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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 112 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

CLOUDY RAINY

45 55

CROSS CAMPUS

DANCE BALLET FINDS ITS FOOTING AT YALE

PAIN AT THE PUMP

THE SILK ROAD

BASKETBALL

Measure to cap state’s gasoline tax has bipartisan support

LIBRARY DATABASE OF EAST ASIA PHOTOS GROWS

Former college star recalls choosing Israel over NBA career

PAGES 6-7 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 NEWS

PAGE 12 SPORTS

Liberal arts enter uncharted territory

They’re back. Two men were spotted on Cross Campus on Tuesday, shouting about salvation and wearing sandwich boards reminding “fornicators, drunkards, sodomites, gangster rappers, immodest women and dirty dancers” that “judgement [sic] is coming.”

BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER

Another guest. Ellery

Althaus, a Massachusetts man who has been biking across America in support of President Barack Obama’s re-election bid, stopped by the Tuesday meeting of the Yale College Democrats’ Elections Committee. Althaus’ journey spans 9,000 miles over 48 states.

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Winners. New Haven-based

Earlier this month, Yale-NUS College joined 16 other divisions of the National University of Singapore at an open house.

FIRSTNAME LASTNAME/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

AVA KOFMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

architects Elizabeth Gray ARC ’87 and Alan Organschi ARC ’88 were named the winners of the American Academy of Arts and Letters’ 2012 architecture award on Tuesday. The award is given out annually to architects whose work “is characterized by a strong personal direction.” There Will Be Henna. Old Campus will turn into a street fair of sorts Friday night, as the UOFC $5K Challenge winner, “Night Market,” will bring “everything from sticky rice to avocado shakes to henna tattoos” to its paths, according to an email from the Yale College Council. How free is speech at Yale?

A ranking released this week from the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education included Yale on its list of 12 Terrible College, for Free Speech for reasons ranging from the administration’s response to the DKE chants of 2010 to the Marshall Committee’s recommendation that Sex Week be cut. Harvard made the list, too.

Best study break? Silliman

College held a study break with Wenzels and salad from the student-led Little Salad Shop Tuesday night, but attendees were not allowed to take more than half a Wenzel.

New beginnings. In addition

to his stop in Morse to introduce the college’s new master, University President Richard Levin was on hand — along with a handful of top administrators, including University Librarian Susan Gibbons — at a Tuesday ribbon cutting in honor of the opening of the Center for Science and Social Science Information in Kline Biology Tower.

Hungerford named next Morse master

W

hen Yale-NUS opens in Singapore, the liberal arts college will find itself alone in a country with a test-based, vocational education system. In part two of a three-part series, AVA KOFMAN and TAPLEY STEPHENSON investigate how a broad-based curriculum will function in a country that values specialization and questions the worth of a liberal arts degree.

differ drastically in its academic structure from its peer institutions in Singapore. Yale and NUS administrators have said their first priority is crafting “a unique and powerful education,” but they face the challenge of attracting students to a new school with an unfamiliar educational model.

A NEW MODEL SINGAPORE — On other days, the giant halls in the National University of Singapore’s Sports & Recreation Centre might feel empty. But the 18,000 Singaporean students who passed through campus on March 17 and 18 for the NUS Open House entered rooms packed with booths from all of the NUS’s 16 schools and countless other student programs. This year, tucked in a corner next to a booth for the NUS Business School, there was a new option on display. Under a sign that read “1 +

1 = 3,” Yale-NUS admissions representatives fielded questions from curious students about how YaleNUS, the country’s first liberal arts college, will recreate Yale’s academic model in a Singaporean setting.

YALE-NUS COLLEGE PART 2 OF 3 Although the booth looked similar in appearance to its neighbors at the open house, Yale-NUS will

In a nation where most undergraduate degrees are offered in vocational subjects such as dentistry, engineering, business and law, some still understand the concept of “arts” as exclusively fine arts, rather than broad-based learning. “Liberal arts is a misnomer; Asians think it means music, dance and drama,” Yale-NUS governing board chair Kay Kuok told the Straits Times in an interview last November. SEE YALE-NUS PAGE 8

Amy Hungerford will succeed Frank Keil as master of Morse College, University President Richard Levin announced at dinner Tuesday in the Morse dining hall. Hungerford, the current acting master of Calhoun College and a professor of English and American studies, and her husband Peter Chemery, associate director of undergraduate admissions, will begin their five-year term as master and associate master of Morse on July 1. Levin said Hungerford’s current role of acting master made her a strong candidate for the Morse position, and several students interviewed said they were pleased with the appointment. “She is a very active player in the University and has done a wonderful job as acting master of Calhoun College,” Levin said of Hungerford at the announcement. “I’m sure she will come to you well prepared to adopt your traditions as Morsels, and maybe add a few of her own.” A New Hampshire native, Hungerford attended Johns Hopkins for both her undergraduate and graduate education, earning a Ph.D. in English and American literature in 1999. A specialist in American literature after 1945, Hungerford has taught at Yale since 1999, and she served as director of undergraduate studies in the English department from January 2009 to spring 2011. Hungerford and Chemery will move into Morse with their two children, Clare, age 10, and Cyrus, age 8, this summer. Hungerford said she was “thrilled” to be appointed as Morse’s next master, and that she and Chemery will strive to meet the high standards set by Keil and his wife, Associate Master Kristi Lockhart. “I hope that I can do as well as a teacher, as a mentor and as a companion-in-fun as they have done,” Hungerford said at the announcement. “It’s wonderful to be in what I consider probably the best job at Yale — to be a college master.” SEE HUNGERFORD PAGE 8

Ahead of key hearing, Occupy wins time BY NICK DEFIESTA STAFF REPORTER Whether or not Occupy New Haven emerges victorious from a court hearing today in the protest’s suit to remain on the Green, the encampment will stay put for at least another 10 days. In a Tuesday afternoon phone conference, U.S. Federal Judge Mark Kravitz told representatives from the protest movement and City Hall that Occupy New Haven could stay on the Green for at least an additional 10 days past its current deadline of midnight on Wednesday. Kravitz will hear oral testimony from both sides at today’s hearing, but said he would give Occupy New Haven the extension because he needs more time to

consider the case before issuing a written opinion. “The city will respect the rule of law, and we hope that the occupiers will do the same,” City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ’04 said in response to the extension. The court hearing comes after City Hall asked protesters to leave their site on the upper Green earlier this month following a breakdown in cooperation between the city and the protesters. As a March 14 deadline imposed by the city for the encampment to be removed, attorney Norm Pattis filed a lastminute lawsuit against the city and the Proprietors of Common and Undivided Lands of New Haven — a centuries-old group that maintains ownership of the Green — and successfully convinced federal

judge Janet Hall to allow protesters to stay on the Green until after the hearing. Pattis said he sees two fundamental debates between the Occupy protest and the city. The first is about the rules that are used to govern the Green and where they come from, an ambiguity that Pattis thinks will allow protesters to stay on the Green longer. “I think the issues of the Proprietors’ role in making rules on the Green is troubling to everyone — there’s not another case like it in the United States,” Pattis said. “Saying that, there must be rules to govern [the Green], and I think the court is trying to determine what those are.” SEE OCCUPY PAGE 4

JACOB GEIGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Acting Calhoun Master Amy Hungerford will succeed Frank Keil as Morse College master.

One night only. Tonight the

one, the only Snoop Dogg, of “Drop It Like It’s Hot” and “Gin and Juice” fame, will hit the stage at Toad’s Place. Tickets cost $42 today. The doors open at 8 p.m., and the show starts at 9 p.m.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1983 Wolfgang Leonhard’s History of the Soviet Union is named Yale’s most popular course, with 674 students. Submit tips to Cross Campus

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Admins weigh software upgrade BY GAVAN GIDEON STAFF REPORTER Administrators are determining how best to upgrade a computer system central to Yale’s administrative tasks, after similar efforts were stalled by the recession. Vice President for Finance and Business Operations Shauna King said in a Tuesday email that administrators are currently “investigating the best approach” to upgrading

Yale’s aging Oracle computer system — a set of applications that handle finance, budgeting, payroll and other administrative tasks. She said keeping Yale up to date will ensure the software continues to operate “efficiently and effectively,” and that she expects administrators will reach a decision about the upgrade before the fiscal year ends on June 30. “This is a relatively big and important decision, and we want to be sure we evaluate our

options thoroughly,” King said. The Office of Finance and Business Operations is working with administrators from different academic departments and schools to determine whether to upgrade the system by adopting an updated version of Oracle or by switching some of the University’s computer systems to a new software provider. Oracle and other University-wide systems are maintained and evaluated on a reg-

ular basis, King said, but are rarely changed entirely. She added that the Oracle Corporation told its customers they would need to complete an upgrade within the next few years, explaining that vendors are able to provide better support and maintenance when computer systems are up to date. Before the recession hit in 2008, King said administrators considered including an upgrade of Oracle in their plans

for YaleNext — a campaign intended to compress updates to the University’s computer systems that would have taken six to 10 years into a four-year process. The Yale Corporation approved roughly $20 million for YaleNext in fall 2008, but the project was put on hold after administrators realized they were facing a $350 million budget deficit in 2009. Though the YaleNext banSEE UPGRADE PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

“This really makes me respect Hull’s. Too many art shops sell the .COMMENT material without supporting the soul of the business.” yaledailynews.com/opinion

‘CWAKEFIELD’ ON ‘HULLS SEES NEW BIP MURAL’

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST M A X R I T VO

GUEST COLUMNIST SARAH MASLIN

Art in and out of the canon

Ditch finals, go hiking

I

’m a big fan of Kenneth Reveiz ’12, the artist and activist behind the recently performed “Osama Play.” He’s a luminous and sensitive writer. But in an interview with the News (“Play to question ‘Yale values,’” March 19), he dismisses apolitical poetry and insists that dialogue with historical or classical material complies with oppressive ideologies those texts bolstered. This is shortsighted. It’s a bit like saying we must ban the swastika, which Native American and Eastern cultures used for centuries as an artistic and theological signifier, because the Nazis appropriated it. Saying there is no canon is as intellectually narrow-minded and fearful as saying there is only the canon. Gender-normative (or any other kind of normative) society may appropriate historical texts, but, like the swastika, they’re far more than that. Also, Plato was pretty gay. Don’t let all the proscriptive weight of traditionalist interpretation appended to the canon demonize the works within it. There is as much anti-establishment rhetoric in Rousseau as in any of the great deconstructionists. Read beyond the canon. But there is nothing wrong with reading brilliant things that happened to be written by white men of means. There are some who believe that interpreting the canon can be nothing more than power-affirming, status quoassuring mental calisthenics. I believe works of art and interpretation aren’t entirely products of the normative societies that were their greenhouses. There are artists with their own seeds. Sometimes art shakes us to our political core, and this is completely worthy. But it’s not the only kind of creativity, and it’s not the only meaningful congress with art. The accretion of other people’s (canonical) thoughts can force the artist into metaphysics and reflection hitherto uncharted. Finding new things to say about the sun, considering all the things said about the sun, is valuable. Artists rely upon constraints to push their minds beyond the perseverative preoccupations that make up 99 percent of everyone’s thinking. Think of tradition as a constraint. Creating from a blank template leads to the construction of a mirror. Instead, try injecting someone else’s thinking, or a whole couple of centuries’ worth of thinking. This includes but is not necessarily white-dudethinking. As for the “pastoral fetishism” Reveiz villifies — can’t we

just say we find something beautiful? People have thought and persist in thinking about the sun, and they carry the burden of a poet’s pastoral word about the sun into their daily lives. Our reality is dominated by vignettes — some of them pretty trivial. Art changes those vignettes. I’m sure Reveiz would agree, and that’s why he wants so badly to shake us up and alter the way we critically think. But away from the abstract ideologies that inform us as activists, there are aesthetic and interpersonal circumstances that are worth our time as artists. These circumstances fabricate our personalities every bit as much as leading an ideologically consistent and thoughtthrough life. It’s okay for a poem to change the way we feel about tea. Recalling art as we live — the rapturous reframing of everyday instances by a painting or poem — helps makes us human. And the act of reading a poem — the beautiful, unique neurochemical states it makes in our brain — has intrinsic value, even if the poem doesn’t turn us out into the world. To demand that art tickle our political pickle is to miss out on a host of valuable art-inspired feelings. Reveiz may say that any aesthetic act that communicates with the status quo reinforces it. He may want us to consolidate our lives into the most impactful, ideologically propelled agents of change we can imagine. There might not be room in his idealization of the human being for her aesthetic to have any lapses into interpersonal pettiness, consumptive desires or unconscious affirmation of traditional roles. But this is not a realistic picture of how we live our lives. On a moment-to-moment basis, we figure out how to love, hate, communicate. We are entrenched in a personal idiom. What to change, whether or not to change it, the status quo, counterculture: These are noble conversations, but they are not all there is to being human. Recognizing that leaves breathing room for art Reveiz would dismiss. Recognizing that might also be with the most effective way to change lives. So my vote is for liberalism. It is a vote for aesthetic and ideological omnivorism. It is for thinking critically about beautiful books of all stripes, including Western books. It is for the notion that the artist may decide what his or her task is, and it is for the assertion that poems about beautiful flowers can change lives. So can “Osama Play.” MAX RITVO is a junior in Jonathan Edwards College. Contact him at max.ritvo@yale.edu .

