to continue with the production process, working to make “Independents” the strongest musical it could be, as Keegan would have wanted, they said.

Noted journalist Fareed Zakaria ’86 resigned from the Yale Corporation earlier this week shortly after he was exposed for plagiarism in his Time magazine column. In a Monday letter to University President Richard Levin, Zakaria wrote that he is reexamining his professional life and has decided to “shed some of [his] other responsibilities” in order to focus on the “core” of his work. “My service at Yale is the single largest commitment of time, energy, and attention outside of my writing and television work,” Zakaria wrote. “The work of the Yale Corporation needs and deserves such attention, but I simply do not have the capacity to do it and keep up with my main professional obligations.” Zakaria, the editor-at-large of Time magazine and host of CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS, was one of 10 successor trustees on the Corporation, Yale’s highest governing body. He began the second of his two six-year terms as successor trustee in July and served as chair of the Corporation’s education policy committee. Though Zakaria’s letter did not explicitly mention plagiarism, his decision to step down came 10 days after the conservative website Newsbusters first noted in an Aug. 10 blog post that a paragraph in Zakaria’s Aug. 20 Time column on gun control closely resembled a portion of an April article in the New Yorker by Harvard professor Jill Lepore SEE ZAKARIA PAGE 10

SEE INDEPENDENTS PAGE 6

Off-campus parties scrutinized BY MADELINE MCMAHON STAFF REPORTER Following a new policy designed to combat underage drinking, students are now required to register off-campus parties attended by more than 50 people with the Yale College Dean’s Office. The rule, which was announced in an Aug. 10 campus-wide email, is intended to bring off-campus parties in line with established on-cam-

pus party registration guidelines and increase student safety, Yale College Dean Mary Miller said in an email to the News. Four student leaders interviewed said they will likely comply with the new regulations, though they plan to wait and see how administrators will enforce the rule. “It will just be a way for us to have more knowledge about what’s going on,” said John Meeske, associate dean for student organizations and physical resources, “and with more knowledge

we can watch what’s going on more closely.” Meeske said students will need to register parties under the name of a “host,” who assumes legal responsibility for the attendees. The online registration form, which Meeske sent in a Wednesday email to all undergraduates, requires the host to acknowledge Yale’s alcohol policies and Connecticut state laws regarding

McHale’s ’13 football captaincy suspended BY CHARLES CONDRO AND GAVAN GIDEON STAFF REPORTERS After a turbulent 2011, the football team’s 2012 season has begun with more controversy. With former coach Tom Williams’ sudden departure and sexual assault allegations against former quarterback Patrick Witt ’12, the Bulldogs are coming off a tough season. Now the Elis will begin a new season without a leader, as Will McHale’s ’13 captaincy was suspended following an altercation at Toad’s on May 15. A witness to the altercation said McHale threw a drink at a friend of Marc Beck ’12, and that when Beck stepped between the two and yelled at McHale, the football captain punched Beck in the face. McHale fled the scene following the incident, according to the witness.

McHale, who was arrested by Yale Police that night, appeared in court Aug. 10 and applied for Connecticut’s Accelerated Rehabilitation program. Following the application, his case was continued until Aug. 9, 2013. The Accelerated Rehabilitation program gives individuals with first-time criminal or motor vehicle violations the opportunity to dismiss those charges following the successful completion of a probation sentence lasting no more than two years, according to the State of Connecticut’s Judicial Branch. McHale and his attorney Michael Luzzi ’85 declined to comment immediately following the court appearance. The trouble at Toad’s began when McHale spilled part of his drink on Beck’s friend while dancing, the witness said. After Beck’s friend attempted SEE MCHALE PAGE 13

SEE OFF-CAMPUS PAGE 10

CREATIVE COMMONS

Fareed Zakaria ’86 served as a Yale Corporation successor trustee until this week.

Freshman orientation gets tweaked BY MADELINE MCMAHON AND CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTERS Freshmen arriving on campus today will participate in an updated freshman orientation program, which administrators say will familiarize new students with Yale’s resources and the city of New Haven. Orientation this fall will include mandatory “communication and consent” workshops on sexual misconduct prevention, reformulated workshops on health and sexuality, and revamped events encouraging freshmen to explore the Elm City and the arts at Yale, Dean of Student Affairs Marichal Gentry said in a Wednesday email. Administrators also made technical improvements to several traditional Yale freshmen orientation events, such as the Kaleidoscope performance on diversity

and freshman keynote address, to help them “run more smoothly and effectively,” he said. The communication and consent workshops, though new to orientation, were first introduced to the class of 2015 last January as part of the University’s efforts to improve its handling of sexual misconduct following complaints that Yale harbored a hostile sexual environment. The workshops are designed to examine common communication patterns and address pressure in social situations to prevent unwanted sexual interactions. Melanie Boyd ’90, assistant dean of student affairs, said the sessions — titled “The Myth of Miscommunication” — were “very successful” when they debuted and have not undergone major changes. Freshmen interviewed SEE ORIENTATION PAGE 10


PAGE 2

YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “Let’s just abolish football and get rid of all this nonsense once and for yaledailynews.com/opinion

all.”

‘SKEPTIC’ ON ‘MCHALE’S CAPTAINCY SUSPENSION FOLLOWS TOAD’S FIGHT’

I L L U S T R A T I O N S E D I T O R D AV I D Y U

Welcome to Yale

NEWS’

VIEW Enter, 2016

U

nder Mother Yale’s increasingly watchful eye, freshmen arrive

for Camp Yale today. Freshmen arrive on campus today after a summer of disheartening headlines about their new school. A member of the Yale Corporation resigned after a plagiarism scandal; the president of Yale-NUS announced that the new college will restrict political student groups on campus. Those issues are worth our attention. But the Yale that appears every so often in national headlines is not the Yale that will be overrun today with freshmen, their families and the eager upperclassmen helping to carry boxes up Old Campus stairs. This Yale is a community, not just a famous name. It’s a community freshmen will enter today and shape each day of the next four years. As they begin their lives as Yalies, the University should be teaching them to explore and to discover how to take care of themselves and each other. Instead, freshmen are going to hear a lot of rules and warnings, including the newly announced requirement that off-campus parties be registered with the Yale College Dean’s Office. Rather than diving into Yale with abandon — and potentially overstepping and then recoiling — they will memorize procedures for registering fun. Mother Yale has taken it upon herself to watch over undergraduates more and more in recent years. Though some changes, like the new system for reporting sexual assault, should be celebrated, Yale is generally sending the wrong message to students learning to be independent adults. Yalies should learn to

govern their own lives rather than relying on — or hiding from — a watchful authority. Despite administrative hurdles, freshmen will walk onto Old Campus today bearing the curiosity and energy that feed Yale. Freshmen, Yale may feel new and intimidating and impenetrable, but you should know that by simple virtue of being here, you have become Yale’s lifeblood. It may not feel like it yet, but this place is yours as much as it is anyone else’s. Your task is to decide what that means. For those o1f you who are new on campus, we are the Yale Daily News, and we will work hard to inform you, entertain you and help you do that deciding. Let us know when we fail to do that. For now, we’ll give you a start: Yale is not YaleNUS, it’s not party regulations and it’s not what you see in national headlines. Start in your suite. Look around; see what’s happening. Remember that it’s the people here who make this place special, that this is the place where the late Marina Keegan ’12 found the opposite of loneliness. “It’s just this feeling that there are people, an abundance of people, who are in this together,” she wrote in the News shortly before her death this summer. “Who are on your team. When the check is paid and you stay at the table. When it’s four a.m. and no one goes to bed. That night with the guitar. That night we can’t remember. That time we did, we went, we saw, we laughed, we felt.”

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COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXV, NO. 1

Yale is for everyone Contrary to popular belief, Al Gore did not invent the Internet. The history of the Internet, in fact, is devoid of future vice presidents, barred from the kind of “Social Network”-style mythology that would otherwise separate truth from myth. I know little about the history of the Internet; freshman year at Yale, it seems, can’t teach you everything. But I do know — thanks to a strange, serendipitous confluence of current events — that a man by the name of Tim Berners-Lee figures prominently in the narrative. The man bears many suffixes, many degrees and many accomplishments, but he recently became a television star, too, having performed in the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 Summer Olympics. There, on a dark stage, the inventor of the World Wide Web wrote a single tweet and broadcast it to the world, its contents written in flashing light on the walls of the arena itself. “This,” read the lights in the stadium, “is for everyone.” This is for everyone. This ceremony, this Olympics — this miraculous invention known as the Internet — is for all of humanity: no quotas, no restrictions, no barriers based on color

or creed. “ Eve ryo n e ” is beautifully inclusive, and “this” is beautifully ambiguous. Yale is nothing like MARISSA InterMEDANSKY the net, though it does bring Sidewinder together people from all over the world in a serendipitous confluence of classes, clubs and communities. Yale is a physical place, full of traditions and sensations and experiences that can only be experienced outside the confines of a backlit screen. But Tim Berners-Lee was on to something, I think. Yale is for you — it’s a beautiful privilege and a gift you have rightly earned — but you, I hope, will one day be for everyone. Yale is for you. You are, first and foremost, the master of your own destiny. You don’t have some pre-planned course schedule or some designated lightsout — the latter, I imagine, much to the administration’s chagrin. There’s no roadmap to guide you. You will have friends and

mentors — plus a litany of professors and advisers, masters and deans. But even Dante had to leave Virgil behind; after Wizard’s Chess and the potions puzzle, first-year Harry faced Voldemort alone. Indeed, the hallmark of your Yale experience will be the freedom you have in shaping it. Want to pick up a new language, or try your hand at computer science? Go right ahead. Want to experiment with African dance, or a cappella music, or intramural sports? Be my guest. Want to pursue the passions you’ve already cultivated, and take your musicianship, sportsmanship or scholarship to the next level? You can do that, too. You have four years at Yale, babies, and today you enter our door tabulae rasae. You’re a blank slate: Savor it. You’ve earned the right to experiment, to challenge yourself, to fail. Yale makes no mistakes, they say, and they’re right; you’ve earned the right to be here: You built that! The creative energy that propelled you to Yale did not die the day you graduated from high school, but curfews and AP classes fortunately did. You’re free. Make the most of it. You are babies in this world,

freshmen. You are full of new energy and life. But Yale is old, older than us both—older than my family’s history in America and America itself. And Yale is bigger than all of us, it can seem. Our traditions are larger-thanlife, our campus grandiose, our Science Hill insurmountable. And like all old, beautiful things, Yale has made mistakes. It has been on the wrong side of history. It has had — and will continue to have — faults. Continue to love Yale, but remember this: to love Yale is to challenge it, even if spending a semester studying abroad in a small Asian city-state seems especially awesome. And remember this, too: We are fortunate to attend a place that will challenge us and let us challenge it — that will hone our skills, sharpen our minds and expand our networks. We are individuals, certainly not guaranteed to make a difference. But be ambitious, freshmen. It could happen. And to make a difference is to be for everyone. MARISSA MEDANSKY is a sophomore in Morse College. Her column runs on Tuesdays. Contact her at marissa.medansky@yale.edu .

Yale’s blue bible In May, a friend of mine chose to attend Yale. I wanted to get her a gift to celebrate, and so I went to the Barnes and Noble on Broadway to buy “Stover at Yale.” Copies of “Stover” line the top shelves of the store 20 feet overhead. I asked an attendant for a ladder to climb the shelves, and he scratched his head. No one, he told me, had bought that book in a long time. You could tell he was right. The many dust jackets of the books, once a deep blue, had paled from years of sun filtered through the store’s windows. Stover had become expensive wallpaper. Most Yalies never open Owen Johnson’s great 1912 novel. The names Dink Stover, Tom Regan and Joe Hungerford mean nothing to the average student. That’s a shame. Because at its core, Stover at Yale is about the Yale experience — not just the Yale College of a century ago, but the modern university in which we live and learn. In the next few days, freshmen will begin their journeys through life as Elis. Over four years, they will be forced to choose between studying, sleep and going out with a pretty girl on a Thursday night. And occasionally they will face tough decisions, ones that often take the form of remaining popular or doing the right thing.

The shortest, gladdest years of life will become complicated and difficult. At a point, they despair, NATHANIEL will throw up their ZELINSKY hands, and say “enough.” We all do — some On Point more than once. Stover at Yale is about those very moments. Dink Stover and his crew grapple with the same underlying issue facing modern Yalies: How do we remain good people in a community pressuring us to excel? A freshman star on the football team, Stover gains social standing quickly. He conforms to accepted notions of success — doing just enough to get by academically and only fraternizing with the “right” crowd. Above all, he keeps his eyes on the brass rings he wants to collect: the football captaincy, election to a sophomore society and, subsequently, a spot in a senior society. Sophomore year, reality jolts Stover awake. He meets a classmate of lower social standing who, unbeknownst to Stover, runs a lucrative advertising busi-

ness. Comparing himself to his socially dead but financially successful peer, Dink sees the hollowness of his own accomplishments. That night, the football celebrity chides himself as “a plain damn fool.” With a little soul searching, Stover realizes that his selfworth should not be defined by what other people think of him. He rallies against Yale’s system of conformity — to the ire of his popular compatriots — and his social standing slips. At the novel’s apex, Dink sacrifices his reputation to save a young woman of ill repute suffering from a ruptured appendix. Despite the resulting scandal, Stover walks away with his head high — he chooses to stand for something. In a fairytale ending, his peers recognize his strength of character, he receives a coveted tap into a senior society and he gets the girl. Like any old book, some parts seem antiquated — even trite — today. And, yes, Dink and his friends are all white and male. There are no blacks, no women and no Jews. Yet the core message of the novel remains true and timeless. Stover is Yale’s great text — a book that speaks about human desires and the quandaries those desires create. As new freshmen will find, Dink’s world and ours

are not so far apart. The football captaincy is no longer the quintessential brass ring, but other positions have taken its place. Like Johnson’s characters, modern Yalies are adept at doing just enough to be passably excellent, usually defined as an A-minus. (Truly thriving intellectually, it turns out, is very déclassé — no one reads. They skim.) Upperclassmen have all felt the pull of prestigious titles. We know people who value themselves and others based on sorority or society membership. And we have done it ourselves. Yale still tempts us with hollow success to become someone we are not. So Dink Stover’s realization remains just as relevant today: Be faithful to your values, be a good friend and the rest will fall into place. It isn’t always easy. There will be, as Dr. Seuss says, hangups and bang-ups, but it all turns out okay. But you don’t need me to tell you that — take a trip to Broadway, climb the ladder and see for yourself. NATHANIEL ZELINSKY is a senior in Davenport College. His column runs on Mondays. Contact him at nathaniel.zelinsky@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

BRIEFLY TODAY’S EVENTS FRIDAY, AUGUST 24 8:30 AM Women in Science and Engineering at Yale. Exhibit features over 70 women scientists currently or historically engaged in teaching and research at Yale and includes portraits, research images, and citations to notable publications. A timeline of significant events and historical tables illustrates the development of Women in Science at Yale and features notable ‘first’ achievements. Image highlights include arctic landscapes, a moon crater, butterfly wing eyespots, nesting fish, nanotubes, and human facial muscles. Kline Biology Tower (219 Prospect St.). 9:00 AM Residences open to freshmen. Welcome Class of 2016! 10:00 AM Big Food: Health, Culture and Evolution of Eating. Exhibition will begin with the neuroscience of appetite, genetics of obesity, and how food and energy are stored in the body. It will examine behavioral choice in nutrition and exercise as well as the influence of social, environmental, and cultural settings. Visitors can investigate our origins as hunter-gatherers; explore societal pressures such as the progressive growth of portion sizes; tackle media influences on food preferences; and consider serious health consequences that have increased the burden of chronic diseases, including diabetes and heart disease. Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History (170 Whitney Ave.).

