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NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 107 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS

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More changes. Daniel Mcphee,

the director of the Yale Farm for the past three years, will leave the farm at the end of March to farm with his family in Maine, the Yale Sustainable Food Project announced Tuesday. Jeremy Oldfield will become interim farm coordinator in Mcphee’s absence.

DNA DISCOVERER WATSON TALKS FUTURE OF FIELD

Days after end of college career, Brian O’Neill ’12 debuts as a pro

PAGES 8-9 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 NEWS

PAGE 14 SPORTS

Yale lures humanities postdocs 88 7

GRAPH ACLS FELLOWSHIPS AWARDED IN 2011, BY SCHOOL

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BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER

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Duke

Columbia

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SOURCE: AMERICAN COUNCIL LEARNED SOCIETIES

Yale attracted seven of the 64 ACLS fellowship recipients in 2011 — more than any other university. BY ANTONIA WOODFORD STAFF REPORTER

A temporary program by the nonprofit American Council of Learned Societies is boosting the number of postdoctoral fellows in the humanities and social sciences at Yale. The ACLS, a group of scholarly organizations that promotes the humanities, launched the New Faculty Fellows

program in 2009 to help support recent Ph.D. graduates in the humanities and humanistic social sciences as the academic job market grew weaker during the recession. Yale failed to attract any ACLS fellowship recipients during the competition’s first year, but last year and this year administrators have considered the winners’ applications more fully and tried harder to make offers to people who are “good matches for Yale,”

Yale College Dean Mary Miller said. Seven of the 64 recipients in 2011 came to Yale last fall — more than went to any other university. Miller said the program is helping to build a “critical mass” of postdocs in the humanities at Yale. The winners of the ACLS fellowships are selected from a pool of hundreds of Ph.D. graduates nominated by their SEE POSTDOCS PAGE 6

Moving up. The former

Winchester Repeating Arms factory, vacant for nearly 50 years, was officially dedicated as new headquarters for New Haven-based financial services company Higher One on Tuesday. The renovations required to transform the factory into an office space for the company, which was founded by Yale students, cost $45 million.

Where Irish Mouths are Drinking. Anna Liffey’s, an

Irish pub on Whitney Street famous for its trivia nights, was named one of the top 10 Irish pubs by the Boston Globe. Diplomatic. A music video

called “We Are Ready” posted to YouTube by Dancefloor Diplomacy, a 20-person band founded by Jakob Dorof ’12, is racking up the hits and garnering attention from big media outlets. The video debuted last Tuesday, and as of Tuesday afternoon, it’s notched over 26,100 views.

Back in the game. Pierson

custodian Jackson Mills, also known as “Buck Breeze,” released a new music video this month for the track “Feeling Myself.” The video features Yale students and was filmed on campus.

Braniacs. The Moose of Ezra

Stiles College won the Gimbel Cup for the highest GPA in the spring and fall of 2011, Stiles Master Stephen Pitti announced in a Tuesday email. To celebrate Stiles’ second annual victory in the Gimbel, the college hosted a Taco Bell study break on Tuesday night.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

2001 The city establishes a new civilian complaint review board to monitor the activity of the New Haven Police Department. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

Science survey courses to begin

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Dean Conor Frailey GRD ’12 will leave Yale at the end of the academic year, he announced in an email to the JE community on Tuesday. After Yale, Frailey will move to Chicago, as he said he has planned for several years.

Ernesto Garcia opens Rubamba in old Ay! Salsa location on High Street

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Changes. Jonathan Edwards

M. HOCKEY

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Passion Pit are slated to perform alongside T-Pain at Yale on April 24 — the Tuesday of the spring term reading week and the traditional date of Spring Fling — according to a listing on the concert website songkick.com Tuesday morning. The listing was removed during the day on Tuesday.

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ART AT OCCUPY PROTEST FINDS CREATIVE VOICE

Sunday liquor sales appear likely BY MASON KROLL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER With bipartisan support, the General Law Committee voted Tuesday in favor of a bill revising Connecticut’s liquor laws to allow, among other measures, sale of alcohol on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The bill passed in committee 15 to 3, with two Democrats and one Republican against the measure. Last year, similar legislation aimed at repealing the state’s blue laws, which forbid the sale of alcohol on Sundays, did not even make it out of committee, faliling by a vote of 13 to 2. Though several local liquor store owners believe the bill in its current state is an improvement to legislation suggested by Gov. Dannel Malloy in January, four owners and managers interviewed said they still did not support the bill. They said that allowing Sunday liquor sales, as well as some of the bill’s other provisions, including one that increases the number of package stores that can be owned by a single person, put small businesses at a competitive disadvantage with respect to larger chains. “I’m very happy with the liquor law bill that passed today,” state Sen. Kevin

A new set of science survey courses will debut next fall, with the goal of improving the introductions to various scientific fields in Yale’s undergraduate curriculum. Three new survey courses — one in engineering and two in biology — will each seek to provide freshmen with broader entries into scientific studies at the University. Though specific departments have introductory classes, the only integrated undergraduate survey course Yale currently offers in the sciences is “Perspectives on Science and Engineering” — a yearlong lecture series on various areas of active scientific research that students apply to before starting their freshman year. Associate Provost for Science and Technology Timothy O’Connor praised the development of the three new survey courses, which he called “independent grassroots efforts” and said will strengthen science offerings for freshmen.

All three courses reflect the trend towards becoming more interdisciplinary. TIMOTHY O’CONNOR Associate Provost for Science and Technology

reform began when Malloy proposed what Witkos called aggressive changes in January. Small liquor storeowners turned up en masse at a 10-hour public hearing held Feb. 28, many in protest of

“All three courses reflect the trend towards becoming more interdisciplinary … and developing more innovative pedagogical methods and approaches,” O’Connor said. “The fact that [reports] have shown that the quality of introductory courses is key to increasing the retention of [science and engineering] majors makes these new courses especially valuable.” The School of Engineering & Applied Science will offer a new engineering course that examines the design process common to all of the engineering fields, while Yale’s biology departments

SEE LIQUOR LAWS PAGE 4

SEE SURVEYS PAGE 6

SARAH ECKINGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The repeal of Connecticut’s blue laws, which prohibit Sunday liquor sales, appears likely. Witkos, a ranking Republican on the committee, said. “It’s evident that it’s a true bipartisan measure. Whenever we work together collectively, we seem to be able to pass great legislation by a large majority.” The recent push for liquor law

In redistricting, shape of Ward 1 hangs in balance BY NICK DEFIESTA STAFF REPORTER New Haven’s political map will likely look different in two months. The Board of Aldermen’s special committee on ward redistricting held its second meeting at City Hall Tuesday night to hear residents’ concerns over the redistricting process currently underway. As the committee redraws the boundaries between the city’s 30 wards, it could potentially split Ward 1 — historically known as the “Yale ward” — into three pieces. According to the city’s charter, the Board must redraw ward boundaries every 10 years after the state legislature changes the state representative districts, which happened last November. Aldermen have six months

after the state district changes to approve a new ward map, setting the deadline for a final map for the end of May. Of primary concern for the committee, chaired by Ward 6 Alderwoman Dolores Colón, is the population of each ward. With a city population of 129,779 residents according to the census, each of the 30 wards should have around 4,326 people, plus or minus about 200 people. Due to uneven city population growth over the past decade, some wards are above or below the target population range. Fair Haven’s Ward 14, with 5,350 residents, is almost 1,000 people above where it should be, while West Rock’s Ward 30’s population of only 2,690 is more than a third below its target population. SEE WARDS PAGE 4

Wards State representative districts SOURCE: NEW HAVEN BOARD OF ALDERMEN

Because of redistricting, state representative district lines now cut through Ward 1, home to Old Campus and eight residential colleges. The “Yale Ward” may split as a result as aldermen redraw the map .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “ ‘Gay’ is not a synonym for ‘radical.’ ” yaledailynews.com/opinion

VALUES” ’

GUEST COLUMNIST M O R K E H B L AY-T O F E Y

GUEST COLUMNIST ANTONIA CZINGER

A lesson in friendship “Hey, are you waiting for the CT Limo?” I asked the person next to me as I just put down my overstuffed suitcase and backpack in the waiting area of Bradley International Airport. I followed the signs that most people in my situation would use to profile a potential Yalie. Young: check. Suitcase stuffed to the brim: check. Dark blue backpack: perfect. She exclaimed “yes,” and we exchanged typical getting-toknow-you-isms. What’s your name? What year are you? What college? What’s your major? What do you do on campus? This is the set of questions I call the initials.

CHOOSE TO GO BEYOND INITIAL CONVERSATIONS That is usually how far our initial conversations go when we see each other on or off campus. Those conversations detour to awkward silence — or an extended questionnaire based on things we happen to notice at the time, such as the weather — and end with the infamous “let’s grab a meal sometime.” That line is often reserved for people we don’t know very well but see every once in a while in some random place. It’s virtually inescapable. Or is it? My conversation at the airport went beyond the two typical paths onto an unpaved one. Beyond the initials, I noticed something different, an authentic sharing of lives that grew to include another Yalie waiting for the finest transportation available and continued on the ride back to Yale. We all shared the experience of going far away from campus — whether to go home or to visit family — to get away from the excitement of Yale. I noticed a sort of cynicism from the youngest one of our small group. She felt life passing her by. I laughingly replied that she’s too young to be cynical. When our peers are seemingly doing everything and we are left standing still, it is very easy to lose track of our own qualities — whether we approach everyday situations with caustic humor or score goals on the soccer field or use that complicated scientific procedure that nobody else ever understood. We traveled through curiosities such as why groups of senior citizens only talk about politics and medical conditions, who is

performing for Spring Fling and how the Yale administration will try to enforce the ban on fraternity rush for first semester freshmen. We joked about absurdities: what our driver was doing coasting through three lanes on I-95 and why Orgo is a gut. (Consensus was it isn’t. Premed students can calm down.) As we got to the familiar Phelps Gate, I remembered a common phenomenon. We would all part ways and rarely or never see each other again, reverting back to the initials that so often replace genuine human interaction. Although parting ways is a natural part of everyday life, I cannot help but think about the uncertain terms we leave people on — not just with new acquaintances but even with our closest friends. It is no fault of our own, of course. With so much on our minds, we often lose track of people. There are classes, what our friends posted on Facebook, our summer internship plans, that funny viral video of the talented animal, our potential perfect lives after college and chicken tender day in the dining hall. We make excuses — lots of them — in our minds. That person may not run in our immediate social circles and thus might not be into that new show everybody’s watching or frequent the same weekend destinations. Or we might not remember a new person’s name. Paralyzed by the choice between building a bridge and burning it, we look for a middle ground and declare something neutral: “Let’s grab a meal.” We want to have our cake and eat it too. It is outlandish to insinuate that CT Limo provides instant networks of friends, but it can teach us something. Taking people out of their constructed safety zones can spark authentic conversation that might continue beyond the initials — or not, if we don’t want it to. Continuing those relationships is a decision, and further decisions determine where the road will lead. We tend to leave our interactions with people in friendship purgatory. But we should make the judgment about whether to follow through. We shouldn’t remain stuck at a fork in the road. And that is what I learned on a CT Limo. MORKEH BLAY-TOFEY is a junior in Trumbull College. Contact him at morkeh.blaytofey@yale.edu .

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‘JESS’ ON ‘PLAY TO QUESTION “YALE

How to really occupy What do former Goldman Sachs director Greg Smith, Senator Olympia Snowe and Occupy Wall Street have in common? All criticized an institution or political system while distancing themselves as much as possible from that institution or system. In a frustrated New York Times op-ed last week, Smith left Goldman; while Maine moderate Snowe chose not to run for re-election, citing impossible partisan pressure. Late last year, Occupiers put up tents and donned winter coats, demonstrating the stark contrast between their new, chosen lifestyle and the culture of the suits. The trend is one of objection followed by abandonment. Exposing wrongs is well and good — the awareness Smith and Snowe’s actions generated is valuable — but abandonment is not the solution. When Smith and Snowe gave up their positions, they created vacancies to be filled by other, possibly less ethical, less capable candidates. Contrary to the current trend, the best way to Occupy may involve not a picket sign but a briefcase and a healthy dose of integrity. Indeed, unless the goal is revo-

lution, improvements must occur from within. Actually working on Wall Street may be the best way to change Wall Street. Pressure from the outside is important, but, ultimately, we need decent people for the job. Without these decent people in positions of power, our disapproval — scrawled all over editorials, sandwich boards and Facebook posts — does not translate into reform. Instead, it stagnates. Our desire for change turns first to despair and then to apathy. In the end, there is nothing to do but go home. The Occupiers pack up, while Smith and Snowe wonder what’s on TV. Until good people learn to stick it out, we remain helpless to effect lasting change. Currently, our culture is caught in a curious place between rage and apathy. We are angry at our failing systems, yet we feel that we cannot take direct action. In his book “Ill Fares the Land, “the historian Tony Judt wrote “The example of the ‘anti-politics’ of the 70s, together with the emphasis on human rights, has perhaps mislead a generation of young activists into believing that, conventional avenues of change being hopelessly

clogged, they should forsake political organization for singleissue, non-governmental groups unsullied by compromise.” But is joining organizations such as Greenpeace or Teach for America really the only way to effect change? While such organizations are certainly laudable, they do little to change the broken, underlying structures of our country. Simply put, it is time to occupy. Unfortunately, the idea that people should occupy by working for problematic institutions is unpopular. We tend to feel cynical towards those going into finance or politics. As reported in the News (“Even artichokes have doubts,” Sept. 30) most financebound Yalies interviewed expressed embarrassment at selling out or considered finance merely a stepping stone to other, better achievements. While the fact that finance attracts a sizeable percentage of undergraduates may be troubling to some, those students bound for the private sector need not feel so pessimistic. If, instead of protesting their choices, we instead encouraged them to implement change from

the inside, then we might bring about reform. In a similar vein, future politicians ought not get too caught up in talk of selling their souls to lobbyists. Instead, they should adopt an attitude of defiance. Obviously, it is difficult to work from within a corrupt system. After all, one must stay employed, so publishing scathing op-eds, as Smith and Snowe did, may be out of the question. Quiet integrity, fair leadership and an unwillingness to let go of one’s principles can, however, make a difference and set a strong counter-example. It is my hope that our problematic financial and political institutions will one day be overrun by upstanding individuals willing to do the right thing. And we must support them. We have to make sure that those with the appropriate talents and moral grit are working inside the organizations we wish to change. Long live that Occupation! ANTONIA CZINGER is a junior in Timothy Dwight College. Contact her at antonia.czinger@yale.edu .