I

confess: I don’t go to Master’s Teas much. It’s not that I don’t like them — I do. But like most undergraduates, I seldom take advantage of the chance to meet an actor I admire or hear about the latest development in global health. I don’t have the time, and, frankly, I don’t care enough. I’ll see the posters, and I’ll sometimes even program the date and place into my Gcal. But in the end, I never go. On the rare occasion that I’m free at 4 p.m., a dozen other things clamor for that blessed hour: reading to catch up on, that problem set from last week, a Blue State skim latté, sleep. But for some reason — my newfound interest in writing, perhaps, or last week’s weird weather that seemed to replace my work ethic with an uncharacteristic and somewhat worrisome spontaneity — I found myself in the Saybrook master’s house on Thursday, sipping from a china cup and nibbling cucumber sandwiches while listening to Gabrielle Hamilton talk about writing, cooking and failing. Hamilton talked about her memoir, “Blood, Bones and Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef.” I had not

read the book, but this was one of those rare Yale events where I found myself not feeling pressure to pretend I had. Approaching the talk more like a conversation than an interview, Hamilton simply told us her story. She talked about wanting to be a writer her whole life and finally giving up and opening a restaurant in the East Village instead, only to fall into writing when she was offered a food column in The New York Times. This led to articles, essays and, finally, her 2011 memoir, a bestseller. Dropping out of college to backpack around Europe, getting married and, later, divorced: To Hamilton, these things made the road curvier, but they also made it more interesting. This was awesome to realize, as I sat there listening to her, because I’ve been feeling pretty anxious watching my brilliant classmates speed on past me in one endeavor or another. I was surprised by how endearingly awkward Hamilton seemed in a setting where one is expected to gush not only about oneself but also about every trend and controversy surrounding one’s industry and experience. When asked for her thoughts on women in the restaurant industry, Hamil-

ton shrugged. “I don’t study that,” she said. “Anything I have to say would just be anecdotal.” In her book, when she describes feeling out of place on a panel of wellknown female chefs, she’s more direct: “I slumped in my chair, dying,” Hamilton writes. I hope her hour in Saybrook was slightly less painful. She didn’t preach, but her message was clear: There’s not just one way to do it, whatever it may be. It’s not worth stressing out or freaking out or even sticking it out if, deep down, now is not the right time for it. To me, that made a lot of sense. I’m not saying that Hamilton’s suggestion of dropping out of school and backpacking around Europe is right for everyone, as appealing as it sounds. I guess what I’m saying is slow down. Take a moment to feel the sunshine before checking your phone when you leave LC. Read a book for fun outside instead of doing work. Stay up late to write a piece that may or may not get published — or get a good night’s sleep for once instead. Throw a Frisbee. Be bored. I’m being sentimental, I know. I’m also being hypocritical. I’m kind of like Hamilton, who said

that even though she knows she got to where she is because of messing up and breaking down, she still can’t refrain from working nonstop, worrying about what’s next and getting stressed. The point here is that we’re going to be okay. Whether you’re a graduating senior or a secondsemester freshman, you don’t need to freak out. Work hard, make plans, but don’t worry too much if they fall through. You’ll get there eventually. Sure, a B on your transcript might last forever, but so will your memories of that crazy winter when it never snowed, your fateful friendship with the cutie you’ve been eyeing for weeks at Slifka or the photos of your week in Myrtle after your last finals at Yale. As a good friend of mine says whenever I complain about my workload or life’s uncertainty or the inevitability of failed plans, stressing out is overrated. And it’s no fun. So let’s stop telling each other to calm down and start doing it ourselves. I’ll start … as soon I get this paper done. SARAH MASLIN is a sophomore in Trumbull College. Contact her at sarah.maslin@yale.edu .

G U E S T C O L U M N I S T C H R I S T O P H E R PA G L I A R E L L A

Death penalty part of flawed system W

ho deserves to die? That question undergirds much of the debate around the implementation of Connecticut’s death penalty. In 2005, a Quinnipiac poll found that while a narrow majority of Connecticut residents supported the death penalty, most preferred life in prison without parole as the default punishment for murderers. This changed after the Cheshire home invasion of 2007, when the citizens of Connecticut faced what looked like pure evil: assault, rape and murder of a family. Since then, support for the death penalty, particularly for the worst criminals, has risen. While recent polling suggests that only a narrow plurality prefer the death penalty to life without parole for first-degree murderers, nearly three-fourths of the state supports the death penalty for the Cheshire perpetrators in particular. Nevertheless, death penalty repeal has continued to work its way through the legislature this month under the leadership of New Haven’s own Representative Gary Holder-Winfield. As a Catholic, I stand against the death penalty on moral grounds. Unfortunately, many misunderstand the nature of the Church’s teaching on this subject, associating it only with other issues of respecting human life — opposi-

tion to abortion and unjust war among them — without making the connection to justice. I wish to highlight the Church’s teachings on justice, as I think they ought be embraced not only by Catholics, but also by all residents of my home state.

DEATH PENALTY IS IMMORAL AND UNFAIR Very often, our ideas of punishment are retributive rather than rehabilitative, full of vengeance rather than chastisement. The Catholic Catechism, seeking humility in human judgment, teaches that punishment in civil society should focus on the safety of society and the rehabilitation of the criminal. The death penalty can only be justified when it is necessary to protect society from the aggressor. Capital punishment clearly fails the rehabilitation test as well, focusing on a murderer not as a broken human to rebuild, but as a futile sacrifice — a death that can never bring our loved ones back to life. (Some concerned about safety will also ask about deterrence:

I merely note that academics, unsure of how to measure cause and effect, still argue about whether the death penalty meaningfully deters murder. Anyone who studies comparative policing strategies can agree that the state need not resort to execution to deter homicide.) Many opponents of repeal bring up the fact that Connecticut uses the death penalty sparingly. Yet a sparing approach does not always imply a judicious one. Though serial killer Michael Ross is the only person to be executed in the state since 1960, 11 more currently sit on death row. An exhaustive Stanford study highlighted in The New York Times in January found that in Connecticut, a murderer is no more likely to be sentenced to death in cases of greater severity, whether measured in number of victims or degree of suffering inflicted. However, the Stanford study did find that race and region mattered: Racial minorities who killed whites were more likely to be assigned to death row, as were those committing crimes in the city of Waterbury — simply because officials in that jurisdiction were more willing to pursue capital punishment. Such disparities seem to violate the spirit of equal treatment regardless of incidents of race or geography.

Additionally, an irreversible punishment cannot be justified when juries can make mistakes. Over 100 death row inmates have been exonerated since the 1970s. Although DNA evidence has helped, this is not a problem technology has fixed; the most recent, Joe D’Ambrosio of Ohio, was fully exonerated only earlier this year. If we aspire to a better standard of justice, we must do away with the death penalty, which is both immoral and arbitrarily applied. Instead, we should focus on developing a system of justice that protects potential victims and rehabilitates the broken. In trying to develop that system, however, we must take care not myopically to focus on hot-button topics like the death penalty. The fight against prison rape in the United States, for example, has been covered much less than death penalty issues, and yet impacts far more incarcerated individuals than does capital punishment. We should consider the death penalty as only one battle in a broader struggle to recognize, protect and preserve the lives and humanity of even the most loathsome among us. CHRISTOPHER PAGLIARELLA is a senior in Berkeley College. Contact him at christopher.pagliarella@yale.edu .

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Ending self-destructive advocacy A lot of noise always surrounds controversial events such as the death of Trayvon Martin and what allegedly happened on the fateful night he was shot. Within weeks, media personalities had begun spouting their opinions based on what they thought happened, whether it was calling for the head of shooter George Zimmerman or claiming that Martin was at fault for wearing a hoodie. Instead of jumping onto my laptop to write what I initially thought about this case, I decided to take my time. I wanted to see if I would be right. Do you remember Troy Davis? Some of you do, but I imagine many of you have forgotten him by now. Last semester, protests unfolded across the nation as thousands of people fought repeated denials of clemency for Davis, whose guilt in the murder of police officer Mark MacPhail was widely contested. We care about something, it fades from the headlines, we don’t. We pay attention to things

we want to, ignore others and pick up new things to care about. That is just how things are. But when we do commit ourselves to a cause, such as an execution or achieving justice for a slain teenager, we must be aware that we are not dealing with an esoteric form or idea. We are dealing with people. As I hoped, advocacy for the full account of Trayvon Martin’s death and due process for George Zimmerman is underway. I am pleased to see involvement from people close to Martin and all over the country. More than anything, I would not like Trayvon’s story and the reflection it has inspired across the nation to fade away. I am an optimist; I believe we learn in bits and pieces from controversies and progress toward a society that is better than it was before. However, I am worried about the way we become intertwined in causes out of convenience. For example, take a look at the Kony 2012 movement, which places a spotlight on Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony and the atrocities his

forces have perpetrated in Uganda and neighboring countries. The video that sparked the movement was great for awareness, inspiring and educating millions about the conflict in Central Africa and Kony. But some viewers think it portrays the people of Uganda as incapable of dealing with their own conflict. It makes it seem as though they need someone to save them from Kony, who has been inactive in Uganda since the mid-2000s. The lively state of public discourse should be a beacon of pride for people who are passionate about a given cause. However, without proper knowledge and the ability to take in new information and analysis of the issues we choose to support, we do a disservice to the people involved, and we allow the issues we care about to fade from public discourse even more quickly. Many advocacy efforts today focus exclusively on disseminating particular perspectives. The people behind those efforts don’t take the time to confront

counterpoints and learn about their audience, and they neglect to accumulate facts and present constructive arguments that could be improved over time. Instead, they rely on repetitive mantras and narrow-minded thinking that inevitably turn issues of public discussion into a gridlock of mobilized and uninformed partisans. By the time we get the full picture, we have moved on to the next thing. Once another controversy happens to catch the slightest bit of steam, widespread calls for justice and accountability will fade, as they always do. Unfortunately, the same advocates who bring these issues to national attention in the first place are often the ones who let them disappear faster than they should. I hope the same doesn’t happen to the cause of justice for Trayvon Martin. MORKEH BLAY-TOFEY is a junior in Trumbull College. Contact him at morkeh.blay-tofey@yale.edu.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 3

PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28 12:00 PM “State of the EPA: A Conversation with Tseming Yang.” Yang, deputy general counsel of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, will speak about some of the EPA’s current projects and priorities. Lunch will be served. Sterling Law Buildings (127 Wall St.), Room 120. 5:30 PM “Cafeteria Man.” This hour-long film focuses on social activists and citizens working to change the way kids eat at school. After the screening, Tim Cipriano, executive director of food services for New Haven Public Schools, will join Jeannette Ickovics, director of Community Alliance for Research and Engagement and curator of the Peabody Museum exhibit “Big Food,” in a discussion of the state of school food in New Haven. Peabody Museum (170 Whitney Ave.), auditorium.

State wins federal money for solar panels

CREATIVE COMMONS

Gov. Dannel Malloy announced Thursday that the state won a federal grant to research methods of reducing solar panel costs. BY LILIANA VARMAN STAFF REPORTER The U.S. Department of Energy is giving Connecticut over $480,000 to improve rooftop solar panel installation through research. Last Thursday, Gov. Dannel Malloy announced the $481,473 grant, which Connecticut’s Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority (CEFIA) will use to research methods of reducing rooftop solar costs in future applications, said CEFIA spokesman David Goldberg. Connecticut’s grant, Goldberg added, was one of 22 awarded nationwide as part of the Department of Energy’s “SunShot Initiative,” which aims to lower installed solar energy system costs by about 75 percent by the end of the decade. The initial stages of the state’s effort, Goldberg said, involve researching the process of obtaining permits for rooftop solar panels in 12 Connecticut municipalities, including New Haven, to streamline the processes associated with developing rooftop solar panel systems and ultimately to drive down overall costs. If CEFIA is successful in researching and developing a more efficient process, he added, Connecticut will be eligible for a second grant that would be used to conduct a pilot program throughout the state and New England. While the money will not cover equipment or installation expenses, Goldberg said CEFIA plans to implement initiatives to reduce non-hardware costs, which can account for up to 20 percent of the total amount needed to finance a solar panel system. He added that CEFIA plans to develop a task force to analyze current market conditions and existing infrastructure in partner-

ing communities to standardize the process of obtaining a permit to install solar panels, lowering costs for developers and consumers. Bill Leahy, chief executive director for operations at the Institute for Sustainable Energy at Eastern Connecticut State University, said developing standardized processes for solar rooftop installations is a good idea following the mixed success of older programs. He added that he supports the use of more “creative financing” for solar panels so interested parties would not have to finance sustainable technology themselves. “For the state of Connecticut, it’s a significant achievement that shows the federal government’s commitment to renewable energy,” said Christine Eppstein Tang, director of the New Haven Office of Sustainability. Although she said she had not heard of the grant, Eppstein Tang said the initiative will contribute to the development of a renewable energy sector in Connecticut. The 12 municipal partners, which include towns and cities of varying populations and income brackets, were selected due to their demonstrated leadership in the clean energy markets, Goldberg said. He added that CEFIA plans to implement the initiatives covered by the grant as soon as possible, and has created various stages during which their progress will be evaluated and reworked as necessary. CEFIA’s ultimate objective, he said, is to complete the streamlining process by the end of the year. Solar energy installations in the United States increased by 109 percent in 2011, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association.