Title IX inquiry concludes BY GAVAN GIDEON AND CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTERS The Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights completed its investigation into Yale’s sexual culture in June following a series of changes made by administrators to the University’s sexual misconduct policies. The 15-month investigation ended after Yale and OCR reached a “voluntary resolution agreement,” announced by OCR on June 15. Under the agreement, the University will continue to uphold its newly implemented grievance mechanisms, such as the University-Wide Committee on Sexual Misconduct, and inform the community of available resources devoted to issues of sexual misconduct. Yale will not face any disciplinary action but will be required to report to OCR until May 31, 2014, according to Russlynn Ali, assistant secretary for civil rights at the Department of Education. Though the investigation did not find Yale in noncompliance with Title IX, it did conclude that the University had underreported incidents of sexual misconduct “for a very long time” and kept inadequate and confus-

ing records of sexual harassment and violence, Ali said. The investigation into Yale’s sexual climate began March 2011, just weeks after 16 students and alumni filed a complaint with OCR alleging that Yale had allowed a hostile sexual environment to persist on campus. Hannah Zeavin ’12 and Alexandra Brodsky ’12, two of the Title IX complainants, pointed out in June that while OCR did not find Yale in noncompliance, it also did not find Yale in compliance with Title IX regulations. Zeavin added that a June 15 letter from OCR to Yale administrators regarding the investigation demonstrated that Yale was “not necessarily within the bounds of Title IX law” before the investigation began. Still, complainants said in a June 15 statement that they were grateful for OCR’s investigation and plan to form a standing committee to oversee the University’s progress and serve as a “conduit of information” between Yale and OCR. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu and CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

Sexual misconduct report released BY GAVAN GIDEON AND CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTERS Forty-nine cases of sexual harassment, assault or other misconduct were brought to Yale officials between Jan. 1 and June 30, according to the University’s second semi-annual report compiling sexual misconduct complaints. As part of the University’s efforts to improve transparency, administrators began releasing semiannual reports last year that compile all sexual misconduct cases. The second such report contains the first instance of expulsion imposed by the newly created the University-Wide Committee on Sexual Misconduct. According to the report, the complaint that led to expulsion was filed on behalf of a female Yale College student and alleged that a male undergraduate with whom she had been in a relationship “committed acts of intimate partner violence.” The UWC, which was established last summer to streamline Yale’s sexual grievance procedures, found sufficient evidence to support the allegations and decided to expel the male student given his “prior history of similar conduct.” The punishment was the first instance in which any student had been expelled from Yale College since at least 1998, according to annual reports of the Executive

Committee archived online. Deputy Provost Stephanie Spangler, who was appointed University Title IX Coordinator last November during the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights’ investigation into Yale’s sexual culture, said administrators will continue working to “clarify and communicate” the University’s sexual misconduct policies and see whether anything needs to be changed.

The goal is to be fair and consistent given the complexities of the case. STEPHANIE SPANGLER Deputy provost “The goal is to be fair and consistent given the complexities of the case,” Spangler said in July about evaluating cases. “It’s not a formulaic process.” According to the University’s first semi-annual report, which was released in February, 52 cases of sexual misconduct were brought to officials between July 1 and Dec. 31 of 2011. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu and CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

50

Amount, in millions of dollars, that Linda McMahon spent of her own money in the 2010 Senate election McMahon lost the election to Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73.

Yale-NUS tensions flare BY TAPLEY STEPHENSON STAFF REPORTER Unease over civil liberties at YaleNUS College surged this summer when a July 16 article in the Wall Street Journal cited Yale-NUS President Pericles Lewis as saying protests and political parties would not be permitted on the school’s campus in Singapore. Lewis said the article paraphrased him incorrectly and told the News in July that “all forms of political expression consistent with Singaporean law” will be allowed at Yale-NUS. But when pressed on how Yale-NUS will handle political expression that goes beyond what is permitted by Singaporean law, Lewis and University President Richard Levin were unwilling or unable to give clear answers. In a July 19 interview, Levin said he did not know whether Yale-NUS will be obligated to report any unregistered political parties or protests, or whether the college will allow Singaporean police

on campus to break up protests or meetings of political parties. “I’d rather just have no comment on these things,” he said. Protests in Singapore are only allowed in Hong Lim Park’s Speakers’ Corner. While students at NUS may participate in established national parties, Singaporean law forbids them from forming political parties or campus chapters of national parties, akin to the Yale College Republicans or the Yale College Democrats. Lewis said in July that, to his knowledge, the college will not be obligated to report political parties or protests to Singaporean authorities. He said at the time that he will ultimately be responsible for developing Yale-NUS’s policies on student parties and protest, but declined to give details. Lewis said in July that the policies will become public by the time the college opens in fall 2013. Reached Thursday, he and Levin declined to comment on the policies until September.

The Journal’s article prompted a wave of criticism. Human Rights Watch accused Yale of “betraying the spirit of the university as a center of open debate and protest,” and Chee Soon Juan, chairman of the opposition Singapore Democratic Party, wrote to Lewis to express his “extreme dismay.” “They say, ‘You have total freedom to express yourself’ — and there’s a but in there — ‘but everything within the confines of what the Singapore government says,’ ” Chee told the News. “You can do anything within those confines, and therein lies the problem, because very soon you’ll find that circle getting smaller and smaller.” The Yale College faculty passed a resolution in April expressing concern over the historical “lack of respect for civil and political rights” in Singapore. Contact TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .

PKU exchange ends BY TAPLEY STEPHENSON STAFF REPORTER Months after reaffirming its partnership with Peking University, Yale announced in July it was cancelling its program that sent undergraduates to live and study at the prestigious Chinese school.

A program where our staff, including Yale faculty members, … exceeds the number of students is not sustainable. MARY MILLER Yale College dean University President Richard Levin called the program a “great success” when Yale renewed the partnership in December, but said in July that it consistently failed to achieve “critical mass,” with only four students signed up for fall

2012. Yale College Dean Mary Miller said the program was not financially viable with such low enrollment. “Programs like this one depend on developing a successful constituency each and every year in order to make them work,” Miller said in a July 26 email. “A program where our staff, including Yale faculty members, who move to Beijing and take up residence for a semester or a year, exceeds the number of students, is not sustainable.” Yale-PKU was the only program that allowed students from other universities to live and study with students at PKU. Administrators expected the program to attract 15 students per semester when it was launched in 2006, but it averaged around 10, Levin said. Yale and PKU considered increasing enrollment by adding other American schools to the partnership, such as Brown University and Wellesley College, but Levin said they were unable to secure commitments from peer institutions. A July 24 email from a faculty member on the program’s advisory committee described the Yale-PKU language program as “notoriously weak,” caus-

ing many students to struggle with reentering the Chinese language program at Yale. “I enjoyed my time [at PKU], but had difficulty coming back into the language classes at Yale because the PKU program had me studying out of a different book and taking language classes four days a week compared to Yale’s five,” Lucy Brady ’12 said. Yale and PKU students interviewed in July said they were surprised to hear the program had been shut down. The PKU students also said they were not informed of the program’s closure. “I think the change may interfere with Yale’s reputation here,” said Shiyao Liu, a PKU student who lived with Yale students in spring 2011. “Making promises and then, after several months, breaking them isn’t a very good action that a prestigious or top-tier American university should do.” PKU students can still take summer courses at Yale through a program established in 2005. Contact TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .

McMahon, Murphy to face off BY NICK DEFIESTA STAFF REPORTER Former wrestling magnate Linda McMahon and current U.S. Rep. Chris Murphy will face each other this November in the race for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by Joseph Lieberman ’64 LAW ’67. McMahon bested challenger Chris Shays by a 73 to 27 percent margin in the GOP primary, and Murphy led former Connecticut Secretary of State Susan Bysiewicz ’83 by a moderately smaller margin of 68 to 32 percent for the Democratic nomination. The two have turned their attention to the November general election, in which polls show Murphy enjoying a substantial lead. “Chris Murphy won tonight, and he’ll win in November because people know he’s not like a lot of politicians in Washington,” Gov. Dannel Malloy, a Demo-

crat, said in a statement after results were released. “He spends his time working to advance the interests of the middle class, especially when it comes to job creation.” McMahon, who lost to Sen. Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73 during the 2010 Senate election despite spending over $50 million of her own money, spent an additional $12 million in her primary campaign. She is expected to spend even more during the general election, a fact Murphy acknowledged in his victory speech. McMahon, meanwhile, characterized Murphy as a picture of Washington’s dysfunction in her victory speech after the primary. “He’s been there six years, and what do we have to show for it?” McMahon said. “More spending, more debt and higher unemployment.” But McMahon faces an uphill battle,

as a July poll by Public Policy Polling gave Murphy a 50 to 42 percent lead over McMahon, substantially wider than a Quinnipiac poll conducted in May that gave Murphy only a three-point lead.

[Murphy has] been there six years, and what do we have to show for it? LINDA MCMAHON Candidate for U.S. Senate, GOP The general election will take place on Nov. 6. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu .

Path cleared for Downtown Crossing BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER After more than five years of planning and review, the $135 million Downtown Crossing project, New Haven’s largest urban development effort in generations, received final legislative approval this month to move forward with construction. Downtown Crossing, the City’s plan to convert the eastern section of Route 34 from a limited access highway into a pair of pedestrian-scale city streets, was first revealed in 2007. The roadwork will reclaim reclaim 11 acres of land, officials said, and a 2.4 acre parcel of that space will be home to a new 10-story, 426,000-square-foot medical office tower. The project began a lengthy legislative review process last April, when the real estate developer, Carter Winstanley, formally submitted a 199-page

proposal to the Board of Aldermen. After months of review and deliberation, the full Board voted unanimously to approve the project on Aug. 6, paving the way for Downtown Crossing to move forward into execution. “For half a century, the highway divided the city and served as a reminder of the homes and businesses that were lost,” Mayor John DeStefano Jr. said at a press conference on Aug. 7, referring to the destruction of the Oak Street neighborhood to make way for an extension of Route 34 under former Mayor Richard Lee in the 1950s. “No more. This January, work will finally begin to remove the highway and restore the street grid, employing thousands of people and propelling our local economy for decades to come.” The first phase of Downtown Crossing will focus on the project’s road construction work. Exits 2 and 3 of Route 34 will be closed, and the old Route

34 Connector at the North and South Frontage roads will be converted into an urban boulevard that officials hope will reconnect the Hill neighborhood with downtown. College Street will then be reconstructed at grade level. In the project’s second phase, the city will transfer the 2.4-acre land parcel Winstanley Enterprises, and Winstanley will develop the site into a medical sciences office tower at 100 College St. with ground level retail space. Gov. Dannel Malloy announced in June that multinational drug company Alexion Pharmaceuticals will relocate its headquarters to 100 College St. — becoming the central tenant of the new development. Alexion plans to move 350 of its current employees to New Haven and make an additional 200 to 300 new hires at the facility by 2017. Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .


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NEWS

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 路 yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS Property thefts spike near campus BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER Yale was struck by a series of crimes on or near campus in the two weeks before students began moving in to the dorms. Between Aug. 12-19, Yale Police Department Chief Ronnell Higgins emailed members of the University community four times about different incidents that occurred on or near Yale’s campus: three robberies, an attempted robbery and the discharge of a weapon. Higgins said he did not know whether the incidents represented a specific pattern of crime, but encouraged students to avoid displaying valuables especially while moving in. “It is hard to characterize instances of crime by season or by time of day, as we seek to encourage students to take safety precautions and be aware of their surroundings throughout the year,” Higgins said in a Wednesday email to the News. “But it is certainly the case that when the semester starts, students are busy moving in, and many items such as portable electronics can be a tempting target to thieves.” On Aug. 12 during a fight on the corner of Church and Chapel Streets at 2 a.m. gunshots were fired, though no one was reported shot. Roughly 30 minutes later a Yale employee was robbed of a wallet at the corner of Sachem Street and Whitney Avenue. Those two incidents were followed by an attempted robbery at Elm and Temple Streets at approximately 2:45 a.m. on Aug. 15. On Aug. 17 and Aug. 19, two victims were robbed at central campus locations before the sun had set: one individual was robbed of an iPod at 7:25 p.m. in front of 15 Broadway near York Street, while another was robbed of her purse around 6:30 p.m. at Elm and Temple Streets. None of the incidents involved Yale students. In an Aug. 21 campus-wide email, Higgins discussed the University’s public safety resources and reiterated the YPD’s safety advice to the Yale community. The same email was forwarded to Yale College parents the following day. In the email, Higgins said students should take advantage of Yale’s safety resources and avoid displaying valuables, jewelry or cash openly, noting that Yale’s campus has seen incidences of “thieves grabbing phones from people’s hands as they are walking,” in line with a national uptick in this type of crime. “Recent incidents have involved situations where a person walking with a cellphone or other device was distracted by listening to music, or texting, or talking on the phone, which gave the perpetrators the opportunity to strike,” Higgins told the News. “That’s why it is so important for people to stay alert and aware of their surroundings.”

