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T H E O L D E ST C O L L E G E DA I LY · FO U N D E D 1 8 7 8

NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 97 · yaledailynews.com

INSIDE THE NEWS MORNING EVENING

SUNNY CLOUDY

47 49

CROSS CAMPUS A whole new wiki. An email

sent to Yale students Tuesday night invited them to join in compiling all knowledge of Yale into one “Yale Wiki.” According to the email, the minds behind Yale Wiki will publish a freshman handbook for the class of 2016 based on information posted to the new site. It’s that time. Underclassmen,

get ready — colleges are holding meetings for housing for the 2012-’13 school year, including a meeting in Ezra Stiles last night.

‘TRANSLATIONS’ A BATTLE OF LANGUAGES

DISCRIMINATION

MEDICAL EDUCATION

W. SWIMMING

Justices may hear black firefighter’s suit over exam that sparked Ricci

NEW MED SCHOOL GROUP TO PROMOTE TEACHER TRAINING

Bulldogs hit the water for Ivy League championships

PAGES 8-9 CULTURE

PAGE 3 CITY

PAGE 5 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

PAGE 14 SPORTS

Levin, Bloomberg spar over MSA monitoring NEW YORK MAYOR DEFENDS POLICE MONITORING OF YALE MUSLIMS; LEVIN STANDS BY COMMENTS BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg defended his city’s police department Tuesday, after reports surfaced Saturday that it had monitored Mus-

lim students at Yale and at least 14 other colleges around the Northeast. At a press conference at the Brooklyn Public Library Tuesday morning, Bloomberg said the New York Police Department’s surveillance helped

“keep the country safe,” the Associated Press reported. His remarks came after University President Richard Levin said in a Monday evening statement to the Yale community that police surveillance on the basis of religion, nationality or “peacefully expressed political opinions” is “antithetical” to the values of Yale. “If going on websites and

looking for information is not what Yale stands for, I don’t know,” Bloomberg said, according to the Associated Press. “It’s the freedom of information … Of course we’re gonna look at anything that’s publicly available and in the public domain. We have an obligation to do so. And it is to protect the very things that let Yale survive.” The NYPD routinely moni-

Piersonites protest master’s departure

Yale made her famous. Chen

Yunyi, a 17-year-old Chinese student, has become the “latest household name” in China after scoring admission to Yale, the China Daily reported Monday. The article explains that Chen’s parents did not use “traditionally Chinese” parenting methods for raising their daughter, and instead opted to give her more freedom. “Neither is my husband a ‘wolf father,’ nor [am] I a ‘tiger mother,’” Chen’s mother told the Sanxiang Metropolitan News.

Flip-flop? Gov. Dannel Malloy

backed out of a March rally with the Connecticut Parents Union after he found out the Union had teamed up with StudentsFirst, an organization led by the controversial former head of D.C. schools, Michelle Rhee, CTNewsJunkie reported.

End of an era. Guida’s Milk,

a leading producer of milk in Connecticut that has gained a reputation for being familyowned, is no longer familyowned. The 20 Guida family members who owned the company sold it last week to a national cooperative of dairy farmers based in Kansas City, the Hartford Courant reported. Once every four years. Next

Wednesday is the first Feb. 29 since 2008. Accordingly, the Yale College Council created a Facebook event Tuesday encouraging students to spend their one leap day at Yale at Toad’s Place.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1962 Leaders of the Directed Studies program announce that, starting with the class of 1965, sophomores enrolled in DS will have choose three of five courses on contemporary issues in the liberal arts. Submit tips to Cross Campus

crosscampus@yaledailynews.com

ONLINE y MORE cc.yaledailynews.com

SEE BLOOMBERG PAGE 4

ICE begins deportation program SECURE COMMUNITIES ENTERS CONNECTICUT; STATE COMPLIANCE UNDECIDED BY NICK DEFIESTA AND CHRISTOPHER PEAK STAFF REPORTER AND CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

Bye bye, scholarships. In

testimony to the state General Assembly’s Education Committee on Tuesday, Gov. Dannel Malloy announced his intention to cut $6.7 million in funding from the Connecticut Independent College Student grant program (CICS), which provides need-based scholarships to Connecticut students attending in-state private colleges. Malloy proposed the state cut the program for students attending schools with endowments greater than $200 million.

tored the websites, blogs and forums of Muslim student associations at colleges including Yale, Columbia University and the University of Pennsylvania, according to internal reports obtained by the Associated Press. The names of students and professors involved in Muslim student associations

GRAHAM HARBOE/CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER

A petition has circulated calling for an extension of Master Harvey Goldblatt’s term in Pierson College. BY SOPHIE GOULD STAFF REPORTER A petition calling for the extension of Harvey Goldblatt’s term as Pierson College master has reopened speculation into what led to his decision to depart after the 2012-’13 academic year. When Goldblatt agreed to a threeyear term in 2010, rumors began circulating that the administration had pressured Goldblatt to retire sooner than he had intended in part

because of his resistance to reductions in Pierson’s budget. The petition — addressed to University President Richard Levin — has garnered approximately 700 signatures since it was sent to Pierson students and alums in a Feb. 13 email, said Jeffrey Hartsough ‘12, author of the petition. “We do not wish to take an adversarial stance against the administration, but rather hope that the administration will reopen discussions regarding Master G’s departure and what appears to be an attempt to

make the residential college experience uniform across all colleges,” he said in an email, adding that Goldblatt’s reasons for leaving remain “unclear.” The administration redistributed funds between the colleges in 2010 to help ensure that students in each of the colleges had commensurate experiences. Pierson’s budget had become larger than that of other colleges in part because of donations SEE MASTER G PAGE 7

Faculty searches double SEARCHES SPAN RANGE OF PROGRAMS BUT WILL NOT LEAD TO LARGE GROWTH IN FACULTY, SALOVEY SAYS BY GAVAN GIDEON STAFF REPORTER Though Yale’s academic departments are conducting twice as many searches for new faculty members this year as they did in 2010-’11, most of those programs are not expected to see a net gain in faculty. There are currently 81 authorized faculty searches across the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, primarily intended to fill openings left by departed or

retired professors, Provost Peter Salovey said in a Monday email. While the searches span more than 30 departments and programs, Salovey said he does not anticipate that the total number of tenured and tenuretrack professors in FAS will grow significantly from those new hires. Administrators have aimed to keep the number of tenured and tenure-track faculty members in FAS at roughly 700 since the economic downturn hit in 2008. In the coming

academic year, Salovey said, he projects that the faculty size will rise to 700 or more from its current level of 691 professors. But the overall increase in Yale’s professors will only translate to faculty growth in engineering departments, as the School of Engineering received a $50 million gift last March that will fund 10 new professorships, Salovey said. The decisions to authorize all other searches were made to fill specific vacancies, he added. “Those decisions are based on a review of the department’s teaching needs, its coverage of different SEE FACULTY HIRING PAGE 7

Despite resistance from city and state officials, a controversial immigration enforcement program will begin operation today in Connecticut. Secure Communities, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement program, will begin checking fingerprints of suspected criminals submitted by local police to the FBI against ICE databases in an effort to deport criminals residing in the country illegally. While Gov. Dannel Malloy’s office issued a statement Monday that criticized Secure Communities, New Haven officials said they are still waiting to see to what degree the state cooperates with the federal program. Through Secure Communities, when ICE officials have reason to believe a suspect may be undocumented, they can issue a detainment request to the state, allowing the suspect to be held for up to 48 hours, during which immigration officials decide whether to initiate deportation proceedings against the suspect. While the program’s stated mission is to prioritize illegal immigrants who have committed crimes for deportation action, critics of the program, including local officials such as Mayor John DeStefano SEE DEPORTATION PAGE 7

CHRISTOPHER PEAK/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

NHPD Chief Dean Esserman denounced the ICE program starting in the state today.

Yale pushes science education reform BY CLINTON WANG STAFF REPORTER With the input of a newly formed committee, administrators plan to reform science teaching and upgrade science facilities to help combat the drift of prospective science majors away from the field. In December, University President Richard Levin and Provost Peter Salovey convened the Science, Technol-

ogy, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Teaching Transformation Committee in response to increased attention on the need to improve STEM education nationwide, Levin said. The committee will release a report this semester, which will include plans for new teaching strategies, research-based science courses for freshmen starting next fall and the renovation of science teaching facilities, said

Timothy O’Connor, associate provost for science and technology. “The objective of the committee is to organize a more systematic institutional effort to complement the various STEM teaching initiatives that are already taking place in departments on Science Hill,” Salovey said. O’Connor, a member of the committee, said the committee’s work was motivated in

part by two recent national reports on science education. A working group of the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology — which included Levin and was co-chaired by molecular, cellular and developmental biology professor Jo Handelsman — found in a report released this month that more than 60 percent of students who enter college intending to major in a STEM field ultimately pur-

sue a different discipline. That followed a September report by the The Association of American Universities which described an “urgent need” to accelerate reforms in STEM pedagogy. In the time since Yale’s STEM Teaching Transformation Committee formed, a subset of it compared Yale’s STEM education to programs at other SEE STEM PAGE 4


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

OPINION

.COMMENT “The first time ever a white male conservative got accused of ‘sticking yaledailynews.com/opinion

NYPD needs an intervention I

can state without hesitation that I love the New York Police Department. When New York City was plagued by sky-high crime rates and over 2,000 murders a year in the early 1990s, it was the NYPD that turned things around. The city owes a debt of gratitude to the men and women who drove crime to historic lows and did much to make the city the way it is today. So it is as a friend that I say that the NYPD is going off the rails. We caught the latest glimpse of this disaster this week when it was reported that the NYPD has been spying on Muslim student associations (MSAs) at colleges across the Northeast, including Yale. The actions officers took to gather intelligence on the Yale MSA might seem fairly harmless: They trawled public websites. Even in Buffalo, where an officer went undercover on a rafting trip with Muslim students, you might think that such spying shouldn’t concern you unless you have something to hide. But failure to be concerned implies an endorsement of unchecked government spying on people based on their religion or politics. And that kind of power, even with the best intentions, can too easily lead to the suffocation of free thought. What the NYPD did to the Yale MSA was blatantly in violation of federal rules, not because officers looked at websites, but because of what they did afterwards. Even though officers uncovered no hints of criminal activity, names and facts about students were recorded in NYPD intelligence files. Under the federal rules that govern the NYPD’s investigations of such activity, officers may visit and, yes, spy on things such as public websites or gatherings, but they cannot retain any information gathered unless it is related to criminal activity. The NYPD’s MSA reports clearly broke those rules. Police spying on organizations because of their political views was endemic in New York City in the 1960s. A lawsuit in 1971 finally led to the creation of federal guidelines in 1985, in which federal Judge Charles S. Haight ’52 LAW ’55 set strict limits on how and when police could investigate political and religious activity. After the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, the NYPD asked Haight to modify the rules. In 2003, Haight agreed to significantly water down the rules, allowing the types of spying activities that we have now seen extended to college campuses across the entire region. Unfortunately, that is just the tip of the iceberg. Jethro M. Eisenstein was one of the lawyers who filed the original lawsuit in 1971, which remains open to provide a constant check against NYPD abuses. Eisenstein told me he is currently trying to get information on how extensive the NYPD’s spying is on Muslim communities in the city, in adjacent states

and even in non-adjacent states — an expansion he called “unbelievable.” Here’s what is COLIN ROSS already known. The Gangbuster NYPD has a Demographics Unit whose mission has been to collect data on the city’s Muslims. A secret NYPD document that was leaked to the press noted that the unit, whose existence officials had publicly denied, was identifying and mapping “ethnic Areas of Concern” based on which ethnicities police felt would be most likely to produce or harbor terrorists. The NYPD sends undercover officers into such areas to mine for information in local schools, mosques, restaurants and anywhere else frequented by Muslims. In the secret report, the NYPD made clear that none of this was connected to investigations of specific plots or persons, but just for the sake of gathering intelligence on the people officers felt most likely to be up to no good. As one former ranking NYPD official told me, this type of “raking” and general surveillance of entire communities is a tactic common in the intelligence community and is thanks to the NYPD’s cooperation with current and former CIA officials. What’s most concerning has been the lack of checks against the NYPD’s attempt to start marching backward to the 1960s. The 2003 rule change eliminated the need to tell an oversight body when police spy on political activities, and no other independent body has the authority and subpoena power to investigate the NYPD — except for the City Council, which, out of a fear of being labeled soft on terror, has largely kept silent. Most of the media has been self-censoring as well. The ones leading the charge to rein in the abuses have been the Associated Press and the veteran independent police reporter Leonard Levitt. As he described it to me in an email, the department’s spying, done hundreds of miles away from the city and without the cooperation of the FBI, “makes it appear as though the NYPD has become a rogue agency.” As Levitt has written, so long as the NYPD lacks oversight, abuses will inevitably plague it and prevent it from remaining the bastion of both security and the rule of law that it has been. Here’s hoping that by spying on Yalies, the NYPD will attract the negative attention necessary to make it clear to all that it is on a dangerous path and needs an intervention from its concerned friends.

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The News’ View represents the opinion of the majority of the members of the Yale Daily News Managing Board of 2013. Other content on this page with bylines represents the opinions of those authors and not necessarily those of the Managing Board. Opinions set forth in ads do not necessarily reflect the views of the Managing Board. We reserve the right to refuse any ad for any reason and to delete or change any copy we consider objectionable, false or in poor taste. We do not verify the contents of any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co., Inc. and its officers, employees and agents disclaim any responsibility for all liabilities, injuries or damages arising from any ad. The Yale Daily News Publishing Co. ISSN 0890-2240

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COPYRIGHT 2012 — VOL. CXXXIV, NO. 97

‘RIVER_TAM’ ON ‘LEARNING TO LIVE WITH INANITY’

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST S G O R D O N M C CA M B R I D G E A N D M I C H A E L W U

Yale needs Chipotle D

ear Chipotle, Come to New Haven! Set us free from the repression of the overpriced and underwhelming! Let my people go … order burritos! We’ve been in New Haven for almost six months now, and while we are just as in love with Yale as ever, we are generally dissatisfied with the food options New Haven has to offer beyond the dining halls. Sure, New Haven is a great place for your caffeine fix or fro-yo or cheap Asian food, but in terms of classic down to earth American nourishment — and what’s more American than 900 calories wrapped in a tortilla with a large drink? — it doesn’t quite deliver. Neopolitan pizza, Wenzels and Insomnia cookies make for nice midnight snacks, but they don’t leave you with the same sense of gastric satisfaction as a full meal. And we gather we’re not alone in our belief and longing; last Monday night we joined a mob in the Branford courtyard waiting not for a Master’s Tea or an a cap-

pella concert but for 80 Chipotle burritos waiting for us inside Master Elizabeth Bradley’s house — all of which were claimed and devoured in under five minutes. Now, not to be whiners (we do love Yale, after all), but some of our other Ivy League brethren have it much better in terms of under-$10, high quality fast food sustenance. Penn, Columbia, Brown, Cornell and Harvard all have Chipotles — in addition to other delectable choices such as Five Guys and Qdoba. Even tiny little Princeton, N.J. has a Panera on Nassau Street. Sadly, the only school we feel confident saying our options are better than is Dartmouth in Hanover, N.H., putting us at dismal seventh in the Ivy League fast food rankings. If Yale is vastly superior to all of these schools — as is obvious to all of us — then why shouldn’t our food options be superior as well? Perhaps good nourishment will give us the brains and the brawn to stay on top of our schoolwork and other schools.

Yes, we are aware that there is a Chipotle in Milford, but as far as the Yale bubble and our walking legs are concerned, that might as well be on the other side of the world. While the burrito carts on York Street and outside the Medical School can satisfy a Mexican food craving, they’re not always present — and maybe not always trustworthy. On the other hand, a brick and mortar establishment with an awning bearing the name of a reputable restaurant chain would always be there to give us the product we love and expect. And if the grime of Yorkside and seediness of G-Heav make you feel like you are fighting the American corporate restaurant machine — and if Willie Nelson singing The Scientist to a group of happy farmers and pigs on the newest commercial doesn’t make your heart swoon for Chipotle — well, then, good for you. In our opinion, there is a reason chains like Chipotle are successful: The food and atmosphere are simply excellent. We are a few weeks past the

one-year anniversary of a News article (“A Chipotle for New Haven?” Jan. 31, 2011) detailing rumors of a potential New Haven Chipotle to open in 2012. Alas, we have heard and seen nothing since then. So, to Steve Ells and the other gods of the Chipotle boardroom, masterminds of all things delicious, allow us to reassure you. Take a chance on us. We know that the all-inclusive Yale meal plan and surrounding neighborhoods may not make us look like a prime destination, but allow us to prove you wrong. Come to Yale and spice up our dining experience; we will personally be first in line to worship you with our orders. We’ll have a Barbacoa burrito with white rice, black beans, hot salsa, pico de gallo, sour cream and cheese, please. GORDON MCCAMBRIDGE and MICHAEL WU are freshmen in Branford College.

