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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 125 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY SUNNY

66 73

CROSS CAMPUS

W. TENNIS ELIS SWEEP IVY FOES IN NEW YORK

FROSH OLYMPICS

HAROLD AND KUMAR

M. LACROSSE

Timothy Dwight steals flags, trophy as Morsels edge out competition

ASIAN-AMERICAN MOVIE STAR REFLECTS ON RACE

Yale clinches spot in Ivy League tournament with 4OT win over Brown

PAGE B1 SPORTS

PAGE 3 NEWS

PAGE 5 NEWS

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Inflated eliteness?

It’s here. Bunches of prefrosh

will arrive on campus today for Bulldog Days, which brings various bazaars and open houses to campus until Wednesday. The News welcomes prefrosh, and hopes they enjoy their stay in New Haven.

‘NEGLECTED’ CLAUSE IN YCC CONSTITUTION CAUSES DISPUTE

Stiles festivities. Ezra Stiles

College played host to two celebrations this weekend. First, on Saturday, a petting zoo brought cuddly animals to the college’s courtyard. And while many students celebrated Easter a week ago, on Sunday the Stiles courtyard hosted a celebration in honor of Orthodox Easter, which comes later because the Eastern Church uses the Julian calendar.

Everyone loves it. In an email to Silliman students, Dean Hugh Flick invited Sillimanders to watch Sunday night’s episode of the HBO series “Game of Thrones” in Silliflicks. Shout-out. An article in the

New York Times about the apps students use on college campuses included among its selections “Fast Track,” an app that allows students to see how crowded a dining hall is before taking the leap. Also included was the Yale Fruit Report, a Twitter account run by “Eli and Nathalie” that gives students the lowdown on the campus’s best fruit options.

A new venue. Moving beyond

men’s hockey and football games, the Yale Precision Marching Band played at softball and baseball games this weekend.

Contested election heads to runoff BY SOPHIE GOULD AND MADELINE MCMAHON STAFF REPORTERS

fell yet again this year to 5.9 percent and 6.8 percent, respectively. Over a dozen college guidance counselors and admissions experts interviewed said they expect admissions rates at the nation’s most elite institutions will continue to slope downward for the foreseeable future. “The big question is, ‘When does it stop?’ Will we see a day that a school like Yale or Harvard only

Late Friday evening, John Gonzalez ’14 receieved a call from Yale College Council Vice President Omar Njie ’13 informing him that he had won the YCC presidency. But just hours later, Gonzalez was told that the race was not yet over, and several days of campaigning remained before him. The YCC Elections Committee, chaired by Njie, announced in a campus-wide email Saturday that Gonzalez and Eric Eliasson ’14 will compete in a runoff election due to a clause in the YCC constitution that has been overlooked in recent years. Since Gonzalez won less than 40 percent of the vote and beat Eliasson by less than 10 percentage points, the constitution stipulates that the election must be decided in a runoff. “Although this election rule of the YCC Constitution has been neglected in years past, we feel it is our responsibility to uphold the YCC Constitution,” the Elections Committee wrote in a press release. Gonzalez won 39.79 percent of the vote, and Eliasson won 30.73 percent. Eliasson said he contacted the Elections Committee Friday night “to get an opinion” after seeing the percentages and realizing that they did not fit the constitution’s requirement for declaring a winner of the contest. “[That was] not good timing because of what the Elections Committee [had already] announced, but I wanted to be clear about the rules,” he said. The clause in the YCC constitution

SEE ADMISSIONS PAGE 4

SEE YCC ELECTION PAGE 6

Participants in Bulldog Days this week were accepted in the most selective admissions cycle in Yale history. How will the University’s low admissions rate and perceived eliteness factor into their college decisions? JOSH SATOK/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Bulldog Days, the University’s annual program for admitted students, begins today and lasts through Wednesday. BY ANDREW GIAMBRONE STAFF REPORTER At last fall’s Harvard-Yale football game, students scattered throughout the Harvard section wore mesh jerseys with the slogan, “We are the 6 percent.”

UPCLOSE The jerseys referred to the percentage of applicants accepted to

Harvard’s class of 2015: The school had admitted 6.2 percent of its applicants, while Yale’s admissions rate was 7.35 percent — the lowest rates the two universities had ever posted. Prefrosh who arrive on campus today for the kickoff of Bulldog Days, the University’s threeday welcoming event for admitted students, have just emerged from a college admissions process that was even more competitive. Both Harvard’s and Yale’s acceptance rates

You thought it was over.

Sunday night was tap night for Yale’s endlessly prestigious junior societies. One young man was spotted wearing a skirt and singing Britney Spears outside Starbucks. Others were in similar states. Awarded. Chemistry professor

Seth Herzon and astronomy professor Daisuke Nagai were both awarded Cottrell Scholar Awards for their research and teaching in the sciences. The award, given out by the Research Corporation for Science Advancement, comes with a $75,000 prize.

Justice? Before he visited Yale last Thursday, Bollywood star Shah Rukh Khan was held at customs in White Plains, N.Y., for two hours. He’d been detained at customs once before, in a 2009 incident that led to an apology on the part of the United States. Once again, immigrations officials expressed their “profound” apologies for detaining Khan. THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1970 More than 400 students vote to demand that the Yale Corporation give $500,000 to the Panther Legal Defense Fund, to support Black Panthers on trial in New Haven. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

ACA D E M I C S

The rise of the interdisciplinary

Facing uncertain future, Occupy celebrates six months

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ith more major programs than most of its peer schools, Yale has introduced an increasing number of interdisciplinary majors that aim to prepare students for a more globalized world. LORENZO LIGATO reports. Every May for the past three decades, about half of Yale College graduates leave the University with a degree in history, economics, English, political science or biology — each of which has been a part of the Yale curriculum since at least the early 1900s. But over the past 15 years, Yale’s undergraduate curriculum has expanded to include at least six new interdisciplinary majors that combine academic approaches from a variety of fields. Some of these majors, including modern Middle East studies and South Asia studies, focus on specific geographical areas of growing international importance, while other programs — such as ethics, politics and economics; ethnicity, race and migration; and global affairs — synthesize different academic fields. “Just as the scholarship has

become deeper and more interdisciplinary, so the world has become more complicated and more international,” said Stephen Pitti ’91, director of the program in ER&M that was established as an independent major this February. “The frameworks for studying have diversified and grown and that reflects the diversity of today’s world.” While Yale College has more major programs that most of its peer institutions, the introduction of these new majors both accommodate students’ academic interests and seem to evidence profound changes within academia. “The quest for knowledge is dynamic, never reaching a final state in which we can say, we now have all the methods and all the materials we need,” Dean of SEE NEW MAJORS PAGE 4

JENNIFER CHEUNG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Occupy protesters celebrated last week after an appeals court’s injunction prevented the city from evicting them from the Green, where they have been since Oct. 15. BY NICK DEFIESTA STAFF REPORTER Occupy New Haven celebrated its sixmonth anniversary Sunday afternoon amid calls to leave by city officials, New Haven residents and some of their own members. Over 50 people gathered at Occupy New Haven’s encampment on the Upper Green for an afternoon of music and food as they commemorated the protest’s arrival at the site on Oct. 15. But with some mem-

bers leaving the protest and calling for its removal from the Green and Occupy’s third court date in its lawsuit against the city set for Tuesday, protesters may not have much more to celebrate. Following a ruling by federal Judge Mark Kravitz that the city’s request for protesters to clear the Green was legal, city workers began to evict protesters last Tuesday. But Occupy attorney Norm Pattis successSEE OCCUPY PAGE 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · SUNDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

“If you can fall asleep by accident, your anxiety isn’t out of control” MIKECONRAD ON “OUTING ANXIETY”

.COMMENT yaledailynews.com/opinion

GUEST COLUMNIST IKE LEE

Remember the living

NEWS’

VIEW

T

Welcome home, prefrosh

B

ulldog Days is Yale at its hectic best. It’s why we love this school

and why you should join us here.

Welcome to Yale, prefrosh. If you’re anything like us when we were in your shoes, you’re overwhelmed right now. You’re sleeping on the dirty floor of some stranger’s suite. The architecture looks like Hogwarts. There are too many things to do. That’s good. Soak up these three days. They’ll show you what’s magical about Yale, and you’ll be talking about them the rest of your senior year — and you’ll be looking back on them fondly when you’re a senior here. Yale puts on a good show for Bulldog Days, and it’s true that there isn’t quite this much pomp or pep to daily life at Yale. But it’s close. Students get bogged down with papers and sleepless nights, but that’s because the energy that drives us during Bulldog Days is real. You will not go unchallenged here. You’re surrounded by people who jump with excitement about Beethoven and Rousseau and calculus. (Mostly the first two.) Mechanical engineering and English majors alike often put extracurriculars ahead of classes. They dive headfirst into debating societies, community service initiatives or intramural sports in a way that is unmatched almost anywhere else. Many of you face tough choices. You can’t really go wrong. Of course, we know Yale is the right way to go. But you should take this time to figure out for yourself why that is. You may have heard Yale’s name in some ugly news stories recently. Yale isn’t perfect. We wouldn’t love it so much if it were. You should know that Yale students and alumni filed a Title IX com-

plaint against the University, that a tailgate at The Game was tarnished by a horrific accident, that this is a campus that has grieved too often in the past four years. You should also know that students know we are the heart of this University, and we are here for each other, whether that means mourning together at a candlelight vigil, suing the school to spur it into action or dancing with friends on a table and belting “Call Me Maybe,” then returning to a suite for a Wenzel. (You should figure out what “Wenzel” means before you leave on Wednesday.) Yalies tend to care more about breathing all the energy and knowledge at Yale than burying ourselves in the library. We love this place, and that means we love more than books, which we can read anywhere. Look at this week: It’s one of the busiest of the semester, but we’re eager to drop everything to show you around. Talk to us. Don’t just talk. Make a new friend and get lost together in Sterling Memorial Library’s stacks. Get your host to take you roofhopping. Go to G-Heav at 3 a.m. And come to the News’ open house on Monday or Tuesday night at 11:00 p.m. Obviously. For these next three days, do everything. Don’t sleep now. Stay up late, talk to fellow prefrosh and current students, think about things you have never considered before. Go along with the crowd; let Yale’s momentum carry you. Let Yalies – both current and future – surprise you. Surprise yourself. You can do anything here – we mean it. Take a shot.

his week, hundreds of admitted students will attend Bulldog Days. Student organizations are ready for late-night social events, and hosts are eager to talk about how much they love Yale. However, when I arrived as a prefrosh one year ago, the campus atmosphere was somewhat different. The night before Bulldog Days kicked off, Michele Dufault ’11 died from asphyxiation after her hair got caught in a machine while she was working late at night in Sterling Chemistry Laboratory. A campus-wide email told the story the next afternoon, and Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel told all of us prefrosh about the accident later that night. Hundreds of students attended the candlelight vigil held in Saybrook’s courtyard the first night of Bulldog Days. In July, Asteroid 15338 was renamed “15338 Dufault” in honor of Dufault. In January, the Yale Physics Department established the Michele Dufault Summer Research Fellowship and Conference Fund to fund research in the physical sciences for one female Yale student over the summer.

What’s with our tendency to recognize distinguished people such as Dufault with namesakes only after they have passed away? We’re all familiar with the phenomenon of stuff being named after people who have long since left us. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day was established decades after King’s assassination; memorial funds like that bearing Dufault’s name are plentiful. I live in Lawrance Hall, which was named one year after Thomas Garner Lawrance 1883 died during his final year at Yale. Perhaps we go through these naming rituals out of respect for people who have died and their accomplishments. Granted, commemoration an admirable act, and I’m not trying to discount that by any means. The question I am asking, though, is why we don’t do similar things for the living. Undoubtedly, there are just as many notable living people, so why don’t we honor them? My suitemate had a swift explanation for our focus on the dead: “Because they’re dead. So they’re more special.” As horrible as that sounds, there’s a certain degree of truth behind it. In our multifaceted and bus-

tling lives, it’s become increasingly harder for someone to stand out in a crowd. Even the most impressive achievement is reduced to an article in the News to be forgotten in a couple of days. With everyone doing so much in such little time, it’s no wonder that death has become the defining factor that distinguishes the people we remember. Ours has become a society in which everyone is so occupied and busy that we fail to realize how special the people around us are. Instead, we take their presence for granted. Then, when they leave us for good, we’re shocked and crushed, and so the memorials begin. We should not wait until such tragedies occur to start applauding these people. We should celebrate them now, while they’re still around, so they can join us in celebrating their passion, love and accomplishments. After all, wouldn’t it be nice if Michele Dufault were able to present the check for the Dufault Fellowship to the recipient herself? Thursday marked the first anniversary of the freak accident that took Dufault’s life. It’s hard to believe it’s been a year since she was taken from the

Yale community so abruptly. However, let us hope something good can come out of her death. Let’s hope we’ll open our eyes wider during our daily lives to recognize the beauty in the people who currently surround us, rather than waiting for death to smack and wake us up. The point is not to honor everyone but to shift the focus of our remembrances toward the living. Though the asteroid and research fellowship bring much joy to Dufault’s friends and family, there is still undeniable grief behind these namesakes that could be avoided if she were celebrated when she was alive. So the next time you come across a beloved friend, family member or even mere acquaintance, ask yourself: If given the chance, would you name something after that person? If you find someone for whom the answer is yes, as I sincerely hope you will, find every possible way to cherish your time together. Because it may very well be too late to do so if you wait any longer. IKE LEE is a freshman in Ezra Stiles College. Contact him at ike.lee@yale.edu .