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Opposing Yale-NUS Our colleague Howard Bloch (“Why I like Yale-NUS,” March 19) invites us to ask what the government of Singapore “was thinking when it invited Yale to establish within its borders a liberal arts college.” We have to ask ourselves in turn: How did we get here, to a place where we are required to guess what this authoritarian government was thinking? In Bloch’s version of things, we at Yale in New Haven are now required not simply to put ourselves inside the mind of that government, but to take sides in Singaporean politics, to combat “the most conservative elements of the Singaporean regime.” If we don’t, we “betray” the faculty of NUS. How did we suddenly assume this responsibility? The answer to that question is simple: through an act of the Yale Corporation and the advocacy of a small group of Yale-New Haven administrators and professors. They have thrust us into the politics of an authoritarian regime, in partnership with a university with seriously, dangerously compromised standards of academic freedom, including surveillance of faculty. The superficial relativism used in the various defenses of Yale-NUS masks a deeper apathy about human rights concerns. Bloch dismisses these concerns under the banner of American exceptionalism: How could we expect other countries to be as perfect as we are? But in today’s world, it is not “exceptional” for homosexuality to be legal. Why, then, did Yale go directly to a state — one of the few in Asia — where it is, in fact, illegal? Would we be putting ourselves through these rhetorical contortions to support involvement with a regime that was antiChristian, anti-Semitic or racist — by law? Of course not. But it seems that Yale is willing to accept legalized homophobia under a smoke-screen of relativism and meliorism. Why? The idea of reforming the “globalized” university through Yale-NUS (an undergraduate college) is also specious, based on a caricature of our academic departments as disciplinary “silos,” which they have not

been for decades. Bloch merely repeats to us what we will find on almost every page of the online advertisements for Yale-NUS College. Yale-NUS will pioneer a “global curriculum” that “will draw on the best elements of the American liberal arts tradition, but re-shape and re-imagine the curriculum and collegiate experience for Asia.” Presumably the “best elements of American liberal arts tradition” do not include freedom of speech and human rights. So what kind of “global thinkers” will these new graduates be? In order to succeed, they will have to be conformist, dissentaverse managers and executives who serve the global profit motive — the only “big idea” that really guides this project. We invite readers to visit the new site, “Yale and Singapore,” established by some of us on the classes server, devoted to information and opinions about Yale-NUS. After logging in to the server, click on “Membership” in the sidebar menu; you will then see (in rather small print at the top of the page) the words “joinable sites.” Search with the full name “Yale and Singapore” to get to the site, where various folders can be found through the button “RESOURCES.” CHRISTOPHER MILLER, VICTOR BERS, JILL CAMPBELL, JOHN ROGERS AND MIMI YIENGPRUKSAWAN MARCH 19 The writers are, respectively, Professor of African American Studies and French, Professor of Classics, Professor of English, Professor of English and Professor of History of Art

A stance on Occupy New Haven Nathaniel Zelinsky (“Occupy’s time is up,” March 19) misstated my opinion about Occupy New Haven. Because this is a very important issue for our community, I’d like to be clear about where I stand. Here is my position, exactly as I wrote it to Zelinsky: “I really support the goals of Occupy and I think that it’s one of the most important movements of our time in drawing so much attention to income inequality locally, nationally, and worldwide. I think that both my colleagues and I want to hear more from the administration and from Occupy about where they’re coming from. As a member of the Board of Aldermen, I have not heard very much from my constituents about Occupy and the Mayor has not consulted with us on this issue. I hope that going forward myself and other members of the Board can help figure out how Occupy can continue to exist peacefully with other residents’ enjoyment of the Green. There is an important legal question in federal court right now, and I look forward to seeing where they come down. I do not think that Occupy poses a public safety risk.” I was very glad to receive a number of emails from constituents with different perspectives who read Monday’s column. I ask that more of you share your opinions so I can best represent them to my colleagues and other stakeholders in the coming weeks. SARAH EIDELSON MARCH 20 The writer is a senior in Jonathan Edwards College and the Ward 1 alderwoman


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21

What do you call a group of frogs? An army; although the words “chorus” and “colony” can also be applied. Many have wondered whether this is the source of the phrase “army green.”

Rubamba opens on High Street

3:30 P.M. “Evolution in a Vaccinated World.” Andrew Read of Pennsylvania State University will give this seminar. Sponsored by the Mrs. Hepsa Ely Silliman Memorial Fund and the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology. Class of 1954 Environmental Sciences Center (21 Sachem St.), Room 110. 6:00 P.M. “Art & Music: A Conversation Between David Byrne and James Murphy.” The Yale School of Art presents this conversation between DFA Records co-founder James Murphy and Talking Heads member David Byrne, moderated by John Schaefer. Yale University Art Gallery (1111 Chapel St.), Robert L. McNeil Jr. Lecture Hall.

CORRECTION MONDAY, MARCH 19

The article “City fails to evict Occupy” incorrectly stated that all of the current proprietors of the New Haven Green are descended from colonial-era New Haven families. While the arrangement through which they own the Green began with the families who owned it in the 1640s and the group has selected its successors ever since, only one of the current proprietors is directly descended from a colonial New Haven family.

State debates proposed hike in minimum wage VICTOR KANG/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

BY CHRISTINA WANG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Last Thursday, the state legislature’s joint Labor Committee approved a bill that would raise the state’s minimum wage. If passed by the General Assembly, the measure would raise Connecticut’s minimum wage by a dollar from $8.25 to $9.25 over the next two years, and adjust it each year afterward in accordance with the cost of living index. The Labor Committee passed the proposal in an 8 to 3 vote, but the fate of the bill remains unclear as the economic implications of the bill continue to be debated, with widespread opposition among business owners and Republicans. “The goal is to increase the economic power of low-income workers, because the people who are working on low-wage jobs are operating on a very narrow margin,” said Senate Majority Leader Martin Looney, who represents New Haven. Looney said that he has supported increases in the minimum wage to improve the living conditions of low-income individuals in the past, and led a successful effort to pass Connecticut’s first Earned Income Tax Credit alongside Gov. Dan Malloy last November. Connecticut’s minimum wage is tied for the fourth-highest in the nation, behind those of Washington, Oregon and Vermont. But Looney said Connecticut’s minimum wage is “higher than the national average” because the state’s cost of living is also much higher, and that the bill hopes to adjust for that. One of the bill’s Republican opponents, State Sen. Rob Kane of Watertown, said the bill comes at an inopportune time and will hurt businesses’ ability to operate in an uncertain economy. “You can see that businesses are really struggling right now and are trying to stay afloat with all the high energy costs and real estate costs and everything else, and raising the minimum wage will really create a burden on our small businesses,” Kane said. “$8.25 is not really $8.25 if you add in insurance and taxes and everything else. If you were to lower that wage, businesses could hire more people based on the lower wage and people could find more work.” Kane said the majority of minimum-wage jobs are held by teenagers and college-age young people, and added that he is working on a bill that will lower the minimum wage for members of the workforce between 16 and 20 years old. But Looney said raising the minimum wage will not add to businesses’ costs or disrupt the state’s labor market. “Historically, increases in the minimum wage have not led to reductions in employment and have not decreased jobs,” Looney said. Kane and Looney both said the bill’s prospects in the General Assembly are uncertain. The bill must go through two other com-

mittees before going to the House and Senate for final approval. Yale economics professor Giuseppe Moscarini said in an email that he foresees both positive and negative effects from a minimum wage hike should the bill be passed. While he said increasing the minimum wage can stimulate immediate spending because minimum-wage workers tend to spend all or most of the money they earn, his main concern lies in the bill’s clause that adjusts to the cost of living index after the third year. “The minimum wage has obviously a redistributional purpose, and in this respect it works very well — low-income workers do gain,” Moscarini said in the email. But he added: “[I]ndexing to inflation… can cause a compression of the wage structure from below. If above-minimum wages will not be automatically adjusted, that may be very distortive.”

After a turbulent six months, the storefront that formerly housed Ay! Salsa welcomed a new restaurant last week. A new Latin American restaurant, Rubamba, has opened at the High Street location on March 14. The store’s opening marks the return of Rubamba’s head chef and owner Ernesto Garcia to High Street, after he left his position as head chef of Ay! Salsa last September following familial and professional disagreements with Ay! Salsa’s previous owner, his then sis-

Businesses could hire more people based on the lower wage and people could find more work.

BY LILIANA VARMAN STAFF REPORTER

ROB KANE Republican State Senator, Connecticut Students from various political organizations weighed in on both sides of the minimum wage debate. Harry Graver ’14, chief whip of the Yale Political Union’s Conservative Party, said in an email that he believes the bill to be a “political calculation” and that it will hurt the low-income workers it is trying to help. “Simply put, sometimes the productivity of someone’s labor does not justify the arbitrarily determined minimum wage,” Graver, a staff columnist for the News, said in the email. “This doesn’t force businesses to be charitable, but instead to just not hire certain employees.” But Zak Newman ’13, president of the Yale College Democrats, said he supports the bill in part because he read about an economist’s testimony at the Labor and Public Employees Committee’s Feb. 28 public hearing. The economist said that “this is a good time to be making this move… and it won’t hinder job growth.” “I think it is really important that we think about what is really a livable wage and a wage that will allow people to be contributing back to the economy,” Newman said. “I think we’ve seen in the economic downturn that people with the lowest paying jobs have been hardest hit, so with Connecticut’s economy on the mend, we should support these people and get them back on their feet.” The federal minimum wage is currently $7.25 an hour. Contact CHRISTINA WANG at christina.wang@yale.edu .

Former head chef of Ay! Salsa Ernesto Garcia has opened up a new restaurant, Rubamba, in Ay! Salsa’s old High Street location. BY SIJIA SONG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

ter-in-law Yani Acosta. Garcia left Ay Salsa along with four other employees, with whom he founded Ay! Arepa, operating out of a food truck on Elm Street. Garcia said he decided to return to High Street after he heard in January that Ay! Salsa was shutting down, eager to run a restaurant again. “I am a chef, so all the time I am trying to get a restaurant,” says Garcia. Yani Acosta, the previous owner of Ay! Salsa, said the new restaurant has no connection to Ay! Salsa, and no one from the Ay! Salsa that vacated in Janu-

ary is involved in Rubamba. Rubamba has seen numerous student customers in the week since it opened, Garcia said, many of whom previously frequented Ay! Salsa or Ay! Arepa. Garcia said many have told him they are happy to see him in the restaurant business again. “They say thank you for coming back, and I say thank you guys for coming back,” he said. The interior of the restaurant remains unchanged from its Ay! Salsa days. Because of the restaurant’s limited space, Garcia will continue to run it in Ay! Arepa’s take-out style. Rubamba does not currently accept credit

cards, but Garcia said: “I’m working on that.” Rubamba’s menu will also remain largely unchanged from that of both Ay! Salsa and Ay! Arepa, featuring burritos, quesadillas and other staples of Latin American cuisine. But unlike his time at Ay! Salsa, Garcia is now the owner as well as the head chef. He also has a new business partner, John Smith, with whom he started Rubamba. The two Ay! Arepa carts are still in operation at their locations on York and Cedar Streets. Contact SIJIA SONG at sijia.song@yale.edu.

Peabody launches frogwatching program This spring, members of the Yale community have the chance to hunt for frogs as part of the Peabody Museum’s frogwatch citizen scientist program. The Peabody program — which is open to members of the Yale community for the first time this year — is a chapter of FrogWatch USA, a national effort by the Association of Zoos & Aquariums to track amphibian populations by reporting local frog and toad calls, said James Sirch, the Peabody’s public education coordinator. Although citizen scientist programs focusing on amphibians are not new to the state of Connecticut, Sirch said the Peabody’s frog watching initiative is the first to use male frog calls to estimate population sites in the New Haven area.

Frogs are really important indicators of environmental health. JAMES SIRCH Public Education Coordinator, Peabody Museum “Frogs are really important indicators of environmental health,” Sirch said, adding that they are sensitive to pollutants, habitatloss and, in some cases, climate destruction. The data collected, he said, can be used to examine any trends in frog populations over time, and serve as indicators of how healthy local wetlands are. Citizen scientists will select a local wetland to monitor frog calls twice a week, Sirch added. The Peabody hosted two training sessions — one on March 16 and the other on Tuesday night — to teach potential citizen scientists the protocols of amphibian watching, such as how often and what time to listen for frog calls. Par-

ticipants also learn to distinguish among the calls of the ten frog species typically found in Connecticut, Sirch said. The frogwatch program, he said, has received “a great response” not only from “gung-ho,” experienced frogwatchers but also from interested newcomers. Participants have primarily been families with children, Sirch said, although several adults attended the training sessions as well. New Haven resident Maria Gomez said her interest in natural wildlife led her to participate in the program. She said the frogwatching initiative provides citizens with an opportunity to involve themselves in the community and understand the surrounding natural environment, and it also provides parents with an opportunity to bond with their children. Like Gomez, local resident Simon Doss-Gollin said his love of nature drew him to attend the frogwatch training sessions. The program, he added, allows citizens to learn more about local wetlands and wildlife while helping the scientific community collect data to help the frog population in the United States. “The sheer amount of data that can be provided by this program is incredible, and hopefully it will be useful to scientists worldwide,” he said. The Peabody’s frogwatching program was created in spring 2011, said Sirch. At first, he added, participation was restricted to Peabody member families and individuals, but the program has since expanded to include members of the Yale community who wish to get involved. This year, the program has expanded to include 25 different parties of either families or individuals, an estimated total of 40 people, Sirch said. FrogWatch USA launched in 1998. Contact LILIANA VARMAN at liliana.varman@yale.edu .

MARIA ZEPEDA/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The Peabody Museum opened its frogwatching program, a chapter of FrogWatch USA, to all Yale affiliates for the first time this year.


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“After all is said that can be said upon the liquor traffic, its influence is degrading … upon everything that you touch in this old world.” BILLY SUNDAY BASEBALL PLAYER AND EVANGELIST

Liquor reform wins broad support As wards redrawn,

Ward 1 map unclear

LIQUOR LAWS FROM PAGE 1 Malloy’s proposals. Following the public hearing, Malloy announced a more moderate set of proposals. The General Law Committee went even in scaling them back, eliminating several of Malloy’s intended measures, such as allowing gas stations to sell beer, and weakening others, such as bringing the number of items that can be sold below cost from 10 to one. The committee passed the bill in half an hour. According to state Sen. Carlo Leone, vice chair of the committee, strong industry support helped drive the proposal through committee proceedings. At the public hearing, Carroll Hughes, executive director of the Connecticut Package Stores Association, a lobby of the state’s liquor retail industry, came out in support of Sunday sales for the first time. He said he did so because he felt it was more important to fight other measures that would “destroy the small liquor stores in Connecticut” than to keep Connecticut’s blue laws intact. Though the association has not yet endorsed the revised bill, Hughes said he expects that if the legislation remains in its current state, the association will support it. But local liquor store owners are wary of measures Malloy has “hidden” in the legislation, said Ankur Patel, manager of New Haven Wine & Liquor Co. on Whalley Avenue. Measures such as the one increasing the number of package stores someone can own will force smaller “mom-and-pop” liquor stores to face increased competition from larger retailers. Ajit Patel, manager and owner of Odd Bins Bottle Shop on Whitney Avenue, said the bill was “designed to drive small stores out of business,” which will ultimately hurt consumers. Some storeowners said even the most publicized provision

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WARDS FROM PAGE 1

SARAH ECKINGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Some liquor store owners are concerned that the passage of a bill reforming the state’s liquor laws, including allowing Sunday liquor sales, will put them at a disadvantage vis-a-vis larger retailers. of the bill — allowing liquor business to open on Sundays — would place a burden on small businesses. Ajit Patel and Mike Fings, manager of Liquor World on Whalley Avenue, said that even if the new legislation were to pass, they would not choose to open on Sunday. “Consumers don’t understand the effort being put behind a package store,” Ankur Patel said. “We’re working 70 to 80 hours a week. We want to have a life, spend time with our families. We need a break.” Members of the General Law Committee expressed their hope Tuesday that the bill will make Connecticut’s liquor industry more competitive with that of its neighbors. According to the

state’s Office of Fiscal Analysis, the bill that passed the committee is expected to bring the state $5.3 million in revenue, in comparison to an estimated $8.5 million as a result of the governor’s original bill. The bill now heads for a vote in the full General Assembly, which must act on it by May 8, when its legislative session ends. Members of the committee said they are fairly confident that, given current bipartisan and industry support for the bill, the measures will pass. “I think what we passed is something most people can live with,” Leone said. “I don’t expect any further changes that will disrupt what we’ve put forward.”