AUBE REY LESCURE/STAFF ILLUSTRATOR

G U E ST C O LU M N I ST S K AT I E A R AG Ó N A N D R AQ U E L Z E P E DA

Don’t ban ethnic studies

COLIN ROSS is a senior in Berkeley College. His column runs on Tuesdays. Contact him at colin.ross@yale.edu .

YALE DAILY NEWS PUBLISHING CO., INC. 202 York Street, New Haven, CT 06511 (203) 432-2400 Editorial: (203) 432-2418 editor@yaledailynews.com Business: (203) 432-2424 business@yaledailynews.com

it to the man.’”

O

n Jan. 1, 2011, Arizona House Bill 2281 took effect, having passed the previous year on a wave of popular political rhetoric of racial tension and distrust. Republican Tom Horne, the author of the bill, accused ethnic studies curricula of “promoting resentment” and encouraging the overthrow of the U.S. government, a charge school officials in the state have decried as unfounded. Last month, the Tucson Unified School District voted to enact HB 2281, buckling under threats of $15 million in annual fines if it did not comply. In the words of TUSD superintendent John Pedicone, the penalty “would have been impossible … to absorb.” During an administrative meeting conducted in early January, administrators advised teachers to avoid books that address themes of race, ethnicity and oppression, including Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” The bill is based on the misguided belief that ethnic studies promote a radical and hateful discourse. In fact, an ethnic studies curriculum does the opposite. It intends to shed light on the often ignored and dismissed experiences of millions of Americans, including the persecution minority communities have often faced throughout the course of history. Although HB 2281 includes the caveat that it does not intend to censor instances of oppression,

that is effectively what it has done. It has forced the TUSD — 75 percent of whose students are not white — to eliminate curricula that included over 50 books dealing with issues of ethnicity and social movements. Now, there will be no more “Ten Little Indians” by Sherman Alexie and no more accounts of American minorities’ histories by historians like Ronald Takaki and Howard Zinn. Now, students in Arizona cannot count on public education to discuss Cesar Chavez and his leadership in the nonviolent American Labor Movement. Three-quarters of TUSD students will be taught that their place in history is limited to servitude and violence and will not be able to read narratives of their ancestors’ creative successes. High school retention rates show the positive impact of ethnic studies. Studies have found that minority students enrolled in ethnic studies courses are more likely to perform better in all of their academic classes and are more likely to graduate high school and enroll in college. However, ethnic studies classes do not solely empower minority students: In their investigation into the value of the courses, the National Educational Association concluded that “both students of color and white students have been found to bene-

fit academically as well as socially from ethnic studies” and that “the overwhelming dominance of Euro-American perspectives leads many students to disengage from academic learning.” A curriculum with demonstrated success including lessons on diverse cultures should be expanded, not eliminated. HB 2281’s proponents have thus far relied on paranoid rhetoric, making unfounded speculations without ever setting foot inside an ethnic studies classroom. Though the bill attempts to couch its racist motives in legal terms as an effort to outlaw “treatment of pupils as anything but individuals,” they ignore the fact that history has rarely acted in accordance with this tenet. History has instead, time and again, grouped people in broad and generalized terms, often on the basis of race. Though HB 2281 doesn’t explicitly ban books, books have nonetheless been taken from students, boxed up and sent to gather dust in a warehouse. Administrators claim these books are still available to the approximately 63,000 students in the district through the public school library system, but the system only holds a few copies of select texts. Teachers were also told they would be increasingly monitored to ensure they don’t violate the bill, thus turning classroom instruction into a fear-

ful process in which threatened teachers shy away from any curricula that provides more than a slim view of another side of American history. This climate of censorship is unacceptable. The elimination of these programs in Arizona is not just an affront to ethnic studies across the nation. It is also an affront to the entire purpose of educators: to teach students to think critically, creatively and deeply by endowing them with the tools to understand perspectives that differ from their own. The narratives found in ethnic studies texts and courses make up the many faces of American identity. States should not be allowed to edit our cultural history. We urge Yale students, faculty and administrators to vehemently reject this bill and its implicit antiintellectual crackdown. No history is illegal. As students and scholars, we cannot stand by as our nation’s history is rewritten. Rather than fear them, we must recognize the histories of ethnic minorities as crucial components to truly understanding both this nation’s history and its current state of affairs. Only then can we be said to fully promote liberty and justice for all. KATIE ARAGÓN is a sophomore in in Timothy Dwight College. RAQUEL ZEPEDA is a sophomore in Jonathan Edwards College .


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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PAGE THREE TODAY’S EVENTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22

362,100

Number of wildfires in the United States in 2010

According to data from the U.S. Fire Administration, firefighters faced over 360,000 fires involving residential buildings in 2010. The fires caused 2,555 deaths and around $6.6 billion in damages.

Suit over Ricci exam may reach justices

3:00 P.M. “Shakespeare at Yale Rep” Exhibit. “Shakespeare at Yale Rep” features production photographs and posters that illuminate the theater’s rich history of staging Shakespeare’s dramas. Whitney Humanities Center (53 Wall St.), The Gallery at the Whitney. 4:30 P.M. “Concord of Sweet Sounds.” The program explores the various influences that shaped Shakespeare’s musical offerings in his plays. This rarely-heard music will be performed by members of the Yale Collegium Musicum. Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library (121 Wall St.). 7:00 P.M. “Sovereign Wealth Funds: An Introduction.” William N. Goetzmann will speak. His purpose will be to introduce and give a perspective on sovereign wealth funds as well analyze their effects on the global economy. Linsly-Chittenden Hall (63 High St.), Room 317. 7:00 P.M. “Solutions at the Intersection of Community, Inequality and Health.” Dr. Mindy Fullilove will talk about her work researching AIDS and other epidemics in poor communities with a speical interest in the relationship between the collapse of communities and decline in health. Afro-American Cultural Center (211 Park St.), Gallery.

CORRECTIONS TUESDAY, FEB. 21

The obituary for Ruth Barcan Marcus incorrectly referred to the field of quantified modal logic as “quantitative modal logic.” The article also stated that Marcus brought a “quantitative dimension to the field” of modal logic. In fact, she developed the use of quantifiers in the field.

SOM degree builds off World Fellows BY DANIEL SISGOREO STAFF REPORTER As the School of Management creates a new degree program for international students, it is building on a model of global education established by Yale’s World Fellows program. In 2001, University President Richard Levin launched the World Fellows program, which brings roughly 20 “rising leaders” from around the world to Yale each year, trains them in leadership and allows them to audit courses at Yale’s various schools. SOM Dean Edward Snyder said the school has looked to the University’s World Fellows program in designing an international initiative specific to SOM: a Master in Advanced Management degree that will bring graduates of roughly 20 partner international business schools to New Haven to take classes at SOM. While SOM has worked with the World Fellows program in the past to bring international perspectives to issues in business education, Snyder said the new master’s program will be more integrated with the school’s regular curriculum.

We’ll be able to start adding a flow of alumni who are from all over the world to our alumni base. EDWARD SNYDER Dean, School of Management “These will be students interested in business and entrepreneurship, whereas the World Fellows obviously have broader interests,” Snyder said. “I’m not sure that in any given year the World Fellows program will necessarily get students from countries like the Philippines or Ghana, and I hope that we will be able to do that through our network.” Though World Fellows can audit classes in any part of the University, SOM has been among the most popular destinations for fellows, World Fellows Director Michael Cappello said. Fellows often find topics covered in SOM courses more applicable to their backgrounds than those offered in Yale’s other schools, Cappello said. SOM professors call on World Fellows to provide a “real world” perspective on

issues, he said, and SOM students look to the fellows for mentorship and advice. But both Snyder and SOM professor Victor Vroom, who has taught parts of the core curriculum for World Fellows, said they think the international students who arrive through the new SOM degree program will be more closely integrated with the school. Vroom noted that all students in the new SOM master’s program will be more like regular SOM students, as they will have already earned MBAs from international business schools and will take courses for credit. Though students in the new program will be able to take classes outside SOM, they will still be based at SOM, unlike the World Fellows, who come from a range of professional and academic backgrounds and audit courses University-wide. “SOM […] incorporates global ideas and material into the subject matter of courses,” Vroom said. “But it’s even more powerful to have a person sitting next to you in an elective course respond to ideas and bring to bear their own international perspective.” Vroom said the new SOM program will likely attract students from the nonprofit, public and private sectors. The majority of World Fellows, by contrast, come from the nonprofit and public sectors, said Leslie Powell, director of communications and alumni affairs for the World Fellows program. The students who pass through the new degree program will also become SOM alumni, which Snyder said will build and diversify the school’s relatively small 6,300-person pool of graduates. “We’ll be able to start adding a flow of alumni who are from all over the world to our alumni base,” Snyder said. “This will be their academic home within Yale, and I think that’s just going to be great for us.” Cappello said the start of the SOM degree program will not cause changes to how the World Fellows program collaborates with SOM, adding that he and Snyder are working to strengthen connections between World Fellows and the school. World Fellows are admitted each spring and spend the fall semester at Yale. Contact DANIEL SISGOREO at daniel.sisgoreo@yale.edu .

YDN

Michael Briscoe, a New Haven firefighter who is black and did not qualify for promotion under the exam the city threw out, prompting the landmark case Ricci vs. DeStefano, is suing the city over the same exam, claiming it discriminated against minorities. BY JAMES LU STAFF REPORTER Less than a year after the City of New Haven finalized its settlement in a bias suit filed by 20 New Haven firefighters that reached the Supreme Court, another case involving claims of racial discrimination by the city might wind up at the nation’s highest court. The city filed a petition last Wednesday requesting that the Supreme Court hear the case of Michael Briscoe vs. New Haven, which had its April 2010 dismissal overturned by a federal appeals court last year. This suit comes from the same controversy that sparked Ricci vs. DeStefano, in which the Supreme Court in 2009 ruled in favor of the firefighters, 19 of them white, who claimed the city discriminated against them after their results on a 2003 New Haven Fire Department promotional exam were thrown out due to concerns that not enough minority applicants had qualified for promotion. Briscoe, a black firefighter who did not qualify for promotion, claims in his suit that the exam discriminated against minorities and violated his civil rights. In their petition, city law-

yers say the 2011 federal appeals court decision in the Briscoe case “flagrantly contravenes” the Supreme Court’s ruling in Ricci, which was handed down after seven years of litigation. The petition claims that the appeals court’s decision to overturn the case’s previous dismissal exposes the city to legal liability for implementing the “very remedies” imposed by the Ricci decision. “The city believes that it is not in anyone’s interest to continue litigating over the 2003 promotional examinations in 2012,” Victor Bolden, the city’s top lawyer, said. “The Supreme Court’s ruling in Ricci resolved any issues resulting from those exams and everyone should be moving forward.” The city’s petition last week would bring the contested 2003 promotional exam before the Supreme Court for the second time in three years. In 2009, the Supreme Court decided in a 5–4 ruling that the the city had violated Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act by throwing out the promotional exam results, which would have left only two of 50 minority candidates eligible for promotion. The promotional exam results

were subsequently certified, 14 of the plaintiffs were promoted and all 20 shared in a $2 million settlement agreement distributed last July.

The Supreme Court’s ruling in Ricci resolved any issues resulting from those exams and everyone should be moving forward. VICTOR BOLDEN Corporation Counsel, New Haven But Briscoe, who finished first on the exam’s oral portion but failed to make the cut for promotion because of a low score on the written section, argued in his 2009 lawsuit that the exam’s underweighting of the oral section was racially discriminatory. Although Briscoe’s case was originally dismissed in 2010 on the grounds that the holding in Ricci foreclosed the suit, the federal court of appeals overturned that dismissal last year, stating that Ricci “neither precluded nor properly dismissed” Briscoe

since “[the appeals court] cannot reconcile all of the indications from the Supreme Court in Ricci.” With the case back in federal court on Church Street last Tuesday, attorney Karen Torre, who successfully represented the 20 firefighters in Ricci, filed a motion to intervene in the case because the interests of 19 of the firefighters she represented are at stake in Briscoe vs. New Haven. One has since retired. As part of her motion, she told the New Haven Independent that she will attempt to challenge the constitutionality of the disparate impact doctrine established by the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits facially neutral employment policies that negatively impact minority groups. Judge Charles Haight did not rule on Torre’s motion to intervene and ordered a stay on all legal proceedings last Tuesday, in anticipation of the city’s Wednesday request to have the Supreme Court consider the case. The stay will remain in place until the Supreme Court decides whether or not to take the case, which it will do in the next 90 days. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

Assassins returns in altered form BY CHRISTOPHER PEAK STAFF REPORTER In overseeing a class-wide game of “Assassins,” the Sophomore Class Council has taken special measures this year to avoid the pitfalls that led to the game’s cancellation last year. The competition ended prematurely last February after an email mistakenly revealed the names of all the contestants, leading to a series of emails from fake Gmail accounts and the infiltration of an organizer’s Yale email account. John Gonzalez ’14, president of this year’s council, said organizers have refrained from sending mass emails to protect players’ privacy and allocated prizes between more contestants to lower the stakes. “There was a lack of protection on their part last year,” Gonzalez said. “This year we put more effort into ensuring emails were individualized.” On Feb. 4, the 199 contestants received their initial “targets” — who they must try to eliminate by hitting them with socks — in individualized emails. Though last year’s game included squirt guns, the council elected to use socks since Dean of Student Affairs

Marichal Gentry expressed concern about contestants’ use of the guns on campus, Gonzalez said. A “kill” can only take place outside of the “safe zones” of class, work, libraries or a target’s room.

The competition among students got more heated than expected. They’ve learned from the events of last year and are ensuring that the same thing doesn’t happen again. OMAR NJIE ’13 Former President, Sophomore Class Council Gonzalez said he considered using websites designed specifically for hosting Assassins, but he eventually decided email communication would be most convenient for competitors. Gonzalez has sent emails to each competitor individually throughout the competition to avoid last year’s

complications with group emails. “We put in the extra time so that now we will not be compromised,” he said. The council has also restructured the system for distributing prizes in an effort to prevent cheating which contributed to the abandonment of year’s game. An email announcing last year’s game said there would only be one prize for first place “to ensure some good old-fashioned back-stabbing,” though the runner-up team received Yale apparel as a consolation prize. But 10 winners in this year’s competition will receive gift certificates to Miya’s Sushi, together totaling nearly $700 in prizes, according to an email to competitors. In addition, $25 prizes are being offered to four sophomores who made the most “kills” — even if they have been eliminated from the contest. In another attempt to discourage cheating, Gonzalez said sophomores are now competing individually instead of in teams. Omar Njie ’13, last year’s president of SoCo, said he believed the sixperson teams “encouraged class cohesion” among the 300 participants in last year’s game, adding that “it would have been nice

if this year’s Sophomore Class Council had done something similar.” Still, he acknowledged that last year’s organizers failed to keep the game under control. “The competition among students got more heated than expected,” Njie said. “They’ve learned from the events of last year and are ensuring that the same thing doesn’t happen again.” Christina Brasco ’14 said there are some sophomores who are taking the game “extremely seriously.” “Personally, I was only in it for the fun and wasn’t super bummed when I got taken out,” said Brasco, who was “killed” six hours into the competition. Player Bryan Epps ’14, who was “assassinated” while working at Freshman Screw, said he thinks despite SoCo’s efforts, some “tech-savvy assassins” could still terminate the game by cheating if they determined it was “worth the risk.” With two weeks left until spring break starts and the game ends, 62 sophomores remained in the competition as of Tuesday night. Contact CHRISTOPHER PEAK at christopher.peak@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

FROM THE FRONT

“No one would accuse Bloomberg, who owns vacation homes in Vail, Palm Beach, London and Bermuda, of having the common touch.” BEN MCGRATH JOURNALIST

Bloomberg defends NYPD surveillance BLOOMBERG FROM PAGE 1 and related events were recorded in reports prepared for New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly, though none were charged with a crime. In a Nov. 22, 2006 NYPD document entitled “Weekly MSA Report,” an NYPD officer reported he “did not find significant information” on the Yale Muslim Students Association’s website. “Mayor Bloomberg’s remarks reveal a startling acceptance of religious profiling conducted by the NYPD,” said Faisal Hamid ’14, the Muslim Students Association’s current vice-president, in a Tuesday evening statement to the News on behalf of the organization. “Profiling on the basis of faith is just as wrong and unacceptable as profiling on the basis of race, gender, sexual orientation or any other identity and we hope that Mayor Bloomberg comes to realize this.” The statement thanked Levin and the Yale administration for standing by the Muslim Students Association. Levin said the Yale Police Department did not participate in the NYPD’s surveillance and was “entirely unaware” of NYPD activities until the Associated Press first reported the monitoring Saturday. “The Yale Muslim Students Association has been an important source of support for Yale students during a period when Muslims and Islam itself have too often been the target of thoughtless stereotyping, misplaced fear and bigotry,” Levin said in his Monday evening statement. “Now, in the wake of these disturbing news reports, I want to

assure the members of the Yale Muslim Students Association that they can count on the full support of Yale University.”