S TA F F I L L U S T R AT O R TA O TA O H O L M E S

The maternity games

GUEST COLUMNIST ANTONIA CZINGER

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hen I was a kid, I never watched Saturday morning cartoons. My parents did not forbid TV; I just never had any particular desire to watch it. Once, my parents did put on Nickelodeon, but it did not work out. I remember being at least mildly entertained, when all of the sudden the program was interrupted by some crazy bird squawking, “I’m cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs!” A commercial. It was an unknown phenomenon. “Mommy!” I cried, “Something is wrong with the movie!” When I tell this story, I usually conclude by suggesting that I lacked the attention span to sit through commercials. This usually gets a laugh. However, recently I got a slightly different response. “Wow,” my friend said, “if you couldn’t pay attention to TV, what could you pay attention to?” I told him I read voraciously. He was surprised. Television is associated with a short attention span, reading with dutiful concentration. I realized that I had been conflating the ability to concentrate with the ability to tolerate interruptions. With television, the notion that I would have to watch something I didn’t want

to watch was unbearable. With reading, the story never had to stop. I could just keep going. The audience of the Antonia Can’t Watch TV Story tends to make the same mistake. This is why I’ve been able to tell the joke for so long. The mistake reveals another basic misconception we have: We think we value a long attention span because it makes us more efficient. Unfortunately, this is not necessarily true. The ability to sit through interruptions and transition seamlessly from one task to another is what we really prize — maybe it’s just as useful as the ability to read books for hours on end. Our society is filled with a variety of stimuli, and we are expected to respond to many of them, often all at once. We consider neglecting email for even two hours irresponsible, even though checking it interrupts other work. New information streams in unrelentingly, often in bitesized bits, and we need to stay updated. We are surrounded constantly by objects that go beep. There are so many things we feel responsible for knowing, but to grasp everything thrown at us, we must transition easily without musing too deeply. We

want to be able to focus on many things rather than a single, sustained point of interest. Contrary to popular belief, we now value a knack for transitions just as much as the ability to concentrate.

ENDURANCE AND ATTENTION AREN’T THE SAME THING What are the repercussions of this shift? Well, for one, it means we have trained our minds to tolerate interruptions with greater ease. This is in many ways a useful and relevant skill. In kindergarten, I did not want to leave the art station and move on to story time if my artwork was unfinished. In middle school, I sometimes forgot to do my homework because I was too busy finishing a book due next week. These were problematic habits. Today, I know how to transition with greater ease. I can multitask. I can move through a society that is set up for people who can juggle multiple tasks with finesse.

The pitfall is when we cannot stop transitioning. The urge to switch gears from writing a paper to checking email to reading articles online often becomes overpowering. I am frustrated by the number of times I stop working on my problem set in order to check Facebook — something I do less out of true desire than dread compulsion. Checking my newsfeed for the umpteenth time actually bores me. Nonetheless, I can’t seem to stop. The need to transition can become almost like a twitch. A tick. My friend listens earnestly to a problem I’m having, but when her phone vibrates she cannot help but look. Thus, the urge to transition and multitask skews our values. And the effects could be potentially devastating. Imagine the politician who misses an important cue from his adviser because he is updating his Twitter feed. In a society where an easily refocused attention span gets us farther than a sustained one, we may lose focus entirely. Or we may just tolerate too much bad TV. ANTONIA CZINGER is a junior in Timothy Dwight College. Contact her at antonia.czinger@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS

“At the Olympics, you’re there to do a job. I feel you should take it seriously. You should be respectful.” SHANNON MILLER FORMER U.S. GYMNAST

Freshman Olympics struck by thefts

MONDAY, APRIL 16 4:00 PM “The Future of Fundamental Physics.” Nima ArkaniHamed of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J., will give the Leigh Page Prize Lecture. Sloane Physics Laboratory (217 Prospect St.), room 59 (overflow in room 57). 4:30 PM “The Accidental City: Improvising New Orleans.” Lawrence N. Powell of the New Orleans Gulf South Center at Tulane University will give this book talk. Sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. Luce Hall (34 Hillhouse Ave.), room 202. 5:00 PM “Obama’s Surprising Uses of American Power: Confronting Iran, Leaving Afghanistan and Coping with the Arab Spring.” David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times, will speak at this Jackson Institute for Global Affairs Town Hall Meeting. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), room 101.

Students inaugurate conference on Africa BY CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTER Roughly 200 students from across the East Coast convened Friday and Saturday to discuss prospects for peace and conflict resolution in Africa as part of the inaugural African Youth Empowerment Conference at Yale. Organized by the Yale Undergraduate Association for African Peace and Development (YAAPD), the conference aimed to create a network of students interested in Africa’s political and economic development, according to YAAPD Secretary-General Akua Agyen ’14. Student ticket prices for the conference were $30 for early registration and $35 for late registration. Though Agyen said organizers faced financial and logistical challenges while planning and running the conference, she called the initiative an overall success and said she hopes it will become an annual Yale-hosted event. “It was really inspiring to hear just how much the participants enjoyed the conference,” Agyen said. “I can’t tell you how many times different people came up to me [after the conference] saying ‘This isn’t just this year, right?’ and ‘You guys better do this next year.’”

Our age isn’t an excuse. People are doing big things now and we can all take inspiration from these people. AKUA AGYEN ’14 Secretary-General, Yale Undergraduate Association for African Peace and Development Organizers initially struggled to secure funding for the conference, Agyen said, since many departments said they viewed the initiative as a “pilot project” — a type of effort Agyen said the departments are not allowed to support financially. Agyen called the departments’ response “disappointing,” noting that Yale is one of few Ivy League schools that did not already host a conference dedicated to examining development issues in Africa. Harvard, Columbia, Brown and Princeton universities all hold conferences addressing African development, she said. Rodney Cohen, dean of the

Afro-American Cultural Center, which provided financial and administrative support to the effort, said in a Friday email that he thinks the conference is important because it “sheds light on the many global issues involving Africa” and “provides a critical platform” to host a variety of African students and scholars. He added that he expects the Afro-American Cultural Center will continue to support the conference in future years. The conference also received funding from groups including the Yale Law School and the Council on African Studies, while several residential colleges donated housing and meal swipes. Events at the conference focused on politics, education and business in Africa, Agyen said. Students attended panel discussions and workshops on topics such as education and entrepreneurship in the country, and were invited to a film screening of “Motherland” by M. K. Asante, who also spoke at the conference. While organizers invited scholars and professionals to speak at the keynote ceremonies — including Asante, University of California, Riverside, professor Chris Abani and entrepreneur Magatte Wade — Agyen said the organizers also recruited student speakers for the event. “We think it’s really important to showcase that we’re not too young to start doing things now,” she said. “Our age isn’t an excuse. People are doing big things now and we can all take inspiration from these people.” Zachary Enumah GRD ’12, who attended the conference, said he thought the event “really created dialogue” and exposed participants to a wide variety of issues affecting Africa today. He added that he found the student speakers inspirational and thought they helped attendees understand how they could promote African development. The diverse group of speakers sent a message that there are “many different kinds of media” individuals can use to promote awareness and action for African issues beyond working in international organizations such as the United Nations, Enumah said. All proceeds from the conference will go to CAMME, a nongovernmental organization that seeks to help children in the Congo. Contact CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

JUSTIN STEWART

The Yale Undergraduate Association for African Peace and Development planned the inaugural African Youth Empowerment Conference.

GAVAN GIDEON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Members of Morse College celebrated their victory in Saturday’s Freshman Olympics on Old Campus. BY GAVAN GIDEON AND DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTERS Lindsay Pearlman ’15 was petting a dog at Saturday’s Freshman Olympics on Old Campus when a student wearing a Berkeley College T-shirt snatched the Morse College flag out of her hands. Morse was one of four colleges to lose their flags in a spate of thefts committed by Timothy Dwight College students during this year’s Freshman Olympics. Though Morse racked up 265 points to take home the trophy while TD finished in last place with a score of 15, members of the college said their string of thefts — which also included stealing the event’s trophy before the games commenced — helped compensate for their dramatic loss. Sonya Levitova ’15, a co-captain for TD’s team, said her college never expected to win the competition, and that stealing the trophy and flags became “a funny joke.” “If we had finished second I don’t think that we would have done what we did,” she said. “There’s a kind of delicious irony in finishing last but stealing four residential colleges’ flags.” Though Davenport College was disqualified in the 2011 Freshman Olympics for stealing Pierson’s flag, TD did not face any similar sanctions this year, said Leandro Leviste ’15, a member of the Freshman Class Council, which organizes the games. The thefts began Friday night during the opening ceremonies when a TD freshman stole the “unguarded” Freshman Olympics trophy from a bench in the LanmanWright courtyard, Leviste said. The FCC sent an email to the freshman class Friday night demanding that those responsible return the trophy. A police officer at the scene had witnessed the theft and was aware of which residential college was responsible, the email said, adding that if the trophy was not returned, that college would face disqualifiaction. Later that night, Gabby Zamora ’15, one of two FCC representatives responsible for organizing Freshman Olympics, received a message from thetrophythieves@gmail.com stating that the trophy would be returned by

the end of the games on Saturday. Leviste said the FCC put together a replacement trophy — a spray-painted flower pot — in preparation for the closing ceremonies. Toward the end of Saturday’s events on Old Campus, TD freshmen announced that they had the cup. A Morsel ran to grab the original trophy, Leviste said, and along with other members of the college managed to grab the prize during a “short tussle.” But during that time Morse lost the replacement trophy, which again had been left unguarded in front of Durfee Hall. The flags of Berkeley, Davenport, Morse and Silliman colleges, along with the replacement trophy, remain in TD’s possession. Leviste said TD Master Jeffrey Brenzel has spoken with the thieves, and the flags will be returned by Monday. Levitova said her college intends to keep the stolen replacement trophy.

There’s a kind of delicious irony in finishing last but stealing four residential colleges’ flags.

come out.” Some participants said they felt the playoff portions of events and award ceremony at the end were subdued because many of the underperforming colleges left earlier in the day. Medina estimated that only three or four colleges remained by the end of Saturday, calling the final events “anticlimactic.” Tobin said the finals were held to the end of the day to build students’ excitement, but added that future FCCs should consider timing playoff rounds to occur earlier. Saybrook College took a close second to Morse, with 240 points. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu and DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

FRESHMAN O L Y M P I C S R E S U LT S 1. Morse College, 265 points.

SONYA LEVITOVA ’15 Co-captain, Timothy Dwight Freshman Olympics team

2. Saybrook College, 240 points.

FCC member Rachel Tobin ’15 said she felt the rampant flag-stealing tainted Freshman Olympics, though she added that it “raised the level of competition a little more.” Fabi Fernandez ’15, co-captain of Davenport’s team, said the theft of his college’s flag was a result of karma given last year’s events. Fernandez added that he hopes TD will return Davenport’s flag soon. Five TD freshmen interviewed declined to reveal the thieves’ identities. Mary Jo Medina ’15 referred to them as “a TD secret.” Despite the thefts, all students interviewed said Freshman Olympics still served as a traditional bonding experience for their class. “Whether they were interested in athletics or not, everyone was there to participate and have a good day,” Tobin said. “I think that was the best thing about it, just seeing everyone

4. Ezra Stiles College, 140 points.

3. Pierson College, 210 points.

5. Davenport College, 120 points. 6. Berkeley College, 110 points. 7. Calhoun College, 95 points. 8. Trumbull College, 70 points. 9. Silliman College, 55 points. 10. Branford College, 50 points. 11. Jonathan Edwards College, 45 points. 12. Timothy Dwight College, 15 points.

Walkers raise AIDS awareness BY MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS STAFF REPORTER Walkers congregated on the New Haven Green this Sunday for the eighth annual AIDS Walk New Haven, a fundraiser for the city’s AIDS-affected community. Around 400 people attended the event, which donates all of its proceeds to nine member organizations of Mayor John DeStefano Jr.’s Taskforce on AIDS, a citywide advisory board that supports those affected by the disease in greater New Haven area and includes groups such as AIDS Project New Haven and Planned Parenthood. Though it was planned and directed entirely by Yale students, attendance by Yale undergraduates was low, according to organizers. “This year’s Walk received a lot of support from the community, and we had students from other universities [than Yale], too,” Renee Wu ’14, one of the event’s co-directors, said. “But we wished we had seen more Yalies around.” Adam Ford ’13 and Connor Buechler ’14, who also co-directed the event, said that this year’s AIDS Walk is expected to raise about $10,000, half of the organizers’ goal of $20,000. Ford said the organizing group may not have begun promoting the event soon enough. Organizers hypothesized that the low attendance among Yale students may have been due in part to the lack of students with AIDS-related experiences. “Community members are more affected than Yalies. Many walkers have family mem-

bers who died of the disease,” Adam Ford ’13 said. “But we’ll keep working hard to expand to more people, beyond Yale and New Haven.” New Haven resident Cathy Lang came with her family to honor her eldest brother Richard Lang, who died of AIDS in 1991 after returning from the Air Force, she said. She added that she attends many events related to HIV/AIDS in the gay community, although she said she thinks “AIDS is not a gay thing anymore.”