“Restore human legs as a means of travel. Pedestrians rely on food for fuel and need no special parking facilities.” LEWIS MUMFORD URBAN PLANNER

State legislators pursue gas tax cap BY HOON PYO JEON AND EUGENE JUNG CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS In response to rising gas prices, Connecticut lawmakers are set to cap taxes on gasoline in an attempt to mitigate the burden on consumers. Following a Wednesday rally in Hartford by Republican state legislators in favor of their bill to cap the state’s gas tax, Democrats in the General Assembly devised their own bill that would cap the gross receipts tax at $3 per gallon wholesale. If the bill passes both chambers, it will be designated as an “emergency-certified” bill and will be fast-tracked to Gov. Dannel Malloy for his signature. As the average price of a gallon of gasoline in Connecticut rose to $4.05 on Tuesday, both Democrats and Republicans said the new bill may alleviate the financial burden on state residents. “At this point, we don’t know how high the prices will soar,” said state Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney, Democrat of New Haven. “We want to make sure we do all we can do.” With a tax cap proposal from each party under consideration, the differences lie in the duration of the caps proposed by the bills. The Democrats call for a yearlong cap, while the Republican draft calls for an indefinite cap. Additionally, the Democratic proposal includes a statute calling for the protection of consumers against “the price gouging and profiteering of big oil companies,” Looney said. Some opponents of the Democratic proposal criticized the consumer protection measures as a “diversionary tactic,” diverting attention away from the fundamental crux of the issue. Republican state Sen. Rob Kane said that Connecticut is already one of the highest-taxed states

JACOB GEIGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A bill to cap the state’s tax on gasoline has bipartisan support from lawmakers in Hartford. in the country and strongly urged the Democrats to enact a gas tax cap in a bipartisan manner. “Democrats never saw a tax they don’t like,” Kane said. “But we need some help and relief right now. We don’t want to wait any longer.” According to research done by the Independent Connecticut Petroleum Association — a lobby of local fuel oil dealers and gasoline distributors — consumers will save about 1.4 cents per gallon from a capped gas tax at current wholesale prices. Despite this relatively low savings per gallon, state Rep. Gary HolderWinfield, Democrat of New Haven, said that the bill will have varying degrees of impact across different income levels, adding that without passage of a gas tax cap, it will be more difficult for

low-income people to afford gas. Kane, despite acknowledging the limitations of political legislation in curbing the mounting gas prices, viewed the proposed capping as the state’s responsibility. “We as the state legislators do not have a lot of control over speculation and the supply and demand of gas,” Kane said. “But one area in which we do have the ability to help people save money is the gross receipts tax. If we have the opportunity to save people money, this is what we should be doing.” However, state Rep. Roland Lemar, Democrat of New Haven, said he was lukewarm on both proposed bills, explaining that the additional revenues from an uncapped gas tax could be directed toward improvements in state infrastructure. Weighing

Contact HOON PYO JEON at hoonpyo.jeon@yale.edu and EUGENE JUNG at eugene.jung@yale.edu .

Malloy aims to revamp homeless services BY SARAH SWONG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER An initiative by Gov. Dannel Malloy promises to give Connecticut’s supportive housing landscape a facelift. On Friday, Malloy announced that he has allotted over $30 million of the state’s 2012 budget to constructing and improving supportive housing facilities

in Connecticut. The funding will be distributed among six projects in New Haven, Hartford, Bridgeport, New London and Waterbury, and construction will begin by this fall. Malloy said in a March 23 press release announcing the funding that supportive housing is a longterm and cost-effective solution to homelessness. “These housing units give

people a chance to build a life that includes family, friends, community and employment,” Malloy said in the press release. The allotted money will fund the acquisition and construction or rehabilitation of residences in the five cities, said James Watson, spokesman for the Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development, as well as various costs ranging from materials to architectural services and legal fees. The funding also includes $1.5 million for rental assistance and $1.1 million for service subsidies, he added. The six projects earned financial support based on evaluations by the Connecticut Interagency Committee on Supportive Housing of their readiness to proceed, quality of the development team, service plan characteristics and financial and site feasibility, Watson said. Supportive housing combines affordable rental homes with personalized health and employment services. Address-

Contact LILIANA VARMAN at liliana.varman@yale.edu .

BY THE NUMBERS CONNECTICUT’S SOLAR PANEL RESEARCH GRANT 481K

Dollars awarded to Connecticut by the U.S. Department of Energy for research into more efficient solar panel installation methods.

75 22

the options of reduced taxes and investment, Lemar argued that investment in public transportation such as the Metro-North Railroad or the New Haven city buses will create bigger, longterm aggregate benefits because citizens use these public transportation systems on a daily basis. “I honestly am a little conflicted at this point,” Lemar said. “It is basically about whether it is smart to return a penny for every dollar now or smart to invest.” The national average price of a gallon of gasoline stood at $3.88 Tuesday.

Percent by which the Department of Energy’s “SunShot Initiative” aims to lower overall solar energy costs by the end of the decade. Number of grants awarded nationwide as part of the “SunShot Initiative.”

COLUMBUS HOUSE

New Haven’s Columbus House will use new state funding to renovate its housing units.

ing both needs saves money by reducing costly interventions such as admission to emergency shelters, hospitalization and imprisonment, Malloy said in the press release. Chris Peterson, director of real estate development and facilities management at Columbus House, a New Haven-based supportive housing provider on Ella T. Grasso Boulevard, said this holistic approach creates stability that “stops the revolving door” by providing services in addition to keeping residents off the streets. Columbus House is one of the renovation projects funded by the $30 million, and will use its portion of the money to renovate 17 housing units in an existing building, Peterson said. The Bridgeport Neighboorhood Trust will construct 30 new apartments in Bridgeport, said Elizabeth Torres, its executive director. Ten will be supportive housing units, 10 will be affordable units and 10 will be rented at market prices, she said. These three categories of residency types will allow the once-homeless to move gradually to independent home rental and ownership, she said. The building will be in an underdeveloped area of downtown Bridgeport, making it a “cornerstone project” for the city, Torres said. “It’s going to create a lot of jobs,” she said. “This could be the project that connects this part of downtown with the city’s vision for development.” For the past decade, the Interagency Committee on Supportive Housing has been the state’s administrative organization responsible for providing these residency units for Connecticut’s homeless. The Committee consists of representatives from eight agencies, including the Department of Children and Families, the Department of Corrections and the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services. Out of 3.5 million people in Connecticut, over 4,000 are homeless, according to the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness website. Contact SARAH SWONG at sarah.swong@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul.” “LOLITA” VLADIMIR NABOKOV

Occupy wins time as suit returns to court

Goals of YaleNext persist UPGRADE FROM PAGE 1 ner no longer exists, King said in November that the University has continued to implement some of the program’s initiatives at a slower pace than originally planned. Provost Peter Salovey also noted in the fall that many of the Yale’s current computer systems are “aging” or “obsolete.” Jane Livingston, director of Information Technology governance, policy and strategy, said in a November email that Yale ITS begins a number of projects each year to update University-wide systems. King said the projected costs of an upgrade to Oracle have not yet been determined. Work on upgrading Oracle will begin soon after administrators decide how to proceed with the improvements, she said.

We want to be sure we evaluate our options thoroughly. SHAUNA KING Vice president, Finance and Business Operations

SELEN UMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Occupy New Haven, which has sued to keep their place on the Green, was given a 10-day extension by a judge who will hear their case today. The other question, he said, is whether those rules conflict with the First Amendment. Before Hall, Pattis argued that the encampment represented protesters’ speech and that evicting Occupy New Haven would infringe on that speech. Hall found enough credibility in that reasoning to grant a two-week reprieve on March 14 to the protesters, but she warned that Occupy’s argument would be more difficult once the city and Proprietors clarified the rules governing the Green, which they are expected to do during today’s court hearing. The unique legal status of the Green, whose regulations are promulgated by the Proprietors but enforced by the city, is part of the reason Occupy New Haven has survived so long, protesters said. “I think Occupy New Haven is the last camp standing in New England because of the complexity of the legalities — who really possesses the Green? Is it public space or does it belong to the Proprietors? — and also because people here are willing to stand their ground,” said Alex Suarez, a member of Occupy New Haven who is a plaintiff in the lawsuit. During the phone conference,

Kravitz also granted Pattis permission to call witnesses, despite the city’s objections. Pattis said he plans on calling Yale Law School professor and head proprietor Drew Days LAW ’66 along with several city officials to the witness stand to try to clarify exactly how the Green is governed.

They can’t evict the idea of Occupy New Haven. They can take our tents and tarps, but we’re still going to be gathering here. KATIE CARBO Member, Occupy New Haven Ultimately, Pattis said he hopes to buy Occupy New Haven more time on the Green to spread its pro-economic equality message. The city, meanwhile, filed a brief that argues that there have been rules governing the Green all along, but City Hall did not enforce them effectively. According to the brief, the Proprietors adopted regulations

for the Green in 1973, including a requirement that groups obtain a permit before holding demonstrations in the space. The Proprietors “delegated” control of the Green to City Hall, according to the brief, which found protesters in violation of several regulations including erecting temporary structures and staying in the park overnight. These violations — along with the environmental and safety hazards the encampment poses — give the city a justifiable reason to remove protesters, officials argue. The brief ends by explaining that the encampments’ eviction does not infringe on protesters’ First Amendment rights and calls on the court to deny any further requests for extensions. Protesters originally settled on the Green in mid-October in full cooperation with the city, which provided portable toilets for the encampment and secured the location with police officers. Then-City Hall spokesman Adam Joseph said the city did not plan an end date for the protest’s presence on the Green, emphasizing that the city’s primary concern was public safety around the Green.

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY. cc.yaledailynews.com

Following Tuesday’s announcement of an additional 10-day extension, protesters said they were excited and preparing to defend their case in court. Even if Kravitz does not rule in their favor, protesters said they will be unfazed. “They can take the camps away, but they can’t evict the idea of Occupy New Haven,” Katie Carbo, who has lived with Occupy New Haven for three months, said. “They can take our tents and tarps, but we’re still going to be gathering here.” She said she believes the city sought to evict Occupy New Haven due to Yale’s Commencement ceremony in May, a charge repeated by other protesters and included in Pattis’ brief that has been denied by both city officials and University administrators. She said Occupy plans to protest the May 20 ceremony whether or not tents remain on the Green. Today’s court hearing will take place at the federal courthouse on Church Street at 1 p.m. Lorenzo Ligato contributed reporting. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu .

Ronn Kolbash, assistant vice president and director of the Yale Shared Services Center, said many “customizations” have been made over time to the University’s Oracle system. Though Kolbash said these additions were initially created to address Yalespecific needs, he said they can increase the complexity of different processes. Removing customizations and using the software as designed “out of the box” can “enhance workflow” and help streamline how the Oracle software operates, he said. Livingston said Yale began implementing Oracle around 1997 in preparation for Y2K. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu .

Morning Checklist [x] Brush teeth [x] Wash face [x] Comb hair [x] Grab a cup of coffee [x] Read the Yale Daily News

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“Well, I learned a lot … I went down to [Latin America] to find out from them and [learn] their views. You’d be surprised. They’re all individual countries.” RONALD REAGAN FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT

Database of East Asia photographs grows BY SHARON YIN STAFF REPORTER A Yale University Library database containing photographs taken by Yale faculty and staff in East Asia roughly doubled in size last month. The Silk Road Database, which has been available since the summer of 2010 and is funded by the U.S. Department of Education Title VI grant for the Council of East Asian Studies, recently acquired an additional 5,400 images to total over 11,000 photographs taken by Yale faculty and staff participating in faculty site seminars in East Asia. History of art professor Mimi Yiengpruksawan, who leads site seminars and initially amassed photos for the project, said roughly 20 professors have contacted her about using the images for their research, adding that many people “just like looking at the pictures.” “These are images taken while traveling to remote areas, and I think there is a lot of information that can be helpful in our understanding of contemporary lifeways in China,” she said. Carolyn Caizzi, an instructional design specialist in the Visual Resources Collection of the Yale Arts Library who oversees the database, said the update allows users to find images more relevant to their research. She said she developed the idea for the project after she visited historic sites in China, such as caves with “amazing” paintings, and decided that she wanted her colleagues to be able to share her experiences. Yiengpruksawan, who said she took roughly 3,000 of the photographs herself, called the process of taking photos and build-

ing the database “one of the most intellectually stimulating” projects in her career. Ingrid Yeung GRD ’15, who helps catalogue the additional images in the updated collection, said she thinks the enhanced collection will have a “significant impact” on researchers because of its unique content. “There is nothing out there, printed or online, that provides this amount of high-quality material,” she said. “Nothing beats going there by yourself, but the photographs give you a close approximation of the experience.” Unlike many of the library’s resources, the database can be accessed by anyone, as there is no log-in required. Yiengpruksawan said she emphasized “outreach” as one of her primary goals when she initially proposed the project; she said she wanted to make the photos available to the “academic community at large,” instead of only researchers at Yale. Yiengpruksawan added that it is important for Yale researchers to have access to research materials that are not widely available, such as those from Xinjiang and Tibet. “We forget, sometimes, that there are worlds of culture that have been eclipsed by various governments for political and other reasons,” she said. “We had a golden opportunity over the past decade to travel to places that prompt us to ask questions about our assumptions.” The Yale Visual Resources Collection has a total of 300,000 images. Contact SHARON YIN at sharon.yin@yale.edu .

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Diplomat discusses Latin America policy BY ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA STAFF REPORTER At a Monday night talk, Arturo Valenzuela, former United States assistant secretary of state for Western hemisphere affairs, praised U.S. foreign policy in Latin America since the Cold War. More than 40 undergraduates, Yale Law School students and professors gathered in the Sterling Law Building to hear Valenzuela trace the evolution of the social, political, cultural and economic realities of Latin American countries throughout history. In addition to laying that foundation, Valenzuela examined how the United States has adjusted its foreign policy to changes within Latin America, such as the democratization of many countries in the region. “Even though it has taken a long time for democratic institutions and ideals to take root in Latin America, and even longer for the U.S. to start supporting them, I believe we are finally living in a Latin American century,” Valenzuela said. Valenzuela served as assistant secretary of state for Western hemisphere affairs from 2009 to 2011, and before that taught Latin American studies at Georgetown and Duke universities. He was born and raised in Concepcion, Chile, but traveled to the United States in the 1960s, attended Drew University in Madison, N.J., and earned a Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University in 1971. Valenzuela said Latin American countries had nominally moved toward democratic institutions during the 1800s, but only began putting democracy into practice during the twentieth century — making efforts to apply their written constitutions and to elect transparent governments that respond to their citizens’ needs. This general shift toward democratic principles has been accompanied by the introduction of “substantive and viable” economic policies, Valenzuela said, which most notably include social welfare programs. In a region that has long struggled to assert itself in the world economy, he said, this move away from former rigid economic policies signifies positive change. Latin America owes much of its 20thcentury progress to the United States, Valenzuela said. He pointed to the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union as the turning point in the relationship between Latin American countries

MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Arturo Valenzuela, a former assistant secretary of state, discussed the evolution of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America at a Monday night talk at the Law School. and the United States. “During the Cold War, all of American foreign policy was specifically created with the purpose to weaken the influence of the Soviet Union everywhere,” Valenzuela said. “But after the threat of the Soviet Union was removed, the U.S. was finally free to transform its foreign policy in Latin America from preventive to substantive.” He added that this transformation began under the second Reagan administration in the late 1980s, when the United States condemned general Augusto Pinochet’s rule in Chile. Valenzuela said U.S. relations with Latin America weakened under the George W. Bush administration, which failed to oppose a coup by Hugo Chavez in Venezuela. Under the Bush administration, a “gulf” also opened between Latin American nations and the United States in the wake of 9/11, he added. The U.S. administration that has done the most to improve the country’s rela-

tionship with Latin America, Valenzuela said, is that of President Barack Obama. Valenzuela said Obama is among few current political leaders who recognizes that neoliberal reforms — if not coupled with policies guaranteeing social justice — cannot solve problems in Latin America. Valenzuela added that Obama considers public health, poverty and inequality, among other factors, in his foreign policy work, thus “giving reforms in Latin America a human element.” Travis Silva LAW ’13 said he found the talk informative, but said he thought Valenzuela’s view on Latin America was more positive than the actual situation in the region. Valenzuela received Brazil’s Order of the Southern Cross and Colombia’s Order of Boyaca for his work with international diplomacy. Contact ALEKSANDRA GJORGIEVSKA at aleksandra.gjorgievska@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS

The Ordos Museum Thanks to its copper exterior, the museum has natural lighting and ventilation. It was built to house cultural artifacts from the surrounding region of Inner Mongolia, but the Chinese government has been having trouble getting people to move to the newly constructed town of Ordos, so the museum is not much apart from its eye-catching and environmentally friendly architecture.