Mayor Bloomberg’s remarks reveal a startling acceptance of religious profiling. FAISAL HAMID ’14 Vice President, Muslim Students Association The American Civil Liberties Union of Connecticut plans to submit a Freedom of Information Act request to the YPD to obtain any documents it may have indicating contact with the NYPD about its monitoring activity, Sandy Staub, the group’s legal director, told the New Haven Independent. Bloomberg criticized Levin’s remarks, arguing that Yale’s freedom to conduct academic research, teach and give people a “place to say what they want to say” is defended by law enforcement agencies such as the NYPD. “I found Mayor Bloomberg’s response to President Levin to be indicative of the very mindset that got the NYPD into this mess,” said Mostafa Al-Alusi ’13, president of Yale’s Muslim Students Association. “He chose to defend the religious and racial profiling done by the NYPD instead of owning up to the fact that they have overstepped their bounds.” In an interview with the News Tuesday evening, Levin

defended his words. “I’m a great admirer of mayor Bloomberg, for his public leadership, for his philanthropy and for his extraordinary acumen as a business leader. On the matter in question, I stand by my statement from last night,” Levin said. NYPD spokesman Paul Browne defended his department’s actions to the Associated Press, saying it was “prudent to get a better handle on” what was occurring at Muslim student associations around the Northeast. He noted that the department monitored collected publicly available information from open websites, the Associated Press reported. The Associated Press also reported that the NYPD sent an undercover agent on a whitewater rafting trip with students from the City College of New York, during which the agent recorded students’ names and noted in police files how many times they prayed. When reporters at the Brooklyn Public Library asked Bloomberg about this rafting trip, he denied that such a move went too far. The purpose of law enforcement is to “prevent things,” he said, and doing so requires intelligence gathering. NYPD monitoring of Muslim student associations took place as recently as 2009, when police set up a safe house in New Brunswick, N.J., to follow the Muslim student group at Rutgers University, the Associated Press reported. Contact JAMES LU at james.q.lu@yale.edu .

ASSOCIATED PRESS

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg criticized University President Richard Levin’s comments condemning the NYPD’s monitoring of Muslim student groups.

Report finds low retention among STEM students STEM FROM PAGE 1 universities. According to the findings, Yale is “not behind” its peers in innovative teaching, but the University lags in the quality of its teaching facilities, O’Connor said. By the summer of 2013, the committee plans to renovate most large science lecture halls, as well around 20 classrooms in Sloane Physics Laboratory, Sterling Chemistry Laboratory, Osborn Memorial Laboratories and J. W. Gibbs Laboratory,

O’Connor said. Some of the renovated classrooms will have multiple projectors, more blackboard space, computer stations and flexible seating that can be rearranged. Salovey said these initial short-term projects are intended to facilitate student interaction in small groups — even in large lecture settings — as well as to maximize flexibility in classrooms. “Pedagogical methods are ever-evolving and we believe that a key principle is to invest in high-quality teaching spaces

that are as flexible as possible,” Salovey said, adding that “improvements in teaching facilities are a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for STEM teaching reforms at Yale.” O’Connor said there are many “grassroots” efforts led by individual professors to educate students in innovative ways. For example, he said some professors are using interactive “clickers,” which enable instructors to immediately collect and view the responses of the entire class, and other courses are send-

ing students abroad to conduct research. Yale’s Center for Scientific Teaching currently offers training sessions for faculty and postdoctoral and graduate students in teaching methods that engage students. Handelsman, who is codirector of the center, said she is collaborating with chemistry professor Andrew Phillips to introduce an introductory biology and chemistry course next fall targeted towards freshmen that incorporates lec-

tures, research and field work. Handelsman added that she hopes that more faculty will consider adapting their own teaching methods to better engage students if they see the success of these type of courses. Yale College Dean Mary Miller said she hopes to allow more classes to offer trips abroad. She said she invited a group of faculty to meet with her and other deans in October to discuss introducing more field trip courses to the curriculum. “Trips can enrich the cur-

riculum and deepen interest and commitment to study in a given field,” Miller said. “I wish I could say that we had special funds to inaugurate the opportunities opened by the new [Yale College academic] calendar, but at this point we do not.” Of 1,281 students who graduated last year, 334 earned degrees in STEM fields. Contact CLINTON WANG at clinton.wang@yale.edu .

CROSS CAMPUS THE BLOG. THE BUZZ AROUND YALE THROUGHOUT THE DAY. cc.yaledailynews.com


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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NEWS

“Finish last in your league and they call you ‘idiot.’ Finish last in medical school and they call you ‘doctor.’” ABE LEMONS COLLEGE BASKETBALL COACH

UCS launches online tools for sophomores BY ANDREW GIAMBRONE STAFF REPORTER

YALE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

UCS Director Allyson Moore encouraged sophomores to take advantage of two new online tools developed by UCS aimed at helping students identify suitable career paths.

Students looking for a summer internship or job now have new tools to use in compiling their resumes and credentials. Yale Undergraduate Career Services launched a set of online selfassessments last week that help students match their skills and interests with potential careers. The two resources — called “Do What You Are” and “Focus” — were made available only to sophomores as “something special” for that class, UCS Director Allyson Moore said. Over the course of the next year, UCS is planning to release other programs tailored to specific portions of the student body, she added. “Students who are exceptionally bright, as our Yale students are, often struggle with determining an appropriate future career path,” Moore said. “And while assessments are not magic bullets, they do help students to reflect, identify their unique interests and narrow the field of career options they should further research, test and potentially explore.” Moore said the tools, accessible through the UCS website, are designed to help students think about how their interests and personalities might relate to specific professional contexts. “Do What You Are” asks students to answer a series of questions about conflict resolution and problem solving, and then generates personality assessments and lists of career fields that seem fitted to their responses. “Focus” uses information that students supply about their education and work experience to provide links to additional information about potentially suitable careers. Students must create separate log-in accounts to access each tool. Moore said she encourages stu-

Students to boost med education BY MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS STAFF REPORTER A group of Yale medical students is launching its school’s first Medical Education Interest Group to help make doctors better teachers next week. Michael Peluso MED ’13 said the organization, called MedEd, consists of medical students interested in developing teaching skills and faculty who will join as both students and mentors. Officially instituted as a registered organization in January, the group will aid the development of teaching skills among future doctors in ways that previous medical school programs and courses have not, Peluso said. “All doctors are educators, since they teach their patients on health and diseases,” Chung Sang Tse MED ’15, one of the group’s organizers, said. “Doctors also teach residents and students, focusing even more on the link between education and medicine. But are they trained to teach? Are they really good teachers?” MedEd will meet next Tuesday to formally launch the program to the rest of the medical community, Peluso said. The group’s goals include providing a forum for people interested in medical education, and connecting students and faculty, he said. One of the features of the group, member Hilary Wang MED ’15 said, is that unlike most interest groups on

Fill this space here. JOIN@YALEDAILYNEWS.COM

campus, theirs aims to encompass all students, residents and faculty members at the school. Pelsuo said that he began to consider forming an interest group after attending last year’s Northeastern Group of Educational Affairs conference, in which several schools showcased their methods for incorporating education training into their curricula. He said that two of the strongest medical education programs that inspired him to bring the idea to Yale are at George Washington University Medical Center and the University of Chicago School of Medicine, which offer medical education as a separate track. After sending an email in December to the medical school community, Peluso said he received responses indicating campuswide interest in medical education. One of the group’s aims for this spring is to develop the curriculum for a medical education elective, a two-week intensive program that is set to be piloted this summer, Peluso said. The group also aims to initiate mentorship programs for faculty and students and monthly workshops for skill development. One of the group’s projects includes setting up a database of available opportunities for medical students to build skills as teachers, which include working as teaching assistants for histology and anatomy classes, and tutoring first-year students.

So far, more than 35 faculty members and over 60 students have registered to attend next Tuesday’s meeting, Peluso said. He added that medical school faculty and staff have been very supportive of MedEd, and that the group did not expect such a positive response. Recently, he added, medical schools are recognizing the “clinician educator” as a possible post-medical school option. Instead of recognition according to the number of published papers or patients, they are noted for their teaching ability. Janet Hafler, the medical school’s assistant dean for educational scholarship and the group’s primary advisor, said although many doctors are involved in teaching, very few have any training in education. She added that medical school administrators and faculty have informally discussed the need for better medical education training in the past. The school’s clinical skills class is one of the few current courses in which students teach each other, she said. The next Northeastern Group of Educational Affairs conference will take place March 23-25 at Tufts University School of Medicine. The medical school will provide funding for four students to attend the conference. Contact MARIANA LOPEZ-ROSAS at mariana.lopez-rosas@yale.edu .

dents to take both tests, as they serve different purposes. She added that students should visit the UCS office at 55 Whitney Ave. and meet with a representative to “debrief” the results of the tests.

Students who are exceptionally bright… often struggle with determining an appropriate future career path. ALLYSON MOORE Director, UCS “Do What You are” and “Focus” were announced to the class of 2014 in an email from the Sophomore Class Council last Thursday, and Moore said about 60 students have already registered for or expressed interest in an online assessment. But only one of 10 sophomores interviewed had heard of the new tools. Five of those students also said they have never utilized UCS services. Serena Candelaria ’14 said she has not yet signed up for either a “Do What You Are” or “Focus” account, but would consider doing so if she does not line up a summer internship or job before the start of spring break. A member of Timothy Dwight College, Candelaria said that if she decides to use the new career tools, she would likely make the “relatively short walk” to UCS to discuss her results. “I’m starting to get a little worried about what I’m doing this summer and whether I’ll gain any experience for future jobs,” Candelaria said. “Hopefully these new tools will help me figure out what aspects of my personality and resume to emphasize that play to my

strengths.” But Zach Bell ’14 said he was not aware of the new online tools, adding that he thinks UCS needs to do a better job publicizing its resources. Other student resources on the UCS website include sample resumes, cover letter advice and interviewing tips. Contact ANDREW GIAMBRONE at andrew.giambrone@yale.edu .

U C S CA R E E R ASSESSMENT TOOLS Last week, Undergraduate Career Services released two online self-assessment tools to sophomores that are designed to help them determine career possibilities. According to the UCS website: DO WHAT YOU ARE

is “a personality assessment designed to provide feedback about your patterns of behavior and preferences. This assessment will generate a report which will provide you with information about careers that are matched to you based on your personal strengths and blind spots.” FOCUS

is “an online interactive career and education planning system which combines selfassessment, career exploration and decision making. The assessment will generate a report which will help you connect your interests, values and skill with potential career paths.”


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

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FROM THE FRONT Most searches to fill specific vacancies FACULTY HIRING FROM PAGE 1 fields, opportunities to increase the diversity of the faculty and opportunities to recruit a particularly distinguished scholar or scientist to Yale,” Salovey said. Currently, the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Steering Committee has authorized searches for West Campus, 14 departments and programs in the humanities, six in the social sciences, four in engineering, and eight in the biological and physical sciences, Salovey said. Deputy Provost Lloyd Suttle said in a Tuesday email that the majority of those searches began this summer, though roughly 10 carried over from last year. Despite the overall increase in faculty searches, History Department chair Laura Engelstein said in a Tuesday email that her department has only been approved to look for two new hires — one junior faculty member in modern Middle East history and one in Latin American history. Engelstein said the department, which currently has 61 assistant, associate and tenured professors, has seen a reduction in authorized searches in recent years and has positions that have remained vacant since 2009. “There are fields we might want to add, but these are decisions the department will have to make, in consultation with the deans and provosts, in relation to the opening of the two new colleges and to the budget situation in coming years,” she said. Within the Mathematics Department, the only authorized searches are two for senior faculty that began last spring and have yet to be completed, department chair Yair Minsky said. The department has shrunk to its current size of 16 professors over the past 15 years, Minsky said, though he added that it has grown slightly over the past two years and shifted toward hiring more tenure-track faculty. The Sociology Department, which will have 19 faculty members after two new professors begin work on July 1, had one search for a senior faculty member approved last semester, department chair Julia Adams said. She added that the department has grown to a “healthy size” over the past decade, following its decline in the early 1990s. Administrators determine the number of searches to authorize each year based on projections about faculty departures and how many hires will result from ongoing searches, Salovey said. He added that senior faculty searches can take two or three years, while searches for assistant professors are generally completed the year they are approved. There were 34 authorized searches in the 2010-’11 academic year, Salovey said. Contact GAVAN GIDEON at gavan.gideon@yale.edu .

“The great social adventure of America is no longer the conquest of the wilderness but the absorption of 50 different peoples.” WALTER LIPPMANN AMERICAN JOURNALIST

Over objections, ICE begins program DEPORTATION FROM PAGE 1 Jr. and New Haven Police Department Chief Dean Esserman, argue that in practice it deports undocumented residents who have a minor or nonexistent criminal record, in addition to having damaging collateral consequences for local law enforcement. In Monday’s statement, Mike Lawlor, the state’s undersecretary for criminal justice policy and planning, said Malloy has ordered Department of Corrections Commissioner Leo Arnone to review the program, and said the state would decide whether to honor ICE’s detainment requests on a case-by-case basis. “We still have yet to see a specific policy from the state regarding how it will handle detainers issued as a result of Secure Communities,” City Hall spokeswoman Elizabeth Benton ’04 said. “We are looking forward to seeing the policy.” In a Tuesday email, Lawlor said some jurisdictions choose to ignore every detainment request from ICE while others decide not to honor a portion of the federal requests. Connecticut, he said, will fall in the latter category. A 2011 review of Secure Communities by the Department of Homeland Security found that “the impact of Secure Communities” extended beyond dangerous offenders. A Yale Law School study of Secure Communities in Fairfield County, where it has been active since 2010, found that 71 percent of those deported through the program were not violent or multiple offenders. DeStefano and several city and state officials held a press conference at City Hall Monday calling on ICE to delay implementation of the program, which is currently active in 30 states, and asked Malloy to distinguish between serious and low-level offenders in han-

dling detainment requests. Benton repeated some of the criticism leveled at Secure Communities. “Secure Communities is a misguided and mishandled program that will neither make New Haven more secure nor a stronger community,” Benton said. “Conversely, Secure Communities will harm community policing efforts in New Haven to build trust between immigrant communities and the police department.” ICE spokesperson Ross Feinstein declined to respond to questions Tuesday, but instead issued a statement that announced a training program — to be run by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties — that will train local law enforcement agencies on how to provide more information about Secure Communities to the public. Feinstein’s statement emphasizes that Secure Communities prioritizes the deportation of criminals. “Approximately 94 percent of the total Secure Communities removals fall within ICE’s civil enforcement priorities, including convicted criminals, recent illegal border entrants and those who game the immigration system,” the statement said. Lt. Paul Vance, a spokesperson for the Connecticut State Police, said Tuesday that he was unaware of the program’s impending implementation in the state and had not been notified by ICE that the program would begin. Neither were top New Haven officials, including DeStefano and Esserman. Benton said city officials learned that Secure Communities would begin in Connecticut through secondhand sources, although she added that an email may have been sent to former NHPD Chief Frank Limon, who left New

CHRIS PEAK/SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

State Rep. Juan Candelaria joined city officials for a press conference Monday urging a delay in the implementation of Secure Communities, a federal deportation program. Haven last fall. Fairfield Police Department Chief Gary MacNamara said the program has not changed the way his department works. Since his officers already submit fingerprints to the FBI, Secure Communities operates in the background and only “piggybacks” off their arrests, he said. “We haven’t become immigration officers,” MacNamara said. “We aren’t out looking for immigrants. We just do our job the way we always did it.” MacNamara said he has seen no difference in relations between Hispan-

ics and police officers, but he added that “every community is different.” “We need the community support to do our job, so if there were concerns in our community, we would certainly want to explain ourselves better,” he added. Secure Communities began under the Bush administration in 2008 and will become mandatory nationwide by 2013. Contact NICK DEFIESTA at nicholas.defiesta@yale.edu and CHRISTOPHER PEAK at christopher.peak@yale.edu .