I’m glad we’re bringing down the violence in this city, but that means nothing to a mother who’s lost her child. DEAN ESSERMAN Chief, New Haven Police Department The three robberies came at the very end of a summer that saw eight men murdered in the Elm City since Yalies left campus. These homicides brought New Haven’s 2012 murder count up to 11, down from 23 at this time last year, in which the city saw a 20-year high of 34 homicides. While New Haven Police Department Chief Dean Esserman said the trend in crime numbers was encouraging, he cautioned that it does not represent a complete victory. “Behind every statistic there’s a story, and behind every number is a name,” Esserman told the News. “I’m glad we’re bringing down the violence in this city, but that means nothing to a mother who’s lost her child.” Back on campus, the crime statistics have been on a “steady decline over the past 20 years,” Higgins said. In 2012, 97 percent of on-campus crime has involved property theft. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

“Poverty is the mother of crime.” MARCUS AURELIUS ROMAN EMPEROR

Despite dip in apps, Promise funds rise BY BEN PRAWDZIK STAFF REPORTER Though fewer students applied for New Haven Promise scholarships this year compared to 2011, the program saw a jump in students both qualifying for and accepting scholarships, causing administrators to conclude that a “college-going culture” is gaining traction in the Elm City public schools. New Haven Promise, the Yale-funded college scholarship program for New Haven high schoolers, accepts applications in the spring and reviews them during the summer to determine which students qualify for awards as they begin college. In this year’s pool, administrators said that 171 students qualified for scholarships and 123 accepted the awards, which can be used only at instate institutions. In 2011, the program’s 150 students in the program’s inaugural applicant pool qualified for scholarships and 115 accepted them. The 14 percent rise in scholarship money doled out demonstrates that the program is beginning to make good on its promise to boost the college aspirations of New Haven students.

I believe we are seeing real progress in creating aspirations of college in our students and we are growing the number of Promise scholarship recipients. REGGIE MAYO Superintendent, New Haven Public Schools PATRICIA MELTON

“I believe we are seeing real progress in creating aspirations of college in our students and we are growing the number of Promise scholarship recipients,” said Reggie Mayo, the city’s schools superintendent. “Our students face unique challenges and we have hard work ahead to achieve our goal of making sure every student is academically prepared and financially able to go to college. We’ll work hard and we’ll get there.” The program’s better numbers this summer followed what some school officials considered a disappointing dip in applications last April — 351 students applied last spring compared to 371 students the year before. But city and program administrators said the number of students who actually enroll in college with the help of the scholarships is a more important metric for the program’s success. Patricia Melton ’82, who was appointed executive director of Promise on June 25, said the numbers show a positive trend but stressed that the program is still “very much a startup.” Will Ginsberg, CEO of the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven, which

Patricia Melton ’82 was named the new director of the New Haven Promise college scholarship program on June 25. finances Promise’s administrative costs, said the dip in applications could be attributed to waning media coverage of the program since it was announced in fall 2010. Betsy Yagla, the communications and research coordinator for New Haven Promise, added that in the program’s first year, every high school senior was given a paper application to fill out, and many students did so instinctively. But in the second year, she said, students had to take the initiative to apply because applications were only available online. Ginsberg said this year’s applicant pool was likely more qualified because students had more time to prepare for their applications. “These students that we just accepted were juniors in high school when Promise was launched, so they had a year and a half to get their grades and such up to qualifications whereas students in the first applicant pool had six months,” Ginsberg said.

As Promise gears up for its third application cycle, Melton said program officials are working on several systemic changes to encourage and support students’ college ambitions. She added that as the number of students on Promise scholarships continues to grow, those recipients can begin to share the knowledge of how they succeeded with students in the grades below them. Melton said program officials will also distribute “pledge forms” to high school seniors in the fall, where students can pledge to strive for good grades. Over the past year, Promise has distributed more than $93,000 to students in tuition money through its first-year 115 scholarships. Melton said program officials are still calculating the total cost of the second round of scholarships. Contact BEN PRAWDZIK at benjamin.prawdzik@yale.edu .

Yale acquires Bluebooking website BY LINDSEY UNIAT AND ANTONIA WOODFORD STAFF REPORTERS The University acquired the studentdesigned course information website Yale Bluebook this summer after the site grew increasingly popular compared to Yale’s own Online Course Information (OCI) system. University Registrar Gabriel Olszewski said the site, now run by Information Technology Services (ITS) and the Registrar’s Office, was “rebranded” earlier this month with a new Yale Bluebook logo and has stronger security features. As of now, the site remains “purely a shopping tool” for students to access course descriptions and evaluations and plan potential schedules, he said, but this fall administrators will consider whether the site could eventually replace Yale’s Online Course Selection (OCS) system, the counterpart to OCI that students must use to submit course selections. “Right now you cannot submit your [course] worksheet via Yale Bluebook,” Olszewski said. “Could Yale Bluebook truly replace OCS? That’s a conversation that we’re having, and that we will have more in depth throughout the fall.” Following the transition to a yale.edu,

University-controlled website on Aug. 8, the site refreshes information on course listings more frequently than it did in the past — four times a day rather than once — and has a better search function and the ability to handle a higher number of simultaneous users, Olszewski said. The University also removed a few features of the old site, such as a button that allowed students to share their schedules on Facebook, he added. Former suitemates Charlie Croom ’12 and Jared Shenson ’12 developed Yale Bluebook in the spring of 2011 as part of the first Yale College Council App Challenge, in which students compete to create software applications to improve student life. While they did not win the competition that year — first place went to the event-aggregation site Roammeo — they continued to develop Yale Bluebook last summer, and the site began to take off among undergraduates once shopping period hit in the fall. Croom is a former photography editor and Shenson is a former production and design editor for the News. About 50 percent of undergraduates signed up on the site and created course worksheets in the fall of 2011, and roughly 75 percent of undergraduates were using it by the spring, Shenson said. Adoption of the site was especially rapid among younger students — 85 percent of the freshman class used the site at least once during shopping period this spring. Olszewski, who came to Yale from the University of Chicago and assumed his position as University Registrar last July, said he first met with Croom and Shenson in August 2011 to understand the technical aspects of how the site worked and whether it was compatible with Yale’s existing software. He added that whenever the University acquires a new software system, it takes on “a lot” of responsibility and must make sure it can be integrated with Yale’s online security protocols and that people on the ITS staff know how to use it. Formal negotiations between Yale and Croom and Shenson over Yale Bluebook happened this April and May, Olszewski said, and the University finally licensed the site. “When we first started, we always hoped [Yale Bluebook] would become officially adopted by Yale — that’s what we strove for

throughout,” Croom said. “It was fantastic that we could both benefit students along the way and use their feedback to help us continue to improve it.” When the new site went live on Aug. 8, roughly 1,700 users had already made course worksheets for the fall. Since then, there have been 7,200 unique visitors to the site, including students and non-students, Olszewski said. Croom added that he hopes Yale’s acquisition of Yale Bluebook will help create “a new era of interaction between ITS and undergraduates,” in which ITS might lend more institutional support to students creating online applications that use Yale data. All 10 upperclassmen interviewed said they have not noticed any substantive changes to the website beyond the new domain name and logo. Paola Severino ’15 said she was only aware of the switch because of a pop-up screen with a link to the new website. She added that she started using Yale Bluebook as a prefrosh because members of the Class of 2015 Facebook page were already using the website before fall semester of last year. Five incoming freshmen interviewed who have used Yale Bluebook said they prefer it to OCI, though five others interviewed said they were not familiar with the site. Angela Pollard ’16 and Austin Johnson ’16, as well as many upperclassmen interviewed, said they found Yale Bluebook more visually appealing and easier to use, and they enjoy formulating various potential schedules on it. Still, three upperclassmen said they experienced technical problems last year on the Yale Bluebook website that turned them back toward OCI. Andrew Hendricks ’14, who said he has not had any technical issues with the website, said he would like to see it integrated with OCI so that students’ prospective course schedules would be the same on both websites. Since the new site went live Aug. 8, the greatest number of users have come from the Class of 2015. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .Contact ANTONIA WOODFORD at antonia.woodford@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment. BUDDHA

‘Independents’ continues Keegan’s ’12 vision

LEE WEXLER

Marina Keegan’s ’12 ‘Independents’ was one of 12 shows in the New York International Fringe Festival selected to be produced again in September in the FringeNYC Encore Series INDEPENDENTS FROM PAGE 1 On Wednesday, Fringe announced that the musical would be one of 12 chosen out of the nearly 200 productions at the festival to be presented again throughout September as part of the FringeNYC Encore Series. The show was sold out for all five performances in its initial Fringe run. Darren Lee Cole, the head of the Encore Series’ curatorial team and the artistic director of the off-Broadway venue SoHo Playhouse, said “Independents” was chosen as part of the encore series due to its artistic excellence and strong future production prospects. The show will be staged at SoHo Playhouse for six shows beginning Sept. 7. Polinger said Fringe’s decision to ask that “Independents” be staged six more times was a development those involved with the musical had been hoping for. He added that the September shows will be presented at a larger venue, exposing the musical to a larger audience and the greater theater industry. Already, though, the show has garnered positive attention. Huffington Post theater reviewer Michael Giltz said in a Wednesday review that the musical was the best show he had seen at this year’s Fringe, and Olivia Jane Smith, a reviewer for the New York Theatre Review blog, noted the success of the show’s songs despite the fact that “a two-hour original musical is an ambitious undertaking for artists regardless of age or experience.” “Independents” has evolved a great deal since its debut at Yale last December, the musical’s team said. In addition to the changes incorporated directly after that first run under Keegan’s direction, the team said they were involved in a months-long editing process made even more difficult by her

death. “We felt that what should happen was that the show shouldn’t just be a tribute or a memorial, in a way that people watching it would be conscious that it was unfinished — that’s not what Marina would have wanted,” said lyricist Sonnenblick, who wrote two shows that starred Keegan and acted in her original play “Utility Monster.” “The fact that we’re in a position to be selling out shows and getting good press — that is exactly what she would have wanted.” Feigenbaum, the show’s composer, said the final drafts of musicals like “Independents” are very different from the first incarnations that are presented to audiences. He added that the Fringe version of the show is 45 minutes shorter than the original and that edits have focused on clarity in how the story moves and how characters are developed. In Keegan’s absence, Sonnenblick said, edits to the show’s book were almost like “guesswork.” But, he added, the team benefitted from their familiarity with Keegan’s clear vision of the world and goals for the show. “She isn’t here, and we have to just go forward and trust ourselves and trust that what we’re doing is honoring her vision … starting from the point of figuring out what the show was about and what she was trying to say,” Polinger said, adding that this effort was made easier by the fact that the team had already discussed problematic aspects of the show and their possible solutions with Keegan. Sonnenblick said his role in editing the script involved largely cosmetic changes to the spoken lines in the play. “The thread of it and the heart of it and the core of it was what Marina had already written,” he said. Prior to the Yale debut of “Inde-

pendents,” Keegan told the News in a November 2011 interview that she believed part of the appeal of studentwritten works lies in the opportunity to develop the script in consultation with writers, actors and directors as multiple versions of scenes emerge and the best is selected.

This is not a memorial, this is not something that is morose and frozen. This is something that is going to, in some ways, be a celebration of things that [Keegan] said. MARK SONNENBLICK ’12 Lyricist, “Independents” Julie Shain ’13, who acted in the musical at Yale, said she recalls Keegan’s emailing the show’s team asking for recommendations about changes, even as she retained her own firm opinions. While the creative team of “Independents” had to continue in the playwright’s stead, Shain added that she felt certain Keegan’s opinions and voice were clear to her three collaborators. “Mark and Stephen knew her really well, and she probably mentioned a lot before,” Shain said. “There’s a lot of personal emotion attached to whatever she put in the show, like her opinions about love and about what friendship means.” Tom Sanchez ’12, the only “Independents” cast member to act in both iterations of the musical, said he believes the show is now “tighter” but that Keegan’s presence and words remain a strong

part of the production. Keegan also spoke in November about her desire to deal with topics relevant to her peers’ concerns in “Independents,” referencing the iconic musical “RENT” as an example of a show that now felt “dated.” “Marina would say this all the time: ‘RENT’ would explore these themes but for a generation ago; [“Independents”] is exploring things that are really relevant to our generation: apathy, doing nothing,” Polinger said. He added that the musical, which focuses on nine youths ostensibly commandeering a vessel in order to run a historical reenactment business, subtly juxtaposes the indifference of the current generation with the energy of 18th century revolutionaries. “Now, if you turn 18, you go to college, and just sort of chill for five to 10 years,” Feigenbaum said. “It’s very easy to lapse into this easy sort of lifestyle, and the boat is the most abstracted version of that.” The composer said that the creative team’s friends at Yale, a number of whom were members of campus bands Tangled Up in Blue and Jamestown: the First Town in America, partly inspired the motif of friends gathering to sing around a guitar, which helped to tie music to the story in an effective, demonstrative way. Still, Sonnenblick said he is wary of projecting one particular message to audiences. “We want to put a show out there, and for different people, different aspects will resonate with their lives,” he said. To strengthen new cast members’ understandings of the show’s vision, the creative team said they made an effort to acquaint the non-Yalies with Keegan’s perspective and role. “What we did was… let them know

about the situation,” Sonnenblick said. “We sent them a lot of things to read if they were interested, but told them that this is not a memorial, this is not something that is morose and frozen. This is something that is going to, in some ways, be a celebration of things that she said.” Polinger said hearing about Keegan’s talent seems to have inspired the cast, allowing them to share in the sense that the New York production of “Independents” was a way to honor her work. The theme of doing Keegan’s vision justice has been on the minds of a number of those involved in “Independents.” Sanchez said he was excited to do the production at first but, after Keegan’s death, worried about whether he was emotionally prepared to take on his role again. But, the actor said, he eventually came to believe that the best way he could honor his classmate was to “do the part that she’d written so well.” For Sonnenblick, working on “Independents” enabled him to come to terms with the loss. “I was around her and thinking about her more or less constantly all summer, but … those tremendous feelings of loss and sadness were coupled with this idea that something was still being created,” he said. “I was still collaborating with her to make something that she had felt so passionately about — being in that constructive, active space as opposed to an empty space or inactive mourning was definitely emotional, but also something I think that was helpful.” “Independents’” Fringe run will end August 25, and the show will be staged six more times over the course of the next month. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

60

Percent of restaurants fail in the first year

According to an article in Businessweek.com, about 60 percent of all new restaurants in the United States fail in the first year.