The bill also calls for the implementation of a task force to look into the impact additional changes will have on the liquor industry. Leone said the committee hopes to use data collected from the task force to consider further revisions next year. “It was a balancing act,” Leone said. “We wanted to give consumers more choice and support small business owners, and yet move forward in a way to see if further revisions will be necessary.” Connecticut is currently one of only two states in the United States that does not allow Sunday liquor sales. Contact MASON KROLL at mason.kroll@yale.edu .

But according to federal standards, the committee must also do its best to balance other considerations, including nondilution of minority voting, equalizing the voting-age population within each ward, ensuring that each ward has an accessible polling location, and natural boundaries such as interstate highways. The city has hired an independent consultant to guide the board through the process. The committee received advice on Tuesday from Nancy Ahern, a former alderwoman who served through two redistricting processes. She pleaded with the board to avoid splitting wards between multiple state representative districts, explaining that such a move would cost the city $30,000 over the next decade in operating costs for an additional polling place. Ward 3 Alderwoman Jackie James, whose ward, following the state’s redistricting process, now straddles the districts of three different state representatives, asked what Ahern recommended as a solution. The former alderwoman told James to choose one of the state representative’s districts as a “base” for her new district, and then to discuss expanding her ward with nearby aldermen. The fate of Ward 1, which currently houses Old Campus and eight of Yale’s residential colleges, was similar to James’ ward. The new state representative district map cuts Ward 1 into three parts, with Pierson and Davenport Colleges in District 93; Trumbull, Berkeley and Calhoun Colleges in district 94; and Old Campus and Jonathan Edwards, Branford and Saybrook Colleges in district 96. If Ahern’s advice is heeded, Ward 1, which now has three different representatives in the state House of Representatives, may split in three.

Lisa Siedlarz, who lives in what she described an “elbow” of Ward 8 that juts into Ward 9, complained that it was often difficult to get basic constituent services taken care of when her house is located away from the core of her ward.

I would hate to lose the sense of community we have built up over the years in Ward 9. ELLEN PENDERGAST Resident, East Rock neighborhood The committee also heard from several of Ward 9’s East Rock residents, who urged the board to keep their neighborhood cohesive. Several of them said they feared they would be displaced into neighboring wards in order to accommodate the redistricting process. “I would hate to lose the sense of community we have built up over the years in Ward 9,” East Rock resident Ellen Pendergast said in an email, which Ward 9 Alderwoman Jessica Holmes read aloud to the committee. Colón closed the meeting by telling committee members that the redistricting process is still in the “discussion stage,” and asked each of them to talk to aldermen whose wards neighbor theirs. She urged them to keep an open mind during the process. The committee will hold another workshop before putting together a proposal for a revised ward map, which will be presented at a public committee meeting on April 4. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 5

NEWS

“The major credit I think Jim and I deserve … is for selecting the right problem and sticking to it.” FRANCIS CRICK ENGLISH BIOCHEMIST AND BIOPHYSICIST

Nobel laureate Watson discusses cancer research BY KIRSTEN ADAIR CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

JOYCE XI/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

James Watson, the British scientist who helped discover the structure of DNA in the early 1950s, visited campus on Tuesday to deliver a talk at the medical school.

James Watson, who discovered the structure of DNA alongside Francis Crick, spoke Tuesday about his ongoing research in oncology. In his talk, “Driven by Ideas,” Watson discussed new ideas about the causes of and treatments for cancer in front of a packed Harkness Auditorium at the Yale School of Medicine. He also walked his audience through the technicalities behind cancer treatment and research, and expressed his views about the nature of scientific research in general. Watson is best known for the paper he published with Crick in 1953 that sparked a scientific revolution in biology. The discovery of the DNA double helix had “transformative ramifications for fields such as biology and forensics,” said Yale biochemistry professor Joan Steitz, a former student of Watson’s at Harvard, who introduced the talk. Watson said he developed an interest in cancer research because his father’s younger brother died from malignant melanoma. “I have always had the desire to first understand cancer, and then cure it,” Watson said. When he first began teaching at Harvard in the 1950s, Watson said little was known about the origins or causes of cancer. Today, he said, studies of the disease have refocused on how genetics affect cancer.

Throughout his talk, Watson emphasized the need to embrace experimentation and risk in science, stressing that he does not shy away from a small amount of uncertainty in his work.

I’m having a lot of fun trying to solve cancer through thinking, but cancer is too important not to be handled intelligently. JAMES WATSON Discoverer of DNA structure “When you teach and something is 90 percent right, treat it as 100 percent right,” he said. “People don’t want to publish anything wrong. I don’t think it matters if it’s wrong. Something that might be wrong nevertheless generates motivation to do experiments, and just might be right.” Watson noted that he and others have developed new ideas about the causes of and treatments for cancer, adding that scientists have discovered that Metformin, a drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes, may also be able to protect against cancer. In order to finance and facilitate breakthroughs in cancer research, Watson argued that research should be conducted in “semi-industrial-

ized labs.” “Why not act like a war against cancer is on?” Watson posed. “I’m having a lot of fun trying to solve cancer through thinking, but cancer is too important not to be handled intelligently.” Undergraduates, Yale School of Medicine students, faculty and New Haven residents alike praised Watson for his thought-provoking discussion. Daniel Ullman ’15 said he was inspired to be in the presence of someone who laid the foundation for much of modern science. Amber Bonds, a forensic science student at the University of New Haven, called Watson “enlightening.” “His perspective is at once so different, so revolutionary and yet so necessary to the field today,” Bonds said. Vinny Craveiro, who conducts cancer research a lab at the School of Medicine, said Watson’s speech was closely related to his current work, adding that he hopes to incorporate some of the talk’s information into his research. Watson currently serves as Oliver Grace professor of cancer research at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y. Contact KIRSTEN ADAIR at kirsten.adair@yale.edu .

Water Week kicks off BY LIZ RODRIGUEZ-FLORIDO STAFF REPORTER

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“World Water Week” at Yale held its first event Tuesday night with a panel discussion on how an academic framework can help combine education and medical research to fight water diseases. The student group Yale United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) is holding several events this week aimed at raising awareness and encouraging discussion about waterrelated diseases and ways to provide access to clean water, said Yale UNICEF president Nell Meosky ’14. Kristina TalbertSlagle, a postdoctoral fellow at the School of Public Health researching infectious diseases, and Epidemiology professor Durland Fish, an expert of vector borne diseases, spoke to around 15 students about the challenges of combating malaria and West Nile Viruses and attempts to treat water. According to Fish, little progress in lowering the prevalence of vector-borne diseases has been made in recent decades because of limited funding for research. He added that the efforts to address vector-borne diseases are concentrated on medical treatment, rather than an “environmental” approach that emphasizes improvements in both education and sanitation. He said “meaningful prog-

ress” can be achieved if social activists and medical researchers collaborate, adding that universities such as Yale bring these types of people together. Both speakers agreed that there is little chance of eradicating vector-borne diseases such as malaria and West Nile Virus because these viruses can survive in both humans and non-humans. Talbert-Slagle said the eradication of smallpox was possible because the virus was contained to only humans and outbreaks could be treated, whereas controlling mosquitoes and other carriers is next to impossible. Even if residents of developing countries are educated about the dangers of vector-borne diseases, they will always still be vulnerable to diseases. “You have to have water to live,” Talbert-Slagle. “It’s not really talked about how these pathogenic organisms have evolved to [benefit from] our need of water.” Students in attendance interviewed noted that while waterborne diseases are not significant problems in developed countries, they understand that the challenge of providing access to clean water is a pressing issue in many countries. Christian Maxwell ’14 said raising awareness about these matters is crucial since solutions are simple provided that sufficient funding is available.

JACOB GEIGER/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Speakers at World Water Week’s opening event discussed the problems that stem from a lack of potable water in the developing world. Tuesday’s event was cosponsored by Yale UNICEF and Yale’s chapter of United Against Infectious Disease. World Water Week at Yale is running from

March 19 to March 24. Contact LIZ RODRIGUEZFLORIDO at liz.rodriguez-florido@yale.edu .

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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT Surveys aim to up retention SURVEYS FROM PAGE 1 will offer two new classes: one that provides a research-based study of molecular and cellular biology and general chemistry, and another that surveys all of the biological sciences. John Morrell, a professor of mechanical engineering who will teach the survey course on engineering design, said the class seeks to help students learn concepts and skills that apply to the entire field of engineering, such as data acquisition and sensors, as well as the fundamentals specific to disciplines within the field.

There’s a fundamental difference between taking [a survey course] and taking each department’s intro course separately. PAUL TURNER E&EB department chair Morrell said the engineering course will be worth a full credit and also incorporate a laboratory component that alternates with lectures. He said since engineering classes are not as prevalent as other science classes in high schools, students are less likely to be familiar with the engineering discipline, making the new course even more crucial. He added that the course will not be required for engineering majors in the 2012-’13 academic year. T. Kyle Vanderlick, dean of the engineering school, said the new engineering course will advance a human-centered approach to design, in which engineers gear their research and technological developments toward addressing specific issues, rather than “building technology for technology’s sake.” She added that the focus on real-world problem solving at the engineering school is one key area where Yale’s school excels relative to its peer institutions. The two new biology courses

will follow different formats from both the engineering course, and from each other. In the course on biology and chemistry, “Drains and Dirt to Microbes and Molecules,” students will collect soil samples on campus to conduct research on antibiotics, in addition to attending traditional lab training and lectures. Molecular, cellular and developmental biology professor Jo Handelsman, who will co-teach the class with chemistry professor Andrew Phillips, said the research aspect of the course is designed to help students feel more invested in their work, and to experience course material in a practical manner. She added that a great amount of research on science education supports this learning style, including a White House report released February by a working group that she led. Tiffany Tsang, a postdoctoral student who is helping to develop and teach the biology and chemistry course, said she hopes its format will better engage students and attract more freshmen to science majors who may otherwise be deterred by dry introductory lectures. The course surveying all the biological sciences will be taught collaboratively by professors from Yale’s three biology departments: Michael Koelle in molecular biology and biophysics, Leo Buss in ecology and evolutionary biology, and Frank Slack and Mark Mooseker in molecular, cellular and developmental biology. The four professors will work to integrate essential material from each department into the course, E&EB Department chair Paul Turner said. “It will be a unified course where all the instructors are interested in working together to cover a wide range of topics,” Turner said. “There’s a fundamental difference between taking that and taking each department’s intro course separately.” Students who major in either MCDB or E&EB are currently required to take each department’s introductory course unless they have received a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement biology

exam. But next year, Turner said Yale will require students to take a more rigorous placement examination to skip the old MCDB and E&EB introductory courses, rather than allowing those with AP scores of 5 to place out automatically. He added that the combination of the placement exam and the biological sciences survey course will help the department ensure that biology majors develop a stronger foundation during their freshman year. “Perspectives on Science and Engineering” currently has 57 students enrolled. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .

NEW SURVEY COURSES ENGINEERING

This course will seek to expose students to each engineering major, while teaching concepts and skills applicable to all engineers. Lectures will alternate with lab sessions in the Center for Engineering Design and Innovation. BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

This course will provide an integrated alternative to the traditional introductory sequence of MCDB 120 and E&EB 122 in a series of lectures by four professors from the MCDB, E&EB and MB&B departments. BIOLOGY AND CHEMISTRY

Students in this course will conduct research on soil samples while attending lectures and lab training, providing freshmen with the opportunity to gain research experience and learn in a more interactive environment.

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PEOPLE IN THE NEWS T. KYLE VANDERLICK Vanderlick, a chemical engineer and the first female dean of the Yale School of Engineering & Applied Science, holds degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of Minnesota. Before coming to Yale, she was the first female chair of a science department at Princeton.

Postdoctoral positions expand beyond sciences POSTDOCS FROM PAGE 1 alma maters. Universities participating in the ACLS program then can make offers to fellowship winners to come to their schools for two years of teaching and research. This year, Yale has made offers to seven of the fellowship recipients, and three had accepted their offers as of Tuesday, said Pamela Schirmeister, associate dean for Yale College and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. “We would really like to see the development of a healthy postdoc community in the humanities and the social sciences,” Schirmeister said. “The ACLS is a really big step in that direction.” While postdoctoral positions are commonplace in the sciences, they are relatively scarce in other fields and particularly in the humanities, administrators said. Schirmeister said postdocs can provide an “infusion of good ideas” as they spend a few years at the University at the beginning of their careers before moving on to tenure-track positions. The Whitney Humanities Center has several postdocs who teach in the Directed Studies program, and the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies is hosting around 20 social sciences postdocs this year. Individual departments also sometimes support postdocs. Postdocs can also help fill departments or programs’ teaching needs, as is the case with postdocs who teach sections of Directed Studies. Sun-Joo Shin, director of graduate studies for the Philosophy Department and a mentor for the ACLS postdocs, said the postdocs in her department “teach very important subjects which we desperately need.” Nancy Ruther, associate director of the MacMillan Center, said postdocs at the center are used to jump-start new research programs and gauge student and faculty interest in them. For Ph.D. graduates in the humanities and social sciences, postdoctoral fellowships are becoming increasingly attractive as a way to build research and teaching expertise before entering the academic job market, five current ACLS postdocs at Yale interviewed said. “Part of what the fellowship aspires to do

is teach us how to be faculty members in a department, to make that next professional step from being a graduate student to being a member of the faculty,” said Adriana Jacobs, an ACLS postdoc in comparative literature and Judaic studies. The ACLS program requires recipients to teach three courses per year during the twoyear fellowship, providing postdocs with “really good teaching experience” while allowing them more time for research than a typical faculty member, Schirmeister said. Jacobs and three other postdocs interviewed said they especially appreciate the chance to teach courses that match their research interests. Pablo Kalmanovitz, an ACLS postdoc in political science, said he is teaching seminars that correspond with the subject of a book he is working on about the history of political thought about postwar justice. He added that discussions with his students in seminar have helped him further develop his own ideas. ACLS postdocs such as Sadia Saeed, in sociology, and Emily Green, in music, also are using the two-year fellowship to organize conferences or workshops around their topics of research. Green said she is planning a conference on “musical consumerism,” how music is bought and sold, while Saeed is convening a comparative research workshop in which graduate students, faculty and visiting scholars from different social science areas discuss their current work. This may be the last year the ACLS offers the New Faculty Fellows program. ACLS Director of Fellowship Programs Nicole Stahlmann said leaders of the program have not yet discussed whether it will continue for a fourth year, and it would have stopped after its second year had the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation not renewed its funding. Stahlmann added that the program was envisioned as a “short-term initiative” for Ph.D. graduates “unduly affected” by the economic downturn. Forty-nine universities are participating in the ACLS New Faculty Fellows program. Contact ANTONIA WOODFORD at antonia.woodford@yale.edu .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 7

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST

Areas of drizzle and fog before 10 am. Cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing with a high near 69.

TOMORROW

FRIDAY

High of 74, low of 50.