Master’s departure draws scrutiny MASTER G FROM PAGE 1 from alumni. Levin told the News in 2010 that administrators and Goldblatt had “agreed mutually” that he would step down in 2013 after serving as master for 18 years. Levin declined to comment Tuesday night on the petition, and Goldblatt did not respond to requests for comment.

If [Goldblatt] is being forced to leave because he refused to back down in administrative debates, then I think Piersonites want some honesty about that decision from the administration. BONNIE ANTOSH ’13 All seven signatories interviewed said they signed the petition out of their respect and admiration for Goldblatt, and most said they did not completely understand the circumstances that led to his decision to step down. Bonnie Antosh ’13 said she signed the petition “in case Master G’s choice to leave[was] not voluntary.”

“Students want to express their appreciation for a man who has contributed so much to their experience of Pierson as a home,” she said in an email. “If he’s being forced to leave because he refused to back down in administrative debates, then I think Piersonites want some honesty about that decision from the administration.” All Pierson students interviewed praised Goldblatt’s friendly nature and devotion to his students. Sarah Armitage ’12 said Goldblatt has been a strong mentor for her throughout her Yale years, and Elise Brown ’12 said he “makes Pierson feel like a home and a community, rather than just a fancy dorm.” But Nicholas Aubin ’14, who declined to sign the petition, said he thinks the petition inappropriately exploits Goldblatt’s upcoming departure in order to dispute the equalization of residential college budgets. “There are deeper issues worth addressing in the structure and arrangement of Yale’s residential college system, but I think it would be disrespectful to Master G to use the occasion of his resignation as a platform to address them,” Aubin said in an email. “Let us instead celebrate the legacy of a great master and a good man.” Though Goldblatt intends to leave his post in 2013, he will remain at Yale as a professor of medieval Slavic literature. Contact SOPHIE GOULD at sophie.gould@yale.edu .

P R I M A RY S O U R C E : T EXT O F P E T I T I O N Dear President Levin, We write to you as concerned Pierson College students and alumni to affirm the power of community in the residential colleges and to ask for your help. We understand the centrality of the Master in residential college life and that successfully fulfilling that role goes beyond simply supplying funds for events, research, and summer projects, organizing study breaks, arranging master’s teas, et al. Masters can provide the support, wisdom, and friendship that makes a residential colleges a family rather than a collection of students sharing a dormitory. Master Harvey Goldblatt, affectionately known as “Master G”, uniquely exemplifies these admirable qualities. His emanating warmth, infectious devotion, and compassionate spirit have made him a pillar of Pierson College’s myriad successes over the past seventeen and one-half years. Master G consistently goes above and beyond the call of duty to create a supportive and lifelong community for Pierson College students and alumni. We understand Master G is currently scheduled to leave the Mastership of Pierson College at the end of the 2012-2013 academic year. Needlessly losing an inspirational leader such as Master G would be devastating not only to Pierson College students, but to our residential college system and Yale University as well. We ask for your help to prevail upon Master G to remain as Pierson College Master beyond the 2012-2013 academic year. Thank you, Pierson College Students Past, Present, and Future


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ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 12 P.M. WED. FEB. 22 THE POLITICS OF P(A)LACE: ROYAL SPACE IN DOWNTOWN BANGKOK The Southeast Asia Studies Brown Bag Seminar Series presents Serhat Ünaldi, a doctoral candidate in Southeast Asian Studies at the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. His dissertation, part-sociology part-architecture, will delve into the city building project that created today’s Bangkok — the world’s 17th tallest city in terms of skyscrapers. Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Ave.

12:15 P.M. WED. FEB. 22

“Theater is one of the few places left where we are in a dialogue right now. Everything has become so partisan … that conversation is almost impossible.” PAULA VOGEL AMERICAN PLAYWRIGHT

In ‘Translations,’ a language war BY ANYA GRENIER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Opening today, the Yale Dramatic Association’s spring mainstage production, “Translations,” deals with language and the fate of those confronted by its loss. Written by Irish playwright Brian Friel in 1980, the play takes place in a small Irish village in the 1830s that is in the midst of being forcibly Anglicized by occupying British troops. While taking on weighty themes, the show maintains a lighter appeal as well — as Dramat President Meredith Davis ’13 said, “it’s very intellectual, but it’s a romance and it’s funny.” In the ensuing culture clash

between the Irish and British, neither understands the other’s native tongue, and the play centers around those characters caught between the two sides. New York-based director Lauren Keating said she was drawn in by the play’s themes of searching for home and community — and sometimes failing. Keating said that trying to communicate and being unable to do so is a problem to which many theater artists can especially relate. Despite the universality of the play’s themes, it is also very specific to a particular moment in Ireland’s past, said Edward Delman ’12, who plays the part of the schoolmaster’s son Manus. He added that it was difficult for

the cast to understand the consciousness of the time. “It’s a challenge to understand where both Brian Friel and these characters are coming from,” Delman said. Actors and designers worked together to make the production as authentic as possible, from costume and hair styles to set design. Keating said that by paying such close attention to detail, she hopes the show will convey that the Irish culture is at risk of being lost. “We wanted to create a very cozy, communal environment, making it textured, to feel like we can touch it and hold it, and then show the loss of that,” Keating said. Producer Yuvika Tolani ’14

said that from the beginning, the director sought to make the play a wholly immersive experience — even within the enormous space of the University Theatre. To draw the audience into the world of the show, Keating chose to move all of the action onto the first five feet of the actual stage and then build a custom stage extension. Keating said that manipulating the physical space of the theater is also a way of conveying the themes of the play. By not using the entirety of the stage and space until the very end of the play, the production shows a shift in the nature of the community. “At first we see these people, and they seem big, and their

world seems very small, and by the end of the play its the world that is very big and the people are very small,” Keating said. Because language barriers play such a key role in the show, actors took lessons with a professional dialect coach. While all the actors speak English, Irish and British accents are meant to denote English and Gaelic respectively. Four members of the cast and crew interviewed cited the accent training as the most challenging part of the production. “I thought I could do a British accent before,” said Daniel Kovalcik ’15, who plays a British captain in the play. “[The dialect coach] went to each one of the actors and told us what we were

doing was completely wrong.” Adding to the challenge of learning an accent, some actors have to transition seamlessly between proper British and heavily regional Irish accents within a scene. Working alongside a team of outside designers gave all students involved a chance to experience how the professional theater world works, Tolani said. As the Dramat’s mainstage production, she explained, “Translations” involved working “on a scale that doesn’t exist anywhere else in theater at Yale.” Jamie Biondi ’12, who plays the part of the town’s school master, said that the opportunity to work with “high caliber” professionals has been a major

factor in his decision to act in mainstage productions all four years of his time at Yale. The Dramat executive board selected Keating from among a pool of professional directors after what Davis described as “a pretty extensive interview process.” Keating, Davis said, came in with a clear enthusiasm for working with students, as well as a specific vision for the show. “[Keating] is fabulous,” Delman said. “She knows how to interact with actors and how to get the results that she wants.” “Translations” will play at the University Theatre from Feb. 22-25. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

UNDERSTUDYING HAMLET: A LOOK INTO THE STUDIO PRACTICE OF EDWIN AUSTIN ABBEY The worlds of visual art and theater collide in this event where the Yale University Art Gallery’s Cindy Schwarz will walk attendees through the gallery’s paintings, watercolors, prints, and drawings by Edwin Austin Abbey — an American painter with a penchant for the Bard. Part of the Shakespeare at Yale series, the talk may elucidate a greater meaning in Act III, Scene ii of Hamlet. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

8 P.M. THURS. FEB. 23 BETRAYAL Davenport College presents Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal” — a play of love, lust, and backwards time. Katherine Latham ’12 directs the three-person cast through their adulterous journey that critic Roger Ebert said “strips away all artifice. It shows, heartlessly, that the very capacity for love itself is sometimes based on betraying not only other loved ones, but even ourselves.” Davenport College, DavenportPierson Auditorium, 248 York St.

8 P.M. THURS. FEB. 23 LICENSE TO TAP The opening night of Yale Taps’s newest show promises to offer a rhythmic good time, complete with resplendent shoes and beats. Off Broadway Theater, 41 Broadway

ALL DAY FRI. FEB. 24 THE TEMPEST Yale’s experimental theater company, The Control Group, present a “collaborative, physical, and installation based process of generating a show from the core and framework of Shakespeare’s text.” Come for the classic quips, stay for the inventive use of non-theater spaces in the conveyance of new and exciting meaning. Payne Whitney Gymnasium, 70 Tower Pkwy., New Haven, CT, 06511 MAP

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

“Translations,” a three-act play written by Irish playwright Brian Friel, premiered in Derry, Northern Ireland in September 1980.

Composing for an American naturalist BY MASON KROLL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While composing the score for the PBS documentary “John Muir in the New World,” Garth Neustadter MUS ’12 asked himself how the 19th-century naturalist and preservation advocate would have directed the film. On Tuesday, Neustadter joined the documentary’s actual filmmaker, Emmy Award-winner Catherine Tatge, as well as Char Miller, director of Environmental Analysis at Pomona College, and Yale School of Music Dean Robert Blocker in a panel to consider the joint issues of “Music, Media, & the Environment.” After Neustadter presented a condensed 15-minute clip of the film, members of the panel answered questions and discussed the creative process behind the making of the documentary, for which Neustadter won

a 2011 Emmy award for his original score. “It occurred to me that if Muir were directing the film, he may have preferred listening to the sound of trees,” Neustadter said. “I wanted to highlight the sections where music was not being used in addition to the places it was.” The event, held at Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies’ Kroon Hall, was hosted by Blocker and Peter Crane, dean of the environment school. Tatge, who described herself as a “city person,” said that making a documentary on Muir, an iconic nature lover, was particularly challenging. “I think this film was really transformational for me,” Tatge said. “I have done films about the human spirit, love, hate and the question of God — but like so many people I am discon-

7:30 P.M. FRI. FEB. 24 ALICE IN WONDERJAM Undergraduate male a cappella group The Duke’s Men will sing,perform “zaney skits,” and do something called the “doox dance.” Expect throngs of screaming groupies and forced Lewis Carroll references. Center Church on the Green Parrish House, 311 Temple St.

8 P.M. SAT. FEB. 25 YALE PHILHARMONIA William Christie conducts the Yale Philharmonia and the new Yale Choral Artists in an exciting allHandel concert. Sprague Memorial Hall, Morse Recital Hall, 470 College St. ZOE GORMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Garth Neustadter MUS ’12 won an Emmy for his original score for “John Muir in the New World” in 2011.

nected from nature. That’s what was so transformative about making this film. It really put me in touch.” Tatge met Neustadter through their alma mater, Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisc. Knowing she wanted an original score for her documentary, Tatge called the dean of the school’s music conservatory to see if he had any recommendations. With an extensive background in music composition, including a firstprize win in the 2007 Turner Classic Movies Young Film Composers Competition, Neustadster said working with Tatge presented a unique opportunity, as composers often join the film process late in postproduction. “I felt that the music was able to be incorporated much more organically and naturally with the edits,” Neustadter said. “[With this film] often the editor would actually ‘cut’ the film to the music, which is very unusual.” Neustadter cited the “rustic, undefined quality” of 20th-century modernist composer Charles Ives as a particular influence. As Muir was born in Scotland, Neustadter said he also tried to incorporate Scottish themes into the score, which was recorded in Woolsey Hall last year with members of the Yale Philharmonia, a graduate ensemble orchestra. Neustadter said that in his time studying composition at Yale, he has found support in developing his own style. “One of the things that attracted me to Yale was how open they were in the composition department to embracing different styles,” Neustadter said. “As teachers, rather than telling me how to compose, they help me find my own voice. That should be the goal for teachers.” Currently, Neustadter is at work finishing a full orchestra score for a restoration of the 1925 silent film “The Circle.” He said he is also is collaborating with fellow composer Daniel Wohl MUS ’12 in composing the score for “Tar,” a feature-length film starring James Franco, Mila Kunis and Jessica Chastain. Contact MASON KROLL at mason.kroll@yale.edu .

‘Helvetica’ filmmaker refocuses on urban design BY NATASHA THONDAVADI STAFF REPORTER Since 2007, documentary filmmaker Gary Hustwit has worked to inspire everyday people to care about design. Monday evening at the School of Architecture, Hustwit presented a screening of “Urbanized,” the final film in his well-known trilogy about the design process, released in 2011. While the first two films, 2007’s “Helvetica” and 2009’s “Objectified,” deal with the topics of graphic and industrial design, Hustwit’s latest film focuses on urban planning, a field central to the study of architecture at Yale. The screening filled Hastings Hall with a crowd that included architecture professors, graduate students and undergraduates, as well as other members of the Yale community interested in the structure of cities. In “Urbanized,” Hustwit blends interviews of prominent members of the urban design field with visual footage of cities around the world accompanied by an original score. The film explores an ongoing debate regarding which members of a community should be responsible for designing cities: government officials, architects or the people at large. Hustwit said that by educating viewers about the ways in which urban architecture can affect their daily lives, he hopes they can be both more appreciative and more critical of the urban planning process. “I think the biggest takeaway for me is how much we as citizens need to be, should be and are not involved enough in the shaping of our cities,” Hustwit said. “I think the most interesting projects are the ones that are citizen-driven.” For several of the undergraduates who came to see the film, the discussion of the urban design techniques with which governments respond to their constituents’ desires was the most impressive part of the documentary. Many assume that urban design is a “top-down” process,

Vogel talks revival of Pulitzer-winning play BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER

a coming-of-age play, rather than [one of] incest and pedophilia.

Chair of the Yale School of Drama’s Playwriting Program and Yale Repertory Theatre playwright-inresidence Paula Vogel’s 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning play “How I Learned to Drive” just reopened off Broadway on Feb. 13, marking the first time it has played in New York in 15 years. The current production is scheduled to run through March. On Monday, Vogel spoke with the News about the new production, her writing process and her teaching commitments at Yale.

draws you to write about QWhat a sensitive subject matter like

prize-winning play, “How QYour I Learned to Drive,” has just been revived off Broadway — you must be excited about that.

A

I’m pretty excited, yes. I’ve had a great time revisiting the play and seeing it anew, but from a completely different perspective. There’s a different cast, different director and different designers this time around.

what extent have you been QTo involved in the new production?

A

Very much so. I feel like every time a play is produced in New York it is best to be involved, because there’s a national impact in terms of the opinions of New York theater reviewers.

I Learned to Drive” Q“How focuses on an incestuous and pedophilic relationship between a young woman and her uncle…

A

Can I stop you right there for a second? I talk about this a lot. Everyone looks down at that character as a pedophile, but what I wanted to do was examine the relationship and look at how one survives relationships like this. If one looks at the demographics, I think that probably four out of 10 people experienced inappropriate emotional relationships in their youth. So I prefer to think of this story as

that?

A

I’m interested in looking at things that hurt us or harm us. I like to look at things that society puts in a box with a label. And if it’s in a box we can’t really look at it. To me the focus of theater is to take something out of its box and look at it. If I asked you to describe “Lolita,” you would describe that as a book about a pedophile. Then you’d miss the entire journey of “Lolita.” I read Nabokov early in college and fell in love with that book. Nabokov made me feel empathy for a man that I would not have wanted to spend time with and whom I would have labeled and put into a box. Theater for me is to see if I can do something like that.

I was no good at acting, so I started writing. PAULA VOGEL Playwright-in-residence, Yale Repertory Theatre

Q

The new production has only been running for a week or so, but how has the critical and public reception of the play been thus far?