Securing a toehold for ballet at Yale For Ma ARC ’02, a natural design approach

WED. MAR. 28 SAT. MAR. 31

BY NATASHA THONDAVADI STAFF REPORTER With the completion of the Ordos Museum in fall 2011, Chinese architect Yansong Ma ARC ’02 and his team at the Beijing-based architecture firm MAD have transformed the architectural landscape of Inner Mongolia. The News spoke to Ma about his architectural career and this sixyear-long project in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert.

OTHELLO Part of Shakespeare at Yale and directed by professor Murray Biggs, this rendering of “Othello,” resets the classic play with a cast of eight actors in modern dress. Stiles-Morse Crescent Theater, 19 Tower Parkway

did you know that you wanted to QWhen be an architect?

4 - 5 P.M. WED. MAR. 28

A

I actually wanted to be a filmmaker when I was in high school, so I applied to film academy. When I went to film academy, the professors there said I should do architecture. I had no idea what architecture was, but that’s why I went to [undergraduate] architecture school. The first year, I started to read books about architectural history and that made me really interested. I found these stories about different architects and their careers, and I realized that different architects can have such different styles.

FRIENDSHIP, RIVALRY AND BETRAYAL IN ART A Pierson College Master’s Tea with Sebastian Smee, the Boston Globe’s art critic and the winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. Pierson College Master’s House, 231 Park St.

5:30 - 6:30 P.M. WED. MAR. 28 CAFETERIA MAN A screening of the documentary “Cafeteria Man,” a film that follows Baltimore public school food service director Tony Gerarci in his battle against to promote healthy, locally-grown foods in school cafeterias. A discussion with Tim Cipriano, the executive director of food services for New Haven Public Schools, will follow. Peabody Museum of Natural History, 170 Whitney Ave.

8 P.M. THURS. MAR. 29 FUNNYHOUSE OF A NEGRO A Yale Cabaret performance, written by Adrienne Kennedy and directed by Lileana Blain-Cruz DRA ‘12. Dinner and drinks begin at 6:30 p.m. Yale Cabaret, 217 Park St.

THURS. MAR. 29 SAT. MAR. 31 SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE Directed by Spencer Klavan ‘13, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical takes to the Yale stage this weekend in all its pointillist glory. Off Broadway Theater, 41 Broadway

8 - 10 P.M. THURS. MAR. 29 NEW MUSIC NEW HAVEN A “New Music New Haven” concert featuring Steve Reich’s “Proverbs” and “Vermont Counterpoint.” Sprague Memorial Hall, 470 College St.

THURS. MAR. 29 SAT. MAR. 31 LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES The spring Dramat Ex production, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” is a sexy tale of love and betrayal set in the last days before the French Revolution. Yale Repertory Theatre, 1120 Chapel St.

THURS. MAR. 29 SAT. MAR. 31 ONCE UPON A MATTRESS A hilarious Broadway rendering of “The Princess and the Pea,” “Once Upon a Mattress” is full of laughs, song and, perhaps, true love. Saybrook Underbrook, 242 Elm St.

studying architecture in Beijing, QAfter you came to Yale for graduate school. How did that experience shape your career?

A ZOE GORMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

One year after its founding, the Yale Undergraduate Ballet Company will give its first full-length performance, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” this weekend. BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER Spotting a gap in the Yale dance scene, a year-old group called the Yale Undergraduate Ballet Company is reaching out to ballet enthusiasts interested in an ensemble dedicated to the traditional style. On Friday, the company will present the ballet “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” their first fulllength performance, at the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School. Group members said the work is the culmination of two months of choreography design and rehearsal, and that they plan to follow it with one formal production annually. “The show is going to increase exposure to an art form that we don’t have a lot of exposure to on this campus,” said company cofounder Aren Vastola ’14. Amymarie Bartholomew ’13, Vastola’s fellow co-founder and a member of the Groove Dance Company, said the vast majority of dance groups on campus incorporate ballet as one of the techniques they employ but otherwise leave the form as “a very minor

part of their performance.” Yalies trained in ballet and not interested in the contemporary work of other groups had few opportunities to perform or attend regular classes in ballet technique until the ballet company was formed last spring, she added. “A lot of dance groups demand versatility [at auditions], which means some excellent ballet dancers end up without a group,” said Vastola, who is also a member of A Different Drum Dance Company and a Yale Dance Theater student coordinator. That would have left current company members like Theresa Oei ’15 and Madeline Duff ’14 without a chance to perform in the style they said they feel most comfortable with. Oei, who arrived on campus just as the company held its first auditions last fall, said that she has trained in classical ballet since she was 6 years old, and that she knew she wanted to continue in the medium in college. “I considered other groups, but I enjoy ballet,” Oei said. “I love the structure of ballet, the technique of it — the artistry is complex, but it has that element of control that

brings out finesse.” Perpetuating the ballet tradition is a way to prove wrong those who see the form as too rigid and emotionally lacking, Duff said. She added that she was left with a choice once she heard about the ballet company and successfully auditioned: keeping her spot on the Yale Ballroom Dance Team, or leaving the team for the fledgling company. “I loved and enjoyed my time on the ballroom team — I made so many friends and flexed some different muscles — but I wanted to return to ballet,” Duff said, adding that working with the company made her feel more “at home.” Bartholomew said that of the 18 people who auditioned in the fall, a majority had ballet pointe experience. The company eventually selected 15 members, inviting the others to attend their regular classes, she added. “For several of them, this is their only dance group, which makes me that these are people who wouldn’t be dancing if we weren’t here,” Bartholomew said. Jordan Cohen ’12 is one of those dancers. He said he joined the group to get back into dancing,

after an injury in high school left him unable to dance until last fall. Training all over again has been a challenge, Cohen added, but has brought back for him memories of joy and exertion from the days when he was at ballet class six days each week. “It’s the one dedicated ballet group [on campus], and has certainly developed a niche [that] a pretty solid group of people are interested in,” Cohen said. “A lot of people are in the situation where they have a [ballet] background, but with coursework and everything else, can’t do the level of training and time that’s normally required.” Bartholomew said the company meets each week for a ballet class, in one of the three studios on campus that feature the specific rubber marley flooring she said is preferable for ballet performers. She and Vastola lead these sessions, Bartholomew said, adding that she also choreographed the company’s upcoming debut production. Bartholomew said the show, which is the first full-length piece she has ever fully choreographed, is very different from the seg-

mented work other groups do, as they present “a semester of small works.” “The standard model of dance groups here is that every person in the group who wants to do so makes a short piece of three to four minutes, and they merge them,” she said. “There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, but as a new group in a place with so many different dance groups, we wanted to do something different, so we’re the only dance show that is a cohesive performance.” Oei said the collaborative nature of the production means that the dancers can contribute their thoughts, a departure from the top-down model of studios like the one she attended during high school, in which all direction came from the teachers. Vastola added that this structure makes the Undergraduate Ballet Company more like an “actual company” rather than a group with less direct engagement between members. Chris Cho ’12, who began learning ballet only last year through classes at Payne Whitney Gymnasium and New Haven Ballet, said that the company has been an

Exiled author sheds light on Iranian assassinations BY SHIRA TELUSHKIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When Roya Hakakian set out to tell the story of eight assassinations ordered by the Iranian government 20 years ago in her book “Assassins of the Turquoise Palace,” she took the novel approach of focusing on the victims themselves. Hakakian, a poet, author and human rights advocate born and raised in Tehran, spoke to a crowd of about 30 students and community members at the Slifka Center for Jewish Life on Tuesday night about writing the book, which was published in 2011. The assassinations and ensuing trial, she said, had all the intrigue of a suspense story and a political significance that has not received enough attention by world historians. On Sept. 17, 1992, eight leaders of the Iranian opposition, four of whom were Kurdish, were having dinner together at Mykonos, a restaurant in Berlin, when two men walked in, opened fire at the table, and killed four of the eight men. Legal scholars have placed the April 1997 verdict of the German court — which implicated the entire Iranian leadership in the assassinations and caused diplomatic ruptures with Iran throughout Europe — as one of the most important verdicts in the history of Germany since Nuremberg Trials of Nazi leaders following World War II. Although her editor wanted the book to center on the assassinations themselves, Hakakian said she chose to focus on the trial. “As an Iranian exile, assassinations have been a dime a dozen — what was most intriguing was what followed, the trial. Against the wishes of my editor I told the story of the assassination right in the first two pages, and got it done with,” she said. According to Hakakian, before these

assassinations, Germany had been Iran’s closest ally, and although nearly 100 Iranians had been assassinated throughout the world, including singers, open homosexuals and sartorialists among political dissidents, no country had ever publicly called on Iran to take responsibility for these assassinations. “In the United States, Geneva, Rome, Turkey, London, India, the Phillipines, everywhere in the world these assassinations had occurred, and in more cases than one when a proper investigation had been carried out, the killers footsteps led to Tehran’s embassy,” she said, noting that in 1988, Austria had arrested a perpetrator but upon realizing his ties to the Iranian embassy chose to deport the man to Iran rather than conduct a trial and upset its relationship with Iran. Hakakian’s talk was sponsored by the Friedlaender Krohner Lecture series, which was founded by Gary and Linda Friedlaender with the goal of opening up conversations about Jewish identity. Gary Friedlaender, a member of the School of Medicine faculty, and Linda Friedlaender, the curator of education at the Yale Center for British Art, founded the lecture series over 20 years ago in honor of both their parents’ wedding anniverseries.. An Iranian Jew herself, Hakakian’s first book, “Journey From the Land of No: A Girl Hood Caught in Revolutionary Iran,” discussed her Jewish identity, a topic she spoke about more in a dinner with several students and community members before her talk. Although “Assassinations in a Turquoise Palace” does not mention Jews or the Holocaust, Hakakian said she felt that both were relevant to the story. “The history of the Holocaust is never mentioned in the book, but its presence hugely affected the story” she said. The emotions and reactions among German people to the events of the book take place

accommodating environment in which he can develop skills such as being able to dance with a partner. “A lot of the other people had an extensive background, so they’re comfortable and natural, but still so supportive,” Cho said. “I’m so excited and nervous — I hope I don’t fall on my face!” With opening night four days away, Bartholomew said she always knew the company would come through, despite other student dancers’ assertion that a new company “would not get off the ground.” One potential challenge to starting a new company, she said, was that the existing groups already face problems organizing dance venues and rehearsal times between themselves. Duff said she hopes the show will make audiences laugh and understand why ballet remains relevant. As of Tuesday night, 238 people had reserved seats for Friday’s performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” forcing the company to open up the balcony of the Coop High School’s auditorium. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

VICTORIA BURNSIDE CLAPP/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

against the backdrop of the Holocaust, she said. Justine Kolata ’12 said she was impressed by the powerful way in which Hakakian told the story. “It was absolutely wonderful as an intersection of human rights and art, the way she told a story that was is in of itself artistic and has such important social implications,” Kolata said. Nathaniel Meyer ’13 agreed, saying that the talk made him think more about the

power of dialogue and the role of recording history. “History for a large part is storytelling, and the talk struck me about the power of storytelling in conveying important political events.” he said. Hakakian won a 2008 Guggenheim fellowship in nonfiction for “Assassinations of the Turquoise Palace.” Contact SHIRA TELUSHKIN at shira.telushkin@yale.edu .

MAD ARCHITECTS

Yansong Ma ARC ’02 designed the Ordos Museum in China’s Inner Mongolia region to reflect the region’s natural landscape. there is a way to connect small architecture to nature, there isn’t yet a way for big buildings.

would you describe your personal How has your interest in nature played QHow style? What are some concepts that you Qout in your designs? How did it affect adhere to or try to project in your work?

your work on the Ordos Museum?

A

A

When I spent two years at Yale, I started to discover who I was and I found my interest [in] nature. The relationship between architecture and nature was my real interest. This is my 10th year after graduation, so I think this nature approach is clearer to me now — not only nature as natural elements, but also as how we combine nature with high-density urban environments. When you look at modern architecture in modern cities, buildings are very powerful and big, and I think that while

At the first stage five years ago, there was so much open, natural space [where the museum is now]. Certainly a distinct geometry. We designed the Ordos Museum around the space. There are ways for architectural shapes to be a reference to nature — the types of curves, for example. They are environments that create the emotional feelings of architecture. When the modern city became so big, it became isolated from emotion, and people feel that it is so big and so strong and so cold. So now

I think we are more interested in those feelings of emotion in architecture. Not only the natural shapes, but also the natural feelings. It’s invisible and hard to describe. But I believe that’s what’s interesting about it. The reality is that people will enter into the space and will feel the connection between the architecture and the surroundings. you tell me more about the Ordos QCould Museum? When was this idea conceived, and what was the process of designing it like? How have people reacted to the structure so far?