AIDS is not as stigmatized as it was. But you are still able to find gay people who have AIDS, and that’s just not right. BILL LAURO Participant, AIDS Walk New Haven Bill Lauro, another New Haven resident, said he came to the walk with his boyfriend after gaining interest in the cause by participating in AIDS fundraising events through work. “AIDS is not as stigmatized as it was,” Lauro said. “But you are still able to find gay people who have AIDS, and that’s just not right.” Several politicians delivered speeches at the event. U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal LAW ’73 commended the organizers’ efforts

and said that HIV/AIDS is still an issue that deserves crucial attention. State Rep. Patricia Dillon, Democrat of New Haven, said that although the stigma around HIV/AIDS is not as pervasive, it is still necessary to raise awareness and teach younger generations about the disease. Local advocacy organizations set up booths on the Green, distributing free educational pamphlets, books, shirts and condoms. Allan Hillman, the president of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Greater New Haven Chapter, manned a booth and handed out pamphlets explaining how his group opposes discrimination faced by people with HIV/ AIDS. Ellen Gabrielle, the director of Liberty Community Services, a homeless services provider, said she attended the event because as many as 75 percent of the residents of her organization’s shelters have HIV/AIDS. Joyce Poole, co-chair of the Mayor’s Task Force on AIDS, said that the New Haven community tends to be supportive of people with the disease. Advocacy organizations, however, still need to raise awareness, “to step out of the office and get in the community,” she said. According to the Connecticut Department of Public Health, more than 19,000 cases of HIV were registered between 1980 and 2010 in the state. AIDS Walk New Haven has raised over $175,000 since 2005, according to the event’s website. Contact MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS at mariana.lopez-rosas@yale.edu .


PAGE 4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

Common Application Founded in 1975, the Common App aims to simplify the college admissions process by enabling students to apply to multiple schools, including Yale, using the same application.

Experts debate effects of downward trend

2012

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Class Year Year Class Cornell UPenn Dartmouth Brown MIT Columbia

Stanford Princeton Yale Harvard

GRAPH TOTAL APPLICATIONS TO YALE COLLEGE

15000

CHANGING THE ‘SOUL OF THE PLACE’?

But some admissions experts expressed concern that falling admissions rates may keep certain students from even applying to the nation’s most competitive institutions. Hughes said a “psychological barrier” may drive away some students if admissions rates keep dropping, creating what he called a “why-bother effect.” Zach Plyam ’16, a senior at Hunter College High School in New York City who will attend Yale next fall, said since his high school restricts students from applying to more than eight private colleges, he had to be “very cautious” when crafting his college list

’08

’09

’13

’14

28974

27283

25869

20000

22817

25000

26003

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19323

The population of 18-year-old Americans peaked in 2009, when the largest group of high school seniors in the nation’s history — 3.3 million — graduated and became eligible to enter college. Though this number has decreased slightly over the past three years, the number is expected to begin rising again around 2015, according to projections published by the College Board, a nonprofit organization that administers college admissions exams. At the same time, a spike in the number of international students applying to Yale and its peer schools has also inflated application counts. The Institute of International Education, a private nonprofit organization that releases data related to international education, found that the number of international students enrolled in American colleges increased by 5 percent in the 2010-’11 academic year to 723,277, a 32 percent increase over a decade ago. Some higher education experts attributed the rise in international students to the growing middle class in East and South Asian countries and to generous financial aid policies offered at Yale and its peer schools. Over the past 10 years, the portion of Yale College students who receive need-based financial

5

21101

JEFFREY BRENZEL Dean of Undergraduate Admissions

10

19451

If applications go up, admit rates must go down. It’s a simple problem in long division.

15

19682

Over the past decade, acceptance rates at the country’s most selective schools have been cut roughly in half. This drop, which culminated in record lows this year at six of eight schools in the Ivy League as well as at Stanford and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is largely due to an increase in college applications nationwide, admissions experts said. “If applications go up, admit rates must go down,” Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Jeffrey Brenzel said in an email last month. “It’s a simple problem in long division.”

20

17735

GROWTH IN APPLICATIONS

GRAPH ADMISSIONS RATES AT YALE’S PEER SCHOOLS

15466

admits 1 percent of the applicant pool?” said James Ouwuachi, a college guidance counselor at the Westminster Schools in Atlanta, Ga. “How as a society are we going to interpret that?” As increasing selectivity makes the college admissions process more intense for high school students, some admissions experts worry that the low acceptance rates might deter some students from applying to Yale and its peer schools while attracting those who value prestige over a fulfilling college experience.

aid — which is offered without regard to citizenship — has risen from 39 percent to 57 percent. “Very few institutions have the type of financial aid program that Yale does where you treat international students similarly to American students,” said Ronald Ehrenberg, director of Cornell’s Higher Education Research Institute. “At other schools, there’s often a fixed financial budget that doesn’t accommodate these students in the same way as American students, so there’s a huge pull from Ivy League schools that makes them more attractive to international folks.” Admissions experts said another factor that has led to higher application numbers is the proliferation of the Common Application, which students can use to apply to its 456 member institutions, including Yale. Chuck Hughes, president and founder of Road to College, a college admissions consulting service, said the ease of using the Common App is causing students to apply to a wider range of schools, even though many of these students may not have the credentials usually demanded by Ivy League institutions. “I’m starting to see a scattershot approach: Kids don’t know where they’re going to get in, so they’re spreading their risk and applying to all the Ivies,” Hughes said. “I discourage that kind of behavior because there are demonstrable differences between these schools.” Sarah Beyreis ’85 GRD ’94, director of college counseling at the private Cincinnati Country Day School, said the low admissions rates can be “somewhat beneficial” because they encourage students to consider schools beyond the Ivy League and other prestigious institutions such as Stanford and MIT, making students “better consumers in the college market.” She added that the increase in applications to elite universities may be the result of “a hint of narcissism” on the part of high school students, who may hope to be among “the chosen few” accepted to the nation’s most selective schools. “I believe you will always have a great demand for these particular schools that are household names,” Ouwuachi said. “We all know when we buy lottery tickets that our chances of winning are low, yet thousands of people buy them anyway.”

Admissions Rate (%)

ADMISSIONS FROM PAGE 1

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SEE ADMISSIONS PAGE 6

New majors arise from student interest, shifts in academia NEW MAJORS FROM PAGE 1 Undergraduate Education Joseph Gordon said in an email to the News.

A CHANGING WORLD?

At its Feb. 2 meeting, the Yale College faculty approved the ethnicity, race and migration program as a stand-alone major, capping a 15-year-long effort to expand the major. The change is the latest addition to the increasingly interdisciplinary curricula offered at Yale. The ER&M program explores the forces that have created today’s multiethnic world and requires analysis from a broad range of fields, Pitti said. The variety of perspectives offered through such majors, he added, allows students to “think internationally and trans-nationally” about historical and contemporary processes. Eb Saldana ’14, a student majoring in ER&M, said that by exploring the subject of ethnicity and migration with different methods, she is able to “get the bigger picture” and examine issues related to current policy making and social interactions. “ER&M offers tools to look at the world around you through an academic lens,” she said. The modern Middle East studies program, formally approved in February 2008, also satisfied a growing academic interest by combining classes previously offered across a variety of separate departments about the culture, history and politics of the area into one course of study, said Beatrice Gruendler, one of two directors of undergraduate studies for the program. The interdisciplinary approach, Gruendler said, is necessary given

the “complexity of a region that comprises billions of people and combines several traditions.” “The increasing emergence of this area made necessary the creation of a major that would allow students to approach the Middle East in an interdisciplinary fashion,” Gruedler said. While ER&M and MMES have only been established recently, Yale has offered one wide-ranging approach to a discipline since at least 1979, when the women’s, gender and sexuality studies program was established, said Howard Bloch, Sterling professor of French and chair of the Humanities program. These interdisciplinary majors provide a useful framework to analyze an increasingly interconnected world, Bloch added. Ethics, politics and economics, for example, was established as a major in 1993 to explore how these three fields could complement each other and provide students with pragmatic skills, said political science professor Steven Wilkinson, the director of undergraduate studies for the major. The program, while not offering specific career training, prepares students to enter a variety of fields — including academia, government, law, journalism and even filmmaking and music, he added. Global affairs, founded in 2010, replaced international studies as a standalone major devoted to hands-on study of international security and development. Sophia Clementi ’14, a sophomore who has been accepted to global affairs and EP&E, agreed that these programs allow students to learn “real-life skills and knowledge” that can be applied in the study of social and political problems. “As we are faced with more

complex, global problems,” she said, “you need to explore how each field is related to other spheres of knowledge.”

COSTS AND BENEFITS

Still, Gruendler expressed some concern that interdisciplinary majors such as MMES are at times too broad and don’t ensure the depth required by a liberal arts education. Faculty members, she said, have addressed this issue by requiring foundational courses and mandatory language proficiency for students in the program. “We had to guarantee enough introductory courses for students with no previous background in the study of the Middle East,” she said. In defence of EP&E, Wilkinson rejected the claim that interdisciplinary majors are too broad, citing a required set of “core courses” for the major: “In our case, I’m confident this criticism doesn’t apply,” Wilkinson said. Gruendler was not the first to identify a potential downside for these majors: Concerns about the establishment of interdisciplinary programs had already been raised by the Committee on Majors, established in 2000 to monitor the majors offered in Yale College. In its Report on the Interdisciplinary Majors released in January 2007, the Committee identified such majors as “a benefit worth having and therefore a cost worth paying,” while also discouraging the addition of more interdisciplinary majors because of the monetary and teaching resources required. Such majors, the report said, demand constant supervision because “the founding enthusiasms behind them can attenuate,

and they can be rocked by exogenous events and actors.” David Mayhew, Sterling professor of political science and chair of the Committee of Majors in 2007, said the report did not forbid the establishment of new interdisciplinary majors, but simply suggested that they “be more careful” when implementing additional programs. After the 2007 report was released, three new interdisciplinary major programs have been introduced: Computing and the arts, MMES and global affairs. But there have been others proposed. Justine Kolata ’12 organized an April 2011 conference called “Human Rights Studies in Academia” that drew about 170 attendees to discuss a potential program for the study of human rights. Kolata said that while she could explore this field through courses offered in the Political Science department, the subject of human rights is interdisciplinary in nature and should be studied through an independent major. Her proposal, though endorsed by over 40 Yale professors, was never officially approved due to lack of funding and teaching resources. Instead, a committee of faculty members has met several times throughout the past year to discuss adding human rights as a concentration track within the political science major, Kolata said. “Yale is very traditional,” Kolata said. “In order to introduce a new major, you have to go through a lot of bureaucracy and guarantee that you have funds available, as well as professors that can teach.” Throughout this process she faced the challenge of convincing administrators that the study of human rights is broad enough

to be analyzed through different perspectives, Kolata added.

CONSTANT GROWTH

All six professors interviewed agreed that Yale’s liberal arts curriculum, by its nature, is constantly evolving to include new majors and programs that reflect emerging interests in academia. Gordon said that non-traditional fields like environmental studies, film studies and South Asian studies are now seen as “dealing with some of the most important questions of our time,” even though they were barely recognized 30 years ago. “A curriculum evolves because scholarship evolves,” Mayhew said. “New majors and programs are constantly created or terminated, and there is nothing surprising or disturbing about that.” Established faculty support, expressed student interest and available academic resources are crucial to the approval of a new major, Gordon said. A department or faculty council must present the Committee on Majors and the Provost’s Office with a proposal to introduce a new major program, which must ultimately be approved by a vote of the Yale College faculty, he said. For instance, while ER&M was only promoted to stand-alone status this February, interest in the field has been present at Yale as far back as the 1970s when many courses exploring subjects related to migration, race and ethnicity issues were included in the Blue Book, Pitti said. Over the 1980s and 1990s, students and faculty pushed for the introduction of more classes in these topics, he said, until the program was finally established as a second major in 1997-’98 academic year. The expansion of the Yale Col-

lege curriculum was addressed in a 2009 evaluation conducted every 10 years as part of a reaccreditation by the New England Association of School and Colleges, Gordon said. The study, he added, questioned if the University possessed the resources necessary to sustain all its programs and departments, especially in light of the slowed expansion of faculty. Yet Gordon said that the richness of the program of study at Yale “is something to boast about,” as it shows the variety of paths to a liberal arts education that the University offers its students. He added that Yale College should not only conform to the changes in research and education, but should also “take the lead in exploring and developing them.” Contact LORENZO LIGATO at lorenzo.ligato@yale.edu .