High of 71, low of 44.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, MARCH 22 4:00 PM The Amy Rossborough Lecture Presents: The Crunk Feminist Collective. Come discuss crunk feminism, the CFC’s ideals and goals and their relation to mainstream feminism. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), room 101 9:00 PM Film Screening: Project NIM. Arguably the most radical experiment of its kind, Project NIM aims to show that a chimpanzee can learn to communicate with language if raised and nurtured like a human child. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), room 102.

FRIDAY, MARCH 23 2:30 PM Talk by Peter Minshall, Caribbean Carnival Artist: Blue Devils, Bats and Fancy Sailors. Minshall will discuss the form of creative expression practised within the Trinidad CArnival called “mas,” based on the practice of masquerade. “Mas” is a performance art, a form of street theater, the enactment of adornment, a dance of the cloth. Yale Repertory Theatre (1120

SATURDAY MORNING BREAKFAST CEREAL BY ZACH WEINER

Chapel St.), Lounge. 8:00 PM “The Rehearsal.” In a quirky and intruiging work, Spanish choreographer and performer Cuqui Jerez challenges the audience’s perception of reality by presenting a rehearsal, or perhaps the rehearsal of a rehearsal. The Iseman Theater (1156 Chapel St.). 9:00 PM JUST THE TIP COMEDY SHOW. Yale’s only stand-up comedy group will host a show featuring both student performers and a professional comedian, Yale alum Robert Valez Jr. ’08. Free Admission. Morse-Stiles Theater (The Crescent Underground).

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

SATURDAY, MARCH 24 8:00 PM Redhot & Blue’s 35th Anniversary Jam. Come listen to the classic Redhot & Blue tunes that this a cappella group has been killin’ for 35 years. Sheffield-Sterling-Strathcoma Hall 114.

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

Questions or comments about the fairness or accuracy of stories should be directed to Max de La Bruyère, Editor in Chief, at (203) 432-2418. Bulletin Board is a free service provided to groups of the Yale community for events. Listings should be submitted online at yaledailynews.com/events/ submit. The Yale Daily News reserves the right to edit listings.

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202 York St. New Haven, Conn. (Opposite JE) FOR RELEASE MARCH 21, 2012

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 17-time NBA champs 6 Stern with strings 11 Hrs. before noon 14 Filing board 15 Word of praise for el niño 16 House plant’s housing 17 With “The,” Bette Midler’s debut album 19 Gun lobby org. 20 Funny Idle 21 Regarding 22 Classic name in toys 24 Floors 26 Kellogg’s cereal 28 1-Across, e.g. 31 Govt. cryptanalysis org. 32 Bar graph, say 33 Alluring 35 Purely academic 39 Ones making deliveries at colleges? 41 Lady in a Beatles song 43 Carafe cousin 44 First razor with a pivoting head 46 Acquire, as debt 47 Austrian article 49 Conceals from the enemy, in a way 51 Riboflavin 55 An ace has a strong one 56 Italian violin craftsman 57 Sci. with cliff notes? 59 Shiite Islam is its state religion 63 Slangy refusal 64 Spectacular concert ender, or what 17-, 26- and 51-Across numerically contain 67 Self-esteem 68 Caribbean country 69 Dry out, in rehab 70 Cross-reference word 71 “__ were the days!”

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3/21/12

By Don Gagliardo and C.C. Burnikel

72 Plus

DOWN 1 Give up 2 Muslim noble 3 Jeans pioneer Strauss 4 October custom done in costume 5 Dict. entry 6 Some PCs 7 “I’m fine with that” 8 Greek with 12Downs 9 Crossword entry: Abbr. 10 Funny pages 11 Sleep disorder 12 Point 13 Pursue, cat-style 18 The life of Riley 23 De Beers properties 25 Hall of Fame quarterback Graham 27 One-named Irish singer 28 “Close call!” 29 Political contest 30 __ D.A. 32 Largest OH airport 34 Marvel superhero

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

36 Tots’ story starter 37 Burden 38 Roof application 40 Rajah’s wife 42 Big name in couture 45 University officers 48 “Perhaps” 50 Young dolphin 51 Windmill blades 52 Public relations concern

IF YOU USED Yaz/Yazmin/Ocella birth control pills or a NuvaRing Vaginal Ring Contraceptive between 2001 and the present and developed blood clots, suffered a stroke, heart attack or required gall bladder removal, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson,1-800-535-5727.

SUDOKU HARD

3/21/12

53 Second-deepest U.S. lake 54 New Zealandborn crime writer Marsh 58 10-Down drooler 60 “Bah!” 61 Natural skin treatment 62 “Who’s turn is it?!” 65 Stadium sound 66 Wyo. neighbor

8 7 5 2 1 2 7 4 8 5 4 5 8 6 1

5 3 2 4 8 1 6 9 1 8 5 2 6


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 6 P.M. WED. MAR. 21

Serbian cinema Some of the more well-known Serbian films include “I Even Met Happy Gysies,” “When Father Was Away on Business,” “Life Is a Miracle,” “Black Cat, White Cat,” “Pretty Village, Pretty Flame” and “Who’s That Singing Over There.”

OCCUPY

Bundy talks next season at Rep

ART & MUSIC: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN DAVID BYRNE AND JAMES MURPHY Musicians David Byrne and James Murphy — of the bands Talking Heads and LCD Soundsystem, respectively — will take to the stage of the Art Gallery to discuss their work. Moderated by John Schaefer. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

6 - 7:30 P.M. WED. MAR. 21 DAVID HOCKNEY: A BIGGER PICTURE Screening of “David Hockney: A Bigger Picture,” a documentary tracking the work of painter David Hockney as he depicts his hometown of Yorkshire, England. Introduction and informal discussion with director Bruno Wolheim. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St.

6:30 - 7:30 P.M. THURS. MAR. 22 REHEARSING INTIMACY: CUQUI JEREZ’S DO-OVERS In a realitybending show hosted by the World Performance Project, Spanish choreographer Cuqui Jerez presents a rehearsal as the final performance project. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

5:30 - 7 P.M. THURS. MAR. 22 CHORAL FEST III Student vocalists from Yale Glee Club Chamber Singers and the Yale Camerata Chamber Chorus will perform works by Yale College composers on the mezzanine of the Beinecke, with a reception to follow. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.

BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER On a poster board leaning against a tent pole, magazine cut-outs loom large, vying for space with fangs made of a clipped up credit card and a martini glass with an ice cube labeled “propaganda.” The work is titled “Bush’s Brain.” Even as a legal battle with City Hall threatens the future of Occupy New Haven, a group of artistically-minded protesters are working to protect and further expand the creative culture they have developed at the camp. Art installations, poetry and creative writing collaborations are the three main forms of creative work that have come out of Occupy New Haven since October, three organizers at the camp said. New Haven resident Matthew Osbourne, who has been at the camp since Oct. 15, said he believes the art coming out of Occupy New Haven facilitates the unraveling of the current global economic system as much as the protesters themselves do. “I think we need to bring to the public consciousness that culture is being produced [at Occupy New Haven],” said Martina Crouch ’14, who joined the movement last fall. “We’re developing an Occupy culture out of the culture we already have.” On March 14, federal judge Janet Hall granted the protest a two-week reprieve from city’s attempt to evict it from The Green, allowing members to remain encamped until at least March 28, when they will have a full hearing before U.S. District Judge Mark Kravitz. This extension gives the growing art scene on the Green a few more days before it faces another challenge to its existence. Osbourne said he has created two art instal-

lations at the camp, one of which is built on and around the tent he originally set up in October, which is now the only Occupy New Haven tent not to have been relocated from its initial spot on the Upper Green. The tent is partly spray-painted a striking orange color and serves as a surface for Osbourne and other Occupiers to write messages about issues that concern them. “[The installations comprise] an un-juried show that’s trying to be flexible and floating,” he said. “I also want to invite unknown artists to bring stuff and add to it, and known artists to contribute if they want to, but to do it discreetly.” Crouch, an art major, said that Osbourne’s work represents a style that could be perceived as street art, due to its being a product not of academic artists but of creative citizens. Part of this informality, she added, derives from his “creative re-interpretation” of found materials. Osbourne said that he has been working on art with political messages for years, with his interest in the medium growing as he became frustrated with politics following the presidential election of 2000. “I just went insane [back then], and now I try to exorcize the demons and get other people to help me with it by adding to my pieces,” Osbourne said, pointing out artifacts he has incorporated, such as a torn Dalí print from his apartment, a McDonald’s playing card from the Bicentennial and a Disney “Finding Nemo” toy in a marmalade jar. “I’m not an apolitical ape,” Osbourne said. Political motives drive a great deal of the work that is being produced, Crouch said. She added that she thinks the production of art on-site will help draw people into the

camp to have conversations with the protesters about their mission. The original vision of the camp, after all, was to share thoughts with one another about pressing political issues, Crouch said. Osbourne said he sees art a means for Occupiers to convey their complaints with a “broken system.” To add to that, he added, he has transported over 300 lbs of artwork from his nearby condominium to the Green. These works are housed in the two tents Osbourne is maintaining as installations. Another part of artistically deconstructing and discussing Occupy’s message occurs in regular weekly meetings called “think tanks,” Crouch said. “At the think tanks, people bring their creative stuff, say, a poem, and discuss it,” said Crouch, who writes poetry herself. “Most Occupy camps across the country set up these think tanks, which are all part of [protesters] informing each other.” Crouch said that she has been inspired by the Occupy movement to get involved in long-form writing, not only to inform her fellow Occupiers, but also to spread and defend the message by publishing her thoughts on her Facebook profile. “A significant amount of people have ‘liked’ [my posts], so I know I have readers,” she said. Crouch added that she plans to publish journal entries detailing her time with Occupy in a newly revived student publication called Year @ Yale, which will annually print journal entries written by students over the course of the year. Crouch said that she was particularly driven to write after signs were stolen from the camp in early February, allegedly by members of the Yale Political Union’s Tory

YALE UNIVERSITY KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Through Occupy New Haven, the Green has become the grounds for found art installations and poetry readings. Party. “I was surprised at the lack of a response,” she said. “I thought people would respond in anger, but no one did, [which] might be because some people agreed but also because some people are afraid of saying something and being negatively associated with Occupy.” Crouch said that she believes the creative power of Occupy lies in its members’ ability to take raw information and convert it into something more powerful. Occupy New Haven made one such powerful statement last Wednesday, she said, with its Big Top circus performance held on the day the police were allegedly scheduled to pull down the Occupy camp. Ben Weidner, a New Haven resident who moved into the settlement over two weeks ago, said the Big Top concept originated when the Occupiers placed a large tarp over some of the smaller tents on the Green and an unknown protester spray-painted ‘Big Top’ on it. “Once the media started asking us questions about it on Monday and Tuesday, I started saying we would put on a circus to make a mockery of the system,” Weidner

A place for arts and crafts at the YCBA

7 - 8 P.M. THURS. MAR. 22 GREAT EXPECTATIONS A screening of David Lean’s 1946 version of Charles Dickens’ serial novel.

THURS. MAR. 22 SAT. MAR. 24 URINETOWN In a new staging of Mark Hollman and Greg Kotis’ darkly comedic musical, director Jacob Reske ’14 reminds Yalies that it is indeed “a privilege to pee.” Off Broadway Theater, 41 Wall St.

2:30 - 5 P.M. FRI. MAR. 23

Yale Repertory Theatre Lounge, 1120 Chapel St.

FRI. MAR. 16 - SAT. APR. 7 THE WINTER’S TALE While undergraduates were sunning over spring break, the Yale Repertory Theatre opened a new production of Shakespeare’s tale of love, loss and forgiveness. University Theatre, 222 York St.

said. Crouch said that the idea of a circuscum-confrontation inspired Occupiers to engage in creative forms of resistance, such as erecting upside down American flags to signal distress and donning “outlandish” uniform-like costumes with heavy combat boots. The protesters, she added, intended to turn any police involvement into a “joke” by performing in outfits playing on police uniforms. As not many police officers actually arrived at the Green on the date of the planned eviction, the Big Top event became more of a metaphor, Weidner said. “The system had plans, but they just didn’t work out. We put a lot of thought into ours,” he said. Crouch said that she and Osbourne are now trying to put together a new installation piece for the site that will engage passersby by inviting them to express some of their own frustration for a small fee. “We’re envisioning at least 50 broken television sets, on which we’ll paste the images of anchors, media outlets, whatever,” Crouch said. New Haven residents will be able to

smash the images of these “very trusted, very big, kind of skewed” institutions, she said. Occupy New Haven is trying to bring together a large quantity of old television sets, Crouch added, by asking around neighborhoods and using GiftFlow, an online project set up by Hans Schoenburg ’10. Speaking of his personal future plans, Osbourne said that he hopes to make his found object installation work more immediately comprehensible. “Some people didn’t get it when it was just a mess, so I’m trying to refine it,” he said. “[It’s] been called ‘too much information’ and worse.” Crouch said that while some art work produced at Occupy New Haven may feature strong language and harsh commentary, such characteristics are part of their identity. “It’s meant to be forceful [because] the reality of the problem is not genteel,” she added. Occupy New Haven is reportedly the last Occupy protest still encamped in New England. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

In Serbian political past, filmmaker finds art BY ANYA GRENIER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

BLUE DEVILS, BATS, AND FANCY SAILORS Peter Minshall, a preeminent Carnival artist of the Caribbean, will present a talk on the performance art of masquerade.

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Imogen Hart, assistant curator in the department of Exhibitions and Publications at the Yale Center for British Art, presented a lecture on the work of William Morris. BY SHIRA TELUSHKIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Home decoration has serious artistic value, as the Tuesday presentation on “The Homes of William Morris” at the Yale Center for British Art made clear. About 60 people gathered for the talk, given by Imogen Hart, assistant curator in the department of Exhibitions and Publications at the Center. Tapestries and books created by Morris, a British artist active during the 1860s and ’70s, are currently on display at the Center as part of “Making History: Antiquaries in Britain,” an exhibition that went up in early February. Credited with founding the Arts and Crafts movement, Morris, who worked across a range of artistic media including poetry, wall hangings and furniture and book design, is known for his revolutionary emphasis on the artistic value of craft design. “Morris renewed attention to the rightful place of design in the arts,”

Hart said, adding that he elevated interior design and home decoration to an artistic pursuit. Citing works that Morris displayed in his own homes, including two wall hangings displayed in “Making History,” Hart noted Morris’ fascination with medieval design and attachment to physical places, particularly Kelmscott Manor, his summer home in Oxfordshire, England. Morris taught his wife, Jane, medieval embroidery techniques, Hart said, adding that Jane and her sister did much of the stitching for her husband’s designs. Senior Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts Elisabeth Fairman, who curated the exhibit, said that she positioned Morris’ works at the conclusion of “Making History,” because of the mid-19th century artist’s gestures to art and design of the Middle Ages and his lasting popularity today. Fairman added that Morris’ art fits well into the exhibit because his beloved Kelmscott Manor is owned by the Society of Antiquaries, an academic institution that donated 100

works to the show and is more often associated with medieval works than with art created during Morris’ time. “I think [Morris’] name still has resonance for people,” Fairman said, adding that “Making History” has had a particularly high number of visitors so far. The pieces by Morris on view include his famous editions of Chaucer’s works published by the Kelmscott Press, which Morris founded in 1891 to produce hand-designed books based on 15th century printing methods. Fairman said that in addition to embellishing the books with elaborate designs and pictures, Morris created his own typography for the project. According to Fairman, many people consider these editions of Chaucer to be the most beautiful modern books in existence. Professor Edward Cooke, who has taught a Yale-in-London course on William Morris three times, said he believes Morris to be the first theorist of crafted objects. “He is the first person who moved craft outside the trade and made it a

Yale School of Drama Dean James Bundy will direct “Hamlet,” featuring Paul Giamatti ’89 DRA ’94, next spring.

chosen endeavor,” Cooke said. “He empowered the middle and upper classes to make their own things and was the first person to say things are better because we make them [ourselves].” Cooke said he sees Morris’ philosophy as the first step in a movement toward appreciating the inherent value in “Do-It-Yourself” creations. Morris is also a useful lens into the world of design and art in 19th century Britain, even though at the time of his death he was better known as a poet, Cooke added. Hart’s lecture was part of the “Art in Context” talks that have been a fixture at the Center for British Art for over 20 years, according to Linda Friedlaender, the Center’s curator of education. The weekly, interdisciplinary talks typically feature speakers not affiliated with the Center. In 2004, the Center held an exhibit on “The Beauty of Life: William Morris and the Art of Design.” Contact SHIRA TELUSHKIN at shira.telushkin@yale.edu .