A

It’s been going extremely well. In fact, one of the things I liked about it was that they gave us a long preview period, so we’ve actually been playing since Jan. 24. And, you know, if the ticket demands are high, I’m hoping we can extend the run.

described your writing QYou’ve style as “writing the play backwards.” What do you mean by that?

A

I usually see an image or an event that is the turning point

of the play. Once I realize that that’s where I’m going, I can figure out how to start it. I have plays just sitting in my head — maybe 30 or 40 at a time — but when I see that moment, I can go backwards and write it.

A

: Yes, since high school. I actually fell in love with theater and tried other things in theater, but I was no good at acting, so I started writing.

helped develop a nationQYou ally recognized graduate the-

A

A

I have in the past. But my teaching responsibilities now are mainly for graduate students. Previously I taught a public class that was open to anyone in New Haven as well. I’d actually like my graduate students to teach undergrads, but Yale College has many interesting traditions and rituals — it’s pretty etched in stone. Right now, [some of] my graduate students, who have incredible experience by the time they come here, are teaching undergraduates at Wesleyan.

summer, you announced QLast you would step down from your position at the end of this school

YALE SCHOOL OF DRAMA

Playwright Paula Vogel’s “How I Learned to Drive” recently reopened off Broadway. year. What prompted that decision?

A

Well, time is short. I have wonderful opportunities set in front of me — most recently one which will require me to spend months at a time in Philadelphia. It’s not possible to keep up a schedule like that while being a full-time administrator at [the School of Drama]. I’m often given these opportunities that I can’t take. I was asked by the Slovenian embassy to come and show “How I Learned to Drive” in Slovenia, but I had to turn them down. I’m seeking a balance now where I can say yes to working with peer artists internationally, and to new opportunities for my own writing. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

Spirit “Truer Than Fiction” Award in 2008. Contact NATASHA THONDAVADI at natasha.thondavadi@yale.edu .

‘Good Goods’ leaves questions unanswered

THEATER REVIEW GOOD GOODS

ater program at Brown, the Brown / Trinity Repertory Company Consortium. How did that come about?

Q

planners,” Rubin said. “It didn’t make you feel like there are forces at play you can’t control.” The first film in Hustwit’s Design Trilogy, “Helvetica,” was nominated for an Independent

Christina Anderson’s DRA ’11 “Good Goods,” in its world premiere at the Yale Repertory Theatre under the direction of Tina Landau ’84, is ambitious in its narrative scope. According to her program notes, Anderson has created a world with no definite geographical place or historical timing that is haunted by an ambiguous catastrophe. This ambition, though adroitly acted by a brilliant cast of six and served by a smart, creative staff, has a hard time standing on its own without the aid of those program notes.

interested in?

Are you teaching both graduate students and undergrads?

JOE CLARK

Released in 2011, “Urbanized” is the last in a trilogy of documentaries by filmmaker Gary Hustwit that focus on the design process.

BY ANDREW FREEBURG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

drama and playwritQWere ing something you were always

I got a very rare opportunity to run a program for playwrights. I had spent my 25 years there proselytizing and advocating for writers to have a stipend so they could write for two years, and towards the end, three years. It was my passion. It’s as strong a passion as my own writing.

Jared Shenson ’12 said, but he felt that Hustwit showed that a cultural shift towards finding a middle ground between city planners and individual citizens is already occurring. Hustwit said he created the film with the intention of bringing architecture to a broader audience, hoping that it will find an audience among those not already involved in design. Hustwit included himself in this group, explaining that in part, he made the film to learn more about the issue. “It’s more valuable as a tool to show people who aren’t involved in design what all of these people do and how it affects them,” Hustwit said. Although the architects and architecture students present at the screening may already be familiar with many of the technical details of urban design, three architecture professors interviewed said it was interesting to engage further in dialogue about urban issues. “Urbanism is a very important part of the school,” School of Architecture Dean Robert A.M. Stern said, adding that every graduate student enrolled in the school’s Master of Architecture I program is required to complete a studio course concentrating on an urban topic. Stern added that while many undergraduate architecture students go on to work in urban planning, most graduate students choose “traditional architectural fields.” Still, several students, both in the architecture school and in other programs said the film inspired them think more seriously about getting involved with local or small-scale urban design projects. Elihu Rubin ’99, a political science and ethics, politics & economics professor, added that the film might motivate students to consider urban design or planning professions. “I thought the film gave a really positive and optimistic image of the role of urban designers and

The play is set in a non-specific Southern town, in a non-specific year between 1961 and 1994, and begins with no backstory provided. An “invasion,” referenced obliquely throughout the course of the play, has cut the characters and their town off from phone service but curiously still allows bus service and deliveries of goods to the general store. The only two discernible landmarks in the town are the general store — named “Good Goods” after the owner’s last name — and a “pencil factory.” The factory, Anderson noted, is not necessarily a purveyor of pencils but instead “whatever you think it is.” The themes of possession and materialism run rampant through the play: the store’s senior employee, Truth, is preternaturally concerned with theft; Stacey, the son of the original owner, wants to own the shop for himself; the other half of Stacey’s former comedy duo, Patricia, wants to own her own life; and Sunny, a vagabond who arrived on the bus with Patricia, becomes possessed by the spirit of a recently-deceased factory worker. The interest of the play lies in the interplay between realism and the supernatural. The play begins in the realm of the real, but the logic of the play’s reality is not given sufficient explanation. The nature of the mysterious “invasion,” how each character arrived back in town and the nature of their relationships are all hinted at, but never fully explained. To be clear: it isn’t the lack of explicit exposition that weakens the play, but

without any explanation, the arbitrary restrictions on each character’s mobility and communication feel contrived. Even the specter of the factory, as open-ended as Anderson tries to keep it, looks false and plastic behind the foreground of the general store. As a result, the elements of the supernatural that enter the world of the play feel cheapened. Where Anderson’s script fails, the cast and crew succeed with aplomb. Landau, who coauthored a text explaining her theory of physical acting with director Anne Bogart in the late 70s, titled “The Viewpoints Book,” did brilliant work with her cast: The actors are truly phenomenal, especially considering that all six made their Rep debut with this show. Of note are the actors playing Sunny/Emeka and Hunter Priestess/ Waymon (Angela Lewis and Oberon K.A. Adjepong), who showed incredible agility in switching between their two respective characters in scenes of spiritual possession. They embodied the nuances of the characters with such boldness and completeness that each moment of transformation was perfectly distinct and believable. Of course, this was to be expected — Landau literally wrote the book on the development of physical character. The sharp changes in character and reality were well served by Scott Zielinski’s DRA ’90 lighting design, which created surreal breaks from reality through color and directionality. The timeless costumes of Toni-Leslie James kept the production connected to some sort of reality. Aside from the smoke-belching “factory” in the background of the set created by James Schuette DRA ’89, the production was visually well-integrated and up to the Rep’s customarily high standards. But in spite of the play’s great beauty, wideranging narrative and brilliant creative team, the objection remains: A play must communicate fully with its audience without the aid of its program notes. Especially in the case of mainstream theater, audience members should not have to contribute their own time and work to the research process — the production should stand on its own. Thus, rather than provoking thought with its loose ends, “Good Goods” only prompted questions that were ultimately left unanswered. Contact ANDREW FREEBURG at andrew.freeburg@yale.edu .


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YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 9

ARTS & CULTURE THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS 12 P.M. WED. FEB. 22 THE POLITICS OF P(A)LACE: ROYAL SPACE IN DOWNTOWN BANGKOK The Southeast Asia Studies Brown Bag Seminar Series presents Serhat Ünaldi, a doctoral candidate in Southeast Asian Studies at the Department of Southeast Asian Studies at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. His dissertation, part-sociology part-architecture, will delve into the city building project that created today’s Bangkok — the world’s 17th tallest city in terms of skyscrapers. Luce Hall, 34 Hillhouse Ave.

12:15 P.M. WED. FEB. 22

“Theater is one of the few places left where we are in a dialogue right now. Everything has become so partisan … that conversation is almost impossible.” PAULA VOGEL AMERICAN PLAYWRIGHT

In ‘Translations,’ a language war BY ANYA GRENIER CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Opening today, the Yale Dramatic Association’s spring mainstage production, “Translations,” deals with language and the fate of those confronted by its loss. Written by Irish playwright Brian Friel in 1980, the play takes place in a small Irish village in the 1830s that is in the midst of being forcibly Anglicized by occupying British troops. While taking on weighty themes, the show maintains a lighter appeal as well — as Dramat President Meredith Davis ’13 said, “it’s very intellectual, but it’s a romance and it’s funny.” In the ensuing culture clash

between the Irish and British, neither understands the other’s native tongue, and the play centers around those characters caught between the two sides. New York-based director Lauren Keating said she was drawn in by the play’s themes of searching for home and community — and sometimes failing. Keating said that trying to communicate and being unable to do so is a problem to which many theater artists can especially relate. Despite the universality of the play’s themes, it is also very specific to a particular moment in Ireland’s past, said Edward Delman ’12, who plays the part of the schoolmaster’s son Manus. He added that it was difficult for

the cast to understand the consciousness of the time. “It’s a challenge to understand where both Brian Friel and these characters are coming from,” Delman said. Actors and designers worked together to make the production as authentic as possible, from costume and hair styles to set design. Keating said that by paying such close attention to detail, she hopes the show will convey that the Irish culture is at risk of being lost. “We wanted to create a very cozy, communal environment, making it textured, to feel like we can touch it and hold it, and then show the loss of that,” Keating said. Producer Yuvika Tolani ’14

said that from the beginning, the director sought to make the play a wholly immersive experience — even within the enormous space of the University Theatre. To draw the audience into the world of the show, Keating chose to move all of the action onto the first five feet of the actual stage and then build a custom stage extension. Keating said that manipulating the physical space of the theater is also a way of conveying the themes of the play. By not using the entirety of the stage and space until the very end of the play, the production shows a shift in the nature of the community. “At first we see these people, and they seem big, and their

world seems very small, and by the end of the play its the world that is very big and the people are very small,” Keating said. Because language barriers play such a key role in the show, actors took lessons with a professional dialect coach. While all the actors speak English, Irish and British accents are meant to denote English and Gaelic respectively. Four members of the cast and crew interviewed cited the accent training as the most challenging part of the production. “I thought I could do a British accent before,” said Daniel Kovalcik ’15, who plays a British captain in the play. “[The dialect coach] went to each one of the actors and told us what we were

doing was completely wrong.” Adding to the challenge of learning an accent, some actors have to transition seamlessly between proper British and heavily regional Irish accents within a scene. Working alongside a team of outside designers gave all students involved a chance to experience how the professional theater world works, Tolani said. As the Dramat’s mainstage production, she explained, “Translations” involved working “on a scale that doesn’t exist anywhere else in theater at Yale.” Jamie Biondi ’12, who plays the part of the town’s school master, said that the opportunity to work with “high caliber” professionals has been a major

factor in his decision to act in mainstage productions all four years of his time at Yale. The Dramat executive board selected Keating from among a pool of professional directors after what Davis described as “a pretty extensive interview process.” Keating, Davis said, came in with a clear enthusiasm for working with students, as well as a specific vision for the show. “[Keating] is fabulous,” Delman said. “She knows how to interact with actors and how to get the results that she wants.” “Translations” will play at the University Theatre from Feb. 22-25. Contact ANYA GRENIER at anna.grenier@yale.edu .

UNDERSTUDYING HAMLET: A LOOK INTO THE STUDIO PRACTICE OF EDWIN AUSTIN ABBEY The worlds of visual art and theater collide in this event where the Yale University Art Gallery’s Cindy Schwarz will walk attendees through the gallery’s paintings, watercolors, prints, and drawings by Edwin Austin Abbey — an American painter with a penchant for the Bard. Part of the Shakespeare at Yale series, the talk may elucidate a greater meaning in Act III, Scene ii of Hamlet. Yale University Art Gallery, 1111 Chapel St.

8 P.M. THURS. FEB. 23 BETRAYAL Davenport College presents Harold Pinter’s “Betrayal” — a play of love, lust, and backwards time. Katherine Latham ’12 directs the three-person cast through their adulterous journey that critic Roger Ebert said “strips away all artifice. It shows, heartlessly, that the very capacity for love itself is sometimes based on betraying not only other loved ones, but even ourselves.” Davenport College, DavenportPierson Auditorium, 248 York St.

8 P.M. THURS. FEB. 23 LICENSE TO TAP The opening night of Yale Taps’s newest show promises to offer a rhythmic good time, complete with resplendent shoes and beats. Off Broadway Theater, 41 Broadway

ALL DAY FRI. FEB. 24 THE TEMPEST Yale’s experimental theater company, The Control Group, present a “collaborative, physical, and installation based process of generating a show from the core and framework of Shakespeare’s text.” Come for the classic quips, stay for the inventive use of non-theater spaces in the conveyance of new and exciting meaning. Payne Whitney Gymnasium, 70 Tower Pkwy., New Haven, CT, 06511 MAP

ZEENAT MANSOOR/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

“Translations,” a three-act play written by Irish playwright Brian Friel, premiered in Derry, Northern Ireland in September 1980.

Composing for an American naturalist BY MASON KROLL CONTRIBUTING REPORTER While composing the score for the PBS documentary “John Muir in the New World,” Garth Neustadter MUS ’12 asked himself how the 19th-century naturalist and preservation advocate would have directed the film. On Tuesday, Neustadter joined the documentary’s actual filmmaker, Emmy Award-winner Catherine Tatge, as well as Char Miller, director of Environmental Analysis at Pomona College, and Yale School of Music Dean Robert Blocker in a panel to consider the joint issues of “Music, Media, & the Environment.” After Neustadter presented a condensed 15-minute clip of the film, members of the panel answered questions and discussed the creative process behind the making of the documentary, for which Neustadter won

a 2011 Emmy award for his original score. “It occurred to me that if Muir were directing the film, he may have preferred listening to the sound of trees,” Neustadter said. “I wanted to highlight the sections where music was not being used in addition to the places it was.” The event, held at Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies’ Kroon Hall, was hosted by Blocker and Peter Crane, dean of the environment school. Tatge, who described herself as a “city person,” said that making a documentary on Muir, an iconic nature lover, was particularly challenging. “I think this film was really transformational for me,” Tatge said. “I have done films about the human spirit, love, hate and the question of God — but like so many people I am discon-

7:30 P.M. FRI. FEB. 24 ALICE IN WONDERJAM Undergraduate male a cappella group The Duke’s Men will sing,perform “zaney skits,” and do something called the “doox dance.” Expect throngs of screaming groupies and forced Lewis Carroll references. Center Church on the Green Parrish House, 311 Temple St.

8 P.M. SAT. FEB. 25 YALE PHILHARMONIA William Christie conducts the Yale Philharmonia and the new Yale Choral Artists in an exciting allHandel concert. Sprague Memorial Hall, Morse Recital Hall, 470 College St. ZOE GORMAN/PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR

Garth Neustadter MUS ’12 won an Emmy for his original score for “John Muir in the New World” in 2011.

nected from nature. That’s what was so transformative about making this film. It really put me in touch.” Tatge met Neustadter through their alma mater, Lawrence University in Appleton, Wisc. Knowing she wanted an original score for her documentary, Tatge called the dean of the school’s music conservatory to see if he had any recommendations. With an extensive background in music composition, including a firstprize win in the 2007 Turner Classic Movies Young Film Composers Competition, Neustadster said working with Tatge presented a unique opportunity, as composers often join the film process late in postproduction. “I felt that the music was able to be incorporated much more organically and naturally with the edits,” Neustadter said. “[With this film] often the editor would actually ‘cut’ the film to the music, which is very unusual.” Neustadter cited the “rustic, undefined quality” of 20th-century modernist composer Charles Ives as a particular influence. As Muir was born in Scotland, Neustadter said he also tried to incorporate Scottish themes into the score, which was recorded in Woolsey Hall last year with members of the Yale Philharmonia, a graduate ensemble orchestra. Neustadter said that in his time studying composition at Yale, he has found support in developing his own style. “One of the things that attracted me to Yale was how open they were in the composition department to embracing different styles,” Neustadter said. “As teachers, rather than telling me how to compose, they help me find my own voice. That should be the goal for teachers.” Currently, Neustadter is at work finishing a full orchestra score for a restoration of the 1925 silent film “The Circle.” He said he is also is collaborating with fellow composer Daniel Wohl MUS ’12 in composing the score for “Tar,” a feature-length film starring James Franco, Mila Kunis and Jessica Chastain. Contact MASON KROLL at mason.kroll@yale.edu .