A

Five years ago when I first went to the city, it was so empty that the only thing I saw was desert. I wanted to translate the local natural landscape into architectural space and give it a futuristic feeling. The

idea was also to talk about the local culture, which was the hope of the owner. They’re Mongolian people, so before this they had no modern architecture. But I think they have very high expectations for the future, [hence] the futuristic shape of the building. I think when we presented the building they felt very surprised. But there was big public praise. They liked how there were waves that matched the wavy desert landscape. So a lot of people come now and just sit there with each other. I also created a space within the museum that’s a public space — you don’t have to go into an exhibition and can just walk in for free. I think that has been successful. Contact NATASHA THONDAVADI at natasha.thondavadi@yale.edu .

Artists fill vacant New Haven storefronts BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER

“Assassins of the Turquoise Palace” author Roya Hakakian discussed Iranian political history at the Slifka Center on Tuesday night.

I think the experience was very important for me. I went to the States because I saw new architecture on the magazines when I was in college, and I thought it was so fantastic. I had to see it in person. And at Yale there was an opportunity to meet those famous designers from all over the world. When I was in school they invited all these architects to come teach, and I found that in this school I could learn from the architects I liked. The more interesting thing was that those architects were so different from each other, and sometimes you could see them argue in the school about issues. You found out that architecture has no rules — there’s no absolutely right thing or wrong thing. On graduation day they said, “From today you should try to forget what you have learned here,” so I was surprised. But you do have to forget what you learn and try to be yourself later on. I think that the school gave me a lot of space and the freedom to be an individual. Some other schools have a very strong style, but I think as a student I was able to explore my personal interests, and that’s really important to me.

Even in the absence of retailers, New Haven is putting empty storefronts around the city to good use. Project Storefronts, a program initiated in April 2010 by the city’s Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism, is a “marriage between economic development and the creative,” said Margaret Bodell, the manager of Project Storefronts. Through the project, the city negotiates with local business owners to lease empty store locations for 90 days, allowing arts-related businesses selected through a competitive application process to occupy the locations. “These spaces allow [artists] the opportunity to test the viability of new, innovative business and retail initiatives,” Economic Development Administrator Kelly Murphy said. “They also educate [artists] about what it takes to be a successful businessperson.” Murphy said the project began as an effort to revive inactive commercial areas in the city. She added that the project seeks to increase foot traffic around sponsored locations, draw shoppers and entice potential tenants to open businesses in nearby areas. The Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism chose arts businesses to fill the spaces in order to encourage creativity and awareness of arts and culture around the city, Murphy said. Project Storefronts’ main ini-

tiative is “Studio 756,” a collection of various artistic projects housed in 756 Chapel St., Bodell said. This location plays host to numerous artistic events related to Project Storefronts, including weekly information sessions about goings-on in the local artistic community led by Bodell and the recently completed “Ripple Effect” exhibit, a multimedia project created by the Arts Council of Greater New Haven. In April, the location will host a series of jewelry-making workshops. Since Feb 14, 756 Chapel St. has housed “Intercambio,” a community arts organization focused on informational exchange between different artistic disciplines, Murphy said. Intercambio holds performances, arts workshops, readings and vendor fairs and aims to provide cultural support for artists in the New Haven area, she said. Arts Council Executive Director Cynthia Clair said that in 2010 the Council awarded Project Storefronts an Arts Award, which annually recognizes individual artists and organizations in the Greater New Haven area for their work in the visual, performing and literary arts. Bodell said Project Storefronts, currently in its early stages, will seek to expand its scope after becoming more established. Currently, the spaces contracted through Project Storefronts are limited to the Ninth Square District, she said, adding that one goal of the project is to expand into other parts

SARAH ECKINGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The New Haven Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism started “Project Storefronts” in April 2010 to bring local art to vacant store windows. of the city. Bodell said other Connecticut cities, including Bridgeport, Hartford and Torrington, have all begun experimenting with similar programs that bring

the arts to economic initiatives. The Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism hopes to act as a resource for these cities as they expand their own projects, she added.

“New Haven is trying to mentor [similar projects] and share our information,” Bodell said. Project Storefronts is funded by the city, the New Haven Economic Development Corpora-

tion, the National Endowment for the Arts and the New England Foundation for the Arts. Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS

The Ordos Museum Thanks to its copper exterior, the museum has natural lighting and ventilation. It was built to house cultural artifacts from the surrounding region of Inner Mongolia, but the Chinese government has been having trouble getting people to move to the newly constructed town of Ordos, so the museum is not much apart from its eye-catching and environmentally friendly architecture.

Securing a toehold for ballet at Yale For Ma ARC ’02, a natural design approach

WED. MAR. 28 SAT. MAR. 31

BY NATASHA THONDAVADI STAFF REPORTER With the completion of the Ordos Museum in fall 2011, Chinese architect Yansong Ma ARC ’02 and his team at the Beijing-based architecture firm MAD have transformed the architectural landscape of Inner Mongolia. The News spoke to Ma about his architectural career and this sixyear-long project in Mongolia’s Gobi Desert.

OTHELLO Part of Shakespeare at Yale and directed by professor Murray Biggs, this rendering of “Othello,” resets the classic play with a cast of eight actors in modern dress. Stiles-Morse Crescent Theater, 19 Tower Parkway

did you know that you wanted to QWhen be an architect?

4 - 5 P.M. WED. MAR. 28

A

I actually wanted to be a filmmaker when I was in high school, so I applied to film academy. When I went to film academy, the professors there said I should do architecture. I had no idea what architecture was, but that’s why I went to [undergraduate] architecture school. The first year, I started to read books about architectural history and that made me really interested. I found these stories about different architects and their careers, and I realized that different architects can have such different styles.

FRIENDSHIP, RIVALRY AND BETRAYAL IN ART A Pierson College Master’s Tea with Sebastian Smee, the Boston Globe’s art critic and the winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. Pierson College Master’s House, 231 Park St.

5:30 - 6:30 P.M. WED. MAR. 28 CAFETERIA MAN A screening of the documentary “Cafeteria Man,” a film that follows Baltimore public school food service director Tony Gerarci in his battle against to promote healthy, locally-grown foods in school cafeterias. A discussion with Tim Cipriano, the executive director of food services for New Haven Public Schools, will follow. Peabody Museum of Natural History, 170 Whitney Ave.

8 P.M. THURS. MAR. 29 FUNNYHOUSE OF A NEGRO A Yale Cabaret performance, written by Adrienne Kennedy and directed by Lileana Blain-Cruz DRA ‘12. Dinner and drinks begin at 6:30 p.m. Yale Cabaret, 217 Park St.

THURS. MAR. 29 SAT. MAR. 31 SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE Directed by Spencer Klavan ‘13, the Pulitzer Prize-winning Broadway musical takes to the Yale stage this weekend in all its pointillist glory. Off Broadway Theater, 41 Broadway

8 - 10 P.M. THURS. MAR. 29 NEW MUSIC NEW HAVEN A “New Music New Haven” concert featuring Steve Reich’s “Proverbs” and “Vermont Counterpoint.” Sprague Memorial Hall, 470 College St.

THURS. MAR. 29 SAT. MAR. 31 LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES The spring Dramat Ex production, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses” is a sexy tale of love and betrayal set in the last days before the French Revolution. Yale Repertory Theatre, 1120 Chapel St.

THURS. MAR. 29 SAT. MAR. 31 ONCE UPON A MATTRESS A hilarious Broadway rendering of “The Princess and the Pea,” “Once Upon a Mattress” is full of laughs, song and, perhaps, true love. Saybrook Underbrook, 242 Elm St.

studying architecture in Beijing, QAfter you came to Yale for graduate school. How did that experience shape your career?

A ZOE GORMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

One year after its founding, the Yale Undergraduate Ballet Company will give its first full-length performance, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” this weekend. BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER Spotting a gap in the Yale dance scene, a year-old group called the Yale Undergraduate Ballet Company is reaching out to ballet enthusiasts interested in an ensemble dedicated to the traditional style. On Friday, the company will present the ballet “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” their first fulllength performance, at the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School. Group members said the work is the culmination of two months of choreography design and rehearsal, and that they plan to follow it with one formal production annually. “The show is going to increase exposure to an art form that we don’t have a lot of exposure to on this campus,” said company cofounder Aren Vastola ’14. Amymarie Bartholomew ’13, Vastola’s fellow co-founder and a member of the Groove Dance Company, said the vast majority of dance groups on campus incorporate ballet as one of the techniques they employ but otherwise leave the form as “a very minor

part of their performance.” Yalies trained in ballet and not interested in the contemporary work of other groups had few opportunities to perform or attend regular classes in ballet technique until the ballet company was formed last spring, she added. “A lot of dance groups demand versatility [at auditions], which means some excellent ballet dancers end up without a group,” said Vastola, who is also a member of A Different Drum Dance Company and a Yale Dance Theater student coordinator. That would have left current company members like Theresa Oei ’15 and Madeline Duff ’14 without a chance to perform in the style they said they feel most comfortable with. Oei, who arrived on campus just as the company held its first auditions last fall, said that she has trained in classical ballet since she was 6 years old, and that she knew she wanted to continue in the medium in college. “I considered other groups, but I enjoy ballet,” Oei said. “I love the structure of ballet, the technique of it — the artistry is complex, but it has that element of control that

brings out finesse.” Perpetuating the ballet tradition is a way to prove wrong those who see the form as too rigid and emotionally lacking, Duff said. She added that she was left with a choice once she heard about the ballet company and successfully auditioned: keeping her spot on the Yale Ballroom Dance Team, or leaving the team for the fledgling company. “I loved and enjoyed my time on the ballroom team — I made so many friends and flexed some different muscles — but I wanted to return to ballet,” Duff said, adding that working with the company made her feel more “at home.” Bartholomew said that of the 18 people who auditioned in the fall, a majority had ballet pointe experience. The company eventually selected 15 members, inviting the others to attend their regular classes, she added. “For several of them, this is their only dance group, which makes me that these are people who wouldn’t be dancing if we weren’t here,” Bartholomew said. Jordan Cohen ’12 is one of those dancers. He said he joined the group to get back into dancing,

after an injury in high school left him unable to dance until last fall. Training all over again has been a challenge, Cohen added, but has brought back for him memories of joy and exertion from the days when he was at ballet class six days each week. “It’s the one dedicated ballet group [on campus], and has certainly developed a niche [that] a pretty solid group of people are interested in,” Cohen said. “A lot of people are in the situation where they have a [ballet] background, but with coursework and everything else, can’t do the level of training and time that’s normally required.” Bartholomew said the company meets each week for a ballet class, in one of the three studios on campus that feature the specific rubber marley flooring she said is preferable for ballet performers. She and Vastola lead these sessions, Bartholomew said, adding that she also choreographed the company’s upcoming debut production. Bartholomew said the show, which is the first full-length piece she has ever fully choreographed, is very different from the seg-

mented work other groups do, as they present “a semester of small works.” “The standard model of dance groups here is that every person in the group who wants to do so makes a short piece of three to four minutes, and they merge them,” she said. “There’s absolutely nothing wrong with that, but as a new group in a place with so many different dance groups, we wanted to do something different, so we’re the only dance show that is a cohesive performance.” Oei said the collaborative nature of the production means that the dancers can contribute their thoughts, a departure from the top-down model of studios like the one she attended during high school, in which all direction came from the teachers. Vastola added that this structure makes the Undergraduate Ballet Company more like an “actual company” rather than a group with less direct engagement between members. Chris Cho ’12, who began learning ballet only last year through classes at Payne Whitney Gymnasium and New Haven Ballet, said that the company has been an

Exiled author sheds light on Iranian assassinations BY SHIRA TELUSHKIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER When Roya Hakakian set out to tell the story of eight assassinations ordered by the Iranian government 20 years ago in her book “Assassins of the Turquoise Palace,” she took the novel approach of focusing on the victims themselves. Hakakian, a poet, author and human rights advocate born and raised in Tehran, spoke to a crowd of about 30 students and community members at the Slifka Center for Jewish Life on Tuesday night about writing the book, which was published in 2011. The assassinations and ensuing trial, she said, had all the intrigue of a suspense story and a political significance that has not received enough attention by world historians. On Sept. 17, 1992, eight leaders of the Iranian opposition, four of whom were Kurdish, were having dinner together at Mykonos, a restaurant in Berlin, when two men walked in, opened fire at the table, and killed four of the eight men. Legal scholars have placed the April 1997 verdict of the German court — which implicated the entire Iranian leadership in the assassinations and caused diplomatic ruptures with Iran throughout Europe — as one of the most important verdicts in the history of Germany since Nuremberg Trials of Nazi leaders following World War II. Although her editor wanted the book to center on the assassinations themselves, Hakakian said she chose to focus on the trial. “As an Iranian exile, assassinations have been a dime a dozen — what was most intriguing was what followed, the trial. Against the wishes of my editor I told the story of the assassination right in the first two pages, and got it done with,” she said. According to Hakakian, before these

assassinations, Germany had been Iran’s closest ally, and although nearly 100 Iranians had been assassinated throughout the world, including singers, open homosexuals and sartorialists among political dissidents, no country had ever publicly called on Iran to take responsibility for these assassinations. “In the United States, Geneva, Rome, Turkey, London, India, the Phillipines, everywhere in the world these assassinations had occurred, and in more cases than one when a proper investigation had been carried out, the killers footsteps led to Tehran’s embassy,” she said, noting that in 1988, Austria had arrested a perpetrator but upon realizing his ties to the Iranian embassy chose to deport the man to Iran rather than conduct a trial and upset its relationship with Iran. Hakakian’s talk was sponsored by the Friedlaender Krohner Lecture series, which was founded by Gary and Linda Friedlaender with the goal of opening up conversations about Jewish identity. Gary Friedlaender, a member of the School of Medicine faculty, and Linda Friedlaender, the curator of education at the Yale Center for British Art, founded the lecture series over 20 years ago in honor of both their parents’ wedding anniverseries.. An Iranian Jew herself, Hakakian’s first book, “Journey From the Land of No: A Girl Hood Caught in Revolutionary Iran,” discussed her Jewish identity, a topic she spoke about more in a dinner with several students and community members before her talk. Although “Assassinations in a Turquoise Palace” does not mention Jews or the Holocaust, Hakakian said she felt that both were relevant to the story. “The history of the Holocaust is never mentioned in the book, but its presence hugely affected the story” she said. The emotions and reactions among German people to the events of the book take place

accommodating environment in which he can develop skills such as being able to dance with a partner. “A lot of the other people had an extensive background, so they’re comfortable and natural, but still so supportive,” Cho said. “I’m so excited and nervous — I hope I don’t fall on my face!” With opening night four days away, Bartholomew said she always knew the company would come through, despite other student dancers’ assertion that a new company “would not get off the ground.” One potential challenge to starting a new company, she said, was that the existing groups already face problems organizing dance venues and rehearsal times between themselves. Duff said she hopes the show will make audiences laugh and understand why ballet remains relevant. As of Tuesday night, 238 people had reserved seats for Friday’s performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” forcing the company to open up the balcony of the Coop High School’s auditorium. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

VICTORIA BURNSIDE CLAPP/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

against the backdrop of the Holocaust, she said. Justine Kolata ’12 said she was impressed by the powerful way in which Hakakian told the story. “It was absolutely wonderful as an intersection of human rights and art, the way she told a story that was is in of itself artistic and has such important social implications,” Kolata said. Nathaniel Meyer ’13 agreed, saying that the talk made him think more about the

power of dialogue and the role of recording history. “History for a large part is storytelling, and the talk struck me about the power of storytelling in conveying important political events.” he said. Hakakian won a 2008 Guggenheim fellowship in nonfiction for “Assassinations of the Turquoise Palace.” Contact SHIRA TELUSHKIN at shira.telushkin@yale.edu .