How does one document the history of a country determined to erase its own past? Serbian film director Mila Turajlic discussed this problem at a Master’s Tea in Pierson College on Monday. Turajlic’s first film, “Cinema Komunisto” tells the story of how Communist dictator Josip Broz Tito manipulated the Serbian film industry to create an illusion of a united Yugoslavian identity in the 1950s and ’60s. The narrative is told through interviews and clips from fiction films made in Serbia under Tito’s regime, and Turajlic said the movie “plays with the idea of a fictional representation of a country.” Turajlic, who was born in Belgrade in 1979 to politically active parents, began by discussing her own journey to documentary filmmaking. She said she initially studied politics and worked with debate organizations, but after the 2003 assassination of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, which Turajlic described as “really a failed coup d’état,” she became increasingly disillusioned with politics and more and more drawn to film. Studying filmmaking in Paris left Turajlic “completely starry-eyed,” she said, adding that “cinema still has a very elevated status [in France].” Throughout the talk, Turajlic noted differences between the film industry in the United States and Europe. She said that in America documentaries are often thought of solely as promoting various social and political messages, while in Europe they are treated as an art form in their own right. Turajlic also described her experiences working on various American films which were being shot in Serbia while developing “Cinema Komunisto,” saying she tried to get jobs as close to the director as possible, in order to keep learning the craft herself. Turajlic spent a year in Mexico working on hair and makeup for Mel Gibson’s film “Apocalypto,” noting that witnessing the large scale of the production and attention to historical detail was a key experience in her career. While acknowledging the horrors of Tito’s regime, Turajlic said that her own attitude towards the dictator evolved from dismissal to respect over the course of her research. As Turajlic read through Tito’s private documents, including his correspondence with Hollywood celebrities such as Kirk Douglas and Richard Burton, she said she began to understand his vision for the country. “He was a serious statesman … with a vision of how to brand and project [Yugoslavia] internationally,” she said. “None of that exists [in Serbia] today.” Turajlic reiterated her disappointment with Serbia’s ongoing failure to reckon with its past, explaining that the frequent turnover in political regimes has led to “a cyclical erasing of the past.” She said that young people in Serbia today have very little understanding of the events the country saw in the ’90s, when Yugoslavia dissolved into small ethnic states and Serbia went to war with Kosovo. Turajlic described the Military Museum in Belgrade’s

BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER Last week, the Yale Repertory Theatre announced its 2012-’13 season, which features productions with themes ranging from the French aristocracy to American immigration politics. Tied to the School of Drama, the Rep produces six shows each year and has won eight Tony Awards since its establishment in 1966. The News spoke with James Bundy, dean of the School of Drama and artistic director of the Rep, about the its role in the national theater scene and what he hopes next season will bring to theatergoers.

A

won the The Acting ComQYou pany’s Houseman Award last

Theatre?

We have two primary areas of programming: One is new works and the other is canonical works. We’re weighing subject matter and form and the vision of the artists who are going to be either writing or directing or acting in the work, and we’re weighing the balance of light and dark, of comic and tragic, and we’re weighing modes of theatricality and period. We’re also weighing our production capacity throughout the year. We’re not just producing the six shows at the Rep, we’re also producing six shows at the School of Drama. All of those 12 plays go through our scene and costume shops — the flow has to be regulated.

A

We wouldn’t produce “Hamlet” in two successive seasons. We would even be unlikely to produce two Shakespearean romances in a row — we’re doing “The Winter’s Tale” this year, so next year’s season will have a comedy or tragedy.

Q

What are the highlights of the 2012-’13 season?

A

closing of its exhibit about World War II as a symbol for Serbia’s lack of dialogue with its communist past. “We have no new narrative for Serbia,” Turajlic said, “we are living in a vacuum, with no official story.” However, Turajlic said that she tried not to allow “Cinema Komunisto’s” political message to overshadow the movie as a work of art. Turajlic said that when she began the project her approach was too heavily academic, and that she has undergone a journey to make it “a film in every sense of the word … moving, entertaining, often funny,” adding that the final product may be “faulty academically,” but satisfying artistically. Justine Kolata ’12, who attended the tea, said Turajlic’s talk reaffirmed the idea that the arts are “a very powerful instrument for informing and educating.” Blair Seideman ’14 said she was particularly struck by what Turajlic had to say about the differences between American and European approaches to documentary filmmaking, and that the talk inspired her to explore more European documentaries. Seideman is a staff photographer for the News. “Cinema Komunisto” premiered at the Tribeca film festival and has won 14 awards to date. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anya.grenier@yale.edu .

A

guides the selection QWhat process for the Repertory

Q

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

a big step. How and QThat’s why did it come about? It’s a very big play, with extraordinary costumes and hair, so it’s the kind of play that really required us to find a coproducing partner.

Are your selections informed by concerns about trends in the Rep or the shows from the previous season?

Filmmaker Mila Turajlic said that while documentaries can communicate political messages, they are also a platform for artistic expression.

tens of millions of Americans: immigration. I’m excited about “Marie Antoinette,” because it’s a phenomenally gifted writer coming to terms with one of the most iconic periods in history, and the first ever collaboration between Harvard and Yale — we’re coproducing it with the American Repertory Theater [in Cambridge]. It’ll premiere there, then come here, and we’re sharing the costs of rehearsal and the physical production.

When you program an entire season, you assume that all the shows are highlights. They’re highlighting different elements of what makes theatergoing exciting. The question is about the nature of my excitement. With a play like “American Night,” I’m excited because it’s very funny and about an issue that’s important to literally

year and have received national media attention for your efforts to promote world premieres and the work of less well established artists. Why have you consistently seen these kinds of productions as part of the ‘right’ mix for the Rep?

A

The history of the Repertory Theatre is most distinguished by its commitment to new work. This is a theater that’s produced over a hundred world and American premieres. In every age, the obligation of producers is to the artists who are alive now, which includes living playwrights. Indeed, the field can only thrive if it’s a place where playwrights are regularly being produced, and the ideas of audiences and artists are regularly meeting each other in the theater space. Because the Rep is run by the School of Drama, the nature of the theater’s work is always going to include not only canonical works but also what it means to produce new work today.

role do you think the QWhat Rep plays in the national the-

ater scene? It’s not a New York theater, but it’s also a very prominent regional one.

A

It’s not a New York theater, but it’s followed by the national press to a meaningful extent. It gives writers a meaningful platform to have their work seen and introduced to a wider audience. A play like “Belleville,” which received significant positive attention here in the fall [of 2011], is [going up next season] at New York The-

ater Workshop, with the same cast and director. That’s great for the play, great for the playwright and great for the artists involved. We’re able to invest in plays and take risks that other theaters in the country that don’t have the backing of a great university aren’t able to invest in, and so we should be taking artistic risks that are justified by our financial stability. does that mean for an QWhat up-and-coming artist looking to get his or her work produced at the Rep?

A

You’d have to ask them what it means! What it means to us is that our goal is to find and advance the voices of artists who we believe have the power to change the theatrical conversation.

do you hope the 2012QWhat ’13 season will bring to the

Rep, and how will it build on previous seasons, particularly since you started here?

A

I guess, for me, it comes down to poetry, that from the very beginning of the theater, playwrights have been thought of as poets. It’s certainly the literary quality of what language can do in the theater, but it’s also other kinds of poetry that are only possible in theater: poetry of space and time and music and big ideas and humanity.

are the themes that QThose guide you?

A

That’s a fundamentally Aristotelian breakdown of what’s possible. My hope is that somebody who comes to all six shows in the season would feel like they’ve seen a remarkable range of human experience revealed in a variety of idioms and that they would have felt that perhaps ideally that they had seen conventional wisdom questioned and had their prejudices disconfirmed. I think there’s a very high correlation between surprises and fun, and one of the oddities of the theater is that we ask people to buy something unexpected — I think that’s the implicit contract of a ticket, that you’ll see something you’ve never seen before, even if you’ve already read the play or seen it a hundred times. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

T H E YA L E R E P E R T O R Y T H E A T R E ’ S 2 0 1 2 - ’ 1 3 S E A S O N 1. AMERICAN NIGHT: THE BALLAD OF JUAN JOSÉ

Written by Richard Montoya and developed by Culture Clash and Jo Bonney. (Sept. 21-Oct. 13) 2. MARIE ANTOINETTE

World premiere of David Adjmi’s play, directed by Rebecca Taichman. A CoProduction with American Repertory Theater. (Oct. 26Nov. 17)

3. DEAR ELIZABETH

World premiere of Sarah Ruhl’s play, directed by Les Waters. (Nov. 30-Dec. 22) 4. STONES IN HIS POCKETS

Written by Marie Jones and directed by Evan Yionoulis. (Jan. 25-Feb. 16, 2013) 5. HAMLET

Written by William Shakespeare and directed by James Bundy, featuring Paul Giamatti. (March 15-April 13, 2013)

6. IN A YEAR WITH 13 MOONS

World premiere of Bill Camp and Robert Woodruff’s adaptation of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s play. Directed by Robert Woodruff and featuring Bill Camp. (April 26-May 18, 2013)


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 6 P.M. WED. MAR. 21

Serbian cinema Some of the more well-known Serbian films include “I Even Met Happy Gysies,” “When Father Was Away on Business,” “Life Is a Miracle,” “Black Cat, White Cat,” “Pretty Village, Pretty Flame” and “Who’s That Singing Over There.”

OCCUPY

Bundy talks next season at Rep

ART & MUSIC: A CONVERSATION BETWEEN DAVID BYRNE AND JAMES MURPHY Musicians David Byrne and James Murphy — of the bands Talking Heads and LCD Soundsystem, respectively — will take to the stage of the Art Gallery to discuss their work. Moderated by John Schaefer. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

6 - 7:30 P.M. WED. MAR. 21 DAVID HOCKNEY: A BIGGER PICTURE Screening of “David Hockney: A Bigger Picture,” a documentary tracking the work of painter David Hockney as he depicts his hometown of Yorkshire, England. Introduction and informal discussion with director Bruno Wolheim. Yale Center for British Art, 1080 Chapel St.

6:30 - 7:30 P.M. THURS. MAR. 22 REHEARSING INTIMACY: CUQUI JEREZ’S DO-OVERS In a realitybending show hosted by the World Performance Project, Spanish choreographer Cuqui Jerez presents a rehearsal as the final performance project. Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

5:30 - 7 P.M. THURS. MAR. 22 CHORAL FEST III Student vocalists from Yale Glee Club Chamber Singers and the Yale Camerata Chamber Chorus will perform works by Yale College composers on the mezzanine of the Beinecke, with a reception to follow. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, 121 Wall St.

BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER On a poster board leaning against a tent pole, magazine cut-outs loom large, vying for space with fangs made of a clipped up credit card and a martini glass with an ice cube labeled “propaganda.” The work is titled “Bush’s Brain.” Even as a legal battle with City Hall threatens the future of Occupy New Haven, a group of artistically-minded protesters are working to protect and further expand the creative culture they have developed at the camp. Art installations, poetry and creative writing collaborations are the three main forms of creative work that have come out of Occupy New Haven since October, three organizers at the camp said. New Haven resident Matthew Osbourne, who has been at the camp since Oct. 15, said he believes the art coming out of Occupy New Haven facilitates the unraveling of the current global economic system as much as the protesters themselves do. “I think we need to bring to the public consciousness that culture is being produced [at Occupy New Haven],” said Martina Crouch ’14, who joined the movement last fall. “We’re developing an Occupy culture out of the culture we already have.” On March 14, federal judge Janet Hall granted the protest a two-week reprieve from city’s attempt to evict it from The Green, allowing members to remain encamped until at least March 28, when they will have a full hearing before U.S. District Judge Mark Kravitz. This extension gives the growing art scene on the Green a few more days before it faces another challenge to its existence. Osbourne said he has created two art instal-

lations at the camp, one of which is built on and around the tent he originally set up in October, which is now the only Occupy New Haven tent not to have been relocated from its initial spot on the Upper Green. The tent is partly spray-painted a striking orange color and serves as a surface for Osbourne and other Occupiers to write messages about issues that concern them. “[The installations comprise] an un-juried show that’s trying to be flexible and floating,” he said. “I also want to invite unknown artists to bring stuff and add to it, and known artists to contribute if they want to, but to do it discreetly.” Crouch, an art major, said that Osbourne’s work represents a style that could be perceived as street art, due to its being a product not of academic artists but of creative citizens. Part of this informality, she added, derives from his “creative re-interpretation” of found materials. Osbourne said that he has been working on art with political messages for years, with his interest in the medium growing as he became frustrated with politics following the presidential election of 2000. “I just went insane [back then], and now I try to exorcize the demons and get other people to help me with it by adding to my pieces,” Osbourne said, pointing out artifacts he has incorporated, such as a torn Dalí print from his apartment, a McDonald’s playing card from the Bicentennial and a Disney “Finding Nemo” toy in a marmalade jar. “I’m not an apolitical ape,” Osbourne said. Political motives drive a great deal of the work that is being produced, Crouch said. She added that she thinks the production of art on-site will help draw people into the

camp to have conversations with the protesters about their mission. The original vision of the camp, after all, was to share thoughts with one another about pressing political issues, Crouch said. Osbourne said he sees art a means for Occupiers to convey their complaints with a “broken system.” To add to that, he added, he has transported over 300 lbs of artwork from his nearby condominium to the Green. These works are housed in the two tents Osbourne is maintaining as installations. Another part of artistically deconstructing and discussing Occupy’s message occurs in regular weekly meetings called “think tanks,” Crouch said. “At the think tanks, people bring their creative stuff, say, a poem, and discuss it,” said Crouch, who writes poetry herself. “Most Occupy camps across the country set up these think tanks, which are all part of [protesters] informing each other.” Crouch said that she has been inspired by the Occupy movement to get involved in long-form writing, not only to inform her fellow Occupiers, but also to spread and defend the message by publishing her thoughts on her Facebook profile. “A significant amount of people have ‘liked’ [my posts], so I know I have readers,” she said. Crouch added that she plans to publish journal entries detailing her time with Occupy in a newly revived student publication called Year @ Yale, which will annually print journal entries written by students over the course of the year. Crouch said that she was particularly driven to write after signs were stolen from the camp in early February, allegedly by members of the Yale Political Union’s Tory

YALE UNIVERSITY KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Through Occupy New Haven, the Green has become the grounds for found art installations and poetry readings. Party. “I was surprised at the lack of a response,” she said. “I thought people would respond in anger, but no one did, [which] might be because some people agreed but also because some people are afraid of saying something and being negatively associated with Occupy.” Crouch said that she believes the creative power of Occupy lies in its members’ ability to take raw information and convert it into something more powerful. Occupy New Haven made one such powerful statement last Wednesday, she said, with its Big Top circus performance held on the day the police were allegedly scheduled to pull down the Occupy camp. Ben Weidner, a New Haven resident who moved into the settlement over two weeks ago, said the Big Top concept originated when the Occupiers placed a large tarp over some of the smaller tents on the Green and an unknown protester spray-painted ‘Big Top’ on it. “Once the media started asking us questions about it on Monday and Tuesday, I started saying we would put on a circus to make a mockery of the system,” Weidner

A place for arts and crafts at the YCBA

7 - 8 P.M. THURS. MAR. 22 GREAT EXPECTATIONS A screening of David Lean’s 1946 version of Charles Dickens’ serial novel.