R E C E N T LY APPROVED MAJORS ETHNICITY, RACE AND MIGRATION (STANDALONE)

2012

GLOBAL AFFAIRS

2010

MODERN MIDDLE EAST STUDIES

2008

COMPUTING AND THE ARTS

2008

SOUTH ASIAN STUDIES

2007


YALE DAILY NEWS ¡ MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 ¡ yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“Spock, you are fully capable of deciding your own destiny. The question is: Which path will you choose? This is something only you can decide.� SAREK “STAR TREK�

‘Harold and Kumar’ star reflects on heritage BY CAROLINE TAN STAFF REPORTER Actor John Cho — famous for his role as Harold Lee in the “Harold and Kumar� films — discussed the intersection of acting and Asian-American identity Saturday evening. Cho, who has also appeared in “Star Trek� and “American Pie,� said he has always practiced a policy of “not doing stereotypical parts� that typecast Asian-Americans. He told anecdotes from his childhood and talked about his Korean heritage in front of more than 200 students in the Berkeley College dining hall as part of the Asian American Cultural Center’s annual celebration of Asian Pacific-American Heritage Month. Recounting his early acting days as a student at the Uni-

versity of California, Berkeley, in the 1990s, Cho said he did not expect to pursue acting, though he “really enjoyed� his time acting in student plays. Cho said those productions introduced him to Asian-American actors in the entertainment industry, which he said became important in shaping his own career. “It’s so important to see someone who looks like you doing it,� Cho said. “It’s something our brain needs, to see someone who looks like us doing something to convince us that something is possible.� Cho said he thinks he was “kind of preoccupied� with his racial identity in college, an attitude he said is less common among college students today. He said cultural identity has become “much more fluid� in recent years and that students now identify not

just by their ethnicity, but also by other factors such as their extracurricular activities and gender. While Cho said his Korean background has given him a sense of resilience, he added that he thinks it is “healthy to jumble your identity.�

It’s so important to see someone who looks like you doing it. It’s something our brain needs‌ to convince us that something is possible. JOHN CHO Actor Since he began acting, Cho said

the “demand� for Asian-American actors has changed as the entertainment industry has recognized the “purchasing power� of AsianAmericans. He added that he has noticed many more Asian-Americans on television — particularly in commercials — than before. Berkeley College Master Marvin Chun said in his introduction that he “jumped� at the opportunity to invite Cho to Yale. Chun said after the talk that he was “impressed� by Cho’s ability to tie together his American and Korean identities. Asian American Cultural Center Dean Saveena Dhall said Saturday’s event — the 10th annual dinner it has hosted to celebrate Asian Pacific-American Heritage Month — marked the first time the center has had to limit registration for a dinner to undergraduates. The center has also never had an event reach capacity just one day after

registration opened, she added. Kevin Chen ’14, who attended the event, said he was encouraged by Cho’s message that AsianAmerican students do not need to focus their careers on their identity in order to promote their cultural community. Karmen Cheung ’13, head coordinator for the Asian American Cultural Center, said she was excited about Cho’s talk because he is a prominent figure in both the acting and Asian-American communities. “[Cho] is not an Asian-American actor,� she said. “He’s an actor who’s also Asian-American.� The event was organized by the Asian American Cultural Center and the Berkeley College Master’s Office. Contact CAROLINE TAN at caroline.tan@yale.edu .

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PAGE 6

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

183

Days that Occupy New Haven has spent on the Green

According to the Occupy New Haven website, the movement has occupied the New Haven Green for 183 days and celebrated its sixth-month anniversary on April 15.

Eliasson, Gonzalez to enter runoff YCC ELECTION FROM PAGE 1 under scrutiny contradicts the information packet distributed to candidates, which states that “any candidate who receives a plurality of the votes and at least five percent votes more than the nearest candidate will

be declared the winner.” Since Gonzalez led by a margin of 9.06 percent, he won the election by the standards in the information packet. “We apologize for the oversight in the election rules,” the Elections Committee wrote in the Saturday email. “We assure

you that appropriate measures will be taken to eliminate this discrepancy moving forward.” Gonzalez told the News on Saturday that he is “a little disappointed” with the decision to hold a runoff and that the Elections Committee should have upheld the initial result in part

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

John Gonzalez ’14 received a call Friday night informing him that he had won the election for YCC president, only to hear later that he would face Eric Eliasson ’14 in a runoff election this week.

Occupy awaits ruling on appeal OCCUPY FROM PAGE 1 fully received a last-minute stay from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York, and city officials were forced to allow protesters to stay for at least another week. A hearing before the appeals court is set for Tuesday at 10 a.m. to determine, again, whether the city can proceed with removing the encampment. Mayor John DeStefano Jr. pledged to fight protesters in court for the “interests of the city,” which he defined as clearing the space to be used for all New Haven residents.

I don’t think it’s appropriate for a few to monopolize one of the central assets of the city — the people of New Haven deserve the New Haven Green back. JOHN DESTEFANO JR. Mayor, New Haven “In the six months that the Occupy encampment has existed on the Green, the city has acted in a cooperative and supportive fashion in terms of free speech,” DeStefano said at an afternoon press conference following the announcement of Kravitz’s ruling. “But this has become an obnoxious use on the Green by a few people. I don’t think it’s appropriate for a few to monopolize one of the central assets of the city — the people of New Haven deserve the New Haven Green back.” Chief Administrative Officer Robert Smuts ’01 estimated that Occupy New Haven has cost the city over $60,000 in police overtime since the protest began, in addition to nearly $2,000 per month spent on bathroom facilities and trash services for the encampment. The cost to clean up and rehabilitate the Green, he estimated, could be as high as $25,000 after the encampment leaves, which could leave the total price tag for Occupy around $100,000. Josh Smith, who has been involved with Occupy New Haven since October and is one of eight plaintiffs listed in the court case against the city, posted on the group’s Facebook page last Wednesday asking fellow protesters to consider

leaving the Green following the six-month anniversary celebration. Occupy New Haven’s real enemy, he reminded his fellow protesters, is the “1 percent,” not the city or the police, and he said he would drop his name from the case. “Six months is longer than any other occupation made it, and that is a formidable victory,” Smith wrote. “I think we stand to regain a lot of our supporters (and gain more supporters) if we pack up the camp and make sure the Green gets cleaned up.” But at a weekly general assembly meeting that night, none of the other protesters sided with Smith. He later posted on the Facebook page that somebody had called him a “traitor” for making the suggestion. Protesters’ ability to stay on the Green will hinge on Tuesday’s court decision. If the city is granted legal authority to remove protesters, it will be the third time city workers have tried to evict Occupy New Haven in a month, following last week’s stalled eviction and the city’s first attempt in March. Occupy protesters initially enjoyed a cooperative relationship with City Hall when it arrived last fall. With the arrival of warmer temperatures, however, city officials and the Green’s legal proprietors — a private group that has perpetuated itself since 17th century — said they were concerned that Occupy’s presence on the Green was hindering the ability of other residents to use the space. They also cited concerns that the encampment could cause long-term damage to the Green. After two February meetings between city officials and protesters failed to reach a compromise, city officials issued a notice that the Green would have to be cleared of tents by March 14. But following a last-minute lawsuit by Pattis, federal judge Janet Hall gave Occupy protesters permission to remain on the Green through March 28, when Kravitz heard the case. Kravitz then extended Occupy’s deadline to stay on the Green a second time to last week in order to give himself time to issue a decision, which the court of appeals will review on Tuesday. Occupy New Haven, a branch of the international anti-economic-inequality Occupy protest movement, is the oldest surviving Occupy encampment in New England. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu .

because the information packet states different rules. He added that he will use the runoff as an opportunity to reach out to people whom he was not able to contact during the campaign, but he added that he hopes the student body will not get “tired out” by the extended election. Eliasson said he thinks the runoff will be determined in large part by former supporters of Cristo Liautaud ’14, who came in third place with 29.47 percent of the vote. “There are a lot of students that had voted for Cristo, and I think the student body will divide themselves between me and John,” Eliasson said. “It comes down to showing them what the differences in our platforms are.” Liautaud told the News Sunday night that he will not endorse Gonzalez or Eliasson. He met with both candidates after the initial election, he said, and they both displayed “openmindedness” in agreeing to pursue objectives and priorities in his platform if elected. Newly elected YCC Events Director Bryan Epps ’14 and Vice President Debby Abramov ’14 said they will not endorse either candidate. “I think we’d all like an e-board that gets along from

the beginning and hasn’t picked favorites from the beginning,” Abramov said. Njie said the candidates will still be able to campaign, though they must abide by a new rule that prohibits use of email mailing lists to “cut down on the amount of email spam.” Several times in the past few years, runoffs have not taken places in cases when they should have, according to the YCC constitution. During the 2010 elections, for example, there was no runoff held when Njie won the Sophomore Class Council presidential election with 33.44 percent of the vote — only 8.09 percent more than the next candidate. In 2007, there was no runoff after Joshua Tan ’09 won a three-way race for UOFC chair with 37.61 percent of the vote, while the second-place candidate captured 32.41 percent of the vote. There will also be a runoff for the Undergraduate Organizations Funding Committee chair between Aly Moore ’14 and Bobby Dresser ’14, who won 45.91 and 44.71 percent of the vote, respectively. Both runoff elections will take place from 9 a.m. Monday to 11:59 p.m. Tuesday. In each election, the candidate who receives the most votes will be

YC C E L E C T I O N R E S U LT S PRESIDENT

John Gonzalez, 39.8% Eric Eliasson, 30.7% Cristo Liautaud, 29.5% VICE PRESIDENT

Debby Abramov, 58.3% Daryl Hok, 41.7% SECRETARY

Leandro Leviste, 61.5% Kyle Tramonte, 38.5% TREASURER

Joseph Yagoda, 69.8% Nathan Kohrman, 30.3% EVENTS DIRECTOR

Bryan Epps, 63.6% Marissa Pettit, 36.4% UOFC CHAIR

Aly Moore, 45.9% Bobby Dresser, 44.7% Richard Harris, 9.4%

declared winner. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu and MADELINE MCMAHON at madeline.mcmahon@yale.edu .

Elite image draws applicants ADMISSIONS FROM PAGE 4 and research his options thoroughly. He added that one of his friends would have applied to Yale if not for its low acceptance rate and the eight-school rule. “My friends and I couldn’t just blindly apply to really selective schools to see whether we got in, as this would limit our chances to apply to safer schools,” Plyam said. Brenzel said although many speculate that Yale’s low admissions rates may discourage potential students from applying, he said “it is clear” that the number of applications have continued to grow. He added that the increase in applications has not contributed to a stronger applicant pool within all demographics. “We do not see even growth in the strength of the overall Yale pool, though we do see increased strength within the subgroups on which we have focused hardest: underrepresented minorities and the science and engineering candidates,” he said. Five experts interviewed said the low admissions rates may cause some qualified applicants to matriculate at schools less selective than Yale since they may view those schools as better fitted to their interests. But low acceptance rates would likely still encourage students who prioritize the “Yale brand” and Yale’s “elite image” to apply, they said. “Here’s the danger: Maybe the odds won’t scare off the seekers of the brand, but it might scare off some of the more interesting, intellectual kids or the kids with genuine kindness, because that usually gets lost in the admission process,” said Jon Reider, a college guidance counselor at San Francisco University High School who worked as an admissions officer at Stanford for 15 years. “In other words, the numbers might be gorgeous, and the Board of Trustees will be smiling, but somehow the soul of the place will have begun to drain away.” Hughes said decreasing acceptance rates may require admissions offices to expend extra effort recruiting qualified students who are discouraged by the low chances of admission. “If [admissions rates] get to 3, 4 percent, these schools are going to have a marketing issue,” Hughes said. “They’re going to have to do a lot of massaging in the pre-application stage. They may have to go to certain demographics where really good kids are not submitting applications anymore because they think it’s almost impossible to get in.” Ouwuachi, the guidance counselor from the Westminster Schools who was formerly an admissions officer at Vanderbilt University, said changing incentives for students created by shrinking acceptance rates will require admissions officers to think “more critically” when evaluating applicants. He added that admissions officers need to consider themselves as “sociologists, educators and anthropologists” to ensure that admitted students reflect the values of their schools.

THE VALUE OF ELITENESS

For many students interviewed, the low acceptance rates at Yale and its peer universities serve as signs of institutional strength and prestige, and become markers of personal success for those who are admitted.

Robbie Flatow ’16, a senior at Regis High School in New York City who was admitted early to Yale, said earning admission at a school with a low acceptance rate is often “a point of individual pride.” “The admissions rate of a school is probably still the single statistic or piece of information used most by students to gauge how good a school is,” he said. Still, the majority of 20 high school students and college freshmen interviewed said the admission figures were not determining factors in their college decisions, though they said they used the rates to measure the relative quality of universities. Martin Kiik, a freshman at Harvard who was accepted to Yale, said admissions rates did not affect which colleges he applied to or his ultimate decision to matriculate at Harvard. “I wouldn’t advise anyone to look at these percentages as a metric to decide between colleges,” Kiik said. “There might be something to be said for the wisdom of the crowds, but at the end of the day, it is you who has to spend the next four years living there, not the average applicant.” Admissions rates can also affect students’ evaluations of universities through their influence on university rankings such as the U.S. News and World Report’s annual list of the nation’s “Best Colleges,” which 17 of 20 students interviewed said they consulted when looking at colleges. Yale ranked third on this year’s list of national universities, behind Harvard and Princeton, which tied for first.

Maybe the odds won’t scare off the seekers of the brand, but it might scare off some of the more interesting, intellectual kids or the kids with genuine kindess. JON REIDER College guidance counselor, San Francisco University High School Robert Morse, director of data and research for U.S. News and World Report, said a measure of “student selectivity” — which weighs acceptance rates, admissions tests scores for matriculating students and the proportion of enrolled freshmen who graduated in the top 10 percent of their high school classes — counts for 15 percent of a school’s ranking. Because of the importance that both prospective students and the media place upon admission rates, many colleges seek to lower their acceptance rates by encouraging large numbers of unqualified students to apply, Ehrenberg said. Brenzel told the News last year said the University’s Admissions Office has not pursued a strategy of soliciting more applications merely to inflate Yale’s statistics. “We have… been able to exercise ethical restraint in conducting outreach to students of all backgrounds who are very unlikely to be offered admission here, while at the same time being very aggressive in our targeted outreach efforts,” he

said. “I have been particularly happy with the increases we are seeing in applications from the most competitive minority students, low-income students, science students and international students.”