Summer arrivals to New Haven’s food scene

O

ver the summer, New Haven’s restaurant industry saw three newcomers, with at least three more restaurants set to open over the next two months. While dining halls remains closed, Yalies have already begun exploring these new eateries. CLINTON WANG reports.

NEW HAVEN MEATBALL HOUSE 1180 Chapel St.

NAKED OYSTER COCKTAIL EATERY

TOMATILLO TACO JOINT 320 Elm St.

200 Crown St. The Meatball House is the third restaurant in New Haven owned by Bob Potter, who also owns Prime 16 and the Mexican bar c.o. jones.

Naked Oyster only serves dinner, specializing in seafood. It also has a vodka bar and dance floor.

This Mexican restaurant chain is based in Greenwich, Conn., and employee Mario Vasquez said it hopes to take advantage of its central campus location to attract students.

FORMER TENANT NIKKITA

FORMER TENANT BULLDOG BURRITO

CUISINE FRENCH LOUISIANA

CUISINE MEXICAN

HOURS TUESDAY-THURSDAY, SUNDAY 4 P.M. - 1 A.M.; FRIDAY-SATURDAY 4 P.M. - 2 A.M.; HAPPY HOUR DAILY 4-7 P.M.

HOURS MONDAY-SATURDAY, 11 A.M.-9 P.M.; SUNDAY, 11 A.M.-8 P.M.

FORMER TENANT INDOCHINE PAVILION CUISINE ITALIAN HOURS MONDAY-SATURDAY, 11:30 A.M.-12 A.M.; SUNDAY 11:30 A.M.-11 P.M.

BLUE STATE COFFEE (TO OPEN IN SEPTEMBER) DENNY’S (TO OPEN ON AUG. 26) 1467 Whalley Ave. This will be Denny’s first location in New Haven. It is relatively far from Yale’s campus, and will likely cater more to the nearby Southern Connecticut State University. FORMER TENANT BLOCKBUSTER

SHAKE SHACK (TO OPEN IN SEPTEMBER)

307 Cedar St. Owned by Drew Ruben ’11 and his mother Carolyn Greenspan, this store will be the chain’s third location in New Haven, and will mainly cater to customers from Yale-New Haven Hospital and School of Medicine. FORMER TENANT CAPPUCCINO’S & MORE CUISINE COFFEEHOUSE

986 Chapel St. This will be the New York-based chain’s first location near a college FORMER TENANT LONG-VACANT CUISINE BURGER JOINT

CUISINE FAMILY DINING

NHPD Chief Dean Esserman to teach Yale College seminar BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER New Haven Police Department Chief Dean Esserman will teach a Yale College seminar on “Policing in America” this fall. Esserman will bring his decades of policing experience to the classroom as his course examines the “major innovations in policing over the past three decades,” according to the Yale College seminar description. Though Esserman is less than a year into his tenure at the helm of the NHPD, Yale College Dean Mary Miller said she invited Esserman last spring to propose a course, which has since been reviewed and approved by a subcommittee in her office. “Those who do not study history are condemned to repeat it,” Esserman told the News, adding that he was grateful and proud to be teaching the course. This is not the first course Esserman, who is now a fellow of Jonathan Edwards college, has taught at Yale. Last semester, he taught a Law School clinic on “Innovations in Policing” with professor James Forman Jr. LAW ’92. Esserman has quickly become an “engaged member of the community” within both New Haven and Yale, Miller said. Esserman’s involvement with the Yale community — at a level above that of former NHPD Chief Frank Limon — comes as he seeks to implement a commu-

nity policing strategy within the NHPD, which would strengthen ties between police and citizens to both prevent and solve crimes. The tenets of this strategy, as well as its implementation in police departments around the nation, will be among the topics examined in Esserman’s seminar.

Those who do not study history are condemned to repeat it. DEAN ESSERMAN Chief, New Haven Police Department All five students enrolled in Esserman’s Law School clinic last spring said they would recommend the course to other students, according to course evaluations. On average, the five students rated the professors’ responsiveness to student comments, questions and concerns a 3.6 out of a maximum of 5, and the professors’ availability to students outside of class a 4.6. While Esserman was originally slated to teach his Yale College seminar in spring 2013, his teaching plans at the Law School “made a fall course more sensible,” Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs George Levesque said. “[Policing in America is] an interesting topic, taught from a unique perspective that com-

bines scholarly research with ‘real world’ experience,” Levesque said. “As such, it fits perfectly within the goals of the college seminar program.” Esserman said his fall seminar will begin by covering the murder of Christian Prince on Hillhouse Avenue in 1991 — the same year Esserman arrived as assistant chief in the NHPD. In addition to writing two papers and a final essay or oral presentation, students who take Esserman’s fall seminar will be required to ride along on patrol once with the NHPD and attend one police command staff meeting, before writing a short response paper about each experience. University President Richard Levin, who said he enjoyed working with Esserman when he previously served at the NHPD, added that today he shares the “highest hopes for [Esserman’s] success as Chief” with Mayor John DeStefano Jr. When he served as chief of the police department in Providence, R.I., Esserman taught for several years as a visiting scholar at Roger Williams University. He graduated from Dartmouth College and a earned his law degree at New York University. Antonia Woodford and Tapley Stephenson contributed reporting. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

JOYCE LI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

NHPD Chief Dean Esserman was invited by Yale College Dean Mary Miller to teach a seminar this fall.


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IN MEMORIAM Keegan ’12 remembered for writing, activism

BY LORENZO LIGATO STAFF REPORTER

BY JAMES LU AND DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTERS Marina Keegan ’12, a prolific writer, actress and activist, died in a May 26 car accident near Dennis, Mass. She was 22. Keegan’s talents covered a wide swathe of disciplines — she wrote and starred in several plays featured on campus; she invigorated Yale’s political scene as president of the Yale College Democrats; and she brought her writing talents to bear in critiquing social issues — but it was her talent with people, whom she inspired, supported and loved, that friends remember most. “Marina was someone who looked at the world and knew it had to be changed, but at the same time saw there was beauty in it,” said Yael Zinkow ’12, Keegan’s close friend. Keegan came to Yale from Wayland, Mass., in fall 2008. An English major and member of Saybrook College, she completed the writing concentration and graduated magna cum laude five days before her death. In her writing, Keegan captured the concerns of her generation, friends and writing professors said. She drew national media attention in September 2011 with the WEEKEND cover “Even artichokes have doubts,” which critiqued the high number of recent Yale graduates pursuing careers in finance and consulting. Keegan was preparing to move to Brooklyn in June to start a position as assistant to the general counsel at The New Yorker. Her writing — particularly her final column, “The Opposite of Loneliness” — gained worldwide attention as the story of her death spread through national media outlets and online social media. After “The Opposite of Loneliness” was posthumously published to yaledailynews.com, it was read over 1.3 million times — the most views of any single article since the News began publishing online. Writing professor Anne Fadiman described Keegan as a “self-starting cornucopia” who demonstrated her aptitude as a writer across genres. Fadiman first encountered Keegan at a Master’s Tea in fall 2010, when Keegan, then a junior, challenged author Mark Helprin for telling audience members not to pursue writing careers because of the low likelihood of success. “I just remember this beautiful, articulate woman standing up and clearly not willing to be cowed by this famous writer, contradicting him, speaking up, declaring her determination to try, declaring her determination to ignore his discouraging words,” Fadiman said. The same conviction was evident in her political and social advocacy on campus. Keegan served as president of the Yale College Democrats in 2011, spearheading the organization’s lobbying efforts to end the death penalty in Connecticut and pass legislation that would allow illegal immigrant students to pay in-state tuition fees at public colleges under certain conditions. In late 2011, she helped organize the Occupy Morgan Stanley movement, which urged Yalies to be more conscious of their career choices.

ER&M founder Pessar dies at 63 Patricia Pessar, professor of American studies and anthropology and co-founder of the Ethnicity, Race and Migration program, died May 10 after a lengthy battle with cancer. She was 63. A scholar of immigration and social movements in Latin America, Pessar helped forge the interdisciplinary study of global migration, ethnicity, nationality and race through her scholarship and teaching. In 1997-’98, she co-founded the ER&M major, for which she served as director of undergraduate studies until the end of the 2011-’12 academic year. Family, students and colleagues interviewed remembered her for her generosity and intellectual leadership. “Patricia was involved with global immigration long before it became a high-profile political issue,” said Gilbert Joseph GRD ’78, Pessar’s husband and the Farnam Professor of History and International Studies at Yale. “She combined a strong advocacy for immigrant and refugee rights with a profound scholarly engagement.” Pessar earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Barnard College in 1971 and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1976. She joined the Yale faculty

in 1993, leaving a tenured position at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, to accompany her husband to New Haven. Colleagues and students said Pessar brought an enthusiasm to campus, creating the environment in which the ER&M program could flourish.

Patricia was the faculty member most responsible for the establishment of ER&M. STEPHEN PITTI ’91 Professor of history and American studies “Patricia was the faculty member at Yale most responsible for the establishment of ER&M, and in her capacity as DUS in recent years she advised or co-advised most of the senior essays in that major,” Stephen Pitti ’91, professor of history and American studies, said. “She was a devoted teacher and mentor, a great scholar… and a major loss for the Yale community.” For more than five years, Pessar pushed for the promotion of the major to stand-alone status, which was finally approved in February 2012. During that time,

Pessar worked to strengthen and expand the program’s academic offerings by securing greater financial backing and new fulltime faculty. Linda Pessar Cowan, Pessar’s sister, said Pessar was not only “a disciplined, rational thinker possessed of unusual courage and moral strength,” but also had “a brightness and an exuberant love of people.” Students and colleagues recalled that she worked closely with both undergraduates and graduate students as a mentor and guide. Diana Enriquez ’13 said she met Pessar her freshman year, when the professor helped Enriquez find funds for an event focusing on Mexico’s drug war. “She was one of the professors on campus whom I sought out as often as possible for guidance, because she was warm, welcoming and encouraging,” Enriquez said. “She pushed me, but also encouraged me to celebrate the work I had done along the way.” Joseph also emphasized his wife’s “tremendous” dedication to the program and to her students, adding that “she mentored her students with all her strength.” In addition to Joseph and Cowan, Pessar is survived by her son Matthew Pessar Joseph ’12. Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

Swimming coach Moriarty dies at 98

DANIELLE SPAMBANATO

Phil Moriarty, right, with Don Schollander ‘68. After captaining the Yale team, Schollander won four gold medals at the 1964 Olympics and added another gold and a silver at the 1968 Games. BY DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTER

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Marina Keegan ’12, a prolific writer, political activist and dramatist, died in a car accident on May 26 on Cape Cod. Ben Stango ’11, Keegan’s predecessor as Dems president, said she advocated for the “type of progressive politics students should be engaged in” with passion and a “grass-rootsy political spirit.”

We’re so young. We’re so young. We’re twenty-two years old. We have so much time. MARINA KEEGAN ’12 As with her efforts in advocacy and writing, Keegan approached her work in theater boldly. Charlie Polinger ’13, who directed Keegan’s musical, “Independents,” last fall and at the New York International Fringe Festival production in August, said Keegan pursued ambitious goals

in her creative work. He recalled how Keegan insisted a 10-minute monologue at the end of “Independents” be left uncut, though the creative team worried the piece would not engage its audience. The monologue “ended up being one of the most powerful parts of the show,” Polinger said. Keegan’s close friends said she considered friendships and relationships a vital part of her life, and maintained them in spite of her numerous other commitments. “The same insights and wits that made her a good writer made her so much fun to be around,” said Chloe Sarbib ’12. “She knew when you needed support or when you needed to be reminded you were good.” Her death on May 26 reverberated throughout the University. Saybrook College Master Paul Hudak said all of his college was in shock, calling the event “an unbelievable tragedy.”

Yale College Dean and former Saybrook College Master Mary Miller and her husband, Japanese literature professor and former interim Saybrook College Master Edward Kamens, said they were “devastated.” In the wake of the car accident, the Massachusetts State Police sought charges of negligent homicide with a motor vehicle and reckless driving again Michael Gocksch ’12, Keegan’s boyfriend and the vehicle’s driver. A magistrate judge dismissed the charges at a July 5 hearing in Orleans District Court because he did not find probable cause. Keegan is survived by her parents, Tracy and Kevin, and brothers, Trevor and Pierce. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu and DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

YALE UNIVERSITY

Patricia Pessar, professor of American studies and anthropology and co-founder of the Ethnicity, Race & Migration program, died in June at age 63 after a long battle with cancer.

First Af-Am studies director Bryce-Laporte dies at 78 BY SOPHIE GOULD AND CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTERS

COLGATE UNIVERSITY

Roy Bryce-Laporte, a sociologist who headed Yale’s African-American Studies Department when it was established in 1969, died at age 78 on July 31.

Roy Bryce-Laporte, an influential sociologist who served as the founding director of Yale’s African American Studies Department, died July 31 in Maryland. He was 78. Born in Panama, BryceLaporte dedicated his life to studying the African diaspora and black immigration to the United States after attending racially segregated schools in the Panama Canal Zone. He was the founding director of the Research Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies at the Smithsonian Institution, and led the University’s African American studies program for three years after it was established in 1969. Wendell Bell, a former chair of the Yale sociology department who helped found the African American studies department, said he recommended Bryce-Laporte as its first director. Bryce-Laporte was a “tremendous diplomat” who did a “terrific job” launching the new program despite facing financial challenges. “He was a very good and competent scholar,” Bell said. “He was someone whose knowledge and whose commitment and understanding transcended national borders.” Bryce-Laporte moved to the United States in the late 1950s

after graduating from Panama Canal College in 1954 and teaching elementary school students in the Canal Zone. An avid scholar, he held a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska and a doctorate in sociology from the University of California at Los Angeles.

[Bryce-Laporte] applied his knowledge and creddentials to make the world understand the labors of the West Indies community. RICARDO MILLETT President, non-profit organization Woods Fund of Chicago

In addition to his academic inclinations, Bryce-Laporte was a fantastic whistler, trombone player and salsa dancer, and spoke Spanish so fluently that “in many respects, Spanish was his first language,” said his brother, Herrington J. Bryce, a business professor at the College of William and Mary. The eldest of three children, Bryce-Laporte was also “third in command” in his household in Panama, his brother said.