THURS. MAR. 22 SAT. MAR. 24 URINETOWN In a new staging of Mark Hollman and Greg Kotis’ darkly comedic musical, director Jacob Reske ’14 reminds Yalies that it is indeed “a privilege to pee.” Off Broadway Theater, 41 Wall St.

2:30 - 5 P.M. FRI. MAR. 23

Yale Repertory Theatre Lounge, 1120 Chapel St.

FRI. MAR. 16 - SAT. APR. 7 THE WINTER’S TALE While undergraduates were sunning over spring break, the Yale Repertory Theatre opened a new production of Shakespeare’s tale of love, loss and forgiveness. University Theatre, 222 York St.

said. Crouch said that the idea of a circuscum-confrontation inspired Occupiers to engage in creative forms of resistance, such as erecting upside down American flags to signal distress and donning “outlandish” uniform-like costumes with heavy combat boots. The protesters, she added, intended to turn any police involvement into a “joke” by performing in outfits playing on police uniforms. As not many police officers actually arrived at the Green on the date of the planned eviction, the Big Top event became more of a metaphor, Weidner said. “The system had plans, but they just didn’t work out. We put a lot of thought into ours,” he said. Crouch said that she and Osbourne are now trying to put together a new installation piece for the site that will engage passersby by inviting them to express some of their own frustration for a small fee. “We’re envisioning at least 50 broken television sets, on which we’ll paste the images of anchors, media outlets, whatever,” Crouch said. New Haven residents will be able to

smash the images of these “very trusted, very big, kind of skewed” institutions, she said. Occupy New Haven is trying to bring together a large quantity of old television sets, Crouch added, by asking around neighborhoods and using GiftFlow, an online project set up by Hans Schoenburg ’10. Speaking of his personal future plans, Osbourne said that he hopes to make his found object installation work more immediately comprehensible. “Some people didn’t get it when it was just a mess, so I’m trying to refine it,” he said. “[It’s] been called ‘too much information’ and worse.” Crouch said that while some art work produced at Occupy New Haven may feature strong language and harsh commentary, such characteristics are part of their identity. “It’s meant to be forceful [because] the reality of the problem is not genteel,” she added. Occupy New Haven is reportedly the last Occupy protest still encamped in New England. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

In Serbian political past, filmmaker finds art BY ANYA GRENIER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

Whitney Humanities Center, 53 Wall St.

BLUE DEVILS, BATS, AND FANCY SAILORS Peter Minshall, a preeminent Carnival artist of the Caribbean, will present a talk on the performance art of masquerade.

KAMARIA GREENFIELD/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Imogen Hart, assistant curator in the department of Exhibitions and Publications at the Yale Center for British Art, presented a lecture on the work of William Morris. BY SHIRA TELUSHKIN CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Home decoration has serious artistic value, as the Tuesday presentation on “The Homes of William Morris” at the Yale Center for British Art made clear. About 60 people gathered for the talk, given by Imogen Hart, assistant curator in the department of Exhibitions and Publications at the Center. Tapestries and books created by Morris, a British artist active during the 1860s and ’70s, are currently on display at the Center as part of “Making History: Antiquaries in Britain,” an exhibition that went up in early February. Credited with founding the Arts and Crafts movement, Morris, who worked across a range of artistic media including poetry, wall hangings and furniture and book design, is known for his revolutionary emphasis on the artistic value of craft design. “Morris renewed attention to the rightful place of design in the arts,”

Hart said, adding that he elevated interior design and home decoration to an artistic pursuit. Citing works that Morris displayed in his own homes, including two wall hangings displayed in “Making History,” Hart noted Morris’ fascination with medieval design and attachment to physical places, particularly Kelmscott Manor, his summer home in Oxfordshire, England. Morris taught his wife, Jane, medieval embroidery techniques, Hart said, adding that Jane and her sister did much of the stitching for her husband’s designs. Senior Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts Elisabeth Fairman, who curated the exhibit, said that she positioned Morris’ works at the conclusion of “Making History,” because of the mid-19th century artist’s gestures to art and design of the Middle Ages and his lasting popularity today. Fairman added that Morris’ art fits well into the exhibit because his beloved Kelmscott Manor is owned by the Society of Antiquaries, an academic institution that donated 100

works to the show and is more often associated with medieval works than with art created during Morris’ time. “I think [Morris’] name still has resonance for people,” Fairman said, adding that “Making History” has had a particularly high number of visitors so far. The pieces by Morris on view include his famous editions of Chaucer’s works published by the Kelmscott Press, which Morris founded in 1891 to produce hand-designed books based on 15th century printing methods. Fairman said that in addition to embellishing the books with elaborate designs and pictures, Morris created his own typography for the project. According to Fairman, many people consider these editions of Chaucer to be the most beautiful modern books in existence. Professor Edward Cooke, who has taught a Yale-in-London course on William Morris three times, said he believes Morris to be the first theorist of crafted objects. “He is the first person who moved craft outside the trade and made it a

Yale School of Drama Dean James Bundy will direct “Hamlet,” featuring Paul Giamatti ’89 DRA ’94, next spring.

chosen endeavor,” Cooke said. “He empowered the middle and upper classes to make their own things and was the first person to say things are better because we make them [ourselves].” Cooke said he sees Morris’ philosophy as the first step in a movement toward appreciating the inherent value in “Do-It-Yourself” creations. Morris is also a useful lens into the world of design and art in 19th century Britain, even though at the time of his death he was better known as a poet, Cooke added. Hart’s lecture was part of the “Art in Context” talks that have been a fixture at the Center for British Art for over 20 years, according to Linda Friedlaender, the Center’s curator of education. The weekly, interdisciplinary talks typically feature speakers not affiliated with the Center. In 2004, the Center held an exhibit on “The Beauty of Life: William Morris and the Art of Design.” Contact SHIRA TELUSHKIN at shira.telushkin@yale.edu .

How does one document the history of a country determined to erase its own past? Serbian film director Mila Turajlic discussed this problem at a Master’s Tea in Pierson College on Monday. Turajlic’s first film, “Cinema Komunisto” tells the story of how Communist dictator Josip Broz Tito manipulated the Serbian film industry to create an illusion of a united Yugoslavian identity in the 1950s and ’60s. The narrative is told through interviews and clips from fiction films made in Serbia under Tito’s regime, and Turajlic said the movie “plays with the idea of a fictional representation of a country.” Turajlic, who was born in Belgrade in 1979 to politically active parents, began by discussing her own journey to documentary filmmaking. She said she initially studied politics and worked with debate organizations, but after the 2003 assassination of Serbian Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, which Turajlic described as “really a failed coup d’état,” she became increasingly disillusioned with politics and more and more drawn to film. Studying filmmaking in Paris left Turajlic “completely starry-eyed,” she said, adding that “cinema still has a very elevated status [in France].” Throughout the talk, Turajlic noted differences between the film industry in the United States and Europe. She said that in America documentaries are often thought of solely as promoting various social and political messages, while in Europe they are treated as an art form in their own right. Turajlic also described her experiences working on various American films which were being shot in Serbia while developing “Cinema Komunisto,” saying she tried to get jobs as close to the director as possible, in order to keep learning the craft herself. Turajlic spent a year in Mexico working on hair and makeup for Mel Gibson’s film “Apocalypto,” noting that witnessing the large scale of the production and attention to historical detail was a key experience in her career. While acknowledging the horrors of Tito’s regime, Turajlic said that her own attitude towards the dictator evolved from dismissal to respect over the course of her research. As Turajlic read through Tito’s private documents, including his correspondence with Hollywood celebrities such as Kirk Douglas and Richard Burton, she said she began to understand his vision for the country. “He was a serious statesman … with a vision of how to brand and project [Yugoslavia] internationally,” she said. “None of that exists [in Serbia] today.” Turajlic reiterated her disappointment with Serbia’s ongoing failure to reckon with its past, explaining that the frequent turnover in political regimes has led to “a cyclical erasing of the past.” She said that young people in Serbia today have very little understanding of the events the country saw in the ’90s, when Yugoslavia dissolved into small ethnic states and Serbia went to war with Kosovo. Turajlic described the Military Museum in Belgrade’s

BY AKBAR AHMED STAFF REPORTER Last week, the Yale Repertory Theatre announced its 2012-’13 season, which features productions with themes ranging from the French aristocracy to American immigration politics. Tied to the School of Drama, the Rep produces six shows each year and has won eight Tony Awards since its establishment in 1966. The News spoke with James Bundy, dean of the School of Drama and artistic director of the Rep, about the its role in the national theater scene and what he hopes next season will bring to theatergoers.

A

won the The Acting ComQYou pany’s Houseman Award last

Theatre?

We have two primary areas of programming: One is new works and the other is canonical works. We’re weighing subject matter and form and the vision of the artists who are going to be either writing or directing or acting in the work, and we’re weighing the balance of light and dark, of comic and tragic, and we’re weighing modes of theatricality and period. We’re also weighing our production capacity throughout the year. We’re not just producing the six shows at the Rep, we’re also producing six shows at the School of Drama. All of those 12 plays go through our scene and costume shops — the flow has to be regulated.

A

We wouldn’t produce “Hamlet” in two successive seasons. We would even be unlikely to produce two Shakespearean romances in a row — we’re doing “The Winter’s Tale” this year, so next year’s season will have a comedy or tragedy.

Q

What are the highlights of the 2012-’13 season?

A

closing of its exhibit about World War II as a symbol for Serbia’s lack of dialogue with its communist past. “We have no new narrative for Serbia,” Turajlic said, “we are living in a vacuum, with no official story.” However, Turajlic said that she tried not to allow “Cinema Komunisto’s” political message to overshadow the movie as a work of art. Turajlic said that when she began the project her approach was too heavily academic, and that she has undergone a journey to make it “a film in every sense of the word … moving, entertaining, often funny,” adding that the final product may be “faulty academically,” but satisfying artistically. Justine Kolata ’12, who attended the tea, said Turajlic’s talk reaffirmed the idea that the arts are “a very powerful instrument for informing and educating.” Blair Seideman ’14 said she was particularly struck by what Turajlic had to say about the differences between American and European approaches to documentary filmmaking, and that the talk inspired her to explore more European documentaries. Seideman is a staff photographer for the News. “Cinema Komunisto” premiered at the Tribeca film festival and has won 14 awards to date. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anya.grenier@yale.edu .

A

guides the selection QWhat process for the Repertory

Q

BLAIR SEIDEMAN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

a big step. How and QThat’s why did it come about? It’s a very big play, with extraordinary costumes and hair, so it’s the kind of play that really required us to find a coproducing partner.

Are your selections informed by concerns about trends in the Rep or the shows from the previous season?

Filmmaker Mila Turajlic said that while documentaries can communicate political messages, they are also a platform for artistic expression.

tens of millions of Americans: immigration. I’m excited about “Marie Antoinette,” because it’s a phenomenally gifted writer coming to terms with one of the most iconic periods in history, and the first ever collaboration between Harvard and Yale — we’re coproducing it with the American Repertory Theater [in Cambridge]. It’ll premiere there, then come here, and we’re sharing the costs of rehearsal and the physical production.

When you program an entire season, you assume that all the shows are highlights. They’re highlighting different elements of what makes theatergoing exciting. The question is about the nature of my excitement. With a play like “American Night,” I’m excited because it’s very funny and about an issue that’s important to literally

year and have received national media attention for your efforts to promote world premieres and the work of less well established artists. Why have you consistently seen these kinds of productions as part of the ‘right’ mix for the Rep?

A

The history of the Repertory Theatre is most distinguished by its commitment to new work. This is a theater that’s produced over a hundred world and American premieres. In every age, the obligation of producers is to the artists who are alive now, which includes living playwrights. Indeed, the field can only thrive if it’s a place where playwrights are regularly being produced, and the ideas of audiences and artists are regularly meeting each other in the theater space. Because the Rep is run by the School of Drama, the nature of the theater’s work is always going to include not only canonical works but also what it means to produce new work today.

role do you think the QWhat Rep plays in the national the-

ater scene? It’s not a New York theater, but it’s also a very prominent regional one.

A

It’s not a New York theater, but it’s followed by the national press to a meaningful extent. It gives writers a meaningful platform to have their work seen and introduced to a wider audience. A play like “Belleville,” which received significant positive attention here in the fall [of 2011], is [going up next season] at New York The-

ater Workshop, with the same cast and director. That’s great for the play, great for the playwright and great for the artists involved. We’re able to invest in plays and take risks that other theaters in the country that don’t have the backing of a great university aren’t able to invest in, and so we should be taking artistic risks that are justified by our financial stability. does that mean for an QWhat up-and-coming artist looking to get his or her work produced at the Rep?

A

You’d have to ask them what it means! What it means to us is that our goal is to find and advance the voices of artists who we believe have the power to change the theatrical conversation.

do you hope the 2012QWhat ’13 season will bring to the

Rep, and how will it build on previous seasons, particularly since you started here?

A

I guess, for me, it comes down to poetry, that from the very beginning of the theater, playwrights have been thought of as poets. It’s certainly the literary quality of what language can do in the theater, but it’s also other kinds of poetry that are only possible in theater: poetry of space and time and music and big ideas and humanity.

are the themes that QThose guide you?

A

That’s a fundamentally Aristotelian breakdown of what’s possible. My hope is that somebody who comes to all six shows in the season would feel like they’ve seen a remarkable range of human experience revealed in a variety of idioms and that they would have felt that perhaps ideally that they had seen conventional wisdom questioned and had their prejudices disconfirmed. I think there’s a very high correlation between surprises and fun, and one of the oddities of the theater is that we ask people to buy something unexpected — I think that’s the implicit contract of a ticket, that you’ll see something you’ve never seen before, even if you’ve already read the play or seen it a hundred times. Contact AKBAR AHMED at akbar.ahmed@yale.edu .