MAD ARCHITECTS

Yansong Ma ARC ’02 designed the Ordos Museum in China’s Inner Mongolia region to reflect the region’s natural landscape. there is a way to connect small architecture to nature, there isn’t yet a way for big buildings.

would you describe your personal How has your interest in nature played QHow style? What are some concepts that you Qout in your designs? How did it affect adhere to or try to project in your work?

your work on the Ordos Museum?

A

A

When I spent two years at Yale, I started to discover who I was and I found my interest [in] nature. The relationship between architecture and nature was my real interest. This is my 10th year after graduation, so I think this nature approach is clearer to me now — not only nature as natural elements, but also as how we combine nature with high-density urban environments. When you look at modern architecture in modern cities, buildings are very powerful and big, and I think that while

At the first stage five years ago, there was so much open, natural space [where the museum is now]. Certainly a distinct geometry. We designed the Ordos Museum around the space. There are ways for architectural shapes to be a reference to nature — the types of curves, for example. They are environments that create the emotional feelings of architecture. When the modern city became so big, it became isolated from emotion, and people feel that it is so big and so strong and so cold. So now

I think we are more interested in those feelings of emotion in architecture. Not only the natural shapes, but also the natural feelings. It’s invisible and hard to describe. But I believe that’s what’s interesting about it. The reality is that people will enter into the space and will feel the connection between the architecture and the surroundings. you tell me more about the Ordos QCould Museum? When was this idea conceived, and what was the process of designing it like? How have people reacted to the structure so far?

A

Five years ago when I first went to the city, it was so empty that the only thing I saw was desert. I wanted to translate the local natural landscape into architectural space and give it a futuristic feeling. The

idea was also to talk about the local culture, which was the hope of the owner. They’re Mongolian people, so before this they had no modern architecture. But I think they have very high expectations for the future, [hence] the futuristic shape of the building. I think when we presented the building they felt very surprised. But there was big public praise. They liked how there were waves that matched the wavy desert landscape. So a lot of people come now and just sit there with each other. I also created a space within the museum that’s a public space — you don’t have to go into an exhibition and can just walk in for free. I think that has been successful. Contact NATASHA THONDAVADI at natasha.thondavadi@yale.edu .

Artists fill vacant New Haven storefronts BY ROBERT PECK STAFF REPORTER

“Assassins of the Turquoise Palace” author Roya Hakakian discussed Iranian political history at the Slifka Center on Tuesday night.

I think the experience was very important for me. I went to the States because I saw new architecture on the magazines when I was in college, and I thought it was so fantastic. I had to see it in person. And at Yale there was an opportunity to meet those famous designers from all over the world. When I was in school they invited all these architects to come teach, and I found that in this school I could learn from the architects I liked. The more interesting thing was that those architects were so different from each other, and sometimes you could see them argue in the school about issues. You found out that architecture has no rules — there’s no absolutely right thing or wrong thing. On graduation day they said, “From today you should try to forget what you have learned here,” so I was surprised. But you do have to forget what you learn and try to be yourself later on. I think that the school gave me a lot of space and the freedom to be an individual. Some other schools have a very strong style, but I think as a student I was able to explore my personal interests, and that’s really important to me.

Even in the absence of retailers, New Haven is putting empty storefronts around the city to good use. Project Storefronts, a program initiated in April 2010 by the city’s Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism, is a “marriage between economic development and the creative,” said Margaret Bodell, the manager of Project Storefronts. Through the project, the city negotiates with local business owners to lease empty store locations for 90 days, allowing arts-related businesses selected through a competitive application process to occupy the locations. “These spaces allow [artists] the opportunity to test the viability of new, innovative business and retail initiatives,” Economic Development Administrator Kelly Murphy said. “They also educate [artists] about what it takes to be a successful businessperson.” Murphy said the project began as an effort to revive inactive commercial areas in the city. She added that the project seeks to increase foot traffic around sponsored locations, draw shoppers and entice potential tenants to open businesses in nearby areas. The Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism chose arts businesses to fill the spaces in order to encourage creativity and awareness of arts and culture around the city, Murphy said. Project Storefronts’ main ini-

tiative is “Studio 756,” a collection of various artistic projects housed in 756 Chapel St., Bodell said. This location plays host to numerous artistic events related to Project Storefronts, including weekly information sessions about goings-on in the local artistic community led by Bodell and the recently completed “Ripple Effect” exhibit, a multimedia project created by the Arts Council of Greater New Haven. In April, the location will host a series of jewelry-making workshops. Since Feb 14, 756 Chapel St. has housed “Intercambio,” a community arts organization focused on informational exchange between different artistic disciplines, Murphy said. Intercambio holds performances, arts workshops, readings and vendor fairs and aims to provide cultural support for artists in the New Haven area, she said. Arts Council Executive Director Cynthia Clair said that in 2010 the Council awarded Project Storefronts an Arts Award, which annually recognizes individual artists and organizations in the Greater New Haven area for their work in the visual, performing and literary arts. Bodell said Project Storefronts, currently in its early stages, will seek to expand its scope after becoming more established. Currently, the spaces contracted through Project Storefronts are limited to the Ninth Square District, she said, adding that one goal of the project is to expand into other parts

SARAH ECKINGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The New Haven Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism started “Project Storefronts” in April 2010 to bring local art to vacant store windows. of the city. Bodell said other Connecticut cities, including Bridgeport, Hartford and Torrington, have all begun experimenting with similar programs that bring

the arts to economic initiatives. The Department of Arts, Culture and Tourism hopes to act as a resource for these cities as they expand their own projects, she added.

“New Haven is trying to mentor [similar projects] and share our information,” Bodell said. Project Storefronts is funded by the city, the New Haven Economic Development Corpora-

tion, the National Endowment for the Arts and the New England Foundation for the Arts. Contact ROBERT PECK at robert.peck@yale.edu .


PAGE 8

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

Morse College History One of Morse’s defining features is the “Lipstick,” a pop-art sculpture created by Claes Oldenburg and brought to the college by Master Vincent Scully in the 1970s, as stated on the Morse College website. Hungerford, the incoming master, has already shown her appreciation for the statue, as well she should as it is located in front of the Master’s House.

Yale-NUS to challenge curricular norms YALE-NUS FROM PAGE 1 The Ministry of Education has previously brought elements of foreign educational models back to its own universities through 60 international partnerships with academic institutions and internal programs like the NUS University Scholars Program (USP). The USP allows for more academic breadth than most NUS programs, though students still take 70 percent of their classes within their majors. The Singaporean government offers bonded scholarships to citizens who attend university abroad and commit to working in the Singaporean civil service after graduation. E-Lynn Yap ’14, who declined a government scholarship in favor of a full financial aid package at Yale, said the strongest high school students in Singapore travel abroad for their college education. By supporting the creation of Yale-NUS, the Ministry of Education hopes that students seeking a broad course load will not have to leave the country, said Ng Cher Pong, deputy secretary for Singapore’s Ministry of Education and a member of the Yale-NUS Board of Governors. But Yap said she thinks many top applicants will still prefer institutions overseas to Yale-NUS. “There’s such an ingrained tradition of the best students going overseas,” Yap said. Ng said liberal arts programs like that at Yale-NUS may carry “upstream benefits” to support broader reforms to the education system in Singapore, but he added that he expects the infrastructure of Singapore’s educational system will take time to change.

BRAIN DRAIN?

Though the Singaporean government will pay for any of Yale’s Yale-NUS related expenses, some critics fear the partnership will have a negative impact on Yale’s campus in New Haven. History of art professor Mimi Yiengpruksawan questions whether the college is drawing other resources — including administrators’ time and fundraising abilities — away from the University. Yale-NUS Dean of Faculty Charles Bailyn ’81 described himself as “on loan” from the Yale astronomy department to Yale-NUS. “It’s true there is an investment of time and effort — I think that would be hard to deny,” said Bailyn, who is also a professor in the Department of Astronomy. “I’m sitting here, and while the

department gets financial compensation, those people won’t do exactly what I would’ve done if I was in New Haven.” Some professors also worried that the new school may raw distinguished faculty away from Yale. But Yale administrators said they did not think this was a concern, estimating that six or fewer Yale professors would teach at Yale-NUS at any given time. When regular faculty members from Yale-New Haven teach at Yale-NUS, they will be compensated by Yale as they would if they worked for the Yale-PKU or Yale-in-London programs, Provost Peter Salovey said. In addition, Yale-NUS, not Yale, will compensate the professor’s department, which will be able to spend the money at its discretion.

LOOPING BACK

Since University President Richard Levin and Salovey first announced plans for Yale-NUS in September 2010, Yale officials have pointed to the potential benefits of implementing successful Yale-NUS innovations in New Haven — an exchange that has been witnessed with other collaborations in Singapore. At Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, which opened in 2007, Dean Ranga Krishnan said the school’s test-taking practice — in which students receive course materials prior to taking a test, then study in pre-assigned teams and retake the same test — was so successful at helping students retain information that it was introduced in chemistry classes on Duke’s home campus in Durham, N.C.

A big part of looking at college [in Singapore] is asking where you will go after. WANG YUFEI Student, Raffles Institution “At Duke, similar to Yale, most of the ways you teach students date back to the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, and that is you basically have somebody who knows a lot about a subject come in front of a class and pontificate,” Krishnan said. “When you have a fresh start and there’s no one to say, ‘You can’t do it, it won’t work,’… it gives you a huge advantage.” As Yale-NUS develops its

AVA KOFMAN/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Approximately 18,000 Singaporean students attended the National University of Singapore’s open house program earlier this month. required “common curriculum” for all students to include instruction in the Eastern and Western literary traditions as well as integrated, multidisciplinary science, all Yale-NUS administrators interviewed said they are confident Yale will bring some elements of the programs back to New Haven. Collaboration between the two schools may be accelerated by designs for Yale-NUS classrooms, which will be outfitted with equipment to teleconference with classes at Yale in New Haven, NUS President Tan Chorh Chuan said.

LIFE AFTER YALE-NUS

But before Yale-NUS can experiment with these ideas, administrators will have to generate enthusiasm for a liberal arts model that is novel in Singapore. After speaking to hundreds of prospective Yale-NUS applicants, Yale-NUS Dean of Admissions Jeremiah Quinlan ’03 said he was frequently asked about the marketability of a Yale-NUS degree in the Singaporean workplace. “Let’s face it: It’s very competitive in Singapore — it’s hard to get a job. People want to have a job when they get out of college, so a big part of looking at college is asking where you will go after,” said Wang Yufei, a prospective Yale-NUS student at Singapore’s elite Raffles Institution. In January, the college announced that it will team up with the NUS law school to pro-

vide a five-year joint-degree program, in which students will earn a liberal arts degree as well as a law degree. Simon Chesterman, dean of the NUS Faculty of Law, said the program would add the chance for students to practice law directly after college, easing concerns about employability. As Yale-NUS administrators have worked to address these concerns, the school has pledged to provide summer internships for all members of its inaugural class during their first summer at Yale-NUS, Quinlan said. A list of 32 “Founding Internship Partner” organizations — including Coca-Cola, Singapore Airlines and the United Nations — is featured prominently in the YaleNUS viewbook. Bailyn called liberal arts the “study of arts and sciences for their own sake, not for purely vocational services,” but added that the “broadly based approach [is] wanted by companies,” even if it might be “oxymoronic.” Ng said the competitive labor market in Asia increasingly demands employees who can adapt, think critically and learn new skills when changing careers — strengths he said the liberal arts will help to foster. “With other colleges you might be stuck [in one job],” said Darryo Chen, a prospective Yale-NUS student from Singapore’s Catholic Junior College. “I’m more concerned where you go after.”