“My parents wanted us to [come to the U.S.] but had not the slightest idea of how to get it done,” Herrington Bryce said. “Roy did.” Bryce-Laporte’s friends and family describe him as a dedicated and driven role model who pushed them to succeed while furthering his own scholarship. Ricardo Millett, the president of the non-profit group Woods Fund of Chicago, called BryceLaporte his “north star.” BryceLaporte had been his fifth grade teacher in Panama and represented a person of West Indian descent who could build a successful career despite Panama’s “cauldron of racial segregation,” Millett said. “Bryce-Laporte paved the way,” he said. “He not only went to Jamaica or the West Indies, but he went to the United States. He not only got a bachelors and a masters, but he got a Ph.D. … he applied his knowledge and credentials to make the world understand the labors of the West Indies community.” Bryce-Laporte is survived by his companion, Marian Holness; his brother; two sisters, Celestina Carter and Yvonne St. Hill; three children, Robertino, Rene and Camila Bryce-Laporte Morris; and his three grandsons. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu and CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@ yale.edu.

Phil Moriarty, a Yale swimming and diving coach who led athletes to collegiate championships and Olympic medals over his four-decade career, died of natural causes last Saturday. He was 98. Moriarty, who began coaching in 1939, arrived at Yale when the University’s swimming program was a national powerhouse. After serving as assistant to head coach Bob Kiphuth, he built on the legendary coach’s success, guiding his athletes to a 195–25 dual-meet record and 11 Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League championships before retiring in 1976. The athletes Moriarty coached, several of whom went on to win Olympic gold medals, remember him for his coaching techniques, as well for his role as a father figure and a source of guidance in and out of the pool. “A coach for an athlete at Yale is someone that they probably see more than any other educator,” said John Lapides ’72, a former president of the Yale Swimming Association. “Those people are really important not just in terms of physical development and achieving athletic goals but also in terms of maturation and personal development. [Moriarty] was one of those coaches.” Moriarty came to Yale immediately after graduating high school in 1932. Initially a swimming teacher for Yale students, he eventually joined the swimming and diving coaching staff

and went on to coach the U.S. diving team at the 1960 Olympics in Rome. He was elected into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1980 and the American Swimming Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2010. His former athletes attribute their successes in the water to Moriarty’s training and credit him with understanding their individual motivations and abilities and adapting his coaching techniques accordingly.

We grew up in a way that was honorable and honest … he just inculcated [those qualities] in us like a father would. DAVID JOHNSON ’69 MED ’73 Yale swimmer and member of team coached by Phil Moriarty “I came to Yale as a good swimmer, but Phil’s the guy who got me from there on,” said Mike Austin ’64, a former Yale swimming team captain who won gold in the 4×100-meter freestyle relay at the 1964 Olympics. “He found ways to relate to each of us.” Gary Tobian, a gold medalist in the three-meter springboard at the 1960 Olympics, describes Moriarty’s coaching as instrumental to his success. Tobian said Moriarty trained him to execute the mechanics of a dive he had previously struggled to pull off.

Moriarty’s influence also stretched beyond the confines of the pool, his former swimmers said. “We were becoming adults, and [Moriarty] sort of bent the curve for us a little bit,” David Johnson ’69 MED ’73, a member of the Yale team who swam in the 1968 Olympics, said. “We grew up in a way that was honorable and honest, and all the good things you’d think about people — being friendly, helpful, courteous, kind, cheerful, brave — all of these things, he just inculcated in us like a father would.” Before Johnson applied to Yale, he said he visited New Haven and saw a wall in Payne Whitney Gymnasium listing the names of Yale athletes who had competed at the Olympics. Moriarty told Johnson that his name, too, could be etched into that wall if he tried hard enough. Moriarty remained involved with the swimming team even after retiring from his coaching position. His successor, Frank Keith, said Moriarty contacted him at least once per month for the rest of his life. Moriarty moved to Florida in 1981 and had lived there ever since, according to the New York Times. He was visiting Mystic, Conn. when he died. Moriarty is survived by his three children, Philip, Richard and Ellen, seven grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren. Kirsten Adair contributed reporting. Contact DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

After his death, music of Ugonna Igweatu ’09 spreads BY MADELINE MCMAHON STAFF REPORTER NEW YORK — Since his death on July 9, the life of musician Ugonna Igweatu ’09 has been honored by thousands who share an appreciation for his artistic work. Shortly after Igweatu died of an asthma attack in his Bronx home on July 9, Jamie Van Dyck ’10 posted a song he had recorded with Igweatu just days earlier on the music-sharing website SoundCloud, and Max Lanman ’10 posted a link on the social-networking website Reddit. Since the original July 11 post, the song — which features vocals accompanied by only an acoustic guitar — has been listened to over 152,000 times, and has climbed as high as No. 10 on Reddit’s front page. A funeral was held on July 14 for Igweatu, a member of Calhoun College and a son of Nigerian immigrants, who had lived in the Bronx with his family since graduation as he pursued a career as a musician. At the well-attended service, Igweatu’s family members and middle school principal shared memories recalling his intelligence, dedication and humility. The recording of his final song was also played. Van Dyck said he initially posted Igweatu’s song to SoundCloud as a way to help Igweatu finally achieve his goal

of becoming a musician. “What’s given us strength in this time has been fighting for Ugonna’s dreams,” he said, “even though he’s no longer here.” A budding filmmaker as well as a musician, Igweatu entered Yale intending to specialize in the sciences but soon devoted his attention to music after teaching himself to sing and play the guitar during his sophomore year, close friend Stephen Brandes ’09 said.

He talked with such enthusiasm and you could tell he was only happy doing what he did: music. JUSTIN MUIRHEAD ’09 Longtime friend of Ugonna Igweatu ’09 Anne Xu ’09, a classmate and close friend of Igweatu’s, said she thinks Igweatu’s music has gained popularity because of his compelling personal story and “amazing” voice. Igweatu’s love of music developed “organically,” starting when he played the flute in the high school band, said his friend and high school classmate Justin Muirhead ’09, who attended the funeral. When Muirhead visited the set of

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Musician and videographer Ugonna Igweatu ‘09 died July 9 of an asthma attack in his Bronx, N.Y., home. a music video Igweatu was shooting, he said he was “blown away” by his friend’s talent. “He talked with such enthusiasm and you could tell he was only happy doing what he did: music,” Muirhead said.

Igweatu’s cousin, Soochie Nnaemeka ’09, said Igweatu was able to nurture his creative side because of an environment at Yale that fosters musical talent. Though Yale can often be overwhelming, Nnaemeka said,

Igweatu was able to “come out of his shell” through music. Van Dyck added that he thinks Igweatu’s song became popular because it had a “powerful beauty and simplicity to it.”

Igweatu was living with his mother and siblings when he died. Contact MADELINE MCMAHON at madeline.mcmahon@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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IN MEMORIAM Keegan ’12 remembered for writing, activism

BY LORENZO LIGATO STAFF REPORTER

BY JAMES LU AND DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTERS Marina Keegan ’12, a prolific writer, actress and activist, died in a May 26 car accident near Dennis, Mass. She was 22. Keegan’s talents covered a wide swathe of disciplines — she wrote and starred in several plays featured on campus; she invigorated Yale’s political scene as president of the Yale College Democrats; and she brought her writing talents to bear in critiquing social issues — but it was her talent with people, whom she inspired, supported and loved, that friends remember most. “Marina was someone who looked at the world and knew it had to be changed, but at the same time saw there was beauty in it,” said Yael Zinkow ’12, Keegan’s close friend. Keegan came to Yale from Wayland, Mass., in fall 2008. An English major and member of Saybrook College, she completed the writing concentration and graduated magna cum laude five days before her death. In her writing, Keegan captured the concerns of her generation, friends and writing professors said. She drew national media attention in September 2011 with the WEEKEND cover “Even artichokes have doubts,” which critiqued the high number of recent Yale graduates pursuing careers in finance and consulting. Keegan was preparing to move to Brooklyn in June to start a position as assistant to the general counsel at The New Yorker. Her writing — particularly her final column, “The Opposite of Loneliness” — gained worldwide attention as the story of her death spread through national media outlets and online social media. After “The Opposite of Loneliness” was posthumously published to yaledailynews.com, it was read over 1.3 million times — the most views of any single article since the News began publishing online. Writing professor Anne Fadiman described Keegan as a “self-starting cornucopia” who demonstrated her aptitude as a writer across genres. Fadiman first encountered Keegan at a Master’s Tea in fall 2010, when Keegan, then a junior, challenged author Mark Helprin for telling audience members not to pursue writing careers because of the low likelihood of success. “I just remember this beautiful, articulate woman standing up and clearly not willing to be cowed by this famous writer, contradicting him, speaking up, declaring her determination to try, declaring her determination to ignore his discouraging words,” Fadiman said. The same conviction was evident in her political and social advocacy on campus. Keegan served as president of the Yale College Democrats in 2011, spearheading the organization’s lobbying efforts to end the death penalty in Connecticut and pass legislation that would allow illegal immigrant students to pay in-state tuition fees at public colleges under certain conditions. In late 2011, she helped organize the Occupy Morgan Stanley movement, which urged Yalies to be more conscious of their career choices.

ER&M founder Pessar dies at 63 Patricia Pessar, professor of American studies and anthropology and co-founder of the Ethnicity, Race and Migration program, died May 10 after a lengthy battle with cancer. She was 63. A scholar of immigration and social movements in Latin America, Pessar helped forge the interdisciplinary study of global migration, ethnicity, nationality and race through her scholarship and teaching. In 1997-’98, she co-founded the ER&M major, for which she served as director of undergraduate studies until the end of the 2011-’12 academic year. Family, students and colleagues interviewed remembered her for her generosity and intellectual leadership. “Patricia was involved with global immigration long before it became a high-profile political issue,” said Gilbert Joseph GRD ’78, Pessar’s husband and the Farnam Professor of History and International Studies at Yale. “She combined a strong advocacy for immigrant and refugee rights with a profound scholarly engagement.” Pessar earned a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from Barnard College in 1971 and a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1976. She joined the Yale faculty

in 1993, leaving a tenured position at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, to accompany her husband to New Haven. Colleagues and students said Pessar brought an enthusiasm to campus, creating the environment in which the ER&M program could flourish.

Patricia was the faculty member most responsible for the establishment of ER&M. STEPHEN PITTI ’91 Professor of history and American studies “Patricia was the faculty member at Yale most responsible for the establishment of ER&M, and in her capacity as DUS in recent years she advised or co-advised most of the senior essays in that major,” Stephen Pitti ’91, professor of history and American studies, said. “She was a devoted teacher and mentor, a great scholar… and a major loss for the Yale community.” For more than five years, Pessar pushed for the promotion of the major to stand-alone status, which was finally approved in February 2012. During that time,

Pessar worked to strengthen and expand the program’s academic offerings by securing greater financial backing and new fulltime faculty. Linda Pessar Cowan, Pessar’s sister, said Pessar was not only “a disciplined, rational thinker possessed of unusual courage and moral strength,” but also had “a brightness and an exuberant love of people.” Students and colleagues recalled that she worked closely with both undergraduates and graduate students as a mentor and guide. Diana Enriquez ’13 said she met Pessar her freshman year, when the professor helped Enriquez find funds for an event focusing on Mexico’s drug war. “She was one of the professors on campus whom I sought out as often as possible for guidance, because she was warm, welcoming and encouraging,” Enriquez said. “She pushed me, but also encouraged me to celebrate the work I had done along the way.” Joseph also emphasized his wife’s “tremendous” dedication to the program and to her students, adding that “she mentored her students with all her strength.” In addition to Joseph and Cowan, Pessar is survived by her son Matthew Pessar Joseph ’12. Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

Swimming coach Moriarty dies at 98

DANIELLE SPAMBANATO

Phil Moriarty, right, with Don Schollander ‘68. After captaining the Yale team, Schollander won four gold medals at the 1964 Olympics and added another gold and a silver at the 1968 Games. BY DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTER

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Marina Keegan ’12, a prolific writer, political activist and dramatist, died in a car accident on May 26 on Cape Cod. Ben Stango ’11, Keegan’s predecessor as Dems president, said she advocated for the “type of progressive politics students should be engaged in” with passion and a “grass-rootsy political spirit.”

We’re so young. We’re so young. We’re twenty-two years old. We have so much time. MARINA KEEGAN ’12 As with her efforts in advocacy and writing, Keegan approached her work in theater boldly. Charlie Polinger ’13, who directed Keegan’s musical, “Independents,” last fall and at the New York International Fringe Festival production in August, said Keegan pursued ambitious goals

in her creative work. He recalled how Keegan insisted a 10-minute monologue at the end of “Independents” be left uncut, though the creative team worried the piece would not engage its audience. The monologue “ended up being one of the most powerful parts of the show,” Polinger said. Keegan’s close friends said she considered friendships and relationships a vital part of her life, and maintained them in spite of her numerous other commitments. “The same insights and wits that made her a good writer made her so much fun to be around,” said Chloe Sarbib ’12. “She knew when you needed support or when you needed to be reminded you were good.” Her death on May 26 reverberated throughout the University. Saybrook College Master Paul Hudak said all of his college was in shock, calling the event “an unbelievable tragedy.”

Yale College Dean and former Saybrook College Master Mary Miller and her husband, Japanese literature professor and former interim Saybrook College Master Edward Kamens, said they were “devastated.” In the wake of the car accident, the Massachusetts State Police sought charges of negligent homicide with a motor vehicle and reckless driving again Michael Gocksch ’12, Keegan’s boyfriend and the vehicle’s driver. A magistrate judge dismissed the charges at a July 5 hearing in Orleans District Court because he did not find probable cause. Keegan is survived by her parents, Tracy and Kevin, and brothers, Trevor and Pierce. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu and DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

YALE UNIVERSITY

Patricia Pessar, professor of American studies and anthropology and co-founder of the Ethnicity, Race & Migration program, died in June at age 63 after a long battle with cancer.

First Af-Am studies director Bryce-Laporte dies at 78 BY SOPHIE GOULD AND CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTERS

COLGATE UNIVERSITY

Roy Bryce-Laporte, a sociologist who headed Yale’s African-American Studies Department when it was established in 1969, died at age 78 on July 31.