T H E YA L E R E P E R T O R Y T H E A T R E ’ S 2 0 1 2 - ’ 1 3 S E A S O N 1. AMERICAN NIGHT: THE BALLAD OF JUAN JOSÉ

Written by Richard Montoya and developed by Culture Clash and Jo Bonney. (Sept. 21-Oct. 13) 2. MARIE ANTOINETTE

World premiere of David Adjmi’s play, directed by Rebecca Taichman. A CoProduction with American Repertory Theater. (Oct. 26Nov. 17)

3. DEAR ELIZABETH

World premiere of Sarah Ruhl’s play, directed by Les Waters. (Nov. 30-Dec. 22) 4. STONES IN HIS POCKETS

Written by Marie Jones and directed by Evan Yionoulis. (Jan. 25-Feb. 16, 2013) 5. HAMLET

Written by William Shakespeare and directed by James Bundy, featuring Paul Giamatti. (March 15-April 13, 2013)

6. IN A YEAR WITH 13 MOONS

World premiere of Bill Camp and Robert Woodruff’s adaptation of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s play. Directed by Robert Woodruff and featuring Bill Camp. (April 26-May 18, 2013)


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

NATION

T Dow Jones 13,170.19, -0.52% S NASDAQ 3,074.15, +0.00% S Oil $105.61, +0.00%

Romney wins handily in Ill. BY DAVID ESPO AND STEVE PEOPLES ASSOCIATED PRESS SCHAUMBURG, Ill. — Frontrunner Mitt Romney won the Illinois primary with ease Tuesday night, defeating Rick Santorum in yet another industrial state showdown and padding his already-formidable delegate lead in the race for the Republican presidential nomination. Romney triumphed after benefitting from a crushing advantage in the television advertising wars, and as his chief rival struggled to overcome self-imposed political wounds in the marathon race to pick an opponent to Democratic President Barack Obama. Returns from 29 percent of the state’s precincts showed Romney gaining 55 percent of the vote compared to 28 percent for Santorum, 9 percent for Ron Paul and 7 percent for Newt Gingrich. Preliminary exit poll results showed Romney preferred by primary goers who said the economy was the top issue in the campaign, and overwhelmingly favored by those who said an ability to defeat Obama was the quality they most wanted in a nominee. The primary capped a week in which the two campaigns seemed to be moving in opposition directions — Romney increasingly focused on the general election battle against Obama while Santorum struggled to escape self-created controversies. Most recently, he backpedaled after saying on Monday that the economy wasn’t the main issue of the campaign. “Occasionally you say some things where you wish you had a do-over,” he said later. Over the weekend, he was humbled in the Puerto Rico primary after saying that to qualify for statehood the island commonwealth should adopt English as an official language. While pre-primary polls taken several days ago in Illinois suggested a close race, Romney and Restore Our future, a super Pac that backs him, unleashed a barrage of campaign ads to erode Santorum’s standing. One

ad accused the former Pennsylvania senator of changing his principles while serving in Congress, while two others criticized him for voting to raise the debt limit, raise his own pay as a lawmaker and side with former Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton to support legislation allowing felons the right to vote. In all, Romney and Restore Our Future outspent Santorum and a super PAC that backs him by $3.5 million to $500,000, an advantage of 7-1. Neither Newt Gingrich nor Ron Paul campaigned extensively in Illinois. Romney and Santorum did, though, and not always in respectful tones. “Senator Santorum has the same economic lightweight background the president has,” Romney said at one point. “We’re not going to replace an economic lightweight with another economic lightweight.” Santorum had a tart reply. “If Mitt Romney’s an economic heavyweight, we’re in trouble.” Including Romney’s victory last weekend in Puerto Rico, the former Massachusetts governor had 522 delegates going into the Illinois voting, according to The Associated Press count. Santorum had 253, Gingrich 135 and Paul 50. If Romney continues on the same pace, he will lock up the nomination before the convention opens in Tampa, Fla., next August. However, the Santorum campaign argued Tuesday that the race for delegates is closer than that. Santorum contends the Republican National Committee at the convention will force Florida and Arizona to allocate their delegates on a proportional basis instead of winnertake-all as the state GOP decided. Romney won both states. On Tuesday, about four in 10 voters interviewed as they left their polling places said they were evangelical or born again. That’s about half the percentage in last week’s primary states of Alabama and Mississippi, where Santorum won narrowly. Despite an

unusually lengthy race for the nomination, less than a third of those voting said in the polling-place survey they hoped the primary season would come to a quick end even if that meant their candidate might lose the nomination. The findings came from preliminary results from the survey of 1,078 Illinois Republican voters, and had a margin of error of plus or minus 4 percentage points. The exit poll was conducted for The Associated Press and the television networks by Edison Research at 35 randomly selected polling places around the state. As Illinois Republicans voted on Tuesday, Romney raised more than $1.3 million at a luncheon in Chicago. He planned an election-night event in nearby Schaumburg, Ill., while Santorum was in Gettysburg, Pa., site of Illinois favorite son Abraham Lincoln’s most famous speech. Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator, has been seeking to make up in broadcast interviews what he has lacked in advertising money. On Monday, his campaign began before sun-up and ended well after dark, including four appearances at rallies around the state as well as an extraordinary 19 radio and television interviews. He accused Romney anew of putting his signature on a Massachusetts health insurance law that is similar to the one Obama pushed through Congress. Romney cut short his planned time in Puerto Rico, site of a primary last weekend, to maximize his time in Illinois. He has eked out victories in other big industrial states over the past few weeks, beginning in Michigan on Feb. 28 and Ohio on March 6. Defeat in any would be likely to trigger fresh anxiety within the party about his ability to wrap up the nomination. Illinois was the 28th state to hold a primary or caucus in the selection of delegates to the nominating convention, about halfway through the calendar of a Republican campaign that has remained competitive longer than most.

S S&P 500 1,405.52, +0.00% T T

10-yr. Bond 2.37%, +0.00 Euro $1.3269, +0.3293

New clue appears in Earhart mystery BY MATTHEW LEE ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON — A new clue in one of the 20th century’s most enduring mysteries could soon uncover the fate of American aviator Amelia Earhart, who went missing without a trace over the South Pacific 75 years ago, investigators said Tuesday. Enhanced analysis of a photograph taken just months after Earhart’s Lockheed Electra plane vanished shows what experts think may be the landing gear of the aircraft protruding from the waters off the remote island of Nikumaroro, in what is now the Pacific nation of Kiribati, they said. Armed with that analysis by the State Department, historians, scientists and salvagers from The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, are returning to the island in July in the hope of finding the wreckage of Earhart’s plane and perhaps even the remains of the pilot and her navigator Fred Noonan. Ric Gillespie, executive director of the group, acknowledged that the evidence was “circumstantial” but “strong” but stopped short of predicting success. The new search is scheduled to last for 10 days in July and will use state-of-the-art underwater robotic submarines and mapping equipment. “The most important thing is not whether we find the ultimate answer or what we find, it is the way we look,” he said. “We see this opportunity to explore … the last great American mystery of the 20th century as a vehicle for demonstrating how to go about figuring out what is true.” Earhart and Noonan disappeared July 2, 1937, while flying from New Guinea to Howland Island as part of her attempt to become the first female pilot to circumnavigate the globe.

Extensive searches at the time uncovered nothing and many historians are convinced they crashed into the ocean. In addition, conspiracy theories, including claims that they were U.S. government agents captured by the Japanese before the Second World War, still abound despite having been largely debunked. Gillepsie’s group believes Earhart and Noonan may have managed to land on a reef abutting the atoll, then known as Gardner Island, and survived for a short time. They surmise that the plane was washed off the reef by high tides shortly after the landing and that the wreckage may be found in the deep waters nearby. Their previous visits to the island have recovered artifacts that could have belonged to Earhart and Noonan and suggest they might have lived for days or weeks. Now, they have the new analysis of the October 1937 photo of the shoreline of the island. Experts say a blurry object sticking out of the water in the lower left corner of the black-and-white photo is consistent with a strut and wheel of a Lockheed Electra landing gear. Renowned oceanographer Robert Ballard, who discovered the wreckage of the Titanic and the Bismarck and is advising the Earhart expedition, said the new analysis of the photograph could be the equivalent of a “smoking gun” as it narrows the search area from tens of thousands of square miles to a manageable size. Ballard confessed to having been previously intimidated by the challenge of finding clues to Earhart’s whereabouts. “If you ever want a case of finding a needle in a haystack, this is at the top of the list,” he at a State Department event where Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood gave their support and encouragement to the privately financed project.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

AROUND THE IVIES

1

SAE ranks as the best national fraternity

According to the Massachusetts Delta Chapter website of fraternity Sigma Alpha Epsilon, the fraternity has been ranked the number one national fraternity for more than 53 years by the College Survey Bureau.

THE DARTMOUTH

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

College charges SAE brothers

Cambridge holds onto city manager

BY CLARE COFFEY STAFF WRITER The Undergraduate Judicial Affairs Office has charged 27 members of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity with hazing violations during the fall 2011 pledge term, charges that could lead to the students’ suspension or permanent separation from the college if they are found responsible, according to SAE president Brendan Mahoney. Mahoney said that administrators told him that former SAE member Andrew Lohse had submitted statements to the college accusing the fraternity of hazing. Director of Media Relations Justin Anderson said he could not comment on individual judicial charges, citing college policy and federal privacy laws, but confirmed that SAE is being charged with hazing violations as an organization. The charges against the house stem from events during both 2009 and 2011 fall pledge terms, Mahoney said. “A witness has come forward with evidence that supports the charges,” Anderson said about the organizational charges. The dates for the Committee on Standards’ judicial hearings that each implicated individual faces will be finalized over spring break, Mahoney said. Mahoney said he could not comment on the details of the evidence against individual members of SAE. A member of SAE who is being charged individually and requested anonymity due to the sensitive and personal nature of the situation said that charges against him lack plausibility because of inconsistencies in the evidence. As far as he knows, there was no preliminary investigation to establish the basic credibility of the allegations, and the process has been “rushed,” he said. Safety and Security contacted him for an interview the week after he received formal notice of the charges and their possible repercussions, and the college disregarded his request that the charges be dropped, he said. The charged SAE member said he has no reason to believe that the judicial process will become more transparent or easier to navigate than it has

BY MAYA JONES-SILVER STAFF WRITER

SAMANTHA OH/THE DARTMOUTH

Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity, as well as 27 of its members, are being charged by the College for hazing violations. been thus far. “I don’t feel that the COS process is designed to bring out the truth,” he said. The hearing for the fraternity will be DARTMOUTH chaired by a member of the Dean of the college office. SAE had already begun working both internally and with the college to reform its pledge process when the charges were filed, according to Mahoney. He disclosed the full extent of SAE’s hazing practices and worked with Greek Letter Organizations and Societies Director Wes Schaub to change practices in violation of the college’s hazing policy, he said. “We set up an internal task force this fall to address some concerns that brothers had about our pledge term,” Mahoney said. “I tried to get as many opinions as possible involved in how to change our pledge term for the better. Lohse declined to participate in this task force this fall.

Michael Fancher, the incoming president of SAE, has met with various administrators this winter with a goal to make fraternity pledge terms more open, transparent and safe.” Since the release of the hazing allegations earlier this term, there has been confusion about who in the administration is responsible for handling the issue that “bespeaks a failure of leadership at the highest level,” Student Body President Max Yoeli said. “I think it would have been good for the student body to hear more from Dean Johnson and less from Justin Anderson,” he said. Hazing is a “campus scourge” that must be eliminated, Yoeli said. However, only organic, grassroots action among the student body will be effective, he said. “Sweeping” disciplinary action will only quell “introspective” conversations within Greek and other organizations about how to eradicate malicious hazing while integrating new members in healthy ways, Yoeli said.

The Cambridge City Council passed a policy order at Monday’s meeting that would extend the city manager’s contract until June 30, 2013, to provide a transition period for the selection and preparation of a new city manager, a task the city has not taken on in over 30 years. Current City Manager Robert W. Healy has served in the role since 1981, but, as he approaches his 70th birthday, has informed the Council that he plans to retire. Healy’s current contract expires in September. “The reality is, there’s been no city manager hired in the city for 31 years, so no one on this council ever hired a city manager,” Healy said. “31 years I’ve led the city, and a 15-month period of planning for a transition was an important one.” Cambridge uses a Plan E form of government, in which the City Council hires a city manager who is responsible for running the city. But the extension of the contract was somewhat contentious among councillors, as Councillors Kenneth E. Reeves, Craig A. Kelley, and Minka Y. vanBeuzekom voted against the policy order. Kelley, who has never supported Healy in the position of city manager, disputed the claim that a 15-month transition was necessary. “We transition a [U.S.] president in two and a half months,” Kelley said during the meeting. “That we need 15 months for the manager of Cambridge just seems unreasonable to me.” Apart from concerns over the length of the transition period,

Reeves said that he did not approve of some of Healy’s recent decisions. In particuHARVARD lar, Reeves objected to Healy’s handling of a discrimination suit brought against the city. “We just wasted millions of dollars pursuing a legal matter that we should have been out of no sooner than we got in,” Reeves said. “I think in this last term there have been some real missteps that have cost the citizens.”

There’s been no city manager hired in the city for 31 years, so no one on this council ever hired a city manager. ROBERT W. HEALY City Manager, Cambridge, Mass. Despite vocal opposition, the decision to extend the contract passed 6-3. “The manager’s done a great job for a long time for the city, and this seemed like a good way to put a transition in motion,” Mayor Henrietta J. Davis, who supported the contract extension, said. “It also honors the work that he’s done for the city—we end up with a very strong local economy, and we’re going to give him a lot of the credit for that.”


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS BRITTNEY GRINER Griner, a 6-foot-8 junior at No. 1 Baylor, became the second woman in history to dunk in an NCAA tournament game Tuesday night. Her slam, which came early in the second half, was part of a 25-point effort that helped lead her team to a victory against No. 9 Florida.

Yale sports can be better COLUMN FROM PAGE 14 those in other forums, athletes would find themselves in a much better environment for all-around success — not marginalized. Speaking of support, that brings me to the second part of my solution. The administration isn’t fooling anyone in showing up to a few athletic events a year and singing the school song with the Yale Precision Marching Band in some semblance of empathetic appreciation for what the players on the field or ice do to be there. The distinction between token displays of support and genuine interest is conspicuous and palpable to athletes, coaches and the athletic administration, especially at a school where the student body’s general consciousness of the athletic scene is not as strong. There must be an understanding from the people at the top that what athletes devote themselves to — with their time, minds and bodies — is just as noble as any other extracurricular activity. The administration has created a stigma against athletes that only fosters a hostile climate for them. Yale has created a divide that not only is unwarranted and ignorant, but neglects the numerous and valuable contributions athletes make off the field. Look at what athletes are doing in labs, with research, and in their coursework, all while being told — in not so many words — that they don’t belong here. Some thanks for the people who, bearing the University’s name across their chests as they sacrifice to earn victories for Yale, are often the University’s

most visible representatives. Notice I haven’t touched even touched the question of monetary support. Admittedly, budget cuts have been crippling to the Athletics Department, but it is one of many departments here dealing with the similar strain. If finances were the only problem facing the athletic department, it would be on a level playing field with nearly the entire country of athletic departments in that way. Create a Yale climate amenable, not hostile, to athletics, and let success, and the accompanying financial support, follow. Financial support is often out of the control of those in administration, subject to outside donors and the economic climate. Other support, as shown by respect for athletes’ efforts and a willingness to give coaches every opportunity to build their programs, is completely within the University’s control.