THE HIGH SCHOOL ‘PRESSURE COOKER’

Though the influx of applications may be requiring admissions offices to change how they evaluate and recruit students, it may be the high school hopefuls who ultimately bear the brunt of the added pressure. Hughes, who has directed Road to College since 2003 and was a senior admissions officer at Harvard for five years before founding his business, said he now regularly consults with the parents of middle school students, who ask about their children’s chances of getting into elite colleges. Hughes added that he thinks there is “not as much room for high-level all-around students” at these schools as there was in the past. “When I talk to my clients, what they understand is that the nature of the competition is changing,” he said. “You need to be a strong student from the start. Families are calling me earlier to talk about what kind of student their child has to be.” When presented with admissions statistics about the nation’s most elite universities, high school students often strategize about what classes or activities will make them appear unique or desirable to college admissions officers, guidance counselors said. Simone Policano ’16, a senior at Hunter College High School who was accepted early to Yale and will attend in the fall, said students at her school feel like they are “fighting an overwhelming battle” in the college admissions process and that they feel compelled to do “whatever looks best for college.” “In a place like Hunter, it’s kind of a pressure cooker,” she said. “You know where everyone is applying, even if you don’t want to know. You walk through the hallways and that’s what people are talking about.” Zach Edelman ’16, a senior at Scarsdale High School who will also attend Yale next year, said the fact that elite universities deny so many qualified applicants suggests that the college admissions process has an element of “arbitrariness,” which leads them to “spend exorbitant amounts of time and money” preparing for college. Beyreis, the college counselor from Cincinnati, said the limited chances of being admitted to elite universities has led students to research, visit and apply to more schools in order to ensure they are accepted “somewhere they would feel happy.” Still, no matter how low the admissions rate goes, many students will continue to play “the lottery” of college admissions. “Since none of us really know what makes admissions choose one student over another, there’s not very much to lose but a lot to gain if things go well,” Katherine Miller ’16, a senior at Hunter College High School who was accepted early to Yale. “So why not take the chance?” Contact ANDREW GIAMBRONE at andrew.giambrone@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

Sunny, with a high near 85. Low of 57. South wind between 5 and 13 mph, with gusts as high as 24 mph. .

WEDNESDAY

High of 76, low of 43.

High of 66, low of 42.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

ON CAMPUS TUESDAY, APRIL 17 4:30 PM “Queer Texts, Queer Times.” Carla Freccero, professor of literature, feminist studies and history of consciousness at the University of California, Santa Cruz, will speak. Queer Rabelais, queer Marguerite, Shakesqueer, queer/early/modern — what is this queer that unsettles definitional stabilities, whether they take the form of the proper name or of a temporal designation? Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), room 208. 5:30 PM “Squaring the Ethical Circle: Zora Neale Hurston as a Doer of Justice.” Katie G. Cannon, professor of Christian ethics at Union Presbyterian Seminary, will give the annual Margaret Lindquist Sorenson Lecture on the topic of Zora Neale Hurston’s journalistic work about a racialized murder case in 1952 and 1953. Sterling Divinity Quadrangle (409 Prospect St.), Niebuhr Hall.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 5:15 PM Brass presents: “From Russia with Love: Music from Eastern Europe.” This concert will feature Slavic music performed by harpist Colleen Potter Thorburn, as well as Modest Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.” Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (121 Wall St.). 6:00 PM “Patterned Poems: Hand-Decorate a Shakespeare Sonnet.” Hand-decorate a Shakespearean sonnet with the Yale Student Guide Art Club. Open to students only. Yale Center for British Art (1080 Chapel St.).

THURSDAY, APRIL 19 7:30 PM “Tribute to Rumi: An Evening of Sufi Whirling & Meditation.” The evening will feature a performance of the “Whirling” meditation by Sh. Bapak Waleed, in honor of the mystical poet Rumi, who lived 800 years ago in Central Asia. The program will include poetry readings, a video presentation, and a selection of spiritual, meditative songs and chants accompanied by traditional music of Central Asia. Saint Thomas More Center (268 Park St.).

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CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Puts behind bars 6 Opera headliners 11 Dairy creature 14 Stan’s sidekick, in old comedy 15 Call forth 16 Hubbub 17 Dish that’s thrown together? 19 Fix a button, say 20 PDQ, in the ICU 21 “__ I a stinker?”: Bugs Bunny 22 Mont Blanc and Monte Rosa 24 Belted out 26 __ B’rith: Jewish org. 27 Phone bk. info 30 Where 6-Across often are when performing 35 Most of 34Down’s surface 37 Sugar suffix 38 Visiting Hollywood, say 39 Protective feature of most power strips 43 Ticklish Muppet 44 Bearded grassland grazer 45 Rib cage locale 46 Wall protector near a room entrance 50 Campfire residue 51 Catches some Z’s 52 Musical work 54 Traveler’s entry document 55 Woman’s sleeveless undergarment, for short 57 Watchman’s order 61 Tasseled headgear 62 One who follows tornadoes ... or an apt description of the starts of 17-, 30-, 39- and 46-Across 65 Get along in years 66 “Casablanca,” for one 67 Protein-building acid 68 Low-quality 69 Make off with

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DOWN 1 Scribbles (down) 2 “That’s __ of hooey!” 3 “Casablanca” heroine 4 Leans to port or to starboard 5 “Get it?” 6 Draw up plans for 7 “Fathers and Sons” novelist Turgenev 8 Chevy’s plug-in hybrid 9 Rap sheet abbr. 10 Some Avis rentals 11 The Volga River flows into it 12 Dedicated poetry 13 “Holy guacamole!” 18 Copenhagen native 23 Not quite timely 25 Skin breakout 26 Uncle Remus title 27 Hard-__: very strict 28 Eye-related prefix 29 Spoke from the pulpit 31 Refresh, as a cup of coffee

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32 Psychic hotline “skill,” briefly 33 Shine 34 Fifth-largest planet 36 Old Greek markets 40 Capt. saluters 41 “__ momento!” 42 Neutral shade 47 Cricks and tics 48 Saddle knob 49 Sweeping in scope

4/16/12

53 Disgrace 54 Folk singer Suzanne 55 Sheltered inlet 56 “The Marriage of Figaro” highlight 58 “In your dreams!” 59 Pre-Easter time 60 City tricked by a wooden horse 61 “Marvy!” 63 Trike rider 64 Actor Holbrook

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YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012· yaledailynews.com

NASDAQ 3,011.33, -44.22

T 10-yr. Bond 2.00%, -0.05

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String of attacks rocks Afghanistan

S&P 500 1,370.26, -17.31

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NATION & WORLD

T Dow Jones 12,849.59, -136.99

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Oil $102.22, -0.61

T Euro $1.3027, -0.0050

Obama promises ‘rigorous’ review of Secret Service BY JIM KUHNHENN ASSOCIATED PRESS

AHMAD JAMSHID/ASSOCIATED PRESS

A NATO soldier runs to the scene of an attack in Kabul, Afghanistan on Sunday. The Taliban launched a series of coordinated attacks on at least seven sites across the Afghan capital on Sunday. BY HEIDI VOGT AND RAHIM FAIEZ ASSOCIATED PRESS KABUL, Afghanistan — Taliban insurgents struck the heart of the Afghan capital and three eastern cities Sunday, firing automatic weapons and grenades at embassies, government buildings and NATO bases as they launched the spring fighting season with the boldest and most complex assault in years. The multi-pronged attacks show the Taliban and their allies are far from beaten and underscored the security challenge facing government forces as U.S. and NATO forces draw down. The majority of international combat troops are scheduled to leave by the end of 2014. The first blasts rocked the diplomatic quarter of Kabul on Sunday afternoon, and soon gunshots and rocket-propelled grenade fire were ringing out across the city.

Smoke rose over the skyline as sirens wailed. A loudspeaker at the U.S. Embassy could be heard barking: “Duck and cover. Move away from the windows.” One police officer and 17 militants were killed in the attacks, the most widespread in the Afghan capital since an assault on the U.S. Embassy and NATO headquarters last September blamed on the Haqqani network, a Pakistan-based insurgent group allied with the Taliban. Fighting continued more than 12 hours after the first blasts, with explosions echoing into the night. The sophistication and firepower of the latest strikes, as well as the high-profile government and foreign targets, bore the hallmarks of the attack last fall and others carried out by Haqqani insurgents. As in the earlier attack, armed insurgents took over half-built buildings Sunday and used them

to fire down on nearby embassies and bases. In the streets of Kabul’s Wazir Akbar Khan neighborhood, where a NATO base and a number of embassies, including the U.S. Embassy, are located, residents scrambled for cover as gunfire rained down from all directions. “I saw two Land Cruisers pull up and two militants jumped from the car,” said Mohammad Zakar, a 27-year-old mechanic who has a shop near the building commandeered by the militants. “They opened fire on an intelligence service guard ... They also fired and killed an Afghan policeman and then they jumped into the building. All the shops closed. I ran away.” Across town at the parliament building, insurgents climbed to the upper floors of another empty building and fired on lawmakers below. A few legislators climbed on the roof of the parliament and fired back.

CARTAGENA, Colombia — President Barack Obama says he expects the investigation of Secret Service misconduct in Colombia to be thorough and rigorous, and says he will “be angry” if the allegations turn out to be true. The scandal involving Secret Service agents and prostitutes overshadowed Obama’s diplomatic work at a major summit this weekend in Colombia. The alleged misconduct took place before Obama arrived. Eleven Secret Service agents were sent home. Five U.S. military service members were also alleged to have been involved in the incident. Obama said the men and women of the Secret Service perform extraordinary service for him, his family and U.S. officials. He never directly mentioned the prostitution allegations but alluded to them, saying “of course I’ll be angry” if they are proven true. The scandal that has overshadowed Obama’s diplomatic mission in Latin American probably isn’t an isolated incident, and the agency should ensure it doesn’t happen again, a leading House Republican said Sunday California Rep. Darrell Issa, chairman of a House investigative panel, said he wasn’t certain whether Congress would hold hearings on the misconduct. But lawmakers will be looking “over the shoulder” of the Secret Service, he said, to make sure that the agency’s method for training and screening agents isn’t endangering the nation’s VIPs. “Things like this don’t happen once if they didn’t happen before,” said Issa, who leads the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. Eleven Secret Service employees are on administrative leave for misconduct and five service members assigned to work with the agency are confined to quarters amid allegations that a group of personnel partied with prostitutes before Obama arrived in Colombia for the weekend summit with Latin American leaders. Obama, who hasn’t addressed the scandal publicly, could make his first comments about it during a late afternoon news conference Sun-

FERNANDO LLANO/ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S. secret service agents in Cartagena, Colombia, prior to the opening ceremony of the sixth Summit of the Americas. day in Cartagena with Colombia’s president. White House spokesman Jay Carney has dismissed suggestions that the incident had distracted the president. “I think it’s been much more of a distraction for the press,” Carney said Saturday. “He’s here engaging in the business that he came here to do with the assembled leaders of the Americas.” Issa told CBS’ “Face the Nation” that lawmakers are trying to confirm the precise number of U.S. personnel involved in the scandal. He said the number could be higher than initially thought. Of primary concern, he said, was that agents who behave badly are vulnerable to blackmail and therefore risk the security of the president and others under their protection.


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

AROUND THE IVIES

The Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs The Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University prepares its students for careers in public service, especially in government. It offers a multidisciplinary public and international affairs major for undergraduates, and a master’s in public affairs, master’s in public policy and doctoral program for graduate students.

T H E D A I LY P R I N C E T O N I A N

T H E D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

Mullen to teach seminar in fall

Penn security officers to unionize

BY COURTNEY BALGOBIN CONTRIBUTING WRITER The former highest-ranking official in the American Armed Forces, Admiral Mike Mullen, will join the Wilson School faculty next semester. Mullen, who served 43 years in the United States Navy and rose to become chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will teach WWS 318: U.S. Military and National and International Diplomacy, an undergraduate seminar which will be offered next fall. Upon his retirement last September, Mullen was presented with many potential jobs, Stephen Kotkin, vice dean of the Wilson School, said in an email. But Kotkin said the Wilson School recruited Mullen “vigorously” and secured him as the Charles and Marie Robertson Visiting Professor. “Several of our faculty were deeply involved and evidently persuasive, particularly about Princeton’s commitment to teaching and to undergraduate education,” he said. Mullen could not be reached for comment. Mullen began as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in 2007. Prior to holding that position, Mullen served as commander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe, commander of the Allied Joint Force Command Naples and the 32nd vice chief of Naval Operations. “He will bring an unparalleled wealth of knowledge and experience to the classroom,” Kotkin said. As the president’s top military advisor, Mullen was particularly attentive to diplomacy and military affairs, Kotkin said. Mullen oversaw the escalation of American involvement in Afghanistan as well as the drawdown of American involvement in Iraq. Four months before retiring from the post, Mullen advised the

BY ANNA PAN STAFF WRITER

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Admiral Mike Mullen, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, will teach an undergraduate seminar on the military and diplomacy next year. operation that killed Osama bin Laden. W i l s o n School professor Wolfga n g Da n speckgruber, foundPRINCETON the ing director of the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination, said he was in conversation with Mullen’s staff about inviting the admiral to a LISD colloquium in Europe next week. Danspeckgruber praised Mullen’s “wisdom,” calling him “one of the world’s most unique representatives of the military profession.”