Roy Bryce-Laporte, an influential sociologist who served as the founding director of Yale’s African American Studies Department, died July 31 in Maryland. He was 78. Born in Panama, BryceLaporte dedicated his life to studying the African diaspora and black immigration to the United States after attending racially segregated schools in the Panama Canal Zone. He was the founding director of the Research Institute on Immigration and Ethnic Studies at the Smithsonian Institution, and led the University’s African American studies program for three years after it was established in 1969. Wendell Bell, a former chair of the Yale sociology department who helped found the African American studies department, said he recommended Bryce-Laporte as its first director. Bryce-Laporte was a “tremendous diplomat” who did a “terrific job” launching the new program despite facing financial challenges. “He was a very good and competent scholar,” Bell said. “He was someone whose knowledge and whose commitment and understanding transcended national borders.” Bryce-Laporte moved to the United States in the late 1950s

after graduating from Panama Canal College in 1954 and teaching elementary school students in the Canal Zone. An avid scholar, he held a master’s degree from the University of Nebraska and a doctorate in sociology from the University of California at Los Angeles.

[Bryce-Laporte] applied his knowledge and creddentials to make the world understand the labors of the West Indies community. RICARDO MILLETT President, non-profit organization Woods Fund of Chicago

In addition to his academic inclinations, Bryce-Laporte was a fantastic whistler, trombone player and salsa dancer, and spoke Spanish so fluently that “in many respects, Spanish was his first language,” said his brother, Herrington J. Bryce, a business professor at the College of William and Mary. The eldest of three children, Bryce-Laporte was also “third in command” in his household in Panama, his brother said.

“My parents wanted us to [come to the U.S.] but had not the slightest idea of how to get it done,” Herrington Bryce said. “Roy did.” Bryce-Laporte’s friends and family describe him as a dedicated and driven role model who pushed them to succeed while furthering his own scholarship. Ricardo Millett, the president of the non-profit group Woods Fund of Chicago, called BryceLaporte his “north star.” BryceLaporte had been his fifth grade teacher in Panama and represented a person of West Indian descent who could build a successful career despite Panama’s “cauldron of racial segregation,” Millett said. “Bryce-Laporte paved the way,” he said. “He not only went to Jamaica or the West Indies, but he went to the United States. He not only got a bachelors and a masters, but he got a Ph.D. … he applied his knowledge and credentials to make the world understand the labors of the West Indies community.” Bryce-Laporte is survived by his companion, Marian Holness; his brother; two sisters, Celestina Carter and Yvonne St. Hill; three children, Robertino, Rene and Camila Bryce-Laporte Morris; and his three grandsons. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu and CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@ yale.edu.

Phil Moriarty, a Yale swimming and diving coach who led athletes to collegiate championships and Olympic medals over his four-decade career, died of natural causes last Saturday. He was 98. Moriarty, who began coaching in 1939, arrived at Yale when the University’s swimming program was a national powerhouse. After serving as assistant to head coach Bob Kiphuth, he built on the legendary coach’s success, guiding his athletes to a 195–25 dual-meet record and 11 Eastern Intercollegiate Swim League championships before retiring in 1976. The athletes Moriarty coached, several of whom went on to win Olympic gold medals, remember him for his coaching techniques, as well for his role as a father figure and a source of guidance in and out of the pool. “A coach for an athlete at Yale is someone that they probably see more than any other educator,” said John Lapides ’72, a former president of the Yale Swimming Association. “Those people are really important not just in terms of physical development and achieving athletic goals but also in terms of maturation and personal development. [Moriarty] was one of those coaches.” Moriarty came to Yale immediately after graduating high school in 1932. Initially a swimming teacher for Yale students, he eventually joined the swimming and diving coaching staff

and went on to coach the U.S. diving team at the 1960 Olympics in Rome. He was elected into the International Swimming Hall of Fame in 1980 and the American Swimming Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 2010. His former athletes attribute their successes in the water to Moriarty’s training and credit him with understanding their individual motivations and abilities and adapting his coaching techniques accordingly.

We grew up in a way that was honorable and honest … he just inculcated [those qualities] in us like a father would. DAVID JOHNSON ’69 MED ’73 Yale swimmer and member of team coached by Phil Moriarty “I came to Yale as a good swimmer, but Phil’s the guy who got me from there on,” said Mike Austin ’64, a former Yale swimming team captain who won gold in the 4×100-meter freestyle relay at the 1964 Olympics. “He found ways to relate to each of us.” Gary Tobian, a gold medalist in the three-meter springboard at the 1960 Olympics, describes Moriarty’s coaching as instrumental to his success. Tobian said Moriarty trained him to execute the mechanics of a dive he had previously struggled to pull off.

Moriarty’s influence also stretched beyond the confines of the pool, his former swimmers said. “We were becoming adults, and [Moriarty] sort of bent the curve for us a little bit,” David Johnson ’69 MED ’73, a member of the Yale team who swam in the 1968 Olympics, said. “We grew up in a way that was honorable and honest, and all the good things you’d think about people — being friendly, helpful, courteous, kind, cheerful, brave — all of these things, he just inculcated in us like a father would.” Before Johnson applied to Yale, he said he visited New Haven and saw a wall in Payne Whitney Gymnasium listing the names of Yale athletes who had competed at the Olympics. Moriarty told Johnson that his name, too, could be etched into that wall if he tried hard enough. Moriarty remained involved with the swimming team even after retiring from his coaching position. His successor, Frank Keith, said Moriarty contacted him at least once per month for the rest of his life. Moriarty moved to Florida in 1981 and had lived there ever since, according to the New York Times. He was visiting Mystic, Conn. when he died. Moriarty is survived by his three children, Philip, Richard and Ellen, seven grandchildren and 13 greatgrandchildren. Kirsten Adair contributed reporting. Contact DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

After his death, music of Ugonna Igweatu ’09 spreads BY MADELINE MCMAHON STAFF REPORTER NEW YORK — Since his death on July 9, the life of musician Ugonna Igweatu ’09 has been honored by thousands who share an appreciation for his artistic work. Shortly after Igweatu died of an asthma attack in his Bronx home on July 9, Jamie Van Dyck ’10 posted a song he had recorded with Igweatu just days earlier on the music-sharing website SoundCloud, and Max Lanman ’10 posted a link on the social-networking website Reddit. Since the original July 11 post, the song — which features vocals accompanied by only an acoustic guitar — has been listened to over 152,000 times, and has climbed as high as No. 10 on Reddit’s front page. A funeral was held on July 14 for Igweatu, a member of Calhoun College and a son of Nigerian immigrants, who had lived in the Bronx with his family since graduation as he pursued a career as a musician. At the well-attended service, Igweatu’s family members and middle school principal shared memories recalling his intelligence, dedication and humility. The recording of his final song was also played. Van Dyck said he initially posted Igweatu’s song to SoundCloud as a way to help Igweatu finally achieve his goal

of becoming a musician. “What’s given us strength in this time has been fighting for Ugonna’s dreams,” he said, “even though he’s no longer here.” A budding filmmaker as well as a musician, Igweatu entered Yale intending to specialize in the sciences but soon devoted his attention to music after teaching himself to sing and play the guitar during his sophomore year, close friend Stephen Brandes ’09 said.

He talked with such enthusiasm and you could tell he was only happy doing what he did: music. JUSTIN MUIRHEAD ’09 Longtime friend of Ugonna Igweatu ’09 Anne Xu ’09, a classmate and close friend of Igweatu’s, said she thinks Igweatu’s music has gained popularity because of his compelling personal story and “amazing” voice. Igweatu’s love of music developed “organically,” starting when he played the flute in the high school band, said his friend and high school classmate Justin Muirhead ’09, who attended the funeral. When Muirhead visited the set of

FACEBOOK

Musician and videographer Ugonna Igweatu ‘09 died July 9 of an asthma attack in his Bronx, N.Y., home. a music video Igweatu was shooting, he said he was “blown away” by his friend’s talent. “He talked with such enthusiasm and you could tell he was only happy doing what he did: music,” Muirhead said.

Igweatu’s cousin, Soochie Nnaemeka ’09, said Igweatu was able to nurture his creative side because of an environment at Yale that fosters musical talent. Though Yale can often be overwhelming, Nnaemeka said,

Igweatu was able to “come out of his shell” through music. Van Dyck added that he thinks Igweatu’s song became popular because it had a “powerful beauty and simplicity to it.”

Igweatu was living with his mother and siblings when he died. Contact MADELINE MCMAHON at madeline.mcmahon@yale.edu .


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

From the 2012-’13 Undergraduate Regulations: “Social functions in off-campus locations hosted by Yale College students (or organizations in which the majority of members are Yale College students) must be registered with the Yale College Dean’s Office at least four days in advance of the event if fifty or more students are expected to attend.”

New policy targets underage drinking OFF-CAMPUS FROM PAGE 1 alcohol. If an alcohol-related incident occurs at a registered party, Meeske said, the host would “very possibly” be subject to an Executive Committee hearing, adding that the policy was passed “largely” to address underage drinking. “There are many, many incidents during the year where students get dangerously drunk,” Meeske said, “and we’re trying to take some steps to reduce that.”

There are many, many incidents during the year where students get dangerously drunk, and we’re trying to take some steps to reduce that. JOHN MEESKE Associate dean for student organizations and physical resources

CHRISTOPHER PEAK/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

The president of Sigma Nu fraternity said the new policy will target fraternity activities in particular.

Investigation ends with resignation ZAKARIA FROM PAGE 1 GRD ’95. In the days after the scandal broke, CNN and Time suspended Zakaria and several media outlets, including the New Haven Register, called on him to leave the Corporation. Zakaria told the New York Times last weekend that he confused his notes on Lepore’s piece with his notes from “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America,” by Adam Winkler, which Lepore mentions in her piece. In an Aug. 10 statement, he called the incident a “serious lapse and one that is entirely my fault.” He did not respond to the News’ request for comment. Levin told the News on Aug. 10 that the Corporation’s committee on trusteeship, of which Zakaria was a member, would “discuss the process for reviewing the matter,” but the University said Monday that the investigation had been discontinued in light of Zakaria’s resignation. Both Levin and University spokesman Tom Conroy declined to comment on the investigation. Levin said in a statement that he is “deeply grateful” for Zakaria’s previous work on the Corporation. The Corporation consists of the 10 successor trustees, six alumni trustees and the University president. The Governor and Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut serve as ex officio members. Contact TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .

The host will submit an online form to the Dean’s Office, he added, and the Dean’s Office will then pass the party information to the Yale Police Department so it can observe the area. Rather than stationing an officer outside of each party, Meeske said, the police will be watching certain areas and intervene “if they observe something getting out of hand,… especially if a party is not registered for that day.” Daniel Tay ’14, president of the Alpha Epsilon Pi fraternity, said his fraternity has not yet planned to hold any Camp Yale parties but would “probably” register one if they did.

“I don’t necessarily think that they’re telling us to register so that they know where to [break up],” he said, “but we do have to be careful about giving up that sort of information because you can only do so much in a fraternity house to manage risk.” Bobby Dresser ’14, pitch of the Baker’s Dozen a capella group, said he has “trouble” seeing how administrators can regulate off-campus parties to make them safer without shutting them down. He added that because most his group’s larger parties occur later in the semester, he will get a chance to “see how [the rule] shapes up.” Russell Holmes ’13, president of the Sigma Nu fraternity, said he thinks the policy will have “no material affect on the dangers of alcohol,” but rather disproportionately restrict fraternity activities. Because the rush implementation committee that met last spring had argued it was unfair that the prohibition of fall rush only affected Greek organizations, Meeske said the new off-campus party policy requires all off-campus parties with over 50 attendees to register, not just ones thrown by fraternities. He added that if fraternities are disproportionately affected by the policy, “in a sense we wanted that, we wanted anybody who is hosting these large affairs to be affected.” Though some fraternities have an established system of directly alerting the Yale Police Department when they are planning to host a party, Meeske said that system was voluntary, and administrators wanted a mandatory rule in place. Meeske said the new policies will be finalized in print in the 2012-’13 Undergraduate Regulations. Contact MADELINE MCMAHON at madeline.mcmahon@yale.edu .

Frosh to see revised Camp Yale ORIENTATION FROM PAGE 1 in January had mixed feelings about the workshops, but Natalie Khosla ’14, a communication and consent educator, said she thinks this fall’s workshops will be engaging and practical. “[The workshops are] not just like the ‘sex police’ who’s telling people to stop, to refrain, to just change their lifestyle entirely,” Khosla said. “It’s from the root … explaining to people that you don’t need to not do this and not do that in order to have a better sexual culture at Yale.” The workshops will run during the weekend of Sept. 1-2 and be administered to small groups of freshmen by communication and consent educators assigned to each residential college, Khosla said.

Yale’s student staff of Community Health Educators will also give revamped mandatory health and sexuality workshops, aimed at helping students practice selfcare and mutual respect. In addition to reworking some of its mandatory orientation programs, Yale also tweaked several of its optional activities. Susan Cahan, associate dean for the arts, said last year’s trial “Explore the Arts” program has been reformatted to include group trips led by freshman counselors to music and dance performances on campus. The program aims to introduce new freshmen to the “tip of the iceberg” of arts resources at Yale, she said, and will include a reception at the Yale University Art Gallery. Organizers have also revamped the

“Discover New Haven” freshman challenge, which encourages freshmen to explore the Elm City using a smartphone application. “We wanted to design an orientation to the city that was interactive, informative and fun,” said Lauren Zucker, director of New Haven Affairs for the Office of New Haven and State Affairs, which partnered with Yale to organize the event. “Discover New Haven will introduce the incoming class to some of the city’s unique and diverse offerings.” Freshman orientation begins Aug. 24 and runs through Sept. 8. Contact MADELINE MCMAHON at madeline.mcmahon@yale.edu and CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

Mostly sunny, with a high near 86. Calm wind becoming northeast around 6 mph in the afternoon.

TOMORROW

SUNDAY

High of 81, low of 62.

High of 82, low of 67.

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

ON CAMPUS SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 10:30 AM Freshman Assembly. Students from the following colleges are scheduled to attend the 10:30 a.m. assembly: Berkeley, Davenport, Morse, Pierson, Silliman and Timothy Dwight. Proper attire should be worn. Family members and guests are invited to attend and take seats on the first floor in the rear section of Woolsey Hall, the parquet terraces located on either side of the main floor and the first balcony. Woolsey Hall (500 College St.). 8:30 PM “October Baby” Movie Night: Choose Life at Yale. Join Choose Life at Yale (CLAY), Yale’s pro-life undergraduate organization for the screening of “October Baby.” LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), Room 211.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 26

WATSON BY JIM HORWITZ

7:00 PM Peer Liaison Desserts. Freshman join peer liaisons of the Afro-American Cultural Center, the Asian American Cultural Center, the Native American Cultural Center, La Casa, The Office of International Students and Scholars and the Office of LGBTQ Resources for tasty treats. Each center will host separate events. 10:30 PM Claire’s and Classes with YUSBS. Wondering about which science classes to take at Yale? Come join the Yale Undergraduate Society for Biological Sciences for some helpful tips and delicious, mouth-watering Claire’s cake! LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), room 317.