QUIET CLASSROOMS

In seeking to encourage strong critical thinking skills and lively debate, Yale-NUS administrators said they will have to overcome many Singaporean students’ hesitancy to speak up in class. Many Yale-NUS administrators, NUS professors and Singaporean students said classrooms in Singapore are generally quiet, lacking the louder debates often found in American seminars. “We’re going to spend a lot of time during this run-up year trying to figure out how we’re going to address just this kind of a problem, at both the intellectual classroom level and the kind of social residential level as well,” Bailyn said. Nigel Koh, a sophomore at Harvard and Singaporean citizen, said teachers mostly lecture to students, who listen and take notes, in the “structured system” of Singaporean high schools. “It’s not uncommon for students to have questions and to be extremely polite, perhaps even diffident about asking them,” said Lily Kong, acting vice president for academic affairs. “But it’s not that they don’t have questions, and it’s the mark of a good teacher to encourage them.” Many NUS students and administrators explained that students in Singapore often feel dissuaded from speaking out in class at the risk of looking foolish in front of their peers. Instead, students may choose to remain

quiet and “save face” — a tendency NUS administrators said is more common in Asian cultures. To counteract this inclination among students, Bailyn said Yale-NUS administrators have arranged for the first class of students at Yale-NUS to travel to New Haven and take seminars with Yale and Yale-NUS professors during the summer of 2013. Students also will not receive letter grades that fall to encourage them to speak in class without fear of hurting their academic standing, he added. Yale-NUS administrators said they will prioritize hiring faculty who can generate thought-provoking discussion. For now, prospective YaleNUS students are being asked to put their faith into an institution whose future is not entirely clear. “There’s quite different paradigms involved between U.S. education and Singaporean education,” said Rebecca Zhang, another prospective student from Raffles. “Some of us are unsure how they are going to merge, so that would be the greatest hindrance [to attracting students].” For the third and final installment of this series, a look at how Yale’s values will be tested in Singapore’s political system, see Thursday’s News. Contact AVA KOFMAN at ava.kofman@yale.edu and TAPLEY STEPHENSON at preston.stephenson@yale.edu .

Hungerford to succeed Keil as Morse master HUNGERFORD FROM PAGE 1 The search for the new Morse master began in February, roughly one month after Keil announced his intention to step down at the end of the spring semester. Steven Girvin, deputy provost for science and technology and chair of the search committee, said the committee collected feedback from Morse students and staff members about what qualities they would like in a master, as well as specific candidate recommendations, and presented its findings to Levin on Feb. 20. “We got quite a bit of input,” Girvin said. “President Levin

and Dean Miller seemed quite happy with the wide range of names that we came up with.” Though Levin said at the announcement that the search was “really not that hard” because Hungerford, as an acting master, was already a strong candidate, he added that the names generated by the search committee will help administrators in appointing masters in the future. Six Morse students interviewed said they were excited about the decision, and that Hungerford seemed enthusiastic at the announcement. Kyle Aberton ’14 said he has heard “great things” about Hungerford from students in

Calhoun, and that her “excitement and spirit” made him confident she would be a good Morse master. Nicole Endsley ’13 said Morse students are sad to see Keil leave, but will be ready to welcome Hungerford in his place. “I got the impression that she was excited and happy,” Philip Engelke ’13 said. “I thought that was a good sign that she’ll bring a lot of energy and new ideas to Morse.” In addition to other courses, Hungerford teaches the popular English lecture “American Novel since 1945.” Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .

JACOB GEIGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

English and American Studies professor Amy Hungerford was announced as the next master of Morse Tuesday.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

TOMORROW

A chance of showers, mainly after 11am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 55.

FRIDAY

High of 54, low of 32.

High of 54, low of 36.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, MARCH 29 6:30 PM “Sustainable Parks for the 21st Century.” New York City Department of Parks & Recreation Commissioner Adrian Benepe will give the Myriam Bellazoug Memorial Lecture. Myriam Bellazoug ARC ’91 died at age 30 when her plane to Paris, where she had designed a residential building, crashed off of Long Island. Paul Rudolph Hall (180 York St.), Hastings Hall. 4:30 PM “The American Civil War: Legacies for Our Own Time.” Independent scholar-historian Amanda Foreman, University of Virginia professor Gary Gallagher, University of Pennsylvania professor Stephanie McCurry, The Atlantic senior editor Ta-Nehisi Coates and Columbia University professor Andrew Delbanco will speak. Moderated by David W. Blight, director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and

SATURDAY MORNING BREAKFAST CEREAL BY ZACH WEINER

Abolition. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Room 102.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30 7:30 PM Yale Concert Band presents: “Harvest.” The Yale Concert Band, directed by Thomas C. Duffy, presents its spring concert. Music includes J. Mackey’s “Harvest: Trombone Concerto,” F. Ticheli’s “Blue Shades” and R. Strauss’ “Serenade for Winds,” as well as a performance by the Yale Band Percussion Ensemble. Woolsey Hall (500 College St.).

SATURDAY, MARCH 31 4:00 PM “All This Singing, One Song: Myths and Paradoxes in Musical Improvisation.” Symposium will explore myths and paradoxes around practices of musical improvisation. Led by Helen Phelan, course director of the master’s program in ritual chant and song at the University of Limerick’s Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, the presentation will draw on current doctoral research in vocal performance at the Academy. Presentations will include sung examples from Irish traditional song, Georgian Orthodox chant, Western plainchant, contemporary Irish rituals, and songwriting with children in urban regeneration areas. Institute of Sacred Music (409 Prospect St.), Great Hall.

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY MICHAEL KANDALAFT

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CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 Salon chorus 6 Modern wall hanging 10 Grilling occasions, briefly 14 White-and-yellow lily 15 Requiem Mass hymn word 16 Riga resident 17 Spanish waters 18 *Handycam project 20 Maritime special ops force member 22 Suez Canal locale 23 *Graduates' burdens 26 Ames sch. 27 Mao's gp. 28 "Boardwalk Empire" airer 31 Picture problem 34 *Marshall Plan subject 38 Vital artery 40 "Let __ Cry": Hootie & the Blowfish hit 41 Word with bald or sea 42 *Frustrating call response 45 Sounds of disapproval 46 LAX calculation 47 Jeanne d'Arc, e.g.: Abbr. 48 Pick, with "for" 50 *Cornerback's responsibility 56 Cover 59 React to an unreasonable boss, perhaps 60 Physiques, and what the starts of the answers to starred clues are 63 Varnish ingredient 64 "__ further reflection ..." 65 Kaneohe Bay locale 66 "__ a Letter to My Love": 1980 film 67 Marketing prefix 68 M.'s counterpart 69 Hauling team

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36 Friend of Stimpson J. Cat 37 Fop's characteristic 39 Court statistic 43 "__ be an honor" 44 Sets of points, in math 49 Illinois county or its seat 50 Revolutionary general known as Mad Anthony

2 5 6 7 7 5

8

3/28/12

51 Oscar winner Mercedes 52 Come after 53 Carpentry tools 54 Cybermag 55 Lets out 56 Border on 57 Easy gait 58 Hollywood favorite 61 Hebrew day 62 Bud

9

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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Health care law in jeopardy BY MARK SHERMAN ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — The fate of President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul was cast into deeper jeopardy Tuesday as the Supreme Court’s conservative justices sharply and repeatedly questioned its core requirement that virtually every American carry insurance. The court will now take up whether any remnant of the historic law can survive if that linchpin fails. The justices’ questions in Tuesday’s hearing carried deeply serious implications but were sometimes flavored with fanciful suggestions. If the government can force people to buy health insurance, justices wanted to know, can it require people to buy burial insurance? Cellphones? Broccoli? The law, pushed to passage by Obama and congressional Democrats two years ago, would affect nearly all Americans and extend insurance coverage to 30 million people who now lack it. Republicans are strongly opposed, including the presidential contenders now campaigning for the chance to challenge Obama in November. The court focused on whether the mandate for Americans to have insurance “is a step beyond what our cases allow,” in the words of Justice Anthony Kennedy. But Kennedy, who is often the swing vote on cases that divide the justices along ideological lines, also said he recognized the magnitude of the nation’s health care problems and seemed to suggest they would require a comprehensive solution. He and Chief Justice John

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Death sparks hearing on racial profiling BY SUZANNE GAMBOA ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHARLES DHARAPAK/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Amy Brighton rallies in front of the Supreme Court Tuesday as health care arguments continue. Roberts emerged as the apparent pivotal votes in the court’s decision. The ruling is due in June in the midst of a presidential election campaign that has focused in part on the new law. Though many of the justices asked tough questions and made strong statements, past cases have shown that those don’t necessarily translate into votes when it comes time for a decision. Wednesday’s final arguments - the third day in the unusually long series of hearings - will focus on whether the rest of the law can remain even if the insurance mandate is struck down and, separately, on the constitutionality of another provision expanding the federal-state Medicaid program. The insurance requirement

is intended to complement two unchallenged provisions of the law that require insurers to cover people regardless of existing medical conditions and limit how much they can charge in premiums based on a person’s age or health. The law envisions that insurers will be able to accommodate older and sicker people without facing financial ruin because the insurance requirement will provide insurance companies with more premiums from healthy people to cover the increased costs of care. The biggest issue, to which the justices returned repeatedly during two hours of arguments in a packed courtroom, was whether the government can force people to buy insurance.

“Purchase insurance in this case, something else in the next case,” Roberts said. “If the government can do this, what else can it not do?” Justice Antonin Scalia asked. He and Justice Samuel Alito appeared likely to join with Justice Clarence Thomas, the only justice to ask no questions, to vote to strike down the key provision of the overhaul. The four Democratic appointees seemed ready to vote to uphold it. Kennedy at one point said that allowing the government mandate would “change the relationship” between the government and U.S. citizens. “Do you not have a heavy burden of justification to show authorization under the Constitution” for the individual mandate? asked Kennedy.

WASHINGTON — In a packed forum on Capitol Hill on Tuesday, the parents of Trayvon Martin found support among members of Congress who turned the death of their 17-year-old’s son into a rallying cry against racial profiling. Martin’s parents spoke briefly before a Democrats-only congressional panel as cameras clicked noisily in front of them. Many in the crowd, which filled the seats and lined the walls, strained to catch a glimpse of the parents whose son was shot and killed Feb. 26 in a Sanford, Fla. gated community. “Trayvon was our son, but Trayvon is your son,” Sybrina Fulton, Martin’s mother, told the panel. “A lot of people can relate to our situation and it breaks their heart like it breaks our heart.” Martin’s father, Tracy Martin, thanked “everyone who is holding the legacy of Trayvon.” “Trayvon is sadly missed and we will continue to fight for justice for him,” Tracy Martin said. During the two-hour forum, the lawmakers and witnesses openly criticized the police investigation of the shooting and the failure of police to arrest the admitted shooter, George Zimmerman. Zimmerman, 28, has said he acted in self-defense. Federal and state officials are investigating. “It is very important that we have independent eyes on this situation,” said Rep. Corrine Brown, a Democrat whose district includes Sanford. “I am hoping we take this as a teachable moment. I am looking forward to how the Justice Department handles their independent investigation.”

At a news conference after the forum, Martin and Fulton renewed their calls for justice in their son’s death. When asked whether he thought his son’s death was a hate crime, Martin said: “Yes, I believe he was racially profiled.” The family’s attorney, Benjamin Crump, said racial profiling also was a factor in the way the police conducted their investigation. Several members of Congress have called for the case to be investigated as a hate crime. Another attorney for the Martin family, Daryl D. Parks, has said that statements from Department of Justice officials in a meeting with Martin’s parents make clear that getting hate crime charges is going to be a challenge. Martin was black. Zimmerman’s father is white and his mother is Hispanic. Tuesday’s session was not an official House Judiciary hearing, so no votes or formal action could occur. The committee’s ranking Democrat, Rep. John Conyers of Michigan, said the meeting was intended to be a discussion of racial profiling, hate crime laws and Florida’s Stand Your Ground law, which eliminated a person’s duty to retreat when threatened with serious bodily harm or death. But much of the discussion revolved around criticism of the police investigation, the failure to arrest Zimmerman, Zimmerman’s actions, and reassurances to Martin’s parents that “we got your back,” as Rep. Andre Carson, D-Indiana, put it. “We see so clearly a case of racial profiling,” said Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-New York, who mentioned he is also dealing with the New York City police force’s stopand-frisk policies.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

SPORTS

Los Angeles Dodgers to be sold for record price

A group led by former basketball star Magic Johnson agreed on Tuesday to buy the Dodgers for $2 billion. That number will almost double the record price for a North American sports franchise, which had been set in 2009 when the Miami Dolphins of the NFL were bought for $1.1 billion. The sale is subject to the approval of federal bankruptcy court.

Cullman ’13 talks team’s strengths SAILING FROM PAGE 12

A

The sailing team hasn’t changed very much. We’ve had the same coaches, but as people graduate, the feeling of the team does change. For example, Thomas Barrows ’10, who served as captain for two years, was a great leader and had a big influence on team in a positive way. It was hard when he left, but we’ve had other amazing sailors come in. Our team philosophy is still the same: There is always more work to do, and we always work hard to improve.

makes an ideal sailor QWhat in your mind?

A

An ideal sailor is someone who is really enthusiastic, loves going out on the water every day and is competitive at a really high level. Those are the people who learn the most in college sailing and who become the best crews and skippers. Just giving it your all every day is so important.

are the benefits of being QWhat on the Yale sailing team, as opposed to other schools’ sailing teams?

A

Our biggest benefit is probably that we have the best coach in college sailing right now, Zach Leonard. He is very technical and knows a ton about fleet and team racing. We are also very lucky to have Bill Healy coaching. The combination of these coaches, and an amazing alumni base that help us out quite often, is a very unique, positive situation to be

in. Alumnae such as Zach Brown ’08 and Thomas Barrows, some of the best team racers in the world, come back to push us to improve.

rounding colleges have athletic programs. And yes, some people in the area probably follow those teams. But most feel a sentimental pull toward Yale. Our tradition is unparalleled, our visibility tremendous, and our place in the athletic scene of Southern Connecticut greater than we often remember. They may not be painting their bodies at every basketball game or filling the Yale bowl for every football game, but Yale fans in our community are as devoted and informed as any I’ve seen anywhere. Whether they work around the school, pass by on their way to work, or grew up coming to games, people in this community follow and love Yale sports, and, as parents and friends of athletes come and go, provide an enduring and passionate fan base. One Yale hockey fan, for example, has been a season ticket holder for 12 years. He told me he’s stood at the same spot at Ingalls Rink for every Bulldog game he’s attended since 1972. He was there for the tougher times in Yale hockey history, just as he was for recent successes. Or take the 11-year-old aspiring Yale women’s hockey player who joined me in the press box for a few women’s games this season. A part of the Yale youth program, she was always proudly wearing her Yale jersey while rattling off the names of all her heroes on the team. She told me she wanted to play Division I hockey when she got to college, but mostly just wants to play at the school she grew up admiring — she’s inspired by her dream of playing hockey at Yale. Then there’s the two fans who sit in the next-to-top row at John J. Lee Amphitheater for almost every Yale basketball game, men’s or women’s. Those guys can tell you more about Yale basketball than the players or coaches can,

other pursuits have QWhat shaped your Yale experience aside from sailing?

is the most difficult I have really enjoyed being QWhat aspect of competitive sail- A part of Jonathan Edwards, ing?