“For me, he has consistently stood for the best of the United States military,” he said. “There can be nothing better than to have him teach our students and interact with our faculty at Princeton. I have been eager to get him to LISD and [the Wilson School]. I am truly delighted about Admiral Mullen’s coming,” he added. Frank von Hippel, former assistant director for National Security in the White House Office of Science and Technology and now a professor in the Wilson School, also praised Mullen’s appointment. “I respect Admiral Mullen and am sure that the Wilson School’s students will benefit from his presence,” he said.

AlliedBarton security guards at Penn voted late Wednesday night to join the Philadelphia Security Officers Union in a landslide 72-2 vote. PennWalk and Penn Park officers, who are employed by AlliedBarton, are protesting poor working conditions, unfair promotions and insufficient health insurance benefits. As a union, the officers and PSOU are legally allowed to negotiate with the national security officer company. Corey Dowdle, an AlliedBarton officer who has been at Penn for three years, is stunned by the overwhelming support for the union. He and several others have been leading the movement to unionize. “I knew it was going to be big based on the positive reinforcement we got from everybody, but I had no idea it would win by this margin,” he said. “It’s absolutely astonishing.” PSOU president Dynnita Bryant is also thrilled at the result. “I’m so happy that the University of Pennsylvania wanted to join us. This means we can make a difference in their workplace and do collective bargaining units with our own management. We don’t need an outsider to come in and fight our battles.” PSOU currently consists of about 230 security officers from the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Penn’s Landing and Delaware River Offices, according to Bryant. An emailed statement from AlliedBarton said the company is “pleased that the procedure set forth by the National Labor Relations Board resulted in an election process that allowed officers in the applicable unit to vote his or her choice for union representation.” The University said its administration is not involved in the negotations between AlliedBarton and the security officers. “We recognize the rights of workers to organize under current laws governed by the National Labor Relations Board, but we do not intervene between a company’s management and its employees,” Executive Vice President Craig Carnaroli said. Over the past month and a half, the security officers have been declaring their intent to

unionize through a series of rallies. They have been trying to garner community support. The Student Labor Action Project showed their support for the officers’ efforts by collecting 84 signatures PENN in a petition. The security officers are protesting their health insurance package provided by PanAmerican Life Insurance Group and the sick day policy — one every year for up to three years. AlliedBarton spokesperson Larry Rubin said “AlliedBarton Security Services does not comment on personnel matters in order to maintain the confidentiality and protection of our employees.” With regards to health insurance, the company wrote that, “We offer comprehensive benefits packages to our employees.”

DAN NESSENSON/THE DAILY PENNSYLVANIAN

Penn AlliedBarton officers are fighting for better worker rights, such as more sick days.


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS 路 MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012路 yaledailynews.com

THROUGH THE LENS

F

or some stressed Stilesians, relief from the pressure of Yale academic life came in the form of ducks, goats, bunnies, and chicks at the second annual Stiles Petting Zoo this Saturday. Staff photographer VICTORIA BURNSIDE CLAPP reports.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Miami 93 New York 85

RUGBY Saracens 28 London Irish 19

SPORTS QUICK HITS

JEFFREY HATTEN ’12 -4 FINISH AT PRINCETON INVITE The men’s golf team took first place this weekend at the Princeton Invitational for the third year in a row. Hatten led the Bulldogs with his second place individual finish in the tournament. The Elis had a total score of 858. See tomorrow’s paper for the full story.

NBA Orlando 100 Cleveland 84

NBA Boston 94 Charlotte 82

NHL Philadelphia 8 Pittsburgh 4

MONDAY “We were able to score as many goals as we did because we made hustle plays and scored blue collar goals.” MATT GIBSON ’12 ATTACKMAN, M. LACROSSE

WOMEN’S SAILING ELIS TAKE TENTH IN NEW LONDON The No. 3 women’s sailing team finished in tenth at the Emily Wick Trophy this weekend. The regatta, which was hosted by the Coast Guard Academy, had a total of 17 schools competing. Next weekend, Yale will compete in a national championship qualifier.

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

BULLDOGS CLINCH IVY TOURNEY SPOT

It took four overtimes to separate the teams, but Yale outlasted Brown in a four-overtime marathon on Friday, 11-10. Deron Dempster ’13 scored the game-winner. PAGE B3 BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The men’s lacrosse team’s victory against Brown on Friday was its fourth straight win. After suffering a string of four straight losses earlier in the season, the Elis have now clinched a spot in the Ivy League tournament.

W. tennis sweeps New York BY JOSEPH ROSENBERG STAFF REPORTER The No. 28 Bulldogs (16–3, 4–0 Ivy) ruled the Empire State this weekend by defeating Columbia (12–5, 3–2 Ivy) and Cornell (9–8, 1–4 Ivy). The victories stretched the Elis’ winning streak to six, matching their largest of the season. On Saturday, Yale eased past

Columbia 5–2. The Elis secured the four points necessary to win the match before Columbia tallied its first.

W. TENNIS For the 17th time in 18 matches, the Bulldogs won the doubles point to jump out to a 1–0 lead. At No. 2, the 86th-ranked pair of Elizabeth Epstein ’13 and Annie

Sullivan ’14 made quick work of its opponents, 8–1. Shortly thereafter, Yale wrapped up the doubles point at No. 3 with Blair Seideman ’14 and captain Stephanie Kent ’12 winning 8–4. At No. 1, the 75thranked duo of Amber Li ’15 and Vicky Brook ’12 fell 8–5. Once again up 1–0, the Elis quickly achieved the three additional points they needed for the win. Playing at No. 6, Sullivan

bulldozed her opponent 6–1, 6–0 for the second point. Brook continued the onslaught at No. 4, where she won 6–1, 6–3. Including her 6–2, 6–1 demolition on Sunday, Brook moved to 9–1 in her last 10 matches. “I’ve found a happy medium with my game,” Brook said. “Also there’s the element of this being my last season. I’m taking the court with a happy and positive

Elis salvage split with Crimson BY CHARLES CONDRO STAFF REPORTER The Yale-Harvard rivalry lived up to its billing this weekend with four games decided by a total of five runs as Yale earned a split of its series with Harvard.

Seventeen minutes into the first half, captain Caroline Crow ’12 sprinted across the field to bring the Bulldogs into the lead against Columbia. The offensive run began when attacker Jen DeVito ’14 passed to fellow attacker Devon Rhodes ’13, who passed back to DeVito. After shaking off the opponent’s defense, DeVito spotted an opportunity and quickly assisted Crow, who rushed past the remaining defenders to blast a shot that shook the Lions’ net. The scoreboard shifted to 4–3 and the flow of the game turned in Yale’s favor.

In the first game of the series Yale (8–26–1, 2–10 Ivy) finally broke its 12-game losing streak with a 3–2 eight-inning walkoff victory, but Harvard (8–25, 4–8 Ivy) forced a split of the Saturday doubleheader by holding off the Elis 7–6 in nine innings. “The split was good for us,” outfielder Charlie Neil ’12 said. “It was fun weekend. [It was] a combo of close games and our biggest rival.”

YDN

The baseball team ended its 12-game losing streak with two wins against Harvard over the weekend.

STAT OF THE DAY 20

their matches. The closest was at No. 1, where Li and Brook won 8–4. In singles, only Hanna Yu’s ’15 match went into three sets. Playing at No. 3, Yu dropped the first set 6–3 to her opponent, Ryann Young. She stormed back to take the second set 6–4 before winning the third set tiebreaker 10–7 SEE W. TENNIS PAGE B2

Seniors dash past Lions BY EUGENE JUNG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

BASEBALL

SEE BASEBALL PAGE B2

frame of mind, making the most of my last opportunity out here. I’ve been having a ton of fun, and it’s reflecting in my game.” Kent sealed the match victory at No. 5 with a 6–2, 6–3 straightset win. On Sunday, Yale swept past the Big Red, 7–0. The Bulldogs took their usual 1–0 advantage by winning the doubles point. All three pairs won

W. LACROSSE Yale would go on to beat

Columbia 13–9 and maintained the lead for the rest of the game. Crow led the team with five goals. “I am really proud of our team since we all played well and gave it our best effort,” attacker Meghan Murray ’14 said. After suffering through four straight conference losses, the Bulldogs (4–8, 1–4 Ivy) took their first Ivy win and secured seventh place. The Lions (2–10, 0–6 Ivy), on the other hand, slipped to eighth. Head coach Anne Phillips said Columbia was a tenacious team that was very difficult to put away. Nevertheless, the Bulldogs celebrated Senior Day, which honored Crow and goalkeeper Whitney Quackenbush ’12, with a victory in front roughly 400 SEE W. LACROSSE PAGE B3

THE NUMBER OF SHOTS THE BROWN AND YALE MEN’S LACROSSE TEAMS TOOK OVER THE COURSE OF FOUR OVERTIME PERIODS BEFORE ATTACKMAN DERON DEMPSTER ’13 SCORED THE GAME-WINNING GOAL. The Elis return to play tonight against Stony Brook.


PAGE B2

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Dodgers celebrate Jackie Robinson with triple play, win

Tied 4–4 in the top of the ninth against the San Diego Padres Sunday, Los Angeles turned a bizarre triple play to end the inning. The Dodgers rode that momentum into the bottom of the inning. when Dee Gordon singled home the winning run. The win gave Los Angeles a 9–1 record, the best mark in the MLB.

Baseball ends losing streak BASEBALL FROM PAGE B1 Pitcher Chris O’Hare ’13 held the Crimson to one earned run in seven innings of work to force extra innings. He did allow Harvard to take a one-run lead in the top of the seventh, but Neil tied the game with a bases-loaded sacrifice fly. After Eric Schultz ’13 pitched a scoreless eighth, outfielder Joe Lubanski ’15 led off the bottom of the inning with a triple and scored the winning run on second baseman Jacob Hunter’s ’14 sacrifice fly.

The split was good for us. It was a fun weekend. [It was] a combo of close games and our biggest rival. CHARLIE NEIL ’12 Outfielder

The momentum did not carry into the second game for the Blue and White, as the Crimson blotted out Yale’s short-lived winning streak by scoring seven runs in the first five innings. The Bulldogs stormed back with a four-run sixth inning to pull within one but would get no closer. Yale took a 3–0 lead in the first game of Sunday’s twin billing but was unable to hold on as the Cantabs stole the game in eight innings 4–3. Cantab starter Matt Timoney lasted just two-thirds of an inning before the Elis knocked him out of the game. Reliever Baron Davis shut down Yale’s bats for 4.2 innings, allowing Harvard to tie the game with three runs off Pat Ludwig ’12 in the sixth. Harvard took the lead in extra innings when Hunter’s two-out

error allowed second baseman Jeff Reynolds to score with the decisive run. Ludwig took his fourth loss of the season despite striking out eight over as many innings and allowing just two earned runs. “Pat [Ludwig] is going to get drafted at the end of the year,” first baseman Kevin Fortunato ’14 said. “[Our starting pitchers] are the best in the league … We have four number ones on our team.” Hunter made up for his miscue in the second game with a double to lead off the bottom of the eighth that sparked Yale’s two-run rally. Fortunato plated Hunter with a double of his own. “It was pretty funny actually,” Fortunato said. “I went up to Jake [Hunter] and said to him ‘How do you want to do this?’ and he said, ‘Back-to-back doubles.’ It’s funny that it actually happened that way.” Fortunato came around to score himself on a sacrifice bunt by Neil. The RBI was Neil’s seventh on the weekend. He drove in at least one run in all four games against the Cantabs. As he has been all season, shortstop Cale Hanson ’14 continued to stay hot this weekend. He hit .438 (7–16) for the series as he extended his Ivy Leagueleading on-base streak to 33 consecutive games. The Bulldogs are now five games out of first place in the Red Rolfe division of the Ivy League. Dartmouth (12–15, 7–5 Ivy) took three of four against Brown (7–24, 4–8 Ivy). Yale will be at home tomorrow against Sacred Heart (11– 23, 7–5 Northeast Conference) for a nine-inning game. Contact CHARLES CONDRO at charles.condro@yale.edu .