MONDAY, AUGUST 27 3:00 PM Opening Days POetry Slam with TEETH Slam Poets, WORD and Oye. Join three of Yale’s spoken word and slam poetry groups for an evening of poetry and fun! Afro-American Cultural Center (211 Park St.), Gallery.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

10:30 PM Claire’s and Classes with YUSBS. Wondering about which science classes to take at Yale? Come join the Yale Undergraduate Society for Biological Sciences for some helpful tips and delicious, mouth-watering Claire’s cake! LinslyChittenden Hall (63 High St.), room 317.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Max de La Bruyère, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Where a canary sings 6 Loser’s catchphrase 11 Blackjack variable 14 Last Olds model 15 Living proof 16 Test to the max 17 Trendy ski slope? 19 Front-end protector 20 Assumed name 21 Diamond offense 23 Skelton’s Kadiddlehopper 25 Tried to hit 26 Monogrammed neckwear? 31 Levi’s alternative 32 Mini successors 33 Henhouse 37 Scout’s honor 39 Pub. with more than 100 Pulitzers 40 Serengeti heavyweight 41 Nonproductive 42 More than strange 44 Watch face display, briefly 45 Red, blue and green food colors? 49 Lesser partner 52 Southern cuisine staple 53 Trucker’s view 56 “Same old, same old” 60 Airport 100+ miles NW of PIT 61 Indicators of royal contentment? 63 Tease 64 GI’s home 65 Ready and then some 66 Mud bath site? 67 Itty-bitty 68 Impedes DOWN 1 Literary nickname 2 The Phoenix of the NCAA’s Southern Conference 3 Forfeited wheels

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8/24/12

By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter

4 Exercise unit 5 Pilgrimage destination 6 “Wait, Wait ... Don’t Tell Me!” airer 7 Relative of mine 8 Yes-or-no decision method 9 Original home of the Poor Clares 10 Raise canines? 11 Ready to swing 12 Sarkozy’s wife __ Bruni 13 Put on a pedestal 18 Low life? 22 “The Garden of Earthly Delights” artist 24 Teen Spirit deodorant brand 26 Kyrgyzstan border range 27 Bawdy 28 Series of rings 29 Played around (with) 30 Letter-shaped shoe fastener 34 Like some garage floors

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU EXPERT

2 1 6

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

35 Almost never, maybe 36 Pea jackets 38 Amber, for one 40 Caroling consequences 43 Pressing needs? 46 Twisting force 47 Stimulate 48 First stage of grief 49 Serious players

2 8

8/24/12

50 Like Mount Rushmore at night 51 Highmaintenance 54 Many ages 55 Dict. entries 57 Food fought over in old ads 58 “Man, it’s hot!” 59 Red gp. 62 Rejection

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YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T Dow Jones 13,057.46, -0.88%

S

PAGE 12

S&P 500 1,402.08, -0.81%

S

NASDAQ 3,053.40, -0.66%

T 10-yr. Bond 1.67%, -0.05

S

Oil $95.76, -0.50%

T Euro $1.2564, -0.0048

Romney promises energy independence by 2020 BY JULIE PACE AND MATTHEW DALY ASSOCIATED PRESS HOBBS, N.M. — Republican presidential contender Mitt Romney promised on Thursday to aggressively expand off-shore oil drilling along Virginia, North Carolina and the Gulf of Mexico, changing the subject from social issues like abortion and Medicare that have dominated the debate in the days before the critical Republican National Convention. Speaking to voters in the heart of New Mexico’s oil and gas industry, Romney declared that his energy plans — which include drilling for oil in a federal Alaskan wildlife reserve — would create 3 million jobs and more than $1 trillion in new revenue. And he predicted complete “North American energy independence by 2020, a never-realized goal claimed by presidential candidates for decades.” “That means we produce all the energy we use in North America,” Romney said, emphasizing an expansion of oil and gas over wind and solar production. “This is not some pie-in-thesky kind of thing. This is a real achievable objective.” President Barack Obama did not face voters on Thursday. Instead, he deployed a popular former president, Bill Clinton, to help convince a divided electorate that he simply needs more time to fix the nation’s struggling economy. Clinton is expected to speak at the Democratic National Convention next month and play a prominent role in the final months before Election Day. “We need to keep going with his plan,” Clinton says of Obama in a new television ad set to run in eight battleground states. The push to re-frame the debate comes at a delicate time,

sandwiched between the sudden resurgence of abortion in the race and Monday’s opening of the Republican National Convention. The event in Tampa is supposed to be all about nominating Romney, emphasizing his plans for the economy and projecting unity. But those plans were disrupted this week by Republican Senate candidate Todd Akin of Missouri, who said in an interview that victims of “legitimate rape” can biologically avoid pregnancy. Romney, who has relentlessly tried to avoid a fight over social issues, led a chorus of Republican officials who demanded Akin abandon his Senate bid. The congressman has so far refused. The uproar raises broader concerns for Romney’s effort to win over female voters. At the same time, a strengthening tropical storm is forcing Republicans to prepare for big schedule changes or even the possibility of mandatory evacuations. GOP convention planners on Thursday said they are working closely with local officials and are moving forward with the convention as scheduled. The stakes are high, the outcome uncertain 75 days before voters choose their next president and the majorities of Congress. Polling suggests that the presidential contest is essentially a tossup, although Obama maintains a slight lead among women. Research also suggests that more voters trust Obama’s plans for Medicare than Romney’s. It’s an advantage that could prove significant given Romney’s selection of running mate Paul Ryan, the House budget architect who crafted a controversial plan to transform Medicare into a voucher-like system for future retirees. But Romney did not mention

Medicare or abortion in Hobbs. And he agreed to an interview with CBS’ Denver affiliate, KCNC, only under the stipulation that he would not be asked about abortion or Akin’s comments. Instead, the former Massachusetts governor accused Obama of crafting an energy policy designed to benefit campaign contributors. “He’s taken federal dollars, your money, to advance these companies — solar companies, wind companies — $90 billion in so-called green jobs,” Romney said of the president, seizing on the administration’s investment in the failed solar company Solyndra. “I don’t want the government investing in companies, particularly companies of his campaign contributors.” That’s much the same argument Democrats levy against Romney, whose energy policy favors the oil and gas industry. The former businessman has deep ties to big oil and raised more than $7 million from industry executives during a campaign fundraiser in Texas earlier this week. Obama campaign spokeswoman Lis Smith called Romney’s energy plan “backward.” “This isn’t a recipe for energy independence,” Smith said. “It’s just another irresponsible scheme to help line the pockets of big oil while allowing the U.S to fall behind and cede the clean energy sector to China.” The cornerstone of Romney’s plan is opening up more areas for offshore oil drilling, including mid-Atlantic swing states like North Carolina and Virginia, where it is currently banned. He also wants to give states the power to establish all forms of energy production on federal lands, a significant shift in current policy that could face strong

Akin grasps for donations BY DAVID LIEB ASSOCIATED PRESS JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. — Abandoned by deep-pocketed national groups, Missouri Rep. Todd Akin is passing a collection plate among his remaining supporters, asking for a few dollars at a time in hopes of sustaining a Senate campaign threatened by his remarks about women’s bodies and “legitimate rape.” Akin claimed Thursday to have taken in more than $100,000 during a two-day online fundraising drive that he portrayed as a grassroots effort to circumvent “party bosses” who demanded that he drop out. But the six-term congressman will need much more than that to replenish a campaign account already diminished by a hotly contested primary. “It’s very difficult, when you have the limited base we have in Missouri, to send emails out asking for $3 at a time,” said Pat Thomas, secretary of the Missouri Republican State Committee who has worked as a coordinator for numerous candidates. “I don’t know how to build a war chest to do that.” Akin now has to go forward without the firepower of wellfunded political groups that had planned to pummel Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill with negative television ads. If his money runs dry, Akin could confront a difficult choice: whether to end his candidacy or adopt a bare-bones strategy relying on social media and socially conservative activists to counter the millions of dollars of mass media advertising expected from McCaskill and her allies. First, Akin has to repair his reputation with fellow conservatives and, according to Thomas, “get back to the point where people think you’re credible.” Federal records show Akin has purchased enough air time to run apology ads in Missouri’s biggest TV markets through at least Monday. Although his campaign has not disclosed how much he is spending, ad trackers for his Democratic opposition describe it as a $277,000 effort. He’s also working to mend fences. On Thursday, Akin attended a meeting of the conservative Council for National Policy in Tampa, Fla., site of the Repub-

lican National Convention, which he has agreed not to attend. He tweeted that his Wednesday fundraising goal had been met. “Thousands of people stepped up and helped us raise over $100,000! The message is clear ... voters should pick candidates, not party bosses,” Akin said. He then sent out a new fundraising email asking supporters to chip in $5 toward a goal of raising an additional $25,000. Earlier in the week, he pleaded for $3 donations. Former Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee issued a fundraising plea for Akin on Thursday, accusing the “Republican establishment” of a “carefully orchestrated and systematic attack.” If the national GOP and the political action committees won’t help Akin “get us to the majority, then we’ll do it without them,” Huckabee wrote. Akin campaign spokesman Ryan Hite declined to say exactly how much has been raised by the online contributions, but he said they were just part of Akin’s fundraising strategy, which still includes efforts to get larger donations from more traditional sources. Akin’s campaign has not revealed how much money it has left. Before Missouri’s primary, financial papers showed he had a little over $530,000 as of July 18. But he has spent steadily on ads since then. The next quar-

terly report is not due until Oct. 15, barely three weeks before the general election. After winning the primary, Akin gained quick backing from national Republican and conservative groups focused on ousting McCaskill. But that support evaporated after Akin was asked in an interview that aired Sunday on St. Louis television station KTVI whether his general opposition to abortion extended to women who have been raped. “From what I understand from doctors, that’s really rare,” Akin said in the interview. “If it’s a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down.” The chairman of the Republican National Committee urged Akin to quit, as did presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, his vice presidential pick Paul Ryan and every living Republican who has represented Missouri in the Senate. Although it still has TV advertising time reserved in Missouri, the National Republican Senatorial Committee says it will pull $5 million of planned ads if Akin stays in the race. The conservative Crossroads group, associated with Republican strategist Karl Rove, also halted its anti-McCaskill ads and said it will pull out of Missouri if Akin doesn’t go.

KAREN ELSHOUT/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., is congratulated by his supporters upon his victory over Sen. Ted House, D-St. Charles in Kansas City, Mo., in 2000.

EVAN VUCCI/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney proposed expanding off-shore drilling as a means to obtain energy independence for the United States. opposition in Congress. Romney specifically cited drilling in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as part of a broad plan to generate millions of additional barrels of oil each day. A Romney campaign official later downplayed the comment. The plan would revive a longtime Republican goal to allow drilling for oil in the wildlife refuge. Congress has blocked drilling there for more than a quarter-century. Romney also plans to approve the Keystone XL pipeline that has worried environmentalists and would run from Canada to

U.S. refineries in Texas. And he is calling for the end of a production tax credit for wind power that is set to expire at the end of the year. Many Republicans in battleground states such as Iowa support the credit, which the American Wind Energy Association says sustains 37,000 jobs. “I think all energy sources need to stand on their own two feet,” Romney said in an interview with a Colorado TV station Thursday, arguing that wind and solar power are subsidized at a higher rate than oil. “I would level the playing field.” Romney’s campaign says he

does not support ending oil subsidies. The Obama administration has proposed a plan that would allow energy companies to begin seismic testing to find oil and natural reserves in the Atlantic Ocean. Companies would use the information to determine where to apply for energy leases, although no leases would be available until at least 2017. The president told donors in New York this week that under his administration, dependence on foreign oil has gone below 50 percent for the first time in 13 years. While the energy debate dom-


YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

Lance Armstrong gives up fight against doping charges The world renowned cyclist surrendered in his fight against charges levied by the United States Anti-Doping Agency, which promptly stripped Armsrrong of his seven Tour titles, the bronze medal he won at the 2000 Olympics and all other awards he won after August of 1998. He will be barred for life from competing, coaching or holding an official role with any sport that follows the World Anti-Doping Code.

McHale charged with infraction

Eight Elis compete in London

MCHALE FROM PAGE 1 to take McHale’s drink away, McHale threw the remainder of the drink at the friend. Beck, a former sports editor for the News, was left with a laceration that required 14 stitches. McHale could not be reached for comment Aug. 6, and his attorney, Michael Luzzi ’85, declined to comment on the case. An Aug. 4 press release by Yale Athletics announced that McHale requested the suspension. “Will made a poor decision and his actions are unacceptable to Yale and our football program,” Head Coach Tony Reno said in the Yale Athletics statement. “He remains an important part of our team, and I fully expect him to work to restore his credibility in the Yale community while remaining a leader on and off the field.”

Will made a poor decision and his actions are unacceptable to Yale and our football program. TONY RENO Head coach, football In the release, McHale said he hopes to put the matter behind him and “regain the trust and confidence that comes with being a member of the Yale football team.” Football player Javi Sosa ’13 said the team was informed of the news by Reno and McHale in a Sunday email. Reno could not

YALE ATHLETICS

Football captain Will McHale’s ’13 leadership was suspended after an altercation at Toad’s Place. be reached for comment Monday, and Athletics Director Tom Beckett declined to comment beyond the press release. “We try to speak about overcoming adversity, and this is just another step,” Sosa said. “I know Will will do his part.” Sosa said he does not know how a new captain will be chosen. Another player told the News Monday that he does not think the team will select anyone to replace McHale, who was elected as the 135th captain on Nov. 17 in a unanimous vote by his teammates. McHale, a linebacker, has 133 career tackles and was secondteam all-Ivy in 2011. He comes from a football family — both his father and grandfather played linebacker for the University of Notre Dame. James Lu contributed reporting. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu and GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu .

Yale harbors its own heroes SLUMP FROM PAGE 14 people doing just that. With no scholarships to bind them, rarely a professional career awaiting them, and hardly a chance at international fame motivating them, Yale athletes and their Ivy League rivals are, in some ways, as close to embodying those ideals as we can get outside of the Olympics. While some of the power conferences may stray from the amateurism that makes the Olympic pursuit so intriguing, the Ivy League has done its best to ensure its athletes compete solely of their own volition. Now hold on: I’m not saying Ivy League athletes are all just as heroic as Olympians. The stage is smaller, the stakes lower and the level of competition is obviously… a little different. But if you’re looking for purity of motivation, sacrifice and determination, and the occasional odds-stacked-against-us story, you really can’t do better than Yale sports. And hey, some Yale athletes are Olympians. Eight Yalies past and present combined to bring home three medals. Since 1908, 200 Olympians have come from Yale and brought home 109 medals. Some may be headed that way. Field hockey player Georgia Holland ’14 made the U.S.-U20 field hockey team, and women’s basketball standout Janna Graf ’14 competed for Germany’s U20 squad at the FIBA U-20 European Championships. Men’s basketball’s Jeremiah Kreisberg ’14 did the same for Israel at last year’s U-20 Euro tournament, and Greg Mangano ’12 played for the U.S. at the World University Games last summer. This handful does not even touch upon sports such as rowing and sailing that have churned out Olympians for decades. But beyond those who’ve had brushes with the Games,

Yale athletes and their Ivy League counterparts rarely get to compete on a scale as large as the Olympics, hardly ever enter the consciousness of the national sports fan, and don’t have massive Nike deals as incentive to win. What they do have are mounds of homework and a variety of other activities that would make some question the hours and hours of time and energy they commit to sports each day. Yet they play on, for all those right reasons. It may sound cliché, but in the current climate of Ivy League athletics, there is no more to play for than pride, passion, and the pursuit of excellence. And that’s exactly how it should be. Just because the world doesn’t see them all the time doesn’t mean the efforts of Ivy League athletes aren’t admirable. In fact, in my notentirely-unbiased opinion, their obscurity makes them more worthy of esteem. Plus, you don’t have to wait four years to appreciate them. All it takes is a trip to John J. Lee Amphitheater, the Whale, the Bowl, Reese Stadium — and of course DeWitt Family Field — where you can see sport played for the right reasons throughout the school year. So if you, like me, miss the Olympics when they’re gone — and maybe need a little boost to your sportsmanship karma after criticizing synchronized diving like you had any idea what was actually going on — you can still go appreciate sport at its finest. Watch a Yale squash match, soccer game, or ehem…a softball game this year. You’ll quickly realize that while our Olympic heroes may fade in the years between the Games, the ideals we admire in their efforts never really do. Contact CHELSEA JANES at chelsea.janes@yale.edu .

U. S ROWING

Taylor Ritzel ’10, center, shown here with the American women’s eight that won gold in London, was one of eight Elis competing in the Olympics BY JACQUELINE SAHLBERG STAFF REPORTER Eight Bulldogs traveled to the London 2012 Olympic Games this July to compete in the rowing and sailing events. Representing three countries, the Eli Olympians realized long-term dreams and faced unwelcome disappointment on the waters outside London. The athletes joined a long tradition of 200 Olympic Elis, athletes, coaches and staff, and three added medals to Yale’s total count to 109, according to a Yale Athletics listing. American Taylor Ritzel ’10 and Canadian Ashley Brzozowicz ’04 won Yale’s first Olympic medals of the 2012 Games with a one-two finish in the women’s eight rowing final at Lake Dorney on Aug 2. In the mens’ four boat, Charlie Cole ’07 of the United States took home the bronze Aug 4 to bring Yale’s medal count to three. “Our long history of Olympic tradition is a tremendous source of pride,” Director of Athletics Tom Beckett said. “It adds to the prestige of the institution and the tradition of excellence of Yale University.” Olympic athletes first attended the second modern Olympics in Paris in 1900. Since then, Yale athletes and alumns have won 31 medals in rowing and three in sailing.

WOMEN’S ROWING: GOLD AND SILVER

Ritzel and the six-time defend-

ing world championship American crew led the final medal race from start to finish. The Canadian crew with Brzozowicz was seen as the U.S. team’s main challenger, after the Canadians recorded the top time in the preliminary heat and finished just three-hundredths of a second behind Team USA at the World Rowing Cup in Lucerne this May. Brzozowicz’s crew crossed the line more than a second behind the Americans to take silver. The race featured a showdown between former teammates — Tess Gerrand ’10 and Ritzel — who together took three NCAA titles while at Yale. Gerrand finished sixth with the Australian crew. Ritzel said her gold — the first in Yale women’s crew history — was the realization of a long-time dream. “I’m really proud and honored to have the opportunity to bring a gold medal to the USA and to Yale,” Ritzel said. “You spend your whole athletic career thinking about winning an Olympic gold... being able to complete the one goal that you have been hyper focused on the entire time is so rewarding and relieving.” More than 15 members of the Yale crew programs watched their former teammates at Eton Dorney, and many sported “For God, For Country and For Yale” tank tops that listed the names of the five competing, alumni Bulldog rowers — including Cole and American alternate Jamie Redman ’08.

IVY MEDALS IN LONDON HARVARD

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PRINCETON

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COLUMBIA PENN DARTMOUTH CORNELL BROWN

In addition to the alumni competitors, American Sarah Trowbridge, who took sixth in the double sculls, was hired as an assistant coach for Yale’s women’s crew program for this coming season.

MEN’S ROWING: BRONZE

Cole’s bronze medal American crew entered the Games as relative unknowns after skipping top international regattas to train this spring. The Americans came together in April and had never raced competitively as a crew before the Games. The four took on veteran world-championship and gold medal winning crews. They won their heat and semifinal on their way to the gold medal final. Up against stiff competition and thunderous cheers for Great Britain, the Americans chased the British and Australian boats to clinch the final spot on the podium. Cole said his crew members thought they had a chance to upset Great Britain — who took their fourth consecutive Olympic gold — but he emphasized the four were pleased to make the podium. “We have a lot to be confident about and hopefully a lot to look forward to in our rowing careers,” Cole added. With a third place, Cole became Yale’s 31st rower to win an Olympic medal.

SAILING

More than 100 miles away from Eton Dorney, two Bulldogs took to the water in early August at the Weymouth and Portland Olympic sailing center. Americans Sarah Lihan ’10 and Stu McNay ’05 went into the Games ranked No. 3 and No. 5 in the world respectively. Lihan took 10th in the women’s 470 class and McNay — who came in 13th at the 2008 Games in Beijing — finished 14th. Lihan and her skipper Amanda Clark were ranked as high as third during the 10-race series but fell back before qualifying for the medal race. “I’m still not satisfied with how things went,” Lihan said more than two weeks after the final race. “I’m proud to have represented the U.S. and proud to have been the one people were rooting for, but I believe we were capable of being on the podium and to not be there is hard.” McNay, who finished just five points away from qualifying for the final medal round after the 10 race series, echoed Lihan’s senti-

ment of disappointment. A sailor from Yale has competed at every Olympics but one since 1984. we should cut the “as a competitor or a coach” line because they were all athletes and it implies that coaches coached the games.

MOVING FORWARD

The London 2012 Olympic motto is “inspire a generation,” and head women’s crew coach Will Porter said these Elis are sure to encourage Olympic dreams for undergraduate rowers. “For our current athletes, just knowing that people who have sat in the same boat and rowed in the same tanks and trained at Yale for four years is inspirational,” Porter said. “Their stories let the current athletes know it is possible.” Porter explained that Brzozowicz, who placed fourth at the 2008 Games in Beijing, was the “forerunner” for the crew program’s Olympic success. The medals won should not overshadow the stories behind the Olympic athletes, Porter added. American alternate Jamie Redman ’08 overcame a major car accident last winter to be named to the team, and Gerrand trained outside the Olympic system without funding to pursue her goal. “So much of what we talk about in the program is being a strong person, and these athletes are strong enough to pursue something on their own terms and just go after it,” Porter said. McNay and Lihan both said returning to Yale and maintaining a connection to the undergraduate sailing program was important to them. McNay said he plans to return to coach several weekends this year. Lihan remains close friends with Claire Dennis ’13, who watched the Bulldog sailors in London and said she herself is one of the many current Eli sailors with Olympic aspirations. “I owe a lot to the quality of the other athletes on the sailing teams at Yale,” Lihan said. “It was those people, my teammates, getting a beer at Rudy’s at the end of a rough weekend or doing another drill when it was snowing in February. They are the reason I love the sport as much as I do.” The University of Southern California and Stanford University tied for most gold medals by a university in 2012 at 12 apiece. Contact JACQUELINE SAHLBERG at jacqueline.sahlberg@yale.edu .

Tennis stars face off at Yale TENNIS FROM PAGE 14 Govortsova. Already down 6–0, 2–1, Radwanska cited a shoulder injury and opted to retire early in the second set. All three other semifinalists pose real threats to Wozniacki’s dominance, should the Dane decide to continue: No. 2 seed Petra Kvitova, the Wimbledon champion of 2011; No. 7 seed Maria Kirilenko, recently buoyed by a fourthplace finish at the London Olympics; and world No. 10 Sara Errani, an Ital-

ian who was the runner-up to Maria Sharapova at the French Open earlier this year. Kirilenko and Wozniacki will face off in one semifinal, and Kvitova and Errani in the other. Yale’s role in the New Haven Open is both geographical and financial, said Jeff Watson, a tournament spokesman. The tournament is played at the Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale, adjacent to the Yale Bowl, and Yale is one of the four cornerstone sponsors of the event. The University decided to pro-

vide financing for the tournament following the fall 2009 withdrawl of Pilot Pen, its previous primary sponsor. Today, Kirilenko will take on Wozniacki in the first semifinal at 1 p.m., while Errani and Kvitova will play Friday evening for the other place in the final. Contact JOSEPH ROSENBERG at joseph.rosenberg@yale.edu .


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CHRISTOPHER MAGOON ’11 MARROW DONOR MEETS MATCH ON ABC’S “GOOD MORNING AMERICA” As a result of Mandi Schwartz Marrow Donor Registration Drive at Yale, Christopher Magoon ’11 donated life-saving bone marrow to a cancer patient. The two met for the first time Wednesday on ABC’s “Good Morning America.”

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“I’m really proud and honored to have the opportunity to bring a gold medal to the USA and to Yale.” TAYLOR RITZEL ’10 WOMEN’S CREW

YALE DAILY NEWS · FRIDAY, AUGUST 24, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

CHELSEA JANES

OLYMPICS

PostOlympics slump For me, the aftermath of an Olympic Games is always a little frustrating. For a few magical weeks during a Summer or Winter Olympics, it’s neither over-the-top nor cliché to say the world is watching as its best in sport go head to head for all the right reasons. While money and fame await some of the most prominent champions, the Games showcase the battles of athletes for whom those things would never have been adequate inspiration. Pride, passion — all those words used so loosely in the sports world most of the time — permeate the Olympics with unparalleled legitimacy. But with the passing of the Olympic torch from one venue to another comes the inevitable passing of those athletes from the front of our minds to the back. As the days pass after the last note of the closing ceremony, we can lose track of the people that give us the closest thing to true heroes sports can provide. Sure, we’ll remember stars such as Gabby Douglas and Michael Phelps for years to come. But in June 2014 when we’re sitting around talking sports, there’s a pretty good chance they won’t beat out Tim Tebow or LeBron James as the topic of conversation. Coverage of sports that captivate us during the Olympics, such as gymnastics, swimming and sailing, is not as lucrative — and therefore not as prevalent — when the stakes aren’t so high. And the stakes only seem to be high enough in the Olympics. That’s just the way it is. But while the poise and grace our Olympic heroes exhibit as they succeed under the intense pressure of a chance granted them perhaps once or twice in a lifetime is undoubtedly one of the things we admire most, the purity of their motivations and the strength of their devotion to their craft is just as, if not more, important to us. And that passion doesn’t fade when the bright lights of NBC Sports leave to refocus on Sunday Night Football or the Winter Classic. That’s why the aftermath of the games is so maddening to me. As I see it, it’s precisely that moment when our focus leaves them that these athletes become truly exceptional; our thoughts leave them just as they’re showing us exactly what made us admire them in the first place. As those athletes retreat into relative obscurity, with no chance of fame or fortune for at least four years — if ever — they continue to push for excellence. And that’s exactly when we stop caring. But the reasons we cared in the first place are too substantial to wait four years, and we can look elsewhere. Olympians aren’t the only ones that compete for all (or at least mostly) the right reasons. In fact, you need look no further than Ivy League athletics to see SEE JANES PAGE 13

THREE-MEDAL HAUL Seven Yale alumni and one coach competed at the London Olympics this summer, participating in rowing and sailing events. Three rowers returned with hardware. PAGE 13 JACQUELINE SAHLBERG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Taylor Ritzel ’10 won a gold medal as part of the United States women’s eight crew after edging out Ashley Brzozowicz ’04 and the second-place Canadian boat.

Wozniacki hurt at N.H. Open quarterfinals BY JOSEPH ROSENBERG STAFF REPORTER

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Yale hosts the New Haven Open singles semifinals today at the Connecticut Tennis Center at Yale starting at 1 p.m.

STAT OF THE DAY 31

For years, one of the main critiques of the Women’s Tennis Association has been the lack of consistency among its top players. But at the New Haven Open at Yale, one player has ruled the Elm City for four years running: Caroline Wozniacki of Denmark. The world’s No. 8, Wozniacki is undefeated in 20 matches in New Haven. But despite that success, she is seeded third this year due to middling performances earlier in the season that may have signaled an end to her dominance in the Elm City. Wozniacki is again through to the semifinals, but after she sustained an injury to her right knee in her quarterfinal victory, she will have to fight for her place in the final, just a week before the U.S. Open begins. Wozniacki will have to choose Friday whether to step onto the court and compete for her fifth consecutive New Haven Open or to conserve her strength for the season’s final major tournament. After taking the first set of her quarterfinal match 6–2, Wozniacki injured her knee while hitting a backhand in the first game of the second set. But Dominika Cibulkova, the tournament’s No. 6 seed, was unable to take advantage of Wozniacki’s injury, and Wozniacki cruised to victory, taking the second set 6-1. Elsewhere in the bracket, No. 1 seed and world No. 2 Agnieszka Radwanska fell in the first round to Belarusian qualifier Olga SEE TENNIS PAGE 13

THE NUMBER OF MEDALS THAT THE YALE CREW PROGRAM HAS WON IN OLYMPIC HISTORY. Taylor Ritzel ’10, Ashley Brzozowicz ’04, and Charlie Cole ’07 added to that tally in London after winning gold, silver, and bronze medals, respectively.


Yale Daily News (Aug. 24, 2012)