A

The most difficult aspect of competitive sailing in college is definitely managing your time. We race all day Saturday and Sunday, and four or more hours every day except Monday. Therefore, the team doesn’t have weekends to do schoolwork. However, if you manage your time well, you definitely can do it.

is typical sailing pracQWhat tice like?

A

This definitely depends on the day and what we’re working toward. In the spring, we are working more on team racing. The best way to practice team racing is to actually team race, so we will do three-onthree and run a bunch of practice races. We try to incorporate a lot of boat handling and boat-on-boat maneuvering. We also work on tactics and practice starts quite a bit.

is your favorite destiQWhat nation you’ve sailed in and why?

A

My favorite destinations are probably Corpus Christi in Texas and the Virgin Islands. Both places are really warm, and the wind just howls. It is always really fun to be able to get going

Local fans give college sports relevance COLUMN FROM PAGE 12

very fast.

and they have seen their share of rough outings along the way. But they will probably never forget the women’s team’s epic upset of then-ranked Florida State last season, or the men’s victory over Harvard on senior day 2011. They may not see their team make a run to the Sweet 16 or a headline on ESPN, but they’re there for the little moments. They’re passionate about a team that is theirs because it is a part of their community, and they a part of its history. Numerous Yale football-goers have told me how their fathers used to bring them to the bowl back in the days of Carm Cozza, and before, when they could watch Yale football compete year in and year out for Ivy League titles. There are Yale baseball fans that remember the days of former major leaguer Ron Darling as well as the play of the newest big leaguer Ryan Lavarnway. These devoted fans range from interested locals to Yale staff, former Yale athletes to former members of the Yale Precision Marching Band. But what ties together them is an appreciation for Yale sports and their tradition, and a concern over the future of both. In taking steps that put that future in ominous peril, Yale is taking something from the community that is not theirs to take: a tradition that is not just one team’s or one school’s, but a community’s. Yale athletics matter, and they matter to more than just me, more than to Yale athletes, or more than to the athletic administration, an administration trying to salvage what it can of that tradition in the face of challenging policy circumstances. No, this stuff matters to this community, a community full of hundreds or thousands of people who see something in this whole college sports thing. A community who has helped sustain and support this school for centuries. A community that knows best.

and getting to know tons of people through the college. I played some intramural sports at the beginning of college, and that was a fun way to get to know other kids on campus. There are the most amazing people at Yale, and I’ll take any excuse I can to meet a whole bunch of Yalies.

had to convince a stuQIfdentyouathlete to come to Yale

over other top-flight schools, what would you say?

A

Yale is one of very few schools where you can get a world-class education and compete internationally and nationally at a top-flight level. You can not only do both of these things, but the atmosphere at Yale allows you to actually thrive while doing so.

role will sailing play in QWhat your life after Yale?

A

I am definitely still deciding. Part of me is debating embarking on an Olympic campaign, but the other part of me is hoping to apply to medical school. Right now I am leaning toward medical school, but I am still very open. I’m going to see where sailing over the next year takes me and decide from there. Contact KIRSTEN ADAIR at kirsten.adair@yale.edu .

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sailing, which is the youngest varsity sport at Yale, consistently ranks among the top teams in the nation.

Putting Israel on the map

YDN

After leading Maccabi Tel Aviv to a European championship in 1977, Tal Brody received Israel’s highest civilian honor, the Israel Prize, in 1979.. BRODY FROM PAGE 12 citizen. In 1977, Brody led Maccabi Tel Aviv to its first ever European Championship. The road to the championship included an 91–79 upset of the heavily favored CSKA Moscow of the Soviet Union in the semifinals. After that game, Brody famously said, “We’re on the map! We’re staying on the map — not only in sports, but in everything.” The European Cup finals were played in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, where sports once again transcended politics. Though Israel did not have diplomatic relations with Yugoslavia at the time, an Israeli plane carrying the players was allowed to land in Belgrade. In the final, Maccabi Tel Aviv defeated the Italian squad Mobilgirgi Varese, 78–77, to clinch Israel’s first European Cup Basketball Championship.

The win ignited widespread celebration in Israel and became a source of national pride for Israelis. “The celebration couldn’t be in the middle of Tel Aviv because it was too small to handle 200,000 people,” Brody said. After retiring from basketball, Brody was called to Jerusalem, the Israeli capital, and awarded the Israel Prize, the highest honor an Israeli can receive. It was the first time the award had ever been given to a sportsman. Three years ago, the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., chose to honor Brody and Maccabi Tel Aviv, which was the first time a team outside the United States had earned recognition from the organization. The exhibit honoring the team was fittingly titled “Putting Israel on the Map.” Students in attendance at the talk said they enjoyed the personal approach of Brody’s talk.

Shira Winter ’12 called Brody “really dynamic” and added that it was interesting to hear how living in Israel impacted him on a personal level. Jonathan Silverstone ’15, a New Jersey native, added that he enjoyed the fact that Brody did not limit the discussion to just foreign policy and the political situation in the Middle East. “It was nice that he really explored the other facet of life in Israel, which is the cultural side of things, and the importance of having a Goodwill Ambassador to show that it’s not all always about the Israel defense forces,” Silverstone said. “That shouldn’t be the only thing that’s discussed in Israel-related events on campus.” Brody is currently in the United States on a speaking tour organized by the Israeli Consulate in America. Contact MARIA GUARDADO at maria.guardado@yale.edu .

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KATIE BALLAINE ’13 BALLAINE ELECTED SQUASH CAPTAIN Ballaine’s teammates elected her to lead the team in 2012-13 season, Yale Athletics announced Monday. This season. Playing at No. 5, Ballaine finished the season with a 14–2 record and ranked No. 28 nationally. The American Studies major hails from Brooklyn, N.Y.

NBA Dallas 90 Houston 81

NHL Florida 3 Montréal 2

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W. BBALL UConn 80 Kentucky 65

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“By going to Israel, basically everything changed with my goals in life. I saw I was doing something for people I felt a part of.” TAL BRODY ISRAEL’S MR. BASKETBALL

DANIELLE MCNAMARA TENNIS COACH HONORED McNamara, head coach for women’s tennis, was named 2011 USTA New England College Coach of the Year on Monday. Since 2005, McNamara has led the Elis to two Ivy League Championships, two NCAA Tournament appearances and four ECAC Indoor Team Championships.

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

CHELSEA JANES

Yale sports rooted in community I’ve always thought the value of sports to be self-evident, a fact wholly and blatantly obvious. Not something that can be quantified in dollars, nor accurately explained with words, nor proven with a well-crafted argument. Which means, I guess, self-evident can also be translated as “tough to prove.” As certain as those who see the importance of sports are about that significance, so certain are those who believe them childishly futile and just simple games. The differences between those two groups are as pronounced at Yale as anywhere. And here, where our teams rarely compete for bigmoney national titles but still have loyal fans, where our athletes gain no athletic scholarships but sacrifice time and health to compete, here — more than anywhere — one can see the true value of sports. Which is ironic considering general sentiment around Yale is that sports are no longer relevant to the University community. But if not to professors, dignitaries or some students, Yale sports do still matter to this community as they do in so many communities around the country. Regardless of those who say they are a waste of energy, money or interest, collegiate sports matter for reasons more guttural than tangible, but powerful nonetheless.

COLLEGE SPORTS GIVE COMMUNITIES SOMETHING THEY CAN’T GET ANYWHERE ELSE

Brody recalls turning down NBA BY MARIA GUARDADO STAFF REPORTER The chance to play in the NBA is an opportunity few basketball players would pass up. But for Tal Brody, the opportunity to inspire a nation proved to be a greater calling. Though he was selected 12th overall in the 1965 NBA Draft, Brody turned down professional basketball in the United States to play in Israel, where he helped the nation capture its first-ever European Championship in 1977. “By going to Israel, basically everything changed with my goals in life,” Brody said. “I saw I was doing something for people I felt a part of.” Now a Goodwill Ambassador for Israel, Brody spoke about his basketball career, life in Israel and the political situation in the Middle East in front of a group of approximately 15 people at the Joseph Slifka Center for Jewish Life at Yale on Tuesday afternoon. Born and raised in Trenton, N.J., Brody was a high school basketball star and helped lead his team to a perfect 24–0 season and a New Jersey state championship in his senior year. His prowess on the court earned him scholarship offers from 40 different colleges, but Brody ultimately settled on the University of Illinois, which at the time had one of the top three basketball teams in the country. Still, Brody continued to excel. His senior year, he was named an All-American and was picked as one of the top 10 basketball players in the country. After the 1965 NBA Draft, everything was lined up for Brody to play for the Baltimore Bullets (today known as the Washington Wizards). “For me, everything was set to go to the NBA,” Brody said. But a trip to Israel permanently

The Jews in East Europe were coming up to us after the game and thanking us so much for making them proud in countries where they had suffered anti-Semitism. TAL BRODY Goodwill Ambassador of Israel Afterwards, officials from Maccabi Tel Aviv, an Israeli basketball team, approached Brody and asked him to consider staying in Israel, as they felt he could make a difference by boosting national morale. Brody chose to defer returning to the NBA for one year. But after that year had passed, he decided to stay for a second year. “I saw the meaning and the importance that I had, going to Israel,” Brody said. “I saw that in many different instances — not only [in] the fact that we were winning and people were smiling, but when we went to East Europe to play. The Jews in East Europe were coming up to us after the game and

YDN

After being selected 12th overall in the 1965 NBA draft, Tal Brody turned down the NBA to make a career in Israel, hoping to inspire the country through sport. thanking us so much for making them proud in countries where they had suffered anti-Semitism.” Brody returned briefly to the United States for two years after he was again drafted, but this time into the United States Army during the Vietnam War. After he fulfilled his military duty, Brody received a letter from Moshe Dayan, the defense minister of Israel, who urged him

to return to Israel, as he had begun to inspire Israelis through basketball, a sport not previously popular in the state. Brody said he was surprised by the offer from such a powerful state official, and he accepted. This time the move was permanent, and Brody began the process toward becoming an Israeli SEE BRODY PAGE 11

Captain talks sailing career

Only a handful of college athletic departments across the nation made any money from those programs last year. Yet those programs endure, donors continue to give, and interest in NCAA sports grows every year. Sure, the purity of college athletics isn’t what it used to be, but the appeal of amateur athletes putting themselves on the line for schools that represent communities and alumni bases remains. Actions speak louder than words, and interest in college athletics is growing — not dwindling — as athletic departments spend more and make little. The value of collegiate athletics, then, goes far beyond the rational. That value lies in the fact that college athletics give sports fans and their communities something they can’t get anywhere else. So often, college teams represent towns or cities that aren’t professional sports markets. And even college teams in pro cities provide a more affordable, accessible option than their detached, professional counterparts. Their schools are inextricably intertwined with the community, whether as employers, via their facilities, or even just as a stop on someone’s walk home. Student-athletes interact with the community whether formally or not, and many actively reach out. College athletics give their communities something to root for and be a part of, and in most cases, college athletes become representatives of those communities more than professionals do. They also serve as the object of far-off awe, criticism, or adoration, just like professionals. There is no doubt which of those relationships means more to the people involved in them. At Yale, the ties are just as strong. As the University says it hopes to reach out and positively influence the New Haven community, its best and most deeply entrenched way of doing so is through athletics. Yes, Quinnipiac and Southern Connecticut and other surSEE COLUMN PAGE 11

changed Brody’s plans. After concluding a Bullets rookie camp, Brody traveled to Tel Aviv to compete in the 1965 Maccabiah Games, where he helped the U.S. basketball team win a gold medal. It was the first time Brody had ever traveled outside the United States, and the international experience left a deep impression on him. For the first time he was interacting with other Jews from around the world and felt bound by the common religion. “For me, it was a cultural experience. All that history I learned in Hebrew school all of a sudden unfolded for me,” Brody said.

BY KIRSTEN ADAIR CONTRIBUTING REPORTER In the 2010-’11 sailing season, Cam Cullman ’13 was named the Men’s New England Singlehanded Champion. He was also a member of both the All New England Skippers Second Team and the second-place team at New England Team Race Championships. Cullman has sailed at the Freshman Atlantic Coast Championships, and was the youngest ever U.S. Junior Singlehanded National Champion in high school. The News sat down with the sailing star to ask about his experiences heading the Yale team, his collegee experience and the dynamics of the team. team has moved up to the number QThe one spot nationally this season. What is your most memorable race this year so far and why?

A

My most memorable race this year was actually this past weekend, when the team participated in the Boston Dinghy Cup. This race was the first time I sailed in the A division. Genoa Warner ’13 crewed for me, and we were able to get second, even against schools like Harvard, Dartmouth and Brown, among the 18 schools that participated. It was an amazing feeling to compete in a higher division and still find such success.

has the sailing team changed or QHow evolved since your freshman year? YALE ATHLETICS

Cam Cullman ’13, the captain of the coed sailing team, has led Yale to a No. 1 national ranking this spring.

STAT OF THE DAY 1

SEE SAILING PAGE 11

THE RANKING OF THE CO-ED SAILING TEAM. The sailing team started in third place this season but moved up to the top spot last week. The Elis lived up to their new ranking in their first weekend as top dogs, clinching the Ivy trophy and dominating in the Boston Dinghy Cup.


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