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0

3

Bulldogs slam Lions W. LACROSSE FROM PAGE B1 spectators at Reese Stadium. “These two seniors have played huge roles for this team over the past four years, and they did a tremendous job against Columbia,” head coach Anne Phillips said. Crow’s scoring rampage began just 40 seconds after the face-off. After a slow break transition, DeVito passed the ball to Crow, positioned right behind Rhodes. The captain then quickly moved past her would-be blockers and stormed into the Lions’ zone for a goal. Both teams exchanged goals for the next 17 minutes, with Columbia scoring three and the Elis adding two more, including a powerful eight-meter free position shot goal from midfielder Christina Doherty ’15. The tie broke in Yale’s favor when Crow recorded her hat trick, and the Elis controlled the game for the remainder of the first half. Rhodes also played a significant role as she added her 16th and 17th goals of the season, and assisted midfielder Erin Magnuson ’15 for the team’s seventh goal. After coming out of the locker room with a 7–4 record, the Elis continued to dominate the first three minutes of the second half. Crow initiated the half’s scoring with her fourth goal only 17 seconds after the face-off. Then midfielder Cathryn Avallone ’15 took the draw control, and within 10 seconds, midfielder Riley Foote’s ’15 shot found the Lions’ net, followed by yet another splendid goal from attacker Kerri Fleishhacker ’15. “We created a lot of great scoring opportunities for ourselves and capitalized on them,” Rhodes said. However, Yale’s scoring slew slowed down a bit as the Lions scored two goals in the following two minutes. Although Fleishhacker suppressed Columbia’s resurgence by adding her second goal of the game, the Lions quickly recovered and added three more goals within three minutes to bring the goal gap down to two. The Bulldogs responded by stepping up their offense’s aggression, but their shots kept going just shy of the goal and deflecting off the goalposts. The string of bad luck ended when the Elis’ captain again emerged to regain the offensive drive and widen the lead again. With only six minutes remaining until the whistle, Rhodes passed to a wide-open Crow, who shot without hesitation deep into the upper side of Columbia’s net. Although the Lions tried desperately to recuperate the deficit, goalie Quackenbush disappointed the visitors. With 2:35 remaining, as Columbia’s lead scorer Kaci Johnson rushed from the backside of the net and pulled off an unexpected powerful shot, Quackenbush went low for a superb block. The save effectively ended all hopes of recovery for the Lions, and Avallone sealed the game by scoring the match’s last goal for Yale.

We created a lot of great scoring opportunities for ourselves and capitalized on them. DEVON RHODES ’13 Attack, women’s lacrosse “It was great that we were able to come up with a win for our seniors who have given so much to the team the past four years,” Murray said. Besides scoring, the Bulldogs over-

MLB honors Jackie Robinson BY BEN WALKER ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — LaTroy Hawkins has heard the stories from his 87-yearold grandfather, about his days of picking cotton in Mississippi, about the times when there were no black players in big league baseball. And about what it meant when Jackie Robinson broke the game’s color barrier. “Without Jackie, I wouldn’t be in front of you,” the Los Angeles Angels pitcher told several dozen kids at a Bronx ballfield Sunday. “Jackie’s role in my life has been tremendous.” From Dodger Stadium to Fenway Park, there were ceremonies as Major League Baseball honored Robinson and his legacy. Video tributes and on-field celebrations at every ballpark included his family, his former teammates, players from the Negro Leagues, NBA great Bill Russell and members of the Tuskegee Airmen. Players, managers, coaches and umpires all wore No. 42 on Jackie Robinson Day to remember the 65th anniversary of the day the future Hall of Famer first took the field with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947. Markers on

each base noted the occasion. Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson, Hawkins and several former players joined Robinson’s daughter, Sharon, at a youth clinic in a park where the old Yankee Stadium stood. Rachel Robinson, Jackie’s wife, and her family were set to take part in a tribute across the street Sunday night before the Angels played the New York Yankees. Hawkins noted the dwindling percentage of black players in the big leaguers. There were only 8.5 percent on opening day in 2011 — there were twice as many in 1990 when the Richard Lapchick’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports at the University of Central Florida started tracking the number. Hawkins thanked his granddad for always steering him toward baseball instead of basketball and encouraged parents to do the same. He also said colleges could help by offering fouryear baseball scholarships. “Play the game,” Hawkins said. Asked whether he thought MLB would ever again achieve a high population of black players, he said: “Anything’s possible.” Jackson recalled his days in the

minor leagues, where he was not allowed to stay in the same hotels or eat in the same restaurants as his teammates. He said he sometimes spent the night on the couch at the apartments of Rollie Fingers, Joe Rudi, Dave Duncan and others. “It was a very embarrassing time in your life,” he said. Jackson paused to “to remember what it was like, what I went through” and reflected on the likes of Roy Campanella and Don Newcombe, black players who followed Robinson to the Dodgers. “He represented all of us,” Jackson said. “I really feel he represented black and white.” Newcombe and former Los Angeles star Tommy Davis threw out ceremonial first pitches at Dodger Stadium before the game against San Diego. Hall of Fame Dodgers announcer Vin Scully, who had missed five games because of a bad cold, returned to the broadcast booth. Scully, now 84, called Brooklyn games for more than seven years when Robinson played. “All I want to do is think about the game and Jackie and how grateful I am to be back,” Scully said.

EUGENE JUNG/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Caroline Crow ’12 celebrated Senior Day with five goals against Columbia. whelmed the Lions in every aspect, especially with ball possession, which was the pivotal component to the team’s precious win. Whereas it is usually Doherty or midfielder Sabine van der Linden ’15 who are given charge of the draws, the Bulldogs this time opted to give that job to Murray, who faced off against the Lions and recorded two more controls. “Columbia’s Kacie Johnson was able to offset van der Linden’s draw so we adjusted and had Meghan Murray draw to herself,” Phillips said. Yale recorded nine more shots (34–25) and one more ground balls (16–15) than the visitors, demonstrating dominance in its offense. “Our offense is multifaceted in that every single player is an offensive threat and that is extremely difficult to defend,” Rhodes said. The defense made a few huge stops, Murray added. Both defender Adrienne Tarver ’14 and defender Kallie Parchman ’14 got some key ground balls, and defender Ashley McCormick ’14 and defender Katherine Sherrill ’14 had caused a few turnovers, which pushed the ball up to the attack in transition. Yale also outdid Columbia in clears (18–13), and although the visitors

recorded more saves, the home team’s defense really tightened up its zone, allowing only a few one-on-one situations against the goalkeeper. Quackenbush was then able to effectively serve as the last line of defense at crucial moments and recorded seven saves. Yale is now in seventh place in the Ivies, right behind the Bears because with one more loss. If the Bulldogs take down Brown this Wednesday at 4 p.m. at home, they will move up to sixth. The next place up is currently occupied by tying teams Harvard, Princeton and Cornell with three wins each. “Like Columbia, Brown is a very tenacious team, and we will have to mark closely three Brown attackers and limit their offensive opportunities,” Phillips said. After the game, the Yale squad signed autographs for their fans. Contact EUGENE JUNG at eugene.jung@yale.edu .

YALE 13, COLUMBIA 9 YALE

7

6

13

COLUMBIA

4

5

9

Elis fall to Harvard TRACK & FIELD FROM PAGE B1 114 to 49. Battling injuries, the team had many athletes compete in new events such as the steeple chase and javelin, but the team still pulled off five victories. Captain Matt Bieszard ’12 performed well, taking gold in the 200-meter and 400-meter dashes. He also ran well as member of the 4x400-meter relay team, which also finished first. William Rowe ’15 ran for a personal record and the win in the 400-meter intermediate hurdles with a time of 59.7 seconds. In the throwing events, Mike Levine ’13 shined as usual and took first in the discus with a distance of 51.78 meters, his season best and 1.30 meters farther than his attempt against Princeton last week. Levine also took second in the hammer throw. While not collecting any gold medals in the middle distance events, the Elis also were able to pick up some points. James Shirvell ’14 finished second in the 800-meter race, with John Van Deventer ’12 just behind him in third. The Bull-

dogs also captured silver and bronze in both the 1500-meter run and the 3000meter steeplechase, even though Jacob Sandry ’15 was new to the event. “Obviously this weekend held few bright spots for Yale men’s track and field,” Timothy Hillas ’13 said. “Neither of my races went as planned, and I don’t think I’m alone in having left the track feeling that many of the day’s performances were simply unacceptable.” “But the lesson of the day isn’t that our team is weak or less than fit; we are. Instead we need to refocus and remember that the essence of track is competing, striving and driving for every last inch,” Hillas added. “This team is too talented to underperform like that again.” Hillas took fourth in the 3000-meter run. Next week, the teams will travel to the Larry Ellis Invitational in Princeton, N.J. Contact JORDAN KONELL at jordan.konell@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE B3

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS SIDNEY CROSBY The high-flying Pittsburgh forward joined in the fisticuffs Sunday as the third game of his team’s playoff series with the Philadelphia Flyers descended into chaos. There were 158 penalty minutes assigned in the game as the Flyers won 8–4 to take a 3–0 series lead.

Bulldogs outlast Bears in 4OT

S C O R E S & S TA N D I N G S

MEN’S GOLF IVY

BY JOHN SULLIVAN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Deron Dempster ’13 played the role of hero again Friday night, whipping the ball past Brown goalkeeper Will Round in the fourth overtime period to give the Elis a thrilling 11–10 victory over the Bears.

M. LACROSSE Two weeks ago against Penn, the junior attacker scored the game-winning goal for the Bulldogs (6–4, 3–2 Ivy) with 11.9 seconds remaining in his first game back from injury. That victory snapped a four-game losing streak, and the Elis have not lost since. Friday’s win was the Bulldogs’ fourth in a row and clinched Yale a spot in the Ivy League tournament in May. “We’ve been playing our best lacrosse of the season the last couple games,” attackman Matt Gibson ’12 said, “and we don’t want that to slip away. We have two non-league games coming up, and we’re going to try to use them to build up our momentum so we end up playing at our highest level in May.” Earlier this season the Bulldogs played the longest game in Yale men’s lacrosse history, a heartbreaking five-overtime loss to Princeton. While Friday’s contest did not go quite as long, it lacked none of the excitement of the Princeton game. The overtime periods were riveting back-andforth affairs, featuring 20 shots and 11 saves between the two teams. Attacker Conrad Oberbeck ’15 hit the inside of the post, and Round saved a broken clear for the Bears (4–7, 1–3 Ivy) with an incredible one-on-one stop in the second overtime period. The Yale defense, which conceded eight goals over the second and third quarters, held the Brown offense scoreless for the final 30 minutes of the game.

We’ve been playing our best lacrosse of the season the last couple of games, and we don’t want that to slip away. MATT GIBSON ’12 Attackman, men’s lacrosse “The Princeton game was such a valuable experience,” defenseman Michael McCormack ’13 said. “It taught us how to remain calm and keep our composure when the game went to overtime. [Head] coach [Andy] Shay also has a ‘one-goal drill’ that simulates a one-goal game with the clock winding down. We practice it a lot, and that helped prepare us well for overtime situations.” Round did everything he could to keep Brown in the game and made seven of his 17 saves in overtime, but in the end, Dempster

SCHOOL

W

RANK AVG. SCORE W%

1

Yale

2

151

75.73

66.971

2

Columbia

1

186

75.67

65.102

3

Penn

2

169

75.44

67.536

4

Princeton

0

171

76.11

65.592

5

Harvard

1

200

76.55

53.247

6

Dartmouth

0

209

76.17

50.476

7

Cornell

0

250

78.29

17.702

8

Brown

0

262

79.13

13.375

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

SATURDAY, APR. 15 1st place

SATURDAY, APR. 21 at Century Intercollegiate

SOFTBALL IVY

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

1

Harvard

11

1

.917

24

10

.706

2

Cornell

10

2

.833

19

16

.543

3

Penn

8

4

.667

23

14

.622

4

Princeton

6

6

.500

12

23

.343

5

Brown

5

7

.417

8

20

.286

6

Columbia

4

8

.333

10

25

.286

7

Dartmouth

3

9

.250

10

17

.370

8

Yale

1

11

.083

7

27

.206

LAST WEEK BLAUR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

SUNDAY, APR. 15 Harvard 9, Yale 2

The men’s lacrosse team has two non-conference games before facing Harvard on April 28 in a home contest. and the Bulldogs proved too much for him. Midfielder Dylan Levings ’14 won the face-off to start the fourth overtime, and Yale quickly called time-out. Levings won all four of the face-offs in overtime and finished 18 of 28 for the game. The sophomore was helped out by huge efforts from his wing players, McCormack and captain Michael Pratt ’12. The trio combined to pick up 20 ground balls for the Elis and their dominance helped the team control possession in overtime. After breaking from the timeout, the Bulldogs worked through their offensive sets and fired several shots past the goal before Dempster found himself on the right wing covered by a shortstick defender. Dempster backed his defender down, watching for the slide to come. It never did, and the junior stepped back and fired the ball at the net. The white rubber missile snuck its way past Round and the Eli bench erupted, converging on Dempster at one end and goalkeeper Jack Meyer ’14 at the other. It was Dempster who won the game, but Gibson was the key for the Elis’ offense. The senior is third in the Ivy League in goals per game and tallied five against Brown to lead all scorers. The senior also scooped up six ground balls and caused two turnovers to complement his highest goal-

scoring output of the season. “They were mostly just effort plays,” Gibson said of his scoring output. “I didn’t do anything specific, I wasn’t dissecting the defense, I was just looking to work hard and make plays. We just outworked them as a team. We didn’t get anything going offensively, but we were able to score as many goals as we did because we made hustle plays and scored blue-collar goals.” Gibson seemed to score at will in the first half, finding the net four times in the first 16 minutes of the game. His outburst helped give the Bulldogs a 7–3 lead midway through the second quarter, but the Bears came roaring back. Yale’s defense became sloppy, and the Bulldog offense struggled mightily to create open shots. Brown went on a 6–1 run to come all the way back and take a 9–8 lead with two minutes left in the third quarter. Gibson scored his fifth goal of the game with less than a minute remaining in the quarter to knot the score at nine. This was another effort play — he collected the ball after a broken Brown clear, stepped under two defend-

ers and finished from five yards out. But less than a minute later Brown midfielder Rob Schlesinger put the Bears back up on a miracle shot from midfield right before the buzzer sounded. It was the last time the Bears found the net that day. Oberbeck’s sidearm rip found the net with four minutes to go in the fourth quarter to tie the score at 10, and Dempster sealed the deal. Friday’s game was especially meaningful for the Bulldogs because of the passing this week of Bob McHenry, the former longtime head coach of the Yale men’s lacrosse team. McHenry was a member of both the Connecticut and Pennsylvania Lacrosse Halls of Fame and described by Shay in an email to the Yale Lacrosse Association as “truly one of the nicest people I’ve ever met.” “I have got to think we got a little help from Coach McHenry on this one,” the coach added after the game. The Bulldogs hit the road to take on Stony Brook tonight at 7 p.m. Contact JOHN SULLIVAN at john.j.sullivan@yale.edu .

to claim the match. Against Cornell, Seideman moved up to play at No. 2, where she out-dueled her adversary 6–0, 6–4. On the previous day against Columbia, Seideman had pulled out a tough match at No. 3, 7–6(2), 7–6(7). She stressed the importance of her narrow win, especially after falling just short in a similar match against No. 9 University of Miami (Fla.) in March.