‘Helvetica’ filmmaker refocuses on urban design BY NATASHA THONDAVADI STAFF REPORTER Since 2007, documentary filmmaker Gary Hustwit has worked to inspire everyday people to care about design. Monday evening at the School of Architecture, Hustwit presented a screening of “Urbanized,” the final film in his well-known trilogy about the design process, released in 2011. While the first two films, 2007’s “Helvetica” and 2009’s “Objectified,” deal with the topics of graphic and industrial design, Hustwit’s latest film focuses on urban planning, a field central to the study of architecture at Yale. The screening filled Hastings Hall with a crowd that included architecture professors, graduate students and undergraduates, as well as other members of the Yale community interested in the structure of cities. In “Urbanized,” Hustwit blends interviews of prominent members of the urban design field with visual footage of cities around the world accompanied by an original score. The film explores an ongoing debate regarding which members of a community should be responsible for designing cities: government officials, architects or the people at large. Hustwit said that by educating viewers about the ways in which urban architecture can affect their daily lives, he hopes they can be both more appreciative and more critical of the urban planning process. “I think the biggest takeaway for me is how much we as citizens need to be, should be and are not involved enough in the shaping of our cities,” Hustwit said. “I think the most interesting projects are the ones that are citizen-driven.” For several of the undergraduates who came to see the film, the discussion of the urban design techniques with which governments respond to their constituents’ desires was the most impressive part of the documentary. Many assume that urban design is a “top-down” process,

Vogel talks revival of Pulitzer-winning play BY LINDSEY UNIAT STAFF REPORTER

a coming-of-age play, rather than [one of] incest and pedophilia.

Chair of the Yale School of Drama’s Playwriting Program and Yale Repertory Theatre playwright-inresidence Paula Vogel’s 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning play “How I Learned to Drive” just reopened off Broadway on Feb. 13, marking the first time it has played in New York in 15 years. The current production is scheduled to run through March. On Monday, Vogel spoke with the News about the new production, her writing process and her teaching commitments at Yale.

draws you to write about QWhat a sensitive subject matter like

prize-winning play, “How QYour I Learned to Drive,” has just been revived off Broadway — you must be excited about that.

A

I’m pretty excited, yes. I’ve had a great time revisiting the play and seeing it anew, but from a completely different perspective. There’s a different cast, different director and different designers this time around.

what extent have you been QTo involved in the new production?

A

Very much so. I feel like every time a play is produced in New York it is best to be involved, because there’s a national impact in terms of the opinions of New York theater reviewers.

I Learned to Drive” Q“How focuses on an incestuous and pedophilic relationship between a young woman and her uncle…

A

Can I stop you right there for a second? I talk about this a lot. Everyone looks down at that character as a pedophile, but what I wanted to do was examine the relationship and look at how one survives relationships like this. If one looks at the demographics, I think that probably four out of 10 people experienced inappropriate emotional relationships in their youth. So I prefer to think of this story as

that?

A

I’m interested in looking at things that hurt us or harm us. I like to look at things that society puts in a box with a label. And if it’s in a box we can’t really look at it. To me the focus of theater is to take something out of its box and look at it. If I asked you to describe “Lolita,” you would describe that as a book about a pedophile. Then you’d miss the entire journey of “Lolita.” I read Nabokov early in college and fell in love with that book. Nabokov made me feel empathy for a man that I would not have wanted to spend time with and whom I would have labeled and put into a box. Theater for me is to see if I can do something like that.

I was no good at acting, so I started writing. PAULA VOGEL Playwright-in-residence, Yale Repertory Theatre

Q

The new production has only been running for a week or so, but how has the critical and public reception of the play been thus far?

A

It’s been going extremely well. In fact, one of the things I liked about it was that they gave us a long preview period, so we’ve actually been playing since Jan. 24. And, you know, if the ticket demands are high, I’m hoping we can extend the run.

described your writing QYou’ve style as “writing the play backwards.” What do you mean by that?

A

I usually see an image or an event that is the turning point

of the play. Once I realize that that’s where I’m going, I can figure out how to start it. I have plays just sitting in my head — maybe 30 or 40 at a time — but when I see that moment, I can go backwards and write it.

A

: Yes, since high school. I actually fell in love with theater and tried other things in theater, but I was no good at acting, so I started writing.

helped develop a nationQYou ally recognized graduate the-

A

A

I have in the past. But my teaching responsibilities now are mainly for graduate students. Previously I taught a public class that was open to anyone in New Haven as well. I’d actually like my graduate students to teach undergrads, but Yale College has many interesting traditions and rituals — it’s pretty etched in stone. Right now, [some of] my graduate students, who have incredible experience by the time they come here, are teaching undergraduates at Wesleyan.

summer, you announced QLast you would step down from your position at the end of this school

YALE SCHOOL OF DRAMA

Playwright Paula Vogel’s “How I Learned to Drive” recently reopened off Broadway. year. What prompted that decision?

A

Well, time is short. I have wonderful opportunities set in front of me — most recently one which will require me to spend months at a time in Philadelphia. It’s not possible to keep up a schedule like that while being a full-time administrator at [the School of Drama]. I’m often given these opportunities that I can’t take. I was asked by the Slovenian embassy to come and show “How I Learned to Drive” in Slovenia, but I had to turn them down. I’m seeking a balance now where I can say yes to working with peer artists internationally, and to new opportunities for my own writing. Contact LINDSEY UNIAT at lindsey.uniat@yale.edu .

Spirit “Truer Than Fiction” Award in 2008. Contact NATASHA THONDAVADI at natasha.thondavadi@yale.edu .

‘Good Goods’ leaves questions unanswered

THEATER REVIEW GOOD GOODS

ater program at Brown, the Brown / Trinity Repertory Company Consortium. How did that come about?

Q

planners,” Rubin said. “It didn’t make you feel like there are forces at play you can’t control.” The first film in Hustwit’s Design Trilogy, “Helvetica,” was nominated for an Independent

Christina Anderson’s DRA ’11 “Good Goods,” in its world premiere at the Yale Repertory Theatre under the direction of Tina Landau ’84, is ambitious in its narrative scope. According to her program notes, Anderson has created a world with no definite geographical place or historical timing that is haunted by an ambiguous catastrophe. This ambition, though adroitly acted by a brilliant cast of six and served by a smart, creative staff, has a hard time standing on its own without the aid of those program notes.

interested in?

Are you teaching both graduate students and undergrads?

JOE CLARK

Released in 2011, “Urbanized” is the last in a trilogy of documentaries by filmmaker Gary Hustwit that focus on the design process.

BY ANDREW FREEBURG CONTRIBUTING REPORTER

drama and playwritQWere ing something you were always

I got a very rare opportunity to run a program for playwrights. I had spent my 25 years there proselytizing and advocating for writers to have a stipend so they could write for two years, and towards the end, three years. It was my passion. It’s as strong a passion as my own writing.

Jared Shenson ’12 said, but he felt that Hustwit showed that a cultural shift towards finding a middle ground between city planners and individual citizens is already occurring. Hustwit said he created the film with the intention of bringing architecture to a broader audience, hoping that it will find an audience among those not already involved in design. Hustwit included himself in this group, explaining that in part, he made the film to learn more about the issue. “It’s more valuable as a tool to show people who aren’t involved in design what all of these people do and how it affects them,” Hustwit said. Although the architects and architecture students present at the screening may already be familiar with many of the technical details of urban design, three architecture professors interviewed said it was interesting to engage further in dialogue about urban issues. “Urbanism is a very important part of the school,” School of Architecture Dean Robert A.M. Stern said, adding that every graduate student enrolled in the school’s Master of Architecture I program is required to complete a studio course concentrating on an urban topic. Stern added that while many undergraduate architecture students go on to work in urban planning, most graduate students choose “traditional architectural fields.” Still, several students, both in the architecture school and in other programs said the film inspired them think more seriously about getting involved with local or small-scale urban design projects. Elihu Rubin ’99, a political science and ethics, politics & economics professor, added that the film might motivate students to consider urban design or planning professions. “I thought the film gave a really positive and optimistic image of the role of urban designers and

The play is set in a non-specific Southern town, in a non-specific year between 1961 and 1994, and begins with no backstory provided. An “invasion,” referenced obliquely throughout the course of the play, has cut the characters and their town off from phone service but curiously still allows bus service and deliveries of goods to the general store. The only two discernible landmarks in the town are the general store — named “Good Goods” after the owner’s last name — and a “pencil factory.” The factory, Anderson noted, is not necessarily a purveyor of pencils but instead “whatever you think it is.” The themes of possession and materialism run rampant through the play: the store’s senior employee, Truth, is preternaturally concerned with theft; Stacey, the son of the original owner, wants to own the shop for himself; the other half of Stacey’s former comedy duo, Patricia, wants to own her own life; and Sunny, a vagabond who arrived on the bus with Patricia, becomes possessed by the spirit of a recently-deceased factory worker. The interest of the play lies in the interplay between realism and the supernatural. The play begins in the realm of the real, but the logic of the play’s reality is not given sufficient explanation. The nature of the mysterious “invasion,” how each character arrived back in town and the nature of their relationships are all hinted at, but never fully explained. To be clear: it isn’t the lack of explicit exposition that weakens the play, but

without any explanation, the arbitrary restrictions on each character’s mobility and communication feel contrived. Even the specter of the factory, as open-ended as Anderson tries to keep it, looks false and plastic behind the foreground of the general store. As a result, the elements of the supernatural that enter the world of the play feel cheapened. Where Anderson’s script fails, the cast and crew succeed with aplomb. Landau, who coauthored a text explaining her theory of physical acting with director Anne Bogart in the late 70s, titled “The Viewpoints Book,” did brilliant work with her cast: The actors are truly phenomenal, especially considering that all six made their Rep debut with this show. Of note are the actors playing Sunny/Emeka and Hunter Priestess/ Waymon (Angela Lewis and Oberon K.A. Adjepong), who showed incredible agility in switching between their two respective characters in scenes of spiritual possession. They embodied the nuances of the characters with such boldness and completeness that each moment of transformation was perfectly distinct and believable. Of course, this was to be expected — Landau literally wrote the book on the development of physical character. The sharp changes in character and reality were well served by Scott Zielinski’s DRA ’90 lighting design, which created surreal breaks from reality through color and directionality. The timeless costumes of Toni-Leslie James kept the production connected to some sort of reality. Aside from the smoke-belching “factory” in the background of the set created by James Schuette DRA ’89, the production was visually well-integrated and up to the Rep’s customarily high standards. But in spite of the play’s great beauty, wideranging narrative and brilliant creative team, the objection remains: A play must communicate fully with its audience without the aid of its program notes. Especially in the case of mainstream theater, audience members should not have to contribute their own time and work to the research process — the production should stand on its own. Thus, rather than provoking thought with its loose ends, “Good Goods” only prompted questions that were ultimately left unanswered. Contact ANDREW FREEBURG at andrew.freeburg@yale.edu .


PAGE 10

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

AROUND THE IVIES

“If people put things on websites and make them available to everybody, of course the NYPD is going to look at anything that’s publicly available.” MICHAEL BLOOMBERG NEW YORK CITY MAYOR

T H E H A R VA R D C R I M S O N

T H E D A I L Y P E N N S Y L VA N I A N

Harvard Muslims criticize NYPD

Penn targets prospective students

BY NATHALIE MIRAVAL AND REBECCA ROBBINS STAFF WRITERS Members of Harvard’s Islamic community expressed dismay over the Associated Press news report released Saturday stating that the New York Police Department had monitored the activities of Muslim students and professors in at least 16 colleges in the Northeast, including three Ivy League schools. Harvard was not specifically mentioned in the report. The investigations, which took place primarily in 2006 and 2007, ranged from questioning local law enforcement officials about professors at the University of Buffalo to sending an undercover agent on a whitewater rafting trip attended by Muslim students studying at the City College of New York. One secret NYPD document dated Nov. 22, 2006 and obtained by the AP states that an undercover officer visited gatherings of Muslim student groups at Yale, Columbia and the University of Pennsylvania and also monitored the groups’ websites, blogs and forums. The officer reported finding “no significant information.” In defense of the NYPD’s surveillance program, police spokesperson Paul Browne told the AP that 12 individuals have been either arrested or convicted on terrorism charges in the United States who previously participated in Muslim student groups. Although Browne told the AP that the investigations at universities concluded in 2007, the AP reports that documents indicate that the surveillance continued beyond that point. Ali Asani, professor of IndoMuslim and Islamic Religion and Cultures, said he was not surprised by the AP’s report because of “the culture of fear that has come to characterize the contemporary American political scene — particularly the fear of Islam and of Muslims.”

Ana R. Nast ’12, president of the Harvard Islamic Society (HIS), said that she HARVARD believes that the NYPD’s actions violated Muslim students’ and professors’ rights to privacy. But she added that “it’s encouraging to see that the amount of support that the Muslim community receives” in response to what she perceives as inappropriately increased surveillance. Muneeb Ahmed ’14, director of external relations for HIS, said he was concerned by the NYPD’s investigation and said that it promotes an already troubling stereotype. “These are hardworking college students,” Ahmed said. “The NYPD should not be wasting its resources in this way.” Asmaa Rimawi ’14, vice president of HIS, echoed her fellow HIS members, calling the NYPD’s actions “a huge setback.” Rimawi said that she hopes HIS will be able to work with University administrators to maintain an environment that supports the rights of Muslim student groups. According to group leaders, the HIS fosters a religious and social community on campus with events including biweekly dinners, group discussions and Islamic Awareness Week in the spring semester. The group has no political or ideological agenda, Ahmed said. Asani, who is also the chair of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, suggested that Harvard should “take all steps to make sure that the civil liberties and freedom of expression of not only Muslim students but also Muslim faculty will be protected.” University administrators could not be reached for comment on the AP’s report.

PENN OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS

Penn hopes that likely letters to its most competitive applicants will heighten their interest in the school. BY LOIS LEE STAFF WRITER Regular decision applicant Caroline McCue — a senior at Sherwood High School in Sandy Spring, Md. — had put the University of Pennsylvania out of her mind temporarily until the end of March. It came to her as a surprise, then, when she received an email on Friday that led her to a website containing a video and a “likely letter” welcoming her to Penn. This weekend, the Penn Office of Admissions sent out about 230 nonathletic likely letters, according to Dean of Admissions Eric Furda. Every year, Penn sends academic likely letters to students the University believes will be competitive in the applicant pools of peer institutions. In particular, the Office of Admissions focused its likely campaign this year on students who expressed an interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, as well as those with an interest in the arts. “We’re going after some of the top academic students, and within that, we’re making it more refined going after some subject areas and some geographic areas,” Furda said.

For her part, McCue had not known about the existence of these “ likely letters” before she checked her inbox on Friday. While McCue’s PENN initial enthusiasm for Penn had slowly dwindled after visiting campus last year because of acceptance letters from other schools, Friday’s news changed the game. “Penn wasn’t on the top of my radar, but I got the likely letter and now it’s shot right up to the top,” she said. “I’m really excited for Penn now.” Last year, the Office of Admissions became one of the first colleges in the country to make use of a video to inform likely recipients, in place of a physical letter. This year, Penn expanded its likely efforts even further. Helped by the student-run Admissions Dean’s Advisory Board, Penn created several different videos — targeted at students, families and high-school counselors — as part of this year’s campaign. The admissions office has also been working with ADAB to begin a pilot pro-

gram that pairs likely letter recipients with student leaders on Penn’s campus. “Based on the feedback we got from the likely students last year, we really addressed the questions ‘Why likely, why Penn, why me?’ through the video, hopefully in a high-energy way,” Furda said. Jeffrey Durso-Finley — director of college counseling at The Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, N.J. — said the online explanation of likely letters that Penn provided to students to this year was “incredibly helpful.” Many students, like McCue, may not know what a likely letter is, and thus may not know what to think upon receiving one, he said. “Historically, it’s been a problem when they get a letter before the official date and they get confused,” he said. “Having the information coming directly from the admissions office will provide that confidence and that assurance that the letter is what it says it is.” Michael Goran — a 1976 Penn graduate and founder of IvySelect College Consulting — said Penn’s unique approach to likely letters may have a positive effect on students’ decisions. “Any time you can do something to personalize the experience to say ‘we really want you,’ it’s obviously very flattering and it engenders good feelings,” he said. However, Furda acknowledged that yield rates — the percentage of admitted students who decide to matriculate — are the most obvious and quantifiable measure of the likely letter campaign’s success. While the overall yield for the class of 2015 was 63 percent, the matriculation rate among likely letter recipients was significantly lower, coming in at around 30 percent. Furda said this gap is to be expected. “You’re going after a cohort of students who are going to have options,” he said. “Hopefully this does produce some tangible results. At the end of it, that’s what we’re going for.” Regular decision applicant Colton Welch — a senior at West Lincoln High School in Brookhaven, Miss. — said receiving a likely letter this weekend has made him more interested in Penn.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 11

BULLETIN BOARD

TODAY’S FORECAST Partly sunny, with a high near 56. Southwest wind between 6 and 14 mph.