THE ADMINISTRATION NEEDS TO VALUE ATHLETICS IN ADMISSIONS I’ve heard the arguments: Yale is first and foremost an academic institution, so to use athletic achievement as a major contributing reason for admission or as a noteworthy component of a student’s collegiate achievement loses sight of what the school is

about. Why, then, consider any extracurriculars at all? Why music? Why dance? Why drama? Why student government? What do any of those tell you about a student’s academic potential? Why not just look at grades, class selection and standardized tests? Because they don’t tell the whole story. Yalies are Yalies because they are excellent in the classroom, but Yale is not high school, and success here — whether on stage, in the classroom, or on the field — is the result of a work ethic, organization and passion evident in the kind of commitment to athletics a high school student must make to garner attention from Division I coaches, including Yale’s. As such, to decrease the number of recruited athletes at Yale is a choice to filter a group of applicants who have proven they possess the tools for success in a highly competitive and intense environment like Yale through their commitment of hours upon hours of training, travel and game play to pursuit of their athletic goals. Remedying the challenges facing the Yale Athletics Department, then, would be simple with some measure of respect for the efforts of athletes. If the playing field were leveled for Yale coaches with the same number of spots for recruited athletes, and if those athletes were shown the same support and backing from their University that is evident elsewhere, Yale athletics could reverse the decline that has threatened its proud tradition in recent years. Contact CHELSEA JANES at chelsea,janes@yale.edu .

Spring ups competition

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

For the women’s tennis team, two-season competition can improve skills but also come at the price of overuse injuries. TWO-SEASON FROM PAGE 14 round. For the men’s lightweight and heavyweight crew teams, the fall season results do not influence the springtime schedule or standings in the Eastern Sprints or Intercollegiate Rowing Association (IRA) championships. But lightweight rowing captain David Walker ’12 said it is advantageous to have two racing seasons, as the fall season allows the team to test its skills and develop a strong technical base. “We can’t row indoors, so during the winter we focus on strength, fitness and power,” Walker said. Heavyweight crew head coach Stephen Gladstone added that the fall season does not begin to approach the spring season in terms of competitive importance. The crucial regattas are held in the spring season, when national standings — and the Yale-

Harvard rivalry — are at stake. The traditional four-mile Yale-Harvard boat race, which will take place on May 26 in New London, Conn., is the oldest intercollegiate athletic event in the United States, and the winner of the race receives the prestigious Sexton Cup. But the series of three “head,” or time trial, races in October provides a break from routine training and allows the team to have some fun competing, Gladstone said. For some teams, competiting in two seasons does have its drawbacks. Women’s tennis captain Steph Kent ’12 said although the extra competition helps the team build confidence and allows the freshmen to experience dual matches before going into the more competitive season, the schedule limits downtime for the players and makes them prone to overuse injuries. For sports such as rowing, sailing and golf, however, overuse injuries are

uncommon. Heavyweight crew captain Tom Dethlefs ’12 said rowing is a physiological sport and as such, it is less jarring on the body. Back injuries occur occasionally, but most Yale rowers compete all through the summer for other teams, he added. Hatten added that golfers also do not suffer overuse injuries, and competing when the weather is warm is “just business as usual for golfers,” he said. Dethlefs rows for Team USA. Three other team members compete for their national teams over the summer after the IRA championships. “As athletes, we always want to compete,” Walker said. “We train all year for only five minutes and 50 seconds at nationals, so I’m always up for more races.”

O’Neill makes pro debut

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Brian O’Neill ’12 led the hockey team with 21 goals and 46 points this season. O’NEILL FROM PAGE 14 onds into the third period of a 1–1 tie, and he said that scoring the gamewinning goal was a “big relief.” “You want to help your team as quickly as possible, and I didn’t know if I was going to be able to make an impact right away,” he said. O’Neill is coming off a superb senior season with the Bulldogs. He notched a team-high 21 goals and 46 points and was named to the ECAC first team for the second consecutive season. O’Neill finished the season on a hot streak, receiving ECAC Player of the Month honors for both January and February and recording a combined 14 goals and 29 points during that span. O’Neill’s contributions, both on and off the ice, led to his appointment as team captain this season. Forward Antoine Laganiere ’13 added that O’Neill was an exemplary leader. “He was great, not only within the room but also with everything outside the team,” Laganiere said. “He was outgoing with all the parents and the fans and he never really got stressed out. It was a pleasure playing under him because you work hard, but you also have a good time doing it.” The season capped off an impressive statistical career that was a major factor in the resounding success of Yale hockey during O’Neill’s four years. During his time at Yale, O’Neill tallied 69 goals, and his 163 total points are second only to Jeff Hamilton ’01. He was an offensive force, who led the Bulldogs in goals scored the past two seasons and total points the last three seasons, on Yale teams that

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DENVER — John Elway flashed that mile-wide grin and turned the microphone over to his new quarterback, Peyton Manning. Talk about a powerful pair. Introducing Manning as the newest Denver Bronco on Tuesday, the two Super Bowl winners each talked about hoisting another Lombardi Trophy, this time together. And soon. “I realize I don’t have 14 years left, by any means,” Manning said. “This isn’t something where I’m just building a foundation to do something in two years or three years. This is a `now’ situation. We’re going to do whatever we can to win right now. That’s all I’m thinking about right

now.” Just so long as Manning’s surgically repaired neck goes along with the plan. Neither he nor Elway has a doubt it will, and the Hall of Famerturned-executive knew the NFL’s only four-time MVP was just what his club needed. The franchise has won just two playoff games since Elway’s career came to an end with a second straight Super Bowl triumph in 1999. Denver’s last playoff victory came over Pittsburgh two months ago, when Tim Tebow delivered a stadium-rocking, 80-yard pass to Demaryius Thomas on the first play of overtime. But things change, and in the NFL, they can change fast. Tebowmania is now a passing fad in Denver.

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A couple of photos of Tebow that once adorned the halls at the Broncos’ headquarters were gone Tuesday by the time Manning was introduced. “I believe that he’s got a lot of great football left in him,” Elway said of his new QB. And if that’s true, the Broncos will wind up paying him $96 million over five years under his new deal. After holding up his new, bright orange jersey in a photo op with Elway and owner Pat Bowlen, Manning answered many of the questions that have been bouncing around since March 7, when his old team, the Colts, released him to avoid paying a $28 million bonus and set in motion one of the most frenetic free-agent pursuits in history.

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40

30

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BY ARNIE STAPLETON ASSOCIATED PRESS

Contact KEVIN KUCHARSKI at kevin.kucharski@yale.edu .

GRAPH BRIAN O’NEILL’S POINTS PER SEASON

26

Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

Manning introduced in Denver

won two ECAC championships and received a bid to the NCAA tournament three times. O’Neill said he has been welcomed with open arms by the Monarchs’ organization and added that he was grateful for the opportunity to play right away with the team. While it’s difficult to project his prospects at this point, Yale teammate Kenny Agostino ’14 said he thinks O’Neill has a good shot at playing on an NHL team. “He’s a pure goal scorer in every sense of the word,” Agostino said. “He can score from anywhere on the ice. Everyone has hockey sense as you move up in professional hockey, but I think his work ethic and determination are really going to set him apart as he moves up.” Although O’Neill has moved on to professional hockey, he still may be spotted around campus for the duration of the semester. The reigning Ivy League Player of the Year said he will be making the three-hour commute to New Haven once or twice a week to meet with his professors and ensure that he can graduate in May. O’Neill said he wants to work on the mental aspects of his game while in Manchester. “I was fortunate to be in a good program at Yale that prepared me for professional hockey,” O’Neill said. “[In the AHL] everyone is so good physically that the way you can improve your game most is being mentally prepared, thinking through the game as fast as possible, which will help you have as much success as possible.”

0

2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012

GRAPH BRIAN O’NEILL’S GOALS PER SEASON 25

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21

16

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12

10 5 0

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2008-2009 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012

Stars indicate a team high for the season. Points are calculated by adding together the number of goals and assists in a season; goals and assists are worth one point each.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NHL Pittsburgh 8 Winnipeg 4

NHL Chicago 5 Columbus 1

SPORTS QUICK HITS

FENCING TOP ELIS HEAD TO NATIONALS When NCAA National Championships begin in Ohio on Thursday, three men and one woman will be on hand to represent Yale. The men will be led by team captain and foilist Shiv Kachru ’12, while the women’s representative will be foilist Lauren Miller ’15.

NHL N.Y. Islanders 5 Toronto 2

NBA New York 106 Toronto 87

y

BASEBALL IN-STATE RIVALS AWAIT YALE Chris O’Hare ’13 will will start on the mound for the baseball team when it heads to Storrs, Conn. today to take on UConn. Yale, which is looking to snap a two-game losing streak, beat the Huskies 10–7 last year despite trailing by seven runs at the top of the seventh.

NBA Indiana 102 L.A. Clippers 89

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“You want to help your team as quickly as possible.” BRIAN O’NEILL ’12 CAPTAIN, MEN’S HOCKEY YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

CHELSEA JANES

Revisiting the state of Yale sports A few weeks ago, I expressed concerns about the state and future of Yale athletics in light of self-imposed recruiting restrictions and the administration’s growing dismissal of athletics. These factors are crippling a once-exemplary athletic department that will, in my opinion, soon be fighting for its Division I life. But I come this week with good news: all is not lost. The solution, as I see it, is simple: First, the university must remove the extra, Yale-specific recruiting restrictions that are both demolishing Yale teams’ numbers and hindering coaches’ abilities to recruit the best of the best. Second, the University must begin to show actual support for the Yale athletics program, and that starts at the top. No, I don’t mean financial support, although that’s always helpful. But I don’t think that’s the problem: instead, I mean support in terms of the attitudes expressed towards athletes and their place in this University. The way I see it, those two simple steps would help Yale regain its footing on the slippery slope to mediocre athletics. By following these steps, the Yale administration can prevent over a century of athletic tradition from quickly becoming nothing more than history. But the issue is a treacherously complex one: The prevailing notion in the world of college athletics at schools including (but certainly not limited to) Yale is that full-fledged support of athletics means a denigration of academic standards. But look straight to Harvard, Princeton and, by extension, Stanford, to see that the two are in no way mutually exclusive. Without a change, Yale’s program will demonstrate that such notions of exclusivity are a self-fulfilling prophecy. The belief that athletics preclude academic prestige undercuts the potential for athletic success. Success is necessary to draw the best all-around student-athletes, so if the University harms its potential for success in athletics out of fear of a dropoff in the classroom, it does, indeed, force a choice, rather than a coexistence of both models of success. Yale’s first step to avoiding this tragic fate is simple: Abort the policy diminishing the number of recruits allotted each team. A mere 13 percent of Yale’s student body is varsity athletes, less than any other school in the Ivy League. It is both pretentious and unnecessary to put our school above the broadly-accepted Ivy League regulations regarding the number of allowed recruited athletes. These regulations already require a degree of creativity from coaches to stay competitive. While the ultimate goal for Yale athletics would be a rise to relative national athletic prominence, which Harvard and Princeton are currently staging, step one is to reestablish a competitive, championship stature across the board in the Ivy League. It is impossible to do this when our coaches and athletic administrators have their hands tied by a policy seeking to reduce the number of recruited athletes coming to New Haven beyond even Ivy League regulations. If the idea behind the move to reduce the number of recruited athletes comes from the notion that they are somehow diminishing the academic prestige at Yale, that idea is, quite frankly, ridiculous. Recruited athletes in the Ivy League meet those standards to ensure they can excel academically. Predicting what they will do in the classroom once they get there is just as difficult as it is for any other admitted student, or just as hard as predicting how a recruit will do on the field: Create an environment of support and provide the best resources possible, and an institution gives any student the best chance to succeed. Non-athletes at Yale are getting those resources and not being marginalized for the extracurricular endeavors. And all Yale students receive tremendous academic support. If the University would acknowledge athletic achievements as contributions just as important and hard-earned as SEE COLUMN PAGE 13

MEN’S HOCKEY

O’Neill ’12 charts course in pro hockey

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

Forward Brian O’Neill ’12 scored the game-winning goal in his professional debut with the Manchester Monarchs of the American Hockey League. BY KEVIN KUCHARSKI STAFF REPORTER Within the span of five days last week, men’s hockey captain Brian O’Neill ’12 shut the door on a storied Yale career and took a big first step in moving onto a new hockey challenge. O’Neill’s collegiate career ended with the Bulldogs’ loss to Harvard in the quarterfinals of the ECAC tournament on Sunday. But he moved toward his dream of play-

ing in the National Hockey League when he signed a contract Thursday with the Los Angeles Kings. Already, he has made an impact with a game-winning goal in his debut for the Manchester, N.H., Monarchs, the Kings’ AHL affiliate, on Saturday. “Before I got to college I didn’t realize [professional hockey] was a possibility,” he said. “I had four years ahead of me, so I tried not to look that far ahead. After my junior year it became a goal of mine, and

I’ve finally realized that goal.” O’Neill said he did not always consider himself an NHL prospect, but playing at Yale has improved his game and helped him prepare for the professional stage. The Kings first expressed interest in O’Neill after his junior season, but he returned to Yale for his final year. After the Elis bowed out of the ECAC tournament this season, the Kings got in touch again, and the two sides negotiated a contract for one year.

O’Neill was shipped out to play last Thursday when he was assigned to the Monarchs. He played in two games over the weekend, the first of which resulted in a 3–1 win over the St. John’s Icecaps in Newfoundland, Canada. The away game was important for the Monarchs, who are in second place behind the Icecaps in the AHL’s Atlantic Division. O’Neill’s game-winning goal came 43 secSEE O’NEILL PAGE 13

Sports launch into second season

HARRY SIMPERINGHAM/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

For the crew teams, the spring season holds the true competitive importance and regattas crucial for national standings. BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER As the winter sports season comes to a close, four Yale teams are gearing for their second, more contentious season of the school year. Crew, golf, sailing and tennis are kicking off their second competitive season for the academic year. For three of the four sports, the fall season does not affect the more heated spring season, but fall competitions are nevertheless instrumental to success as they allow the team to experience and size up competition. “It’s nice we get to compete a lot … to have a breather between two seasons and not just be done right away,” sailor and former women’s captain Margot Benedict ’12.

STAT OF THE DAY 163

For the sailing team, fall regattas have a direct effect the team’s prospects for the spring season. The sailing team competes in the Atlantic Coast Championships in November, and the national championship in the spring. While the Atlantic Coast Championship in the fall “doesn’t mean much for the team,” sailor and former captain Benedict said, the results from the fall season influence an unofficial coaches’ ranking. The ranking determines the teams that have first pick in choosing springtime regattas. While the fall season does not factor into competitive prospects for most teams, members of all four teams interviewed said the fall gives the team an opportunity to size up their competition, helps the athletes

evaluate their own performance and allows them to break up training.

It’s nice we get to compete a lot … to have a breather between two seasons and not just be done right away. MARGOT BENEDICT ’12 Women’s sailing Six athletes from various sports interviewed said the fall season is an important time to evaluate competition. “Most of the teams in at Nation-

als are in the Atlantic Coast as well, so [the fall season] is a good way to see where we stand going into the spring,” Benedict said. The fall tournaments for the golf team do not influence springtime standings. In fact, during the threeday Ivy League Championship at the end of the spring season, the team’s main event of the year, all teams start out even with each other, so the team rankings do not influence who makes the cut. Still, men’s captain Jeff Hatten ’12 said that the team views the fall and spring tournaments “of equal importance” when it comes to competing. The fall season allows the team to keep its play up to par all year SEE TWO-SEASON PAGE 13

THE TOTAL NUMBER OF POINTS MEN’S HOCKEY FORWARD BRIAN O’NEILL ’12 AMASSED DURING HIS YALE CAREER. O’Neill has signed a contract with the Los Angeles Kings and has already started playing professional hockey with the Kings’ AHL affiliate, the Manchester Monarchs.

Today's Paper  

March 21, 2012