We understand the target really is on our back. We are getting up for every single match. DANIELLE MCNAMARA Head coach, women’s tennis “The second set was mentally a breakthrough for me because I had lost the match in Miami when it was that close,” Seideman, a staff photographer for the News, said. “It was nice to come through like that in an Ivy League match.” In Saturday’s victory against Colum-

WEDNESDAY, APR. 18 at Sacred Heart, 3 p.m.

BASEBALL IVY SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

10

2

.833

24

8

.742

2

Princeton

9

3

.750

16

13

.552

3

Dartmouth

7

5

.583

12

15

.444

4

Penn

6

6

.500

15

16

.484

Columbia

6

6

.500

14

19

.424

Harvard

4

8

.333

8

25

.242

Brown

4

8

.333

7

24

.226

Yale

2

10

.167

8

26

.243

6

8

LAST WEEK

NEXT WEEK

TUESDAY, APR. 17 Yale vs. Sacred Heart, 3:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, APR. 15 Yale 5, Harvard 3

MEN’S LACROSSE IVY

YALE

5

2

2

1

0

0

0

1

11

BROWN

2

4

4

0

0

0

0

0

10

OVERALL

SCHOOL

W

L

%

W

L

%

Cornell

4

0

1.000

9

1

.900

Princeton

4

0

1.000

8

3

.727

3

Yale

3

2

.600

6

4

.600

4

Harvard

2

2

.500

6

6

.500

5

Brown

1

3

.250

4

7

.364

6

Penn

1

4

.200

2

8

.200

Dartmouth

0

4

.000

2

8

.200

1

LAST WEEK

bia, team members stressed the importance of the team’s depth. The match was won with the doubles point and the singles points from No. 4, No. 5, and No. 6. Although Columbia has a very strong line-up for the top positions, the Elis were able to pull out the victory because of a full team effort, top to bottom. The Bulldogs’ two victories were doubly important as No. 48 Brown (16–6, 2–2 Ivy) lost both to Columbia and Cornell. The Bears were considered to be the Elis’ toughest competitors for the Ivy title. While the team was certainly aware that Cornell had beaten Brown on Saturday, that knowledge was not necessarily the impetus for the trouncing of the Big Red. “We were coming into the weekend really excited about both matches regardless,” coach Danielle McNamara said. “We understand the target really is on our back. We are getting up for every single match.” The Bulldogs will be back in action against Harvard at the Cullman-Heyman Tennis Center on Friday, April 20 at 2 p.m. Contact JOSEPH ROSENBERG at joseph.rosenberg@yale.edu .

OVERALL

1

YALE 11, BROWN 10

Elis defeat Lions, Big Red W. TENNIS FROM PAGE B1

NEXT WEEK

NEXT WEEK

MONDAY, APR. 16 Yale at Stony Brook, 7:00 p.m.

FRIDAY, APR. 13 Yale 11, Brown 10 (4OT)

WOMEN’S LACROSSE IVY SCHOOL

W L

%

W L

%

1

Dartmouth

5

0

1.000

9

2

.818

2

Penn

4

1

.800

6

5

.545

3

Cornell

3

2

.600

8

3

.727

4

Harvard

3

2

.600

7

6

.538

5

Princeton

3

2

.600

6

6

.500

6

Brown

1

3

.250

6

5

.545

7

Yale

1

4

.200

4

8

.333

8

Columbia

0

6

.000

2

10

.167

LAST WEEK

HYOON PYO JEON/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Vicky Brook ’12 has gone 9-1 in her last ten matches.

OVERALL

SATURDAY, APRIL 14 Yale 13, Columbia 9

NEXT WEEK

WEDNESDAY, APR. 11 Yale vs. Brown, 4:00 p.m.


PAGE B4

YALE DAILY NEWS · MONDAY, APRIL 16, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

SPORTS

Los Angeles Kings push Vancouver to brink of elimination

Jonathan Quick made 41 saves. Dustin Brown scored in the third period, and the No. 8 seed Kings brought themselves within one win of a shocking playoff sweep of No. 1 Vancouver with a 1–0 victory on Sunday. The Kings have lost in the first round of the playoffs for the past two years, after having missed the playoffs for the eight years before that.

Mixed weekend results for m. tennis BY ADLON ADAMS CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The men’s tennis team fought through a tough weekend, battling rowdy fans and rain during its run for the Ivy League title.

MEN’S TENNIS In the first match of the weekend, Yale (13–8, 2–2 Ivy) upset the No. 37 Columbia Lions 4–3, serving them their first loss in the Ivies. In a disappointing turn of events the next day, Yale struggled to repeat its performance. The Elis became unranked Cornell’s first win in the Ivy League this season with a 4–3 loss. “It was great to beat [Columbia] because it’s great to pull out those close matches,” Patrick Chase ’14 said. “To have them come here after losing to them 4–3 last year and then beat them 4–3 meant a lot.” During the beginning of the match against Columbia (16–4, 3–2 Ivy), it looked as if the Bulldogs would suffer another loss to an Ivy League opponent. Yale lost the first match of the day at No. 1 doubles when the pair of Daniel Hoffman ’13 and Marc Powers ’13 fell 8–2. Captain Erik Blumenkranz ‘12 and Joel Samaha ’12 were next to finish with an 8–3 win at No. 3. The doubles point then fell to the No. 2 pair of Chase and John Huang ’13. During the second set, Columbia suffered a point penalty resulting from their fans cheering during point play, but managed to hold on to the match. The Lions won 9–8 in a close tie-breaker,

ending Yale’s six-point winning streak in doubles. In singles, both teams won three matches each. Team captain Erik Blumenkranz ’12 started off with a decisive win at No. 4, 6–2, 6–0. Columbia took No. 2 in a tight match, after which Huang followed up with a win at No. 1 against No. 96 Haig Schneiderman to bring the match score to 2–2. The two teams then split No. 5 and No. 6, when Kyle Dawson ’13 won at No. 5 and Zach Krumholz ’15 lost at No. 6. The outcome of the match came down to the No. 3 contest. Hoffman defeated his opponent in three sets, extending the total time of the whole match to five hours.

I thought it was a great atmosphere with all [the fans]. That’s what you play for really. JOHN HUANG ’13

“I thought it was a great atmosphere with all [the fans],” Huang said. “That’s what you play for really. It makes it so much more exciting because tennis seems like such a quiet sport.” In a quick turnaround of 24 hours, the Bulldogs had to take on Cornell (8–15, 1–4 Ivy), which before the match was 0–4 in Ivy play. Yale

destroyed the Big Red’s doubles lineup in under an hour, setting the stage for a potential win in the singles round. In singles, Yale struggled to maintain its momentum from the doubles win. Huang came out swinging, defeating his opponent with power and precision 6–2, 6–1 and extending his winning streak to nine consecutive matches. At this point, the Bulldogs were now up 2–0 and only had to win two out of the five remaining matches to win. After the initial singles victory, the match started to fall apart for the Elis. A 30-minute rain delay halted four matches mid-game, but Yale returned to play down a set in three out of the four remaining matches. Yale was not able to recover from falling behind. At No. 3, Hoffman was the only other player to win in singles. Yet again, the match was completed in just under five hours. “I think we came out a little too flat,” Huang said. “Yesterday was a really long match that took a lot out of us. We started off too slowly, and once we were behind it made it really tough to come back. Everyone gave it their best, but it was too late.” Next weekend the Bulldogs will continue Ivy play away against No. 24 Harvard on Friday. After their trip to Boston, Yale will host Dartmouth at home for Senior Day. Hoffman said Harvard will be a good match to win as the team is currently No. 1 in Ivy League standings. On Sunday he hopes to win for the seniors. MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Contact ADLON ADAMS at adlon.adams@yale.edu .

John Huang ’13 beat Columbia’s No. 96 Haig Schneiderman on Saturday. The Elis won 4-3.

Cantabs sweep Bulldogs

W. track falls just short BY JORDAN KONELL STAFF REPORTER After impressive individual performances at the Sam Howell Invitational at Princeton, the Bulldogs traveled to Cambridge where both the men and women’s track teams fell to Harvard.

TRACK AND FIELD The women’s team won seven events on Saturday and accumulated 73 points, just short of the Cantabs’ 89. The scoring margin was the smallest it has been since Yale beat Harvard in 2007. The Bulldogs stood out in the longdistance runs and won all three events. In the 1500-meter run, Nihal Kayali ’13 took first place with a time of 4:28.62, and Sarah Barry ’14 came in second, more than three seconds behind Kayali. “While losing to Harvard is never a palatable experience, I really think our team put out some gutsy performances and stayed within striking distance of Harvard throughout the meet, no doubt putting some fear in the hearts of the Harvard squad,” Kayali said. “I was really excited to have the opportunity to run the 1500 and then double back in

the 3000 to try to scrape a couple more points.” Kayali also placed third in the 3000-meter run, with Liana Epstein ’14 and Elizabeth Marvin ’13 taking gold and silver. The Elis also swept the hurdles, with Emily Cable ’15 taking gold with a time of 1:03.40, followed by Jenna Poggi ’13 in 1:05.17 and Dakota McCoy ’14 in 1:05.69. Both the 4x400-meter and 4x100-meter relays, which included Cable, took gold as well. Captain Alexa Monti ’12, who participated in both relays and took second in the 100-meter dash and third in the 200-meter dash, said that while Harvard came out with the win, the Bulldogs gave them a run for their money. “We gave Harvard a tough battle,” Monti said. “Losing the meet was disappointing, but we were encouraged by how well our team competed as a whole.” Annelies Gamble ’13, who placed third in the 800-meter run, said the meet gives the team “great building block” for later outdoor meets. Despite a valiant effort, the men’s team struggled throughout Saturday and lost to Harvard SEE TRACK & FIELD PAGE B2

HENRY EHRENBERG/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The softball team fell to first-place Harvard in all four games this weekend. BY MASON KROLL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER The women’s softball team was no match for first-place Harvard and fell in all four of its games Saturday and Sunday by considerable margins.

SOFTBALL The Bulldogs (7–27, 1–11 Ivy) took their 14th straight loss and maintained their last-place status in the Ivy League. Over the course of the weekend, the Crimson (24–10, 11–1 Ivy) outscored the Elis by 43 runs. “[The Crimson] had everything to lose. We had nothing to lose. Breaking our losing streak against Harvard would’ve been ideal,” Meg Johnson ’12 said. The mercy rule cut three of the four games played short. Harvard won the first game 11–2 in six innings, the second 14–1 in five innings and the third 15–1 in five innings. But the Bulldogs showed some improvement and the closest game was the final matchup, in which Harvard beat Yale 9–2 after the Bulldogs rallied in the bottom of the sixth inning. Harvard is known especially for its strong pitching staff, including three-time All-Ivy Rachel Brown. Crimson pitchers held Yale scoreless for 19 innings, and Brown only gave up two earned runs over

two games. “We went in with the expectation that we would put some runs on the board and give them a good game,” captain Christy Nelson ’13 said. “But they outhit our pitching.” The Bulldogs struggled on defense as well. Harvard scored multiple runs in 12 of 16 innings and managed to score six runs in an inning twice and seven runs once. Team members said the Bulldogs should have put a stop to these innings early on. “A lot of physical and mental mistakes out there really cost us,” Johnson said. “But again, it’s hard for every team to stay energized when you’re down by 11 runs.” The Bulldogs were also out-staffed by the Crimson. While Yale had 13 able-bodied players, Harvard fielded an average of 17.5 a game. Yale could not afford the luxury of pinch runners and substitutes, and so some team members said the lack of energy was understandable. Taking a step away from the scoreboard, the Bulldogs said they appreciated the opportunity to play their northern rivals. Johnson, in her fourth career HarvardYale game, described the excitement of the matchup. “It’s a dream to play for your fans and family against your archrival,” Johnson said. The Bulldogs have 12 games left this season.

Yale will next face Sacred Heart (16–25) in Fairfield on Wednesday at 3 p.m. Contact MASON KROLL at mason.kroll@yale.edu .

HARVARD 9, YALE 2 HARVD

2

0

0

2

3

2

0

9

YALE

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

2

HARVARD 14, YALE 1 HARVD

1

7

1

4

1

14

YALE

1

0

0

0

0

1

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ANDREW GOBLE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s track team posted its best performance against Harvard in seven years.

Today's Paper  

April 16, 2012

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