TOMORROW

THURSDAY

High of 51, low of 39.

High of 53, low of 34.

SCIENCE HILL BY SPENCER KATZ

ON CAMPUS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23 5:00 P.M. “‘Save Our Children’: Gay Rights, Conservative Politics, and Racial Conflict in the 1970s.” Gillian Frank, a postdoctoral fellow at Stony Brook University, will speak. Sponsored by the Yale Research Initiative on the History of Sexualities. Hall of Graduate Studies (320 York St.), Room 211. 8:00 P.M. “Good Goods.” The Yale Repertory Theatre presents Christina Anderson’s production of “Good Goods.” Directed by Tina Landau ’84. Tickets can be purchased at www.yalerep.org. Yale Repertory Theatre (1120 Chapel St.).

THAT MONKEY TUNE BY

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24 11:00 A.M. “Can Animals be Moral?” The Program in Agrarian Studies presents this lecture by University of Miami philosophy professor Mark Rowlands. Institution for Social and Policy Studies (77 Prospect St.), Room B012. 8:00 P.M. Yale TAPS presents: “License to Tap.” TAPS, Yale’s only all-tap dancing group, is putting on its winter show. The program will feature everything from Broadway-style tap to cloginspired dancing, from the Beatles to Missy Elliott and more. Reserve free tickets at yaledramacoalition.org/taps2012. OffBroadway Theater (41 Broadway).

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25 7:30 PM The Haven String Quartet Presents “Out of Africa, Into Europe.” Steve Reich is widely regarded as the greatest living American composer, and that distinction is largely credited to his 1988 masterpiece “Different Trains.” Composed for string quartet and prerecorded tape, “Different Trains” relies on recorded testimonies of Holocaust survivors as a melodic base for the composition. Join the Haven String Quartet for a rare performance of this masterpiece along with original string quartets by African composers Kevin Volans and Justinian Tamuzuza. The Unitarian Society of New Haven (700 Hartford Turnpike).

DOONESBURY BY GARRY TRUDEAU

y SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS ONLINE yaledailynews.com/events/submit To reach us: E-mail editor@yaledailynews.com Advertisements 2-2424 (before 5 p.m.) 2-2400 (after 5 p.m.) Mailing address Yale Daily News P.O. Box 209007 New Haven, CT 06520

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Interested in drawing cartoons for the Yale Daily News? CONTACT DAVID YU AT dayu.yu@yale.edu

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle

CLASSIFIEDS

CROSSWORD Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Lewis ACROSS 1 ’50s-’60s Bronx Bombers nickname, with “The” 5 South Seas tuber 9 Oceans 14 Like the team before @, on schedules 15 Not much 16 Hotel courts 17 Best Original Song Oscar winner from ... Disney’s “Pocahontas” 20 Little one 21 __-tzu 22 On the calmer side 23 ... Disney’s “Aladdin” 28 Headache 29 WSJ headline 30 __ rock: music genre 31 Faux pas 33 Bars with hidden prices? 35 Evensong? 39 ... Disney’s “Song of the South” 43 Wed. vis-à-vis Thu. 44 Reed of The Velvet Underground 45 Expel, as lava 47 Western treaty gp. 50 Periods prec. soccer shootouts 52 Before, poetically 53 ... Disney’s “Mary Poppins” 58 French city mostly destroyed in 1944 59 Golf’s Woosnam 60 Tyler of “Jersey Girl” 61 ... Disney’s “Monsters, Inc.” 67 Athena’s shield 68 “__ chic!” 69 File’s partner 70 Actor Milo 71 Holiday tubers 72 __-Ball DOWN 1 Brolly user’s garment 2 __ Jima 3 ’20s White House nickname

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2/22/12

By Gareth Bain

4 1997 ecological protocol city 5 Gustatory sensor 6 Blood typing abbr. 7 Sight site 8 Bilingual Canadian city 9 John who explored the Canadian Arctic 10 Openly hostile 11 Showy extra 12 Like tridents 13 Marquis de __ 18 Three-sixty in a canoe 19 Coyote call 23 Grain beard 24 Suffering from vertigo 25 Legendary skater Sonja 26 “Ixnay!” 27 Sgt. Snorkel’s dog 32 Covert __: spy stuff 34 Disney frame 36 Some mag spreads 37 Flat hand, in a game 38 __ Khan: “The Jungle Book” tiger 40 Elemental bit

Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

SUDOKU MEDIUM

4

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

41 Judgment Day 42 Blow away in competition 46 Pint-size 48 Low-pH substance 49 Crudely built home 51 Switchblade 53 Tables-on-thestreet restaurants 54 “__-Ho”: Dwarfs’ song

2/22/12

55 Non-mainstream film 56 Prefix with mural 57 Civil rights activist Medgar 58 “Farewell, cara mia” 62 Metaphor words 63 Skirt line 64 Asian plow puller 65 Vague pronoun 66 Hawaiian strings

9 7 3 6 8 6 9 4 7 8 4 6 7 7 1 4 9 3 2 5 3 7 6 3 8 9 1 7 6 2


PAGE 12

YALE DAILY NEWS · WENDESDAY,FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

Dow Jones 12,965.69, +0.12%

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NASDAQ 2,948.57, -0.11%

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NATION & WORLD

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Oil $105.79, -0.43%

Santorum blasts Obama on abortion BY CHARLES BABINGTON ASSOCIATED PRESS PHOENIX — A surging Rick Santorum is making increasingly harsh remarks about President Barack Obama, questioning not just the president’s competence but his motives and even his Christian values. Mitt Romney also is sharpening his anti-Obama rhetoric. He said Tuesday the president governs with “a secular agenda” that hurts religious freedom. In general, however, the former Massachusetts governor has not seriously challenged Obama’s motives, often saying the president is decent but inept. But Santorum and Newt Gingrich have heightened their claims that Obama’s intentions are not always benign, ahead of Wednesday’s televised GOP presidential debate and next week’s primaries in Michigan and Arizona. Santorum, the former Pennsylvania senator who suddenly is threatening Romney in his

native state of Michigan, says Obama cares only about power, not the “interests of people.” He says “Obamacare,” the health care overhaul Obama enacted, includes a “hidden message” about the president’s disregard for impaired fetuses, which might be aborted. Santorum even seemed to compare Obama to Adolf Hitler, although he denies trying to do so. Santorum’s remarks have gotten only scattered attention because he weaves them into long, sometimes rambling speeches. Romney’s team is monitoring Santorum’s comments, privately suggesting they could hurt him in a general election. But it’s difficult for Romney to openly criticize Santorum on these points because Romney already has trouble appealing to the party’s socially conservative base. Santorum’s remarks could come up in Wednesday’s debate in Mesa, Ariz., sponsored by CNN.

Gingrich, campaigning Monday in Oklahoma, called Obama “the most dangerous president in modern American history.” Gingrich said the administration’s “willful dishonesty” about alleged terrorists’ motives threatens the country. Gingrich has long been known for over-the-top rhetoric, and Santorum’s rapid rise in the polls has drawn much of the campaign’s focus away from the former House speaker. Some of Santorum’s remarks echo attacks on Obama during the 2008 presidential race, when critics portrayed him as a mysterious politician with hidden motives and questionable allegiance to the United States. White House spokesman Jay Carney declined Tuesday to get drawn into a point-bypoint rebuttal of Santorum’s comments. He said Obama “is focused on his job as president, getting this country moving in the right direction, ensuring that the recovery, which is under way, continues forward.”

BEIRUT — Food and water are running dangerously low in the besieged Syrian city of Homs, with frantic cries for help from residents amid government shelling that pounded rebel strongholds and killed at least 30 people Tuesday, activists said. Shells reportedly rained down on rebellious districts at a rate of 10 per minute at one point and the Red Cross called for a daily two-hour cease-fire so that it can deliver

emergency aid to the wounded and sick. “If they don’t die in the shelling, they will die of hunger,” activist and resident Omar Shaker told The Associated Press after hours of intense shelling concentrated on the rebel-held neighborhood of Baba Amr that the opposition has extolled as a symbol of their 11-month uprising against President Bashar Assad’s regime. Another 33 people were killed in northern Syria’s mountainous Jabal al-Zawiya region when government forces raided a town in pursuit of

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10-yr. Bond 2.05%, +0.05%

T Euro $1.32, -0.05%

Justices to review racial preference BY MARK SHERMAN ASSOCIATED PRESS

CHRIS USHER/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Presidential candidate Rick Santorum appears on CBS’ “Face the Nation” Sunday, Feb. 19.

Dozens killed in Syria; Red Cross urges cease-fire BY ZEINA KARAM ASSOCIATED PRESS

S S&P 500 1,362.21, +0.07%

regime opponents, raising Tuesday’s overall death toll to 63, activists said. The Local Coordination Committees, an opposition group, said more than 100 were killed Tuesday, but the report could not immediately be confirmed by others. Russia, one of Assad’s remaining allies, urged the United Nations to send a special envoy to Syria to help coordinate security issues and delivery of humanitarian assistance. Assad’s forces showed no sign of easing their assault on Homs, Syr-

ia’s third-largest city, whose defiance has become an embarrassing counterpoint to the regime’s insistence that the opposition is mostly armed factions with limited public support. The rebel defenses in Homs are believed to be bolstered by hundreds of military defectors, which has possibly complicated attempts by Syrian troops to stage an offensive. On Monday, reinforcements of Syrian tanks and soldiers massed outside the city in what could be a prelude to a ground attack.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court is setting an election-season review of racial preference in college admissions, agreeing Tuesday to consider new limits on the contentious issue of affirmative action programs. A challenge from a white student who was denied admission to the University of Texas flagship campus will be the high court’s first look at affirmative action in higher education since its 2003 decision endorsing the use of race as a factor. This time around, a more conservative court could jettison that earlier ruling or at least limit when colleges may take account of race in admissions. In a term already filled with health care, immigration and political redistricting, the justices won’t hear the affirmative action case until the fall. But the political calendar will still add drama. Arguments probably will take place in the final days of the presidential election campaign. A broad ruling in favor of the student, Abigail Fisher, could threaten affirmative action programs at many of the nation’s public and private universities, said Vanderbilt University law professor Brian Fitzpatrick. A federal appeals court upheld the Texas program at issue, saying it was allowed under the high court’s decision in Grutter vs. Bollinger in 2003 that upheld racial considerations in university admissions at the University of Michigan Law School. But there have been changes in the Supreme Court since then. For one thing, Justice Samuel Alito appears more hostile to affirmative action than his predecessor, Sandra Day O’Connor. For another, Justice Elena Kagan, who might be expected to vote with the court’s liberal-leaning justices in support of it, is not taking part in the case.


YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

PAGE 13

SPORTS

Theo Epstein ’95 compensation decided The Chicago Cubs and Boston Red Sox settled a four-month dispute on Tuessday over what Boston should receive as compensation for Epstein’s departure for Chicago. In exchange for Epstein — who won two World Series trophies as general manager of the Red Sox — and a player to be named later, Chicago will send reliever Chris Carpenter and a player to be named later to Boston.

Elis aim to place at Ivies

Mahony balances premed and lax MAHONY FROM PAGE 14 ning on walking on… It wasn’t until my senior year when I was about to graduate that we played a team from New York and the assistant coach was good friends with the assistant coach of our [Yale] team. They called me when I was just about to graduate and had already put down my deposit together for a different school to not play a sport. And they called me and said, “Listen, if you want to come to Yale, take a year off and apply again.” And so I did that, and that’s why I’m here.

QWhat did you do in your year off?

A

I played [lacrosse] in Canada before I came to Yale. They do have field lacrosse, but everyone plays box lacrosse. It’s the same equipment but in a hockey rink where they shave off all the ice so it’s a lot more physical and a lot less space. So you need a completely different skill set. … I went out there, got bruised and battered. And then I came to Yale. It wasn’t the most culturally enriching thing, but I definitely got a lot better at lacrosse.

has the team changed since QHow your first season?

A

Our group of seniors, we’ve been on both ends of the spectrum. When we were freshmen, we [the team] were lacking out on the field and in leadership areas, and then the very next year we went around and took the Ivy League title. Within one year we had seen what it meant to win and lose games, and then took the positive attitude that is takes to win. We’ve had four years of seeing

the team’s attitude get progressively better and better, and so as seniors we try to convey that attitude and those emotions to the other guys and hope that they can continue that trend. No one likes to lose.

has been one of your best QWhat games in your Yale career?

Q

A

How do you balance being pre-med and playing lacrosse?

A

I knew that I wanted to do something in health care … and playing a sport just keeps my day so structured, I don’t really have the time to sit down and do nothing. When you have something always happening, you’re always on a constant schedule. It’s really helped me get through classes because I get in a working mode and can’t really get out of it. Grades go up a little bit, which is surprising to a lot of people, and I just function a lot better when I’m busy.

are your plans for the future? QWhat Do you intend to play lacrosse professionally?

A

I haven’t taken my MCAT yet, and I’ll be doing a year of research, hopefully in a clinical center or a hospital. And the way drafting works, the rosters on the teams are small, so I still have to try out and the chances are slim. But hey, if they [the Boston Cannons] really want me, I’d do it. I’d be one of the two people ever to be drafted from my home state, and so we’d be the first two professional players from Washington if we both make it. I think that’d be really cool.

do you see yourself in 10 QWhere years?

I’ll be a position where I can make my own decisions and hopefully impact people.

It was last year when we played Princeton. Yale historically has had a tough time with Princeton, and its senior class is one of the topranked recruiting classes in the country. Even though we had done very well, it’s always been that the Princeton players get all the preseason hype. It’s nice to beat a team that has gotten all that and accolades, and to just tell them that we’ve been flying under the radar, but we’re still better than you. I remember taking a lap around the field and one of the kids saying, “You haven’t beat us and you guys will never beat us,” and then we beat them [8–7 in overtime]. It was a great game.

Q

What do you like about the team? How does it differ from other college teams?

ingness to be average, and a willingness to commit to something other than excellence. Speaking as someone who loves and takes great pride in this school: that is absolutely unacceptable on any front. Things wouldn’t be easy even without the extra restraints. Building a highlycompetitive program in the only league in Division I that can’t give scholarships has always been challenging. League sanctions aimed at preserving academic excellence make things even harder, and Yale’s added restrictions will eventually leave the Bulldogs battling to stay afloat in Division I. This approach to athletics also suggests that we know something people at seven of the most prestigious universities in the country don’t. The academic prestige of Harvard and Princeton certainly hasn’t dropped off with the growth and these institutions’ efforts to let their athletics departments flourish in recent years. In fact (and it really does sting to say it), according to those oh-so-infallible U.S. News rankings, their academic prestige has surpassed our own. Yale prides itself on being one of the nation’s best across the board. Not just in academics, but also in our newspaper, our arts, our music, our debate teams, our libraries, our faculty, our tradition. No one at Yale comes here to be average. No one at Yale got here by committing him or herself to anything but excellence. So why is the one exception athletics? I won’t be drawn into answering that question. That argument has been waged several times, and regardless of the perspective, it’s always hopelessly polarizing. All I will say (at least this week … ) is that the administration’s distrust in the people they’ve put in charge of the Athletics Department to choose student athletes deserving of being here and willing to contribute positively to the Yale community reflects on the abilities of no one but the administrators themselves. In my opinion and experience, the people the administration has in place in that regard do recruit wisely and tirelessly: they put countless hours and log countless miles in doing so. The fact that Yale athletes are accomplishing the Herculean task of overcoming their comparative disadvantage while maintaining high standards academically is evidence enough of their efforts. Don’t try to throw the “reducing the number of recruited athletes means you’ll get people who just love the sport” argument at me either. Yale athletes — and Ivy Leaguers in general — can’t earn scholarships. They come to play here because they love the game and want to be challenged academically too. If an

Contact MONICA DISARE at monica.disare@yale.edu .

We recently had a preseason scrimmage, and one of the coaches said something along the lines that we were “small in stature but deceptively physical.” I think that says a lot about us: We may not be the big time recruits or the big-time athletes, but we’re a bunch of guys who put everything on the line and scrap and play. In that sense we’re all the same, and I think that’s why we get along so well. We’re scrappy little fighters.

A

I just hope that I’m in a position where people need me, and I’m not just travestying through life.

athlete wants to go somewhere where they can mess around for four years and grab a diploma, they can pick somewhere easier and cheaper to do it than Yale (and somewhere cooler than New Haven — let’s be honest). Similarly, if a recruited athlete decides to abandon ambition and mishandles him or herself, he or she is a) a rare exception in the athletic community and b) wouldn’t be unique amongst members of all groups across the Yale student body in doing so. I can say with relative certainty that the majority of the Yale athlete population is highly focused on success on the field and off it. No one comes to Yale to play and get famous. There are no motives other than high-quality athletics and high-quality academics: the same “excellent-allaround” appeal that draws the nation’s best and brightest in everything to New Haven.

THE ADMINISTRATON’S DISREGARD FOR ATHLETIC RECRUITMENT AND COACHING WILL BE A DETRIMENT TO YALE’S ABILITY TO COMPETE. Harvard beat up on us a bit this year. I’m confident we’ll reverse that trend next year, but doing so is going to get tougher and tougher. Yale’s prestige will suffer; our reputation for haughty elitism will harden, and the honor and privilege of being involved in the most prestigious rivalry in all of college sports will soon devolve into an embarrassingly onesided token matchup, if that. We can be amongst the best and are choosing not to be. Anyone that is willing to let any department that represents this school be anything less than the best it can be is losing sight of everything Yale stands for. We (not athletes, not sports fans, but everyone who loves Yale) deserve better. Passion for such success aside, and however much Yale athletes are trained to not make excuses and work with what they’ve got, University restrictions are eventually going to make staying competitive in an increasingly-ambitious Ivy League impossible. End of story. And end of a storied tradition. Contact CHELSEA JANES at chelsea.janes@yale.edu .

The championship meet is also scored differently than a regular dual meet. The top 24 swimmers score points at the Ivies, while only the top five swimmers count towards a team’s score during the regular season. Since so many swimmers have the potential to score, it is not enough to place first, Albrecht said, swimmers in all positions matter. While the main focus is on the team, there is also an individual component to the meet. If their times are fast enough, swimmers may qualify for the NCAA championships in mid March. Although swimmers can qualify throughout the year, qualification usually happens at the Ivy championships, since swimmers are rested and

performing to the best of their abilities. Last year, no one on Yale’s women’s team qualified for NCAA tournament, and in 2010, only two swimmers qualified. But this year, the team hopes individuals such as Alexandra Forrester ’13 will qualify, and that one of their relays will also make the cut, sending four more Yalies to the tournament, Hyde said. The team has the best chance to qualify in the 400-yard and 800-yard freestyle relays, she added. The NCAA championships will take place March 15-17 in Auburn, Ala., after the NCAA zone diving meet from March 9 to 11 in Buffalo, N.Y.

A

Administration dooming athletics COLUMN FROM PAGE 14

SWIMMING FROM PAGE 14

Contact HANNA MORIKAMI at hanna.morikami@yale.edu .

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

The women’s swimming and diving team hopes that some of its members will qualify for the NCAA championships at the upcoming Ivy League championships.

Anthony faces N.Y. doubts BY BRIAN MAHONEY ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony briefly had what now belongs to Jeremy Lin. Madison Square Garden shook when he was announced. Fans lined up to buy his jerseys, chanted his name, delighted in having the New York native back in the city. The happy homecoming hasn’t lasted. The Knicks are a sub.-500 team in the year since Anthony’s celebrated trade from Denver, and the New York Post even wrote Tuesday that the Knicks should try to deal him to the Lakers for Pau Gasol. Still popular, Anthony is no longer beloved. Fans appreciate his talents but question whether they translate to victories, writing on Twitter they feared he’d mess things up once he returned from injury to play with Lin. Anthony tried to laugh that off, but the truth is he craves the popularity of Lin, an underdog success story whom Anthony compared to Rudy. “I don’t see why fans (would) not like me. I don’t say I wouldn’t care, I don’t care, because I do care if fans like me or not. But at the end of the day I’m here to do one thing and that’s to win basketball games,” he said last week. “If people don’t like it, then they don’t like it. I move on, I go on.” The problem for Anthony is he isn’t winning enough games. The Knicks were 14-14 after acquiring him on Feb. 22, 2011, after going 28-26 before his arrival. They are 16-17 this season, but 6-4 without Anthony. Meanwhile, Lin is the winner, leading the Knicks to an 8-2 record since earning his first meaningful minutes in a victory over the Nets on Feb. 4. Anthony strained his right groin two nights later and missed the next seven games while the offense emerged from what had been a season-long funk. The better they looked without Anthony, the more people speculated that Anthony, despite being the Knicks’ leading scorer, had been the problem all along. One person tweeted on Feb. 12 that he wondered if Anthony “knows or cares how terrified Knicks fans are about his return.” Yes, Anthony was aware. And yes, turns out they had reason to worry. The Knicks lost 100-92 to New Jersey on Monday, as a rusty Anthony shot only 4 for 11 from the field for 11 points. He said afterward he was trying to play as the Knicks did during the previous two weeks and reiterated his belief in Lin’s ability to run the team.

“I want Jeremy to have the ball. Hands down. I want him to create for me. I want him to create for Amare (Stoudemire). I want him to create for everybody and still be as aggressive as he’s been over the past two weeks. I want that,” Anthony said. “There’s going to be times I have the ball during the pick-and-roll situations, being a distributor, trying to be aggressive. But for the most part, I want Jeremy having the ball in his hands.” Anthony was greeted with a loud cheer Monday, maybe even louder than Lin’s. He was voted by fans to start the All-Star game — though the TNT analysts announcing the picks unanimously said he was undeserving — so he’s still got a huge following. He thanked his fans Tuesday with a message on Twitter. “Big shout to all my fans and the (Knicks) fans as well,” he wrote. “It’s been 1yr. Wow!!!!!!” Still, it’s fallen short of hopes. He wore a huge grin throughout his Feb. 23 debut Milwaukee, when the words “I was born in Brooklyn, New York” played across the overhead video board to a raucous ovation before he scored 27 points in a victory. He doesn’t flash it nearly as often now in a frustrating season in which he’s battled an assortment of injuries. The Knicks paid an enormous price to get Anthony, surrendering starters Danilo Gallinari, Raymond Felton, Timofey Mozgov and top reserve Wilson Chandler, and that’s created expectations that are nearly impossible to meet. He could have waited and joined the Knicks as a free agent with their core intact, and those holding that against him

are likely the ones behind the occasional groaning at the Garden when Anthony launches an ill-advised shot. Lin, on the other hand, was a simple waiver pickup who had already been cut twice this season, the type of guy that’s easy to love. The undrafted Harvard guard has downplayed concerns of his ability to play with Anthony, noting Monday was also the debut of Baron Davis and the second game with J.R. Smith. “We’re not in panic mode, because it doesn’t just work where all of sudden people show up and you have great chemistry,” Lin said. “So we’re going to have to work through some struggles, so as long as we’re all committed and buying in, we’ll be fine.” D’Antoni and Stoudemire have also used the “buying in” term, and though nobody has ever said so, the hunch is always that they’re talking specifically about Anthony. D’Antoni’s offense flows best with quick ball movement and unselfish play, and Anthony’s preference has also been to isolate and hold the ball before trying to take his man 1-on-1. Anthony has had moments of brilliance with the Knicks, such as his 42-point, 17-rebound Game 2 performance against Boston in the playoffs. His 20 game-winning or tying baskets with under 10 seconds left are second among active players to Kobe Bryant’s 22, so the Knicks need him on the floor no matter what this season’s results have been. Extra practice time around the All-Star break should allow Lin and Anthony to develop cohesion, and eventually New York’s two most popular players might be just as productive.

SETH WENIG/ASSCOCIATED PRESS

New York Knicks’ Carmelo Anthony looks on during the second half of an NBA basketball game agains the Orlando Magic in New York.


IF YOU MISSED IT SCORES

NBA Cleveland 101 Detroit 100

NHL Edmonton 6 Calgary 1

SPORTS QUICK HITS

MORGAN TRAINA ’15 ECAC ROOKIE OF THE WEEK Traina, a member of the gymnastics team, received rookie of the week honors from the ECAC for the third week in a row. This past weekend against SCSU, Traina earned first place in beam with a score of 9.775. The team had a season-high score of 190.85.

SOCCER Napoli 3 Chelsea 1

NBA Miami 120 Sacramento 108

y

KENNY AGOSTINO ’14 ECAC HOCKEY PLAYER OF THE WEEK Agostino, a forward on the men’s hockey team, earned player of the week following his three goals and two assists in Yale’s wins against Dartmouth and Harvard last weekend. Agostino averages .52 goals per game and has scored 13 goals so far this season.

NCAA BB Michigan 67 Northwestern 55

FOR MORE SPORTS CONTENT, VISIT OUR WEB SITE yaledailynews.com/sports

“We’re a bunch of guys who put everything on the line and scrap and play...we’re scrappy little fighters. GREGORY MAHONY ’12 MIDFIELDER, M. LACROSSE

YALE DAILY NEWS · WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2012 · yaledailynews.com

Elis aim to place at Ivies

CHELSEA JANES

W. SWIMMING

A transition to mediocrity As athletics transitions into spring sports, Yale is in the middle of a much more wide-sweeping, and more weighty transition. This transition extends further back even than the past decade. It is predominantly out of the control of anyone within the Athletics Department, and it has me, for one, very concerned: a transition to mediocrity. Soon, even our best year ever will no longer stack up with ancient rival Harvard’s norm, nor Princeton’s, nor that of the rest of the Ivy League. Grab your tickets to that 2025 Yale vs. Southwestern Connecticut State Division III rivalry showdown now, because that’s where we’re headed. And it’s no secret why. Since the 1993-1994 academic year, Yale has won 51 Ivy League titles. In that time, only Columbia at 33 and Dartmouth with 39 have claimed fewer. That year coincides with the start of a move by Yale University administration to reduce the number of recruited student-athletes. According to a Sept. 2010 interview with University President Richard Levin in the Yale Alumni Magazine, the Levin administration has reduced the number of recruited athletes from 17 percent of the Yale’s student body to 13 percent. Levin told the magazine he wants that number to go down even more. For those few slots Yale coaches are allotted for athletes, recruiting gets harder and harder as coaches’ hands are tied not only with stringent restrictions, but also by the obvious gap in Yale’s commitment to support its athletes when compared with other schools. Simply put, it won’t be long before we don’t stand a chance.

YALE NEEDS TO COMMIT TO SUCCESFUL ATHLETICS. I am a huge believer in the power of work ethic: recruit hard enough, coach hard enough, work hard enough as athletes and you can compete no matter what. And that’s exactly what the Yale Athletics Department has been doing — to the tune of one of our best years ever and seven Ivy titles in 2010-11. We even bested the Crimson’s total of five titles last year. But that was the first time since 1993 that we’ve outdone Harvard in the Ivy title category and only the fourth time since 1993 that Yale has been in the top three in Ivy League titles in a season. I see no better future for Yale in the decision to drive one of the most storied Athletics Departments in American history into the ground. I see a willingness to accept less than the best, a willSEE COLUMN PAGE 13

BRIANNE BOWEN/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

After nearly two weeks of tapering, the women’s swimming and diving team will compete fully rested in the Ivy League championships Feb. 23-25. MONICA DISARE STAFF REPORTER The women’s swimming and diving team has trained all year for the tomorrow’s meet: the Ivy League championships. From Feb. 23-25, the Ancient Eight will face off in Cambridge, Mass. Yale is one of the only Ivy teams that has not rested for any other meet this season, and the Elis hope their two-week tapering period will shed seconds off their times this weekend. Yale’s goal is to place in the top three. “We’ve been training so hard for so long, we’re all really excited to come together as a team,” Hayes Hyde ’12, who specializes in butterfly and freestyle, said. This is the first meet this season the team will swim fully rested. The Bull-

dogs began tapering on Feb. 10, the day before the Brown meet. During taper, the team has lighter workouts. While a normal in-season practice consists of swimming about 5,500 yards, during tapering period the team swims only about 2,000-2,500 yards, Athena Liao ’12 said in an email. Swimmers also try to use the stairs less, walk less and generally minimize their physical activity outside of the pool. The is to produce significantly improved times at Ivy League Championships, the only meet for which Yale’s team rests. In a 200-yard race, for example, swimmers may be able to drop anywhere from two to eight seconds off their time, Molly Albrecht ’13 said. Hayes Hyde said she expects to drop about six or seven seconds off of some of her race times. The Bulldogs hope improved times

will be enough to place them in the top three in the Ivy League. The team is

Third is definitely within our reach. It would take every member of the team to step up and perform to the top of their ability. RACHEL ROSENBERG ’12 Captain, women’s swimmming and diving projected to place somewhere between third and fifth, Albrecht said, adding that the team would not frown at a third place finish.

“Third is definitely within our reach,” team captain Rachel Rosenberg ’12 said. “It would take every member of the team to step up and perform to the top of their ability.” The meet’s structure may help the Elis reach their goal. Teams are only allowed to bring their top 18 swimmers (divers count as a third of a spot) to Ivy League Championships. At regular dual meets, teams are allowed to bring their entire squad. A lack of man power is usually a disadvantage, Hyde said, because swimmers on small teams must compete in more events than swimmers on large teams. But since the cap on swimmers makes all teams the same size at Ivies, it helps “level the playing field” for smaller teams such as Yale’s, Hyde said. SEE W. SWIMMING PAGE 13

Mahony brings West Coast flare to East Coast sport BY HANNA MORIKAMI CONTRIBUTING REPORTER Of all the talented lacrosse players in the nation, very few hail from the West Coast. But the men’s lacrosse team picked up a prize in Washington-native midfielder Gregory Mahony ’12. Mahony is a two-time All-Ivy and All-New England selection. In January, he was picked in the 2012 Major League Lacrosse Collegiate Draft by the Boston Cannons. Most recently, last week he was named a candidate for the national Lowe’s and Tewaaraton awards — two distinctions handed to the top lacrosse player in the country. The history of science and medicine major and pre-med has been a core contributor for the Bulldogs, who enter this season ranked 13th nationally in the Inside Lacrosse poll. The News sat down with Mahony to ask him about his experience playing lacrosse at Yale and his future prospects.

QWhen did you start playing lacrosse?

A

I actually didn’t start until the eighth grade, which surprises a lot of people since a lot of college recruits start around third grade and have sticks in their hands their whole life. I was really into soccer, and I was a really big baseball player, and I was playing sports so much and I got burned out. My brother saw some kids playing [lacrosse] so I

STAT OF THE DAY 8

just followed them to practice. Turns out, we were pretty good at it. We liked it, stuck with it and dropped our other sports to play lacrosse. you imagine yourself playing in colQDid lege?

I have a pretty interesting recruiting story, not anything mainstream by any standard. I played football in high school and also played lacrosse. GREGORY MAHONY ’12 Midfielder, men’s lacrosse

A

I have a pretty interesting recruiting story, not anything mainstream by any standard. I played football in high school and also played lacrosse, and I knew I wanted to play in college, and didn’t want to sit around. I had been an athlete my whole life and sports kept me going and kept me busy. I was looking at random Division III schools, and I had talked to a couple of Division I coaches for sports, and no one really showed much interest in me playing either sport in college. I was planSEE MAHONY PAGE 13

YDN

Midfielder Gregory Mahony ’12 was second-team All-Ivy and first-team AllNew England last season.

THE NUMBER OF PLAYERS ON THE MEN’S LACROSSE TEAM, OUT OF A ROSTER OF 41 PLAYERS, WHO ARE NOT FROM THE EAST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES. Gregory Mahony ’12, a resident of Mercer Island, Washington and a midfielder on the lacrosse team, is one of those players.

Today's Paper  

Feb. 22, 2012

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